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Sample records for petroleum refinery workers

  1. Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C; Dreyer, N A; Satterfield, M H; Levin, L; Rothman, K J

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. To each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of "present" or "absent" were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refinery work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). PMID:8020449

  2. An updated cause specific mortality study of petroleum refinery workers.

    PubMed Central

    Dagg, T G; Satin, K P; Bailey, W J; Wong, O; Harmon, L L; Swencicki, R E

    1992-01-01

    An update of a cohort study of 14,074 employees at the Richmond and El Segundo refineries of Chevron USA in California was conducted to further examine mortality patterns. The update added six years of follow up (1981-6) and 941 deaths. As in the previous study, mortality from all causes (standard mortality ratio (SMR) = 73) was significantly lower among men compared with the general United States population. Significant deficits were also found for all cancers combined (SMR = 81), several site specific cancers, and most non-malignant causes of death. Mortality from suicide was increased relative to the United States as a whole. Based on a comparison with California rates, however, men had fewer deaths from suicide than expected. Standard mortality ratios were raised for several other causes of death, but only leukaemia and lymphoreticulosarcoma exhibited a pattern suggestive of an occupational relation. The increase appeared to be confined to those hired before 1949, and in the case of lymphoreticulosarcoma, to Richmond workers. PMID:1554618

  3. Incidence of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in UK Petroleum Distribution and Oil Refinery Workers, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Sorahan, Tom; Mohammed, Nuredin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) experienced by cohorts of 16,467 petroleum distribution workers and 28,554 oil refinery workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres or eight UK oil refineries in the period 1946-1974; all subjects had a minimum of twelve months employment with some employment after 1st January, 1951. Observed numbers (Obs) of MDS cases were compared with expectations based on national incidence rates for the period 1995-2011. The overall standardised registration ratio (SRR) was 73 (Obs = 17) in petroleum distribution workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 77 (Obs = 21) for the age-range 15-99 years. The overall SRR was 81 (Obs = 29) in oil refinery workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 83 (Obs = 36) for the age-range 15-99 years. More detailed analyses were carried out in terms of year of registration, period from hire, decade of hire, and duration of employment. The overall SRR findings did not provide clear evidence for the presence of an occupational cancer hazard, and provide no support for the hypothesis that low-level benzene exposure has an important effect on the risks of MDS. PMID:27164123

  4. Incidence of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in UK Petroleum Distribution and Oil Refinery Workers, 1995–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, Tom; Mohammed, Nuredin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) experienced by cohorts of 16,467 petroleum distribution workers and 28,554 oil refinery workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres or eight UK oil refineries in the period 1946–1974; all subjects had a minimum of twelve months employment with some employment after 1st January, 1951. Observed numbers (Obs) of MDS cases were compared with expectations based on national incidence rates for the period 1995–2011. The overall standardised registration ratio (SRR) was 73 (Obs = 17) in petroleum distribution workers for the age-range 15–84 years, and 77 (Obs = 21) for the age-range 15–99 years. The overall SRR was 81 (Obs = 29) in oil refinery workers for the age-range 15–84 years, and 83 (Obs = 36) for the age-range 15–99 years. More detailed analyses were carried out in terms of year of registration, period from hire, decade of hire, and duration of employment. The overall SRR findings did not provide clear evidence for the presence of an occupational cancer hazard, and provide no support for the hypothesis that low-level benzene exposure has an important effect on the risks of MDS. PMID:27164123

  5. An updated cohort mortality study of workers at a northeastern United States petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, K W; Raabe, G K; Wong, O

    1996-01-01

    An update of a cohort study of 4855 employees at a Paulsboro, New Jersey refinery was conducted to further examine mortality patterns. The earlier study investigated refinery workers employed for a minimum of 1 year between 1 January 1946 and 1 January 1979. The vital status of these workers was ascertained through 1979. The update extended enrollment in the study and vital status follow-up for an additional 8 years (1980-1987). As in the previous study, mortality from all causes [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 87; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 83-91] was significantly lower than expected compared with the general population. Total cancer mortality was also lower than expected (SMR = 96; 95% CI: 86-106). A borderline significant mortality increase in prostatic cancer was found (SMR = 144; 95% CI: 106-190). This increase was similar to the nonsignificant increase reported in the original study (SMR = 135; 95% CI: 90-196). The excess was of comparable magnitude among white males and nonwhite males, although it was not significant for the latter. Detailed analysis indicated that the prostatic cancer was not likely to be related to employment at the refinery. Mortality from lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers was similar to the expected mortality. Mortality from overall leukemia was as expected and detailed analyses by specific cell type showed no increase. An increase in mortality occurred from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among male workers (SMR = 132; 95% CI: 74-217). The increase was not statistically significant and unlikely to be associated with refinery employment. Mortality from multiple myeloma among male employees was lower than expected (SMR = 74; 95% CI: 20-190). Mortality from asbestos-related diseases (pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma) was also lower than expected among male workers. No cause-specific mortality was found to be associated with duration of employment at the refinery, including several causes which have been

  6. Asbestos exposure and cancer mortality among petroleum refinery workers: a Poisson regression analysis of updated data.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Fabio; Ceppi, Marcello; Puntoni, Riccardo; Silvano, Stefania; Gennaro, Valerio

    2004-04-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between asbestos exposure and respiratory cancer mortality among maintenance workers and other blue-collar workers at an Italian oil refinery. The cohort contained 931 men, 29,511 person-years, and 489 deaths. Poisson regression analysis using white-collar workers as an internal referent group provided relative risk estimates (RRs) for main causes of death, adjusted for age, age at hiring, calendar period, length of exposure, and latency. Among maintenance workers, RRs for all tumors (RR = 1.50), digestive system cancers (RR = 1.41), lung cancers (RR = 1.53), and nonmalignant respiratory diseases (RR = 1.71) were significantly increased (p < 0.05); no significant excess was found for all causes and among maintenance (RR = 1.12) and other blue-collar workers (RR = 1.01). Results confirm the increased risk of death from respiratory diseases and cancer among maintenance workers exposed to asbestos, whereas other smoking-related diseases (circulatory system) were not statistically different among groups. PMID:16189991

  7. Health Risk Assessment for Exposure to Benzene in Petroleum Refinery Environments

    PubMed Central

    Edokpolo, Benjamin; Yu, Qiming Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2015-01-01

    The health risk resulting from benzene exposure in petroleum refineries was calculated using data from the scientific literature from various countries throughout the world. The exposure data was collated into four scenarios from petroleum refinery environments and plotted as cumulative probability distributions (CPD) plots. Health risk was evaluated for each scenario using the Hazard Quotient (HQ) at 50% (CEXP50) and 95% (CEXP95) exposure levels. Benzene levels were estimated to pose a significant risk with HQ50 > 1 and HQ95 > 1 for workers exposed to benzene as base estimates for petroleum refinery workers (Scenario 1), petroleum refinery workers evaluated with personal samplers in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 2B) and evaluated using air inside petroleum refineries in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 3B). HQ50 < 1 were calculated for petroleum refinery workers with personal samplers in Italian refineries (Scenario 2A), air inside petroleum refineries (Scenario 3A) and air outside petroleum refineries (Scenario 4) in India and Taiwan indicating little possible adverse health effects. Also, HQ95 was < 1 for Scenario 4 however potential risk was evaluated for Scenarios 2A and 3A with HQ95 > 1. The excess Cancer risk (CR) for lifetime exposure to benzene for all the scenarios was evaluated using the Slope Factor and Overall Risk Probability (ORP) methods. The result suggests a potential cancer risk for exposure to benzene in all the scenarios. However, there is a higher cancer risk at 95% (CEXP95) for petroleum refinery workers (2B) with a CR of 48,000 per 106 and exposure to benzene in air inside petroleum refineries (3B) with a CR of 28,000 per 106. PMID:25588154

  8. Health risk assessment for exposure to benzene in petroleum refinery environments.

    PubMed

    Edokpolo, Benjamin; Yu, Qiming Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2015-01-01

    The health risk resulting from benzene exposure in petroleum refineries was calculated using data from the scientific literature from various countries throughout the world. The exposure data was collated into four scenarios from petroleum refinery environments and plotted as cumulative probability distributions (CPD) plots. Health risk was evaluated for each scenario using the Hazard Quotient (HQ) at 50% (CEXP50) and 95% (CEXP95) exposure levels. Benzene levels were estimated to pose a significant risk with HQ50 > 1 and HQ95 > 1 for workers exposed to benzene as base estimates for petroleum refinery workers (Scenario 1), petroleum refinery workers evaluated with personal samplers in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 2B) and evaluated using air inside petroleum refineries in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 3B). HQ50 < 1 were calculated for petroleum refinery workers with personal samplers in Italian refineries (Scenario 2A), air inside petroleum refineries (Scenario 3A) and air outside petroleum refineries (Scenario 4) in India and Taiwan indicating little possible adverse health effects. Also, HQ95 was < 1 for Scenario 4 however potential risk was evaluated for Scenarios 2A and 3A with HQ95 > 1. The excess Cancer risk (CR) for lifetime exposure to benzene for all the scenarios was evaluated using the Slope Factor and Overall Risk Probability (ORP) methods. The result suggests a potential cancer risk for exposure to benzene in all the scenarios. However, there is a higher cancer risk at 95% (CEXP95) for petroleum refinery workers (2B) with a CR of 48,000 per 106 and exposure to benzene in air inside petroleum refineries (3B) with a CR of 28,000 per 106. PMID:25588154

  9. Poland petroleum refinery sludge lagoon demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.J.

    2000-05-05

    The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Area have been working together to develop mutually beneficial, cost-effective environmental remediation technologies such as the demonstration of bioremediation techniques for the clean up of acidic petroleum sludge impacted soils at an oil refinery in southern Poland. After an expedited site characterization, treatability study, and a risk assessment study, a remediation strategy was devised. The waste material was composed primarily of high molecular weight paraffinic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A biopile design which employed a combination of passive and active aeration in conjunction with nutrient and surfactant application as used to increase the biodegradation of the contaminants of concern.

  10. Worker exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons at selected petroleum-refinery process units, Chevron U. S. A. Inc. Refinery, El Segundo, California, January 15-17, 1980. Phase 3 survey report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, C.

    1980-09-01

    Worker exposures to 23 individual or groups of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and azo-heterocyclic compounds were determined at Chevron U.S.A. Inc. Refinery, El Segundo, California, on January 15-17, 1980. Area and personal samples were collected in the fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) and delayed coker units using a silver-membrane filter followed by Chromosorb 102. Upwind samples at the refinery boundary line were also collected. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Of 39 samples from the two process units, 38 had detectable quantities of at least 4 of the 23 PAHs (or groups of PAHs). Cumulative PAH concentrations for individual samples ranged from nondetected to 145.7 micrograms per cubic meter (CuM). Upwind boundary samples averaged 2.7 micrograms/CuM. Personal samples at the FCC unit generally were more than 5 times greater than those from the delayed coker. Two total mass area samples averaged in the FCC unit also were much higher than those collected in the coker.

  11. 77 FR 959 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries; National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... final MACT standards for petroleum refineries (40 CFR part 63, subpart CC) on August 18, 1995 (60 FR... amendments to Refinery MACT 1 on October 28, 2009 ] (74 FR 55670). This action proposes amendments to 40 CFR... systems at petroleum refineries in amendments to Refinery MACT 1 on October 28, 2009 (74 FR 55670)....

  12. 78 FR 76788 - Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AS03 Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which... amend the Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or... to take action on amendments to the standards of performance for petroleum refineries at 40 CFR...

  13. Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-04-01

    Through the California State IOF initiative, the California Energy Commission PIER Program developed a petroleum refining roadmap to identify energy issues and priorities unique to the refining industry in California and create a plan for future R&D that could help California refineries implement energy efficient technologies.

  14. Mortality patterns among workers in three Texas oil refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, T.L.; Waxweiler, R.J.; Moure-Eraso, R.; Itaya, S.; Fraumeni, J.F.

    1982-02-01

    The cause-specific mortality experience of 2,509 active and retired members of the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW) who worked at three oil refineries in the Beaumont/Port Arthur area of Texas was examined to determine whether there might be unusual patterns of fatal disease related to workplace exposures. Deaths that occurred between 1943 and 1979 were identified from membership records of the OCAW headquarters in Denver and from the records of union locals in Texas which represent workers at the three refineries. Death certificates were obtained from state vital records offices for the decedents. Cause-specific Proportionate Mortality Ratios (PMRs) were calculated using the mortality experience of the U.S. general population as a standard. Excess mortality from stomach cancer occurred among active union members who worked at Refinery A and among active and retired members who worked at Refineries B and C. PMRs for leukemia, multiple myeloma, and other lymphomas were elevated, especially among retired workers. Relative frequencies of brain tumor deaths were significantly elevated among active members at all three refineries and slightly elevated among retirees at Refineries A and C. Findings suggest that oil refinery workers may have elevated risks of these cancers and indicate that more definitive studies are necessary.

  15. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q.

    2010-12-08

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  16. LAND TREATMENT OF PETROLEUM REFINERY SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Petroleum API Separator sludge was applied to field plots to evaluate optimization of loading rates and frequencies for waste disposal by land treatment. Loading rates 3 to 13 weight percent and frequencies 1 to 12, respectively, per year were studied over an 18 month period. Tot...

  17. Assessment of electrocoagulation for the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Al-Lobaney, Amal; Makhlouf, Souzan

    2009-10-01

    Batch electrocoagulation experiments were carried out to evaluate the removal of sulfate and COD from petroleum refinery wastewater using three types of electrodes: aluminum, stainless steel, and iron. The effects of current density, electrode arrangement, electrolysis time, initial pH, and temperature were investigated for two wastewater samples with different concentrations of COD and sulfate. The experimental results indicated that the utilization of aluminum, as anode and cathode, was by far the most efficient arrangement in the reduction of both the contaminants. The treatment process was found to be largely affected by the current density and the initial composition of the wastewater. Although electrocoagulation was found to be most effective at 25 degrees C and a pH of 8, the influence of these two parameters on the removal rate was not significant. The results demonstrated the technical feasibility of electrocoagulation as a possible and reliable technique for the pretreatment of heavily contaminated petroleum refinery wastewater. PMID:19717218

  18. 77 FR 47429 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... concerning the Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones. This request for comment is being made... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries... CBP is soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title:...

  19. 77 FR 63320 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Petroleum Refineries... collection was previously published in the Federal Register (77 FR 47429) on August 8, 2012, allowing for...

  20. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  1. Cancer incidence of workers in the Swedish petroleum industry.

    PubMed Central

    Järvholm, B; Mellblom, B; Norrman, R; Nilsson, R; Nordlinder, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of cancer due to occupational exposure to petroleum products in the Swedish transport and refinery industries. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study the cancer incidence in 4128 men and 191 women, who had worked for at least one year in the petroleum industry, was compared with the incidence in the general population. The job titles and employment times for each person were found in personal files in the industries. The men had on average worked in jobs exposed to petroleum for 11.6 years at the end of the observation period. The cases of cancer were identified by record linkage with the Swedish cancer register. RESULTS: In total there were 146 cases of cancer v 157.6 expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 0.93 90% confidence interval (90% CI) 0.80 to 1.1). Operators at refineries had an increased risk of leukaemia (6 cases v 1.7 expected, 90% CI of relative risk (RR) 1.5 to 7.0). Five of the six cases had started to work at the refineries in the 1950s or later. No other significantly increased risk of cancer was found. Distribution workers had a decreased incidence of lung cancer (no cases, 90% CI of RR 0 to 0.4). CONCLUSIONS: Operators at Swedish refineries had an increased risk of leukaemia. A possible cause is exposure to benzene. There was no increased risk of leukaemia in distribution workers. Distribution workers had a decreased risk of lung cancer. PMID:9423584

  2. BTEX biodegradation by bacteria from effluents of petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Levy, Carlos Emílio; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2010-09-15

    Groundwater contamination with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has been increasing, thus requiring an urgent development of methodologies that are able to remove or minimize the damages these compounds can cause to the environment. The biodegradation process using microorganisms has been regarded as an efficient technology to treat places contaminated with hydrocarbons, since they are able to biotransform and/or biodegrade target pollutants. To prove the efficiency of this process, besides chemical analysis, the use of biological assessments has been indicated. This work identified and selected BTEX-biodegrading microorganisms present in effluents from petroleum refinery, and evaluated the efficiency of microorganism biodegradation process for reducing genotoxic and mutagenic BTEX damage through two test-systems: Allium cepa and hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells. Five different non-biodegraded BTEX concentrations were evaluated in relation to biodegraded concentrations. The biodegradation process was performed in a BOD Trak Apparatus (HACH) for 20 days, using microorganisms pre-selected through enrichment. Although the biodegradation usually occurs by a consortium of different microorganisms, the consortium in this study was composed exclusively of five bacteria species and the bacteria Pseudomonas putida was held responsible for the BTEX biodegradation. The chemical analyses showed that BTEX was reduced in the biodegraded concentrations. The results obtained with genotoxicity assays, carried out with both A. cepa and HTC cells, showed that the biodegradation process was able to decrease the genotoxic damages of BTEX. By mutagenic tests, we observed a decrease in damage only to the A. cepa organism. Although no decrease in mutagenicity was observed for HTC cells, no increase of this effect after the biodegradation process was observed either. The application of pre-selected bacteria in biodegradation processes can represent a reliable and

  3. [Arterial hypertension and alcoholism among workers in an oil refinery].

    PubMed

    Lima, C T; Carvalho, F M; Quadros, C de A; Gonçalves, H R; Silva Júnior, J A; Peres, M F; Bonfim, M S

    1999-09-01

    The role of alcohol ingestion in the incidence of arterial hypertension has not been completely established. In addition, there are few studies addressing this point in relation to populations of workers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between alcoholism and arterial hypertension among workers in an oil refinery in Mataripe, Bahia, Brazil, from 1986 to 1993. We designed a retrospective cohort study with a 7-year follow-up in a stratified systematic sample of 335 workers from the refinery. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed based on blood pressure measurements done during routine medical examinations. At the beginning of follow-up, three groups were defined using the CAGE test of alcohol dependency: nondrinkers (n = 121), CAGE-negative workers (n = 116), and CAGE-positive workers (n = 98). In comparison with the CAGE-negative group, the CAGE-positive group had both greater relative risk and greater attributable risk for developing arterial hypertension (RR = 2.58; AR = 24.95 per 1,000 person-years). The CAGE-positive group also had greater risks compared to nondrinkers (RR = 2.06; AR = 20.97 per 1,000 person-years). The attributable fractions for the same two comparisons of groups were 61% and 51%, respectively. Rate standardization by age or smoking habit did not substantially change the results. Alcoholism is an important risk factor for arterial hypertension. PMID:10517096

  4. The Implementation and Maintenance of a Behavioral Safety Process in a Petroleum Refinery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Wanda V.; McSween, Terry E.; Medina, Rixio E.; Rost, Kristen; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2010-01-01

    A values-centered and team-based behavioral safety process was implemented in a petroleum oil refinery. Employee teams defined the refinery's safety values and related practices, which were used to guide the process design and implementation. The process included (a) a safety assessment; (b) the clarification of safety-related values and related…

  5. Smoking and occupational allergy in workers in a platinum refinery.

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K. M.; Dally, M. B.; Nunn, A. J.; Stevens, J. F.; Stephens, R.; Farrer, N.; Hunter, J. V.; Stewart, M.; Hughes, E. G.; Newman Taylor, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that smoking increases the risk of sensitisation by occupational allergens. DESIGN--Historical prospective cohort study. SETTING--Platinum refinery. SUBJECTS--91 Workers (86 men) who started work between 1 January 1973 and 31 December 1974 and whose smoking habit and atopic state (on skin prick testing with common allergens) had been noted at joining. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of skin prick tests with platinum salts carried out routinely every three to six months and records of any respiratory symptoms noted by the refinery's occupational health service. Follow up was until 1980 or until leaving refinery work, whichever was earlier. RESULTS--57 Workers smoked and 29 were atopic; 22 developed a positive result on skin testing with platinum salts and 49 developed symptoms, including all 22 whose skin test result was positive. Smoking was the only significant predictor of a positive result on skin testing with platinum salts and its effect was greater than that of atopy; the estimated relative risks (95% confidence interval) when both were included in the regression model were: smokers versus non-smokers 5.05 (1.68 to 15.2) and atopic versus non-atopic 2.29 (0.88 to 5.99). Number of cigarettes smoked per day was the only significant predictor of respiratory symptoms. CONCLUSION--Smokers are at increased risk of sensitisation by platinum salts. PMID:2508944

  6. THE MEASUREMENT OF HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM FUGITIVE SOURCES IN PETROLEUM REFINERIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives preliminary results of measurements of hydrocarbon emissions from a number of petroleum refineries. Sampled sources included valves, flanges, pump and compressor seals, pressure relief devices, drains, and cooling towers. The paper discusses sampling techniques an...

  7. Purification and detoxification of petroleum refinery wastewater by electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Gousmi, N; Sahmi, A; Li, H Z; Poncin, S; Djebbar, R; Bensadok, K

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of synthetic oily wastewater having the characteristics of a typical petroleum refinery wastewater (PRW) by electrocoagulation (EC) using iron and aluminum electrodes was conducted in an electrolytic reactor equipped with fluid recirculation. During the treatment, the emulsion stability was followed by the measurement of Zeta potential and particle sizes. Effects of some operating conditions such as electrodes material, current density and electrolysis time on removal efficiencies of turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were investigated in detail. The PRW purification by the EC process was found to be the most effective using aluminum as the anode and cathode, current density of 60 A/m(2) and 30 min of electrolysis time. Under these conditions, the process efficiencies were 83.52% and 99.94%, respectively, for COD and turbidity removals which correspond to final values of 96 mg O2/L and 0.5 NTU. A moderate energy consumption (0.341 kWh) was needed to treat 1 m(3) of PRW. Besides, the ecotoxicity test proved that toxic substances presented in the PRW, and those inhibiting the germination growth of whet, were eliminated by the EC technique. PMID:26853634

  8. Airborne concentrations of metals and total dust during solid catalyst loading and unloading operations at a petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan C; Gaffney, Shannon H; Le, Matthew H; Unice, Ken M; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2012-09-01

    Workers handle catalysts extensively at petroleum refineries throughout the world each year; however, little information is available regarding the airborne concentrations and plausible exposures during this type of work. In this paper, we evaluated the airborne concentrations of 15 metals and total dust generated during solid catalyst loading and unloading operations at one of the largest petroleum refineries in the world using historical industrial hygiene samples collected between 1989 and 2006. The total dust and metals, which included aluminum, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, platinum, silicon, silver, vanadium, and zinc, were evaluated in relation to the handling of four different types of solid catalysts associated with three major types of catalytic processes. Consideration was given to the known components of the solid catalysts and any metals that were likely deposited onto them during use. A total of 180 analytical results were included in this analysis, representing 13 personal and 54 area samples. Of the long-term personal samples, airborne concentrations of metals ranged from <0.001 to 2.9mg/m(3), and, in all but one case, resulted in concentrations below the current U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Permissible Exposure Limits and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' Threshold Limit Values. The arithmetic mean total dust concentration resulting from long-term personal samples was 0.31mg/m(3). The data presented here are the most complete set of its kind in the open literature, and are useful for understanding the potential exposures during solid catalyst handling activities at this petroleum refinery and perhaps other modern refineries during the timeframe examined. PMID:22177528

  9. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  10. Petroleum Technology: From Refinery To Home, Business, and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewell, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the application of petroleum technology and presents activities designed to raise students' awareness of the importance of petroleum-based products in their lives. Includes a handout designed to help students understand the refining processes in which the crude oil from the drill site is transformed into nearly 6,000 petroleum-based…

  11. Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission intensity of petroleum products at U.S. refineries.

    PubMed

    Elgowainy, Amgad; Han, Jeongwoo; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael; Forman, Grant S; DiVita, Vincent B

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of (1) a formula correlating the variation in overall refinery energy efficiency with crude quality, refinery complexity, and product slate; and (2) a methodology for calculating energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensities and processing fuel shares of major U.S. refinery products. Overall refinery energy efficiency is the ratio of the energy present in all product streams divided by the energy in all input streams. Using linear programming (LP) modeling of the various refinery processing units, we analyzed 43 refineries that process 70% of total crude input to U.S. refineries and cover the largest four Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) regions (I, II, III, V). Based on the allocation of process energy among products at the process unit level, the weighted-average product-specific energy efficiencies (and ranges) are estimated to be 88.6% (86.2%-91.2%) for gasoline, 90.9% (84.8%-94.5%) for diesel, 95.3% (93.0%-97.5%) for jet fuel, 94.5% (91.6%-96.2%) for residual fuel oil (RFO), and 90.8% (88.0%-94.3%) for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The corresponding weighted-average, production GHG emission intensities (and ranges) (in grams of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2e) per megajoule (MJ)) are estimated to be 7.8 (6.2-9.8) for gasoline, 4.9 (2.7-9.9) for diesel, 2.3 (0.9-4.4) for jet fuel, 3.4 (1.5-6.9) for RFO, and 6.6 (4.3-9.2) for LPG. The findings of this study are key components of the life-cycle assessment of GHG emissions associated with various petroleum fuels; such assessment is the centerpiece of legislation developed and promulgated by government agencies in the United States and abroad to reduce GHG emissions and abate global warming. PMID:24869918

  12. 75 FR 37730 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... systems at petroleum refineries. 74 FR 55670 (40 CFR part 63, subpart CC). In this action, we are... Executive Order Reviews Under Executive Order 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review (58 FR 51735, October 4..., Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999). This action does not significantly or uniquely affect...

  13. APPLICABILITY OF PETROLEUM REFINERY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES TO COAL CONVERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the applicability of refinery control technologies to coal conversion. It is part of a comprehensive program for the environmental assessment of high-Btu gasification technology. Process/waste streams from coal gasification and liquefa...

  14. Improvement of processes for treating saline wastewater in petroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Sorochenko, V.F.

    1994-11-01

    The saline waste water produced in desalting crude oil in electric desalting units is usually dumped into the sewer system of the refinery. This work was aimed at developing methods of treatment with reagents to prevent and remove salt deposits in the process of freshening saline wastes, by means of aluminium chloride waste materials that have been recovered for utilization.

  15. Genotoxic activity of particulate material in petroleum refinery effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, C.D.; Sonstegard, R.A.; Quilliam, M.A.

    1985-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic hazard associated with the discharge of suspended particulates in oil refinery effluents. Particulate extracts were tested by in vitro assays for mutagenic (Ames test) and clastogenic (sister chromatid exchange assay) activity, both with and without mammalian microsomal activation.

  16. Refinery Outages: Description and Potential Impact on Petroleum Product Prices

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This report responds to a July 13, 2006 request from Chairman Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requested that the Energy Information Administration conduct a study of the impact that refinery shutdowns have had on the price of oil and gasoline.

  17. Pulmonary symptoms and spirometric values in Kangan Sour Gas Refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Mostaghni, A A; Nabipour, I; Dianat, M; Hamidi, B

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the author measured the frequency of symptoms and/or alterations in respiratory functions in workers of the sour gas refining industry. All workers (n = 62) were employed in the most-exposed units of the Kangan Sour Gas Refinery. The refinery is approximately 250 km east of Bushehr Port along the Persian Gulf. This cross-sectional study involved a comprehensive health questionnaire, standardized clinical examinations by physicians blinded to subjects' symptoms and concerns, and multiple spirometric values. Although gas refinery workers experienced more respiratory symptoms than the 30 controls (i.e., 37.7% vs. 23.3%, respectively), who were matched for age and smoking status, pulmonary function data were not statistically different (p > .05) between the groups. The authors concluded, therefore, that in Kangan Sour Gas Refinery workers there were no respiratory or spirometric values associated with chronic low-dose exposure to sour gas plant emissions, including hydrogen sulfide. PMID:11063403

  18. ACUTE TOXIC EFFECTS OF PETROLEUM REFINERY WASTEWATERS ON REDEAR SUNFISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Static bioassays of 24 hours' duration were performed on samples of wastewaters provided by 22 domestic petroleum refiners. These wastewaters represent three types of water discharges prevalent to this industry: process wastewaters prior to dilution with other streams; API separa...

  19. Hydrogen sulphide inhalational toxicity at a petroleum refinery in Sri Lanka: a case series of seven survivors following an industrial accident and a brief review of medical literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This case series details clinical observations in 7 survivors of accidental hydrogen sulphide inhalation toxicity at a petroleum refinery in Sri Lanka. One survivor developed status epilepticus and severe neurotoxicity whilst another survivor developed delayed respiratory failure; both patients required intensive care management. One victim manifested mild bronchospasms in the immediate post-exposure period and another developed mild perioral numbness 2 days following the exposure. A brief literature review explores the manifestations, pathophysiology and available modalities of treatment of hydrogen sulphide inhalation toxicity. Background Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a highly toxic gas. Accidental deaths following H2S exposure is a known hazard amongst petroleum workers exposed to by-products of refineries. Toxicity results mainly due to cellular respiratory poisoning which impairs oxidative phosphorylation. The heart, brain and the lungs are the organs most commonly affected in H2S inhalational toxicity leading to varied clinical presentations. PMID:23578012

  20. Leukemia mortality by cell type in petroleum workers with potential exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Raabe, G K; Wong, O

    1996-12-01

    Workers in the petroleum industry are potentially exposed to a variety of petrochemicals, including benzene or benzene-containing liquids. Although a large number of studies of petroleum workers have been conducted to examine leukemia and other cancer risks, few existing studies have investigated cell-type-specific leukemias. One of the major reasons for the lack of cell-type-specific analysis was the small number of deaths by cell type in individual studies. In the present investigation, all cohort studies of petroleum workers in the United States and the United Kingdom were combined into a single database for cell-type-specific leukemia analysis. The majority of these workers were petroleum refinery employees, but production, pipeline, and distribution workers in the petroleum industry were also included. The combined cohort consisted of more than 208,000 petroleum workers, who contributed more than 4.6 million person-years of observation. Based on a meta-analysis of the combined data, cell-type-specific leukemia risks were expressed in terms of standardized mortality ratios (meta-SMRs). The meta-SMR for acute myeloid leukemia was 0.96. The lack of an increase of acute myeloid leukemia was attributed to the low levels of benzene exposure in the petroleum industry, particularly in comparison to benzene exposure levels in some previous studies of workers in other industries, who had been found to experience an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia. Similarly, no increase in chronic myeloid, acute lymphocytic, or chronic lymphocytic leukemias was found in petroleum workers (meta-SMRs of 0.89, 1.16, and 0.84, respectively). Stratified meta-analyses restricted to refinery studies or to studies with at least 15 years of follow-up yielded similar results. The findings of the present investigation are consistent with those from several recent case-control studies of cell-type-specific leukemia. Patterns and levels of benzene exposure in the petroleum industry are

  1. Leukemia mortality by cell type in petroleum workers with potential exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, G K; Wong, O

    1996-01-01

    Workers in the petroleum industry are potentially exposed to a variety of petrochemicals, including benzene or benzene-containing liquids. Although a large number of studies of petroleum workers have been conducted to examine leukemia and other cancer risks, few existing studies have investigated cell-type-specific leukemias. One of the major reasons for the lack of cell-type-specific analysis was the small number of deaths by cell type in individual studies. In the present investigation, all cohort studies of petroleum workers in the United States and the United Kingdom were combined into a single database for cell-type-specific leukemia analysis. The majority of these workers were petroleum refinery employees, but production, pipeline, and distribution workers in the petroleum industry were also included. The combined cohort consisted of more than 208,000 petroleum workers, who contributed more than 4.6 million person-years of observation. Based on a meta-analysis of the combined data, cell-type-specific leukemia risks were expressed in terms of standardized mortality ratios (meta-SMRs). The meta-SMR for acute myeloid leukemia was 0.96. The lack of an increase of acute myeloid leukemia was attributed to the low levels of benzene exposure in the petroleum industry, particularly in comparison to benzene exposure levels in some previous studies of workers in other industries, who had been found to experience an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia. Similarly, no increase in chronic myeloid, acute lymphocytic, or chronic lymphocytic leukemias was found in petroleum workers (meta-SMRs of 0.89, 1.16, and 0.84, respectively). Stratified meta-analyses restricted to refinery studies or to studies with at least 15 years of follow-up yielded similar results. The findings of the present investigation are consistent with those from several recent case-control studies of cell-type-specific leukemia. Patterns and levels of benzene exposure in the petroleum industry are

  2. Probabilistic ecological risk assessment of selected PAH`s in sediments near a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, W.R.; Biddinger, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment samples were collected and analyzed for a number of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) along a gradient from a petroleum refinery`s wastewater diffuser. These data were used to calculate the potential risk to aquatic organisms using probabilistic modeling and Monte Carlo sampling procedures. Sediment chemistry data were used in conjunction with estimates of Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors and Non-Polar Narcosis Theory to predict potential risk to bivalves. Bivalves were the receptors of choice because of their lack of a well-developed enzymatic system for metabolizing PAHs. Thus, they represent a species of higher inherent risk of adverse impact. PAHs considered in this paper span a broad range of octanol-water partition coefficients. Results indicate negligible risk of narcotic effects from PAHs existing near the refinery wastewater discharge.

  3. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  4. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  5. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a petroleum refinery in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Guohao; Wang, Gang; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-06-01

    This study made a field VOCs (volatile organic compounds) measurement for a petroleum refinery in Beijing by determining 56 PAMS VOCs, which are demanded for photochemical assessment in US, and obtained the characteristics of VOCs emitted from the whole refinery and from its inner main devices. During the monitoring period, this refinery brought about an average increase of 61 ppbv in the ambient TVOCs (sum of the PAMS VOCs) at the refinery surrounding area, while the background of TVOCs there was only 10-30 ppbv. In chemical profile, the VOCs emitted from the whole refinery was characteristic by isobutane (8.7%), n-butane (7.9%), isopentane (6.3%), n-pentane (4.9%%), n-hexane (7.6%), C6 branched alkanes (6.0%), propene (12.7%), 1-butene (4.1%), benzene (7.8%), and toluene (5.9%). On the other hand, the measurement for the inner 5 devices, catalytic cracking units (CCU2 and CCU3), catalytic reforming unit (CRU), tank farm (TF), and wastewater treatment(WT), revealed the higher level of VOCs pollutions (about several hundred ppbv of TVOCs), and the individual differences in VOCs chemical profiles. Based on the measured speciated VOCs data at the surrounding downwind area, PMF receptor model was applied to identify the VOCs sources in the refinery. Then, coupling with the VOCs chemical profiles measured at the device areas, we concluded that CCU1/3 contributes to 25.9% of the TVOCs at the surrounding downwind area by volume, followed by CCU2 (24.7%), CRU (18.9%), TF (18.3%) and WT (12.0%), which was accordant with the research of US EPA (2008). Finally, ozone formation potentials of the 5 devices were also calculated by MIR technique, which showed that catalytic cracking units, accounting for about 55.6% to photochemical ozone formation, should be given the consideration of VOCs control firstly.

  6. Preliminary assessment of the integration of a coal gasifier into a petroleum refinery. [Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, in association with Hunt Oil Company and Westinghouse Electric Corporation, has evaluated the integration of a coal gasifier into a petroleum refinery. The refinery used for this study is the 30,000 BPD Hunt Oil Company refinery in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The major gasification-train components include the Westinghouse fluidized-bed gasifier, an air separation plant, a heat-recovery system, Selexol acid-gas removal, and a sulfur-recovery plant. The gasification train will convert a nominal 280 tons/day of petroleum coke to 790,000 SCF/hr of 365-Btu/SCF gas (equivalent to 7 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas), which comes close to replacing the entire 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas that must be purchased. The total capital investments for a 311-ton/day plant (280-ton/day nominal feed rate with operating factor of 90% is estimated to be 41 X 10/sup 6/ (1986 basis. This results in a manufacturing cost for the MBG in 1986 of 4.99 X 10/sup 6/ Btu, based on 2.53 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/yr of gas generated. 5 refs.

  7. Health status of copper refinery workers with specific reference to selenium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Holness, D.L.; Taraschuk, I.G.; Nethercott, J.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Copper refinery workers exposed to selenium were studied before, during, and after a shutdown period. Urine selenium levels were 83 {plus minus} 30 mumol/mol creatinine and 69 {plus minus} 27 mumol/mol creatinine when measured on two occasions during exposure compared with 56 {plus minus} 17 mumol/mol creatinine when the workers had been free of exposure for 10 wk during a shutdown. The refinery workers reported more nose and eye irritation, indigestion, stomach pain, and fatigue than controls. Garlic-like breath odor was reported to be personally and socially offensive by many of the workers. Reporting of symptoms, pulmonary function indices, and laboratory test results did not change with exposure except for hemoglobin level, which rose during the shutdown. Hemoglobin levels were found to be inversely correlated with the urine selenium level, and there was a positive correlation noted for the interactive effect of urine selenium and urine arsenic levels on hemoglobin.49 references.

  8. [The Paraguayan sugar refinery of Tebicuary promotes family planning education for its workers].

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    The Paraguayan sugar refinery of Tebicuary, the largest private enterprise in the country, has initiated courses in family planning education for its workers. The Paraguayan Centre for Studies on Population is in charge of courses and lectures. The Centre operates the only family planning clinic in Tebicuary, which also distributes general health services to the community. PMID:12309626

  9. 77 FR 44685 - ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Workers From Shrack, Young, and Associates, Inc., and Project Control Associates, Trainer, PA; Notice of... subject worker group includes on-site leased workers from Shrack, Young, and Associates, Inc. and Project...Phillips Company, Trainer Refinery, including on-site leased workers from Shrack, Young, and...

  10. Lymphohematopoietic Cancer Mortality and Morbidity of Workers in a Refinery/Petrochemical Complex in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Yoon, Yong-Hoon; Shin, Kyung-Seok; Yoo, Seung-Won

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between exposure of Korean workers to petrochemicals in the refinery/petrochemical industry and lymphohematopoietic cancers. Methods The cohort consisted of 8,866 male workers who had worked from the 1960s to 2007 at one refinery and six petrochemical companies located in a refinery/petrochemical complex in Korea that produce benzene or use benzene as a raw material. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for 1992-2007 and 1997-2005 based on the death rate and cancer incidence rate of the Korean male population according to job title (production, maintenance, laboratory, and office workers). Results The overall mortality and most cause-specific mortalities were lower among these workers than those of the general Korean population. Increased SMRs were observed for leukemia (4/1.45; SMR 2.77, 95% CI: 0.75-7.09) and lymphohematopoietic cancers (5/2.51; SMR 2, 95% CI: 0.65-4.66) in production workers, and increased SIRs were also observed in leukemia (3/1.34; SIR 2.24, 95% CI: 0.46-6.54) and lymphohematopoietic cancers (5/3.39; SIR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.48-3.44) in production workers, but the results were not statistically significant. Conclusion The results showed a potential relationship between leukemia and lymphohematopoietic cancers and exposure to benzene in refinery/petrochemical complex workers. This study yielded limited results due to a short observational period; therefore, a follow-up study must be performed to elucidate the relationship between petrochemical exposure and cancer rates. PMID:22953184

  11. Preliminary assessment of the integration of a coal gasifier into a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, in association with Hunt Oil Company and Westinghouse Electric Corporation, has evaluated the integration of a coal gasifier into a petroleum refinery. The refinery used for this study is the 30,000 BPD Hunt Oil Company refinery in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The refinery is required to purchase 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas to satisfy fuel and feedstock requirements. This study is based on gasifying 280 tons/day of by-product petroleum coke to produce medium-Btu gas (MBG) to replace natural gas and thus convert a material of relatively low value to a product that can significantly reduce purchased-fuel costs. The gasification system used for this study is the Westinghouse Electric Corporation fluidized bed coal-gasification process, which has been proposed for the Westinghouse Lamp Plant in Fairmont, West Virginia. The major gasification-train components include the Westinghouse fluidized-bed gasifier, an air separation plant, a heat-recovery system, Selexol acid-gas removal, and a sulfur-recovery plant. The gasification train will convert a nominal 280 tons/day of petroleum coke to 790,000 SCF/h of 365-Btu/SCF gas (equivalent to 7 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas), which comes close to replacing the entire 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas that must be purchased. The total capital investments for a 311-ton/day plant (280-ton/day nominal feed rate with operating factor of 90%) is estimated to be $41 x 10/sup 6/ (1986 basis). Of this investment, approximately $32 x 10/sup 6/ is battery-limits capital and $5 x 10/sup 6/ represents offsites and land. Working capital is estimated at about $3 x 10/sup 6/. Gross annual operating expenses are estimated to be $14.55 x 10/sup 6/ and by-product credits account for $1.92 x 10/sup 6/. This results in a manufacturing cost for the MBG in 1986 of $4.99/10/sup 6/ Btu, based on 2.53 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/y of gas generated.

  12. Preliminary assessment of the integration of a coal gasifier into a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, in association with Hunt Oil Company and Westinghouse Electric Corporation, has evaluated the integration of a coal gasifier into a petroleum refinery. The refinery used for this study is the 30,000 EPD Hunt Oil Company refinery in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The refinery is required to purchase 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas to satisfy fuel and feedstock requirements. This study is based on gasifying 280 tons/day of by-product petroleum coke to produce medium-Btu gas (MBG) to replace natural gas and thus convert a material of relatively low value to a product that can significantly reduce purchased-fuel costs. The gasification system used for this study is the Westinghouse Electric Corporation fluidized-bed, coal-gasification process. The major gasification-train components include the Westinghouse fluidized-bed gasifier, an air separation plant, a heat-recovery system, Selexol acid-gas removal, and a sulfur-recovery plant. The gasification train will convert a nominal 280 tons/day of petroleum coke to 790,000 SCF/hr of 365-Btu/SCF gas (equivalent to 7 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas), which comes close to replacing the entire 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of natural gas that must be purchased. The total capital investments for a 311-ton/day plant (280-ton/day nominal feed rate with operating factor of 90%) is estimated to be $41 x 10/sup 6/ (1986 basis). Of this investment, approximately $32 x 10/sup 6/ is battery-limits capital and $5 x 10/sup 6/ represents offsites and land. Working capital is estimated at about $3 x 10/sup 6/. Gross annual operating expenses are estimated to be $14.55 x 10/sup 6/ and by-product credits account for $1.92 x 10/sup 6/. This results in a manufacturing cost for the MBG in 1986 of $4.99/10/sup 6/ Btu, based on 2.53 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/yr of gas generated.

  13. Catalytic ozonation of petroleum refinery wastewater utilizing Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O 3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunmao; Yoza, Brandon A; Wang, Yandan; Wang, Ping; Li, Qing X; Guo, Shaohui; Yan, Guangxu

    2015-04-01

    There is of great interest to develop an economic and high-efficient catalytic ozonation system (COS) for the treatment of biologically refractory wastewaters. Applications of COS require options of commercially feasible catalysts. Experiments in the present study were designed to prepare and investigate a novel manganese-iron-copper oxide-supported alumina-assisted COS (Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS) for the pretreatment of petroleum refinery wastewater. The highly dispersed composite metal oxides on the catalyst surface greatly promoted the performance of catalytic ozonation. Hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation is a dominant reaction in Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS enhanced COD removal by 32.7% compared with a single ozonation system and by 8-16% compared with Mn-Fe/Al2O3-COS, Mn-Cu/Al2O3-COS, and Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. The O/C and H/C ratios of oxygen-containing polar compounds significantly increased after catalytic ozonation, and the biodegradability of petroleum refinery wastewater was significantly improved. This study illustrates potential applications of Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS for pretreatment of biologically refractory wastewaters. PMID:25649390

  14. Tracking Petroleum Refinery Emission Events Using Lanthanum and Lanthanides as Elemental Markers for Fine Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P.; Chellam, S.; Fraser, M. P.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation reports the development and application of an analytical method to quantify the rare earth elements (REEs) in atmospheric particulate matter and emissions of catalyst material from the petroleum refining industry. Inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry following high temperature/high pressure microwave digestion has been used to study the REE composition of several fresh and spent catalysts used in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) units in petroleum refineries as well as in ambient atmospheric fine particulate matter collected in Houston, TX. The results show that the routine emissions from local FCC units in Houston contribute a constant and low amount to ambient PM2.5 of ~0.1 micrograms per cubic meter. However, a significant (33 - 106 fold) increase in the contributions of FCC emissions to PM2.5 is quantified during an upset emission event compared with background levels associated with routine operation. The impact of emissions from the local refinery that reported the emission event was tracked to a site approximately 50 km downwind from the source, illustrating the potential exposure of humans over a large geographical area through the long-range transport of atmospheric fine particles as well as the power of elemental signatures to understand the sources of fine particles.

  15. Electric resistance welded pipe for use in chemical plants and petroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Isfeld, B.

    1984-02-01

    Cost effective material has been and will continue to be of increasing importance in the design and construction of chemical plants and petroleum refineries. A large percentage of the cost incurred in such projects may be attributed to the pipe required to transport numerous liquids and gases at a variety of temperatures and pressures. Pipe was first manufactured with a longitudinal seam some 150 years ago. Since then, the processes employed have progressed to the point where high frequency electric resistance welding has proved the most effective in the manufacture of pipe suitable for oil and gas transmission. To more readily understand the suitability and reliability of electric resistance welded pipe, a discussion relating to the processes involved in its manufacture was presented. Attention was focussed on the weld seam and inspections performed to confirm its integrity. Mechanical properties of the weld seam were compared to those of the pipe body. Using high frequency electric resistance welding and modern inspection techniques, it is possible to produce pipe with a longitudinal weld seam that is virtuously indistinguishable from the parent metal chemically, mechanically, and visually. Furthermore, ASME/ANSI B31.3 Chemical Plant and Petroleum Refinery Piping approves the use of ERW pipe for a variety of applications at temperatures up to and including 593 degrees Celsius.

  16. Effects of work-related stress on work ability index among refinery workers

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Dehghan, Habibollah; Safari, Shahram; Mahaki, Behzad; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related stress is one of the basic problems in industrial also top 10 work-related health problems and it is increasingly implicated in the development a number of problems such as cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal diseases, early retirement to employees. On the other hand, early retirement to employees from the workplace has increased on the problems of today's industries. Hereof, improving work ability is one of the most effective ways to enhance the ability and preventing disability and early retirement. The aim of This study is determine the relationship between job stress score and work ability index (WAI) at the refinery workers. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study in which 171 workers from a refinery in isfahan in 2012 who were working in different occupational groups participated. Based on appropriate assignment sampling, 33 office workers, 69 operational workers, and 69 maintenance workers, respectively, were invited to participate in this study. Two questionnaires including work related-stress and WAI were filled in. Finally, the information was analyzed using the SPSS-20 and statistic tests namely, analysis of covariance Kruskal-Wallis test. Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and t-test. Results: Data analysis revealed that 86% and 14% of participants had moderate and severe stress respectively. Average score of stress and standard deviation was 158.7 ± 17.3 that was in extreme stress range. Average score and standard deviation of WAI questionnaire were 37.18 and 3.86 respectively. That placed in a good range. Pearson correlation coefficient showed that WAI score had significant reversed relationship with a score of stress. Conclusion: According to the results, mean stress score among refinery worker was high and one fator that affect work abiity was high stress, hence training on communication skills and safe working environment in order to decreses stress, enhance the work ability of workers. PMID

  17. Retrospective exposure assessment of airborne asbestos related to skilled craftsmen at a petroleum refinery in Beaumont, Texas (1940-2006).

    PubMed

    Williams, Pamela; Paustenbach, Dennis; Balzer, J LeRoy; Mangold, Carl

    2007-07-01

    Despite efforts over the past 50 or more years to estimate airborne dust or fiber concentrations for specific job tasks within different industries, there have been no known attempts to reconstruct historical asbestos exposures for the many types of trades employed in various nonmanufacturing settings. In this paper, 8-h time-weighted average (TWA) asbestos exposures were estimated for 12 different crafts from the 1940s to the present day at a large petroleum refinery in Beaumont, TX. The crafts evaluated were insulators, pipefitters, boilermakers, masons, welders, sheet-metal workers, millwrights, electricians, carpenters, painters, laborers, and maintenance workers. This analysis quantitatively accounts for (1) the historical use of asbestos-containing materials at the refinery, (2) the typical workday of the different crafts and specific opportunities for exposure to asbestos, (3) industrial hygiene asbestos air monitoring data collected at this refinery and similar facilities since the early 1970s, (4) published and unpublished data sets on task-specific dust or fiber concentrations encountered in various industrial settings since the late 1930s, and (5) the evolution of respirator use and other workplace practices that occurred as the hazards of asbestos became better understood over time. Due to limited air monitoring data for most crafts, 8-h TWA fiber concentrations were calculated only for insulators, while all other crafts were estimated to have experienced 8-h TWA fiber concentrations at some fraction of that experienced by insulators. A probabilistic (Monte Carlo) model was used to account for potential variability in the various data sets and the uncertainty in our knowledge of selected input parameters used to estimate exposure. Significant reliance was also placed on our collective professional experiences working in the fields of industrial hygiene, exposure assessment, and process engineering over the last 40 yr. Insulators at this refinery were

  18. ESTE: Verification of Portable Optical and Thermal Imaging Devices for Leak Detection at Petroleum Refineries and Chemical Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an ESTE project summary brief. EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) is verifying the performance of portable optical and thermal imaging devices for leak detection at petroleum refineries and chemical plans. Industrial facilities, such as chemical p...

  19. Case history of a toxicity identification/reduction evaluation (TI/RE) at a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, W.R.; Zaleski, R.T.; Biddinger, G.R.; Simmerman, J.J.; Stewart, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    During an operational turn-around at a high conversion petroleum refinery, the final wastewater effluent became toxic to three fish species used in continuous on-line flow-through acute toxicity tests. Discharge of effluent to the receiving bay was promptly halted. Wastewater treatment continued and the treated effluent was diverted to a series of holding ponds with limited capacity. A refinery team was formed to coordinate toxicity identification studies as well as to facilitate modifications of waste disposal practices and treatment operations. A test program was conducted, consisting of one rainbow trout Phase 1 TIE and 84 strategic acute toxicity tests. As a result, a treatment methodology was identified within three days and within eight days of first observing toxicity a cationic water treatment polymer was identified as the primary toxicant. The toxicity was due to increased bioavailability of the polymer when suspended solids loads dropped during turn-around. Use of the polymer was immediately stopped and discharge to the bay was resumed with 100% survival of all three monitoring species. The authors present an overview of the studies and decisions leading to the successful identification and management of this situation.

  20. Increased risk of preterm delivery in areas with air pollution from a petroleum refinery plant in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Chiu, H F; Yu, H S; Tsai, S S; Cheng, B H; Wu, T N; Sung, F C; Yang, C Y

    2001-12-21

    The petrochemical and petroleum industries are among the main sources of industrial air pollution in Taiwan. Data in this study concern outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in communities in close proximity to a petroleum refinery plant. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants was significantly higher in mothers living in a petroleum refinery area compared to controls in Taiwan. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.41 (95% CI = 1.08-1.82) for delivery of preterm infants in the polluted region. Data support the view that air pollution can affect the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:11766170

  1. Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2008-03-15

    The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Refinery Outages

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    Semiannual reporting on refinery outages and their potential implications for available refinery capacity, petroleum product markets, and supply of gasoline, diesel fuel, and heating oil. Dissemination of such analyses can be beneficial to market participants who may otherwise be unable to access such information.

  3. Identification of Genes and Pathways Related to Phenol Degradation in Metagenomic Libraries from Petroleum Refinery Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cynthia C.; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; De Paula, Sérgio O.; Silva, Lívia C. F.; Vidigal, Pedro M. P.; Vicentini, Renato; Sousa, Maíra P.; Torres, Ana Paula R.; Santiago, Vânia M. J.; Oliveira, Valéria M.

    2013-01-01

    Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system. PMID:23637911

  4. Micronucleus and chromosome aberrations induced in onion (Allium cepa) by a petroleum refinery effluent and by river water that receives this effluent.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Márcia M; Marin-Morales, Maria A

    2009-11-01

    In this study, micronucleus (MN) and chromosome aberration (CA) tests in Allium cepa (onion) were carried out in order to make a preliminary characterization of the water quality of the Atibaia River in an area that is under the influence of petroleum refinery and also to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments used by the refinery. For these evaluations, seeds of A. cepa were germinated in waters collected in five different sites related with the refinery in ultra-pure water (negative control) and in methyl methanesulfonate solution (positive control). According to our results, we can suggest that even after the treatments (physicochemical, biological and stabilization pond) the final refinery effluent could induce chromosome aberrations and micronucleus in meristematic cells of A. cepa and that the discharge of the petroleum refinery effluents in the Atibaia River can interfere in the quality of this river. PMID:19647317

  5. Lead poisoning in precious metals refinery assayers: a failure to notify workers at high risk.

    PubMed

    Kern, D G

    1994-05-01

    Lead poisoning in a precious metals refinery fire assayer and a routine OSHA inspection prompted an investigation of the index facility, a survey of the industry, and efforts to notify assayers of this previously unrecognized hazard. Air and blood samples were obtained at the index facility. Management personnel from all fire assay laboratories in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts were interviewed. The industry's trade association, OSHA, NIOSH, trade unions, and the media were asked to assist in a nationwide notification effort. Assayers at the index facility had excessive exposures to lead due to an age-old, lead-based assaying method that remains the industry gold standard. Blood lead levels of the three assayers (mean 61.3 micrograms/dl, range 48-86 micrograms/dl) were considerably higher than those of 16 other refinery workers (mean 27.4 micrograms/dl, range 13-49 micrograms/dl). The industry survey revealed inadequate knowledge of both the lead hazard and the applicability of the OSHA lead standard. Notification efforts failed in large part due to economic obstacles. The notification of workers at high risk of lead exposure and the eradication of occupational lead poisoning will require greater attention to economic forces. PMID:8030646

  6. Cancer incidence and mortality among temporary maintenance workers in a refinery/petrochemical complex in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Chung, Eun-Kyo; Jang, Jae-Kil; Lee, Hye-Eun; Ryu, Hyang-Woo; Yoo, Kye-Mook; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Kyoo-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Petrochemical plant maintenance workers are exposed to various carcinogens such as benzene and metal fumes. In Korea, maintenance operations in petrochemical plants are typically performed by temporary employees hired as contract workers. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate cancer risk in temporary maintenance workers in a refinery/petrochemical complex in Korea. Methods: Subjects consisted of 14 698 male workers registered in a regional petrochemical plant maintenance workers union during 2002–2007. Cancer mortality and incidence were identified by linking with the nationwide death and cancer registries during 2002–2007 and 2002–2005, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for each cancer. Results: Increased SMR 3.61 (six cases, 95% CI: 1.32–7.87) and SIR 3.18 (five cases, 95% CI: 1.03–7.42) were observed in oral and pharyngeal cancers. Conclusion: Our findings may suggest a potential association between oral and pharyngeal cancers and temporary maintenance jobs in the petrochemical industry. Future studies should include a longer follow-up period and a quantitative exposure assessment. PMID:24999849

  7. Mortality among workers employed in petroleum refining and petrochemical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, T.L.; Decoufle, P.; Moure-Eraso, R.

    1980-02-01

    The cause-specific mortality experience of 3,105 members of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union was examined to determine if there were unusual patterns of fatal disease that may be indicative of hazardous agents in the work environment. Deaths among active Union members that were reported by locals in Texas between 1947 and 1977 were identified through membership records, and proportionate mortality was analyzed in several broad industrial categories. PMRs for cancers of the liver and biliary passages, pancreas, lung and skin were elevated among refinery and petrochemical plant workers; however risks did not increase with length of membership. Increased relative frequencies of stomach cancer, cancer of the brain, leukemia and multiple myeloma were confined to white males in the same category who had been Union members for 10 or more years. Excess deaths from stomach cancer and brain cancer were found among white male members employed at one specific oil refinery and petrochemical plant. Observed numbers of deaths from cancer of the stomach were greater than expected among whites and nonwhites, and an elevated PMR for lung cancer among nonwhites was found at an additional plant. Findings suggest that workers in this industry may be at increased risk of certain cancers and indicate areas for further investigation.

  8. Chronic and Initiation/Promotion Skin Bioassays of Petroleum Refinery Streams.

    PubMed Central

    Skisak, C; Furedi-Machacek, EM; Schmitt, SS; Swanson, MS; Vernot, EH

    1994-01-01

    Nine refinery streams were tested in both chronic and initiation/promotion (I/P) skin bioassays. In the chronic bioassay, groups of 50 C3H/HeJ mice received twice weekly applications of 50 microl of test article for at least 2 years. In the initiation phase of the I/P bioassay, groups of CD-1 mice received an initiating dose of 50 microl of test article for 5 consecutive days, followed by promotion with 50 microl of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (0.01% w/v in acetone) for 25 weeks. In the promotion phase of the I/P bioassay, CD-1 mice were initiated with 50 microl of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (0.1% w/v in acetone) or acetone, followed by promotion with 50 microl of test article twice weekly for 25 weeks. The most volatile of the streams, sweetened naphtha, and the least volatile, vacuum residuum, were noncarcinogenic in both assays. Middle distillates, with a boiling range of 150 degrees-370 degreesC, demonstrated carcinogenic activity in the chronic bioassay and acted as promoters but not initiators in the I/P bioassay. Untreated mineral oil streams displayed initiating activity and were carcinogenic in the chronic bioassay, presumably due to the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of requisite size and structure. A highly solvent-refined mineral oil stream lacked initiating activity. These results indicate that the I/P bioassay, which takes 6 months to complete, may be a good qualitative predictor of the results of a chronic bioassay, at least for petroleum streams. Furthermore, the I/P bioassay can provide insight into possible mechanisms of tumor development. Images p82-a PMID:9719673

  9. Lead exposure and hair lead level of workers in a lead refinery industry in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pirsaraei, Seyed Reza Azimi

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out on the workers of a lead refinery industry and two control groups in Zanjan city in Iran. The scalp hair samples were collected from 25 workers who were occupationally exposed to lead contamination as a case group and from 25 subjects among the staff of the same industry and 25 subjects among Zanjan citizens as the first and second control groups respectively. A flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer used to determine lead level in all of the samples. The age of all subjects in the three groups was matched. The mean concentrations of hair lead in the workers (case group), the staff (control groupA) and the citizens (control group B) were 131.7±93.4 µgr/gr, 21.1±13.2 µgr/gr and 27.9±14.1 µgr/gr respectively. The mean concentration of hair lead in the case group was more than hair lead of normal range found in humans (0-30 µgr/gr). The mean of hair lead level in the citizens who had used gas vehicles was statistically higher than who had not used it (36.9±12.2 µgr/gr vs. 16.6±4.9 µgr/gr, P<0.001). PMID:21957365

  10. The sublethal effects of petroleum refinery effluents: Mixed function oxygenase (MFO) induction in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Parrott, J.; Hodson, P.; Rao, S.

    1995-12-31

    Canada uses a single biological parameter which is based on the ability of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to survive a 24 hour exposure to assess and regulate the toxicity of refinery effluents. The acute toxicity of Canadian refinery effluents is generally well controlled. Long term exposures to sublethal toxicants, which are not covered by the current regulations, could have adverse ecological effects. Since PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, can occur in refinery effluents, the authors tested the hypothesis that refinery effluents can induce mixed-function oxygenase measured as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) activity in fish. Two end of pipe effluent samples were collected from each of four Ontario refineries. All effluents induced EROD activity in young trout in a dose dependent manner. The EROD parameter has potential as a bioindicator of exposure to refinery effluents. The samples were also tested for toxicity to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae and to a fish cell line (Ictalurus nebulosus). Fathead minnow growth was significantly reduced by six out of eight samples, and larval survival was affected by one sample. The in vitro data were less consistent: weak toxicity was detected in some samples but the dose response relationship was poor. Direct acting mutagens were detected in two effluents using the Ames Fluctuation assay.

  11. Optimization of Fenton-based treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater with scrap iron using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Ali; Hasheminejad, Hasti; Taebi, Amir; Ghaffari, Ghasem

    2014-09-01

    The ever-increasing number and production capacity of petroleum refineries in recent years have intensified the need for developing an effective and practical method for treating their wastewaters. In this study, the application of Fenton process with scrap iron powder was investigated for the treatment of a bio-refractory petroleum refinery effluent. Response surface methodology was employed with a cubic IV optimal design to optimize the process using chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal as the target response. H2O2/COD, and H2O2/Fe mass ratios as well as pH were considered as the relevant parameters. A COD removal of more than 83 % was achieved under optimal conditions (H2O2/COD 10.03, H2O2/Fe 2.66 and pH 3.0) within 90 min. Kinetics studies were conducted to investigate the effect of reaction time on COD removal. In addition, the role of post-coagulation on COD removal under optimal conditions was investigated and it was found that 37 % of COD removal occurred due to coagulation, indicating its high potential in the Fenton process.

  12. Using PM(2.5) lanthanoid elements and nonparametric wind regression to track petroleum refinery FCC emissions.

    PubMed

    Du, Li; Turner, Jay

    2015-10-01

    A long term air quality study is being conducted in Roxana, Illinois, USA, at the fenceline of a petroleum refinery. Measurements include 1-in-6 day 24-hour integrated ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) speciation following the Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sampling and analysis protocols. Lanthanoid elements, some of which are tracers of fluidized-bed catalytic cracker (FCC) emissions, are also measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after extraction from PM2.5 using hot block-assisted acid digestion. Lanthanoid recoveries of 80-90% were obtained for two ambient particulate matter standard reference materials (NIST SRM 1648a and 2783). Ambient PM2.5 La patterns could be explained by a two-source model representing resuspended soil and FCC emissions with enhanced La/Ce ratios when impacted by the refinery. Nonparametric wind regression demonstrates that when the monitoring station was upwind of the refinery the mean La/Ce ratio is consistent with soil and when the monitoring station is downwind of the refinery the mean ratio is more than four times higher for bearings that corresponds to maximum impacts. Source apportionment modeling using EPA UNMIX and EPA PMF could not reliably apportion PM2.5 mass to the FCC emissions. However, the weight of evidence is that such contributions are small with no large episodes observed for the 164 samples analyzed. This study demonstrates the applicability of a hot block-assisted digestion protocol for the extraction of lanthanoid elements as well as insights obtained from long-term monitoring data including wind direction-based analyses. PMID:26005750

  13. A case-control study of lung cancer among refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Rosamilia, K; Wong, O; Raabe, G K

    1999-12-01

    This case-control study examined the relationship between lung cancer and the work histories of male employees at a large Texas refinery. The study included 112 lung cancer deaths observed between 1946 and 1987 and 490 matched controls. Employment histories were obtained from personnel records, and smoking information was available from medical records. Both stratification methods and conditional logistic regression were used in data analyses. Overall employment in four general job categories (administrative, engineering/laboratory, process, maintenance/mechanical) was not associated with lung cancer mortality. Results by hire period (< 1940, 1940+) showed that workers hired into process jobs before 1940 had a nonsignificantly elevated odds ratio (OR) of 1.71 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85-3.45) compared with nonprocess workers hired before 1940. Among process workers hired before 1940, there was a significant trend toward increasing OR with increasing duration of employment in process jobs, and the association with lung cancer was strongest among smokers in the highest duration category of 30+ years (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.07-8.31). Latency analyses of process workers hired before 1940 indicated that their lung cancer risk had peaked between 30 and 50 years since first employment. Definitive statements about causal factors are limited because results among process workers were based on small numbers of subjects in some exposure categories, and there was no information on specific workplace exposures. The OR for maintenance/mechanical jobs after adjustment for smoking was 1.00 (95% CI = 0.55-1.82). Furthermore, there was no pattern in relation to duration of employment in maintenance/mechanical jobs. The results from this study do not support the hypothesis that work in maintenance/mechanical jobs increases lung cancer risk. On the basis of analyses in this study, it is unlikely that asbestos exposure contributed to excess lung cancer mortality. Additional

  14. A nested case-control study of kidney cancer among refinery/petrochemical workers

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, J.F.; Pearlman, E.D.; Nicolich, M.J.

    1996-06-01

    A nested case-control study was designed to evaluate whether a nearly twofold excess of kidney cancer among workers at a refinery/petrochemical plant was associated with cumulative exposure to C{sub 2}-C{sub 5} saturated, C{sub 2}-C{sub 5} unsaturated, C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} aliphatic saturated, C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} aliphatic unsaturated, and C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} aromatic process streams. Nonoccupational risk factors were body mass index association with cumulative exposure or tenure as estimated by conditional logistic regression and adjusted for nonoccupational risk factors. Categorical analysis showed increased odds ratios only in the second (low) and fourth (high) quartiles compared to the first quartile reference group of lowest exposed workers, and a three-quarter-fold increased odds ratio for >32 years` tenure compared to the <25-year reference group. The number of cases was small with wide confidence intervals around estimate of risk, so the possibility of an exposure-response trend cannot be ruled out. Multivariate analysis identified overweight (high BMI; p<0.01) as the most important risk factor in this data set, followed by tenure and increased blood pressure. There was a weak association with current smoking, but not with pack-years smoked. The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker with normal blood pressure but 25% overweight was increased about 2.6-fold (95% CI = 1.2-5.4). The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker of normal weight with high blood pressure (e.g., 150/110), was increased about 4.5 (95% CI, 0.8-26). 49 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. A nested case-control study of kidney cancer among refinery/petrochemical workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, J F; Pearlman, E D; Nicolich, M J

    1996-01-01

    A nested case-control study was designed to evaluate whether a nearly twofold excess of kidney cancer among workers at a refinery/petrochemical plant was associated with cumulative exposure to C2-C5 saturated, C2-C5 unsaturated, C6-C10 aliphatic saturated, C6-C10 aliphatic unsaturated, and C6-C10 aromatic process streams. Nonoccupational risk factors were body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (both measured at about age 28), and smoking. There was no significant association with cumulative exposure or tenure as estimated by conditional logistic regression and adjusted for nonoccupational risk factors. Categorical analysis showed increased odds ratios only in the second (low) and fourth (high) quartiles compared to the first quartile reference group of lowest exposed workers, and a three-quarter-fold increased odds ratio for > 32 years' tenure compared to the < 25-year reference group. The number of cases was small with wide confidence intervals around estimate of risk, so the possibility of an exposure-response trend cannot be ruled out. Multivariate analysis identified overweight (high BMI; p < 0.01) as the most important risk factor in this data set, followed by tenure and increased blood pressure. There was a weak association with current smoking, but not with pack-years smoked. The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker with normal blood pressure but 25% overweight was increased about 2.6-fold (95% CI = 1.2-5.4). The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker of normal weight with high blood pressure (e.g., 150/110), was increased about 4.5 (95% CI, 0.8-26). Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8793353

  16. A nested case-control study of kidney cancer among refinery/petrochemical workers.

    PubMed

    Gamble, J F; Pearlman, E D; Nicolich, M J

    1996-06-01

    A nested case-control study was designed to evaluate whether a nearly twofold excess of kidney cancer among workers at a refinery/petrochemical plant was associated with cumulative exposure to C2-C5 saturated, C2-C5 unsaturated, C6-C10 aliphatic saturated, C6-C10 aliphatic unsaturated, and C6-C10 aromatic process streams. Nonoccupational risk factors were body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (both measured at about age 28), and smoking. There was no significant association with cumulative exposure or tenure as estimated by conditional logistic regression and adjusted for nonoccupational risk factors. Categorical analysis showed increased odds ratios only in the second (low) and fourth (high) quartiles compared to the first quartile reference group of lowest exposed workers, and a three-quarter-fold increased odds ratio for > 32 years' tenure compared to the < 25-year reference group. The number of cases was small with wide confidence intervals around estimate of risk, so the possibility of an exposure-response trend cannot be ruled out. Multivariate analysis identified overweight (high BMI; p < 0.01) as the most important risk factor in this data set, followed by tenure and increased blood pressure. There was a weak association with current smoking, but not with pack-years smoked. The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker with normal blood pressure but 25% overweight was increased about 2.6-fold (95% CI = 1.2-5.4). The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker of normal weight with high blood pressure (e.g., 150/110), was increased about 4.5 (95% CI, 0.8-26). PMID:8793353

  17. PORTABLE IMAGING DEVICES FOR INDUSTRIAL LEAK DETECTION AT PETROLEUM REFINERIES AND CHEMICAL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Undiscovered gas leaks, or fugitive emissions, in chemical plants and refinery operations can impact regional air quality as well as being a public health problem. Surveying a facility for potential gas leaks can be a daunting task. Industrial Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) pro...

  18. 78 FR 37133 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...) on August 18, 1995 (60 FR 43620). These standards are commonly referred to as the ``Refinery MACT 1... leaks and closed vent system and control devices (see 77 FR 17898). We believe it is appropriate to..., letter to the EPA. As described in detail in the January 6, 2012, proposal (see 77 FR 964), we denied...

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF A MAXIMUM RECYCLE, SIDESTREAM SOFTENING SYSTEM AT A PETROCHEMICAL PLANT AND A PETROLEUM REFINERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    New full-scale maximum recycle sidestream softening systems at USS Chemicals, Houston, Texas and TOSCO refinery, Bakersfield, California were evaluated as a technology to achieve zero wastewater discharge. Softener process efficiency was optimum at a pH control range of 10.3 to 1...

  20. THE EFFECT OF POWERED ACTIVATED CARBON IN A PETROLEUM REFINERY ACTIVATED SLUDGE TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research program was to determine the effect of the addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to refinery activated sludge systems. Bench-scale and full-scale tests were performed. A wide range of PAC concentrations and sludge ages were evaluated. Bench-scal...

  1. Increased risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among upstream petroleum workers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Riise, Trond; Bjørge, Tone; Moen, Bente E; Bråtveit, Magne; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate cancer risk, particularly oesophageal cancer, among male upstream petroleum workers offshore potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents. Methods Using the Norwegian Registry of Employers and Employees, 24 765 male offshore workers registered from 1981 to 2003 was compared with 283 002 male referents from the general working population matched by age and community of residence. The historical cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Results Male offshore workers had excess risk of oesophageal cancer (RR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.8) compared with the reference population. Only the adenocarcinoma type had a significantly increased risk (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0 to 7.0), mainly because of an increased risk among upstream operators (RR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 to 14.5). Upstream operators did not have significant excess of respiratory system or colon cancer or mortality from any other lifestyle-related diseases investigated. Conclusion We found a fourfold excess risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among male workers assumed to have had the most extensive contact with crude oil. Due to the small number of cases, and a lack of detailed data on occupational exposure and lifestyle factors associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, the results must be interpreted with caution. Nevertheless, given the low risk of lifestyle-related cancers and causes of death in this working group, the results add to the observations in other low-powered studies on oesophageal cancer, further suggesting that factors related to the petroleum stream or carcinogenic agents used in the production process might be associated with risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:19858535

  2. Electron microscopy of particles deposited in the lungs of nickel refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Miriam; Weinbruch, Stephan; Skaug, Vidar; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Thornér, Elín Einarsdóttir; Benker, Nathalie; Ebert, Martin; Chashchin, Valery; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2015-08-01

    The size, morphology, and chemical composition of particles deposited in the lungs of two nickel refinery workers were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The particles were extracted from the lung tissue by low-temperature ashing or by dissolution in tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The suitability of both sample preparation techniques was checked with reference materials. Both approaches lead to Fe-rich artifact particles. Low-temperature ashing leads to oxidation of small (diameter < 2 μm) metallic Ni and Ni sulfide particles, dissolution in tetramethylammonium hydroxide to removal of sulfate surface layers. Silicates and alumosilicates are the most abundant particle groups in the lungs of both subjects. From the various metal-dominated particle groups, Ni-rich particles are most abundant followed by Fe-rich and Ti-rich particles. Ni appears to be present predominantly as an oxide. Pure Ni metal and Ni sulfides were not observed. The presence of soluble Ni phases was not investigated as they will not be preserved during sample preparation. Based on their spherical morphology, it is estimated that a large fraction of Ni-rich particles (50-60 % by number) as well as Fe-rich and Cu-rich particles (27-45 %) originate from high-temperature processes (smelting, welding). This fraction is much lower for silicates (3-5 %), alumosilicates (1-2 %), and Ti-rich particles (9-11 %). The absence of metallic Ni particles most likely results from low exposure to this species. The absence of Ni sulfides may be either ascribed to low exposure or to fast clearance. PMID:26077746

  3. A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw for oil recovery from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Hou, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw was examined for recovering oil from the high-moisture petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge. Five solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), dichloromethane (DCM), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), ethyl acetate (EA), and 2-propanol (2-Pro) were examined. It was found that these solvents except 2-Pro showed a promising oil recovery rate of about 40%, but the recycling of DCM solvent after oil extraction was quite low. Three solvents (CHX, MEK and EA) were then selected for examining the effect of freeze/thaw treatment on improving the quality of recovered oil. This treatment increased the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in recovered oil from about 40% to 60% for both MEK and EA extractions, but little effect was observed for CHX extraction. Although the solid residue after oil recovery had a significantly decreased TPH content, a high concentration of heavy metals was observed, indicating that this residue may require proper management. In general, the combination of solvent extraction with freeze/thaw is effective for high-moisture oily hazardous waste treatment. PMID:25464326

  4. The effects of Fenton process on the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from oily sludge in Shiraz oil refinery, Iran

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the high concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in oily sludge and their environmental hazards, the concern regarding their effects on health and the environment has increased. The main objective of this research was focused on evaluating the feasibility of using Fenton process in removing TPH in oily sludge from Shiraz oil refinery, Southern Iran. Results To determine optimum conditions, four different parameters were assessed at four different levels using Taguchi method. According to data, the optimum conditions were as follows: the reaction time of 1 hour, H2O2 to sample mass ratio of 15, H2O2 to Fe (II) molar ratio of 10 and pH of 5. The maximum TPH reduction rate was 36.47%. Because of the semi-solid nature of the sample and the hydroxyl radicals mainly generated in the aqueous solution, TPH reduction rate greatly improved by adding water. Ultimately, by adding 40 ml water per gram of the oily sludge under optimized conditions, the reduction rate of 73.07% was achieved. Conclusions The results demonstrated that this method can be used as a pre-treatment method for the oily sludge. Moreover, a complementary treatment is necessary to reach the standard limit. PMID:24422994

  5. Individual and combined effects of organic, toxic, and hydraulic shocks on sequencing batch reactor in treating petroleum refinery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mizzouri, Nashwan Sh; Shaaban, Md Ghazaly

    2013-04-15

    This study analyzes the effects of toxic, hydraulic, and organic shocks on the performance of a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with a capacity of 5L. Petroleum refinery wastewater (PRWW) was treated with an organic loading rate (OLR) of approximately 0.3 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/kg MLSSd at 12.8h hydraulic retention time (HRT). A considerable variation in the COD was observed for organic, toxic, hydraulic, and combined shocks, and the worst values observed were 68.9, 77.1, 70.2, and 57.8%, respectively. Improved control of toxic shock loads of 10 and 20mg/L of chromium (VI) was identified. The system was adversely affected by the organic shock when a shock load thrice the normal value was used, and this behavior was repeated when the hydraulic shock was 4.8h HRT. The empirical recovery period was greater than the theoretical period because of the inhibitory effects of phenols, sulfides, high oil, and grease in the PRWW. The system recovery rates from the shocks were in the following order: toxic, organic, hydraulic, and combined shocks. System failure occurred when the combined shocks of organic and hydraulic were applied. The system was resumed by replacing the PRWW with glucose, and the OLR was reduced to half its initial value. PMID:23474407

  6. Adverse Health Effects of Benzene Exposure Among Children Following a Flaring Incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the health effects of benzene exposure among children from a flaring incident at the British Petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. A total of 899 children (benzene exposed, n = 641 and unexposed, n = 258), aged <17 years, were included. Hematological analysis showed that white blood cell (×10(3)/µL) counts were significantly decreased in the exposed children compared with the unexposed children (7.1 ± 2.2 versus 7.6 ± 2.1, P = .001). Similarly, the hemoglobin (g/dL) levels were decreased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (12.7 ± 1.3 vs 13.1 ± 1.5, P = .001). Conversely, platelet (×10(3)/µL) counts were increased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (318.6 ± 79.8 versus 266.9 ± 58.8, P = .001). Hepatic enzymes were also significantly elevated among exposed children compared with the unexposed children. These findings suggest that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing both hepatic and bone marrow-related disorders. PMID:26269465

  7. Sensitivity of screening-level toxicity tests using soils from a former petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Pauwels, S.; Bureau, J.; Roy, Y.; Allen, B.; Robidoux, P.Y.; Soucy, M.

    1995-12-31

    The authors tested five composite soil samples from a former refinery. The samples included a reference soil (Mineral Oil and Grease, MO and G < 40 ppm), thermally-treated soil, biotreated soil, and two untreated soils. They evaluated toxicity using the earthworm E. foetida, lettuce, cress, barley, Microtox, green algae, fathead minnow, and D. magna. The endpoints measured were lethality, seed germination, root elongation, growth, and bioluminescence. Toxicity, as measured by the number of positive responses, increased as follows: biotreated soil < untreated soil No. 1 < reference soil < thermally-treated soil and untreated soil No. 2. The biotreated soil generated only one positive response, whereas the thermally-treated soil and untreated soil No. 2 generated five positive responses. The most sensitive and discriminant terrestrial endpoint was lettuce root elongation which responded to untreated soil No. 1, thermally-treated soil, and reference soil. The least sensitive was barley seed germination for which no toxicity was detected. The most sensitive and discriminant aquatic endpoint was green algae growth which responded to untreated soil No. 1, thermally-treated soil, and reference soil. The least sensitive was D. magna for which no toxicity was detected. Overall, soil and aqueous extract toxicity was spotty and no consistent patterns emerged to differentiate the five soils. Biotreatment significantly reduced the effects of the contamination. Aqueous toxicity was measured in the reference soil, probably because of the presence of unknown dissolved compounds in the aqueous extract. Finally, clear differences in sensitivity existed among the test species.

  8. Identification of the cause of weak acute toxicity to rainbow trout at a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, W.R.; Zaleski, R.T.; Biddinger, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    The refinery in question performs flow through acute toxicity tests on its effluent four times per month using three fish species: fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus oculeatus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Several months of monitoring data indicated a transient low level acute toxicity to rainbow trout. In most cases, several days were required for mortality to occur in the flow through tests and numerous attempts to reproduce toxicity in static and static renewal tests were unsuccessful. A decision was made to manipulate the effluent in an attempt to enhance the toxic effect in the static mode so that conventional methods could be used to identify the cause. these tests indicated that toxicity was pH dependent. Additional testing, using EPA`s Phase 1 Toxicity Identification Evaluation methods suggested that the cause of toxicity was probably an organic acid. Experiments were subsequently begun to identify the specific cause and source of toxicity. This paper reviews the problems confronted during the various phases of the study and the decisions that were made that eventually led to an understanding of the basis of toxicity.

  9. Refinery Capacity Report

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions. The Refinery Capacity Report does not contain working and shell storage capacity data. This data is now being collected twice a year as of March 31 and September 30 on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report", and is now released as a separate report Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity.

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions. The Refinery Capacity Report does not contain working and shell storage capacity data. This data is now being collected twice a year as of March 31 and September 30 on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report", and is now released as a separate report Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity.

  11. Control of occupational exposure to phenol in industrial wastewater treatment plant of a petroleum refinery in Alexandria, Egypt: An intervention application case study.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Gehan R; El-Marakby, Fadia A; Ramadan, Alaa El-Din K; Issa, Ahmed I; Nofal, Faten H

    2016-11-01

    Phenol exposure is one of the hazards in the industrial wastewater treatment basin of any refinery. It additively interacts with hydrogen sulfide emitted from the wastewater basin. Consequently, its concentration should be greatly lower than its threshold limit value. The present study aimed at controlling occupational exposure to phenol in the work environment of wastewater treatment plant in a refinery by reducing phenolic compounds in the industrial wastewater basin. This study was conducted on both laboratory and refinery scales. The first was completed by dividing each wastewater sample from the outlets of different refinery units into three portions; the first was analyzed for phenolic compounds. The second and third were for laboratory scale charcoal and bacterial treatments. The two methods were compared regarding their simplicities, design, and removal efficiencies. Accordingly, bacterial treatment by continuous flow of sewage water containing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa was used for refinery scale treatment. Laboratory scale treatment of phenolic compounds revealed higher removal efficiency of charcoal [100.0(0.0) %] than of bacteria [99.9(0.013) %]. The refinery scale bacterial treatment was [99.8(0.013) %] efficient. Consequently, level of phenol in the work environment after refinery-scale treatment [0.069(0.802) mg/m(3)] was much lower than that before [5.700(26.050) mg/m(3)], with removal efficiency of [99.125(2.335) %]. From the present study, we can conclude that bacterial treatment of phenolic compounds in industrial wastewater of the wastewater treatment plant using continuous flow of sewage water containing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa reduces the workers' exposure to phenol. PMID:27310430

  12. Bioleaching of metals from spent refinery petroleum catalyst using moderately thermophilic bacteria: effect of particle size.

    PubMed

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Singh, Sradhanjali; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won; Heyes, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigated the leaching potential of moderately thermophilic bacteria in the recovery of metals from spent petroleum catalyst of varying particle sizes. The batch bioleaching experiments were conducted by employing a mixed consortium of moderate thermophilic bacteria at 45°C and by using five different particle sizes (from 45 to >2000 μm) of acetone-washed spent catalyst. The elemental mapping by FESEM confirmed the presence of Al, Ni, V and Mo along with sulfur in the spent catalyst. During bioleaching, Ni (92-97%) and V (81-91%) were leached in higher concentrations, whereas leaching yields of Al (23-38%) were found to be lowest in all particle sizes investigated. Decreasing the particle size from >2000 μm to 45-106 μm caused an increase in leaching yields of metals during initial hours. However, the final metals leaching yields were almost independent of particle sizes of catalyst. Leaching kinetics was observed to follow the diffusion-controlled model showing the linearity more close than the chemical control. The results of the present study suggested that bioleaching using moderate thermophilic bacteria was highly effective in removing the metals from spent catalyst. Moreover, bioleaching can be conducted using spent catalyst of higher particle size (>2000 μm), thus saving the grinding cost and making process attractive for larger scale application. PMID:24679088

  13. A review of the technological solutions for the treatment of oily sludges from petroleum refineries.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Leonardo Jordão; Alves, Flávia Chaves; de França, Francisca Pessôa

    2012-10-01

    The activities of the oil industry have several impacts on the environment due to the large amounts of oily wastes that are generated. The oily sludges are a semi-solid material composed by a mixture of clay, silica and iron oxides contaminated with oil, produced water and the chemicals used in the production of oil. Nowadays both the treatment and management of these waste materials is essential to promote sustainable management of exploration and exploitation of natural resources. Biological, physical and chemical processes can be used to reduce environmental contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons to acceptable levels. The choice of treatment method depends on the physical and chemical properties of the waste as well as the availability of facilities to process these wastes. Literature provides some operations for treatment of oily sludges, such as landfilling, incineration, co-processing in clinkerization furnaces, microwave liquefaction, centrifugation, destructive distillation, thermal plasma, low-temperature conversion, incorporation in ceramic materials, development of impermeable materials, encapsulation and biodegradation in land farming, biopiles and bioreactors. The management of the technology to be applied for the treatment of oily wastes is essential to promote proper environmental management, and provide alternative methods to reduce, reuse and recycle the wastes. PMID:22751947

  14. Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Leylâ; Plante, Céline; Jacques, Louis; Goudreau, Sophie; Perron, Stéphane; Hicks, John; Kosatsky, Tom; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children’s respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO2 have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO2 from petroleum refineries located in Montreal’s (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO2 exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO2 exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child’s age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home. RESULTS: The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO2 levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO2. The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO2 [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO2 and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries. PMID:22536578

  15. Upper respiratory cancer among refinery and chemical plant workers: a case-control study in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Soskolne, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Upper respiratory cancer (URC) specific to workers employed on an ethanol unit at a large southern United States refinery and chemical plant was associated with exposure to strong concentrations of sulfuric acid used as a reactant in this process. The carcinogen implicated by indirect evidence was diethyl sulfate. However, additional URC cases were subsequently found that could not be associated with employment on the former ethanol unit. This fact, together with the continued use of sulfuric acid in strong, intermediate, and weak concentrations in the same industrial complex, motivated the present investigation. In particular, hypotheses concerning an association between laryngeal cancer and industrial exposure to the three concentrations of sulfuric acid present in the complex have been tested. The study is a multiple-matched case-control design with a minimum of three controls individually matched to each case on race, sex, date of birth, date of initial employment and duration of employment. Results indicate significant associations between sulfuric acid exposure and URC with odds ratio exceeding four. Strong collinearity among the three acid concentrations has rendered any separation of independent acid strength effects impossible. None of the other exposures examined in this study, including asbestos, nickel or wood dust, revealed significant associations. There is a strong possibility that the association is specific for laryngeal cancer.

  16. Optimization of two-step bioleaching of spent petroleum refinery catalyst by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won

    2014-01-01

    A central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for maximizing bioleaching yields of metals (Al, Mo, Ni, and V) from as-received spent refinery catalyst using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Three independent variables, namely initial pH, sulfur concentration, and pulp density were investigated. The pH was found to be the most influential parameter with leaching yields of metals varying inversely with pH. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model indicated that the predicted values were in good agreement with experimental data. Under optimized conditions of 1.0% pulp density, 1.5% sulfur and pH 1.5, about 93% Ni, 44% Al, 34% Mo, and 94% V was leached from the spent refinery catalyst. Among all the metals, V had the highest maximum rate of leaching (Vmax) according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The results of the study suggested that two-step bioleaching is efficient in leaching of metals from spent refinery catalyst. Moreover, the process can be conducted with as received spent refinery catalyst, thus making the process cost effective for large-scale applications. PMID:25320861

  17. Retrospective mortality study of workers in three major U. S. refineries and chemical plants. Part II: Internal comparisons by geographic site, occupation, and smoking history

    SciTech Connect

    Hanis, N.M.; Shallenberger, L.G.; Donaleski, D.L.; Sales, E.A.

    1985-05-01

    A cohort of 21,698 U.S. refinery and chemical plant workers was observed for eight years to determine if there were interplant or other variations in causes of mortality. Plant populations in three geographic locations were combined to develop an internal standard for comparing subgroups within the total cohort. At no one geographic site were consistently different rates for all major causes of death observed. The adjusted mortality rates for potentially exposed workers were slightly greater than those for nonexposed workers for most causes examined. Smokers incurred a higher risk of mortality from many causes of death when compared with nonsmokers, regardless of occupational category. After controlling for smoking, there remained a slight excess in mortality for potentially exposed as compared with nonexposed workers.

  18. Differential optical absorption spectrometer measurement of NO 2, SO 2, O 3, HCHO and aromatic volatile organics in ambient air of Kaohsiung Petroleum Refinery in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Kong Hwa; Sree, Usha; Hong Tseng, Sen; Wu, Chien-Hou; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    UV-differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) technique is considered as a promising technique to detect gaseous pollutants and was applied to conduct one-week continuous measurements in the Chinese Petroleum (CPC) refinery plant located in Lin Yuan industrial park of Kaohsiung, Southern Taiwan. With the combination of local meteorological information, including solar radiation, wind direction and speed, the results showed that the concentrations of aromatic compounds and formaldehyde (HCHO) were higher at night while the values of ozone, NO 2 and SO 2 were high during the day. The major source of aromatics was the aromatic extraction unit in the refinery while NO 2 and SO 2 were mainly emitted from chimneys with not very high average concentrations. Formaldehyde concentration was above 50 ppbv during night. There exists an apparent correlation between the variation of ground-level ozone concentration and photochemical reactions. The results indicate that in addition to benzene and toluene, ozone is a deleterious pollutant. The commercial DOAS system provides reliable information on distribution patterns of major air pollutants depending on their concentration levels in ambient air.

  19. Organic constituents in sour condensates from shale-oil and petroleum-crude runs at Sohio's Toledo refinery: identification and wastewater-control-technology considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wingender, R J; Harrison, W; Raphaelian, L A

    1981-02-01

    Samples of sour condensate generated from the continuous processing of both crude shale oil and petroleum crude were collected and extracted with methylene chloride. The extracts were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at Argonne National Laboratory and Radian Corporation. Qualitatively, the predominant types of organic compounds present in the shale-oil sour condensate were pyridines and anilines; semiquantitatively, these compounds were present at a concentration of 5.7 ppM, or about 78% of the total concentration of components detected. In contrast, straight-chain alkanes were the predominant types of compounds found in the sour condensate produced during isocracking of conventional crude oil. The approximate concentration of straight-chain alkanes, 8.3 ppM, and of other branched and/or unsaturated hydrocarbons, 6.8 ppM, amounted to 88% of the total concentration of components detected in the sour condensate from the petroleum-crude run. Nitrogen compounds in the shale-oil sour condensate may necessitate alterations of the sour water and refinery wastewater-treatment facilities to provide for organics degradation and to accommodate the potentially greater ammonia loadings. This would include use of larger amounts of caustic to enhance ammonia removal by steam stripping. Possible problems associated with biological removal of organic-nitrogen compounds should be investigated in future experimental shale-oil refining runs.

  20. Injuries to international petroleum drilling workers, 1988 to 1990.

    PubMed

    McNabb, S J; Ratard, R C; Horan, J M; Farley, T A

    1994-06-01

    Nonfatal work-related injury (NFI) rates are 49% higher among oil and gas field workers than among workers in all US industries combined, and these injuries are more severe (the rate of lost workdays in the oil and gas field services industry is 2.8 times that of all US industries combined). We analyzed the 1988 to 1990 incident reports submitted by drilling companies to the International Association of Drilling Contractors, an industry-wide international trade association representing 95% of the world's oil and gas drilling companies. We determined geographic and occupation-specific incidence rates by full-time equivalents, calculated per job category and year. Of the 5,251 reports, 5,218 (99.4%) were of NFI and 33 (0.6%) of fatal work-related injuries (FI). The overall NFI rate was 1.2/100 full-time equivalents and the overall FI rate was 7.5/100,000 full-time equivalents. Reported NFI in US territory was 4 times more common than in non-US territory. Reported FI in US and non-US waters were 4 and 5 times more common than on land, respectively. Three job categories--floormen, roustabouts, and derrickmen--accounted for 74% of the NFI and 64% of FI, with a rate ratio, compared with rates for all other occupations, of 10.5, 8.5, and 7.0 for NFI and 5.0, 9.4, and 4.0 for FI. Among all occupations, the body part most frequently injured was the upper extremity (1,631/5,218 [31%]). The four key NFI types and circumstances identified included the upper extremities "caught in" (857/5,218 [16%]),the back "strained" (592/5,218[11%]), the lower extremities "struck by" (538/5,218 [10%]), and the lower extremities injured while "slipping" (402/5,218 [8%]). Results of these analyses revealed several high-risk occupations in this industry and identified high-risk activities that can be targeted for further study. PMID:8071724

  1. Tracking petroleum refinery emission events using lanthanum and lanthanides as elemental markers for PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankararaman; Fraser, Matthew P

    2007-10-01

    Fine particulate matter levels at four air sampling stations in the Houston, TX area are apportioned to quantify the impact of emissions from a local refinery during a reported emission event. Through quantification of lanthanum and lanthanides using a recently developed analytical technique, the impacts of emissions from fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) units are quantitatively tracked across the Houston region. The results show a significant (33-106-fold) increase in contributions of FCC emissions to PM2.5 compared with background levels associated with routine operation. This impact from industrial emissions to ambient air quality occurs simultaneously with a larger, regional haze episode that lead to elevated PM2.5 concentrations throughout the entire region. By focusing on detailed chemical analysis of unique maker metals (lanthanum and lanthanides), the impact of emissions from the FCC unit was tracked from the local refinery that reported the emission event to a site approximately 50 km downwind, illustrating the strength of the analytical method to isolate an important source during a regional haze episode not related to the emission event. While this source apportionment technique could separate contributions from FCC emissions, improved time-resolved sampling is proposed to more precisely quantify the impacts of transient emission events on ambient PM2.5. PMID:17969690

  2. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of metagenomic libraries of phenol degrading sludge from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In petrochemical refinery wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), different concentrations of pollutant compounds are received daily in the influent stream, including significant amounts of phenolic compounds, creating propitious conditions for the development of particular microorganisms that can rapidly adapt to such environment. In the present work, the microbial sludge from a refinery WWTP was enriched for phenol, cloned into fosmid vectors and pyrosequenced. The fosmid libraries yielded 13,200 clones and a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of the sequence data set revealed a complex and diverse bacterial community in the phenol degrading sludge. The phylogenetic analyses using MEGAN in combination with RDP classifier showed a massive predominance of Proteobacteria, represented mostly by the genera Diaphorobacter, Pseudomonas, Thauera and Comamonas. The functional classification of phenol degrading sludge sequence data set generated by MG-RAST showed the wide metabolic diversity of the microbial sludge, with a high percentage of genes involved in the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of phenol and derivatives. In addition, genes related to the metabolism of many other organic and xenobiotic compounds, such as toluene, biphenyl, naphthalene and benzoate, were found. Results gathered herein demonstrated that the phenol degrading sludge has complex phylogenetic and functional diversities, showing the potential of such community to degrade several pollutant compounds. This microbiota is likely to represent a rich resource of versatile and unknown enzymes which may be exploited for biotechnological processes such as bioremediation. PMID:22452812

  3. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater by distillation-assisted catalytic oxidation under low temperature and low pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoming; Li, Wenhong; Fu, Feng; Li, Dong; Cao, Zhenheng; Wang, Jiwu

    2011-01-01

    A distillation-assisted catalytic oxidation (DACO) process under low temperature (100 degrees C) and atmospheric pressure was investigated to treat heavily contaminated wastewater from oil refining industry. The DACO experiments were carried out in a distillation batch reactor, using CuO/gamma-A1(2)O3 as catalyst. The experimental temperature was kept at 100 degrees C and H2O2 oxidant was supplied into the reactive system with 200 mL/L. The results demonstrated that more than 92.2% of chemical oxygen demand removal was obtained and the absorbance of the refinery wastewater after treatment was zero, indicating significant decolorization efficiency for the solution. The research of life and stability showed that the catalyst had a good stability. The present study indicates that this DACO approach may have a significant application potential for industrial wastewater treatment. PMID:22049769

  4. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater using a sequential anaerobic-aerobic moving-bed biofilm reactor system based on suspended ceramsite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mang; Gu, Li-Peng; Xu, Wen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel suspended ceramsite was prepared, which has high strength, optimum density (close to water), and high porosity. The ceramsite was used to feed a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system with an anaerobic-aerobic (A/O) arrangement to treat petroleum refinery wastewater for simultaneous removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system was varied from 72 to 18 h. The anaerobic-aerobic system had a strong tolerance to shock loading. Compared with the professional emission standard of China, the effluent concentrations of COD and NH3-N in the system could satisfy grade I at HRTs of 72 and 36 h, and grade II at HRT of 18 h. The average sludge yield of the anaerobic reactor was estimated to be 0.0575 g suspended solid/g CODremoved. This work demonstrated that the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system using the suspended ceramsite as bio-carrier could be applied to achieving high wastewater treatment efficiency. PMID:23656940

  5. Possible health effects of liquefied petroleum gas on workers at filling and distribution stations of Gaza governorates.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al Laham, N A; El Madhoun, R A

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is widely used in the Gaza Strip for domestic purposes, in agriculture and industry and, illegally, in cars. This study aimed to identify possible health effects on workers exposed to LPG in Gaza governorates. Data were collected by a questionnaire interview, and haematological and biochemical analyses of venous blood samples were made from 30 workers at filling and distribution stations and 30 apparently healthy controls. Statistically significant differences were found in all self-reported health-related complaints among LPG workers versus controls. LPG workers had significantly higher values of red blood cell counts, haemoglobin, haematocrit mean corpuscular haemoglobin and platelet counts. They also had significantly higher values of kidney function tests (urea, creatinine and uric acid) and liver function enzyme activities (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase). LPG workers at Gaza Strip petroleum stations are at higher risk for health-related symptoms and clinical abnormalities. PMID:23879082

  6. A retrospective mortality study among Canadian petroleum marketing and distribution workers.

    PubMed Central

    Schnatter, A R; Katz, A M; Nicolich, M J; Thériault, G

    1993-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective mortality study among 6672 petroleum marketing and distribution workers from 226 locations throughout Canada. These employees worked for at least 1 year in the marketing distribution segment from 1964 through 1983 or were annuitants as of 1964. Industrial hygienists assigned hydrocarbon (HC) exposure frequency scores for several jobs, departments, and job functions. We computed standardized mortality ratios for the total cohort, HC exposure frequency groups, and tank truck drivers, and we also used Poisson regression techniques to model mortality for selected causes of death according to HC exposure frequency. Results indicate overall mortality below that of the general Canadian population for all marketing distribution workers [Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 0.88]. Mortality from aortic aneurysms was significantly elevated in all marketing/distribution workers (SMR = 1.79) but was due to raised mortality in nonexposed workers (SMR = 2.80). Tank truck drivers showed significantly elevated mortality due to leukemia (SMR = 3.35) based on five deaths. The leukemia findings were not evident in the larger group of marketing distribution workers classified as exposed to hydrocarbons (SMR = 1.01). No other cause of death was elevated in truck drivers. The leukemia findings are suggestive of a possible influence due to exposure to HCs in tank truck drivers, although other explanations cannot be ruled out. Other findings of elevated mortality in the marketing distribution group are generally not statistically significant. These included moderately increased mortality due to multiple myeloma, malignant melanoma, and kidney cancer. Small numbers of observed and expected deaths limit concise interpretations for these diseases. PMID:8020452

  7. Pulmonary fibrosis in cable plant workers exposed to mist and vapor of petroleum distillates.

    PubMed

    Skyberg, K; Rønneberg, A; Kamøy, J I; Dale, K; Borgersen, A

    1986-08-01

    Twenty-five cable plant workers exposed to mists and vapors of mineral oils and kerosene for 5-35 years have been investigated in a cross-sectional, matched pairs study. The exposed cohort and the referents were examined by radiology, pulmonary function measurements, and a questionnaire for symptoms of respiratory disease. Lung tissue from a deceased worker with 35 years of exposure was investigated by histopathologic methods and by scanning electron microscopy. Exposure measurements were performed by personal sampling. Previous employment and smoking habits were recorded for all subjects. An increased prevalence of slight basal lung fibrosis was found in chest films of the exposed workers. Pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed histopathologically. A moderately decreased vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume (FEV1) was found. Oil mist was measured to time-weighted average levels of 0.15-0.30 mg/m3 with short-term vapor exposure of up to 4000 mg/m3. It is concluded that mists and vapors from petroleum distillates are the most probable causes of the findings. PMID:3732201

  8. Petroleum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, T. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review of petroleum covers: crude oil; fuels, gaseous and liquid; lubricants, oils, and greases; asphalts, bitumens, tars, and pitches; hydrocarbons; physical properties; metals in oil; nonmetallic elements and heterocompounds; and analytical methods and apparatus. (MVL)

  9. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic application of TiO2/Fe-ZSM-5 nanocomposite for the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater: Optimization of process parameters by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Zahra; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2016-09-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminants from petroleum refinery wastewater under UV and sunlight was investigated by immobilizing nanosized TiO2 photocatalyst into the structure of as-synthesized Fe-ZSM-5 zeolite via sol-gel method. Pure phase of TiO2/Fe-ZSM-5 photocatalyst with specific surface area of 304.6 m(2) g(-1) and loaded TiO2 of 29.28% was successfully synthesized. Effects of various operational parameters on treatment process were investigated by use of Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Maximum reduction of 80% COD was achieved at pH of 4, a photocatalyst concentration of 2.1 g l(-1), temperature of 45 °C and UV exposure time of 240 min. Gas chromatography-mass demonstrated an apparent shift in molecular weight from a higher fraction to a lower fraction even under sunlight. It is expected that the prepared photocatalyst is able to use ultraviolet and visible light energy. Results indicated that removal of COD degradation did not decrease as the reuse cycle of photocatalyst increased. Moreover, the potential to use sunlight energy and the simplicity of operation make photocatalysis an attractive prospect in terms of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment. PMID:27341159

  10. The relationship between low-level benzene exposure and leukemia in Canadian petroleum distribution workers.

    PubMed

    Schnatter, A R; Armstrong, T W; Thompson, L S; Nicolich, M J; Katz, A M; Huebner, W W; Pearlman, E D

    1996-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between leukemia occurrence and long-term, low-level benzene exposures in petroleum distribution workers. Fourteen cases were identified among a previously studied cohort [Schnatter et al., Environ Health Perspect 101 (Suppl 6):85-89 (1993)]. Four controls per case were selected from the same cohort, controlling for birth year and time at risk. Industrial hygienists estimated workplace exposures for benzene, without knowledge of case-control status. Average benzene concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.2 ppm. Company medical records were used to abstract information on other potential confounders such as cigarette smoking. Odds ratios were calculated for several exposure metrics. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to control for potential confounders. The risk of leukemia was not associated with increasing cumulative exposure to benzene for these exposure levels. Duration of benzene exposure was more closely associated with leukemia risk than other exposure metrics, although results were not statistically significant. A family history of cancer and cigarette smoking were the two strongest risk factors for leukemia, with cumulative benzene exposure showing no additional risk when considered in the same models. This study is consistent with other data in that it was unable to demonstrate a relationship between leukemia and long-term, low-level benzene exposures. The power of the study was limited. Thus, further study on benzene exposures in this concentration range are warranted. PMID:9118923

  11. Smoking habits of oil refinery employees

    SciTech Connect

    Van Peenen, P.F.D.; Blanchard, A.G.; Wolkonsky, P.M.

    1984-12-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies of the mortality of oil refinery workers have reported low Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) for lung cancer and other cancers linked to cigarette smoking. A suggested explanation is that refinery employees do not smoke because of the obvious danger of, and prohibition against, smoking in many refinery areas. To evaluate this hypothesis, data were analyzed from employees of a large petrochemical company, Standard Oil Company (Indiana), and a comparison made of smoking habits of White males who worked in oil refineries with those of nonrefinery White males.

  12. 77 FR 29362 - Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... on February 28, 2012 (77 FR 12084). The initial investigation resulted in a negative determination... Employment and Training Administration Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of... former workers of ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, Pennsylvania (subject firm)....

  13. AMBIENT HYDROCARBON AND OZONE CONCENTRATIONS NEAR A REFINERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ambient air monitoring study to characterize airborne emissions from petroleum refineries was conducted near the Marathon oil refinery at Robinson, Illinois during June 17 - July 29, 1977. Ground-level sampling facilities and an airplane equipped with air pollutant monitoring ...

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Petroleum Products Supply Module

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    The Petroleum Products Supply Module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model provides forecasts of petroleum refinery inputs (crude oil, unfinished oils, pentanes plus, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline blending components, and aviation gasoline blending components) and refinery outputs (motor gasoline, jet fuel, distillate fuel, residual fuel, liquefied petroleum gas, and other petroleum products).

  15. Petroleum catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, B.

    1996-10-01

    Catalysis reaches almost every major industrial chemical process in place today and spans production of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals to commodity plastics and gasoline. The catalytic upgrading of crude oil for example renders chemicals, fuels, lubricants, and even coke for steel production. The initial conversion point for all these end products is the petroleum refinery. While there are a variety of catalytic schemes in the modern refinery, four key processes make up the mainstay of refinery operations: Catalytic Cracking, Alkylation, Reforming, and Isomerization. A brief history and outline of the processes will be given followed by a more detailed discussion of the catalysis. It is intended that a knowledge of both the catalytic chemistry and catalytic materials useful in these reactions may be garnered along with a broader view of the importance of catalysis in modern industrial chemistry.

  16. LAND TREATABILITY OF REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The land disposal of API separator sludges was investigated with regard to decomposition rates or organic constitutents and the possible impact of these materials on plants and surface water or groundwater quality. Two oily sludges (one from a petroleum refinery and one from a pe...

  17. Biotreatment of refinery spent sulfidic caustics

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.; Rajganesh, B.; Woolsey, M.; Plato, A.

    1995-12-31

    Caustics are used in petroleum refinering to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. Spent sulfidic caustics from two Conoco refineries have been successfully biotreated on bench and pilot scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate by Thiobacillus denitrificans. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic.

  18. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  19. [Gene polymorphism of xenobiotics in workers of petroleum and chemical industry].

    PubMed

    Makarova, O V; Karimova, L K; Gimranova, G G; Churmantaeva, S Kh; Viktorova, T V

    2004-01-01

    Increasing use of aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives, known mutagens and carcinogens, in petrochemistry leads to higher number of workers having occupational contact with those chemicals. Most alien chemicals (xenobiotics) incorporated into human body do not demonstrate direct biological effects but undergo various biologic transformations. Humans proved to have genetic control over metabolism of xenobiotics entering the body, so various individuals depending on genetic features could be resistant or otherwise be extremely sensitive to chemical agents. PMID:15152552

  20. Partial oxidation of heavy refinery fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, R.M.; Rhodes, H.A.; Wallon, S.B.

    1984-07-31

    This is a partial oxidation process in which heavy hydrocarbonaceous fractions from a petroleum refinery and light liquid paraffinic hydrocarbon extractants are used in the production of synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas i.e., gaseous mixtures comprising H/sub 2/ and CO. In the process, substantially all of the particulate carbon and soot that are simultaneously produced are recovered and recycled to the reaction zone. A dispersion of carbon-soot-light paraffinic hydrocarbon extractant from the decanting zone is combined with a heavy refinery fraction in admixture with a liquid aromatic-rich hydrocarbon to produce a pumpable single liquid phase mixture which is introduced into a fractionation zone where the following streams are separated from each other: (a) a stream of light paraffinic hydrocarbon extractant which is recycled to the decanting zone, (b) a stream comprising at least a portion of the aromatic-rich hydrocarbon which is recycled for mixing with the heavy refinery fraction, and (c) a stream of pumpable dispersion of carbon-soot heavy refinery fraction and any remaining aromatic-rich hydrocarbon which may be used as fuel in the system or exported. Troublesome asphaltene precipitation that causes operational problems and increased viscosity is avoided by the subject process. Comparatively low cost heavy refinery fractions which ordinarily are difficult to handle may be now used along with light liquid paraffinic hydrocarbon extractants.

  1. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The summary statistics section show 16 years of data depicting the balance between supply, disposition and ending stocks for various commodities including crude oil, motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, jet fuel propane/propylene, and liquefied petroleum gases. The detailed statistics section provide 1996 detailed statistics on supply and disposition, refinery operations, imports and exports, stocks, and transportation of crude oil and petroleum products. The refinery capacity contain listings of refineries and associated crude oil distillation and downstream capacities by State, as of January 1, 1997, as well as summaries of corporate refinery capacities and refinery storage capacities. In addition, refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation for 1996 are provided. Also included are fuels consumed at refineries, and lists of shutdowns, sales, reactivations, and mergers during 1995 and 1996. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  2. Petroleum: An energy profile, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This report prepared by the Energy Information Administration covers the following topics: petroleum production and end-use sectors; resources and reserves; exploration and production; LPG sources and processing; motor gasoline octane enhancement; constructing pipelines; the strategic petroleum reserve; imports and exports; marketing; district descriptions and maps; and refinery processes and facilities. 33 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Optimal Design of Air Quality Monitoring Network and its Application in an Oil Refinery Plant: An Approach to Keep Health Status of Workers

    PubMed Central

    ZoroufchiBenis, Khaled; Fatehifar, Esmaeil; Ahmadi, Javad; Rouhi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Industrial air pollution is a growing challenge to humane health, especially in developing countries, where there is no systematic monitoring of air pollution. Given the importance of the availability of valid information on population exposure to air pollutants, it is important to design an optimal Air Quality Monitoring Network (AQMN) for assessing population exposure to air pollution and predicting the magnitude of the health risks to the population. Methods: A multi-pollutant method (implemented as a MATLAB program) was explored for configur­ing an AQMN to detect the highest level of pollution around an oil refinery plant. The method ranks potential monitoring sites (grids) according to their ability to represent the ambient concentration. The term of cluster of contiguous grids that exceed a threshold value was used to calculate the Station Dosage. Selection of the best configuration of AQMN was done based on the ratio of a sta­tion’s dosage to the total dosage in the network. Results: Six monitoring stations were needed to detect the pollutants concentrations around the study area for estimating the level and distribution of exposure in the population with total network efficiency of about 99%. An analysis of the design procedure showed that wind regimes have greatest effect on the location of monitoring stations. Conclusion: The optimal AQMN enables authorities to implement an effective program of air quality management for protecting human health. PMID:26933646

  4. EMISSION FACTORS AND FREQUENCY OF LEAK OCCURRENCE FOR FITTINGS IN REFINERY PROCESS UNITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of sampling fugitive emissions at nine integrated oil refineries throughout the U.S. The petroleum refining industry is a significant source of atmospheric hydrocarbon (HC) emissions in the U.S. Each refinery has a large number of potential emission sourc...

  5. AMBIENT HYDROCARBON AND OZONE CONCENTRATIONS NEAR A REFINERY, BENICIA, CALIFORNIA, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to characterize airborne emissions from petroleum refineries, an ambient air monitoring study was conducted near the Exxon refinery at Benicia, California, during September 8-22, 1975. Ground-level sampling facilities and an airplane equipped with air polluta...

  6. LABORATORY ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM LAND TREATMENT OF REFINERY OILY SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organics emissions were characterized when petroleum refinery oily sludges were incorporated in soils under controlled laboratory conditions. The sludges tested included three of the five listed hazardous wastes for the refining industry: dissolved air flotation float, s...

  7. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Ecuador). Refinery equipment, parts, and accessories, March 1991. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    The petroleum sector in Ecuador brings in about 65 percent of the country's revenue. Three of the refineries are located in the coastal region. The other two, plus the Liquified Petroleum Gas Plant (LPG), are located in the Oriente region (Amazon jungle). The refineries operate at about 85% of their installation capacity. The Petroindustrial and Petropeninsula investment plan for 1991 comtemplates the expansion of the Esmeraldas refinery to 110,000 barrels a day, and the up-grading of the Shushufindi and Libertad refineries located near the city of Guayaquil. The United States is by far the largest supplier of refinery equipment, parts and accessories, controlling about 90% of the total market.

  8. Conflicting energy and environmental policies: The portsmouth oil refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yearn Hong

    1984-03-01

    This case study presents the series of decision-making processes surrounding a current environmental issue—the Portsmouth oil refinery in Virginia. Crude oil must be refined before it can be used as fuel. Additionally, some oil must be desulfurized for use other than as gasoline. In 1977, the nation imported about one million barrels of oil a day. Although the US Department of Energy has emphasized the critical need for greater east coast refinery capability, the east coast is to supply only 25% of its refined oil needs. In the same year, the east coast met its demands for petroleum products from three sources: (a) refinery production, 22.7%, (b) product imports, 28.0%, and (c) products from the Gulf Coast, 49.3%.1 The energy program after the Arab oil embargo has an objective of encouraging the construction of oil refineries and petrochemical plants in the United States rather than abroad. The tariff is higher on imports of refined oil products than of crude oil, and new refineries are allowed to import a large proportion of their requirements tarifffree. The US federal government does not directly regulate the locations for oil refineries or methods of desulfurization. The oil import program, however, does influence decisions concerning location of desulfurization facilities and refineries, and air and water pollution standards affect methods of refining, besides making desulfurization necessary.

  9. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  10. Shift schedules, work factors, and mental health among onshore and offshore workers in the Norwegian petroleum industry

    PubMed Central

    BERTHELSEN, Mona; PALLESEN, Ståle; BJORVATN, Bjørn; KNARDAHL, Stein

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to answer the following research questions: (1) Do workers in different shift schedules differ in mental distress? (2) Do workers in different shift schedules differ in neuroticism? (3) Do shift schedules differ in psychosocial work exposures? (4) Do psychosocial work exposures contribute to mental distress among onshore- and offshore workers? (5) Does neuroticism confound the association between work exposures and mental distress? Workers on six shift-schedules answered a questionnaire (1,471 of 2,628 employees). Psychological and social work factors were measured by QPSNordic, mental distress was measured by HADS and neuroticism was measured by EPQ. The results showed 1) No differences in mental distress between workers in different shift schedules, 2) Revolving-shift workers reported higher neuroticism compared to day workers, 3) Swing-shift workers and revolving-shift workers reported lower job control compared to permanent-night and -day workers, 4) Job demands and role conflict were associated with more mental distress. Job control, role clarity, support, and leadership were associated with lower mental distress, 5) Neuroticism influenced the relationship between psychosocial work factors and mental distress. The present study did not find differences in mental distress between shift schedules. Job characteristics may be contributing factors when determining health effects of shift work. PMID:25740007

  11. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide

  12. Measurement and removal of bioconcentratable compounds in refinery effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, W.R.; Dorn, P.B.; Means, J.C.; Jenkins, K.D.; Folwarkow, S.

    1994-12-31

    Public concern regarding the presence of persistent, bioconcentratable compounds in fish and shellfish has led the petroleum industry to investigate methods for the measurement of bioconcentratable compounds in refinery effluents. Research has focused on developing methods to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other hydrocarbons directly in the effluent and in bivalves exposed to refinery effluents in the field and in the laboratory. Results from a multi-refinery study in the San Francisco Bay Area using selective ion monitoring GC/MS-MS indicated that alkylated and non-substituted 2--3 ring PAHs are rarely present in refinery effluents at concentrations greater than 100 ng/L. Higher MW PAHs were rarely detected. PAHs did not substantially bioconcentrate in bivalves exposed in the laboratory to refinery effluent and reference sea water. Total PAHs were generally less than 50 {mu}g/g in the effluent-exposed bivalves. A comparison of the waste water treatment facilities at each refinery suggest that biological treatment already required by existing regulations is sufficient to reduce PAH concentrations to these low levels.

  13. 76 FR 50214 - Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara (MHA) Nation's Refinery, Notice of Availability of the Record of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ...,000 barrels-per-day petroleum refinery on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation near Makoti in North Dakota. The refinery will produce diesel fuel, gasoline and propane. The NPDES permit will be for surface... summarized in a Supplemental Information Report (SIR). The FEIS, ROD and SIR are available for review at...

  14. Refinery anti-foulant-asphaltene dispersant

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, W.K.; Mercer, B.D.; Comer, D.G.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a method of dispersing asphalt and asphaltene in petroleum, crude oil, or any hydrocarbon fraction thereof exposed to heat transfer processes in an oil refinery. It comprises: adding an effective anti-foulant amount of asphalt-asphaltene polymeric anti-foulant to the petroleum, crude oil, or fraction thereof, the polymeric anti-foulant comprising an admixture of Polymer A and Polymer B ranging from 95 to 5 weight percent A and from 5 to 95 weight percent B, wherein Polymer A is an alkyl substituted phenol-formaldehyde liquid resin having a weight average molecular weight ranging from about 1,000 to about 20,000, and an alkyl substituent may be a linear or branched alkyl group; an Polymer B is a hydrophilic-lipophilic vinylic polymer.

  15. Nickel refinery dust

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel refinery dust ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  16. Employment and exposures in the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries and the risk of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the risk of lung cancer associated with occupational exposures in the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries. Earlier epidemiologic studies of this association did not adjust for cigarette smoking or have specific exposure classifications. The Texas EXposure Assessment System (TEXAS) was developed with data from a population-based, case-comparison study conducted in five southeast Texas counties between 1976 and 1980. An industry-wide, increased risk for lung cancer was associated with jobs having low-level hydrocarbon exposure that also include other occupational inhalation exposures. The prohibition of cigarette smoking for jobs with high-level hydrocarbon exposure might explain part of the increased risk for jobs with low-level hydrocarbon exposures. Asbestos exposure comprises a large part of the risk associated with jobs having other inhalation exposures besides hydrocarbons. Workers in petroleum refineries were not shown to have an increased, occupational risk for lung cancer. The study results demonstrate that the predominant risk for lung cancer is due to cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking accounts for 86.5% of the incident lung cancer cases within the study area. Workers in the petroleum industry smoke significantly less than persons employed in other industries. Only 2.2% of the incident lung cancer cases may be attributed to petroleum industry jobs; lifestyle factors (e.g., nutrition) may be associated with the balance of the cases.

  17. Storage tracking refinery trends

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.

    1996-05-01

    Regulatory and marketplace shakeups have made the refining and petrochemical industries highly competitive. The fight to survive has forced refinery consolidations, upgrades and companywide restructurings. Bulk liquid storage terminals are following suit. This should generate a flurry of engineering and construction by the latter part of 1997. A growing petrochemical industry translates into rising storage needs. Industry followers forecasted flat petrochemical growth in 1996 due to excessive expansion in 1994 and 1995. But expansion is expected to continue throughout this year on the strength of several products.

  18. Benzene and total hydrocarbons exposures in the downstream petroleum industries.

    PubMed

    Verma, D K; Johnson, D M; Shaw, M L; des Tombe, K

    2001-01-01

    A review of studies, including both articles published in peer-reviewed journals and reports that were not peer reviewed, regarding occupational exposure to benzene and total hydrocarbons in the downstream petroleum industry operations was performed. The objective was to provide a broad estimate of exposures by compiling exposure data according to the following categories: refinery, pipeline, marine, rail, bulk terminals and trucks, service stations, underground storage tanks, tank cleaning, and site remediations. The data in each category was divided into personal occupational long-term and short-term samples. The summarized data offers valuable assistance to hygienists by providing them with an estimate and range of exposures. The traditional 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) exposure and the 40-hour workweek do not generally coincide with exposure periods applicable to workers in marine, pipeline, railcar, and trucking operations. They are more comparable with short-term exposure or task-based exposure assessments. The marine sector has a large number of high exposures. Although relatively few workers are exposed, their exposures to benzene and total hydrocarbons are sometimes an order of magnitude higher than the respective exposure limits. It is recommended that in the future, it would be preferable to do more task-based exposure assessments and fewer traditional TWA long-term exposure assessments within the various sectors of the downstream petroleum industry. PMID:11331990

  19. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-22

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  20. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  1. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. Petroleum supply monthly, with data from June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Petroleum Supply Division (PSD) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects and published information on petroleum supply and disposition in the United States. The information is collected through a series of surveys that make up the Petroleum Supply Reporting System (PSRS). The PSRS data are published in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). This report presents information on crude oil production, crude oil imports and exports, refinery operations, natural gas processing, transportation, and oxygenate data.

  3. World petroleum outlook. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Cosso, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Mr. Cosso projects the following: (1) petroleum consumption growth will decline during the 1980s, with the US recording the largest decline, while supplies will be adequate and price increases moderate; (2) fuel substitution and conservation will account for most of the drop in demand, but some will shift to developing countries; (3) excess refinery capacity will increase because of reduced demand, which will also moderate prices; and (4) energy projects will demand a large share of investment capital during the decade because of exploration and alternative energy sources. These forecasts are based on market statistics, world reserve estimates, refining capacity, and an analysis of the OPEC pricing plan. 8 tables. (DCK)

  4. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 1: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program is described for predicting the flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuel of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

  5. Retrospective estimation of exposure to benzene in a leukaemia case-control study of petroleum marketing and distribution workers in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S J; Bell, G M; Cordingley, N; Pearlman, E D; Rushton, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide quantitative estimates of exposure to benzene for cases and controls in an epidemiology study to investigate the risk of leukaemia in petroleum distribution workers. METHODS: Work histories were obtained for cases and controls together with detailed information on the distribution sites. For each job in the work history, an estimate of exposure (parts per million (ppm)) was obtained by multiplying a measure derived from exposure data by modifying factors to reflect the differences between the conditions that existed at the time of measurement and those at the time of interest. The modifying factors used related to job activity, the number of road tankers loaded, the benzene content of the gasoline, the mixture of products handled, temperature, and loading technology. Cumulative exposures for each case and control were obtained by multiplying the exposure estimates for each job by the duration of time in the respective jobs, and summing these over all jobs in the work history. Peak exposure and exposure through dermal contact were quantitatively classified for each job. RESULTS: Measured exposures were obtained for 30 job categories, and ranged from 0.003 to 8.20 ppm. 40% of work histories were assigned background exposures, with a further 34% assigned the exposure estimate for a driver carrying out top submerged loading of motor fuel into road tankers. Cumulative exposures ranged from < 1 to > 200 ppm-years, although 81% were < 5 ppm-years. Comparison of the exposure estimates for selected jobs with data from sources not used in the study showed similar results. CONCLUSION: The estimates of exposure to benzene in this study provide a sound basis for the epidemiological analyses. PMID:9155777

  6. Real-time refinery optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    This article discusses refinery operation with specific consideration of the topics of: gasoline; control projects; catalytic reforming control; hydrocracker control packages; blending optimization; real-time data acquisition; and other plant automation packages.

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

  8. Nutrient-stimulated biodegradation of aged refinery hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, E.N.; Stokley, K.E.; Calcavecchio, P.; Bare, R.E.; Rothenburger, S.J.; Prince, R.C.; Douglas, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Aged hydrocarbon-contaminated refinery soil was amended with water and nutrients and tilled weekly for 1 year to stimulate biodegradation. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) and triterpane biomarkers, and Freon IR analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), were used to determine the extent of biodegradation. There was significant degradation of extractable hydrocarbon (up to 60%), but neither hopane, oleanane, nor the amount of polars decreased during this period of bioremediation, allowing them to be used as conserved internal markers for estimating biodegradation. Significant degradation of the more alkylated two- and three-ring compounds, and of the four-ring species pyrene and chrysene and their alkylated congeners, was seen. Substantial degradation (> 40%) of benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene also was seen. The results show that bioremediation can be a useful treatment in the cleanup of contaminated refinery sites.

  9. Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-10-01

    The petroleum refining energy bandwidth report analyzes the most energy-intensive unit operations used in U.S. refineries: crude oil distillation, fluid catalytic cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic reforming, and alkylation. The "bandwidth" provides a snapshot of the energy losses that can potentially be recovered through best practices and technology R&D.

  10. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  11. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  12. Oil refinery experience with the assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters using biologically based methods.

    PubMed

    Comber, Michael H I; Girling, Andrew; den Haan, Klaas H; Whale, Graham

    2015-10-01

    The trend in discharges of petroleum-related substances from refineries in Europe shows a consistent picture of declining emissions, since first measured in 1969. This decline coincides with enhanced internal capture or recycling procedures and increasing use of physical and biological treatments. At the same time, and partly in response to legislative drivers, there has been an increase in the use of chronic (long-term) toxicity tests and alternative methods for assessing the quality of effluent discharges. The Whole Effluent Assessment (WEA) approach has also driven the increased conduct of studies addressing the fate of effluent constituents. Such studies have included the use of biodegradation and solid-phase micro-extraction-biomimetic extraction (SPME-BE) methods to address potentially bioaccumulative substances (PBS). In this way, it is then possible to address the persistence and toxicity of these PBS constituents of an effluent. The data collected in various case studies highlights the advantages and pitfalls of using biologically-based methods to assess the potential for refinery effluents to cause environmental impacts. PMID:25810150

  13. Refinery suppliers face tough times

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.; Walsh, K.

    1997-03-12

    Despite a handful of bright spots in hydroprocessing and petrochemical sectors, economic woes plague much of the refinery and petrochemical catalysts business, as suppliers are feeling the impact of mature markets and refiners` ongoing cost cutting. Industry experts say the doldrums could spur further restructuring in the catalyst business, with suppliers scrambling for market share and jockeying for position in growing sectors. Expect further consolidation over the next several years, says Pierre Bonnifay, president of IFP Enterprises (New York). {open_quotes}There are still too many players for the mature [refinery catalyst] markets.{close_quotes} Others agree. {open_quotes}Only about seven [or] eight major suppliers will survive,{close_quotes} says Robert Allsmiller, v.p./refinery and petrochemical catalysts at United Catalysts Inc. (UCI; Louisville, KY). {open_quotes}Who they [will be] is still up in the air.{close_quotes}

  14. Constructing a refinery information system

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, K.R. ); Kennedy, J.P. )

    1994-09-01

    With the right information links, a distributed control system can become the cornerstone of a total refinery information system. Using an advanced historical data and archiving system, sequential query language (SQL) links to key databases and object embedding with live data links in a spreadsheet, Atlas is bridging its process control and information systems to give the plant useful information easily via a windows-type PC interface. Atlas Processing is Pennzoil's largest refinery. The vision for the plant information system was to provide the refinery with ready access to: operating data from the distributed control system; laboratory data; accounting throughputs and yields; tank gauges and volumes; and production and scheduling model information. This information could be used to develop an executive information system, provide the operating personnel with reliable information to facilitate unit operations and enhance the facility's ability to use statistical process control to enhance yields and reduce energy costs.

  15. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  16. Multi objective multi refinery optimization with environmental and catastrophic failure effects objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khogeer, Ahmed Sirag

    2005-11-01

    Petroleum refining is a capital-intensive business. With stringent environmental regulations on the processing industry and declining refining margins, political instability, increased risk of war and terrorist attacks in which refineries and fuel transportation grids may be targeted, higher pressures are exerted on refiners to optimize performance and find the best combination of feed and processes to produce salable products that meet stricter product specifications, while at the same time meeting refinery supply commitments and of course making profit. This is done through multi objective optimization. For corporate refining companies and at the national level, Intea-Refinery and Inter-Refinery optimization is the second step in optimizing the operation of the whole refining chain as a single system. Most refinery-wide optimization methods do not cover multiple objectives such as minimizing environmental impact, avoiding catastrophic failures, or enhancing product spec upgrade effects. This work starts by carrying out a refinery-wide, single objective optimization, and then moves to multi objective-single refinery optimization. The last step is multi objective-multi refinery optimization, the objectives of which are analysis of the effects of economic, environmental, product spec, strategic, and catastrophic failure. Simulation runs were carried out using both MATLAB and ASPEN PIMS utilizing nonlinear techniques to solve the optimization problem. The results addressed the need to debottleneck some refineries or transportation media in order to meet the demand for essential products under partial or total failure scenarios. They also addressed how importing some high spec products can help recover some of the losses and what is needed in order to accomplish this. In addition, the results showed nonlinear relations among local and global objectives for some refineries. The results demonstrate that refineries can have a local multi objective optimum that does not

  17. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 3: Detailed systems and programming documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The FORTRAN computing program predicts flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuels of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has a provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

  18. Cross-sectional survey of kidney function in refinery employees

    SciTech Connect

    Viau, C.; Bernard, A.; Lauwerys, R.; Buchet, J.P.; Quaeghebeur, L.; Cornu, M.E.; Phillips, S.C.; Mutti, A.; Lucertini, S.; Franchini, I.

    1987-01-01

    We examined sensitive biochemical and immunological markers of kidney function and damage in 53 male oil refinery workers exposed to hydrocarbons and compared their results with those of a control group of 61 age-matched nonexposed males. The mean duration of employment of exposed males was 11 years. The current levels of exposure to a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as determined by personal monitoring, were well below the current threshold limit values. No difference was found in the urinary tubular parameters beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) and retinol-binding protein. Similar serum beta 2-m levels indicated no impairment of the glomerular filtration rate in the exposed workers. The levels of circulating immune complexes were also identical in both groups. The mean albuminuria was slightly higher (p less than .005) in the exposed group in a quantitative assay but was not dipstick-detectable. The mean urinary excretion of a renal antigen was also higher (p less than .05) in the exposed group and correlated with the excretion of albumin. Finally, slightly higher titers of anti-laminin antibodies were found in five exposed employees, but this was not accompanied by an increased albuminuria. We conclude that chronic low-level hydrocarbon exposure in these refinery workers does not lead to clinically significant renal abnormalities. Nevertheless, some findings are consistent with the possible role of hydrocarbon exposure in the induction of renal disturbances.

  19. Increased risk of preterm delivery among people living near the three oil refineries in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chang, Chih-Ching; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Ho, Chi-Kung; Wu, Trong-Neng; Chang, Po-Ya

    2004-05-01

    The petrochemical and petroleum industries are two of the main sources of industrial air pollution in Taiwan. Data used in this study concern outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in communities in close proximity to oil refinery plants. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants was significantly higher in mothers living near the oil refinery plants than in control mothers in Taiwan. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.14 (95% CI=1.01-1.28) for delivery of preterm infants for mothers living near oil refinery plants. These data provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect the outcome of pregnancies. PMID:14987863

  20. Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-18

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions, the production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level.

  1. STANDARDIZATION OF METHOD 11 AT A PETROLEUM REFINERY. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    A collaborative test was run of the revised Method 11 procedures that was developed in Volume I. Ten collaborators were selected from a total of 24 interested organizations. Part of the screening process was to require each potential collaborator to analyze a set of liquid sample...

  2. MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF REFINERY AND SYNFUELS VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) EMISSION DATA. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT AND APPENDIX A

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a model for estimating emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petroleum refineries and synfuel plants. The model, responding to a need to define a consistent and comprehensive approach for estimating VOC emissions from these tw...

  3. MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF REFINERY AND SYNFUELS VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) EMISSION DATA. VOLUME 2. APPENDICES B AND C

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a model for estimating emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petroleum refineries and synfuel plants. The model, responding to a need to define a consistent and comprehensive approach for estimating VOC emissions from these tw...

  4. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  5. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  6. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  7. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-04-23

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  8. 2. NORTHEAST CORNER OF LARD REFINERY (CONNECTING BUILDING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. NORTHEAST CORNER OF LARD REFINERY (CONNECTING BUILDING ON THE RIGHT) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Lard Refinery, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  9. 3. FOURTH FLOOR OF LARD REFINERY (NOTICE ORIGINAL WOODEN BEAMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FOURTH FLOOR OF LARD REFINERY (NOTICE ORIGINAL WOODEN BEAMS AND UNDATED LARD PRESS AND VATS ON RIGHT SIDE) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Lard Refinery, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  10. Synergies between bio- and oil refineries for the production of fuels from biomass.

    PubMed

    Huber, George W; Corma, Avelino

    2007-01-01

    As petroleum prices continue to increase, it is likely that biofuels will play an ever-increasing role in our energy future. The processing of biomass-derived feedstocks (including cellulosic, starch- and sugar-derived biomass, and vegetable fats) by catalytic cracking and hydrotreating is a promising alternative for the future to produce biofuels, and the existing infrastructure of petroleum refineries is well-suited for the production of biofuels, allowing us to rapidly transition to a more sustainable economy without large capital investments for new reaction equipment. This Review discusses the chemistry, catalysts, and challenges involved in the production of biofuels. PMID:17610226

  11. Effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, S. ); Sengar, R.M.S. ); Mittal, S.; Bhattacharjee, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Algal species (65) were isolated from oil refinery effluent. Twenty-five of these species were cultured in Benecke's medium in a growth chamber, along with controls. Retardation in algal growth, inhibition in algal photosynthesis, and discoloration was observed in petroleum enriched medium. Few forms, viz. Cyclotella sp., Cosmarium sp., and Merismopedia sp. could not survive. The lag phase lengthened by several days and slope of exponential phase was also depressed. Chlamydomonas sp., Scenedesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus sp., Nitzschia sp. and Navicula sp. were comparatively susceptible to petroleum. Depression in carbon fixation, cell numbers, and total dry algal mass was noticeable, showing toxicity to both diatoms and green algae.

  12. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  14. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  15. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  16. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  17. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  18. Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Petroleum Refining.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, William Gale

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the analysis presented here is improved recovery (and use) of waste heat at existing petroleum refineries. The major energy-conservation opportunities associated with waste heat are systematically examined both physically and in terms of cost. The opportunities at the Study Refinery are systematically examined in detail. The presentation begins with an overview of the processes carried out in contemporary petroleum refineries including discussion of typical energy use. There follows a brief thermodynamic description of refinery energy flows with an emphasis on heat and on energy-efficiency analysis. The heart of the thesis is Chapters 3-5 describing heat recovery opportunities involving, respectively: extraction and use of heat from combustion gases being discharged through stacks, the exchange of heat between product streams, and uses for low-temperature waste heat. In Chapter 6, a unifying economic concept is introduced (with details in the Appendix): a "supply curve" for saved energy. This describes the potential rate of energy savings in barrels of oil-equivalent per year (in analogy with production capacity of oil or gas fields), as a function of the cost of saved energy in dollars per barrel (in analogy with the production cost of energy). The nature of the distribution is, of course, for the cost of saved energy to increase with increasing energy savings. In this chapter, estimates are presented for the energy conservation opportunities other than waste heat at the Study Refinery. All the opportunities are then summarized in a single supply curve. The extraordinary result in a cost-effective opportunity to reduce refinery energy use by some 26% at 1984 prices. This translates into roughly a 1 energy-cost reduction per 42-gallon barrel of petroleum input. Of course, investments are required; the net benefit would be about 1.5 cents per gallon of product. This would be a major benefit in relation to typical refinery earnings. The concluding

  19. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses

  20. 40 CFR 80.1141 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small refinery exemption. 80.1141... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1141 Small refinery exemption... parties under this subpart if that refinery meets the definition of a small refinery under §...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1141 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small refinery exemption. 80.1141... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1141 Small refinery exemption... parties under this subpart if that refinery meets the definition of a small refinery under §...

  2. Dutch refinery nears completion of major renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1997-03-17

    Shell Nederland Raffinaderij B.V. has completed construction of a major upgrade at its refinery in Pernis, The Netherlands. The project, called PER+, centers around the addition of Shell Gasification Hydrogen Process (SGHP) and hydrocracking units. The expansion will increase the complexity of Shell`s Dutch refinery and enable it to convert low-value streams to useful products such as cleaner-burning transportation fuels, hydrogen, and electricity. PER+ is a prime example of the kind of innovative planning necessary for European refineries to stay competitive in a tough market. The project reached mechanical completion early this year, and is scheduled to start up in May. The paper describes the refinery, project objectives, process options, the SGHP process, soot ash removal, syngas treatment, power and hydrogen production, environmental issues, and construction.

  3. Health Risk Assessments for Alumina Refineries

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe contemporary air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment methodologies applied to alumina refineries and to summarize recent results. Methods: Air dispersion models using emission source and meteorological data have been used to assess ground-level concentrations (GLCs) of refinery emissions. Short-term (1-hour and 24-hour average) GLCs and annual average GLCs have been used to assess acute health, chronic health, and incremental carcinogenic risks. Results: The acute hazard index can exceed 1 close to refineries, but it is typically less than 1 at neighboring residential locations. The chronic hazard index is typically substantially less than 1. The incremental carcinogenic risk is typically less than 10−6. Conclusions: The risks of acute health effects are adequately controlled, and the risks of chronic health effects and incremental carcinogenic risks are negligible around referenced alumina refineries. PMID:24806721

  4. Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions. The production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level. This report is organized as follows: Chapter 2, Model Purpose; Chapter 3, Model Overview and Rationale; Chapter 4, Model Structure; Appendix A, Inventory of Input Data, Parameter Estimates, and Model Outputs; Appendix B, Detailed Mathematical Description of the Model; Appendix C, Bibliography; Appendix D, Model Abstract; Appendix E, Data Quality; Appendix F, Estimation methodologies; Appendix G, Matrix Generator documentation; Appendix H, Historical Data Processing; and Appendix I, Biofuels Supply Submodule.

  5. Recovering selenium from copper refinery slimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, Olli; Lindroos, Leo; Yllö, Erkki

    1989-07-01

    The selenium contained within copper refinery slimes may be recovered advantageously by roasting at about 600°C. While roasting in air is inefficient, roasting in a sulfating atmosphere enables practically complete selenium recovery. Based on laboratory tests, a new selenium recovery process was adopted at Outokumpu Copper Refinery. In this process, sulfation is achieved by feeding sulfur dioxide and oxygen into the roasting furnace.

  6. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  7. The potential for low petroleum gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.; Webb, G.M.; Clauson, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Energy Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace at least 30 percent of the projected consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. The Act also requires the Secretary to determine the greenhouse gas implications of the use of replacement fuels. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including certain alcohols, ethers, and other components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the cost and refinery impacts for production of {open_quotes}low petroleum{close_quotes} gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and a major contributor to cost increase is investment in processes to produce and etherify light olefins. High oxygenation can also increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon of gasoline, and with greenhouse gas emissions changes between a 3 percent increase and a 16 percent decrease. Crude oil reduction, with decreased dependence on foreign sources, is a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program. For year-round gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components, crude oil use is reduced by 10 to 12 percent, at a cost $48 to $89 per barrel. Depending upon resolution of uncertainties about extrapolation of the Environmental Protection Agency Complex Model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues, costs could be lower or higher.

  8. A Comparative Assessment of Resource Efficiency in Petroleum Refining

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeongwoo; Forman, G; Elgowainy, Amgad; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael; Divita, V

    2015-10-01

    Because of increasing environmental and energy security concerns, a detailed understanding of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the petroleum refining industry is critical for fair and equitable energy and environmental policies. To date, this has proved challenging due in part to the complex nature and variability within refineries. In an effort to simplify energy and emissions refinery analysis, we delineated LP modeling results from 60 large refineries from the US and EU into broad categories based on crude density (API gravity) and heavy product (HP) yields. Product-specific efficiencies and process fuel shares derived from this study were incorporated in Argonne National Laboratory's GREET life-cycle model, along with regional upstream GHG intensities of crude, natural gas and electricity specific to the US and EU regions. The modeling results suggest that refineries that process relatively heavier crude inputs and have lower yields of HPs generally have lower energy efficiencies and higher GHG emissions than refineries that run lighter crudes with lower yields of HPs. The former types of refineries tend to utilize energy-intensive units which are significant consumers of utilities (heat and electricity) and hydrogen. Among the three groups of refineries studied, the major difference in the energy intensities is due to the amount of purchased natural gas for utilities and hydrogen, while the sum of refinery feed inputs are generally constant. These results highlight the GHG emissions cost a refiner pays to process deep into the barrel to produce more of the desirable fuels with low carbon to hydrogen ratio. (c) 2015 Argonne National Laboratory. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. 77 FR 56421 - Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries; Standards of Performance for Petroleum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... heaters on June 24, 2008. This action also lifts the stay that was granted on September 26, 2008 (73 FR 55751) and extended until further notice on December 22, 2008 (73 FR 78552) on the provisions at issue... system of emission reduction'' or BSER in its rulemaking packages. See, e.g., 76 FR 52738, 52740...

  10. Analysis of nickel refinery dusts.

    PubMed

    Draper, M H; Duffus, J H; John, P; Metcalfe, L; Morgan, L; Park, M V; Weitzner, M I

    1994-06-01

    After characterization of bulk samples by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopic (ICP-ES) quantitative analysis and X-ray powder diffraction studies, single particle techniques using quantitative image analysis, scanning electron microscopy--energy dispersive analysis by X-ray, and finally laser beam ionization mass spectrometry analysis (LIMA) for surface analysis have been applied to historical nickel refinery dust samples from the nickel refining plant at Clydach in Wales. There were two historical samples of processed material from 1920 and 1929. These samples had a remarkably small particle size range, mean 3 microns and range, 0.75-24 microns. The most significant difference in elemental composition was the presence of 10% arsenic in the 1920 sample compared with 1% in the 1929 sample. The X-ray spectra revealed the presence of NiO in both. However, surprisingly, CuO was identified only in the 1929 sample. Of particular interest was the presence of a component, in the 1920 sample only, identified as the mineral orcelite, a copper-iron-nickel-arsenide-sulphide mineral, predominantly, Ni5-XAs2. Using the LIMA technique, it was found that in both samples, arsenic and arsenic derivative peaks are prominent, indicating the surface availability of arsenic compounds. PMID:8029701

  11. Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J.; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K.

    1997-05-10

    The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

  12. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 2: Data and technical bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The FORTRAN computing program predicts the flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuel of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case. The report has sufficient detail for the information of most readers.

  13. Measuring, managing and maximizing refinery performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bascur, O.A.; Kennedy, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Implementing continuous quality improvement is a confluence of total quality management, people empowerment, performance indicators and information engineering. Supporting information technologies allow a refiner to narrow the gap between management objectives and the process control level. Dynamic performance monitoring benefits come from production cost savings, improved communications and enhanced decision making. A refinery workgroup information flow model helps automate continuous improvement of processes, performance and the organization. The paper discusses the rethinking of refinery operations, dynamic performance monitoring, continuous process improvement, the knowledge coordinator and repository manager, an integrated plant operations workflow, and successful implementation.

  14. A 39-year follow-up of the U.K. oil refinery and distribution center studies: results for kidney cancer and leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents briefly some of the principal results of a mortality analysis of a cohort of workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1975 at eight oil refineries and approximately 750 distribution centers in the U.K., together with detailed results for kidney cancer and leukemia. Over 99% of the workers were successfully traced. Their mortality was compared with that of all males in the national population. The mortality from all causes of death is lower than that of the comparison population in both studies, and reduced mortality is also found for many of the major nonmalignant causes of death. In the refinery study, some increased mortality patterns are found for diseases of the arteries, and no healthy worker effect is found in the distribution center study for ischemic heart disease. Mortality from all neoplasms is lower than expected overall in both studies, largely due to a deficit of deaths from malignant neoplasm of the lung. Mortality from malignant neoplasm of the kidney is increased overall in the distribution center study, and in drivers in particular. The mortality from this disease increases with increased time since first exposure. The observed deaths from leukemia are slightly less than expected in the refinery study and slightly more than expected in the distribution center study. One refinery shows increased mortality due to in myeloid leukemia, and mortality is increased among refinery operators. Mortality is also raised in distribution center drivers, particularly for myeloid leukemias, including acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:8020451

  15. A 39-year follow-up of the U.K. oil refinery and distribution center studies: Results for kidney cancer and leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rushton, L.

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents briefly some of the principal results of a mortality analysis of a cohort of workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1975 at eight oil refineries and approximately 750 distribution centers in the U.K, together with detailed results for kidney cancer and leukemia. Over 99% of the workers were successfully traced. Their mortality was compared with that of all males in the national population. The mortality from all causes of death is lower than that of the comparison population in both studies, and reduced mortality is also found for many of the major nonmalignant causes of death. In the refinery study, some increased mortality patterns are found for diseases of the arteries, and no healthy worker effect is found in the distribution center study for ischemic heart disease. Mortality from all neoplasms is lower than expected overall in both studies, largely due to a deficit of deaths from malignant neoplasm of the lung. Mortality from malignant neoplasm of the kidney is increased overall in the distribution center study, and in drivers in particular. The mortality from this disease increases with increased time since first exposure. The observed deaths from leukemia are slightly less than expected in the refinery study and slightly more than expected in the distribution center study. One refinery shows increased mortality due to in myeloid leukemia, and mortality is increased among refinery operators. Mortality is also raised in distribution center drivers, particularly for myeloid leukemias, including acute myeloid leukemia. 71 refs., 9 tabs.

  16. 40 CFR 80.1441 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) of this section. (6) Refiners who own refineries that qualified as small under 40 CFR 80.1141 do not... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small refinery exemption. 80.1441... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1441 Small refinery...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1441 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) of this section. (6) Refiners who own refineries that qualified as small under 40 CFR 80.1141 do not... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small refinery exemption. 80.1441... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1441 Small refinery...

  18. Determination of silicon in petroleum products by ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, S.G.; Williams, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    The determination of silicon in petroleum and related products is an important issue due to the effects it has in its various compound forms. Silicone fluids are used in many lubricants as foam inhibitors and serve a vital function as performance additives. Likewise, silicates are used in coolant formulations. The beneficial effects of these additives can be seen at very low treatment levels. Silicon can also occur as an unwanted contaminant in refined products as carryover of foam inhibitor used in refinery units or as silica deposited as fines from catalyst supports. Silicon compounds can poison refinery catalysts and their presence in certain products can ruin machinery. Traditionally, the presence of foam inhibitor in lubricants has been indicated by a foam test (ASTMD 8924P 146) rather than by spectroscopic determination of silicon. Aspects of determining silicon by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy in petroleum and related products will be presented.

  19. Risk of Asthmatic Episodes in Children Exposed to Sulfur Dioxide Stack Emissions from a Refinery Point Source in Montreal, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Smargiassi, Audrey; Kosatsky, Tom; Hicks, John; Plante, Céline; Armstrong, Ben; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Goudreau, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the respiratory effects of short-term exposures to petroleum refinery emissions in young children. This study is an extension of an ecologic study that found an increased rate of hospitalizations for respiratory conditions among children living near petroleum refineries in Montreal (Canada). Methods We used a time-stratified case–crossover design to assess the risk of asthma episodes in relation to short-term variations in sulfur dioxide levels among children 2–4 years of age living within 0.5–7.5 km of the refinery stacks. Health data used to measure asthma episodes included emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions from 1996 to 2004. We estimated daily levels of SO2 at the residence of children using a) two fixed-site SO2 monitors located near the refineries and b) the AERMOD (American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model) atmospheric dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios associated with an increase in the interquartile range of daily SO2 mean and peak exposures (31.2 ppb for AERMOD peaks). We adjusted for temperature, relative humidity, and regional/urban background air pollutant levels. Results The risks of asthma ED visits and hospitalizations were more pronounced for same-day (lag 0) SO2 peak levels than for mean levels on the same day, or for other lags: the adjusted odds ratios estimated for same-day SO2 peak levels from AERMOD were 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00–1.22] and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.82), over the interquartile range, for ED visits and hospital admissions, respectively. Conclusions Short-term episodes of increased SO2 exposures from refinery stack emissions were associated with a higher number of asthma episodes in nearby children. PMID:19440507

  20. Prospective morbidity surveillance of Shell refinery and petrochemical employees.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S P; Dowd, C M; Cowles, S R; Ross, C E

    1991-03-01

    Results for a prospective morbidity study of 14,170 refinery and chemical workers from 1981 through 1988 are presented. Illness/absence data for this study were extracted from the morbidity section of the Shell Health Surveillance System which includes records of all illness/absences in excess of five days. Age adjusted annual morbidity frequency rates and annual durations of absence are presented by age, sex, job, and work status. Generally, rates and durations of absence were highest for older age groups, women, and production workers. Increased risk was associated with the presence of known disease risk factors. Overall, 48% of the employees had at least one illness/absence in excess of five days during the eight year period. Twelve per cent of the employees had four or more absences, which accounted for 54% of the total number of absences and 52% of the total work days lost. Among men, the five most common conditions accounted for 72% of all illness/absences. In descending order they were injuries (25%), respiratory illnesses (17%), musculoskeletal disorders (14%), digestive illnesses (9%), and heart disease (7%). Similar patterns were noted among women. These findings may be useful in setting priorities and directing efforts such as health education programmes and other strategies for the prevention of disease. PMID:2015205

  1. Exergoeconomic analysis of a refinery`s utilities plant: Part II-improvement proposals

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, R.; Hernandez, R.

    1996-12-31

    A crude oil refinery normally consumes a large amount of energy, not only in the form of the combustion of fossil fuels in the process units, but also in the associated Utilities Plant which produces process steam at different pressure levels and electricity. Energy losses of the utilities plant represent some 40 % of the total refinery`s energy losses. It is then extremely important to evaluate the performance of this plant and the costs to be assigned to the production of steam and electricity as a supplier of energy to the process units. This paper presents the improvement proposals generated by the application of an exergoeconomic analysis to the Utilities Plant of an existing 150,000 BPD crude oil refinery. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  3. The Use of Oil Refinery Wastes as a Dust Suppression Surfactant for Use in Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon-Hardy, D.W.; Beyhan, S.; Ediz, I.G.; Erarslan, K.

    2008-10-15

    In this research, the suitability of a selection of petroleum refinery wastes as a dust suppressant were examined. Dust is a significant problem in surface and underground mining mainly because of its adverse effects on human health and machinery. Hence, dust control and suppression is a vital part of mine planning for mining engineers. Water is the oldest and the cheapest suppressant in dealing with the mine dusts. However, surfactant use has recently been used for a wider range of applications in the mining industry. In order to carry out laboratory experiments, a dust chamber was designed and manufactured. The chamber has an inlet for coal dust entrance and a nozzle for spraying water and the oil refinery wastes. Water and the surfactants were mixed at various ratios and then sprayed onto the coal dusts within the cell. Dust concentration was measured systematically to determine the effects of surfactant containing solution on the coal dust and the data obtained by the measurements were analyzed. The results showed that the oil refinery wastes could be used as a dust suppressant, which may create an economical utilization for the wastes concerned.

  4. TPH-contaminated Mexican refinery soil: health risk assessment and the first year of changes.

    PubMed

    Iturbe, Rosario; Flores, Rosa M; Flores, Carlos R; Torres, Luis G

    2004-02-01

    The soil of a coastal Mexican refinery is quite contaminated, especially by hydrocarbons, with detected concentrations up to 130000 mg kg(-1) as TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons). The main sources of contamination are pipelines, valves, and old storage tanks, besides the land disposal of untreated hydrocarbon sediments derived from the cleaning of storage tanks. A health risk assessment (HRA) was carried out in order to measure the risk hazard indexes and clean-up standards for the refinery soil. HRA suggested the following actions to be taken: benzene concentrations must be reduced in eight of the 16 studied refinery zones to 0.0074-0.0078 mg kg(-1). Also, vanadium concentration must be reduced in two zones up to a concentration of 100 mg kg(-1). In only one of all of the studied zones, benzo(a)pyrene concentration must be reduced to 0.1 mg kg(-1). After 1 yr, TPHs showed a diminution of about 52%. Even though TPHs concentrations were variable, during 1999 the average concentrations were as much as 15.5 times the goal concentration. For year 2000, TPHs concentrations were only 7.4-fold the proposed value. For the 1999-2000 period, PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) concentrations decreased by 82%. Some PAHs with 2, 3, 4, and 5 aromatic rings were removed up to 100% values. PMID:14969447

  5. [Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill) biomass refinery engineering].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Wang, Ning; Li, Tan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill) is an abundant and widely distributed Chinese native plant. Sumac fruit contains low content of vegetable oil, as an atypical oil plants hardly being processed through traditional vegetable oil production technologies. Based on our own studies on the characteristics of sumac fruit and branches, we established a novel model of sumac biomass refinery, and constructed the sumac biomass refinery technology system and eco-industrial chain integration. Steam explosion was the key technology, and several components fractionation technologies were integrated in the sumac biomass refinery system. The fractionated components were converted into different products depending on their functional features. Eight products including sumac fruit oil, biodiesel, protein feed, flavonoids, unbleached facial tissue, phenolic resin, biomass briquette and biogas were produced in the refinery. The extracted sumac fruit oil by steam explosion pretreatment was applied for the new food resource of Ministry of Health, and the permit was approved. This research provides a new model for the development of atypical wild plant resources. PMID:25118393

  6. Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    The Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery (ICBR) process will use new technology to convert corn grain and stover into fermentable sugars for the parallel production of value-added chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (PDO) and fuel ethanol.

  7. Use of refinery computer model to predict fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    Several factors (crudes, refinery operation and specifications) that affect yields and properties of broad specification jet fuel were parameterized using the refinery simulation model which can simulate different types of refineries were used to make the calculations. Results obtained from the program are used to correlate yield as a function of final boiling point, hydrogen content and freezing point for jet fuels produced in two refinery configurations, each one processing a different crude mix. Refinery performances are also compared in terms of energy consumption.

  8. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil From Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Michael; Marker, Terry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Wangerow, Jim; Swanson, Dan; McLeod, Celeste; Del Paggio, Alan; Urade, Vikrant; Rao, Madhusudhan; Narasimhan, Laxmi; Gephart, John; Starr, Jack; Hahn, John; Stover, Daniel; Parrish, Martin; Maxey, Carl; Shonnard, David; Handler, Robert; Fan, Jiquig

    2015-08-31

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be converted to bio-oils containing less than 10% oxygen by a hydropyrolysis process. Hydropyrolysis is the first step in Gas Technology Institute’s (GTI) integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion IH2®. These intermediate bio-oils can then be converted to drop-in hydrocarbon fuels using existing refinery hydrotreating equipment to make hydrocarbon blending components, which are fully compatible with existing fuels. Alternatively, cellulosic or woody biomass can directly be converted into drop-in hydrocarbon fuels containing less than 0.4% oxygen using the IH2 process located adjacent to a refinery or ethanol production facility. Many US oil refineries are actually located near biomass resources and are a logical location for a biomass to transportation fuel conversion process. The goal of this project was to work directly with an oil refinery partner, to determine the most attractive route and location for conversion of biorenewables to drop in fuels in their refinery and ethanol production network. Valero Energy Company, through its subsidiaries, has 12 US oil refineries and 11 ethanol production facilities, making them an ideal partner for this analysis. Valero is also part of a 50- 50 joint venture with Darling Ingredients called Diamond Green Diesel. Diamond Green Diesel’s production capacity is approximately 11,000 barrels per day of renewable diesel. The plant is located adjacent to Valero’s St Charles, Louisiana Refinery and converts recycled animal fats, used cooking oil, and waste corn oil into renewable diesel. This is the largest renewable diesel plant in the U.S. and has successfully operated for over 2 years For this project, 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oil from wood and 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oils from corn stover were produced. The hydropyrolysis oil produced had 4-10% oxygen. Metallurgical testing of hydropyrolysis liquids was completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories (Oak Ridge) and showed the

  9. The US petroleum refining industry in the 1980's

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-11

    As part of the EIA program on petroleum, The US Petroleum Refining Industry in the 1980's, presents a historical analysis of the changes that took place in the US petroleum refining industry during the 1980's. It is intended to be of interest to analysts in the petroleum industry, state and federal government officials, Congress, and the general public. The report consists of six chapters and four appendices. Included is a detailed description of the major events and factors that affected the domestic refining industry during this period. Some of the changes that took place in the 1980's are the result of events that started in the 1970's. The impact of these events on US refinery configuration, operations, economics, and company ownership are examined. 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Some aspects of the structure of petroleum asphaltenes

    SciTech Connect

    Speight, J.G.; Pancirov, R.J.

    1983-09-01

    Projected shortages of liquid fuels have led refineries to look deeper into the barrel for further sources of hydrocarbon liquids. Thus, the heavy ends of petroleum are assuming a popularity never before imagined. It is, however, the misfortune of these heavier fractions to be rich in the asphaltene portion of petroleum. In short, the asphaltenes are not very amenable to refinery processes and usually are responsible for catalyst destruction and coke lay-down. Thus, a considerable effort has been applied to defining asphaltenes in terms of structural and functional moieties on the presumption that knowledge of the structure will assist in the design of suitable conversion sequences in the refinery. The molecular nature of the asphaltene fractions of petroleum and bitumens has been the subject of numerous investigations but determining the actual structures of the constituents of the asphaltene fraction has proved to be difficult. It is, no doubt, the great complexity of the asphaltene fraction that has hindered the formulation of the individual molecular structures. Nevertheless, the various investigations have brought to light some significant facts about asphaltene structure; there are indications that asphaltenes consist of condensed aromatic nuclei that carry alkyl and alicyclic systems with hetero-elements (i.e., nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur) scattered throughout in various, including heterocyclic, locations.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC EMISSIONS FROM PETROLEUM REFINING: VOLUME 3. APPENDIX B

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a 3-year program to assess the environmental impact of petroleum refining atmospheric emissions. This volume contains a detailed compilation of the data and a summary of the results obtained from measurements taken at 13 refineries throughout the U.S. ...

  12. ASSESSMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC EMISSIONS FROM PETROLEUM REFINING: VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a 3-year program to assess the environmental impact of petroleum refining atmospheric emissions. Fugitive process emissions were extensively sampled at 13 refineries in the U.S. Nonmethane hydrocarbon emission rates were measured from valves, flanges, ...

  13. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  14. Prebiotic petroleum.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mekki-Berrada

    2014-12-01

    This short communication summarizes a global and continuous reflection on the origins of life. "Prebiotic Petroleum" assumes that "the class of most complex molecules of life that may have geochemical and abiotic origin is the class of fatty acids with long aliphatic chains" and proposes a physical process for the formation of liposomes. Developments following the workshop start from the idea that the liposomes also acquire ion exchange channels physically during their forming process. PMID:25743765

  15. Prebiotic Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mekki-Berrada

    2014-12-01

    This short communication summarizes a global and continuous reflection on the origins of life. "Prebiotic Petroleum" assumes that " the class of most complex molecules of life that may have geochemical and abiotic origin is the class of fatty acids with long aliphatic chains" and proposes a physical process for the formation of liposomes. Developments following the workshop start from the idea that the liposomes also acquire ion exchange channels physically during their forming process.

  16. Fate and effect of naphthenic acids on oil refinery activated sludge wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Teresa; Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex group of alkyl-substituted acyclic, monocyclic and polycyclic carboxylic acids present in oil sands process waters, crude oil, refinery wastewater and petroleum products. Crude oil, desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent refinery samples were received from six United States refineries. The total acid number (TAN) of the six crudes tested ranged from 0.12 to 1.5 mg KOH/g crude oil and correlated to the total NA concentration in the crudes. The total NA concentration in the desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent samples ranged from 4.2 to 40.4, 4.5 to 16.6, 9.6 to 140.3 and 2.8 to 11.6 mg NA/L, respectively. The NAs in all wastewater streams accounted for less than 16% of the total COD, indicating that many other organic compounds are present and that NAs are a minor component in refinery wastewaters. Susceptibility tests showed that none of the activated sludge heterotrophic microcosms was completely inhibited by NAs up to 400 mg/L. Growth inhibition ranging from 10 to 59% was observed in all microcosms at and above 100 mg NA/L. NAs chronically-sorbed to activated sludge mixed liquor biomass and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were recalcitrant and persistent. More than 80% of the total NAs remained in the solid phase at the end of the 10-day desorption period (five successive desorption steps). Throughout a 90-day incubation period, the total NA concentration decreased by 33 and 51% in PAC-free and PAC-containing mixed liquor microcosms, respectively. The lower molecular weight fraction of NAs was preferentially degraded in both mixed liquors. The persistence of the residual, higher molecular weight NAs is likely a combination of molecular recalcitrance and decreased bioavailability when chronically-sorbed to the biomass and/or PAC. PMID:23141768

  17. Impact of software and hardware technologies on occupational health and safety policies in Saudi Arabian oil refineries.

    PubMed

    Idreis, Hany M; Siqueira, Carlos E; Levenstein, Charles C

    2006-01-01

    This article seeks to examine the impact of technology importation on occupational health and safety in both Saudi Arabian and U.S. oil refining industries. Technologies imported to the Saudi oil industry take two forms: hardware (sophisticated equipment to run oil facilities) and software (policies and regulations pertaining to workers' health and safety, and employment rights installed by Aramco's founding multinational companies). This study utilizes qualitative, historically oriented, cross-national case studies to compare and assess workers' health, safety, and rights in Saudi Aramco with its U.S. counterpart, Motiva Enterprises. Two facilities were chosen to conduct field research: the Saudi Aramco oil refinery at Jeddah and Motiva's refinery at Port Arthur, Texas. The Jeddah refinery is fully owned by Saudi Aramco, thus, representing Aramco's health and safety policies and regulations. The Port Arthur refinery serves as a reference case study for U.S. oil refining facilities. The aspects of occupational health and safety in Saudi Aramco--ExxonMobil's joint ventures SAMREF and LUBREF--also are discussed to examine workers' health policies in both companies. The American oil industry made a significant contribution in establishing the Saudi oil industry, with the cooperation of the Saudi government. Despite having outstanding employment benefits schemes in Saudi Aramco, the presence of an organized work force better serves employee participation in Motiva than in Aramco. Safety systems such as Process Safety Management (PSM)--applied in Motiva--partially exist in Aramco to operate hardware technologies safely. Motiva training systems are better through PACE's Triangle of Prevention (TOP). Both companies follow the same pattern of handling occupational injuries and diseases; however, Saudi government agencies (GOSI) are responsible for compensating and treating injured workers. Saudi workers expressed conditional support for the worker committee program

  18. [Occupational exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) at an oil refinery].

    PubMed

    Perbellini, L; Pasini, F; Prigioni, P; Rosina, A

    2003-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is widely used as an additive to gasoline, to increase oxygen content and reduce tailpipe emission of carbon monoxide. Our research dealt with 37 refinery workers in order to measure their occupational exposure to MTBE during two different seasonal periods. They provided blood and urine samples before and after a work shift during which they wore an active charcoal sampler for solvents. All samples were analysed by a gas-chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometer detector. The concentration in air of MTBE was very low (median: 25 micrograms/m3 in spring and 5 micrograms/m3 in autumn). The blood and urine concentrations of MTBE at the end of the work shift were higher than those found before the shift. The increment in biological samples confirmed a small intake of MTBE by refinery workers: the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to this solvent yielded reliable results. Blood and urinary concentrations of MTBE obtained from workers split in relation to their smoking habit did not give a statistic significance to say that cigarette smoke is not a confusion factor in monitoring exposure to MTBE. PMID:14979074

  19. Petroleum coke in the urban environment: a review of potential health effects.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Joseph A; Zhang, Kezhong; Schroeck, Nicholas J; McCoy, Benjamin; McElmurry, Shawn P

    2015-06-01

    Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a granular coal-like industrial by-product that is separated during the refinement of heavy crude oil. Recently, the processing of material from Canadian oil sands in U.S. refineries has led to the appearance of large petcoke piles adjacent to urban communities in Detroit and Chicago. The purpose of this literature review is to assess what is known about the effects of petcoke exposure on human health. Toxicological studies in animals indicate that dermal or inhalation petcoke exposure does not lead to a significant risk for cancer development or reproductive and developmental effects. However, pulmonary inflammation was observed in long-term inhalation exposure studies. Epidemiological studies in coke oven workers have shown increased risk for cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, but these studies are confounded by multiple industrial exposures, most notably to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are generated during petcoke production. The main threat to urban populations in the vicinity of petcoke piles is most likely fugitive dust emissions in the form of fine particulate matter. More research is required to determine whether petcoke fine particulate matter causes or exacerbates disease, either alone or in conjunction with other environmental contaminants. PMID:26035666

  20. Petroleum Coke in the Urban Environment: A Review of Potential Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Joseph A.; Zhang, Kezhong; Schroeck, Nicholas J.; McCoy, Benjamin; McElmurry, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a granular coal-like industrial by-product that is separated during the refinement of heavy crude oil. Recently, the processing of material from Canadian oil sands in U.S. refineries has led to the appearance of large petcoke piles adjacent to urban communities in Detroit and Chicago. The purpose of this literature review is to assess what is known about the effects of petcoke exposure on human health. Toxicological studies in animals indicate that dermal or inhalation petcoke exposure does not lead to a significant risk for cancer development or reproductive and developmental effects. However, pulmonary inflammation was observed in long-term inhalation exposure studies. Epidemiological studies in coke oven workers have shown increased risk for cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, but these studies are confounded by multiple industrial exposures, most notably to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are generated during petcoke production. The main threat to urban populations in the vicinity of petcoke piles is most likely fugitive dust emissions in the form of fine particulate matter. More research is required to determine whether petcoke fine particulate matter causes or exacerbates disease, either alone or in conjunction with other environmental contaminants. PMID:26035666

  1. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  2. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  3. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  4. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  5. TRACE ORGANICS VARIATION ACROSS THE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM OF A CLASS-B REFINERY AND ESTIMATE OF REMOVAL OF REFRACTORY ORGANICS BY ADD-ON MIXED-MEDIA FILTRATION AND GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON AT PILOT SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of research to evaluate the efficiency of pilot-scale granular activated carbon for the removal of organic compounds refractory to the activated-sludge treatment system of a Class B petroleum refinery that met BPT ('best practicable technology') i...

  6. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  7. Occupational exposure to carbon/coke fibers in plants that produce green or calcined petroleum coke and potential health effects: 2. Fiber concentrations.

    PubMed

    Maxim, L Daniel; Galvin, Jennifer B; Niebo, Ron; Segrave, Alan M; Kampa, Otto A; Utell, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    We monitored exposure to various fibers among workers in eight plants operated by ConocoPhillips that produce green or calcined petroleum coke. Carbon/coke and other fibers, including calcium silicate, cellulose, gypsum, and iron silicate, were found in occupational samples. Carbon/coke fibers were found in bulk samples of calcined petroleum coke, the probable source of these fibers in occupational samples. Time-weighted average (TWA) total fiber concentrations were approximately lognormally distributed; 90% were < or = 0.1 f/ml. Although consistently low, TWA total fiber concentrations varied with plant, job (tasks), and type of coke. This was expected given the substantial differences in plant configuration, technology, and workplace practices among refineries and carbon plants. Carbon/coke fibers (identified and measured using transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) were found at all plants producing all types of calcined coke and not detected at any plant producing only green coke. Approximately 98% of all carbon/coke TWAs were < or = 0.1 f/ml. Analysis of task length average (TLA) data by various statistical techniques indicates that the average carbon/coke TLA is certainly < or = 0.05 f/ml and probably < 0.03 f/ml. PMID:16326398

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement in the Petroleum RefiningIndustry

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-05-01

    Information has proven to be an important barrier inindustrial energy efficiency improvement. Voluntary government programsaim to assist industry to improve energy efficiency by supplyinginformation on opportunities. ENERGY STAR(R) supports the development ofstrong strategic corporate energy management programs, by providingenergy management information tools and strategies. This paper summarizesENERGY STAR research conducted to develop an Energy Guide for thePetroleum Refining industry. Petroleum refining in the United States isthe largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually every economicsector, including the transport sector and the chemical industry.Refineries spend typically 50 percent of the cash operating costs (e.g.,excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy amajor cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction.The petroleum refining industry consumes about 3.1 Quads of primaryenergy, making it the single largest industrial energy user in the UnitedStates. Typically, refineries can economically improve energy efficiencyby 20 percent. The findings suggest that given available resources andtechnology, there are substantial opportunities to reduce energyconsumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry whilemaintaining the quality of the products manufactured.

  9. EIA model documentation: Petroleum market model of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-28

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions, the production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level.

  10. Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-18

    This report contains the following: Bibliography; Petroleum Market Model abstract; Data quality; Estimation methodologies (includes refinery investment recovery thresholds, gas plant models, chemical industry demand for methanol, estimation of refinery fixed costs, estimation of distribution costs, estimation of taxes gasoline specifications, estimation of gasoline market shares, estimation of low-sulfur diesel market shares, low-sulfur diesel specifications, estimation of regional conversion coefficients, estimation of SO{sub 2} allowance equations, unfinished oil imports methodology, product pipeline capacities and tariffs, cogeneration methodology, natural gas plant fuel consumption, and Alaskan crude oil exports); Matrix generator documentation; Historical data processing; and Biofuels supply submodule.

  11. Further follow up of mortality in a United Kingdom oil refinery cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, L

    1993-01-01

    The results of an extension of follow up (1976 to 1989) of a cohort of workers employed for at least one year between 1 January 1950 and 31 December 1975 at eight oil refineries in Britain are reported. Over 99% of the workers were successfully traced to determine their vital status at 31 December 1989. The mortality observed was compared with that expected from the death rates of all the male population of England and Wales and Scotland. The mortality from all causes of death for the total study population was lower than that of the comparison population, and reduced mortality was also found for many of the major non-malignant causes of death. Raised mortality patterns were found for diseases of the arteries, in particular aortic aneurysm, and accidental fire and explosion, for the total study population, and across several refineries and other subgroups. Mortality from all neoplasms was lower than expected overall, largely due to a deficit of deaths from malignant neoplasm of the lung. Raised mortality from all neoplasms was found for labourers and in particular for malignant neoplasms of the oesophagus, stomach, and lung, although the mortality was also high for all men in this social class in the national population. Regional variations may have accounted for some of the high mortality. There were other raised mortality patterns in malignant neoplasms of the intestine, rectum, larynx, and prostate but these tended to be isolated and not consistent across refineries and other subgroups. As in the earlier follow up there was raised mortality from melanoma in several job groups. PMID:8329321

  12. [Analisys of work-related accidents and incidents in an oil refinery in Rio de Janeiro].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos Augusto Vaz; de Freitas, Carlos Machado

    2003-01-01

    Accidents in the chemical industry can have serious consequences for workers, communities, and the environment and are thus highly relevant to public health. This article is the result of an occupational surveillance project involving several public institutions. We analyze 800 work-related accidents that resulted in injuries, environmental damage, or loss of production in 1997 in an oil refinery located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology was based on managerial and organizational approaches to accident investigation, with the European Union reporting system as the reference. The results highlight various limitations in the process of reporting and investigating accidents, as well as a certain hierarchy of accidents, with more attention given to accidents involving loss of production and less to those resulting in injuries, particularly among outsourced workers. PMID:14666211

  13. Multi-Criteria Optimization of Refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, Mikhail Yu.; Sizikov, Aleksandr P.

    2016-02-01

    Vector optimization of refinery is discussed. As the target function, a multi-level hierarchy criterion convolution is used. This convolution is formed following the recurrent procedure based on a scalar invariant representing a linear combination of Hölder norms: the first order norm and the sup-norm. The issue of matrix representation of the suggested invariant has been analyzed; the procedure of building the respective matrix structure has been developed. The approach has been implemented in a respective package of application software programs.

  14. 78 FR 10128 - Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Subzone 70T; Marathon Petroleum Company LP; Detroit, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Marathon Petroleum Company LP refinery in Detroit, Michigan. (B-42-2012, docketed 6/1/2012); Whereas, notice inviting public comment has been given in the Federal Register (77 FR 33716-33717) and the... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Subzone 70T; Marathon...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1621 - Small volume refinery definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... whether the reduction in crude oil capacity is due to operational changes at the refinery or a company....1622: (1) Produces gasoline by processing crude oil through refinery processing units. (2) The average aggregate daily crude oil throughput, including feedstocks derived from crude oil, for the calendar...

  16. 76 FR 52556 - Election To Expense Certain Refineries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... capacity. Section 179C(a) allows a taxpayer to elect to deduct as an expense 50 percent of the cost of any... are recovered under section 168 and section 179B, if applicable. All costs properly capitalized into qualified refinery property are includable in the cost of the qualified refinery property. As...

  17. PROCESSING REFINERY WASTEWATER BY COAGULATION AND FLOTATION FOLLOWING BIOLOGICAL OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amoco Oil Company has a large refinery on the southern shore of Lake Michigan in Whiting, Indiana. It is a Class D refinery, lube subcategory, as classified under the EPA effluent Guidelines in the Federal Register of May 9, 1974. Because of the complexity and size of the refiner...

  18. Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

  19. [Analysis of fluorescence spectrum of petroleum-polluted water].

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Fen; Song, Qing-Jun; Xing, Xu-Feng; Jian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Zu-Long

    2014-09-01

    In four ratio experiments, natural waters, sampled from the mountain reservoir and the sea water around Dalian city, were mixed with the sewage from petroleum refinery and petroleum exploitation plants. The fluorescence spectra of water samples containing only chromophoric dissolved organic matters(CDOM), samples containing only petroleum, and samples containing a mixture of petroleum and CDOM were analyzed, respectively. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a basis for determining the contribution of petroleum substances and CDOM to the total absorption coefficient of the petroleum-contaminated water by using fluorescence technique. The results showed that firstly, CDOM in seawater had three main fluorescence peaks at Ex: 225-230 nm/Em: 320-330 nm, Ex: 280 nm/Em: 340 nm and Ex: 225-240 nm/Em: 430-470 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the oceanic chlorophyll. CDOM in natural reservoir water had two main fluorescence peaks at EX: 240- 260 nm/Em: 420-450 nm and Ex: 310~350 nm/Em: 420--440 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the terrestrial sources; secondly, the water samples containing only petroleum extracted with n-hexane had one to three fluorescence spectral peaksat Ex: 220-240 nm/Em: 320-340 nm, Ex: 270-290 nm/Em: 310-340 nm and Ex: 220-235 nm/Em: 280-310 nm, respectively, caused by their hydrocarbon component; finally, the water samples containing both petroleum and CDOM showed a very strong fluorescence peak at Ex: 230-250 nm/Em: 320-370 nm, caused by the combined effect of CDOM and petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:25532346

  20. Enhanced treatment of refinery soils with open-system slurry reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.W.; Lee, M.K.; Horn, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    Refinery site cleanups of residual hydrocarbons arising from long-term operations have become a concern. Because contaminated soil has been generated over many years from spills of many types of materials, it is often difficult to identify the actual spilled material. Because many of these materials are weathered, the less degradable fractions can predominate, creating a challenge for bioremedial process solutions. Open-system slurry reactors were run with an aged refinery soil after a 6-month period of field bioremediation in which 23% TPH removal resulted. The open system (a system where the liquid medium was replaced daily and the solids were retained in the reactor for 2 weeks) achieved 60 to 80% total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal based on the initial, prefield bioremediation soil concentration. A process concept twice as effective as other bioremediation schemes has been devised that takes advantage of the formation and removal of small black particulate solids in an open or continuous slurry reactor configuration. These small black particles are chemically or biologically produced in the open system and with their small size and low density are easily elutriated from the bioreactor as the liquid medium is changed. A statistically designed experiment has determined optimal values of nutrients, temperature, and mixing.

  1. Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a new German law to encourage foreign workers to return to their home countries, employment exchanges for young foreigners in Germany, and a training program for migrant workers in India. (SK)

  2. Land treatability of refinery and petrochemical sludges. Final report 10 Oct 77-30 Mar 82

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.W.; Deuel, L.E. Jr.; Thomas, J.C.

    1983-08-01

    The land disposal of API separator sludges was investigated with regard to decomposition rates or organic constitutents and the possible impact of these materials on plants and surface water or groundwater quality. Two oily sludges (one from a petroleum refinery and one from a petrochemical plant) were studied as to their phytotoxicity, biodegradability in soils, water-soluble constituents, and field mobility. The water-soluble compounds in both sludges were low indegradability, potentially toxic, and extremely mobile in high concentrations. These results indicate a need for careful managmement of land treatment sites to avoid groundwater contamination. Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) combined with column chromatography is recommended for effective monitoring of oily wastes applied to soils.

  3. Aquatic toxicity variability for fresh- and saltwater species in refinery wastewater effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Bleckmann, C.A.; Rabe, B.; Edgmon, S.J.; Fillingame, D.

    1995-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established test requirements for toxicity reduction or toxicity identification evaluations (TR/TIE) of wastewater effluents. Interpretations of test results are complicated by factors other than toxicity when essentially freshwater wastewaters flow into estuaries and the effluent permit requires marine organisms for testing. This paper reports the results of an investigation of potential freshwater surrogate species, and Microtox{reg_sign}, for use in such a TIE. Of the five species tested, mysid shrimp were found to be most sensitive to unidentified toxicants in petroleum refinery wastewater. No strong correlations of this sensitivity to that of other organisms, or to several wastewater constitutents, were identified. The two marine species specified in the effluent permit were more sensitive to the toxicants that were the freshwater species.

  4. Worker Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    The philosophy and workability of the concept of worker participation in management decisions is discussed in the context of British society. It is recommended that four interests be represented in any kind of Workers' Council: management, workers, shareholders, and consumers. (AG)

  5. Classification of diesel pool refinery streams through near infrared spectroscopy and support vector machines using C-SVC and ν-SVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Julio Cesar L.; Henriques, Claudete B.; Poppi, Ronei J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods have been widely used in petroleum and petrochemical industry and provides suitable methods for process control and quality control. The algorithm support vector machines (SVM) has demonstrated to be a powerful chemometric tool for development of classification models due to its ability to nonlinear modeling and with high generalization capability and these characteristics can be especially important for treating near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of complex mixtures such as petroleum refinery streams. In this work, a study on the performance of the support vector machines algorithm for classification was carried out, using C-SVC and ν-SVC, applied to near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of different types of streams that make up the diesel pool in a petroleum refinery: light gas oil, heavy gas oil, hydrotreated diesel, kerosene, heavy naphtha and external diesel. In addition to these six streams, the diesel final blend produced in the refinery was added to complete the data set. C-SVC and ν-SVC classification models with 2, 4, 6 and 7 classes were developed for comparison between its results and also for comparison with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) models results. It is demonstrated the superior performance of SVC models especially using ν-SVC for development of classification models for 6 and 7 classes leading to an improvement of sensitivity on validation sample sets of 24% and 15%, respectively, when compared to SIMCA models, providing better identification of chemical compositions of different diesel pool refinery streams.

  6. Classification of diesel pool refinery streams through near infrared spectroscopy and support vector machines using C-SVC and ν-SVC.

    PubMed

    Alves, Julio Cesar L; Henriques, Claudete B; Poppi, Ronei J

    2014-01-01

    The use of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods have been widely used in petroleum and petrochemical industry and provides suitable methods for process control and quality control. The algorithm support vector machines (SVM) has demonstrated to be a powerful chemometric tool for development of classification models due to its ability to nonlinear modeling and with high generalization capability and these characteristics can be especially important for treating near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of complex mixtures such as petroleum refinery streams. In this work, a study on the performance of the support vector machines algorithm for classification was carried out, using C-SVC and ν-SVC, applied to near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of different types of streams that make up the diesel pool in a petroleum refinery: light gas oil, heavy gas oil, hydrotreated diesel, kerosene, heavy naphtha and external diesel. In addition to these six streams, the diesel final blend produced in the refinery was added to complete the data set. C-SVC and ν-SVC classification models with 2, 4, 6 and 7 classes were developed for comparison between its results and also for comparison with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) models results. It is demonstrated the superior performance of SVC models especially using ν-SVC for development of classification models for 6 and 7 classes leading to an improvement of sensitivity on validation sample sets of 24% and 15%, respectively, when compared to SIMCA models, providing better identification of chemical compositions of different diesel pool refinery streams. PMID:24012979

  7. Refinery catalysts: Coping with performance anxiety

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, S.

    1994-04-01

    Petroleum refiners worldwide are struggling to comply with environmental mandates that tightly dictate the composition of gasoline and diesel fuel. At the same time, many are trying to capitalize on cost advantages offered by heavy, dirty feedstocks. This is stimulating development in catalysts for resid cracking, isomerization, alkylation and hydrotreating. The paper briefly describes development efforts.

  8. Petroleum Processing Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the petroleum processing wastes, covering publications of 1977. This review covers studies such as the use of activated carbon in petroleum and petrochemical waste treatment. A list of 15 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Characterizing exposures to airborne metals and nanoparticle emissions in a refinery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Arthur; Drake, Pamela L; Hintz, Patrick; Habjan, Matt

    2010-07-01

    An air quality survey was conducted at a precious metals refinery in order to evaluate worker exposures to airborne metals and to provide detailed characterization of the aerosols. Two areas within the refinery were characterized: a furnace room and an electro-refining area. In line with standard survey practices, both personal and area air filter samples were collected on 37-mm filters and analyzed for metals by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. In addition to the standard sampling, measurements were conducted using other tools, designed to provide enhanced characterization of the workplace aerosols. The number concentration and number-weighted particle size distribution of airborne particles were measured with a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). Custom-designed software was used to correlate particle concentration data with spatial location data to generate contour maps of particle number concentrations in the work areas. Short-term samples were collected in areas of localized high concentrations and analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to determine particle morphology and elemental chemistry. Analysis of filter samples indicated that all of the workers were exposed to levels of silver above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit of 0.01 mg m(-3) even though the localized ventilation was functioning. Measurements with the FMPS indicated that particle number concentrations near the furnace increased up to 1000-fold above the baseline during the pouring of molten metal. Spatial mapping revealed localized elevated particle concentrations near the furnaces and plumes of particles rising into the stairwells and traveling to the upper work areas. Results of TEM/EDS analyses confirmed the high number of nanoparticles measured by the FMPS and indicated the aerosols were rich in metals including silver, lead, antimony, selenium, and zinc. Results of

  10. New oil era prompts unique resid refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.E.; Sliger, A.G.; Kain, G.E.

    1982-03-22

    Flowsheets and a process description are given for a refinery that will employ resid desulfurization and the Heavy Oil Cracking (HOC) process to upgrade the bottom of the crude barrel. The key processing concept in the new Saber facility is the combination of HOC, a proven process, that has been employed since the early 1960's, with resid hydrodesulfurization (HDS) a newer process but one that is well proven and that has found widespread application. Design feedstock for the complex is heavy Arabian 650+/degree/ F. atmospheric resid, but flexibility to run light Arabian atmospheric resid or any intermediate resid also has been incorporated into the design. Rated Capacity is 46,100 b/sd. 9 refs.