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Sample records for petroleum reservoir simulation

  1. Petroleum reservoir data for testing simulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.M.; Harrison, W.

    1980-09-01

    This report consists of reservoir pressure and production data for 25 petroleum reservoirs. Included are 5 data sets for single-phase (liquid) reservoirs, 1 data set for a single-phase (liquid) reservoir with pressure maintenance, 13 data sets for two-phase (liquid/gas) reservoirs and 6 for two-phase reservoirs with pressure maintenance. Also given are ancillary data for each reservoir that could be of value in the development and validation of simulation models. A bibliography is included that lists the publications from which the data were obtained.

  2. High performance computing for domestic petroleum reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.; Auer, L.; Dendy, J.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. High-performance computing offers the prospect of greatly increasing the resolution at which petroleum reservoirs can be represented in simulation models. The increases in resolution can be achieved through large increases in computational speed and memory, if machine architecture and numerical methods for solution of the multiphase flow equations can be used to advantage. Perhaps more importantly, the increased speed and size of today`s computers make it possible to add physical processes to simulation codes that heretofore were too expensive in terms of computer time and memory to be practical. These factors combine to allow the development of new, more accurate methods for optimizing petroleum reservoir production.

  3. Hydrodynamic modeling of petroleum reservoirs using simulator MUFITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    MUFITS is new noncommercial software for numerical modeling of subsurface processes in various applications (www.mufits.imec.msu.ru). To this point, the simulator was used for modeling nonisothermal flows in geothermal reservoirs and for modeling underground carbon dioxide storage. In this work, we present recent extension of the code to petroleum reservoirs. The simulator can be applied in conventional black oil modeling, but it also utilizes a more complicated models for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs as well as for oil rim fields. We give a brief overview of the code by providing the description of internal representation of reservoir models, which are constructed of grid blocks, interfaces, stock tanks as well as of pipe segments and pipe junctions for modeling wells and surface networks. For conventional black oil approach, we present the simulation results for SPE comparative tests. We propose an accelerated compositional modeling method for sub- and supercritical flows subjected to various phase equilibria, particularly to three-phase equilibria of vapour-liquid-liquid type. The method is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic potential of reservoir fluid as a function of pressure, total enthalpy and total composition and storing its values as a spline table, which is used in hydrodynamic simulation for accelerated PVT properties prediction. We provide the description of both the spline calculation procedure and the flashing algorithm. We evaluate the thermodynamic potential for a mixture of two pseudo-components modeling the heavy and light hydrocarbon fractions. We develop a technique for converting black oil PVT tables to the potential, which can be used for in-situ hydrocarbons multiphase equilibria prediction under sub- and supercritical conditions, particularly, in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs. We simulate recovery from a reservoir subject to near-critical initial conditions for hydrocarbon mixture. We acknowledge

  4. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  5. Characterization and simulation of an exhumed fractured petroleum reservoir. Final report, March 18, 1996--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, C.B.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.

    1998-12-01

    An exhumed fractured reservoir located near Alligator Ridge in central Nevada provides the basis for developing and testing different approaches for simulating fractured petroleum reservoirs. The fractured analog reservoir comprises a 90 m thickness of silty limestone and shaly interbeds within the Devonian Pilot Shale. A period of regional compression followed by ongoing basin and range extension has created faults and fractures that, in tern, have controlled the migration of both oil and gold ore-forming fluids. Open pit gold mines provide access for observing oil seepage, collecting the detailed fracture data needed to map variations in fracture intensity near faults, build discrete fracture network models and create equivalent permeability structures. Fault trace patterns mapped at the ground surface provide a foundation for creating synthetic fault trace maps using a stochastic procedure conditioned by the outcrop data. Conventional simulations of petroleum production from a 900 by 900 m sub-domain within the reservoir analog illustrate the possible influence of faults and fractures on production. The consequences of incorporating the impact of different stress states (e.g., extension, compression or lithostatic) are also explored. Simulating multiphase fluid flow using a discrete fracture, finite element simulator illustrates how faults acting as conduits might be poorly represented by the upscaling procedures used to assign equivalent permeability values within reservoir models. The parallelized reservoir simulators developed during this project provide a vehicle to evaluate when it might be necessary to incorporate very fine scale grid networks in conventional reservoir simulators or to use finely gridded discrete fracture reservoir simulators.

  6. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility of petroleum reservoir fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Oleksandr P.; Potter, David K.

    A knowledge of the magnetic properties of petroleum reservoir fluids may provide new techniques for improved reservoir characterisation, petroleum exploration and production. However, magnetic information is currently scarce for the vast majority of reservoir fluids. For instance, there is little in the literature concerning basic magnetic susceptibility values of crude oils or formation waters. We have therefore measured the mass magnetic susceptibility ( χm) of several crude oils, refined oil fractions, and formation waters from local and world-wide sites. All the fluids measured were diamagnetic, however there were distinct differences in magnitude between the different fluid types. In particular, χm for the crude oils was more negative than for the formation waters of the same locality. The magnetic susceptibility of the oils appears to be related to their main physical and chemical properties. The results correlated with the density, residue content, API (American Petroleum Institute) gravity, viscosity, sulphur content and metal concentration of the fluids. Light fractions of crude oil were the most diamagnetic. The magnetic measurements potentially allow physical and chemical differences between the fluids to be rapidly characterised. The results suggest other possible applications, such as passive in situ magnetic susceptibility sensors for fluid monitoring (for example, the onset of water breakthrough, or the detection of migrating fines) in reservoirs, which would provide an environmentally friendly alternative to radioactive tracers. The mass magnetic susceptibilities of the fluids in relation to typical reservoir minerals may also play a role in fluid-rock interactions, such as studies of wettability. The χm of crude oil from the various world-wide oil provinces that were tested also showed some differences, possibly reflecting broad physical and chemical features of the geological history of each province.

  8. Application of multitracer technology to petroleum reservoir studies

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) improve the assessment of the character of petroleum reservoirs using tracer technology for the monitoring and improvement of EOR techniques, specifically, (a) To apply the presently available multitracer perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology to the study of petroleum reservoirs in characterizing reservoir bulk subsurface flow transport and dispersion rates; and (b) to demonstrate that PFTs with differing physical properties will interact with differing rates of absorption and dispersion within such reservoirs, from which may be inferred difference in the character and/or extent of petroleum in those reservoirs. (2) To develop a data base of petroleum transport and dispersion properties from tracer experiments for use by modellers for developing, validating and extending petroleum reservoirs models used for characterizing petroleum reservoirs.

  9. Inverse Theory for Petroleum Reservoir Characterization and History Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Dean S.; Reynolds, Albert C.; Liu, Ning

    This book is a guide to the use of inverse theory for estimation and conditional simulation of flow and transport parameters in porous media. It describes the theory and practice of estimating properties of underground petroleum reservoirs from measurements of flow in wells, and it explains how to characterize the uncertainty in such estimates. Early chapters present the reader with the necessary background in inverse theory, probability and spatial statistics. The book demonstrates how to calculate sensitivity coefficients and the linearized relationship between models and production data. It also shows how to develop iterative methods for generating estimates and conditional realizations. The text is written for researchers and graduates in petroleum engineering and groundwater hydrology and can be used as a textbook for advanced courses on inverse theory in petroleum engineering. It includes many worked examples to demonstrate the methodologies and a selection of exercises.

  10. Process for emulsion flooding of petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lepper, U.

    1984-12-18

    A process for emulsion flooding of petroleum reservoirs comprising injecting a thermodynamically stable microemulsion consisting of oil, a non-ionic surfactant and water which optionally contains salts dissolved in any desired concentrations, into an injection well; driving injected microemulsion bank through the reservoir by means of water which likewise may contain salts dissolved in any desired concentrations. The microemulsion bank in contact with the water driving the bank forms an excess phase with a high water content, a low surfactant content and low oil content, and has such a viscosity sufficient to prevent the penetration of the subsequent water into the microemulsion bank which would cause a decrease of its flowability and its ability to displace oil.

  11. Geothermal reservoir simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. W., Jr.; Faust, C.; Pinder, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    The prediction of long-term geothermal reservoir performance and the environmental impact of exploiting this resource are two important problems associated with the utilization of geothermal energy for power production. Our research effort addresses these problems through numerical simulation. Computer codes based on the solution of partial-differential equations using finite-element techniques are being prepared to simulate multiphase energy transport, energy transport in fractured porous reservoirs, well bore phenomena, and subsidence.

  12. A finite element simulation system in reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xiaozhong

    1996-03-01

    Reservoir engineering is performed to predict the future performance of a reservoir based on its current state and past performance and to explore other methods for increasing the recovery of hydrocarbons from a reservoir. Reservoir simulations are routinely used for these purposes. A reservoir simulator is a sophisticated computer program which solves a system of partial differential equations describing multiphase fluid flow (oil, water, and gas) in a porous reservoir rock. This document describes the use of a reservoir simulator version of BOAST which was developed by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research in July, 1991.

  13. Interactive reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Regtien, J.M.M. Por, G.J.A.; Stiphout, M.T. van; Vlugt, F.F. van der

    1995-12-31

    Shell`s new Modular Reservoir Simulator (MoReS) has been equipped with a comprehensive and versatile user interface called FrontEnd. Apart from providing a user-friendly environment for interactive reservoir simulation, FrontEnd serves a software platform for other dynamic simulation and reservoir-engineering applications. It offers to all supported applications a common user interface, enables the re-use of code and reduces overall maintenance and support costs associated with the embedded applications. Because of its features, FrontEnd facilitates the transfer of research results in the form of operational software to end users. When coupled with MoReS, FrontEnd can be used for pre- and post-processing and interactive simulation. The pre-processing options allow data to be inputted by means of various OSF/Motif widgets containing a spreadsheet, text editors, dialogues and graphical input. The display of the input data as well as the post-processing of all simulation results is made possible by a variety of user-defined plot of tabular (e.g. timestep summary) and array (simulation grid) data. During a simulation user-defined plots can be displayed and edited, allowing a close inspection of the results as they are being calculated. FrontEnd has been equipped with a powerful input command language, which gives the batch user as much flexibility and control over the input as the interactive user.

  14. Trends in reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.S.

    1995-06-01

    The future of reservoir simulation is driven by two different and, on the surface, paradoxical trends. On the one hand, the user base is on average becoming less experienced, and on the other, increasingly complex models are being built to honor the advances in reservoir-description technology. The job of the software development community is to create software that satisfies both the ease-of-use needs of the novice and the accuracy needs of the integrated geoscience team. One of the near-term effects of these demands will be to improve the capabilities and quality of the fully integrated geoscience work-station. This will include the need for implementation of industry-wide data standards. Reservoir simulators will need to incorporate increasing amounts of interactivity and built-in expertise. Accuracy of results will be improved by increased use of unstructured grids, including automatic gridding software with dynamic capabilities. Additional research will focus on complex wells, including both in-flow performance and wellbore hydraulics. Finally, grid size will continue to escalate in step with advances in hardware and software. The growth of grid size will be mitigated by substantial efforts in upscaling, but ultimately parallel computing must provide the mechanism for continued growth.

  15. Cooperative Learning in Reservoir Simulation Classes: Overcoming Disparate Entry Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awang, Mariyamni

    2006-01-01

    Reservoir simulation is one of the core courses in the petroleum engineering curriculum and it requires knowledge and skills in three major disciplines, namely programming, numerical methods and reservoir engineering. However, there were often gaps in the students' readiness to undertake the course, even after completing the necessary…

  16. Downhole fluid analysis and asphaltene science for petroleum reservoir evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Oliver C; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Zuo, Julian Y; Dong, Chengli

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum reservoirs are enshrouded in mysteries associated with all manner of geologic and fluid complexities that Mother Nature can inspire. Efficient exploitation of petroleum reservoirs mandates elucidation of these complexities; downhole fluid analysis (DFA) has proven to be indispensable for understanding both fluids and reservoir architecture. Crude oil consists of dissolved gases, liquids, and dissolved solids, known as the asphaltenes. These different fluid components exhibit fluid gradients vertically and laterally, which are best revealed by DFA, with its excellent precision and accuracy. Compositional gradient analysis falls within the purview of thermodynamics. Gas-liquid equilibria can be treated with a cubic equation of state (EoS), such as the Peng-Robinson EoS, a modified van der Waals EoS. In contrast, the first EoS for asphaltene gradients, the Flory-Huggins-Zuo (FHZ) EoS, was developed only recently. The resolution of the asphaltene molecular and nanocolloidal species in crude oil, which is codified in the Yen-Mullins model of asphaltenes, enabled the development of this EoS. The combination of DFA characterization of gradients of reservoir crude oil with the cubic EoS and FHZ EoS analyses brings into view wide-ranging reservoir concerns, such as reservoir connectivity, fault-block migration, heavy oil gradients, tar mat formation, huge disequilibrium fluid gradients, and even stochastic variations of reservoir fluids. New petroleum science and DFA technology are helping to offset the increasing costs and technical difficulties of exploiting ever-more-remote petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24702298

  17. Water propagation in two-dimensional petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, M. N.; Ghaedi, M.; Moghimi-Araghi, Saman

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper we investigate the problem of water propagation in 2 dimensional (2D) petroleum reservoir in which each site has the probability p of being occupied. We first analyze this propagation pattern described by Darcy equations by focusing on its geometrical features. We find that the domain-walls of this model at p =pc ≃ 0.59 are Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) curves with κ = 3.05 ∓ 0.1 consistent with the Ising universality class. We also numerically show that the fractal dimension of these domain-walls at p =pc is Df ≃ 1.38 consistent with SLEκ=3. Along with this analysis, we introduce a self-organized critical (SOC) model in which the water movement is modeled by a chain of topplings taking place when the water saturation exceeds the critical value. We present strong indications that it coincides with the reservoir simulation described by Darcy equation. We further analyze the SOC model and show numerically that for this model the spanning cluster probability has a maximum around p = 0.65.

  18. Application of multitracer technology to petroleum reservoir studies. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: Improve the assessment of the character of petroleum reservoirs using tracer technology for the monitoring and improvement of EOR techniques, specifically, (a) to apply the presently available multitracer perfluorocarbon tracer (PFI) technology to the study of petroleum reservoirs in characterizing reservoir bulk subsurface flow transport and dispersion rates; and (b) to demonstrate that PFTs with differing physical properties will interact with differing rates of adsorption and dispersion within such reservoirs, from which may be inferred difference in the character and/or extent of petroleum in those reservoirs. Develop additional tracers, and tracer injection, sampling and analyses methodologies for use in petroleum reservoir characterization experiments. Develop a data base of petroleum transport and dispersion properties from tracer experiments for use by modellers for developing, validating and extending petroleum reservoirs models used for characterizing petroleum reservoirs. Technical progress is discussed according to the three ongoing field experiments at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC).

  19. Application of multitracer technology to petroleum reservoir studies. [Perfluorocarbon tracer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: Improve the assessment of the character of petroleum reservoirs using tracer technology for the monitoring and improvement of EOR techniques, specifically, (a) to apply the presently available multitracer perfluorocarbon tracer (PFI) technology to the study of petroleum reservoirs in characterizing reservoir bulk subsurface flow transport and dispersion rates; and (b) to demonstrate that PFTs with differing physical properties will interact with differing rates of adsorption and dispersion within such reservoirs, from which may be inferred difference in the character and/or extent of petroleum in those reservoirs. Develop additional tracers, and tracer injection, sampling and analyses methodologies for use in petroleum reservoir characterization experiments. Develop a data base of petroleum transport and dispersion properties from tracer experiments for use by modellers for developing, validating and extending petroleum reservoirs models used for characterizing petroleum reservoirs. Technical progress is discussed according to the three ongoing field experiments at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC).

  20. Glacial isostasy - possible tilting of petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjeldskaar, Willy; Amantov, Aleksey

    2015-04-01

    Scandinavia has experienced major uplift after the last ice age. The rate of uplift along the coasts is so high that its effects have been observed within one generation. Glaciers, sediments and erosion act as loads on the Earth's surface - positive or negative. When a load is applied to the lithosphere covering the asthenosphere, part of the applied load will be supported by the elastic stiffness of the lithosphere, and part by the buoyant forces of the asthenosphere. This process is called isostasy, and the rebound over the last thousands of years has revealed how the Earth reacts to loads. Prior to the last glaciation, northern Europe has experienced more than 30 glaciations. Glacial erosion and repeated ice loading over the last millions of years has significantly influenced the temperature history of sedimentary basins, and associated hydrocarbon maturation in potential source rocks. In addition, repeated loading of glaciers leads to an isostatic response of the lithosphere, which may cause tilting of potential reservoirs, and possible remigration of hydrocarbons. The effects of glaciations are assumed to have caused parts of the accumulation in the Johan Sverdrup field (Utsira High) due to changed migration pathways. Glacial isostasy will lead to tilting of potential reservoirs on the entire Norwegian Continental Shelf. In the western Barents Sea and offshore mid Norway the tilts could exceed 4 m/km, dipping towards east during the glaciations.

  1. Application of multitracer technology to petroleum reservoir studies. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) improve the assessment of the character of petroleum reservoirs using tracer technology for the monitoring and improvement of EOR techniques, specifically, (a) To apply the presently available multitracer perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology to the study of petroleum reservoirs in characterizing reservoir bulk subsurface flow transport and dispersion rates; and (b) to demonstrate that PFTs with differing physical properties will interact with differing rates of absorption and dispersion within such reservoirs, from which may be inferred difference in the character and/or extent of petroleum in those reservoirs. (2) To develop a data base of petroleum transport and dispersion properties from tracer experiments for use by modellers for developing, validating and extending petroleum reservoirs models used for characterizing petroleum reservoirs.

  2. Distribution, origin and prediction of carbon dioxide in petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, J.; Fleet, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    High concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in petroleum reservoirs can significantly reduce the value of the discovery, by diluting any hydrocarbons, and by increasing production costs because of the increased likelihood of corrosion and scale formation. Huge volumes of CO{sub 2} have been found, for example in the Indonesian Natuna d-Alpha structure (estimated 240 tcf gas, of which around 70% is CO{sub 2}). This study reviews the possible sources of CO{sub 2} in the petroleum system, and the geological and geochemical data from some CO{sub 2} {open_quotes}polluted{close_quotes} reservoirs, to improve future predictions of the exploration risk of finding significant CO{sub 2}. A number of case studies show that the most common geological circumstances for the occurrence of high concentrations of CO{sub 2} include: carbonates associated with post-trap igneous activity (e.g. Ibleo Platform, Sicily); reservoir close to hot basement (e.g. Cooper-Eromanga Basin, Australia) and deep faults close to traps (e.g. Gulf of Thailand). Less common circumstances for high proportions of CO{sub 2} in gas include: post-trap igneous activity and coals (e.g. Taranaki, New Zealand) and reservoirs associated with pre-oil window coaly kerogen (e.g. Malay Trough), although the volumes of CO{sub 2} generated from kerogen are usually low relative to volumes of hydrocarbons generated from kerogen.

  3. RESEARCH PROGRAM ON FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2002-04-12

    Numerical simulation of water injection in discrete fractured media with capillary pressure is a challenge. Dual-porosity models in view of their strength and simplicity can be mainly used for sugar-cube representation of fractured media. In such a representation, the transfer function between the fracture and the matrix block can be readily calculated for water-wet media. For a mixed-wet system, the evaluation of the transfer function becomes complicated due to the effect of gravity. In this work, they use a discrete-fracture model in which the fractures are discretized as one dimensional entities to account for fracture thickness by an integral form of the flow equations. This simple step greatly improves the numerical solution. Then the discrete-fracture model is implemented using a Galerkin finite element method. The robustness and the accuracy of the approach are shown through several examples. First they consider a single fracture in a rock matrix and compare the results of the discrete-fracture model with a single-porosity model. Then, they use the discrete-fracture model in more complex configurations. Numerical simulations are carried out in water-wet media as well as in mixed-wet media to study the effect of matrix and fracture capillary pressures.

  4. Bioremediation potential of microorganisms derived from petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Dellagnezze, Bruna Martins; de Sousa, Gabriel Vasconcelos; Martins, Laercio Lopes; Domingos, Daniela Ferreira; Limache, Elmer E G; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto; da Cruz, Georgiana Feitosa; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-12-15

    Bacterial strains and metagenomic clones, both obtained from petroleum reservoirs, were evaluated for petroleum degradation abilities either individually or in pools using seawater microcosms for 21 days. Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses were carried out to evaluate crude oil degradation. The results showed that metagenomic clones 1A and 2B were able to biodegrade n-alkanes (C14 to C33) and isoprenoids (phytane and pristane), with rates ranging from 31% to 47%, respectively. The bacteria Dietzia maris CBMAI 705 and Micrococcus sp. CBMAI 636 showed higher rates reaching 99% after 21 days. The metagenomic clone pool biodegraded these compounds at rates ranging from 11% to 45%. Regarding aromatic compound biodegradation, metagenomic clones 2B and 10A were able to biodegrade up to 94% of phenanthrene and methylphenanthrenes (3-MP, 2-MP, 9-MP and 1-MP) with rates ranging from 55% to 70% after 21 days, while the bacteria Dietzia maris CBMAI 705 and Micrococcus sp. CBMAI 636 were able to biodegrade 63% and up to 99% of phenanthrene, respectively, and methylphenanthrenes (3-MP, 2-MP, 9-MP and 1-MP) with rates ranging from 23% to 99% after 21 days. In this work, isolated strains as well as metagenomic clones were capable of degrading several petroleum compounds, revealing an innovative strategy and a great potential for further biotechnological and bioremediation applications. PMID:25457810

  5. Biodegradation of petroleum constituents by indigenous bacteria isolated from petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Azadpour, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of the work described in this paper were to isolate microorganisms indigenous to petroleum reservoirs, with special emphasis on anaerobic degradation of petroleum constituents and production of emulsifiers. Seven cores from reservoir depths of 805 to 14,492 feet were examined for microorganisms. Of a large number of pure culture isolates obtained, 37 were characterized for thir ability to use nitrogen (NO{sub 3} ions, NH{sub 4} ions, and urea) and carbon (crude oil, n-hexadecane, and acetate) sources. Experiments demonstrated that anaerobic microbial growth on crude oil was possible when a nitrogen source and a phosphorus source (mineral salt medium) were added. However, very little gas production was observed for the anaerobic cultures as compared to the aerobic tests. Chromatography fdata indicated that the more easily degraded compounds were attacked first, and that degradation also seemed to be dependent on the molecular weight and concentration of constituents rather than the crude type. The range of concentrations of emulsifier produced by the isolates is presented in the paper. The experiments indicated that all of the 37 culture isolates examined grew anaerobically and produced product such as emulsifiers which have the potential for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated aquifers.

  6. A flexible gridding scheme for reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a new control volume based finite difference scheme for petroleum reservoir simulation which can be used with unstructured grids. The numerical scheme to model fluid flow is shown to be easily used for Voronoi grids in 2D. It can also be used with certain geometrical limitations for 3D Voronoi grids. The scheme can be used without any significant limitations for triangle or tetrahedron based grids where control volumes are constructed around their vertices. It assumes uniform properties inside such control volumes. Full, anisotropic and asymmetric permeability tensor can be easily handled with the proposed method. The permeability tensor can vary from block to block. Thus it will be of great value in modeling fluid flow in reservoirs where principal directions of permeability varies between beds or within a bed. The paper also presents an analysis of some of the published flexible gridding schemes which use a control volume type algebraic approximation and demonstrate the advantages of the method presented here. The technique for grid construction is also discussed. Test results presented here demonstrate the need for proper representation of reservoir geometry to predict the correct flow behavior. The gridding scheme described in this paper achieves that purpose.

  7. Mapping steam and water flow in petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C.; Daley, T.; Peterson, J.; Majer, E.; Murer, A.S.; Johnston, R.M.; Klonsky, L.

    1996-11-01

    Over the past 5 years, we have applied high-resolution geophysical methods (crosswell seismic and electromagnetics (EM), and passive seismic) to map and characterize petroleum reservoirs in the San Joaquin Valley and to monitor changes during secondary recovery operations. The two techniques provide complementary information. Seismic data reveal the reservoir structure, whereas EM measurements are more sensitive to the pore fluid distribution. Seismic surveys at the south Belridge field were used to map fracture generation and monitor formation changes due to the onset of steam flooding. Early results show possible sensitivity to changes in gas saturation caused by the steam flooding. Crosswell EM surveys were applied at a shallow pilot at Lost Hills for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. Images made from baselines data clearly show the distribution of the target oil sands; repeated surveys during the steam flood allowed us to identify the boundaries of the steam chest and to accurately predict breakthrough. Applications of the EM techniques in steel-cased wells are at an early stage, but preliminary results at Lost Hills show sensitivity to formation resistivity in a water-flood pilot. Finally, passive seismic surveys during hydrofracture operations measured events corelatable in frequency content and magnitude with the size and orientation of induced fractures.

  8. Mapping steam and water flow in petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C.; Daley, T.; Peterson, J.; Majer, E.; Murer, A.S.; Johnston, R.M.; Klonsky, L.

    1997-11-01

    During the past 5 years, the authors have applied high-resolution geophysical methods [crosswell seismic and electromagnetics (EM) and passive seismic] to map and characterize petroleum reservoirs in the San Joaquin Valley and to monitor changes during secondary-recovery operations. The two techniques provide complementary information. Seismic data reveal the reservoir structure, whereas EM measurements are more sensitive to the pore-fluid distribution. Seismic surveys at the South Belridge field were used to map fracture generation and monitor formation changes caused by the onset of steamflooding. Early results show possible sensitivity to changes in gas saturation caused by the steamflooding. Crosswell EM surveys were applied at a shallow pilot at Los Hills for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. Images made from baseline data clearly show the distribution of the target oil sands; repeated surveys during the steamflood allowed the authors to identify the boundaries of the steam chest and to predict breakthrough accurately. Applications of the EM techniques in steel-cased wells are at an early stage, but preliminary results at Los Hills show sensitivity to formation resistivity in a waterflood pilot.

  9. The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect

    Sarg, Frederick

    2012-03-01

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  10. Bacterial diversity characterization in petroleum samples from Brazilian reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; Sette, Lara Durães; Simioni, Karen Christina Marques; dos Santos Neto, Eugênio Vaz

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating potential differences among the bacterial communities from formation water and oil samples originated from biodegraded and non-biodegraded Brazilian petroleum reservoirs by using a PCR-DGGE based approach. Environmental DNA was isolated and used in PCR reactions with bacterial primers, followed by separation of 16S rDNA fragments in the DGGE. PCR products were also cloned and sequenced, aiming at the taxonomic affiliation of the community members. The fingerprints obtained allowed the direct comparison among the bacterial communities from oil samples presenting distinct degrees of biodegradation, as well as between the communities of formation water and oil sample from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Very similar DGGE band profiles were observed for all samples, and the diversity of the predominant bacterial phylotypes was shown to be low. Cloning and sequencing results revealed major differences between formation water and oil samples from the non-biodegraded reservoir. Bacillus sp. and Halanaerobium sp. were shown to be the predominant components of the bacterial community from the formation water sample, whereas the oil sample also included Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Rhodococcus sp., Streptomyces sp. and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The PCR-DGGE technique, combined with cloning and sequencing of PCR products, revealed the presence of taxonomic groups not found previously in these samples when using cultivation-based methods and 16S rRNA gene library assembly, confirming the need of a polyphasic study in order to improve the knowledge of the extent of microbial diversity in such extreme environments. PMID:24031244

  11. Reservoir quality and potential, National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Mowatt, T.C.; Seidlitz, A.; Gibson, C.; Bascle, R.; Dygas, J. )

    1991-03-01

    As part of the reservoir management, resource assessment, and planning programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska, the oil and gas resource potential of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) is undergoing review in light of new technical information, as well as changing national and international socioeconomic conditions. Emphasis is on integration of geological, petrophysical, geophysical, and engineering information to provide a refined, more technically substantive knowledge base for resource assessment and management. Brookian clastic rocks - in particular the Nanushuk Group and underlying Torok/Topagoruk intervals - have been the principal horizons of concern. Petrologic-mineralogic characteristics have been reinvestigated, related to petrophysical parameters and wireline log responses, and integrated with available engineering data, for key wells within and peripheral to the NPRA. Particular attention has been directed to diagenetic relationships, effects on reservoir quality, and implications for untested portions of this sizable basin. Similar efforts have been directed to pre-Brookian strata as well. Only some 127 exploratory wells (all but one under government aegis) have been drilled within or adjacent to NPRA (a geographic area on the order of 37,000 mi{sup 2} - about the size of the state of Indiana), many only to shallow depths. In almost every well drilled to any appreciable depth in the area, there have been manifestations of the presence of hydrocarbons. The results to date are actually rather promising from a qualitative geologic-geochemical perspective, in terms of potential for significant resources to be present.

  12. Development planning and management of petroleum reservoirs using tank models and nonlinear programming

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, J.W.; Lasdon, L.; Loose, V.

    1984-04-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying generalized reduced gradient nonlinear programing methods to solve optimal control models for petroleum reservoir development planning and management. The objective of the models is to maximize present value of profits; their decision variables are how many wells to drill in each time period, the production rates, abandonment time, and platform size. The analysis uses tank-type reservoir models to describe the reservoir dynamics, and models both a gas reservoir with water drive, and a 3-phase oil reservoir. Results of several case studies on each model are presented. Extensions that consider spatial variation in the reservoir and use grid reservoir models are investigated. 40 references.

  13. Next generation oil reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort between Amoco Production Company, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cray Research Inc. to develop a next-generation massively parallel oil reservoir simulation code. The simulator, code-named Falcon, enables highly detailed simulations to be performed on a range of platforms such as the Cray T3D and T3E. The code is currently being used by Amoco to perform a sophisticated field study using multiple geostatistical realizations on a scale of 2-5 million grid blocks and 1000-2000 wells. In this paper we discuss the nature of this collaborative effort, the software design and engineering aspects of the code, parallelization experiences, and performance studies. The code will be marketed to the oil industry by a third-party independent software vendor in mid-1996.

  14. Application of multitracer technology to petroleum reservoir studies. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.

    1993-06-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) Improve the assessment of the character of petroleum reservoirs using tracer technology for the monitoring and improvement of EOR techniques, specifically, (a) to apply the presently available multitracer perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology to the study of petroleum reservoirs in characterizing reservoir bulk subsurface flow transport and dispersion rates; and, (b) to demonstrate that PFTs with differing physical properties will interact with differing rates of adsorption and dispersion within such reservoirs, from which may be inferred difference in the character and/or extent of petroleum in those reservoirs. This is accomplished by participation in field experiments so as to fully demonstrate the perfluorocarbon tracer technology in its utility in this aspect. 2. Develop new tracers, compatible with the perfluorocarbon tracer technology, so as to interface these new tracers in a suite of tracers available for petroleum reservoir experiments. 3. Design and performance of a quantitative PFF experiment to demonstrate the potential of calculating a two-dimensional residual oil saturation map based on a multi-PFT tracer experiment in a reservoir. Technical progress is discussed for: (1) Ongoing demonstration experiments at the Naval Petroleum Reservoir in California; (2) development of new tracers; and (3) design of the 2D residual oil mapping experiment.

  15. Molecular Biological Analysis of Microorganisms in Petroleum Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Son, H. A.; Im, K. C.; Back, K. H.; Kim, H. T.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms in petroleum reservoirs were analyzed to examine the potential to apply for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Genomic DNA (16S rDNA) were extracted from two heavy oil samples from Canadian oil sand and six light oil samples from the Salin fore-arc basin in Myanmar, and amplified using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The microbes were identified by cloning the PCR products and pyrosequencing. Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were common in both Canadian and Myanmar samples. Staphylococcus and Streptococcus belonging to the Firmicutes phylum are abundant in oil sands, while Propionibacteria belonging to the Actinobacteria phylum and Coprothermobacter, Streptococcus, and Clostridia belonging to the Frimicutes phylum are contained in Myanmar samples. Streptococcus is known to use crude oil as nutrient, and produce organic acid, bio-gas and polysaccharide that could reduce oil viscosity, improve permeability by dissolving carbonate cement from pores throat, and reduce interfacial tension between oil and rock/water surface. Clostridia produce acids and gases by methanogenesis that could improve oil recovery.

  16. Reservoir Simulations of Low-Temperature Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedre, Madhur Ganesh

    The eastern United States generally has lower temperature gradients than the western United States. However, West Virginia, in particular, has higher temperature gradients compared to other eastern states. A recent study at Southern Methodist University by Blackwell et al. has shown the presence of a hot spot in the eastern part of West Virginia with temperatures reaching 150°C at a depth of between 4.5 and 5 km. This thesis work examines similar reservoirs at a depth of around 5 km resembling the geology of West Virginia, USA. The temperature gradients used are in accordance with the SMU study. In order to assess the effects of geothermal reservoir conditions on the lifetime of a low-temperature geothermal system, a sensitivity analysis study was performed on following seven natural and human-controlled parameters within a geothermal reservoir: reservoir temperature, injection fluid temperature, injection flow rate, porosity, rock thermal conductivity, water loss (%) and well spacing. This sensitivity analysis is completed by using ‘One factor at a time method (OFAT)’ and ‘Plackett-Burman design’ methods. The data used for this study was obtained by carrying out the reservoir simulations using TOUGH2 simulator. The second part of this work is to create a database of thermal potential and time-dependant reservoir conditions for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs by studying a number of possible scenarios. Variations in the parameters identified in sensitivity analysis study are used to expand the scope of database. Main results include the thermal potential of reservoir, pressure and temperature profile of the reservoir over its operational life (30 years for this study), the plant capacity and required pumping power. The results of this database will help the supply curves calculations for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs in the United States, which is the long term goal of the work being done by the geothermal research group under Dr. Anderson at

  17. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar

  18. [Microbial metabolic characteristics and ecological controlling in petroleum reservoir--a review].

    PubMed

    Gao, Peike; Ma, Ting; Liu, Rulin

    2011-06-01

    Petroleum reservoir has a variety of microbes with diverse metabolic characteristics and great diversity. These microbes play an important role in geochemical cycle. Research on their metabolism and ecological relationships enables the understanding of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR). Based on the present researches, we review the microbial metabolic characteristics and ecological relationships in oil reservoir. PMID:21866693

  19. Role of reservoir engineering in the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, M.K.; Bird, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    The geology and reservoir-engineering data were integrated in the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey assessment of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA). VVhereas geology defined the analog pools and fields and provided the basic information on sizes and numbers of hypothesized petroleum accumulations, reservoir engineering helped develop necessary equations and correlations, which allowed the determination of reservoir parameters for better quantification of in-place petroleum volumes and recoverable reserves. Seismic- and sequence-stratigraphic study of the NPRA resulted in identification of 24 plays. Depth ranges in these 24 plays, however, were typically greater than depth ranges of analog plays for which there were available data, necessitating the need for establishing correlations. The basic parameters required were pressure, temperature, oil and gas formation volume factors, liquid/gas ratios for the associated and nonassociated gas, and recovery factors. Finally, the re sults of U.S. Geological Survey deposit simulation were used in carrying out an economic evaluation, which has been separately published. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Applications of aerospace technology to petroleum extraction and reservoir engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Back, L. H.; Berdahl, C. M.; Collins, E. E., Jr.; Gordon, P. G.; Houseman, J.; Humphrey, M. F.; Hsu, G. C.; Ham, J. D.; Marte, J. E.; Owen, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Through contacts with the petroleum industry, the petroleum service industry, universities and government agencies, important petroleum extraction problems were identified. For each problem, areas of aerospace technology that might aid in its solution were also identified, where possible. Some of the problems were selected for further consideration. Work on these problems led to the formulation of specific concepts as candidate for development. Each concept is addressed to the solution of specific extraction problems and makes use of specific areas of aerospace technology.

  1. Terrisporobacter petrolearius sp. nov., isolated from an oilfield petroleum reservoir.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Guo, Xiang; Wang, Yanwei; He, Mingxiong; Ma, Kedong; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Xiaorong; Kong, Delong; Yang, Zhirong; Ruan, Zhiyong

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, spore-forming, strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated strain LAM0A37T, was isolated from enrichment samples collected from a petroleum reservoir in Shengli oilfield. Cells of strain LAM0A37T were rod-shaped and motile by peritrichous flagella. The optimal temperature and pH for growth were 40 °C and 7.0–7.5, respectively. The strain did not require NaCl for growth but tolerated up to 3 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain LAM0A37T was able to utilize glucose, fructose, maltose, xylose, sorbitol, cellobiose, melibiose and melezitose as sole carbon sources. Sulfite was used as an electron acceptor. The main products of glucose fermentation were acetate and CO2. The predominant fatty acid was C16 : 0 (23.6 %). The main polar lipid profile comprised of five glycolipids, six phospholipids and two lipids. No menaquinone was detected. The genomic DNA G+C content was 27.1 ± 0.2 mol% as determined by the T m method. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the isolate was a member of the genus Terrisporobacter, and was most closely related to Terrisporobacter glycolicus JCM 1401T and Terrisporobacter mayombei DSM 6539T with 98.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to both. DNA–DNA hybridization values between strain LAM0A37T and type strains of Terrisporobacter glycolicus and Terrisporobacter mayombei were 45.6 ± 0.3 % and 38.3 ± 0.4 %, respectively. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain LAM0A37T is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Terrisporobacter, for which the name Terrisporobacter petrolearius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LAM0A37T ( = ACCC 00740T = JCM 19845T). PMID:26297478

  2. A chemical EOR benchmark study of different reservoir simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Ali; Delshad, Mojdeh; Sepehrnoori, Kamy

    2016-09-01

    Interest in chemical EOR processes has intensified in recent years due to the advancements in chemical formulations and injection techniques. Injecting Polymer (P), surfactant/polymer (SP), and alkaline/surfactant/polymer (ASP) are techniques for improving sweep and displacement efficiencies with the aim of improving oil production in both secondary and tertiary floods. There has been great interest in chemical flooding recently for different challenging situations. These include high temperature reservoirs, formations with extreme salinity and hardness, naturally fractured carbonates, and sandstone reservoirs with heavy and viscous crude oils. More oil reservoirs are reaching maturity where secondary polymer floods and tertiary surfactant methods have become increasingly important. This significance has added to the industry's interest in using reservoir simulators as tools for reservoir evaluation and management to minimize costs and increase the process efficiency. Reservoir simulators with special features are needed to represent coupled chemical and physical processes present in chemical EOR processes. The simulators need to be first validated against well controlled lab and pilot scale experiments to reliably predict the full field implementations. The available data from laboratory scale include 1) phase behavior and rheological data; and 2) results of secondary and tertiary coreflood experiments for P, SP, and ASP floods under reservoir conditions, i.e. chemical retentions, pressure drop, and oil recovery. Data collected from corefloods are used as benchmark tests comparing numerical reservoir simulators with chemical EOR modeling capabilities such as STARS of CMG, ECLIPSE-100 of Schlumberger, REVEAL of Petroleum Experts. The research UTCHEM simulator from The University of Texas at Austin is also included since it has been the benchmark for chemical flooding simulation for over 25 years. The results of this benchmark comparison will be utilized to improve

  3. Modeling a distributed environment for a petroleum reservoir engineering application with software product line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Faria Scheidt, Rafael; Vilain, Patrícia; Dantas, M. A. R.

    2014-10-01

    Petroleum reservoir engineering is a complex and interesting field that requires large amount of computational facilities to achieve successful results. Usually, software environments for this field are developed without taking care out of possible interactions and extensibilities required by reservoir engineers. In this paper, we present a research work which it is characterized by the design and implementation based on a software product line model for a real distributed reservoir engineering environment. Experimental results indicate successfully the utilization of this approach for the design of distributed software architecture. In addition, all components from the proposal provided greater visibility of the organization and processes for the reservoir engineers.

  4. Integration of reservoir simulation and geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan

    Fluid production from tight and shale gas formations has increased significantly, and this unconventional portfolio of low-permeability reservoirs accounts for more than half of the gas produced in the United States. Stimulation and hydraulic fracturing are critical in making these systems productive, and hence it is important to understand the mechanics of the reservoir. When modeling fractured reservoirs using discrete-fracture network representation, the geomechanical effects are expected to have a significant impact on important reservoir characteristics. It has become more accepted that fracture growth, particularly in naturally fractured reservoirs with extremely low permeability, cannot be reliably represented by conventional planar representations. Characterizing the evolution of multiple, nonplanar, interconnected and possibly nonvertical hydraulic fractures requires hydraulic and mechanical characterization of the matrix, as well as existing latent or healed fracture networks. To solve these challenging problems, a reservoir simulator (Advanced Reactive Transport Simulator (ARTS)) capable of performing unconventional reservoir simulation is developed in this research work. A geomechanical model has been incorporated into the simulation framework with various coupling schemes and this model is used to understand the geomechanical effects in unconventional oil and gas recovery. This development allows ARTS to accept geomechanical information from external geomechanical simulators (soft coupling) or the solution of the geomechanical coupled problem (hard coupling). An iterative solution method of the flow and geomechanical equations has been used in implementing the hard coupling scheme. The hard coupling schemes were verified using one-dimensional and two-dimensional analytical solutions. The new reservoir simulator is applied to learn the influence of geomechanical impact on unconventional oil and gas production in a number of practical recovery scenarios

  5. Models for naturally fractured, carbonate reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Park, A.; Ozkan, G.; Zhan, X.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    This report outlines the need for new tools for the simulation of fractured carbonate reservoirs. Several problems are identified that call for the development of new reservoir simulation physical models and numerical techniques. These include: karst and vuggy media wherein Darcy`s and traditional multi-phase flow laws do not apply; the need for predicting the preproduction state of fracturing and stress so that the later response of effective stress-dependent reservoirs can be predicted; and methods for predicting the fracturing and collapse of vuggy and karst reservoirs in response to draw-down pressure created during production. Specific research directions for addressing each problem are outlined and preliminary results are noted.

  6. Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature

    DOEpatents

    Kamath, Krishna

    1984-08-14

    The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7.degree. F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88.degree. F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

  7. Mechanisms of arsenic enrichment in geothermal and petroleum reservoirs fluids in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Birkle, Peter; Bundschuh, Jochen; Sracek, Ondra

    2010-11-01

    The lack of chemical similarity between thermal fluids in geothermal and petroleum reservoirs in Mexico indicates a distinct origin for arsenic in both types of reservoirs. Deep fluids from geothermal reservoirs along the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) are characterized by elevated arsenic concentrations, within a range between 1 and 100 mg L(-1) at a depth from 600 to 3000 m b.s.l. Based on hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), arsenic is linked to typical geothermal species like lithium, silica, and boron. The lack of correlation between arsenic and salinity reflects the importance of secondary water-rock interaction processes. The predominance of arsenic compared to Fe- and Cu-concentrations, and the occurrence of secondary minerals (sulfides and clay minerals) in temperature-dependent hydrothermal zones, supports this hypothesis. Neither magmatic fluids input, nor As mineralization is a prerequisite for As enrichment in Mexican geothermal fluids. In contrast, petroleum reservoir waters from sedimentary basins in SE-Mexico show maximum As concentrations of 2 mg L(-1), at depths from 2900 to 6100 m b.s.l. The linear chloride-arsenic correlation indicates that evaporated seawater represents the major source for aqueous arsenic in oil reservoirs, and only minor arsenic proportions are derived from interaction with carbonate host rock. Speciation modeling suggests the lack of arsenic solubility control in both geothermal and petroleum reservoirs, but precipitation/co-precipitation of As with secondary sulfides could occur in petroleum reservoirs with high iron concentrations. Geothermal fluids from magmatic-type reservoirs (Los Azufres and Los Humeros at the TMVB and Las Tres Vírgenes with a granodioritic basement) show relative constant arsenic concentrations through varying temperature conditions, which indicates that temperatures above 230-250 °C provide optimal and stable conditions for arsenic mobility. In contrast, temperature conditions for sedimentary

  8. A petroleum system in search of a reservoir; the Palmyrid Region, Syria

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, D.C.; Dembicki, H. Jr.; Dow, W.G.

    1995-08-01

    World class accumulations of hydrocarbons have not been discovered in the Palmyrid region of central Syria despite the presence of all of the essential elements of a petroleum system such as source rock, seal rock, trap and, to a lesser extent, reservoir rock. Recent exploration has resulted in an appreciation of why the Palmyrid region has failed to yield significant hydrocarbon discoveries even though active source generation appears more than adequate to charge the basin. The early Triassic Mulussa E, D1 and C2 source-reservoir system is characterized by an overall shallowing up sequence capped by Mulussa C-1 salt rock. Source rock quality and facies distribution and subsequent oil and gas generation and migration are correctly placed in time and space to take advantage of the structural evolution of traps. The sub-salt system fails primarily because of poor reservoir quality although patchy, unpredictable porosity-permeability enhancement provides adequate reservoir quality for the Ash Shaer and Cherrife gas fields. The Palmyrid petroleum system illustrates a case where all of the processes and elements required to form large accumulations are present but for one essential element, the reservoir, is insufficiently developed to form major hydrocarbon accumulations.

  9. Petroleum reservoir engineering support for the Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In accordance with the ''Procedures for the Determination and Approval of Maximum Efficient Rates of Production from the Naval Petroleum Reserves'' issued by the Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, US Department of Energy, dated January 1985, the proposed MER for the NWS A4-A6 reservoirs is herewith submitted. The subject Task Assignment was explicit as to certain operational restraints within which the MER determinations were to be made. In the case of the NWS A4-A6 reservoirs, these restraints were limited to a specification of the water injection rates, i.e., gradually building up to and maintaining an injection rate of 22,000 barrels water per day. Accordingly, the proposed MER results in an average of 8575 BOA/D for the six-month period ending March 31, 1987, and 8662 BOA/D for the nine-month period ending mid-year 1987. We believe that these rates will be both attainable and sustainable, and will be a reasonable target which is justified in terms of both maximizing ultimate recovery and providing a suitable economic return. The study was performed in the manner prescribed by the Department of Energy. It was based on the reservoir study which was made by Evans, Carey and Crozier, and which had an effective date of May 1, 1986. The proposed MER differs from that in the study only as a result of injection rates which vary slightly from those assumed in the latter. Each of the sections of this MER proposal contains a discussion, if appropriate, plus such graphical or tabular presentations as are necessary to explain and/or support the conclusions contained therein.

  10. Existing and emerging technologies that exploit sulfur cycling bacteria in subsurface petroleum reservoir microbial communities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fossil fuels remain by far our most important energy resources, providing around 90% of global primary energy supply. In the coming decadal transition between petroleum reliance and a more sustainable energy future we must increasingly view our vital petroleum reserves as microbial ecosystems that can be engineered to responsibly and creatively meet the energy needs of societies worldwide. In this way, the bioenergy agenda must interface with the traditional geoenergy industry and the challenges it faces. Bioengineering and deep biosphere geomicrobiology focus on the ecophysiology and biogeography of microorganisms in subsurface habitats including marine sediments and petroleum reservoirs. Understanding microbial communities in fossil fuel deposits will allow their distribution and catalytic potential to be exploited as geobiotechnologies that target known problem areas including sulfur cycle management related to biodesulfurization of heavy oils and reservoir souring control via nitrate injection, as well as promising emerging directions such as understanding subsurface geofluid dispersal vectors that could enable microbes to be used as bio-indicators in offshore oil and gas exploration. Results related to different research themes within contemporary petroleum geomicrobiology and bioengineering at Newcastle University will be presented with a focus on microorganisms involved in sulfur cycling that are commonly detected in different oil field microbial communities including mesophilic sulfide-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and thermophilic sulfate-reducers belonging to the genus Desulfotomaculum.

  11. New Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Microbial Metagenome from Brazilian Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; Pantaroto de Vasconcellos, Suzan; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  12. New hydrocarbon degradation pathways in the microbial metagenome from Brazilian petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  13. Effective Stress Approximation using Geomechanical Formulation of Fracturing Technology (GFFT) in Petroleum Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, A.; Asef, M.; Kharrat, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, rock mechanics and geophysics contribution in petroleum industry has been significantly increased. Wellbore stability analysis in horizontal wells, sand production problem while extracting hydrocarbon from sandstone reservoirs, land subsidence due to production induced reservoir compaction, reservoir management, casing shearing are samples of these contributions. In this context, determination of the magnitude and orientation of the in-situ stresses is an essential parameter. This paper is presenting new method to estimate the magnitude of in-situ stresses based on fracturing technology data. Accordingly, kirsch equations for the circular cavities and fracturing technology models in permeable formations have been used to develop an innovative Geomechanical Formulation (GFFT). GFFT introduces a direct reasonable relation between the reservoir stresses and the breakdown pressure of fracture, while the concept of effective stress was employed. Thus, this complex formula contains functions of some rock mechanic parameters such as poison ratio, Biot’s coefficient, Young’s modulus, rock tensile strength, depth of reservoir and breakdown/reservoir pressure difference. Hence, this approach yields a direct method to estimate maximum and minimum effective/insitu stresses in an oil field and improves minimum in-situ stress estimation compared to previous studies. In case of hydraulic fracturing; a new stress analysis method is developed based on well known Darcy equations for fluid flow in porous media which improves in-situ stress estimation using reservoir parameters such as permeability, and injection flow rate. The accuracy of the method would be verified using reservoir data of a case history. The concepts discussed in this research would eventually suggest an alternative methodology with sufficient accuracy to derive in-situ stresses in hydrocarbon reservoirs, while no extra experimental work is accomplished for this purpose.

  14. Cooperative Learning in Reservoir Simulation Classes: Overcoming Disparate Entry Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awang, Mariyamni

    2006-10-01

    Reservoir simulation is one of the core courses in the petroleum engineering curriculum and it requires knowledge and skills in three major disciplines, namely programming, numerical methods and reservoir engineering. However, there were often gaps in the students' readiness to undertake the course, even after completing the necessary requirements. The disparate levels of competency of the good and poor students made it difficult to target a certain level. Cooperative learning in the form of projects and peer teaching was designed to address the major concern of disparate entry skills, and at the same time the method used should also succeed in keeping students interest in class, developing communication skills and improving self-learning. Slower and weaker students were expected to benefit from being taught by good students, who were better prepared, and good students would gain deeper comprehension of the subject matter. From evaluations, the approach was considered successful since the overall passing rate was greater than 95% compared to previous years of around 70-80%. It had also succeeded in improving the learning environment in class. Future simulation classes will continue to use the cooperative approach with minor adjustments.

  15. Rabi multi-sector reservoir simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bruijnzeels, C.; O`Halloran, C.

    1995-12-31

    To ensure optimum ultimate recovery of the 46 meter thick oil rim of the Rabi Field in Gabon, a full field simulation model was required. Due to it`s size and complexity, with local cusping, coning and geological circumstances dominating individual well behavior, a single full field model would be too large for existing hardware. A method was developed to simulate the full field with 5 separate sector models, whilst allowing the development in one sector model to have an effect on the boundary conditions of another sector. In this manner, the 13 x 4.5 km field could be simulated with a horizontal well spacing down to 175 meter. This paper focuses on the method used to attach single 3-phase tank cells to a sector simulation grid in order to represent non-simulated parts of the field. It also describes the history matching methodology and how to run a multisector model in forecasting mode. This method can be used for any reservoir, where size and complexity require large reservoir simulation models that normally could not be modeled within the constraints of available computer facilities. Detailed studies can be conducted on specific parts of a field, whilst allowing for dynamic flow and pressure effects caused by the rest of the field.

  16. Profiles of Reservoir Properties of Oil-Bearing Plays for Selected Petroleum Provinces in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, P.A.; Attanasi, E.D.

    2016-01-01

    Each province profile figure consists of five strip charts and a boxplot. The five strip charts display for individual plays the following reservoir-fluid and reservoir properties: A, oil density (American Petroleum Institute [API] gravity in degrees); B, computed pseudo-Dykstra-Parsons coefficient; C, reservoir porosity (in percent); D, reservoir permeability (in millidarcies); and E, estimates of the original oil in place (OOIP) per unit volume of reservoir rock (in barrels per acre-foot). The OOIP per unit volume of reservoir rock is an indicator of the relative richness of the oil reservoir and is derived from estimates in the CRD of OOIP, reservoir acreage, and net pay. The net pay is the interval of productive reservoir rock. The same data for OOIP per unit volume are graphed as a strip chart (E) and a boxplot (F).

  17. Dynamic processes of indigenous microorganisms from a low-temperature petroleum reservoir during nutrient stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pei-Ke; Li, Guo-Qiang; Zhao, Ling-Xia; Dai, Xue-Cheng; Tian, Hui-Mei; Dai, Liu-Bing; Wang, Hong-Bo; Huang, Hai-Dong; Chen, Yue-Hua; Ma, Ting

    2014-02-01

    Compared to medium-high temperature petroleum reservoirs (30°C-73°C), little is known about microbial regulation by nutrients in low-temperature reservoirs. In this study, we report the performance (oil emulsification and biogas production) and community structure of indigenous microorganisms from a low-temperature (22.6°C) petroleum reservoir during nutrient stimulation. Culture-dependent approaches indicated that the number of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria (HOB), nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) and methane-producing bacteria (MPB) increased by between 10- and 1000-fold, while sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were observed at low levels during stimulation. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that Pseudomonas, Ochrobactrum, Acinetobacter, Halomonas and Marinobacter, which have the capability to produce surfactants, were selectively enriched. Methanoculleus, Methanosaeta, Methanocorpusculum and Methanocalculus showed the largest increase in relative abundance among archaea. Micro-emulsion formed with an average oil droplet diameter of 14.3 μm (ranging between 4.1 μm and 84.2 μm) during stimulation. Gas chromatographic analysis of gas production (186 mL gas/200 mL medium) showed the levels of CO2 and CH4 increased 8.97% and 6.21%, respectively. Similar to medium-high temperature reservoirs, HOB, NRB, SRB and MPB were ubiquitous in the low-temperature reservoir, and oil emulsification and gas production were the main phenomena observed during stimulation. Oil emulsification required a longer duration of time to occur in the low-temperature reservoir. PMID:23968868

  18. T-R Cycle Characterization and Imaging: Advanced Diagnostic Methodology for Petroleum Reservoir and Trap Detection and Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; William C. Parcell; Bruce S. Hart

    2006-03-06

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is to classify the known petroleum reservoirs in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by using a sequence stratigraphic framework based on T-R sequence terminology, to formulate exploration strategies for identifying specific facies with reservoir potential and for identifying possible stratigraphic traps using a sequence stratigraphic model in combination with the discovered reservoir classification, and to use these exploration strategies to assess the potential for underdeveloped and undiscovered petroleum resources in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  19. Improved storage efficiency through geologic modeling and reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.; Covatch, G.L.

    1997-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), through partnerships with industry, is demonstrating the importance of geologic modeling and reservoir simulation for optimizing the development and operation of gas storage fields. The geologic modeling and reservoir simulation study for the Natural Fuel Gas Supply Corporation CRADA was completed in September 1995. The results of this study were presented at the 1995 Society of Petroleum Engineers` (SPE) Eastern Regional Meeting. Although there has been no field verification of the modeling results, the study has shown the potential advantages and cost savings opportunities of using horizontal wells for storage enhancement. The geologic modeling for the Equitrans` CRADA was completed in September 1995 and was also presented at the 1995 SPE Eastern Regional Meeting. The reservoir modeling of past field performance was completed in November 1996 and prediction runs are currently being made to investigate the potential of offering either a 10 day or 30 day peaking service in addition to the existing 110 day base load service. Initial results have shown that peaking services can be provided through remediation of well damage and by drilling either several new vertical wells or one new horizontal well. The geologic modeling for the Northern Indiana Public Service Company CRADA was completed in November 1996 with a horizontal well being completed in January 1997. Based on well test results, the well will significantly enhance gas deliverability from the field and will allow the utilization of gas from an area of the storage field that was not accessible from their existing vertical wells. Results are presented from these three case studies.

  20. Life in the slow lane; biogeochemistry of biodegraded petroleum containing reservoirs and implications for energy recovery and carbon management.

    PubMed

    Head, Ian M; Gray, Neil D; Larter, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the processes underlying the formation of heavy oil has been transformed in the last decade. The process was once thought to be driven by oxygen delivered to deep petroleum reservoirs by meteoric water. This paradigm has been replaced by a view that the process is anaerobic and frequently associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation. The thermal history of a reservoir exerts a fundamental control on the occurrence of biodegraded petroleum, and microbial activity is focused at the base of the oil column in the oil water transition zone, that represents a hotspot in the petroleum reservoir biome. Here we present a synthesis of new and existing microbiological, geochemical, and biogeochemical data that expands our view of the processes that regulate deep life in petroleum reservoir ecosystems and highlights interactions of a range of biotic and abiotic factors that determine whether petroleum is likely to be biodegraded in situ, with important consequences for oil exploration and production. Specifically we propose that the salinity of reservoir formation waters exerts a key control on the occurrence of biodegraded heavy oil reservoirs and introduce the concept of palaeopickling. We also evaluate the interaction between temperature and salinity to explain the occurrence of non-degraded oil in reservoirs where the temperature has not reached the 80-90°C required for palaeopasteurization. In addition we evaluate several hypotheses that might explain the occurrence of organisms conventionally considered to be aerobic, in nominally anoxic petroleum reservoir habitats. Finally we discuss the role of microbial processes for energy recovery as we make the transition from fossil fuel reliance, and how these fit within the broader socioeconomic landscape of energy futures. PMID:25426105

  1. Life in the slow lane; biogeochemistry of biodegraded petroleum containing reservoirs and implications for energy recovery and carbon management

    PubMed Central

    Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.; Larter, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the processes underlying the formation of heavy oil has been transformed in the last decade. The process was once thought to be driven by oxygen delivered to deep petroleum reservoirs by meteoric water. This paradigm has been replaced by a view that the process is anaerobic and frequently associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation. The thermal history of a reservoir exerts a fundamental control on the occurrence of biodegraded petroleum, and microbial activity is focused at the base of the oil column in the oil water transition zone, that represents a hotspot in the petroleum reservoir biome. Here we present a synthesis of new and existing microbiological, geochemical, and biogeochemical data that expands our view of the processes that regulate deep life in petroleum reservoir ecosystems and highlights interactions of a range of biotic and abiotic factors that determine whether petroleum is likely to be biodegraded in situ, with important consequences for oil exploration and production. Specifically we propose that the salinity of reservoir formation waters exerts a key control on the occurrence of biodegraded heavy oil reservoirs and introduce the concept of palaeopickling. We also evaluate the interaction between temperature and salinity to explain the occurrence of non-degraded oil in reservoirs where the temperature has not reached the 80–90°C required for palaeopasteurization. In addition we evaluate several hypotheses that might explain the occurrence of organisms conventionally considered to be aerobic, in nominally anoxic petroleum reservoir habitats. Finally we discuss the role of microbial processes for energy recovery as we make the transition from fossil fuel reliance, and how these fit within the broader socioeconomic landscape of energy futures. PMID:25426105

  2. Scientific bases, methods, and results of mathematical simulation and prediction of structure and behavior of petroleum geology systems

    SciTech Connect

    Buryakovsky, L.A. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that the systems approach to geology is both a sophisticated ideology and a scientific method for investigation of very complicated geological systems. As applied to petroleum geology, it includes the methodological base and technology of mathematical simulation used for modeling geological systems: the systems that have been previously investigated and estimated by experimental data and/or field studies. Because geological systems develop in time, it is very important to simulate them as dynamic systems. The main tasks in the systems approach to petroleum geology are the numerical simulation of physical and reservoir properties of rocks, pore (geofluid) pressure in reservoir beds, and hydrocarbon resources. The results of numerical simulation are used for prediction of geological system structure and behavior in both studies and noninvestigated areas.

  3. Multigrid methods with applications to reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Shengyou

    1994-05-01

    Multigrid methods are studied for solving elliptic partial differential equations. Focus is on parallel multigrid methods and their use for reservoir simulation. Multicolor Fourier analysis is used to analyze the behavior of standard multigrid methods for problems in one and two dimensions. Relation between multicolor and standard Fourier analysis is established. Multiple coarse grid methods for solving model problems in 1 and 2 dimensions are considered; at each coarse grid level we use more than one coarse grid to improve convergence. For a given Dirichlet problem, a related extended problem is first constructed; a purification procedure can be used to obtain Moore-Penrose solutions of the singular systems encountered. For solving anisotropic equations, semicoarsening and line smoothing techniques are used with multiple coarse grid methods to improve convergence. Two-level convergence factors are estimated using multicolor. In the case where each operator has the same stencil on each grid point on one level, exact multilevel convergence factors can be obtained. For solving partial differential equations with discontinuous coefficients, interpolation and restriction operators should include information about the equation coefficients. Matrix-dependent interpolation and restriction operators based on the Schur complement can be used in nonsymmetric cases. A semicoarsening multigrid solver with these operators is used in UTCOMP, a 3-D, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional reservoir simulator. The numerical experiments are carried out on different computing systems. Results indicate that the multigrid methods are promising.

  4. Microbial diversity and abundance in the Xinjiang Luliang long-term water-flooding petroleum reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peike; Tian, Huimei; Li, Guoqiang; Sun, Hongwen; Ma, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Microbial populations associated with microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and their abundance in the Xinjiang Luliang water-flooding petroleum reservoir were investigated using 16S rRNA, nitrate reductases, dissimilatory sulfate reductase, and methyl coenzyme-M reductase-encoded genes to provide ecological information for the potential application of MEOR. 16S rRNA gene miseq sequencing revealed that this reservoir harbored large amounts of taxa, including 155 bacterial and 7 archeal genera. Among them, Arcobacter, Halomonas, Marinobacterium, Marinobacter, Sphingomonas, Rhodococcus, Pseudomonas, Dietzia, Ochrobactrum, Hyphomonas, Acinetobacter, and Shewanella were dominant, and have the potential to grow using hydrocarbons as carbon sources. Metabolic gene clone libraries indicated that the nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) mainly belonged to Pseudomonas, Azospirillum, Bradyrhizobium, Thauera, Magnetospirillum, Sinorhizobium, Azoarcus, and Rhodobacter; the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were Desulfarculus, Desulfomonile, Desulfosarcina, Desulfotignum, Desulfacinum, Desulfatibacillum, Desulfatibacillum, Desulfomicrobium, and Desulfovibrio; while the methanogens were archaea and belonged to Methanomethylovorans, Methanosaeta, Methanococcus, Methanolobus, and Methanobacterium. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the number of bacterial 16S rRNA reached 106 copies/mL, while the metabolic genes of NRB, SRB, and methanogens reached 104 copies/mL. These results show that the Luliang reservoir has abundant microbial populations associated with oil recovery, suggesting that the reservoir has potential for MEOR. PMID:25641701

  5. Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Corbett, P.; Ementon, N.

    1994-12-31

    Geochemistry provides a natural but poorly exploited link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the PVT properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a sub-meter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

  6. Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N.

    1997-02-01

    Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

  7. Spatial isolation and environmental factors drive distinct bacterial and archaeal communities in different types of petroleum reservoirs in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peike; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Xie, Jinxia; Zeng, Bing; Zhou, Jiefang; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of microbial communities and their drivers in petroleum reservoir environments, we performed pyrosequencing of microbial partial 16S rRNA, derived from 20 geographically separated water-flooding reservoirs, and two reservoirs that had not been flooded, in China. The results indicated that distinct underground microbial communities inhabited the different reservoirs. Compared with the bacteria, archaeal alpha-diversity was not strongly correlated with the environmental variables. The variation of the bacterial and archaeal community compositions was affected synthetically, by the mining patterns, spatial isolation, reservoir temperature, salinity and pH of the formation brine. The environmental factors explained 64.22% and 78.26% of the total variance for the bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively. Despite the diverse community compositions, shared populations (48 bacterial and 18 archaeal genera) were found and were dominant in most of the oilfields. Potential indigenous microorganisms, including Carboxydibrachium, Thermosinus, and Neptunomonas, were only detected in a reservoir that had not been flooded with water. This study indicates that: 1) the environmental variation drives distinct microbial communities in different reservoirs; 2) compared with the archaea, the bacterial communities were highly heterogeneous within and among the reservoirs; and 3) despite the community variation, some microorganisms are dominant in multiple petroleum reservoirs. PMID:26838035

  8. Spatial isolation and environmental factors drive distinct bacterial and archaeal communities in different types of petroleum reservoirs in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peike; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Xie, Jinxia; Zeng, Bing; Zhou, Jiefang; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of microbial communities and their drivers in petroleum reservoir environments, we performed pyrosequencing of microbial partial 16S rRNA, derived from 20 geographically separated water-flooding reservoirs, and two reservoirs that had not been flooded, in China. The results indicated that distinct underground microbial communities inhabited the different reservoirs. Compared with the bacteria, archaeal alpha-diversity was not strongly correlated with the environmental variables. The variation of the bacterial and archaeal community compositions was affected synthetically, by the mining patterns, spatial isolation, reservoir temperature, salinity and pH of the formation brine. The environmental factors explained 64.22% and 78.26% of the total variance for the bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively. Despite the diverse community compositions, shared populations (48 bacterial and 18 archaeal genera) were found and were dominant in most of the oilfields. Potential indigenous microorganisms, including Carboxydibrachium, Thermosinus, and Neptunomonas, were only detected in a reservoir that had not been flooded with water. This study indicates that: 1) the environmental variation drives distinct microbial communities in different reservoirs; 2) compared with the archaea, the bacterial communities were highly heterogeneous within and among the reservoirs; and 3) despite the community variation, some microorganisms are dominant in multiple petroleum reservoirs.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Gram-Positive Biosurfactant-Producing Halothermophilic Bacilli From Iranian Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Zargari, Saeed; Ramezani, Amin; Ostvar, Sassan; Rezaei, Rasool; Niazi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    Background: Petroleum reservoirs have long been known as the hosts of extremophilic microorganisms. Some of these microorganisms are known for their potential biotechnological applications, particularly production of extra and intracellular polymers and enzymes. Objectives: Here, 14 petroleum liquid samples from southern Iranian oil reservoirs were screened for presence of biosurfactant‐producing halothermophiles. Materials and Methods: Mixture of the reservoir fluid samples with a minimal growth medium was incubated under an N2 atmosphere in 40°C; 0.5 mL samples were transferred from the aqueous phase to agar plates after 72 hours of incubation; 100 mL cell cultures were prepared using the MSS-1 (mineral salt solution 1) liquid medium with 5% (w/v) NaCl. The time-course samples were analyzed by recording the absorbance at 600 nm using a spectrophotometer. Incubation was carried out in 40°C with mild shaking in aerobic conditions. Thermotolerance was evaluated by growing the isolates at 40, 50, 60 and 70°C with varying NaCl concentrations of 5% and 10% (w/v). Halotolerance was evaluated using NaCl concentrations of 5%, 10%, 12.5% and 15% (w/v) and incubating them at 40°C under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Different phenotypic characteristics were evaluated, as outlined in Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology. Comparing 16S rDNA sequences is one of the most powerful tools for classification of microorganisms. Results: Among 34 isolates, 10 demonstrated biosurfactant production and growth at temperatures between 40°C and 70°C in saline media containing 5%‐15% w/v NaCl. Using partial 16S rDNA sequencing (and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis [ARDRA]) and biochemical tests (API tests 20E and 50 CHB), all the 10 isolates proved to be facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive moderate thermohalophiles of the genus Bacillus (B. thermoglucosidasius, B. thermodenitrificans, B. thermoleovorans, B. stearothermophilus and B. licheniformis

  10. Noble gas as tracers for CO2 deep input in petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Magali; Stuart, Finlay; Gilfillan, Stuart; Montel, François; Masini, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    The sub-salt hydrocarbon reservoirs in the deep offshore part of the Atlantic Ocean passive margins are a new key target for frontier oil and gas exploration. Type I source rocks locally rich in TOC (Total Organic Carbon) combined with an important secondary connected porosity of carbonate reservoirs overlain by an impermeable salt layer gives rise to reservoirs with high petroleum potential. However, some target structures have been found to be mainly filled with CO2 rich fluids. δ13C of the CO2 is generally between -9 and -4 permil, compatible with a deep source (metamorphic or mantle). Understanding the origin of the CO2 and the relative timing of its input into reservoir layers in regard to the geodynamic context appears to be a key issue for CO2 risk evaluation. The inertness and ubiquity of noble gases in crustal fluids make them powerful tools to trace the origin and migration of mixed fluids (Ballentine and Burnard 2002). The isotopic signature of He, Ne and Ar and the elemental pattern (He to Xe) of reservoir fluid from pressurized bottom hole samples provide an insight into fluid source influences at each reservoir depth. Three main end-members can be mixed into reservoir fluids (e.g. Gilfillan et al., 2008): atmospheric signature due to aquifer recharge, radiogenic component from organic fluid ± metamorphic influence, and mantle input. Their relative fractionation provides insights into the nature of fluid transport (Burnard et al., 2012)and its relative migration timing. In the studied offshore passive margin reservoirs, from both sides of South Atlantic margin, a strong MORB-like magmatic CO2 influence is clear. Hence, CO2 charge must have occurred during or after lithospheric break-up. CO2 charge(s) history appears to be complex, and in some cases requires several inputs to generate the observed noble gas pattern. Combining the knowledge obtained from noble gas (origin, relative timing, number of charges) with organic geochemical and thermodynamic

  11. Could petroleum biodegradation be a joint achievement of aerobic and anaerobic microrganisms in deep sea reservoirs?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several studies suggest that petroleum biodegradation can be achieved by either aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms, depending on oxygen input or other electron acceptors and appropriate nutrients. Evidence from in vitro experiments with samples of petroleum formation water and oils from Pampo Field indicate that petroleum biodegradation is more likely to be a joint achievement of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial consortium, refining our previous observations of aerobic degradation. The aerobic consortium depleted, in decreasing order, hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes while the anaerobic consortium depleted hydrocarbons > steranes > hopanes > tricyclic terpanes. The oxygen content of the mixed consortia was measured from time to time revealing alternating periods of microaerobicity (O2 ~0.8 mg.L-1) and of aerobicity (O2~6.0 mg.L-1). In this experiment, the petroleum biodegradation changed from time to time, alternating periods of biodegradation similar to the aerobic process and periods of biodegradation similar to the anaerobic process. The consortia showed preferences for metabolizing hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes during a 90-day period, after which this trend changed and steranes were more biodegraded than hopanes. The analysis of aerobic oil degrading microbiota by the 16S rRNA gene clone library detected the presence of Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Mesorhizobium and Achromobacter, and the analysis of the anaerobic oil degrading microbiota using the same technique detected the presence of Bacillus and Acinetobacter (facultative strains). In the mixed consortia Stenotrophomonas, Brevibacterium, Bacillus, Rhizobium, Achromobacter and 5% uncultured bacteria were detected. This is certainly a new contribution to the study of reservoir biodegradation processes, combining two of the more important accepted hypotheses. PMID:22196374

  12. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability

  13. Simulation of California's Major Reservoirs Outflow Using Data Mining Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    The reservoir's outflow is controlled by reservoir operators, which is different from the upstream inflow. The outflow is more important than the reservoir's inflow for the downstream water users. In order to simulate the complicated reservoir operation and extract the outflow decision making patterns for California's 12 major reservoirs, we build a data-driven, computer-based ("artificial intelligent") reservoir decision making tool, using decision regression and classification tree approach. This is a well-developed statistical and graphical modeling methodology in the field of data mining. A shuffled cross validation approach is also employed to extract the outflow decision making patterns and rules based on the selected decision variables (inflow amount, precipitation, timing, water type year etc.). To show the accuracy of the model, a verification study is carried out comparing the model-generated outflow decisions ("artificial intelligent" decisions) with that made by reservoir operators (human decisions). The simulation results show that the machine-generated outflow decisions are very similar to the real reservoir operators' decisions. This conclusion is based on statistical evaluations using the Nash-Sutcliffe test. The proposed model is able to detect the most influential variables and their weights when the reservoir operators make an outflow decision. While the proposed approach was firstly applied and tested on California's 12 major reservoirs, the method is universally adaptable to other reservoir systems.

  14. History matching of petroleum reservoir models by the Ensemble Kalman Filter and parameterization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Leila; Gervais, Véronique; Ravalec, Mickaële Le; Wackernagel, Hans

    2013-06-01

    The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) has been successfully applied in petroleum engineering during the past few years to constrain reservoir models to production or seismic data. This sequential assimilation method provides a set of updated static variables (porosity, permeability) and dynamic variables (pressure, saturation) at each assimilation time. However, several limitations can be pointed out. In particular, the method does not prevent petrophysical realizations from departing from prior information. In addition, petrophysical properties can reach extreme (non-physical) values. In this work, we propose to combine the EnKF with two parameterization methods designed to preserve second-order statistical properties: pilot points and gradual deformation. The aim is to prevent the departure of the constrained petrophysical property distributions from prior information. Over/under estimations should also be avoided. The two algorithms are applied to a synthetic case. Several parameter configurations are investigated in order to identify solutions improving the performance of the method.

  15. The sequential method for the black-oil reservoir simulation on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoyan; Chen, Zhangxin; Huan, Guanren

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents new results for applying the sequential solution method to the black-oil reservoir simulation with unstructured grids. The fully implicit solution method has been successfully applied to reservoir simulation with unstructured grids. However, the complexity of the fully implicit method and the irregularity of the grids result in a very complicated structure of linear equation systems (LESs) and in high computational cost to solve them. To tackle this problem, the sequential method is applied to reduce the size of the LESs. To deal with instable problems caused by the low implicit degree of this method, some practical techniques are introduced to control convergence of Newton-Raphson's iterations which are exploited in the linearization of the governing equations of the black-oil model. These techniques are tested with the benchmark problem of the ninth comparative solution project (CSP) organized by the society of petroleum engineers (SPE) and applied to field-scale models of both saturated and undersaturated reservoirs. The simulation results show that the sequential method uses as little as 20.01% of the memory for solving the LESs and 23.89% of the total computational time of the fully implicit method to reach the same precision for the undersaturated reservoirs, when the same iteration control parameters are used for both solution methods. However, for the saturated reservoirs, the sequential method must use stricter iteration control parameters to reach the same precision as the fully implicit method.

  16. A structurally complex and dynamic reservoir description for reservoir simulation, Kuparuk River Field, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, T.P.; Leander, M.H.; Wilcox, T.C.

    1995-08-01

    The Kupanuk River Field is a structurally complex giant oil field adjacent to the Prudhoe Bay Field on Alaska`s North Slope. Oil is reservoired within two Early Cretaceous shallow marine sandstone formations, separated stratigraphically by an erosionally truncated marine silt/shale. Subjected to several phases of tectonism, this highly compartmentalized reservoir has been developed on regular 160 acre direct line drive patterns. An integrated team of geoscientists and engineers from BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. and ARCO Alaska Inc. is presently quantifying the benefits of infill drilling at Kuparuk, and identifying the best locations for well placement. The two primary reservoir characteristics believed to impact the effectiveness of infill drilling are large-scale reservoir heterogeneity, and reservoir comparmentation due to faulting. Multiple thin pay zones within the two reservoir intervals are isolated laterally by faults with magnitudes greater than pay zone thickness. A process and tools designed to construct and maintain a structurally complex reservoir description, shared by the geoscientists and reservoir engineers, are described. Cross-discipline integration is aided by the use of Tech*Logic`s IREX 3-D reservoir modeling and visualization application. The unique architecture of the IREX model allows for representation of very complex structural geometries, and facilitates iteration between reservoir description and simulation, along the seismic to simulation continuum. Modifications to the reservoir description are guided by well-level history matching within the constraints of all available geoscience information. The techniques described will be of particular interest to those working on reservoir description and simulation of structurally complex fields.

  17. Microbial abundance and community composition influence production performance in a low-temperature petroleum reservoir.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Gao, Peike; Wu, Yunqiang; Tian, Huimei; Dai, Xuecheng; Wang, Yansen; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhang, Hongzuo; Pan, Xiaoxuan; Dong, Hanping; Ma, Ting

    2014-05-01

    Enhanced oil recovery using indigenous microorganisms has been successfully applied in the petroleum industry, but the role of microorganisms remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the relationship between microbial population dynamics and oil production performance during a water flooding process coupled with nutrient injection in a low-temperature petroleum reservoir. Samples were collected monthly over a two-year period. The microbial composition of samples was determined using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. Our results indicated that the microbial community structure in each production well microhabitat was dramatically altered during flooding with eutrophic water. As well as an increase in the density of microorganisms, biosurfactant producers, such as Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Rhodococcus, and Rhizobium, were detected in abundance. Furthermore, the density of these microorganisms was closely related to the incremental oil production. Oil emulsification and changes in the fluid-production profile were also observed. In addition, we found that microbial community structure was strongly correlated with environmental factors, such as water content and total nitrogen. These results suggest that injected nutrients increase the abundance of microorganisms, particularly biosurfactant producers. These bacteria and their metabolic products subsequently emulsify oil and alter fluid-production profiles to enhance oil recovery. PMID:24730445

  18. Simulating Gas-Liquid-Water Partitioning and Fluid Properties of Petroleum under Pressure: Implications for Deep-Sea Blowouts.

    PubMed

    Gros, Jonas; Reddy, Christopher M; Nelson, Robert K; Socolofsky, Scott A; Arey, J Samuel

    2016-07-19

    With the expansion of offshore petroleum extraction, validated models are needed to simulate the behaviors of petroleum compounds released in deep (>100 m) waters. We present a thermodynamic model of the densities, viscosities, and gas-liquid-water partitioning of petroleum mixtures with varying pressure, temperature, and composition based on the Peng-Robinson equation-of-state and the modified Henry's law (Krychevsky-Kasarnovsky equation). The model is applied to Macondo reservoir fluid released during the Deepwater Horizon disaster, represented with 279-280 pseudocomponents, including 131-132 individual compounds. We define >n-C8 pseudocomponents based on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) measurements, which enable the modeling of aqueous partitioning for n-C8 to n-C26 fractions not quantified individually. Thermodynamic model predictions are tested against available laboratory data on petroleum liquid densities, gas/liquid volume fractions, and liquid viscosities. We find that the emitted petroleum mixture was ∼29-44% gas and ∼56-71% liquid, after cooling to local conditions near the broken Macondo riser stub (∼153 atm and 4.3 °C). High pressure conditions dramatically favor the aqueous dissolution of C1-C4 hydrocarbons and also influence the buoyancies of bubbles and droplets. Additionally, the simulated densities of emitted petroleum fluids affect previous estimates of the volumetric flow rate of dead oil from the emission source. PMID:27117673

  19. Magnetic theoretical and experimental study of clays for petroleum reservoir clay typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Aleksandr; Makarova, Maria; Telman, Meruert

    2013-04-01

    This study describes theoretical and experimental magnetic analysis of different clay types for petroleum reservoir characterisation by using low and high field magnetic susceptibility. Most clays for example, saponite, clay loam and bentonite are paramagnetic, whereas some clays (kaolinite) and matrix minerals such as quartz and calcite are diamagnetic. Model magnetic susceptibility and magnetic hysteresis plots for various concentrations of different clays in quartz matrix were initially calculated. Experimental magnetic measurements were undertaken for comparison on a series of synthetic reservoir samples comprising various concentrations of dispersed clays in a quartz matrix. The experimental magnetic measurements showed substantial agreement with the model magnetic values, and with estimates of the magnetic susceptibility based on low and high field magnetic susceptibility for derived mineral contents. Importantly different magnetic parameters, including IRM (isothermal remnant magnetisation) were determined for the different clay types and their mixtures with the sandstone rock matrix, together with given permeability variations in the samples. Results demonstrate that these magnetic measurements potentially provide a sensitive, rapid, quantitative technique which can be used for petrophysical analysis of clay-rich rocks and clay typing.

  20. A general formulation for compositional reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, F.; Guzman, J.; Galindo-Nava, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors present a general formulation to solve the non-linear difference equations that arise in compositional reservoir simulation. The general approach here presented is based on newton`s method and provides a systematic approach to generate several formulations to solve the compositional problem, each possessing a different degree of implicitness and stability characteristics. The Fully-Implicit method is at the higher end of the implicitness spectrum while the IMPECS method, implicit in pressure-explicit in composition and saturation, is at the lower end. They show that all methods may be obtained as particular cases of the fully-implicit method. Regarding the matrix problem, all methods have a similar matrix structure; the composition of the Jacobian matrix is however unique in each case, being in some instances amenable to reductions for optimal solution of the matrix problem. Based on this, a different approach to derive IMPECS type methods is proposed; in this case, the whole set of 2nc + 6 equations, that apply in each gridblock, is reduced to a single pressure equation through matrix reduction operations; this provides a more stable numerical scheme, compared to other published IMPCS methods, in which the subset of thermodynamic equilibrium equations is arbitrarily decoupled form the set of gridblock equations to perform such reduction. The authors discuss how the general formulation here presented can be used to formulate and construct an adaptive-implicit compositional simulators. They also present results on the numerical performance of FI, IMPSEC and IMPECS methods on some test problems.

  1. Feasibility study of sedimentary enhanced geothermal systems using reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Kyoung

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the preliminary feasibility of commercial geothermal projects, from a sedimentary reservoir with low permeability that requires productivity enhancement, using numerical reservoir simulation. The performance of a sedimentary geothermal reservoir is investigated in terms of reservoir hydraulics and thermal evolution. To build a reliable benchmark for simulation study, validation of the numerical reservoir model with respect to an analytical model is presented, and the process to achieve an acceptable match between the numerical and analytical solutions is described. The analytical model used in this study is based on the work of Gringarten (1978), which consists of a conceptual geothermal reservoir, considering an injection and production well doublet in a homogeneous porous media. A commercial thermal reservoir simulator (STARS from Computer Modeling Group, CMG) is used in this work for numerical modeling. In order to reproduce the analytical model results, the numerical simulation model is modified to include the same assumptions of the analytical model. Simulation model parameters that make the numerical results deviate from the analytical solution, such as the grid block size, time step and no-flow boundary are identified and investigated. An analytical tracer test model proposed by Shook (2000) is numerically modeled. This model allows us to predict the time when the temperature of the produced water decreases by capturing a tracer component at production well. Reservoir simulation models with different porosity and permeability distribution are tested to see the effects of reservoir inhomogeneity and anisotropy. In particular, premature thermal breakthrough due to the presence of high permeability streak in a reservoir model is simulated. In an effort to apply the knowledge we obtained from the analytical solutions, the effects of reservoir rock and water properties, as a function of pressure and temperature, are

  2. T-R Cycle Characterization and Imaging: Advanced Diagnostic Methodology for Petroleum Reservoir and Trap Detection and Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-08-30

    Characterization of stratigraphic sequences (T-R cycles or sequences) included outcrop studies, well log analysis and seismic reflection interpretation. These studies were performed by researchers at the University of Alabama, Wichita State University and McGill University. The outcrop, well log and seismic characterization studies were used to develop a depositional sequence model, a T-R cycle (sequence) model, and a sequence stratigraphy predictive model. The sequence stratigraphy predictive model developed in this study is based primarily on the modified T-R cycle (sequence) model. The T-R cycle (sequence) model using transgressive and regressive systems tracts and aggrading, backstepping, and infilling intervals or sections was found to be the most appropriate sequence stratigraphy model for the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the Gulf of Mexico to improve petroleum stratigraphic trap and specific reservoir facies imaging, detection and delineation. The known petroleum reservoirs of the Mississippi Interior and North Louisiana Salt Basins were classified using T-R cycle (sequence) terminology. The transgressive backstepping reservoirs have been the most productive of oil, and the transgressive backstepping and regressive infilling reservoirs have been the most productive of gas. Exploration strategies were formulated using the sequence stratigraphy predictive model and the classification of the known petroleum reservoirs utilizing T-R cycle (sequence) terminology. The well log signatures and seismic reflector patterns were determined to be distinctive for the aggrading, backstepping and infilling sections of the T-R cycle (sequence) and as such, well log and seismic data are useful for recognizing and defining potential reservoir facies. The use of the sequence stratigraphy predictive model, in combination with the knowledge of how the distinctive characteristics of the T-R system tracts and their subdivisions are expressed in well log patterns

  3. [Microbial diversity in shengli petroleum reservoirs analyzed by T-RFLP].

    PubMed

    Yuan, San-qing; Xue, Yan-fen; Gao, Peng; Wang, Wei-dong; Ma, Yan-he; Li, Xi-ming; Xu, Guo-wang

    2007-04-01

    Recent investigations on the microbial ecology of oil reservoirs in a variety of locales indicated that these habitats harbor various assemblages. In this study, a cultured-independent molecular technique, Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP), was used to analyze the microbial diversity of an injection well (S12-ZHU) and three related production wells (S12-4, S12-5 and S12-19) in the ShengLi oilfield (Shandong province, China). The 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR with the 5'carboxy-fluorescein (5-FAM)-labelled universal forward primers (27F for bacteria and 21F for archaea) and a universal reverse primer (1495R). Then the 16S rRNA genes were digested with restriction enzymes (Hae III and Hha I) and analyzed by using an automated DNA sequencer. The Shannon-Wiener Diversity index, based on the T-RFLP profiles, indicated that the bacterial and archaeal species richness in the injection well was higher than those of the production ones. The similarity coefficient showed the microbial community similarity among the four samples was 22.4%-30.8% (Bacteria) and 20.8%-34.5% (Archaea), respectively. According to the analysis by TAP T-RFLP program, species belonging to Pseudomonas, Marinobacter and Methanosarcina as well as some uncultured archaeon were supposed to be the dominant bacteria in all four samples. Thus, this study indicates that T-RFLP is useful for analysis of the microbial diversity in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:17552237

  4. Large eddy simulation of a pumped- storage reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, Marina; Leite Ribeiro, Marcelo; Roman, Federico; Armenio, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The last decades have seen an increasing number of pumped-storage hydropower projects all over the world. Pumped-storage schemes move water between two reservoirs located at different elevations to store energy and to generate electricity following the electricity demand. Thus the reservoirs can be subject to important water level variations occurring at the daily scale. These new cycles leads to changes in the hydraulic behaviour of the reservoirs. Sediment dynamics and sediment budgets are modified, sometimes inducing problems of erosion and deposition within the reservoirs. With the development of computer performances, the use of numerical techniques has become popular for the study of environmental processes. Among numerical techniques, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has arisen as an alternative tool for problems characterized by complex physics and geometries. This work uses the LES-COAST Code, a LES model under development in the framework of the Seditrans Project, for the simulation of an Upper Alpine Reservoir of a pumped-storage scheme. Simulations consider the filling (pump mode) and emptying (turbine mode) of the reservoir. The hydraulic results give a better understanding of the processes occurring within the reservoir. They are considered for an assessment of the sediment transport processes and of their consequences.

  5. Evaluation of Gas Production Potential of Hydrate Deposits in Alaska North Slope using Reservoir Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandanwar, M.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, the recognition of the importance of gas hydrates as a potential energy resource has led to more and more exploration of gas hydrate as unconventional source of energy. In 2002, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) started an assessment to conduct a geology-based analysis of the occurrences of gas hydrates within northern Alaska. As a result of this assessment, many potential gas hydrate prospects were identified in the eastern National Petroleum Reserve Alaska (NPRA) region of Alaska North Slope (ANS) with total gas in-place of about 2 trillion cubic feet. In absence of any field test, reservoir simulation is a powerful tool to predict the behavior of the hydrate reservoir and the amount of gas that can be technically recovered using best suitable gas recovery technique. This work focuses on the advanced evaluation of the gas production potential of hydrate accumulation in Sunlight Peak - one of the promising hydrate fields in eastern NPRA region using reservoir simulations approach, as a part of the USGS gas hydrate development Life Cycle Assessment program. The main objective of this work is to develop a field scale reservoir model that fully describes the production design and the response of hydrate field. Due to the insufficient data available for this field, the distribution of the reservoir properties (such as porosity, permeability and hydrate saturation) are approximated by correlating the data from Mount Elbert hydrate field to obtain a fully heterogeneous 3D reservoir model. CMG STARS is used as a simulation tool to model multiphase, multicomponent fluid flow and heat transfer in which an equilibrium model of hydrate dissociation was used. Production of the gas from the reservoir is carried out for a period of 30 years using depressurization gas recovery technique. The results in terms of gas and water rate profiles are obtained and the response of the reservoir to pressure and temperature changes due to depressurization and hydrate

  6. Petroleum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, T. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review of petroleum covers: crude oil; fuels, gaseous and liquid; lubricants, oils, and greases; asphalts, bitumens, tars, and pitches; hydrocarbons; physical properties; metals in oil; nonmetallic elements and heterocompounds; and analytical methods and apparatus. (MVL)

  7. Reservoir analysis study, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 2 report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    Jerry R. Bergeso and Associates, Inc. (Bergeson) has completed Phase II of the Reservoir Analysis, Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1, Elk Hills Oilfield, California. The objectives for this phase of the study included the establishment of revised estimates of the original oil and gas-in-place for each of the zones/reservoirs, estimation of the remaining proved developed, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves, and assessment of the effects of historical development and production operations and practices on recoverable reserves. Volume one contains the following: summary; introduction; and reservoir studies for tulare, dry gas zone, eastern shallow oil zone, western shallow oil zone, and Stevens --MBB/W31S, 31S NA/D.

  8. Conference on the topic: {open_quotes}Exploration and production of petroleum and gas from chalk reservoirs worldwide{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.G.

    1995-07-01

    More than 170 delegates from 14 countries in Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia took part in a conference on the topic: Exploration and Production of Petroleum and Gas from Chalk Reservoirs Worldwide. The conference was held in Copenhagen, Denmark in September,1994, and was a joint meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), and the European Association of Petroleum Geoscientists and Engineers (EAPG). In addition to the opening remarks, 25 oral and nine poster reports were presented. The topics included chalk deposits as reservoir rocks, the occurrence of chalk deposits worldwide, the North Sea oil and gas fields, and other related topics.

  9. New petrophysical magnetic methods MACC and MAFM in permeability characterisation of petroleum reservoir rock cleaning, flooding modelling and determination of fines migration in formation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, O. P.

    2012-04-01

    Potential applications of magnetic techniques and methods in petroleum engineering and petrophysics (Ivakhnenko, 1999, 2006; Ivakhnenko & Potter, 2004) reveal their vast advantages for the petroleum reservoir characterisation and formation evaluation. In this work author proposes for the first time developed systematic methods of the Magnetic Analysis of Core Cleaning (MACC) and Magnetic Analysis of Fines Migration (MAFM) for characterisation of reservoir core cleaning and modelling estimations of fines migration for the petroleum reservoir formations. Using example of the one oil field we demonstrate results in application of these methods on the reservoir samples. Petroleum reservoir cores samples have been collected within reservoir using routine technique of reservoir sampling and preservation for PVT analysis. Immediately before the MACC and MAFM studies samples have been exposed to atmospheric air for a few days. The selected samples have been in detailed way characterised after fluid cleaning and core flooding by their mineralogical compositions and petrophysical parameters. Mineralogical composition has been estimated utilizing XRD techniques. The petrophysical parameters, such as permeability and porosity have been measured on the basis of total core analysis. The results demonstrate effectiveness and importance of the MACC and MAFM methods for the routine core analysis (RCAL) and the special core analysis (SCAL) in the reservoir characterisation, core flooding and formation damage analysis.

  10. A CUDA based parallel multi-phase oil reservoir simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaza, Ayham; Awotunde, Abeeb A.; Fairag, Faisal A.; Al-Mouhamed, Mayez A.

    2016-09-01

    Forward Reservoir Simulation (FRS) is a challenging process that models fluid flow and mass transfer in porous media to draw conclusions about the behavior of certain flow variables and well responses. Besides the operational cost associated with matrix assembly, FRS repeatedly solves huge and computationally expensive sparse, ill-conditioned and unsymmetrical linear system. Moreover, as the computation for practical reservoir dimensions lasts for long times, speeding up the process by taking advantage of parallel platforms is indispensable. By considering the state of art advances in massively parallel computing and the accompanying parallel architecture, this work aims primarily at developing a CUDA-based parallel simulator for oil reservoir. In addition to the initial reported 33 times speed gain compared to the serial version, running experiments showed that BiCGSTAB is a stable and fast solver which could be incorporated in such simulations instead of the more expensive, storage demanding and usually utilized GMRES.

  11. A simulation-based reservoir management program

    SciTech Connect

    Voskanian, M.M.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.; Coombs, S.; Paul, R.G.; Ershaghi, I.

    1996-05-01

    There are more than 5,200 independent oil and gas producers operating in the US today (based on current IPAA membership figures). These companies are playing an increasingly important role in production of hydrocarbons in California and elsewhere in the US. Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., in a historic collaboration with its government royalty owners, the California State Lands Commission and the Minerals Management Service of the US Department of Interior, is attempting to redevelop the Carpinteria Offshore Field after two-and-a-half decades of production and partial abandonment by a previous operator. This paper will describe a project which focuses on the distribution of advanced reservoir management technologies (geological, petrophysical, and engineering) to independent producers like Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc. The evolving information highway, specifically the World Wide Web (WWW), serves as the distribution medium. The project to be described in this paper is an example of the implementation of a reservoir management tool which is supported by distributed databases, incorporates a shared computing environment, and integrates stochastic, geological, and engineering modeling.

  12. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  13. Understanding Reservoir Quality in the Petroleum System of the Ediacaran-Early Cambrian Ara Group (South Oman Salt Basin):

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Reuning, L.; Kukla, P.; Marquez, X.; Farquani, S.; Rawahi, Z.

    2009-04-01

    The Ediacaran-Early Cambrian Ara Group of the South Oman Salt Basin consists of six carbonate to evaporite (rock salt, gypsum) sequences. These Ara Group carbonates are termed A0C to A6C from the bottom towards the top of the basin. Differential loading of locally 5 km thick Cambrian to Ordovician clastics onto the mobile rock salt of the Ara Group caused growth of isolated salt diapirs, which resulted in strong fragmentation and faulting of the carbonate intervals into several isolated so-called ‘stringers'. These carbonate stringers represent a unique intra-salt petroleum system, which has been successfully explored in recent years. Initially the reservoir properties of the carbonate stringers were controlled by their depositional facies. After deposition, the stringers experienced a complex diagenetic history from the shallow to the deep burial realm. Diagenetic processes like anhydrite and halite plugging exerted a negative affect on poroperm properties, whereas e.g. calcite dissolution had a positive affect. Our goal is to detect spatial and temporal distribution patterns of diagenetic phases and their effect on reservoir properties. Mineralogy, rock fabrics, paragenetic relationships and geochemistry of ~ 200 samples from several petroleum wells from the late Neoproterozoic A2C interval were analyzed. For a mineralogical overview the samples were measured by XRD - powder diffraction, whereas the rock fabric was studied by thin section analysis and if required additionally with SEM. This high-resolution dataset was used in combination with external petrophysical observations to defined porosity-permeability trends for different rock-fabric groups according to LUCIA (1995). The spatial distribution of these petrophysical characteristics will be displayed in field-scale distribution maps of the analyzed diagenetic phases. The expected integrated 3D - diagenesis model will enable better predictions of the reservoir qualities in the Ara fields and will

  14. An adaptive nonlinear solution scheme for reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    Numerical reservoir simulation involves solving large, nonlinear systems of PDE with strongly discontinuous coefficients. Because of the large demands on computer memory and CPU, most users must perform simulations on very coarse grids. The average properties of the fluids and rocks must be estimated on these grids. These coarse grid {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} properties are costly to determine, and risky to use, since their optimal values depend on the fluid flow being simulated. Thus, they must be found by trial-and-error techniques, and the more coarse the grid, the poorer the results. This paper describes a numerical reservoir simulator which accepts fine scale properties and automatically generates multiple levels of coarse grid rock and fluid properties. The fine grid properties and the coarse grid simulation results are used to estimate discretization errors with multilevel error expansions. These expansions are local, and identify areas requiring local grid refinement. These refinements are added adoptively by the simulator, and the resulting composite grid equations are solved by a nonlinear Fast Adaptive Composite (FAC) Grid method, with a damped Newton algorithm being used on each local grid. The nonsymmetric linear system of equations resulting from Newton`s method are in turn solved by a preconditioned Conjugate Gradients-like algorithm. The scheme is demonstrated by performing fine and coarse grid simulations of several multiphase reservoirs from around the world.

  15. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R.; Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  16. Genome sequence of Brevibacillus agri strain 5-2, isolated from the formation water of petroleum reservoir.

    PubMed

    She, Yuehui; Wu, Wenqiong; Hang, Chunchun; Jiang, Xiawei; Chai, Lujun; Yu, Gaoming; Shu, Fuchang; Wang, Zhengliang; Su, Sanbao; Xiang, Tingsheng; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Hou, DuJie; Zhang, Fan; Zheng, Beiwen

    2014-12-01

    Brevibacillus agri strain 5-2 was isolated from the formation water of a deep oil reservoir in Changqing Oilfield, China. This bacterium was found to have a capacity for degrading tetradecane, hexadecane and alkanesulfonate. To gain insights into its efficient metabolic pathway for degrading hydrocarbon and organosulfur compounds, here, we report the high quality draft genome of this strain. Two putative alkane 1-monooxygenases, one putative alkanesulfonate monooxygenase, one putative alkanesulfonate transporter, one putative sulfate permease and five putative sulfate transporters were identified in the draft genome. The genomic data of strain 5-2 may provide insights into the mechanism of microorganisms adapt to the petroleum reservoir after chemical flooding. PMID:25194923

  17. Probability theory versus simulation of petroleum potential in play analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    An analytic probabilistic methodology for resource appraisal of undiscovered oil and gas resources in play analysis is presented. This play-analysis methodology is a geostochastic system for petroleum resource appraisal in explored as well as frontier areas. An objective was to replace an existing Monte Carlo simulation method in order to increase the efficiency of the appraisal process. Underlying the two methods is a single geologic model which considers both the uncertainty of the presence of the assessed hydrocarbon and its amount if present. The results of the model are resource estimates of crude oil, nonassociated gas, dissolved gas, and gas for a geologic play in terms of probability distributions. The analytic method is based upon conditional probability theory and a closed form solution of all means and standard deviations, along with the probabilities of occurrence. ?? 1987 J.C. Baltzer A.G., Scientific Publishing Company.

  18. Reservoir simulation in a North Sea reservoir experiencing significant compaction drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.C.; Jewell, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Valhall field in the Norwegian North Sea is a high porosity chalk reservoir undergoing primary pressure depletion. Over the last ten years there have been a number of computer modeling studies of the field which have all assumed an original oil-in-place of approximately 2,000 MMSTB (318.0{times}10{sup 6}m{sup 3}) to the present due to the addition of wells and the optimization of completion techniques. However, the single most important and unique feature influencing Valhall long term production performance is reservoir rock compaction. This paper describes the mathematical model used to simulate reservoir performance in a compacting reservoir with specific discussion regarding the proportion of oil produced by each physical recovery process. An understanding of the recovery mechanisms and their relative importance is critical for the successful management of the field. This paper also presents an alternative method for evaluating the various recovery processes using a simple solution to the material balance equation. This is used to substantiate the magnitude of the various recovery mechanisms identified in the simulation model.

  19. Multiscale characterization of porous media properties for hydrocarbon reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeman, Henry; Lao, Hio-Wai; Simpson, Dale; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2001-07-01

    Fluid flow through porous materials is critical for understanding and predicting the behavior of systems as diverse in function and scale as hydrocarbon reservoirs, aquifers, filters, membrane separators and even catalytic converters. Recently, there have been calls to incorporate more physics in oil reservoir simulations, as well as to enhance computational capability through the use of High Performance Computing (HPC), in order to improve reservoir management. Accurate prediction of reservoir behavior depends on the physical properties of not only the fluid but also the underlying rock formation. Contemporary approaches to solving these flows involve simulation of only a single physical scale. We are currently developing HiMuST (Hierarchical Multiscale Simulator Technology), an integrated multiscale simulation system for flow through heterogeneous porous materials. HiMuST uses a hierarchy of simulation codes to address the issue of rock property characterization at the pore scale and can self-adjust according to available input data. At the microscopic scale, HiMuST employs the Lattice Boltzmann Method, based on magnetic resonance digitizations of actual rock samples. At the mesoscopic scale, a stochastic model represents a pore network as a randomly generated skeleton of cylindrical pipes, based on physical characteristics determined by the microscopic simulation. We present computational and computer science issues involved in the HPC implementation of the codes and in integrating them into a seamless simulation system. Issues such as portability, scalability, efficiency and extensibility of the final product are also discussed, as well as the numerical methods implemented at each scale. Example simulation results are presented.

  20. Homogenization and simulation for compositional flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangxin

    2007-02-01

    A dual porosity model of multidimensional, multicomponent, multiphase flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is derived by the mathematical theory of homogenization. A fully compositional model is considered where there are N chemical components, each of which may exist in any or all of the three phases: gas, oil, and water. Special attention is paid to developing a general approach to incorporating gravitational forces, pressure gradient effects, and effects of mass transfer between phases. In particular, general equations for the interactions between matrix and fracture systems are obtained under homogenization by a careful scaling of these effects. Using this dual porosity compositional model, numerical experiments are reported for the benchmark problems of the sixth comparative solution project organized by the society of petroleum engineers.

  1. Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

  2. Reservoir simulation improves implementation of Midway Sunset steamflood

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, T.K.; Clayton, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal reservoir simulation was utilized to understand, make development recommendations, and project the performance of the Monarch C steamflood in a portion of Mobil`s South Midway Sunset field. The Monarch, a thick sequence of complex turbidite deposition, is characterized by extreme geological heterogeneity (lithofacies-controlled permeability and saturation variation, and mudstone barrier layers). Steamflood performance in the Monarch is related directly to the reservoir quality, and the path of steam flow is significantly influenced by the numerous laterally extensive mudstone barriers. The fine grain clay-bearing sediments were deposited on the anticline, distal from the source, whereas the coarser grain sediments, with little clay, were deposited on the more proximal syncline and steep dip areas. Consequently, steamflood performance improves relative to the crest since reservoir quality improves (including oil saturation), clay content decreases, and structure (dip) becomes more pronounced.

  3. Well logging means and method for determining water saturation of a petroleum reservoir having two transmitters and two receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzagatti, R.P.; Dowling, D.J.

    1987-09-08

    A well logging system is described for determining the water saturation of a petroleum reservoir earth formation comprising: a well logging sonde which includes: first transmitter means for transmitting electromagnetic energy into the earth formation at a first frequency selected from a range of frequencies from 0.01 MHz to 100 MHz, second transmitter means for transmitting electromagnetic energy into the earth formation at a second frequency selected from the range of frequencies, first receiving means spaced predetermined distances from the first and second transmitter means for receiving the transmitted electromagnetic energies from the earth formation and providing a signal corresponding, second receiving means spaced predetermined distances from the first and second transmitting means for receiving the transmitted electromagnetic energies from the earth formation and providing a signal corresponding, and processing means for processing the signals provided by both receiving means to provide an output signal related to the received electromagnetic energies; well logging cable means for conducting the output signal from the well logging sonde to the surface; and means at the surface receiving the output signal provided by the well logging cable means for deriving the water saturation of the petroleum reservoir earth formation in accordance with the received electromagnetic energies.

  4. The potential for hydrocarbon biodegradation and production of extracellular polymeric substances by aerobic bacteria isolated from a Brazilian petroleum reservoir.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, S P; Dellagnezze, B M; Wieland, A; Klock, J-H; Santos Neto, E V; Marsaioli, A J; Oliveira, V M; Michaelis, W

    2011-06-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) can contribute to the cellular degradation of hydrocarbons and have a huge potential for application in biotechnological processes, such as bioremediation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Four bacterial strains from a Brazilian petroleum reservoir were investigated for EPS production, emulsification ability and biodegradation activity when hydrocarbons were supplied as substrates for microbial growth. Two strains of Bacillus species had the highest EPS production when phenanthrene and n-octadecane were offered as carbon sources, either individually or in a mixture. While Pseudomonas sp. and Dietzia sp., the other two evaluated strains, had the highest hydrocarbon biodegradation indices, EPS production was not detected. Low EPS production may not necessarily be indicative of an absence of emulsifier activity, as indicated by the results of a surface tension reduction assay and emulsification indices for the strain of Dietzia sp. The combined results gathered in this work suggest that a microbial consortium consisting of bacteria with interdependent metabolisms could thrive in petroleum reservoirs, thus overcoming the limitations imposed on each individual species by the harsh conditions found in such environments. PMID:25187151

  5. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  6. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  7. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  8. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-05-02

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  9. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1994-10-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a 3-D representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  10. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  11. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1997--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

  12. NFFLOW: A reservoir simulator incorporating explicit fractures (SPE 153890)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, E.J.; Sams, W.N.

    2012-01-01

    NFFLOW is a research code that quickly and inexpensively simulates flow in moderately fractured reservoirs. It explicitly recognizes fractures separately from rock matrix. In NFFLOW fracture flow is proportional to the pressure gradient along the fracture, and flow in the rock matrix is determined by Darcy’s Law. The two flow mechanisms are coupled through the pressure gradient between a fracture and its adjacent rock matrix. Presented is a promising change to NFFLOW that allows for flow across a rock matrix block.

  13. Reservoir characterization with sequential Gaussian simulation constrained by diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.W.; Bermawi, A.

    1994-12-31

    A geostatistical approach for reservoir characterization that honors both surface seismic data and wireline data is described. It first computes a velocity profiles with seismic diffraction tomography, then, performs kriging with an external drift and sequential Gaussian simulation using the velocity profiles as soft data and the sonic logs as hard data. The product is a velocity profile with a resolution as high as that of the smoothed sonic logs, showing lateral velocity variations constrained by surface seismic data.

  14. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  15. Reservoir simulation studies: Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Numerical reservoir simulation techniques were used to perform a history-match of the Wairakei geothermal system in New Zealand. First, a one-dimensional (vertical) model was chosen; realistic stratigraphy was incorporated and the known production history was imposed. The effects of surface and deep recharge were included. Good matches were obtained, both for the reservoir pressure decline history and changes in average discharge enthalpy with time. Next, multidimensional effects were incorporated by treating with a two-dimensional vertical section. Again, good history matches were obtained, although computed late-time discharge enthalpies were slightly high. It is believed that this disparity arises from inherently three-dimensional effects. Predictive calculations using the two-dimensional model suggest that continued future production will cause little additional reservoir pressure drop, but that thermal degradation will occur. Finally, ground subsidence data at Wairakei was examined. It was concluded that traditional elastic pore-collapse models based on classical soil-mechanics concepts are inadequate to explain the observed surface deformation. It is speculated that the measured subsidence may be due to structural effects such as aseismic slippage of a buried reservoir boundary fault.

  16. The effect of carboxylic acid anions on the stability of framework mineral grains in petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, D.B.; Surdam, R.C.; Ewing, R.E. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and empirical evidence to show that carboxylic acid anions (CAA's) are a major diagenetic control on first-cycle basins in Jurassic-to-Pleistocene reservoirs in the 80-to-120{degrees}C thermal window.

  17. Iterative Schemes for Time Parallelization with Application to Reservoir Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrido, I; Fladmark, G E; Espedal, M S; Lee, B

    2005-04-18

    Parallel methods are usually not applied to the time domain because of the inherit sequentialness of time evolution. But for many evolutionary problems, computer simulation can benefit substantially from time parallelization methods. In this paper, they present several such algorithms that actually exploit the sequential nature of time evolution through a predictor-corrector procedure. This sequentialness ensures convergence of a parallel predictor-corrector scheme within a fixed number of iterations. The performance of these novel algorithms, which are derived from the classical alternating Schwarz method, are illustrated through several numerical examples using the reservoir simulator Athena.

  18. Galerkin finite-element simulation of a geothermal reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.W., Jr.; Pinder, G.F.

    1973-01-01

    The equations describing fluid flow and energy transport in a porous medium can be used to formulate a mathematical model capable of simulating the transient response of a hot-water geothermal reservoir. The resulting equations can be solved accurately and efficiently using a numerical scheme which combines the finite element approach with the Galerkin method of approximation. Application of this numerical model to the Wairakei geothermal field demonstrates that hot-water geothermal fields can be simulated using numerical techniques currently available and under development. ?? 1973.

  19. Three dimensional simulation for Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR).

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Lee, Moo Yul

    2005-07-01

    3-D finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of caverns located at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's Big Hill site. State-of-art analyses simulated the current site configuration and considered additional caverns. The addition of 5 caverns to account for a full site and a full dome containing 31 caverns were modeled. Operations including both normal and cavern workover pressures and cavern enlargement due to leaching were modeled to account for as many as 5 future oil drawdowns. Under the modeled conditions, caverns were placed very close to the edge of the salt dome. The web of salt separating the caverns and the web of salt between the caverns and edge of the salt dome were reduced due to leaching. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence and infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified. The analyses included recently derived damage criterion obtained from testing of Big Hill salt cores. The results show that from a structural view point, many additional caverns can be safely added to Big Hill.

  20. New Simulator for Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Hydrate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Qorbani Nashaqi, K.; Jemai, K.; Vafaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to Gibbs phase rule and combination of first and second law of thermodynamics, hydrate in nature cannot be in equilibrium since they come from different parent phases. In this system hydrate formation and dissociation is affected by local variables such as pressure, temperature and composition with mass and energy transport restrictions. Available simulators have attempted to model hydrate phase transition as an equilibrium reaction. Although those which treated the processes of formation and dissociation as kinetics used model of Kim and Bishnoi based on laboratory PVT experiment, and consequently hard to accept up scaling to real reservoirs condition. Additionally, they merely check equilibrium in terms of pressure and temperature projections and disregard thermodynamic requirements for equilibrium especially along axes of concentrations in phases. Non-equilibrium analysis of hydrate involves putting aside all the phase transitions which are not possible and use kinetic evaluation to measure phase transitions progress in each grid block for each time step. This procedure is Similar to geochemical reservoir simulators logic. As a result RetrasoCodeBright has been chosen as hydrate reservoir simulator and our work involves extension of this code. RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) is able to handle competing processes of formation and dissociation of hydrates as pseudo reactions at each node and each time step according to the temperature, pressure and concentration. Hydrates can therefore be implemented into the structure as pseudo minerals, with appropriate kinetic models. In order to implement competing nature of phase transition kinetics of hydrate formation, we use classical nucleation theory based on Kvamme et al. as a simplified model inside RCB and use advanced theories to fit parameters for the model (PFT). Hydrate formation and dissociation can directly be observed through porosity changes in the specific areas of the porous media. In this work which is in

  1. Generation of saturation functions for simulation models of carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingfeng

    A rock type is the unit of rock deposited under similar conditions, which went through similar diagenetic processes, producing analogous rock fabric, with distinct set of pore types, and pore throat size distribution, having specific range of porosity and permeability. Rock typing can generally be used as a guide to assign petrophysical characteristics to different zones for detailed reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, which provide valid frames for reservoir development. It is often assumed that conventional rock types are capable of assigning multiphase flow characteristics, such as capillary pressure and relative permeability to the cells of dynamic simulation models. However, these conventional rock types, or static reservoir rock types (SRRT) fail to capture the actual variability of capillary pressure and relative permeability, due to lack of representation of wettability difference at different elevation above the free water level (FWL) in carbonate reservoirs, especially in the highly heterogeneous reservoirs. This should be resolved through dynamic reservoir rock types (DRRT), in which wettability effect is imposed on the SRRTs to generate saturation functions for simulation models. This research studies Ghedan's comprehensive DRRT model7, and proposes a modified Ghedan's model. First, the defined static rock types are sub-divided into sub-static rock types based on porosity frequency. Second, three curve-fitting programs are coded to generate the related saturation-height functions. These are the modified Ghedan-Okuyiga equation, Cuddy function and Power Law function. Developed from Ghedan-Okuyiga function113, the recommended modified Ghedan-Okuyiga function has been proposed with saturation and implicit porosity as a function of height above FWL in the transition zone. Third, each sub-static rock type is divided into a number of DRRTs by determining the capillary pressure and relative permeability curves in the oil zone from gas

  2. Impact of integrated 3D reservoir modeling/flow simulation on development of deepwater sands, Mars Field, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, C.S.; Johnston, J.R.; Juedeman, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Prospect Mars is a major Gulf of Mexico deep water oil discovery made under joint partnership between operator Shell Offshore Inc. and partner British Petroleum Inc. The discovery lies in 3000 feet of water, located 130 miles southeast of New Orleans, Louisiana. The field was discovered in 1989 and to date 14 significant reservoir intervals from 10,000 to 19000 feet below sea level have been penetrated. Estimated recoverable reserves for the first phase of field development are in excess of 500 MMBE and development plans include installation of a 24 slot tension leg platform and two subsea wells, with first production in mid-1996. Over a two year period a comprehensive effort was directed at creating a new set of reservoir models utilizing an integrated software package developed at Shell E&P Technology Co. This package is able to incorporate pertinent geological, geophysical, and petrophysical data into 3-D reservoir models which can be used to: (1) estimate reservoir quantity, quality, and continuity, (2) predict reservoir production performance, (3) select development well locations, and (4) facilitate reserve estimation. This software allows interpretations from 3-D seismic, well control, and analog outcrops to be effectively integrated and passed to the reservoir model for flow simulation. This integrated effort at modeling ensured a more realistic reservoir picture upon which to base field development. Almost all the development wells pre-drilled prior to platform installation have been affected or designed based on these reservoir models and well results have been used to keep the models updated and evergreen.

  3. Impact of integrated 3D reservoir modeling/flow simulation on development of deepwater sands, Mars Field, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, C.S.; Johnston, J.R.; Juedeman, M.E. )

    1996-01-01

    Prospect Mars is a major Gulf of Mexico deep water oil discovery made under joint partnership between operator Shell Offshore Inc. and partner British Petroleum Inc. The discovery lies in 3000 feet of water, located 130 miles southeast of New Orleans, Louisiana. The field was discovered in 1989 and to date 14 significant reservoir intervals from 10,000 to 19000 feet below sea level have been penetrated. Estimated recoverable reserves for the first phase of field development are in excess of 500 MMBE and development plans include installation of a 24 slot tension leg platform and two subsea wells, with first production in mid-1996. Over a two year period a comprehensive effort was directed at creating a new set of reservoir models utilizing an integrated software package developed at Shell E P Technology Co. This package is able to incorporate pertinent geological, geophysical, and petrophysical data into 3-D reservoir models which can be used to: (1) estimate reservoir quantity, quality, and continuity, (2) predict reservoir production performance, (3) select development well locations, and (4) facilitate reserve estimation. This software allows interpretations from 3-D seismic, well control, and analog outcrops to be effectively integrated and passed to the reservoir model for flow simulation. This integrated effort at modeling ensured a more realistic reservoir picture upon which to base field development. Almost all the development wells pre-drilled prior to platform installation have been affected or designed based on these reservoir models and well results have been used to keep the models updated and evergreen.

  4. Scale Model Simulation of Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, M.; Frash, L.; Hampton, J.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal energy technology has successfully provided a means of generating stable base load electricity for many years. However, implementation has been spatially limited to limited availability of high quality traditional hydro-thermal resources possessing the combination of a shallow high heat flow anomaly and an aquifer with sufficient permeability and continuous fluid recharge. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) has been proposed as a potential solution to enable additional energy production from the non-conventional hydro-thermal resources. Hydraulic fracturing is considered the primary means of creating functional EGS reservoirs at sites where the permeability of the rock is too limited to allow cost effective heat recovery. EGS reservoir creation requires improved fracturing methodology, rheologically controllable fracturing fluids, and temperature hardened proppants. Although large fracture volumes (several cubic km) have been created in the field, circulating fluid through these full volumes and maintaining fracture volumes have proven difficult. Stimulation technology and methodology as used in the oil and gas industry for sedimentary formations are well developed; however, they have not sufficiently been demonstrated for EGS reservoir creation. Insufficient data and measurements under geothermal conditions make it difficult to directly translate experience from the oil and gas industries to EGS applications. To demonstrate the feasibility of EGS reservoir creation and subsequent geothermal energy production, and to improve the understanding of hydraulic and propping in EGS reservoirs, a heated true-triaxial load cell with a high pressure fluid injection system was developed to simulate an EGS system from stimulation to production. This apparatus is capable of loading a 30x30x30 cubic cm rock sample with independent principal stresses up to 13 MPa while simultaneously providing heating up to 180 degree C. Multiple orientated boreholes of 5 to 10 mm

  5. Geological and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    M. Lee Allison

    1997-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reser v oir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similiar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined . Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations . Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone in the Ivie Creek case-study area: (1) geostatistics, (2) field description of clinoform bounding surfaces, (3) reservoir modeling, and (4) technology transfer.

  6. Exploration for fractured petroleum reservoirs using radar/Landsat merge combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.; Waite, W.; Borengasser, M.; Tolman, D.; Elachi, C.

    1981-01-01

    Since fractures are commonly propagated upward and reflected at the earth's surface as subtle linears, detection of these surface features is extremely important in many phases of petroleum exploration and development. To document the usefulness of microwave analysis for petroleum exploration, the Arkansas part of the Arkoma basin is selected as a prime test site. The research plan involves comparing the aircraft microwave imagery and Landsat imagery in an area where significant subsurface borehole geophysical data are available. In the northern Arkoma basin, a positive correlation between the number of linears in a given area and production from cherty carbonate strata is found. In the southern part of the basin, little relationship is discernible between surface structure and gas production, and no correlation is found between gas productivity and linear proximity or linear density as determined from remote sensor data.

  7. Characterization of a complex fluvial-deltaic reservoir for simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Begg, S.H.; Kay, A.; Gustason, G.

    1996-09-01

    Lithotype is shown to be the main geological control on the spatial distribution of reservoir flow properties. The distribution of lithotypes is in turn controlled by lithofacies. Using core data, assemblages of lithotypes were grouped into major facies associations (MFA`s). Log signatures were used to pick MFA`s in uncored wells to provide conditioning data for a stochastic description of their interwell distribution using the sequential indicator simulation (SIS) technique. Deterministic correlation was not enforced. Characteristic object-models of the distribution of lithotypes within each MFA were then generated and converted to fine-scale poro-perm models using core-lug data. These models were upscaled to yield characteristic poro-perm distributions at the reservoir simulation scale. Finally, the MFA model was used as a template to distribute the upscaled poro-perm within the simulation model. The model history-matched rapidly and accurately, even though the wells were conditioned only to the MFA`s and not to foot-by-foot data. Multiple MFA realizations were generated to provide some understanding of the uncertainty in thickness and other rock properties between wells.

  8. Simulating Oil Production from Fractured/Faulted Basement Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Forster, C.; Fu, Y.; Huang, C.; Yang, Y.; Deo, M.

    2006-12-01

    A fully-implicit, three-dimensional (3D), three-phase, discrete fault/fracture, black oil simulator provides new insight and understanding of oil production from reservoirs in fractured, low-permeability basement rocks. Results obtained with a controlled volume finite element (CVFE) method compare favorably to those obtained using both single- and dual-porosity finite difference methods (e.g., ECLIPSE). A regularized network of 30 orthogonal faults within a 1000 by 1000 by 200 feet model domain is used to compare the simulator results and to explore the implications of grid sensitivity. In this simple reservoir, cumulative oil recoveries over 900 days of production are similar for CVFE, single-porosity and dual-porosity approaches. CVFE is used to simulate a complex network of intersecting faults that mimic a more realistic basement reservoir with the same fault surface area and fault volume as the regularized network. Cumulative oil production at 900 days is about 3% lower than for the regularized network. The CVFE method provides a much improved ability to represent complex fracture/fault geometries and spatial variations in the internal properties of faults. CVFE simulations of the realistic network illustrate the possible consequences of uncertainty in knowing fracture/fault properties (e.g., porosity, permeability, thickness, dip orientation, connectivity and flow transmissibility). For example, introducing spatial variability in permeability within the fault planes (using spatially randomized patterns of 10, 100 and 1000 md), while retaining a constant geometric mean permeability of 100 md, yields enhanced oil production due to the high-permeability pathways. A 50:50 mix of 10 and 1000 md elements yields 36%OOIP while a 33:33:33 mix of 10, 100 and 1000 md yields 24%OOIP. These results are 26% and 14% greater, respectively, than that obtained for the uniform 100 md case (11%OOIP). This inherent variability, combined with uncertainty in knowing the detailed

  9. CO2/ brine substitution experiments at simulated reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Capillary properties of rocks affect the mobility of fluids in a reservoir. Therefore, the understanding of the capillary pressure behaviour is essential to assess the long-term behaviour of CO2 reservoirs. Beyond this, a calibration of the petrophysical properties on water saturation of reservoir rocks at simulated in situ conditions is crucial for a proper interpretation of field monitoring data. We present a set-up, which allows for the combined measurements of capillary pressure, electric resistivity, and elastic wave velocities under controlled reservoir conditions (pconf = 400 bar, ppore = 180 bar, T = 65 ° C) at different brine-CO2 saturations. The capillary properties of the samples are measured using the micropore membrane technique. The sample is jacketed with a Viton tube (thickness = 4 mm) and placed between two current electrode endcaps, which as well contain pore fluid ports and ultrasonic P and S wave transducers. Between the sample and the lower endcap the hydrophilic semi-permeable micro-pore membrane (pore size = 100 nm) is integrated. It is embedded into filter papers to establish a good capillary contact and to protect the highly sensitive membrane against mechanical damage under load. Two high-precision syringe pumps are used to displace a quantified volume of brine by CO2 and determine the corresponding sample saturation. The fluid displacement induces a pressure gradient along the sample, which corresponds to the capillary pressure at a particular sample saturation. It is measured with a differential pressure sensor in the range between 0 - 0.2 MPa. Drainage and imbibition cycles are performed to provide information on the efficiency of capillary trapping and to get a calibration of the petrophysical parameters of the sample.

  10. Research program on fractured petroleum reservoirs. Final report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1997-05-01

    Multiphase flow in fractured porous media is a complex problem. While the study of single phase flow in a fractured or a layered medium can be pursued by some kind of averaging process, there is no meaning to averaging two-phase flow when capillarity is an active force. For a two-layer system comprised of high and low permeable layers, the performance of gas-oil gravity can be less efficient than the homogeneous low permeable medium. On the other hand, heterogeneity may enhance water imbibition due to capillarity. Due to the above and various other complexities, current tools for predicting the performance of fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs are not reliable. Based on the research work carried out at the Reservoir Engineering Research Institute, and some other Institutions, a good deal of progress has been made in recent years. But still we are a long way from good predictive reservoir models. In this final report, we summarize some of our achievements in the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured media. Since some of the features of two-phase flow in fractured and layered many are similar due to the capillary forces, the work includes progress in both types of media. There are some basic issues of flow in both fractured and unfractured media that are currently unresolved. These issues include: (1) new phase formation such as the formation of liquid phase in gas condensate reservoirs, and gas phase formation in solution gas drive process and (2) composition variation due to thermal convection and diffusion processes. In the following, a brief summary of our findings in the last three years during the course of the project is presented.

  11. Integrated oil and reservoir database system for geological and petroleum engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.Y.; Schneider, R.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Lake, L.W.

    1984-08-01

    As the data available to explorers and operators increase and when timeliness and accuracy of record keeping are of concern, the need for a more efficient data handling technique has prompted research in the application of database technology in the oil industry. In this thesis, a database is developed to cover areas in exploration, drilling, production, scout tickets and well logs. Salient characteristics of wells and reservoirs are investigated and a global structure is obtained. The relationship between well and reservoir is found to be a many-to-many type. Out of the three widely accepted data models (hierarchical, network, and relational), the relational model was chosen in our approach because of its easiness to use and ability to implement the many-to-many relationship. A set of criteria for evaluation of logical database design methodologies is presented and a modified entity-relationship approach is used. The global structure of the database is implemented in VAX/VMS INGRES, a commercial relational database management system. The database model and the data dictionary are tested through an application to the data of two reservoirs provided by Conoco Oil Inc. and Shell Oil Co. 88 references, 27 figures, 9 tables.

  12. Integrated oil and reservoir database system for geological and petroleum engineering. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.Y.; Schneider, R.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Lake, L.W.

    1984-12-01

    As the data available to explorers and operators increase and when timeliness and accuracy of record keeping are of concern, the need for a more efficient data handling technique has prompted research in the applications of database technology in the oil industry. In this thesis, a database is developed to cover areas in exploration, drilling, production, scout tickets and well logs. Salient characteristics of wells and reservoirs are investigated and a global structure is obtained. The relationship between well and reservoir is found to be a many-to-many type. Out of the three widely accepted data models (hierarchical, network, and relational), the relational model was chosen in our approach because of its easiness to use and ability to implement the many-to-many relationship. A set of criteria for evaluation of logical database design methodologies is presented and a modified entity-relationship approach is used. The global structure of the database is implemented in VAX/VMS INGRES, a commercial relational database management system. The database model and the data dictionary are tested through an application to the data of two reservoirs provided by Conoco Oil Inc. and Shell Oil Co. 88 references, 27 figures, 9 tables.

  13. Response of microbial community structure to microbial plugging in a mesothermic petroleum reservoir in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; She, Yue Hui; Ma, Sha Sha; Hu, Ji Ming; Banat, Ibrahim M; Hou, Du Jie

    2010-12-01

    Microbial plugging, a microbial enhancement of oil recovery (MEOR) technique, has been applied in a candidate oil reservoir of Daqing Oil Field (China). The goal of this study is to monitor the survival of injected bacteria and reveal the response of microbial communities in field trial of microbial plugging through injection of selected microbial culture broth and nutrients. Culture-dependent enrichment and culture-independent 16S rDNA clone library methods were used. The results show that it was easy to activate targeted biopolymer-producing bacteria in a laboratory environment, and it was difficult for injected exogenous bacteria to survive. In addition, microbial communities in the oil reservoir also changed before and after the field trial. However, microbial communities, activated by fermentative medium for biopolymer-producing bacteria, appeared to show greater differences in the laboratory than in the natural reservoir. It was concluded that microbial populations monitoring was important to MEOR; results of response of microbial communities could provide a guide for the future field trials. PMID:20803140

  14. Geological and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoir.

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial- deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone: (1) evaluation of the Ivie Creek case-study area and (2) technology transfer. The Ivie Creek case-study evaluation work during the quarter focused on the two parasequence sets, the Kf-1 and Kf-2, in the lower Ferron Sandstone. This work included: (1) clinoform characterization, (2) parasequence characterization from elevation and isopach maps, and (3) three-dimensional facies modeling. Scaled photomosaic panels from the Ivie Creek amphitheater (south-facing outcrop belt) and Quitchupah Canyon (Fig. 1) provide a deterministic framework for two apparent-dip cross sections. These panels along with other photomosaic coverage and data from five drill holes, ten stratigraphic sections, and 22 permeability transacts (Fig. 1), acquired during two field seasons, provided the necessary information for this geologic evaluation and creation of the models to be used

  15. Parallel computation for reservoir thermal simulation: An overlapping domain decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongxiao

    2005-11-01

    In this dissertation, we are involved in parallel computing for the thermal simulation of multicomponent, multiphase fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs. We report the development and applications of such a simulator. Unlike many efforts made to parallelize locally the solver of a linear equations system which affects the performance the most, this research takes a global parallelization strategy by decomposing the computational domain into smaller subdomains. This dissertation addresses the domain decomposition techniques and, based on the comparison, adopts an overlapping domain decomposition method. This global parallelization method hands over each subdomain to a single processor of the parallel computer to process. Communication is required when handling overlapping regions between subdomains. For this purpose, MPI (message passing interface) is used for data communication and communication control. A physical and mathematical model is introduced for the reservoir thermal simulation. Numerical tests on two sets of industrial data of practical oilfields indicate that this model and the parallel implementation match the history data accurately. Therefore, we expect to use both the model and the parallel code to predict oil production and guide the design, implementation and real-time fine tuning of new well operating schemes. A new adaptive mechanism to synchronize processes on different processors has been introduced, which not only ensures the computational accuracy but also improves the time performance. To accelerate the convergence rate of iterative solution of the large linear equations systems derived from the discretization of governing equations of our physical and mathematical model in space and time, we adopt the ORTHOMIN method in conjunction with an incomplete LU factorization preconditioning technique. Important improvements have been made in both ORTHOMIN method and incomplete LU factorization in order to enhance time performance without affecting

  16. Hydrodynamic thickness of petroleum oil adsorbed layers in the pores of reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Alkafeef, Saad F; Algharaib, Meshal K; Alajmi, Abdullah F

    2006-06-01

    The hydrodynamic thickness delta of adsorbed petroleum (crude) oil layers into the pores of sandstone rocks, through which the liquid flows, has been studied by Poiseuille's flow law and the evolution of (electrical) streaming current. The adsorption of petroleum oil is accompanied by a numerical reduction in the (negative) surface potential of the pore walls, eventually stabilizing at a small positive potential, attributed to the oil macromolecules themselves. After increasing to around 30% of the pore radius, the adsorbed layer thickness delta stopped growing either with time or with concentrations of asphaltene in the flowing liquid. The adsorption thickness is confirmed with the blockage value of the rock pores' area determined by the combination of streaming current and streaming potential measurements. This behavior is attributed to the effect on the disjoining pressure across the adsorbed layer, as described by Derjaguin and Churaev, of which the polymolecular adsorption films lose their stability long before their thickness has approached the radius of the rock pore. PMID:16414057

  17. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  18. Molecular Detection of Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox) Bacteria in High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Chen, Shuo; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) process plays an important role in the nitrogen cycle of the worldwide anoxic and mesophilic habitats. Recently, the existence and activity of anammox bacteria have been detected in some thermophilic environments, but their existence in the geothermal subterranean oil reservoirs is still not reported. This study investigated the abundance, distribution and functional diversity of anammox bacteria in nine out of 17 high-temperature oil reservoirs by molecular ecology analysis. High concentration (5.31–39.2 mg l−1) of ammonium was detected in the production water from these oilfields with temperatures between 55°C and 75°C. Both 16S rRNA and hzo molecular biomarkers indicated the occurrence of anammox bacteria in nine out of 17 samples. Most of 16S rRNA gene phylotypes are closely related to the known anammox bacterial genera Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Scalindua, and Candidatus Jettenia, while hzo gene phylotypes are closely related to the genera Candidatus Anammoxoglobus, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Scalindua, and Candidatus Jettenia. The total bacterial and anammox bacterial densities were 6.4 ± 0.5 × 103 to 2.0 ± 0.18 × 106 cells ml−1 and 6.6 ± 0.51 × 102 to 4.9 ± 0.36 × 104 cell ml−1, respectively. The cluster I of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distant identity (<92%) to the known Candidatus Scalindua species, inferring this cluster of anammox bacteria to be a new species, and a tentative name Candidatus “Scalindua sinooilfield” was proposed. The results extended the existence of anammox bacteria to the high-temperature oil reservoirs. PMID:20740282

  19. Use of XML and Java for collaborative petroleum reservoir modeling on the Internet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Victorine, J.; Watney, W.L.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2005-01-01

    The GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through INternet Informatics) is a public-domain, web-based freeware that is made up of an integrated suite of 14 Java-based software tools to accomplish on-line, real-time geologic and engineering reservoir modeling. GEMINI facilitates distant collaborations for small company and academic clients, negotiating analyses of both single and multiple wells. The system operates on a single server and an enterprise database. External data sets must be uploaded into this database. Feedback from GEMINI users provided the impetus to develop Stand Alone Web Start Applications of GEMINI modules that reside in and operate from the user's PC. In this version, the GEMINI modules run as applets, which may reside in local user PCs, on the server, or Java Web Start. In this enhanced version, XML-based data handling procedures are used to access data from remote and local databases and save results for later access and analyses. The XML data handling process also integrates different stand-alone GEMINI modules enabling the user(s) to access multiple databases. It provides flexibility to the user to customize analytical approach, database location, and level of collaboration. An example integrated field-study using GEMINI modules and Stand Alone Web Start Applications is provided to demonstrate the versatile applicability of this freeware for cost-effective reservoir modeling. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Petroleum Generation and Migration in the Song Hong Basin, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Byeong-Kook; Thi Nguyen, Hong; Park, Mee-Sook

    2014-05-01

    The numerical modeling of petroleum systems is an effective tool to understand generation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons in a sedimentary basin and hence to determine future targets for the hydrocarbon exploration. The numerical modeling identifies two petroleum systems in the Song Hong Basin, which is a petroliferous Cenozoic basin, offshore eastern Vietnam. These petroleum systems were named DinhCao-PhuCu(.) Petroleum System and SongHuong-BienDong(.) Petroleum System. DinhCao-PhuCu(.) Petroleum System covers northern and central parts of the Song Hong basin with Oligocene shale and coaly shale source rocks of Dinh Cao formation, which are dominated by type II-III kerogens. The hydrocarbon generation starts at 13 Ma within deeply buried Oligocene strata located in the centre of the basin. The hydrocarbon expels from the Oligocene source rock and migrates laterally and then up dip toward marginal areas where Middle Miocene sandstones of Phu Cu formation are present as major reservoirs. The numerical model shows that the critical moment occurs at about 3.5 Ma. The DinhCao-PhuCu(.) petroleum system is confirmed by sparse occurrence of oil and gas along the coast of eastern Vietnam. SongHuong-BienDong(.) Petroleum System is identified in limited areas of the central and southern Song Hong basin. The major source rock of this petroleum system is Lower Miocene dark claystones of Song Huong formation which contain gas prone, type III kerogen. The migration model shows that hydrocarbons are generated from the Miocene source rocks in the center of the basin at about 12 Ma, and migrates updip through sand bodies of Quang Ngai formation to the major boundaries faults, and further moves into highly permeable up-dipping units, the Bien Dong formation. The best depiction of the generation-migration-accumulation of hydrocarbons occurs at about 2 Ma. The presence of the SongHuong-BienDong(.) Petroleum System is indicated by the large gas fields in the central and

  1. Application of ATP measurements to the microbiological evaluation of a petroleum reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.M.

    1981-06-01

    The objective of the work reported in this document was to determine whether the bioluminescent luciferin/luciferase based adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay could be used as a rapid field tests for determining the presence and numbers of microorganisms in oil field fluids. The ATP-photometric technique employed is based on the ATP-mediated bioluminescent oxidation of firefly luciferin. Light production is stoichiometrically related to ATP concentration; ATP concentration is related to numbers of living organisms present in a sample. Samples used in this study comprised reservoir fluids collected from several Southern California oilfields. Based on experimental evidence, it was concluded that the ATP assay could be profitably applied to Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) process monitoring and control. The theoretical basis for the assay, field-usage methodologies, and fundamentals of data interpretation are presented to make the document usable as a field manual.

  2. Research program on fractured petroleum reservoirs. [Quarterly report], October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1996-01-31

    A number of experiments have been performed to study water injection in fractured porous media. These experiments reveal that: (1) the co-current imbibition may be the primary flow process in water-wet fractured media, and (2) the imbibition may result in over 20 percent recovery from very tight rock (Austin Chalk with K{sub ma} of the order of 0.01 md) for an imbibition period of about 2 months. Theoretical consideration reveal that the exponential function of Aronofsky et al. [``A Model for the Mechanism of Oil Recovery from Porous Matrix Due to Water Invasion In Fractured Reservoirs,`` Trans. AIME (1958) 213, 17-19] does not describe the early-time, but may represent the late-time recovery.

  3. Improved oil recovery using bacteria isolated from North Sea petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, R.A.; Lappin-Scott, H.

    1995-12-31

    During secondary oil recovery, water is injected into the formation to sweep out the residual oil. The injected water, however, follows the path of least resistance through the high-permeability zones, leaving oil in the low-permeability zones. Selective plugging of these their zones would divert the waterflood to the residual oil and thus increase the life of the well. Bacteria have been suggested as an alternative plugging agent to the current method of polymer injection. Starved bacteria can penetrate deeply into rock formations where they attach to the rock surfaces, and given the right nutrients can grow and produce exo-polymer, reducing the permeability of these zones. The application of microbial enhanced oil recovery has only been applied to shallow, cool, onshore fields to date. This study has focused on the ability of bacteria to enhance oil recovery offshore in the North Sea, where the environment can be considered extreme. A screen of produced water from oil reservoirs (and other extreme subterranean environments) was undertaken, and two bacteria were chosen for further work. These two isolates were able to grow and survive in the presence of saline formation waters at a range of temperatures above 50{degrees}C as facultative anaerobes. When a solution of isolates was passed through sandpacks and nutrients were added, significant reductions in permeabilities were achieved. This was confirmed in Clashach sandstone at 255 bar, when a reduction of 88% in permeability was obtained. Both isolates can survive nutrient starvation, which may improve penetration through the reservoir. Thus, the isolates show potential for field trials in the North Sea as plugging agents.

  4. Foam flooding reservoir simulation algorithm improvement and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yining; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Ruihe; Lai, Fengpeng; Zhang, Hanhan

    2014-05-01

    As one of the important enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technologies, Foam flooding is being used more and more widely in the oil field development. In order to describe and predict foam flooding, experts at domestic and abroad have established a number of mathematical models of foam flooding (mechanism, empirical and semi-empirical models). Empirical models require less data and apply conveniently, but the accuracy is not enough. The aggregate equilibrium model can describe foam generation, burst and coalescence by mechanism studying, but it is very difficult to accurately describe. The research considers the effects of critical water saturation, critical concentration of foaming agent and critical oil saturation on the sealing ability of foam and considers the effect of oil saturation on the resistance factor for obtaining the gas phase relative permeability and the results were amended by laboratory test, so the accuracy rate is higher. Through the reservoir development concepts simulation and field practical application, the calculation is more accurate and higher.

  5. New simulators quantify slimhole effects on reservoir performance

    SciTech Connect

    Azari, M.; Soliman, M.

    1995-03-01

    According to a recent slimhole survey, 60% of the slimhole wells drilled in 1992 were considered an economic success. The remaining 40% of wells drilled, however, either had not been in service long enough for their success to be determined or had failed to provide the expected production results. To more accurately predict production results before choosing to drill a slimhole well, drilling operators must answer the following questions: (1) How would the rate performance and cumulative recovery of a slimhole well compare to a standard well bore completion? (2) How would the reduced tubing ID of a slim hole affect well bore hydraulics? (3) What effect would hole diameter have on the well bore storage period? (4) Will a slimhole well more likely experience serious coning or cresting problems? Reservoir engineers can use several powerful simulators and software programs to determine well performance.

  6. Integration of geology and reservoir engineering to produce reservoir simulation model at Cabin Creek Field, Cedar Creek Anticline, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Pieterson, R.; DiMarco, M.J.; Sodersten, S.S. )

    1996-01-01

    Because of its mature stage of development, a key aspect of continued economic development of the Cedar Creek Anticline (CCA), Montana (STOOIP > 2 billion barrels with over 360 MMstb produced) is the Identification of remaining pods of high S[sub o] within the original field boundaries. Present economic conditions make it essential to select drillsites with high probabilities of success and high prognoses flow rates in these remaking high S. area. Integration of a well-constrained geologic model and reservoir simulation pinpointed remaining pods of oil in a 3-m thick, subvertically fractured, dolomitic limestone reservoir of the Carboniferous Mission Canyon Formation in the Cabin Creek Field of the CCA This resulted in a successful high-flow-rate horizontal well (initial rate >800 BOPD) whose oil production was accurately predicted by a 3-D reservoir simulation. The model has 53,750 gridblocks each of which Is 60 by 60 m. The effect of the natural-fracture network was constrained with the k[sub v]/k[sub h] (vertical to horizontal permeability ratio). The simulation covered a 40-yr. production period. Gross production was Input as a constraint; oil and water rates were matched. Adjustments to absolute permeability, aquifer volume and relative water permeability were required to obtain a match between observed and simulated production rates. The model was fine tuned by matching the production of individual wells in areas with a high remaining S[sub o]. This project demonstrated that (1) interplay of geology and reservoir engineering provided a better reservoir model than could have been done individually, (2) simulation work identified horizontal drilling and recompletion candidates, with one successful horizontal well completed to date, and (3) use of the reservoir simulator for field-scale modeling In conjunction with a well-refined geologic synthesis can successfully pinpoint undeveloped reserves at CCA.

  7. Integration of geology and reservoir engineering to produce reservoir simulation model at Cabin Creek Field, Cedar Creek Anticline, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Pieterson, R.; DiMarco, M.J.; Sodersten, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    Because of its mature stage of development, a key aspect of continued economic development of the Cedar Creek Anticline (CCA), Montana (STOOIP > 2 billion barrels with over 360 MMstb produced) is the Identification of remaining pods of high S{sub o} within the original field boundaries. Present economic conditions make it essential to select drillsites with high probabilities of success and high prognoses flow rates in these remaking high S. area. Integration of a well-constrained geologic model and reservoir simulation pinpointed remaining pods of oil in a 3-m thick, subvertically fractured, dolomitic limestone reservoir of the Carboniferous Mission Canyon Formation in the Cabin Creek Field of the CCA This resulted in a successful high-flow-rate horizontal well (initial rate >800 BOPD) whose oil production was accurately predicted by a 3-D reservoir simulation. The model has 53,750 gridblocks each of which Is 60 by 60 m. The effect of the natural-fracture network was constrained with the k{sub v}/k{sub h} (vertical to horizontal permeability ratio). The simulation covered a 40-yr. production period. Gross production was Input as a constraint; oil and water rates were matched. Adjustments to absolute permeability, aquifer volume and relative water permeability were required to obtain a match between observed and simulated production rates. The model was fine tuned by matching the production of individual wells in areas with a high remaining S{sub o}. This project demonstrated that (1) interplay of geology and reservoir engineering provided a better reservoir model than could have been done individually, (2) simulation work identified horizontal drilling and recompletion candidates, with one successful horizontal well completed to date, and (3) use of the reservoir simulator for field-scale modeling In conjunction with a well-refined geologic synthesis can successfully pinpoint undeveloped reserves at CCA.

  8. Subtask 1.17 - Measurement of Hydrocarbon Evolution from Coal and Petroleum Reservoirs Under Carbon Dioxide Floods

    SciTech Connect

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2006-12-31

    The project developed, built, and tested three apparatuses for studying different interactions of carbon dioxide with geologic materials. In Year 1, an online instrument was constructed by coupling a high-pressure carbon dioxide extraction system with a flame ionization detector that can yield a real-time profile and quantitative measurements of hydrocarbons removed from materials such as coal and petroleum reservoir rock. In Years 2 and 3, one instrument was built to measure the excess sorption of carbon dioxide in geologic materials such as coal and showed that measurable uptake of carbon dioxide into the coal matrix is rapid. The final apparatus was built to expose geologic materials to carbon dioxide for long periods of time (weeks to months) under the range of pressures and temperatures relevant to carbon dioxide sequestration. The apparatus allows as many as twenty gram-sized samples of geologic materials to be exposed simultaneously and can also include exposures with geologic brines. The system was used to demonstrate complete conversion of magnesium silicate to magnesium carbonate in less than 4 weeks when exposed to clean water or brine, compared to no measurable conversion of dry magnesium carbonate.

  9. Nonlinear Flow Numerical Simulation of an Ultra-Low Permeability Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rong-Ze; Lei, Qun; Yang, Zheng-Ming; Bian, Ya-Nan

    2010-07-01

    A nonlinear flow mathematical model is established and the grid equation is deduced. A nonlinear flow reservoir numerical simulation program is compiled. The permeability loss coefficient is used to describe the permeability loss. A pilot calculation is made on the basis of actual field data, which reflects the reservoir development characteristics. The numerical simulation program based on nonlinear flow can anticipate the dynamic characteristics of the ultra-low permeability reservoir exploitation more exactly.

  10. Extracting Energy from Petroleum Reservoirs at Large Scale without CO2 Emissions -Is it possible? Is The Attempt Desirable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, Steve; Strous, Marc; Bryant, Steven

    2016-04-01

    One of our greatest challenges is the rapid transition to a carbon-neutral energy future. Alberta, with vast petroleum resources and a key role in Canada's current economy, embodies this global challenge of balancing environmental, economic and energy security goals - the "energy trilemma." The proposition that limiting future global warming requires holding atmospheric CO2 concentrations below a target value leads inexorably to the conclusion that the carbon in most of the world's fossil fuels, has to remain underground. Most fossil fuel resources would be stranded, as so would the economic wealth associated with those resources - unless resource development can be accomplished by maintaining a fossil fuel industry with a reduced and eventually eliminated environmental footprint. If achievable, there are potential political and economic benefits evident, that could greatly accelerate broader, desirable energy system changes. In this alternate paradigm, petroleum reservoirs might play a transitional role as storehouses of chemical energy, but instead of utilizing that energy by surface combustion, an alternative is to convert it into other forms of chemical or electrical energy. By carrying out this conversion in situ, CO2 can be left in the reservoir. By choosing energy forms such as hydrogen, hydrogen rich fuels or electricity, that emit no CO2 when used to power our machines and devices, we can in principle, continue to derive value from fossil fuel resources and provide economic drivers for a complete and rapid transformation of our energy supply systems and economies. We examine the technical and political aspects of this route emphasizing the need for safeguards against emergent issues that might slow a rapid transition towards dominant renewable energy sources in the medium and long terms. Technologies such as conventional carbon capture and storage can only have a small effect on oil related emissions, as downstream emissions dominate. So, dramatic

  11. Reservoir management applications to oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.D.; Ouenes, A.; Weiss, W.W.; Chawathe, A.

    1996-02-01

    Winnipegosis and Red River oil production in the Bainville North Field in Roosevelt County, Montana began in 1979. The Red River is at 12,500 ft and one well is completed in the Nisku formation at 10,200 ft. This well produced 125,000 bbl from the Nisku during its first 41 months. Since operating conditions inhibit dual completions and Nisku wells cost $900,000, the need for a Nisku development plan is apparent. The size of the reservoir and optimum well density are the key unknowns. Recognizing the need for additional Nisku data, a 5000 acre 3-D seismic survey was processed and the results used to map the top of the Nisku. The reservoir thickness, porosity, and water saturation were known from the openhole logs at eight well locations on an average of 320 acres spacing. The thickness of the thin pay limited the seismic information to areal extent of reservoir depth. Static reservoir pressure from drillstem test was available at two wells. Additional reservoir pressure data in the form of transient tests were available at two wells. Under Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Ordering Agreement 9-XU3-0402J-1, the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center (PRRC) characterized the Nisku to develop a reservoir management plan. Nance Petroleum provided all available field and laboratory data for characterizing the Nisku formation. Due to sparse well coverage, and the lack of producing wells, the PRRC had to develop a new reservoir description approach to reach an acceptable characterization of the entire reservoir. This new approach relies on the simultaneous use of 3-D seismic and reservoir simulation to estimate key reservoir properties.

  12. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  13. Development of a compositional model fully coupled with geomechanics and its application to tight oil reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yi

    Tight oil reservoirs have received great attention in recent years as unconventional and promising petroleum resources; they are reshaping the U.S. crude oil market due to their substantial production. However, fluid flow behaviors in tight oil reservoirs are not well studied or understood due to the complexities in the physics involved. Specific characteristics of tight oil reservoirs, such as nano-pore scale and strong stress-dependency result in complex porous medium fluid flow behaviors. Recent field observations and laboratory experiments indicate that large effects of pore confinement and rock compaction have non-negligible impacts on the production performance of tight oil reservoirs. On the other hand, there are approximations or limitations for modeling tight oil reservoirs under the effects of pore confinement and rock compaction with current reservoir simulation techniques. Thus this dissertation aims to develop a compositional model coupled with geomechanics with capabilities to model and understand the complex fluid flow behaviors of multiphase, multi-component fluids in tight oil reservoirs. MSFLOW_COM (Multiphase Subsurface FLOW COMpositional model) has been developed with the capability to model the effects of pore confinement and rock compaction for multiphase fluid flow in tight oil reservoirs. The pore confinement effect is represented by the effect of capillary pressure on vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE), and modeled with the VLE calculation method in MSFLOW_COM. The fully coupled geomechanical model is developed from the linear elastic theory for a poro-elastic system and formulated in terms of the mean stress. Rock compaction is then described using stress-dependent rock properties, especially stress-dependent permeability. Thus MSFLOW_COM has the capabilities to model the complex fluid flow behaviors of tight oil reservoirs, fully coupled with geomechanics. In addition, MSFLOW_COM is validated against laboratory experimental data, analytical

  14. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, September 29, 1993--September 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be collected. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1993-94, the first year of the project. Most work consisted of developing field methods and collecting large quantities of existing and new data. We also developed preliminary regional and case-study area interpretations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) development of reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies.

  15. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the ferron sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Allison, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic interwell and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah was collected. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1994-95, the second year of the project. Most work consisted of developing field methods and collecting large quantities of existing and new data. We also continued to develop preliminary regional and case-study area interpretations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies.

  16. Research program on fractured petroleum reservoirs. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1994-04-30

    We have developed a simple method to account for reinfiltration and capillary continuity processes in a grid cell that may contain a large number of matrix blocks. This method requires fine grid simulation of a three-block stack. The proposed technique also takes into account the variation of capillary pressure, and even permeability and height variation among various matrix blocks reasonably well.

  17. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah was collected. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1995-96, the third year of the project. Most work consisted of interpreting the large quantity of data collected over two field seasons. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies. The primary objective of the regional stratigraphic analysis is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy and gross reservoir characteristics of the Ferron Sandstone as exposed in outcrop. The primary objective of the case-studies work is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir.

  18. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dauben, D.L.

    1991-07-15

    The study has two principal objectives: (1) To evaluate the effects of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas reserves from naturally fractured petroleum or natural gas reservoirs. (2) To evaluate procedures for improving the recovery of these reserves using innovative fluid injection techniques to maintain reservoir pressure and mitigate the impact of fracture closure. The total scope of the study has been subdivided into three main tasks: (1) Baseline studies (non-pressure sensitive fractures); (2)studies with pressure sensitive fractures; and (3) innovative approaches for improving oil recovery.

  19. Formation evaluation and reservoir geology. 1995 SPE annual technical conference and exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains the proceedings of the Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition of the Society of Petroleum Engineers which was held on October 22-25, 1995 in Dallas, Texas. This volume contains the presentations regarding Formation Evaluation and Reservoir Geology. The topics covered in these presentations include: resource management and reservoir engineering of oil, natural gas and gas condensate fields, magnetic, electrical, and seismic surveys of reservoir rock, mathematical models and computerized simulation of fluid flow in reservoir rock, geochemistry of reservoir fluids, and enhanced recovery of oil and natural gas using waterflooding and other secondary recovery methods. Team approaches to reservoir characterization using geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering are also described.

  20. Metagenomic and geochemical characterization of pockmarked sediments overlaying the Troll petroleum reservoir in the North Sea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pockmarks (depressions in the seabed) have been discovered throughout the world’s oceans and are often related to hydrocarbon seepage. Although high concentrations of pockmarks are present in the seabed overlaying the Troll oil and gas reservoir in the northern North Sea, geological surveys have not detected hydrocarbon seepage in this area at the present time. In this study we have used metagenomics to characterize the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the surface sediments in the Troll area in relation to geochemical parameters, particularly related to hydrocarbon presence. We also investigated the possibility of increased potential for methane oxidation related to the pockmarks. Five metagenomes from pockmarks and plain seabed sediments were sequenced by pyrosequencing (Roche/454) technology. In addition, two metagenomes from seabed sediments geologically unlikely to be influenced by hydrocarbon seepage (the Oslofjord) were included. The taxonomic distribution and metabolic potential of the metagenomes were analyzed by multivariate analysis and statistical comparisons to reveal variation within and between the two sampling areas. Results The main difference identified between the two sampling areas was an overabundance of predominantly autotrophic nitrifiers, especially Nitrosopumilus, and oligotrophic marine Gammaproteobacteria in the Troll metagenomes compared to the Oslofjord. Increased potential for degradation of hydrocarbons, especially aromatic hydrocarbons, was detected in two of the Troll samples: one pockmark sample and one from the plain seabed. Although presence of methanotrophic organisms was indicated in all samples, no overabundance in pockmark samples compared to the Oslofjord samples supports no, or only low level, methane seepage in the Troll pockmarks at the present time. Conclusions Given the relatively low content of total organic carbon and great depths of hydrocarbon containing sediments in the Troll area, it is possible that

  1. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-10-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Technical progress this quarter is divided into regional stratigraphy, case studies, stochastic modeling and fluid-flow simulation, and technology transfer activities. The regional stratigraphy of the Ferron Sandstone outcrop belt is being described and interpreted. Detailed geological and petrophysical characterization of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir, is continuing at selected case-study areas. Interpretations of lithofacies, bounding surfaces, and other geologic information are being combined with permeability measurements from closely spaced traverses and from drill-hole cores (existing and two drilled during the quarter). Petrophysical and statistical analyses are being incorporated with the geological characterization to develop a three-dimensional model of the reservoirs through fluid-flow simulation.

  2. Multigrid Methods for Fully Implicit Oil Reservoir Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molenaar, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we consider the simultaneous flow of oil and water in reservoir rock. This displacement process is modeled by two basic equations: the material balance or continuity equations and the equation of motion (Darcy's law). For the numerical solution of this system of nonlinear partial differential equations there are two approaches: the fully implicit or simultaneous solution method and the sequential solution method. In the sequential solution method the system of partial differential equations is manipulated to give an elliptic pressure equation and a hyperbolic (or parabolic) saturation equation. In the IMPES approach the pressure equation is first solved, using values for the saturation from the previous time level. Next the saturations are updated by some explicit time stepping method; this implies that the method is only conditionally stable. For the numerical solution of the linear, elliptic pressure equation multigrid methods have become an accepted technique. On the other hand, the fully implicit method is unconditionally stable, but it has the disadvantage that in every time step a large system of nonlinear algebraic equations has to be solved. The most time-consuming part of any fully implicit reservoir simulator is the solution of this large system of equations. Usually this is done by Newton's method. The resulting systems of linear equations are then either solved by a direct method or by some conjugate gradient type method. In this paper we consider the possibility of applying multigrid methods for the iterative solution of the systems of nonlinear equations. There are two ways of using multigrid for this job: either we use a nonlinear multigrid method or we use a linear multigrid method to deal with the linear systems that arise in Newton's method. So far only a few authors have reported on the use of multigrid methods for fully implicit simulations. Two-level FAS algorithm is presented for the black-oil equations, and linear multigrid for

  3. Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1995-01-01

    Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

  4. Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation calculations using MUSHRM and CHARGR geothermal reservoir simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchett, J.W.

    1980-11-01

    The essential features of the reservoir codes CHARGR and MUSHRM are described. Solutions obtained for the problem set posed by DOE are presented. CHARGR was used for all six problems; MUSHRM was used for one. These problems are: the 1-D Avdonin solution, the 1-D well test analysis, 2-D flow to a well in fracture/block media, expanding two-phase system with drainage, flow in a 2-D areal reservoir, and flow in a 3-D reservoir. Results for the last problem using both codes are compared. (MHR)

  5. Leasing policy and the rate of petroleum development: analysis with a Monte Carlo simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Abbey, D; Bivins, R

    1982-03-01

    The study has two objectives: first, to consider whether alternative leasing systems are desirable to speed the rate of oil and gas exploration and development in frontier basins; second, to evaluate the Petroleum Activity and Decision Simulation model developed by the US Department of the Interior for economic and land use planning and for policy analysis. Analysis of the model involved structural variation of the geology, exploration, and discovery submodels and also involved a formal sensitivity analysis using the Latin Hypercube Sampling Method. We report the rate of exploration, discovery, and petroleum output under a variety of price, leasing policy, and tax regimes.

  6. Long-term Reservoir Routing Simulations Using Data-Driven Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashouri, H.; Chowdhary, H.; Chinnayakanahalli, K.; Dodov, B.

    2015-12-01

    Flood is a highly complex natural hazard that accounts for major losses to human societies worldwide. Dams built with the aim of mitigating the flood risk significantly modify river flow regimes but unavailability and/or inaccessibility of proper information about reservoir operational rules impose a big hurdle to global flood modeling. This is specifically critical for flood-prone regions where lack of proper representation of reservoir operation can lead to significant under- or overestimation of the flood magnitude, risk, and losses. With the availability of longer in-situ observational data records, as well as advancements in satellite altimetry techniques for measuring reservoir levels, operational rules can be indirectly deduced. In this study, the observed reservoir levels as well as the historical and forecast time series of inflows are incorporated into a stochastic autoregressive moving average statistical modeling scheme to simulate the releases from the dam at each time step. The resulting operational rule curve is used in a reservoir simulation model to simulate the outflows from the reservoirs. The efficiency of the model is examined for three case studies in the United States, including John Martin Reservoir (CO), Coralville Lake (IA, and specifically for the devastating 2008 flood in the state), and Boca Reservoir (CA). Statistical measures are derived and tested to evaluate the accuracy of the simulated hydrographs against USGS streamflow gauge observations. The results prove the capability of the developed model in simulating reasonably accurate outflows from dams and will be presented at the meeting.

  7. Moomba Lower Daralingie Beds (LDB) gas storage project: Reservoir management using a novel numerical simulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jamal, F.G.

    1994-12-31

    Engineers managing underground gas storage projects are often faced with challenges involving gas migration, inventory variance, gas quality and inventory-pressures. This paper discusses a unique underground gas storage project where sales gas and ethane are stored in two different but communicating regions of the same reservoir. A commercially available reservoir simulator was used to model the fluid flow behavior in this reservoir, hence, providing a tool for better management and use of the existing gas storage facilities.

  8. Nonlinear filtering in oil/gas reservoir simulation: filter design

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Voss, D.A.; Mayer, D.W.

    1980-10-01

    In order to provide an additional mode of utility to the USGS reservoir model VARGOW, a nonlinear filter was designed and incorporated into the system. As a result, optimal (in the least squares sense) estimates of reservoir pressure, liquid mass, and gas cap plus free gas mass are obtained from an input of reservoir initial condition estimates and pressure history. These optimal estimates are provided continuously for each time after the initial time, and the input pressure history is allowed to be corrupted by measurement error. Preliminary testing of the VARGOW filter was begun and the results show promise. Synthetic data which could be readily manipulated during testing was used in tracking tests. The results were positive when the initial estimates of the reservoir initial conditions were reasonably close. Further testing is necessary to investigate the filter performance with real reservoir data.

  9. The Simulation of Inflow Discharge and Suspended Sediment Transport Rate for a Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ching-Hsien; Chen, Ching-Nuo; Tsai, Chih-Heng; Tsai, Chang-Tai

    2010-05-01

    The major functions of a reservoir include flood-protection, public water-supply, irrigation, hydropower and tourism. Consequently, these functions can provide great contributions for economic development. Therefore, important issues associated with reservoir watersheds such as soil erosion and deposition must be carefully studied in order to enhance watershed management. Accurate and timely estimation of peak flow discharges into a reservoir is very crucial for flood protection strategies and the general safety of the reservoir. In this study, GIS is applied to a physiographical soil erosion-deposition model, using rainfall data as the primary input, to simulate both stream flow hydrographs and sediment transport into a reservoir. In this study, the Shihmen Reservoir watershed is used as an illustrative example. The Shihmen Reservoir, a multiple-purpose reservoir for irrigation, hydropower, public water-supply, flood-protection, and tourism, is located on the mid-stream reach of the Tahan River. High-concentration sediment-containing flood flow events during storm periods are primarily responsible for the turbidity and sedimentation in the Shihmen Reservoir. Therefore, if incoming stream flow and sediment concentration hydrographs can be determined promptly during storm periods, high-concentration turbid water can be diverted from the reservoir and low-concentration water, during the recession, can be stored. Consequently, the deposition of the reservoir can be reduced extending the life of the reservoir. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to establish a physiographic soil erosion-deposition model for the Shihmen Reservoir watershed. Using rainfall data as input, we can simulate the hydrographs of both stream flow and sediment concentration entering the reservoir. The results obtained from our model can be used as a reference to aid in the operation of the Shihmen Reservoir concerning deposition prevention. The numerical studies show that the peak flow and

  10. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. [Quarterly] report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1994-04-22

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic interwell and reservoir-scale modeling to be used for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a 3-D representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for interwell to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduce economic risks, increase recovery from existing oil fields, and provide more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry will be an integral component of the project. The technical progress is divided into several sections corresponding to subtasks outlined in the Regional Stratigraphy Task and the Case Studies Task of the original proposal. The primary objective of the Regional Stratigraphy Task is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy of the Ferron Sandstone outcrop belt from Last Chance Creek to Ferron Creek. The morphological framework established from the case studies will be used to generate subsequent flow models for the reservoir types. The primary objective of the Case Study Task is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir. Sedimentary structures, lithofacies, bounding surfaces, and permeabilities measured along closely spaced traverses (both vertical and horizontal) will be combined with data from core drilling to develop a 3-D morphology of the reservoirs within each case study area.

  11. G-2 and G-3 reservoirs, Delta South field, Nigeria - 2. Simulation of water injection

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, G.C.; Stanat, P.L.; Aruna, M.; Ajayi, S.A.; Poston, S.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of a two-dimensional, three-phase, black-oil simulation of the G-2 and G-3 reservoirs in the Delta South field offshore Nigeria. The purpose of these studies was to investigate, from an engineering standpoint, various operating schemes for optimizing the oil recovery from each of these highly gravity-segregated reservoirs. 4 refs.

  12. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  13. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  14. Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

    1999-01-01

    The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

  15. Simulations of Flow Circulations and Atrazine Concentrations in a Midwest U.S. Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xianggui; Gu, Roy R.; Guo, Chuling; Wang, Kui; Li, Shijie

    Atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the spring for pre-emergent weed control in the corn cropping area in the Midwestern United States. A frequent high level of herbicide concentrations in reservoirs is a great concern for public health and aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a two-dimensional hydrodynamics and toxic contaminant transport model was applied to Saylorville Reservoir, Iowa, USA. The model simulates physical, chemical, and biological processes and predicts unsteady vertical and longitudinal distributions of a toxic chemical. Model results were validated by measured temperatures and atrazine concentrations. Simulated flow velocities, water temperatures, and chemical concentrations demonstrated that the spatial variation of atrazine concentrations was largely affected by seasonal flow circulation patterns in the reservoir. In particular, the simulated fate and transport of atrazine showed the effect of flow circulation on spatial distribution of atrazine during summer months as the river flow formed an underflow within the reservoir and resulted in greater concentrations near the surface of the reservoir. Atrazine concentrations in the reservoir peaked around the end of May and early June. A thorough understanding of the fate and transport of atrazine in the reservoir can assist in developing operation and pollution prevention strategies with respect to timing, amount, and depth of withdrawal. The responses of atrazine transport to various boundary conditions provide useful information in assessing environmental impact of alternative upstream watershed management practices on the quality of reservoir water.

  16. Simulating the effects of adsorption and capillary forces in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Sta. Maria, Roman B.; Pingol, Alponso S.

    1996-01-24

    Until recently, geothermal reservoir simulators use flat interface thermodynamics to determine the thermodynamic state of the reservoir. Development of new simulators and the modification of existing ones has now incorporated the physics of curved interface thermodynamics. These simulators account for the effects of sorption and capillary forces. The simulators GSS and TETRAD were used to simulate the performance of a hypothetical vapordominated geothermal reservoir. GSS is a simulator specifically developed to account for adsorption by using adsorption isotherms. On the other hand, TETRAD is a commercial simulator that was modified to account for vapor pressure lowering by using capillary pressure relations. GSS and TETRAD yielded similar results. Thus, the two formulations being used to account for curved interface thermodynamics are practically equivalent. Areas for improvement of both GSS and TETRAD were identified. The hysteresis and temperature dependence of sorption and capillary properties are issues that are needed to be addressed.

  17. Fractal characterization of geological fractures in an exposed analog of a petroleum reservoir and its application to fluid flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez, A.; Tolson, G.

    2012-12-01

    The quantification of fracture systems is important to understand the phenomenon of fluid flow in naturally fractured petroleum reservoirs. In this work, we present a case of detailed analysis of filled fracture networks (veins) covering four orders of magnitude of scale. For our analysis we selected rocks of the El Doctor platform in the state of Querétaro, Central Mexico, which is an exposed analog of naturally fractured carbonate reservoir rocks common in the near-offshore oil fields in southeast Mexico. The fractal properties of one and two dimensional natural fracture patterns mapped on limestone outcrops, are present and compared to the results obtained in other studies at different scales. The fractal dimension of different fracture properties, such as spacing, thickness, spatial distribution, density, connectivity and length are investigated and measured using different methods. The principal fractal parameters obtained in this study include the cumulative-frequency exponent of spacing and thickness, box-counting dimension, correlation dimension and Lyapunov exponent in 1D analysis; whereas the 2D analysis included the cumulative-length exponent (fragmentation dimension), box-counting dimension, mass dimension (mid and intersection points of fractures), lacunarity and connectivity. In addition, we analyzed the orientation, density and intensity of the fracture arrays. The results of the 1D analysis indicate that the fracture spacing can be characterised using the parameters mentioned before, but the best fractal parameter to characterize the distribution and array of fractures is the Lyapunov exponent, because it's value (1.06-1.42) can differentiate between different types of array. The fractal dimension obtained for cumulative-frequency of the spacing, shows a power law with a negative exponent between -1.08 and -0.70. In the case of box-counting and correlation dimensions, the values of dimension were 0.30-0.68 and 0.40-0.63 respectively. With respect

  18. Simulation and optimization technologies for petroleum waste management and remediation process control.

    PubMed

    Qin, X S; Huang, G H; He, L

    2009-01-01

    Leakage and spill of petroleum hydrocarbons from underground storage tanks and pipelines have posed significant threats to groundwater resources across many petroleum-contaminated sites. Remediation of these sites is essential for protecting the soil and groundwater resources and reducing risks to local communities. Although many efforts have been made, effective design and management of various remediation systems are still challenging to practitioners. In recent years, the subsurface simulation model has been combined with techniques of optimization to address important problems of contaminated site management. The combined simulation-optimization system accounts for the complex behavior of the subsurface system and identifies the best management strategy under consideration of the management objectives and constraints. During the past decades, a large number of studies were conducted to simulate contaminant flow and transport in the subsurface and seek cost-effective remediation designs. This paper gives a comprehensive review on recent developments, advancements, challenges, and barriers associated with simulation and optimization techniques in supporting process control of petroleum waste management and site remediation. A number of related methodologies and applications were examined. Perspectives of effective site management were investigated, demonstrating many demanding areas for enhanced research efforts, which include issues of data availability and reliability, concerns in uncertainty, necessity of post-modeling analysis, and usefulness of development of process control techniques. PMID:18694620

  19. Fractured Petroleum Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, Dr. Abbas

    2000-01-18

    In this report the results of experiments of water injection in fractured porous media comprising a number of water-wet matrix blocks are reported for the first time. The blocks experience an advancing fracture-water level (FWL). Immersion-type experiments are performed for comparison; the dominant recovery mechanism changed from co-current to counter-current imbibition when the boundary conditions changed from advancing FWL to immersion-type. Single block experiments of co-current and counter-current imbibition was performed and co-current imbibition leads to more efficient recovery was found.

  20. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Self-priming hemodynamic reservoir and inline flow meter for a cardiopulmonary bypass simulation.

    PubMed

    Raasch, David; Austin, Jon; Tallman, Richard

    2010-06-01

    Simulator exercises are used at Midwestern University to augment academic and laboratory training toward consolidating particular skills, increasing situation awareness, and preparing the student for practice within the team environment of an operating room. This paper describes an enhanced cardiopulmonary bypass simulator consisting of a self-priming hemodynamic reservoir that includes an inline flow meter. A typical cardiopulmonary bypass adult perfusion circuit was assembled using a roller pump console and integrated oxygenator/heat exchanger/reservoir and primed with 2 liters of water. For patient simulation, a soft-sided reservoir bag was mounted onto an inclined platform. A 1-liter soft-sided bag was placed just above the reservoir, providing an overflow reservoir. The priming line extended to the head of the mannequin. The arterial, venous, and suction lines extended through the open chest. The primed perfusion circuit was connected to ports on the filled reservoir bag. To test the patient simulation, the arterial pump output was adjusted to flow rates ranging from 1-7 liters per minute, with a complete interruption (to zero flow) between each test run. An inline flow meter was added to the bypass circuit and an analog to digital converter board was used to pass flow data into the computer-based simulation program. The use of an inclined hemodynamic reservoir bag proved to be self-priming and functional without problems over a wide range of flows tested. By including a reservoir with the mannequin, plus processing and displaying real-time flow data using the CPB-Sim simulation program, a higher fidelity and more realistic simulation experience was created. PMID:20648900

  2. Using gas geochemistry to delineate structural compartments and assess petroleum reservoir-filling directions: A Venezuelan case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, G.; Escobar, M.; Lorenzo, E.; Gallego, J. R.; Tocco, R.

    2013-04-01

    Here we examined the light hydrocarbon and nitrogen content and isotopic signatures of eleven gaseous samples in order to evaluate lateral intra-reservoir continuity in a Venezuelan reservoir in the central area of Lake Maracaibo Basin. At least three single compartments, located in the northern-central and southern parts of the reservoir, are revealed by nitrogen concentrations showing clear step-like compositional breaks. The occurrence of step-breaks was also supported by the isotopic signature of individual hydrocarbon compounds in the range of C1-C4 alkanes. Samples presented only slight differences in N2 and hydrocarbon gas compositions within the central and northern parts of the reservoir, and therefore it was not possible to infer structural barriers in coherence with the geological section. Some oil bulk parameters corroborate gradual changes that provide additional information on the reservoir-filling history, thus suggesting that the lateral physical-chemical equilibrium of fluids was not reached in this reservoir.

  3. Vortex formation in coalescence of droplets with a reservoir using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Taherian, Fereshte; Marcon, Valentina; Bonaccurso, Elmar; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2016-10-01

    The flow patterns generated by the coalescence of aqueous ethanol droplets with a water reservoir are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The influence of surface tension gradient, which leads to the spreading of the droplet along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir, is studied by changing the ethanol concentration of the droplet. The internal circulation (vortex strength) of the droplet and the reservoir are analyzed separately. Simulation results reveal the formation of swirling flows within the droplet at early times when the radius of the coalescence neck due to the capillary forces increases rapidly with time. The vortex strength is found to be higher at lower concentrations of ethanol (higher liquid-vapor surface tension of the droplet), where the driving force for the contact line movement (capillary force) is stronger. The circulation diminishes by moving the center of mass of the droplet toward the reservoir. The lower surface tension of the droplet compared to the reservoir leads to surface tension gradient driven flow, which transports the droplet molecules along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir. Such a flow motion results in the generation of convective flows in the underlying water, which forms swirling flows within the reservoir. Therefore, the vortex strength of the reservoir is higher at higher ethanol concentrations of the droplet. The reservoir circulation decays to zero as soon as the ethanol concentration becomes homogeneous along the interface of the pool. The time evolution of circulation within the droplet and the reservoir are correlated with the center of mass motion of the droplet toward the surface, the time variation of the precursor film radius and the dynamic surface tension of the reservoir. PMID:27388133

  4. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone: (1) preparation of the project final report and (2) technology transfer.

  5. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Technical progress report, October 1--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone and are described within: (1) regional stratigraphic interpretation and (2) technology transfer.

  6. Integration of seismic methods with reservoir simulation, Pikes Peak heavy oil field, Saskatchewan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ying

    The Pikes Peak heavy oil field has been operated by Husky Energy Ltd since 1981. Steam injection has been successfully employed to increase production. Efforts in geophysics and reservoir engineering have been made to improve interpretations in the mapping of reservoir conditions. This dissertation developed tools and a working flow for integrating the analysis of time-lapse seismic surveys with reservoir simulation, and applied them to the Pikes Peak field. Two time-lapse 2D seismic lines acquired in February 1991 and March 2000 in the eastern part of the field were carefully processed to produce wavelet and structure matched final sections. Reservoir simulation based on the field reservoir production history was carried out. It provided independent complementary information for the time-lapse seismic analysis. A rock physics procedure based on Gassmann's equation and Batzle and Wang's empirical relationship successfully linked the reservoir engineering to the seismic method. Based on the resultant seismic models, synthetic seismic sections were generated as the analogy of field seismic sections. The integrated interpretation for the Pikes Peak reservoir drew the following conclusions: The areas with a gas saturation difference, between two compared time steps, have seismic differences. Thicker gas zones correspond with large reflectivity changes on the top of the reservoir and larger traveltime delays in the seismic section. The thin gas zones only induce large reflectivity changes on the top of the reservoir, and do not have large time delays below the reservoir zone. High temperature regions also correlate with areas having large seismic energy differences. High temperature with thick gas (steam and methane) zones may be evidence for steam existence. The seismic differences at locations far from the production zone are due to the lower pressure that causes solution gas to evolve from the oil. Pressure changes propagate much faster (˜20 m in one month) than

  7. Comparison of Microbial Community Compositions of Injection and Production Well Samples in a Long-Term Water-Flooded Petroleum Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Song, Zhi-yong; Rupert, Wieger; Gao, Guang-Jun; Guo, Sheng-xue; Zhao, Li-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Water flooding plays an important role in recovering oil from depleted petroleum reservoirs. Exactly how the microbial communities of production wells are affected by microorganisms introduced with injected water has previously not been adequately studied. Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, the comparison of microbial communities is carried out between one injection water and two production waters collected from a working block of the water-flooded Gudao petroleum reservoir located in the Yellow River Delta. DGGE fingerprints showed that the similarities of the bacterial communities between the injection water and production waters were lower than between the two production waters. It was also observed that the archaeal composition among these three samples showed no significant difference. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries showed that the dominant groups within the injection water were Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Methanomicrobia, while the dominant groups in the production waters were Gammaproteobacteria and Methanobacteria. Only 2 out of 54 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and 5 out of 17 archaeal OTUs in the injection water were detected in the production waters, indicating that most of the microorganisms introduced by the injection water may not survive to be detected in the production waters. Additionally, there were 55.6% and 82.6% unique OTUs in the two production waters respectively, suggesting that each production well has its specific microbial composition, despite both wells being flooded with the same injection water. PMID:21858049

  8. Simulation and resistivity modeling of a geothermal reservoir with waters of different salinity

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Wilt, M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Goldstein, N.E.

    1982-10-01

    Apparent resistivities measured by means of repetitive dipole-dipole surveys show significant changes within the Cerro Prieto reservoir. The changes are attributed to production and natural recharge. To better understand the observed geophysical phenomena a simple reservoir simulation study combined with the appropriate DC resistivity calculations to determine the expected magnitude of apparent resistivity change. We consider production from a liquid-dominated reservoir with dimensions and parameters of the Cerro Prieto A reservoir and assume lateral and vertical recharge of colder and less saline waters. Based on rather schematic one- and two-dimensional reservoir simulations, we calculate changes in formation resistivity which we then transform into changes in apparent resistivity that would be observed at the surface. Simulated changes in apparent resistivities over the production zone show increases of 10 to 20% over a 3 year period at the current rate of fluid extraction. Changes of this magnitude are not only within our ability to discern using proper field techniques, but are consistent in magnitude with some of the observed effects. However, the patterns of apparent resistivity changes in the simulated dipole-dipole pseudosection only partially resemble the observed field data. This is explained by the fact that the actual fluid recharge into the A reservoir is more complicated than assumed in our simple, schematic recharge models.

  9. Optimization of coalbed-methane-reservoir exploration and development strategies through integration of simulation and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, C.R.; McGovern, J.M.

    2005-12-15

    The unique properties and complex characteristics of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, and their consequent operating strategies, call for an integrated approach to be used to explore for and develop coal plays and prospects economically. An integrated approach involves the use of sophisticated reservoir, wellbore, and facilities modeling combined with economics and decision-making criteria. A new CBM prospecting tool (CPT) was generated by combining single-well (multilayered) reservoir simulators with a gridded reservoir model, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and economic modules. The multilayered reservoir model is divided into pods, representing relatively uniform reservoir properties, and a 'type well' is created for each pod. At every MC iteration, type-well forecasts are generated for the pods and are coupled with economic modules. A set of decision criteria contingent upon economic outcomes and reservoir characteristics is used to advance prospect exploration from the initial exploration well to the pilot and development stages. A novel approach has been used to determine the optimal well spacing should prospect development be contemplated. CPT model outcomes include a distribution of after-tax net present value (ATNPV), mean ATNPV (expected value), chance of economic success (Pe), distribution of type-well and pod gas and water production, reserves, peak gas volume, and capita. Example application of CPT to a hypothetical prospect is provided. An integrated approach also has been used to assist with production optimization of developed reservoirs. For example, an infill-well locating tool (ILT) has been constructed to provide a quick-look evaluation of infill locations in a developed reservoir. An application of ILT to a CBM reservoir is provided.

  10. Comparisons of Simulated Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Projected Demands in 2046, Pueblo Reservoir, Southeastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, Roderick F.; Galloway, Joel M.; Miller, Lisa D.; Mau, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Pueblo Reservoir is one of southeastern Colorado's most valuable water resources. The reservoir provides irrigation, municipal, and industrial water to various entities throughout the region. The reservoir also provides flood control, recreational activities, sport fishing, and wildlife enhancement to the region. The Bureau of Reclamation is working to meet its goal to issue a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the Southern Delivery System project (SDS). SDS is a regional water-delivery project that has been proposed to provide a safe, reliable, and sustainable water supply through the foreseeable future (2046) for Colorado Springs, Fountain, Security, and Pueblo West. Discussions with the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Geological Survey led to a cooperative agreement to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality of Pueblo Reservoir. This work has been completed and described in a previously published report, U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2008-5056. Additionally, there was a need to make comparisons of simulated hydrodynamics and water quality for projected demands associated with the various EIS alternatives and plans by Pueblo West to discharge treated water into the reservoir. Plans by Pueblo West are fully independent of the SDS project. This report compares simulated hydrodynamics and water quality for projected demands in Pueblo Reservoir resulting from changes in inflow and water quality entering the reservoir, and from changes to withdrawals from the reservoir as projected for the year 2046. Four of the seven EIS alternatives were selected for scenario simulations. The four U.S. Geological Survey simulation scenarios were the No Action scenario (EIS Alternative 1), the Downstream Diversion scenario (EIS Alternative 2), the Upstream Return-Flow scenario (EIS Alternative 4), and the Upstream Diversion scenario (EIS Alternative 7). Additionally, the results of an Existing Conditions scenario (water years 2000 through

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Petroleum Coke Calcination in Pot Calciner Using Two-Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jin; Huang, Jindi; Zhong, Qifan; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a mathematical model for the analysis of calcining process of petroleum coke in a 24-pot calciner via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation method. The model can be divided into two main parts (1) heterogeneous reacting flow of petroleum coke calcination in the pot was simulated using a two-fluid model approach where the gas and solid phase are treated as a continuous phases; and (2) the standard turbulence equations combined with the finite rate/eddy-dissipation combustion model and discrete ordinates model were solved for the turbulent gas reacting flow in the flue. The model of the calcining process was implemented in ANSYS Fluent 15.0 (commercial CFD software) and validated by industrial production data. After the validation research, the model has been applied to inspect the distribution features of the temperature field in the furnace, the concentration field of residual moisture and volatiles in the petroleum coke, and the vector velocity field of gas and solid phases. This research can provide a theoretical basis for optimizing the structure and improving the automatic control level of a pot calciner.

  12. National Petroleum Technology Office`s publication list for January--June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This report lists 20 publications and 19 computer software and supporting documentation that are available from the National Petroleum Technology Office. Publications relate to environmental management, field demonstrations, general research, reservoir characterization, and supporting research for the petroleum industry. Many of the computer codes are for the simulation of enhanced recovery techniques.

  13. The energy-water nexus: Potential groundwater-quality degradation associated with petroleum production from shale and tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharaka, Y. K.; Gans, K. D.; Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.

    2013-12-01

    Oil and natural gas are the main sources of primary energy in the USA, providing 63% of total energy consumption in 2011. Production of petroleum from shale and very low permeability reservoirs has increased substantially due to recent developments in deep horizontal drilling, downhole telemetry and massive multi-stage hydraulic fracturing using ';slick water'. Production of natural gas from shale has increased rapidly, from 0.4 Tcf in 2000, to 6.8 Tcf in 2011, almost 30% of gas production in USA; it is projected to increase to account for 49% of USA gas in 2035. U.S. crude oil production has also increased from 5.0 Mbpd in 2008 to 5.6 Mbpd in 2011; oil from unconventional sources in 2035 is projected to be 0.7 to 2.8 Mbpd, accounting for 36% of domestic production. Hydraulic fracturing is carried out by injecting large volumes (~10,000-50,000 m3/well) of fresh water with added proppant, and organic and inorganic chemicals at high fluid pressures. Approximately 500-5,000 m3/well of water are also used for drilling the wells. The total water used for shale gas wells is relatively low compared to the consumptive total water usage in wet regions (e.g. 0.06% of water for the Marcellus Shale); but is much higher in arid regions (e.g. 0.8% for the Haynesville Shale) where water used could be a significant constraint for gas development because its use could impact the available water supply. Fluid pressure is lowered following hydraulic fracturing, causing the ';flowback' brine, which is a mixture of fracturing fluid and formation water, to return to the surface through the casing. During the 2-3 weeks of the ';flowback' period for a Marcellus Shale well, 10-50% of the fracturing fluid returns to the surface, initially at high rates (~1,000 m3/day), decreasing finally to ~ 50 m3/day. The salinity of the ';flowback' water is initially moderate (45,000 mg/L TDS), reflecting the composition of the fracturing water, and increasing to ~200,000 mg/L TDS. Production of natural

  14. Some mismatches occurred when simulating fractured reservoirs as homogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Cesar Suarez Arriaga; Fernando Samaniego V.; Fernando Rodriguez

    1996-01-24

    The understanding of transport processes that occur in naturally fractured geothermal systems is far from being complete. Often, evaluation and numerical simulations of fractured geothermal reservoirs, are carried out by assuming equivalent porous media and homogeneous petrophysical properties within big matrix blocks. The purpose of this paper, is to present a comparison between results obtained from numerical studies of a naturally fractured reservoir treated as a simple porous medium and the simulation of some real aspects of the fractured reservoir. A general conclusion outlines the great practical importance of considering even approximately, the true nature of such systems. Our results show that the homogeneous simplified evaluation of the energy resource in a fractured system, could result in unrealistic estimates of the reservoir capacity to generate electricity.

  15. Mathematical simulation of gas-liquid mixture flow in a reservoir and a wellbore with allowance for the dynamical interactions in the reservoir-well system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasov, E. M.; Feyzullayev, Kh. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid dynamic processes related to mature oil field development are simulated by applying a numerical algorithm based on the gas-liquid mixture flow equations in a reservoir and a wellbore with allowance for the dynamical interaction in the reservoir-well system. Numerical experiments are performed in which well production characteristics are determined from wellhead parameters.

  16. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

    2001-08-23

    Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

  17. 3-D-numerical approach to simulate an avalanche impact into a reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabl, R.; Seibl, J.; Gems, B.; Aufleger, M.

    2015-06-01

    The impact of an avalanche into a reservoir induces an impulse wave, which poses a threat to population and infrastructure. For a good approximation of the generated wave height and length as well as the resulting outflow volume over structures and dams, formulas, which base on different simplifying assumptions, can be used. Further project-specific investigations by means of a scale model test or numerical simulations are advisable for complex reservoirs as well as the inclusion of hydraulic structures such as spillways. The paper presents a new approach for a 3-D-numerical simulation of an avalanche impact into a reservoir. In this model concept the energy and mass of the avalanche are represented by accelerated water on the real hill slope. Instead of snow, only water and air are used to simulate the moving avalanche with the software FLOW-3D. A significant advantage of this assumption is the self-adaptation of the model avalanche onto the terrain. In order to reach good comparability of the results with existing research at the ETH Zürich, a simplified reservoir geometry is investigated. Thus, a reference case has been analysed including a variation of three geometry parameters (still water depth in the reservoir, freeboard of the dam and reservoir width).

  18. On-line Optimization-Based Simulators for Fractured and Non-fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Milind D. Deo

    2005-08-31

    Oil field development is a multi-million dollar business. Reservoir simulation is often used to guide the field management and development process. Reservoir characterization and geologic modeling tools have become increasingly sophisticated. As a result the geologic models produced are complex. Most reservoirs are fractured to a certain extent. The new geologic characterization methods are making it possible to map features such as faults and fractures, field-wide. Significant progress has been made in being able to predict properties of the faults and of the fractured zones. Traditionally, finite difference methods have been employed in discretizing the domains created by geologic means. For complex geometries, finite-element methods of discretization may be more suitable. Since reservoir simulation is a mature science, some of the advances in numerical methods (linear, nonlinear solvers and parallel computing) have not been fully realized in the implementation of most of the simulators. The purpose of this project was to address some of these issues. {sm_bullet} One of the goals of this project was to develop a series of finite-element simulators to handle problems of complex geometry, including systems containing faults and fractures. {sm_bullet} The idea was to incorporate the most modern computing tools; use of modular object-oriented computer languages, the most sophisticated linear and nonlinear solvers, parallel computing methods and good visualization tools. {sm_bullet} One of the tasks of the project was also to demonstrate the construction of fractures and faults in a reservoir using the available data and to assign properties to these features. {sm_bullet} Once the reservoir model is in place, it is desirable to find the operating conditions, which would provide the best reservoir performance. This can be accomplished by utilization optimization tools and coupling them with reservoir simulation. Optimization-based reservoir simulation was one of the

  19. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Malik, M.A.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. This project involves reservoir characterization of two Late Permian slope and basin clastic reservoirs in the Delaware Basin, West Texas, followed by a field demonstration in one of the fields. The fields being investigated are Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields in Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Project objectives are divided into two major phases, reservoir characterization and implementation. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project were to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of the two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field. Reservoir characterization utilized 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once reservoir characterized was completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} at the northern end of the Ford Geraldine unit was chosen for reservoir simulation. This report summarizes the results of the second year of reservoir characterization.

  20. Simulation of irreversible rock compaction effects on geopressured reservoir response: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1986-12-01

    A series of calculations are presented which quantitatively demonstrate the effects of nonlinear stress-deformation properties on the behavior of geopressured reservoirs. The range of stress-deformation parameters considered is based on information available from laboratory rock mechanics tests performed at the University of Texas at Austin and at Terra Tek, Inc. on cores recovered from geopressured wells. The effects of irreversible formation rock compaction, associated permeability reduction, and repetitive load/unload cycling are considered. The formation rock and geopressured brine properties are incorporated into an existing reservoir simulator using a bilinear model for the irreversible compaction process. Pressure drawdown and buildup testing of a well producing from the geopressured formation is simulated for a suite of calculations covering the range of formation parameters. The results are presented and discussed in terms of the inference (e.g., permeability and reservoir volume) that would be drawn from the simulated test data by an analyst using conventional methods.

  1. Maps showing petroleum exploration intensity and production in major Cambrian to Ordovician reservoir rocks in the Anadarko Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, Mitch; Hester, Tim

    1996-01-01

    The Anadarko basin is a large, deep, two-stage Paleozoic basin (Feinstein, 1981) that is petroleum rich and generally well explored. The Anadarko basin province, a geogrphic area used here mostly for the convenience of mapping and data management, is defined by political boundaries that include the Anadarko basin proper. The boundaries of the province are identical to those used by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the 1995 National Assessment of United Stated Oil and Gas Resources. The data in this report, also identical to those used in the national assessment, are from several computerized data bases including Nehring Research Group (NRG) Associates Inc., Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States (1992); Petroleum Information (PI), Inc., Well History Control System (1991); and Petroleum Information (PI), Inc., Petro-ROM: Production data on CD-ROM (1993). Although generated mostly in response to the national assessment, the data presented here arc grouped differently and arc displayed and described in greater detail. In addition, the stratigraphic sequences discussed may not necessarily correlate with the "plays" of the 1995 national assessment. This report uses computer-generated maps to show drilling intensity, producing wells, major fields, and other geologic information relevant to petroleum exploration and production in the lower Paleozoic part of the Anadarko basin province as defined for the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 national petroleum assessment. Hydrocarbon accumulations must meet a minimum standard of 1 million barrels of oil (MMBO) or 6 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG) estimated ultimate recovery to be included in this report as a major field or revoir. Mapped strata in this report include the Upper Cambrian to Lower Ordovician Arbuckle and Low Ordovician Ellenburger Groups, the Middle Ordovician Simpson Group, and the Middle to Upper Ordovician Viola Group.

  2. Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Application of Clone Libraries: Syntrophic Acetate Degradation to Methane in a High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoir - Culture-Based and 16S rRNA Genes Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, Natalya M.; Ivoilov, Valeriy S.; Tourova, Tatiana P.; Belyaev, Sergey S.; Poltaraus, Andrei B.; Nazina, Tamara N.

    The presence of microorganisms in petroleum reservoirs has been established about 100 years ago. Microbiological, radioisotope, molecular biological and biogeochemical techniques have been used to investigate microbial diversity and activity in the oilfields. These techniques were applied separately and the composition of the microbial community and its geochemical activity remained poorly understood.

  3. Radioactive Sediment Transport on Ogaki Dam Reservoir in Fukushima Evacuated Zone: Numerical Simulation Studies by 2-D River Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiro; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on March 2011 released significant quantities of radionuclides to atmosphere. The most significant nuclide is radioactive cesium isotopes. Therefore, the movement of the cesium is one of the critical issues for the environmental assessment. Since the cesium is strongly sorbed by soil particles, the cesium transport can be regarded as the sediment transport which is mainly brought about by the aquatic system such as a river and a lake. In this research, our target is the sediment transport on Ogaki dam reservoir which is located in about 16 km northwest from FDNPP. The reservoir is one of the principal irrigation dam reservoirs in Fukushima Prefecture and its upstream river basin was heavily contaminated by radioactivity. We simulate the sediment transport on the reservoir using 2-D river simulation code named Nays2D originally developed by Shimizu et al. (The latest version of Nays2D is available as a code included in iRIC (http://i-ric.org/en/), which is a river flow and riverbed variation analysis software package). In general, a 2-D simulation code requires a huge amount of calculation time. Therefore, we parallelize the code and execute it on a parallel computer. We examine the relationship between the behavior of the sediment transport and the height of the reservoir exit. The simulation result shows that almost all the sand that enter into the reservoir deposit close to the entrance of the reservoir for any height of the exit. The amounts of silt depositing within the reservoir slightly increase by raising the height of the exit. However, that of the clay dramatically increases. Especially, more than half of the clay deposits, if the exit is sufficiently high. These results demonstrate that the water level of the reservoir has a strong influence on the amount of the clay discharged from the reservoir. As a result, we conclude that the tuning of the water level has a possibility for controlling the

  4. Simulation of Hydrodynamics at Stratified Reservoirs Using a Staged Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Paik, Joongcheol; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-10-01

    Hydropower reservoirs impounded by high-head dams exhibit complex circulation that confuses the downstream migrating salmon and limits successful collection and passage of fish. Fish passage engineers attempt to modify the hydrothermal behavior at reservoirs through structural and operational modifications and often use hydrodynamic simulations to guide their actions. Simulation of key hydrothermal processes such as (a) development of a stable two-layer stratified system, (b) density-driven currents over a reservoir length scale, and (c) discharge hydraulics near the power generation and fish collection intakes requires highly specialized models applied at differing temporal and spatial scales. A staged modeling approach is presented that uses external coupling of models at varying temporal scales and spatial resolution to simulate the entire hydraulic regime from the mouth of the reservoir at the upstream end to the discharge at the dam. The staged modeling approach is illustrated using a case study where structural modifications were evaluated to improve reservoir stratification and density-driven currents. The model results provided input and valuable insight in the development of a new structure design and configuration for effective fish collection near the forebay of a high-head dam.

  5. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1996-04-30

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

  6. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope, and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley P. Dutton

    1997-04-30

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir-characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi 2 in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO 2 flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Through technology transfer workshops and other presentations, the knowledge gained in the comparative study of these two fields can then be applied to increase production from the more

  7. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin).

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1997-10-30

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, water flood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Through technology transfer workshops and other present at ions, the knowledge gained in the comparative study of these two fields can then be applied to increase product ion

  8. Contributions in petroleum geology and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A.H.; Koederitz, L.; Honarpour, M. )

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses petroleum reservoir components and properties. The contents include: Systems of units. Reservoir Rocks. Reservoir fluids. Relative permeability and capillarity. Reservoir volume and fluid flow. Naturally fractured reservoirs. Natural production mechanisms. Prediction of oil and gas recovery. Analysis of well performance. Gas-condensate reservoirs. Enhanced oil recovery processes.

  9. Environmental and petroleum resource conflicts: a simulation model to determine the benefits of petroleum production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Goerold, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), located on the Alaska North Slope, is believed to contain high petroleum production potential. This region also has outstanding wildlife and wilderness values. Currently ANWR is closed to oil and gas leasing. However, Congress is considering an Interior Department recommendation to open a portion of ANWR to oil and gas production. Environmentalists maintain that petroleum exploration and development will have severe environmental impacts. A draft study by the Interior Department reports values that are used to generate an expected present value of the net economic benefits of petroleum development in ANWR of $2.98 billion. Alternatively, using updated oil price projections and revised tax and financial assumptions, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Financial Analysis Simulation Model (AFAM) projects the expected present value of net economic benefits of oil production at between $0.32 and $1.39 billion. AFAM results indicate that, within most drilling cost scenarios, oil producers would earn an aftertax profit in 100% of the simulation trials. However, in a high-cost drilling scenario, AFAM projects aftertax losses to oil producers in 45% of the simulation trials. Although the Interior Department does not report a range of net economic benefits from oil development of ANWR, AFAM indicates that the distribution of net economic benefits across all scenarios is positively skewed. Net economic benefits from oil development range from $0 to $4.75 billion with a greater probability of benefits closer to the lower value. Decision makers considering whether or not to open ANWR to petroleum development can use these values to judge if the economic benefits outweigh the projected negative wilderness and wildlife impacts. 10 references, 9 figures, 6 tables.

  10. Reservoir analysis study, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, economic development and production plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Jerry R. Bergeson and Associates, Inc. (Bergeson) has completed Phase 3 of the Reservoir Analysis, Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1, Elk Hills Oilfield, California. The objective of this phase of the study was to establish the economic potential for the field by determining the optimum economic plan for development and production. The optimum economic plan used net cash flow analysis to evaluate future expected Department of Energy revenues less expenses and investments for proved developed, proved undeveloped, probable, possible and possible-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) reserves assigned in the Phase 2 study. The results of the Phase 2 study were used to define future production flowstreams. Additional production scheduling was carried out to evaluate accelerated depletion of proved developed reserves in the 29R, 31 C/D Shale and Northwest Stevens T Sand/N Shale Reservoirs. Production, cost and investment schedules were developed for the enhanced oil recovery projects identified in Phase 2. Price forecasts were provided by the Department of Energy. Operating costs and investment requirements were estimated by Bergeson. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  11. The abundance and distribution of diamondoids in biodegraded oils from the San Joaquin Valley: Implications for biodegradation of diamondoids in petroleum reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Peters, K.E.; Wang, Y.; Xiang, W.

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradability of diamondoids was investigated using a collection of crude oil samples from the San Joaquin Valley, California, that had been biodegraded to varying extent in the reservoir. Our results show that diamondoids are subjected to biodegradation, which is selective as well as stepwise. Adamantanes are generally more susceptible to biodegradation than other diamondoids, such as diamantanes and triamantanes. We report a possible pathway for the microbial degradation of adamantane. This cage hydrocarbon possibly breaks down to a metabolic intermediate through the action of microbes at higher levels of biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs. Microbial alteration has only a minor effect on diamondoid abundance in oil at low levels of biodegradation. Our results suggest that most diamondoids (with the exception of adamantane) are resistant to biodegradation, like the polycyclic terpanes (e.g. C19-C24 tricyclic terpanes, hopanes, gammacerane, oleananes, Ts, Tm, C29 Ts), steranes and diasteranes. Microbial alteration of diamondoids has a negligible impact on the quantification of oil cracking achieved using the diamondoid-biomarker method. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  13. Estimation of discontinuous coefficients in parabolic systems: Applications to reservoir simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamm, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    Spline based techniques for estimating spatially varying parameters that appear in parabolic distributed systems (typical of those found in reservoir simulation problems) are presented. The problem of determining discontinuous coefficients, estimating both the functional shape and points of discontinuity for such parameters is discussed. Convergence results and a summary of numerical performance of the resulting algorithms are given.

  14. Application of a new scale up methodology to the simulation of displacement processes in heterogeneous reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, L.J.; Milliken, W.J.; Dehghani, K.; Jones, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    A general method for the scale up of highly detailed, heterogeneous reservoir cross sections is presented and applied to the simulation of several recovery processes in a variety of geologic settings. The scale up technique proceeds by first identifying portions of the fine scale reservoir description which could potentially lead to high fluid velocities, typically regions of connected, high permeability. These regions are then modeled in detail while the remainder of the domain is coarsened using a general numerical technique for the calculation of effective permeability. The overall scale up method is applied to the cross sectional simulation of three actual fields. Waterflood, steamflood and miscible flood recovery processes are considered. In all these cases, the scale up technique is shown to give coarsened reservoir descriptions which provide simulation results in very good agreement with those of the detailed reservoir descriptions. For these simulations, speedups in computation times, for the coarsened models relative to their fine grid counterparts, range from a factor of 10 to a factor of 200.

  15. A combination of streamtube and geostatical simulation methodologies for the study of large oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, A.; Emanuel, A.S.; Bernath, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    The application of streamtube models for reservoir simulation has an extensive history in the oil industry. Although these models are strictly applicable only to fields under voidage balance, they have proved to be useful in a large number of fields provided that there is no solution gas evolution and production. These models combine the benefit of very fast computational time with the practical ability to model a large reservoir over the course of its history. These models do not, however, directly incorporate the detailed geological information that recent experience has taught is important. This paper presents a technique for mapping the saturation information contained in a history matched streamtube model onto a detailed geostatistically derived finite difference grid. With this technique, the saturation information in a streamtube model, data that is actually statistical in nature, can be identified with actual physical locations in a field and a picture of the remaining oil saturation can be determined. Alternatively, the streamtube model can be used to simulate the early development history of a field and the saturation data then used to initialize detailed late time finite difference models. The proposed method is presented through an example application to the Ninian reservoir. This reservoir, located in the North Sea (UK), is a heterogeneous sandstone characterized by a line drive waterflood, with about 160 wells, and a 16 year history. The reservoir was satisfactorily history matched and mapped for remaining oil saturation. A comparison to 3-D seismic survey and recently drilled wells have provided preliminary verification.

  16. Quantum simulation of dissipative processes without reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Candia, R.; Pedernales, J. S.; del Campo, A.; Solano, E.; Casanova, J.

    2015-05-29

    We present a quantum algorithm to simulate general finite dimensional Lindblad master equations without the requirement of engineering the system-environment interactions. The proposed method is able to simulate both Markovian and non-Markovian quantum dynamics. It consists in the quantum computation of the dissipative corrections to the unitary evolution of the system of interest, via the reconstruction of the response functions associated with the Lindblad operators. Our approach is equally applicable to dynamics generated by effectively non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. We confirm the quality of our method providing specific error bounds that quantify its accuracy.

  17. Quantum Simulation of Dissipative Processes without Reservoir Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Di Candia, R.; Pedernales, J. S.; del Campo, A.; Solano, E.; Casanova, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum algorithm to simulate general finite dimensional Lindblad master equations without the requirement of engineering the system-environment interactions. The proposed method is able to simulate both Markovian and non-Markovian quantum dynamics. It consists in the quantum computation of the dissipative corrections to the unitary evolution of the system of interest, via the reconstruction of the response functions associated with the Lindblad operators. Our approach is equally applicable to dynamics generated by effectively non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. We confirm the quality of our method providing specific error bounds that quantify its accuracy. PMID:26024437

  18. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses

  19. Laboratory modeling, field study, and numerical simulation of bioremediation of petroleum contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.J.; Islam, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    The use of bioremediation as an alternative remediation technology is fast becoming the technique of choice among many environmental professionals. This method offers substantial benefits not found in other remediation processes. Bioremediation is very cost effective, nondestructive, relatively uncomplicated in implementing, requires nonspecialized equipment, and can be extremely effective in removing recalcitrant petroleum hydrocarbons. This study researched the availability of viable microbial populations in the arid climate in South Dakota. Exponential growth of the bacteria and the ability of bacteria to degrade long-chain hydrocarbons indicated that healthy populations do exist and could be used to mineralize organic hydrocarbons. Experimental results indicated that bioremediation can be effectively enhanced in landfills as well as in the subsurface using a supply of harmless nutrients. The biodegradation rate can be further enhanced with the use of edible surfactant that helped disperse the petroleum products. Also, the use of hydrogen peroxide enhanced the oxygen availability and increased the degradation rate. Interestingly, the bacterial growth rate was found to be high in difficult-to-biodegrade contaminants, such as waste oil. A numerical simulation program was also developed that describes the bacterial growth in the subsurface along with the reduction in substrate (contamination). Results from this program were found to be consistent with laboratory results.

  20. Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2008-03-15

    The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Simulated distillation of petroleum and coal-derived products by packed capillary supercritical fluid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, M.; Johnson, B.R.; Mitchell, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The advantages of simulated distillation (SD) of petroleum compounds by super-critical fluid chromatography (SFC) over high temperature gas chromatography (HTGC) are well recognised. Most of the research performed using this technique has employed conventional open tubular columns but the use of packed capillary columns which offer high sample capacities, greater efficiency of separation and a shorter analysis time has recently received much attention. Previous work at Leeds using a variety of column packings (C{sub 1}-C{sub 18} alkyl groups bonded to silica) has demonstrated that high molecular weight hydrocarbons with boiling points up to 800{degrees}C can be successfully eluted with pure CO{sub 2} as a mobile phase. However, the high compositional variability of coal-derived samples increases the difficulty of SD-SFC of coal fractions as compared to petroleum derived fractions. In this study, a number of coal samples have been investigated to determine the suitability of packed capillary SD-SFC for heavy coal products.

  2. Deposition and simulation of sediment transport in the Lower Susquehanna River reservoir system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hainly, R.A.; Reed, L.A.; Flippo, H.N., Jr.; Barton, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Susquehanna River drains 27,510 square miles in New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland and is the largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay. Three large hydroelectric dams are located on the river, Safe Harbor (Lake Clarke) and Holtwood (Lake Aldred) in southern Pennsylvania, and Conowingo (Conowingo Reservoir) in northern Maryland. About 259 million tons of sediment have been deposited in the three reservoirs. Lake Clarke contains about 90.7 million tons of sediment, Lake Aldred contains about 13.6 million tons, and Conowingo Reservoir contains about 155 million tons. An estimated 64.8 million tons of sand, 19.7 million tons of coal, 112 million tons of silt, and 63.3 million tons of clay are deposited in the three reservoirs. Deposition in the reservoirs is variable and ranges from 0 to 30 feet. Chemical analyses of sediment core samples indicate that the three reservoirs combined contain about 814,000 tons of organic nitrogen, 98,900 tons of ammonia as nitrogen, 226,000 tons of phosphorus, 5,610,000 1tons of iron, 2,250,000 tons of aluminum, and about 409,000 tons of manganese. Historical data indicate that Lake Clarke and Lake Aldred have reached equilibrium, and that they no longer store sediment. A comparison of cross-sectional data from Lake Clarke and Lake Aldred with data from Conowingo Reservoir indicates that Conowingo Reservoir will reach equilibrium within the next 20 to 30 years. As the Conowingo Reservoir fills with sediment and approaches equilibrium, the amount of sediment transported to the Chesapeake Bay will increase. The most notable increases will take place when very high flows scour the deposited sediment. Sediment transport through the reservoir system was simulated with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' HEC-6 computer model. The model was calibrated with monthly sediment loads for calendar year 1987. Calibration runs with options set for maximum trap efficiency and a "natural" particle-size distribution resulted in an overall computed trap

  3. Optimization or Simulation? Comparison of approaches to reservoir operation on the Senegal River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raso, Luciano; Bader, Jean-Claude; Pouget, Jean-Christophe; Malaterre, Pierre-Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Design of reservoir operation rules follows, traditionally, two approaches: optimization and simulation. In simulation, the analyst hypothesizes operation rules, and selects them by what-if analysis based on effects of model simulations on different objectives indicators. In optimization, the analyst selects operational objective indicators, finding operation rules as an output. Optimization rules guarantee optimality, but they often require further model simplification, and can be hard to communicate. Selecting the most proper approach depends on the system under analysis, and the analyst expertise and objectives. We present advantage and disadvantages of both approaches, and we test them for the Manantali reservoir operation rule design, on the Senegal River, West Africa. We compare their performance in attaining the system objectives. Objective indicators are defined a-priori, in order to quantify the system performance. Results from this application are not universally generalizable to the entire class, but they allow us to draw conclusions on this system, and to give further information on their application.

  4. Culture-Dependent and Culture-Independent Characterization of Microbial Assemblages Associated with High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Orphan, V. J.; Taylor, L. T.; Hafenbradl, D.; Delong, E. F.

    2000-01-01

    Recent investigations of oil reservoirs in a variety of locales have indicated that these habitats may harbor active thermophilic prokaryotic assemblages. In this study, we used both molecular and culture-based methods to characterize prokaryotic consortia associated with high-temperature, sulfur-rich oil reservoirs in California. Enrichment cultures designed for anaerobic thermophiles, both autotrophic and heterotrophic, were successful at temperatures ranging from 60 to 90°C. Heterotrophic enrichments from all sites yielded sheathed rods (Thermotogales), pleomorphic rods resembling Thermoanaerobacter, and Thermococcus-like isolates. The predominant autotrophic microorganisms recovered from inorganic enrichments using H2, acetate, and CO2 as energy and carbon sources were methanogens, including isolates closely related to Methanobacterium, Methanococcus, and Methanoculleus species. Two 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) libraries were generated from total community DNA collected from production wellheads, using either archaeal or universal oligonucleotide primer sets. Sequence analysis of the universal library indicated that a large percentage of clones were highly similar to known bacterial and archaeal isolates recovered from similar habitats. Represented genera in rDNA clone libraries included Thermoanaerobacter, Thermococcus, Desulfothiovibrio, Aminobacterium, Acidaminococcus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Desulfomicrobium. The archaeal library was dominated by methanogen-like rDNAs, with a lower percentage of clones belonging to the Thermococcales. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that sulfur-utilizing and methane-producing thermophilic microorganisms have a widespread distribution in oil reservoirs and the potential to actively participate in the biogeochemical transformation of carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur in situ. PMID:10653739

  5. Reservoir analysis study: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, Recommended additional reservoir engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The basis for completion of the Phase III tasks above were the reports of Phases I and II and the associated backup material. The Phase II report was reviewed to identify the major uncertainties in all of the reserve assignments. In addition to the Proved, Probable and Possible reserves of Phase II, ''potential reserves'' or those associated with a greater degree of risk than the Possible reserves included in the Phase II report, were also identified based on the work performed by Bergeson through the Phase II reporting date. Thirty-three specific studies were identified to address the major Phase II reserve uncertainties or these potential reserves. These studies are listed in Table 1 and are grouped by the Elk Hills pool designation. The basis and need for each study are elaborated in the discussion which follows. Where possible, the need for the study was quantified by associating the study with a particular reserve estimate which would be clarified by the analysis. This reserve value was either the Probable or Possible reserves which were being studied, the potential reserves that were identified, or simply the uncertainty inherent in the proved reserves as identified in the study purpose. The costs associated with performing the study are also shown in Table 1 and were estimated based on Bergeson's knowledge of the Elk Hills reservoirs and data base following Phases I and II, as well as the company's experience in performing similar studies in other fields. The cost estimates are considered reasonable for general budgeting purposes, but may require refinement prior to actual initiation of these studies. This is particularly true for studies involving field testing to obtain additional log, core or test information as the cost of such items is not considered in this report. 51 figs., 46 tabs.

  6. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley P. Dutton

    1997-07-30

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir-characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi 2 in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation.

  7. Enhancement of the sweep efficiency of waterflooding operations by the in-situ microbial population of petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.; Vadie, A.A.; Stephens, J.O.; Azadpour, A.

    1995-12-31

    Live cores were obtained from five reservoirs using special precautions to prevent contamination by exogenous microorganisms and minimize exposure to oxygen. The depths from which the cores were obtained ranged from 2,705 ft to 6,568 ft. Core plugs were cut radially from live cores, encased in heat-shrink plastic tubes, placed in core holders, and fitted with inlets and outlets. Nutrient additions stimulated the in-situ microbial population to increase, dissolve stratal material, produce gases, and release oil. Reduction in flow through the core plugs was observed in some cases, while in other cases flow was increased, probably due to the dissolution of carbonates in the formation. A field demonstration of the ability of the in-situ microbial population to increase oil recovery by blocking the more permeable zones of the reservoir is currently underway. This demonstration is being conducted in the North Blowhorn Creek Unit situated in Lamar County, Alabama. Live cores were obtained from a newly drilled well in the field and tested as described above. The field project involves four test patterns each including one injector, four to five producers, and a comparable control injector with its four to five producers. Nutrient injection in the field began November 1994.

  8. Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PCs

    SciTech Connect

    Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1994-01-01

    TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large 3-D geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally non-symmetric and non-positive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000 + grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PCs provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

  9. Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PCs

    SciTech Connect

    Antunez, Emilio; Moridis, George; Pruess, Karsten

    1994-01-20

    TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large 3-D geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally non-symmetric and non-positive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000+ grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PCs provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

  10. Reservoir Simulation on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field: A Continuing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, M.; Marquez, R.; Arellano, V.; Esquer, C.A.

    1983-12-15

    The Cerro Prieto geothermal field is a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir of complex geological and hydrological structure. It is located at the southern end of the Salton-Mexicali trough which includes other geothermal anomalies as Heber and East Mesa. Although in 1973, the initial power plant installed capacity was 75 MW of electrical power, this amount increased to 180 MW in 1981 as field development continued. It is expected to have a generating capacity of 620 MW by the end of 1985, when two new plants will be completely in operation. Questions about field deliverability, reservoir life and ultimate recovery related to planned installations are being presently asked. Numerical modeling studies can give very valuable answers to these questions, even at the early stages in the development of a field. An effort to simulate the Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoir has been undergoing for almost two years. A joint project among Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) and Intercomp of Houstin, Texas, was created to perform reservoir engineering and simulation studies on this field. The final project objective is tosimulate the behavior of the old field region when production from additional wells located in the undeveloped field zones will be used for feeding the new power plants.

  11. Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1994-01-01

    TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport, was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large three dimensional (3-D) geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally nonsymmetric and nonpositive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000+ grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PC's provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

  12. Geochemical simulations on CO2-fluid-rock interactions in EGS reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, F.; McPherson, B. J.; Lichtner, P. C.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Lo Re, C.; Karra, S.; Lu, C.; Xu, T.

    2012-12-01

    Supercritical CO2 has been suggested as a heat transmission fluid in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs to improve energy extraction. Understanding the geochemical processes of CO2-fluid-rock interactions in EGS reservoirs is significant important to investigate the performance of energy extraction with CO2 instead of water as a working fluid, carbon sequestration and risk assessment. The objectives of this study: (1) to calibrate and evaluate the kinetic rate constants and specific reactive surface areas of minerals based on the batch experimental data conducted by other researchers (collaborators Kaszuba and Lo Ré at the University of Wyoming); (2) to investigate the effects of CO2-fluid-rock geochemical interactions on the energy extraction efficiency, carbon sequestration, and risk assessment. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted (Lo Ré et al., 2012) to investigate the geochemical reactions among water, fractured granite rocks, and injected supercritical CO2 at elevated temperatures of 250 oC, and pressures of 250-450 bars. The batch simulations were firstly conducted to mimic the laboratory experiments with the calibration of mineral reactive surface areas using TOUGHREACT model and parameter estimation software (PEST). Then, we performed 2-D geochemical modeling to simulate the chemical interactions among CO2, fluids, and rocks at high temperatures and pressures of EGS reservoirs. We further investigated the effects of fluid-rock interactions on the energy extraction, carbon sequestration, and risk assessment with CO2 as a heat transmission fluid instead of water for EGS reservoirs. Results of carbonate mineral precipitations suggested that the CO2 as a working fluid instead of water was favorable for EGS reservoirs on the CO2 sequestration. Our simulations also suggested that the energy extraction could be enhanced using CO2 as the transmission fluid compared to water.

  13. Simulating California reservoir operation using the classification and regression-tree algorithm combined with a shuffled cross-validation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tiantian; Gao, Xiaogang; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Li, Xin

    2016-03-01

    The controlled outflows from a reservoir or dam are highly dependent on the decisions made by the reservoir operators, instead of a natural hydrological process. Difference exists between the natural upstream inflows to reservoirs and the controlled outflows from reservoirs that supply the downstream users. With the decision maker's awareness of changing climate, reservoir management requires adaptable means to incorporate more information into decision making, such as water delivery requirement, environmental constraints, dry/wet conditions, etc. In this paper, a robust reservoir outflow simulation model is presented, which incorporates one of the well-developed data-mining models (Classification and Regression Tree) to predict the complicated human-controlled reservoir outflows and extract the reservoir operation patterns. A shuffled cross-validation approach is further implemented to improve CART's predictive performance. An application study of nine major reservoirs in California is carried out. Results produced by the enhanced CART, original CART, and random forest are compared with observation. The statistical measurements show that the enhanced CART and random forest overperform the CART control run in general, and the enhanced CART algorithm gives a better predictive performance over random forest in simulating the peak flows. The results also show that the proposed model is able to consistently and reasonably predict the expert release decisions. Experiments indicate that the release operation in the Oroville Lake is significantly dominated by SWP allocation amount and reservoirs with low elevation are more sensitive to inflow amount than others.

  14. A methodology for incorporating geomechanically-based fault damage zones models into reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Pijush Kanti

    In the fault damage zone modeling study for a field in the Timor Sea, I present a methodology to incorporate geomechanically-based fault damage zones into reservoir simulation. In the studied field, production history suggests that the mismatch between actual production and model prediction is due to preferential fluid flow through the damage zones associated with the reservoir scale faults, which is not included in the baseline petrophysical model. I analyzed well data to estimate stress heterogeneity and fracture distributions in the reservoir. Image logs show that stress orientations are homogenous at the field scale with a strike-slip/normal faulting stress regime and maximum horizontal stress oriented in NE-SW direction. Observed fracture zones in wells are mostly associated with well scale fault and bed boundaries. These zones do not show any anomalies in production logs or well test data, because most of the fractures are not optimally oriented to the present day stress state, and matrix permeability is high enough to mask any small anomalies from the fracture zones. However, I found that fracture density increases towards the reservoir scale faults, indicating high fracture density zones or damage zones close to these faults, which is consistent with the preferred flow direction indicated by interference and tracer test done between the wells. It is well known from geologic studies that there is a concentration of secondary fractures and faults in a damage zone adjacent to larger faults. Because there is usually inadequate data to incorporate damage zone fractures and faults into reservoir simulation models, in this study I utilized the principles of dynamic rupture propagation from earthquake seismology to predict the nature of fractured/damage zones associated with reservoir scale faults. The implemented workflow can be used to more routinely incorporate damage zones into reservoir simulation models. Applying this methodology to a real reservoir utilizing

  15. Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-05-10

    A major concern in the development of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths such as those caused by thermally-induced stress cracking. Past analyses of HDR and HFR reservoirs have tended to focus primarily on the coupling between hydrology (flow), heat transfer, and rock mechanics. Recent studies suggest that rock-fluid interactions and associated mineral dissolution and precipitation effects could have a major impact on the long-term performance of HFR reservoirs. The present paper uses recent European studies as a starting point to explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in HFR systems. We examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance by maintaining or even enhancing injectivity. Chemical manipulations considered here include pH modification and dilution with fresh water. We performed coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua), using the non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate that modifying the injection water chemistry can enhance mineral dissolution and reduce clay swelling. Chemical interactions between rocks and fluids will change a HFR reservoir over time, with some changes favorable and others not. A detailed, quantitative understanding of processes and mechanisms can suggest chemical methods for reservoir management, which may be employed to improve the performance of the geothermal system.

  16. Analysis of numerical simulations and influencing factors of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Xilai; Chen, Lei; Wei, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal manganese pollution has become an increasingly pressing water quality issue for water supply reservoirs in recent years. Manganese is a redox-sensitive element and is released from sediment under anoxic conditions near the sediment-water interface during summer and autumn, when water temperature stratification occurs. The reservoir water temperature and water dynamic conditions directly influence the formation of manganese pollution. Numerical models are useful tools to quantitatively evaluate manganese pollution and its influencing factors. This paper presents a reservoir manganese pollution model by adding a manganese biogeochemical module to a water quality model-CE-QUAL-W2. The model is applied to the Wangjuan reservoir (Qingdao, China), which experiences manganese pollution during summer and autumn. Field data are used to verify the model, and the results show that the model can reproduce the main features of the thermal stratification and manganese distribution. The model is used to evaluate the manganese pollution process and its four influencing factors, including air temperature, water level, wind speed, and wind directions, through different simulation scenarios. The results show that all four factors can influence manganese pollution. High air temperature, high water level, and low wind speed aggravate manganese pollution, while low air temperature, low water level, and high wind speed reduce manganese pollution. Wind that travels in the opposite direction of the flow aggravates manganese pollution, while wind in the same direction as the flow reduces manganese pollution. This study provides useful information to improve our understanding of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs, which is important for reservoir manganese pollution warnings and control. PMID:27068892

  17. Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on small computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1995-05-01

    The performance of TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers, was tested on three PCs (486-33, 486-66, Pentium-90), a MacIntosh Quadra 800, and a workstation IBM RISC 6000. A two-phase, single porosity, 3-D geothermal reservoir model with 1,411 irregular grid blocks, with production from and injection into the reservoir was used as the test model. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in each machine environment are described. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported for each of the machines used. It is concluded that the current PCs provide the best price/performance platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers and high-end workstations.

  18. Influence of tectonic terranes adjacent to Precambrian Wyoming province of petroleum source and reservoir rock stratigraphy in northern Rocky Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnsen, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    The perimeter of the Archean Precambrian Wyoming province can be generally defined. A Proterozoic suture belt separates the province from the Archean Superior province to the east. The western margin of the Precambrian rocks lies under the western Overthrust belt, but the Precambrian province extends at least as far west as southwest Montana and southeast Idaho. The province is bounded on the north and south by more regionally extensive Proterozoic mobile belts. In the northern belt, Archean rocks have been remobilized by Proterozoic tectonic events, but the southern belt does not appear to contain rocks as old as Archean. The tectonic response of these Precambrian terranes to cratonic and continental margin vertical and horizontal forces has exerted a profound influence on Phanerozoic sedimentation and stratigraphic facies distributions. Petroleum source rock and reservoir rock stratigraphy of the Northern Rocky Mountain region has been correlated with this structural history. In particular, the Devonian, Permian, and Jurassic sedimentation patterns can be shown to have been influenced by articulation among the different terranes comprising the ancient substructure. Depositional patterns in the Chester-Morrow carbonate and clastic sequence in the Central Montana trough are also related to this substructure. Further, a correlation between these tectonic terranes and the localization of regional hydrocarbon accumulations has been observed and has been useful in basin analyses for exploration planning.

  19. Faults simulations for three-dimensional reservoir-geomechanical models with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prévost, Jean H.; Sukumar, N.

    2016-01-01

    Faults are geological entities with thicknesses several orders of magnitude smaller than the grid blocks typically used to discretize reservoir and/or over-under-burden geological formations. Introducing faults in a complex reservoir and/or geomechanical mesh therefore poses significant meshing difficulties. In this paper, we consider the strong-coupling of solid displacement and fluid pressure in a three-dimensional poro-mechanical (reservoir-geomechanical) model. We introduce faults in the mesh without meshing them explicitly, by using the extended finite element method (X-FEM) in which the nodes whose basis function support intersects the fault are enriched within the framework of partition of unity. For the geomechanics, the fault is treated as an internal displacement discontinuity that allows slipping to occur using a Mohr-Coulomb type criterion. For the reservoir, the fault is either an internal fluid flow conduit that allows fluid flow in the fault as well as to enter/leave the fault or is a barrier to flow (sealing fault). For internal fluid flow conduits, the continuous fluid pressure approximation admits a discontinuity in its normal derivative across the fault, whereas for an impermeable fault, the pressure approximation is discontinuous across the fault. Equal-order displacement and pressure approximations are used. Two- and three-dimensional benchmark computations are presented to verify the accuracy of the approach, and simulations are presented that reveal the influence of the rate of loading on the activation of faults.

  20. Application of parallel computing techniques to a large-scale reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Ding, Chris; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-02-01

    Even with the continual advances made in both computational algorithms and computer hardware used in reservoir modeling studies, large-scale simulation of fluid and heat flow in heterogeneous reservoirs remains a challenge. The problem commonly arises from intensive computational requirement for detailed modeling investigations of real-world reservoirs. This paper presents the application of a massive parallel-computing version of the TOUGH2 code developed for performing large-scale field simulations. As an application example, the parallelized TOUGH2 code is applied to develop a three-dimensional unsaturated-zone numerical model simulating flow of moisture, gas, and heat in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach employs refined spatial discretization to represent the heterogeneous fractured tuffs of the system, using more than a million 3-D gridblocks. The problem of two-phase flow and heat transfer within the model domain leads to a total of 3,226,566 linear equations to be solved per Newton iteration. The simulation is conducted on a Cray T3E-900, a distributed-memory massively parallel computer. Simulation results indicate that the parallel computing technique, as implemented in the TOUGH2 code, is very efficient. The reliability and accuracy of the model results have been demonstrated by comparing them to those of small-scale (coarse-grid) models. These comparisons show that simulation results obtained with the refined grid provide more detailed predictions of the future flow conditions at the site, aiding in the assessment of proposed repository performance.

  1. Bacteria in the injection water differently impacts the bacterial communities of production wells in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongyan; Xiong, Shunzi; Gao, Guangjun; Song, Yongting; Cao, Gongze; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Water flooding is widely used for oil recovery. However, how the introduction of bacteria via water flooding affects the subsurface ecosystem remains unknown. In the present study, the distinct bacterial communities of an injection well and six adjacent production wells were revealed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. All sequences of the variable region 3 of the 16S rRNA gene retrieved from pyrosequencing were divided into 543 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 97% similarity. Approximately 13.5% of the total sequences could not be assigned to any recognized phylum. The Unifrac distance analysis showed significant differences in the bacterial community structures between the production well and injection water samples. However, highly similar bacterial structures were shown for samples obtained from the same oil-bearing strata. More than 69% of the OTUs detected in the injection water sample were absent or detected in low abundance in the production wells. However, the abundance of two OTUs reached as high as 17.5 and 26.9% in two samples of production water, although the OTUs greatly varied among all samples. Combined with the differentiated water flow rate measured through ion tracing, we speculated that the transportation of injected bacteria was impacted through the varied permeability from the injection well to each of the production wells. Whether the injected bacteria predominate the production well bacterial community might depend both on the permeability of the strata and the reservoir conditions. PMID:26052321

  2. Bacteria in the injection water differently impacts the bacterial communities of production wells in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongyan; Xiong, Shunzi; Gao, Guangjun; Song, Yongting; Cao, Gongze; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Water flooding is widely used for oil recovery. However, how the introduction of bacteria via water flooding affects the subsurface ecosystem remains unknown. In the present study, the distinct bacterial communities of an injection well and six adjacent production wells were revealed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. All sequences of the variable region 3 of the 16S rRNA gene retrieved from pyrosequencing were divided into 543 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 97% similarity. Approximately 13.5% of the total sequences could not be assigned to any recognized phylum. The Unifrac distance analysis showed significant differences in the bacterial community structures between the production well and injection water samples. However, highly similar bacterial structures were shown for samples obtained from the same oil-bearing strata. More than 69% of the OTUs detected in the injection water sample were absent or detected in low abundance in the production wells. However, the abundance of two OTUs reached as high as 17.5 and 26.9% in two samples of production water, although the OTUs greatly varied among all samples. Combined with the differentiated water flow rate measured through ion tracing, we speculated that the transportation of injected bacteria was impacted through the varied permeability from the injection well to each of the production wells. Whether the injected bacteria predominate the production well bacterial community might depend both on the permeability of the strata and the reservoir conditions. PMID:26052321

  3. Chemical stimulation of gas condensate reservoirs: An experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Viren

    Well productivity in gas condensate reservoirs is reduced by condensate banking when the bottom hole flowing pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. Several methods have been proposed to restore gas production rates after a decline due to condensate blocking. Gas injection, hydraulic fracturing, horizontal wells and methanol injection have been tried with limited success. These methods of well stimulation either offer only temporary productivity restoration or are applicable only in some situations. Wettability alteration of the rock in the near well bore region is an economic and efficient method for the enhancement of gas-well deliverability. Altering the wettability of porous media from strongly water-wet or oil-wet to intermediate-wet decreases the residual liquid saturations and results in an increase in the relative permeability to gas. Such treatments also increase the mobility and recovery of condensate from the reservoir. This study validates the above hypothesis and provides a simple and cost-efficient solution to the condensate blocking problem. Screening studies were carried out to identify the chemicals based on structure, solubility and reactivity at reservoir temperature and pressure. Experiments were performed to evaluate these chemicals to improve gas and condensate relative permeabilities. The improvement in relative permeability after chemical treatment was quantified by performing high pressure and high temperature coreflood experiments in Berea sandstone, Texas Cream limestone and reservoir cores using synthetic gas mixtures at reservoir conditions. Experiments were done at high flow rates and for long time periods to evaluate the durability of the treatment. Single well simulation studies were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the chemical treatment in the field. The experimental relative permeability data was modeled using a trapping number dependent relative permeability model and incorporated in the simulations. Effect of

  4. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The first of a three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The objectives of the study are to (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies were conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulator was initialized using properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. Simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicate that the simulator is predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results to-date confirm that horizontal wells can increase both oil recovery rate and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. The year one simulation results will provide the baseline for the ongoing study which will evaluate the performance degradation caused by the sensitivity of fracture permeability to pressure change, and investigate fluid injection pressure maintenance as a means to improve oil recovery performance. The study is likely to conclude that fracture closure decreases oil recovery and that pressure support achieved through fluid injection could be beneficial in improving recovery.

  5. Computer simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the application of a computer model to simulate reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well following the Deepwater Horizon blowout. Reservoir and fluid data used for model development are based on (1) information released in BP's investigation report of the incident, (2) information provided by BP personnel during meetings in Houston, Texas, and (3) calibration by history matching to shut-in pressures measured in the capping stack during the Well Integrity Test. The model is able to closely match the measured shut-in pressures. In the simulation of the 86-day period from the blowout to shut in, the simulated reservoir pressure at the well face declines from the initial reservoir pressure of 11,850 pounds per square inch (psi) to 9,400 psi. After shut in, the simulated reservoir pressure recovers to a final value of 10,300 psi. The pressure does not recover back to the initial pressure owing to reservoir depletion caused by 86 days of oil discharge. The simulated oil flow rate declines from 63,600 stock tank barrels per day just after the Deepwater Horizon blowout to 52,600 stock tank barrels per day just prior to shut in. The simulated total volume of oil discharged is 4.92 million stock tank barrels. The overall uncertainty in the simulated flow rates and total volume of oil discharged is estimated to be + or - 10 percent.

  6. Simulation of extreme reservoir level distribution with the SCHADEX method (EXTRAFLO project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquet, Emmanuel; Penot, David; Garavaglia, Federico

    2013-04-01

    The standard practice for the design of dam spillways structures and gates is to consider the maximum reservoir level reached for a given hydrologic scenario. This scenario has several components: peak discharge, flood volumes on different durations, discharge gradients etc. Within a probabilistic analysis framework, several scenarios can be associated with different return times, although a reference return level (e.g. 1000 years) is often prescribed by the local regulation rules or usual practice. Using continuous simulation method for extreme flood estimation is a convenient solution to provide a great variety of hydrological scenarios to feed a hydraulic model of dam operation: flood hydrographs are explicitly simulated by a rainfall-runoff model fed by a stochastic rainfall generator. The maximum reservoir level reached will be conditioned by the scale and the dynamics of the generated hydrograph, by the filling of the reservoir prior to the flood, and by the dam gates and spillway operation during the event. The simulation of a great number of floods will allow building a probabilistic distribution of maximum reservoir levels. A design value can be chosen at a definite return level. An alternative approach is proposed here, based on the SCHADEX method for extreme flood estimation, proposed by Paquet et al. (2006, 2013). SCHADEX is a so-called "semi-continuous" stochastic simulation method in that flood events are simulated on an event basis and are superimposed on a continuous simulation of the catchment saturation hazard using rainfall-runoff modelling. The SCHADEX process works at the study time-step (e.g. daily), and the peak flow distribution is deduced from the simulated daily flow distribution by a peak-to-volume ratio. A reference hydrograph relevant for extreme floods is proposed. In the standard version of the method, both the peak-to-volume and the reference hydrograph are constant. An enhancement of this method is presented, with variable peak

  7. Burial dolomitisation in a non-tropical carbonate petroleum reservoir: the Oligocene Tikorangi Formation, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Steven D.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Kamp, Peter J. J.

    2004-11-01

    The Oligocene Tikorangi Formation is a subsurface, non-tropical, limestone-rich, fracture-producing oil reservoir in Taranaki Basin, New Zealand. The formation is distinct from uplifted and exposed age-equivalent New Zealand limestones due to partial dolomitisation by modest quantities of silt-sized, scattered, inclusion-rich, euhedral dolomite rhombs, occasionally displaying idiotopic fabrics. Rhombs commonly have dull luminescent Fe-rich cores, and oscillatory bright and dull concentric outers. The dolomites are non-stoichiometric, high calcian and highly ferroan varieties. Dolomite 18O and 13C values are moderately depleted, while associated precursor calcite phases are less depleted. Petrographic, geochemical and geohistory evidence suggest that the dolomite formed during and following the later stages of pressure-dissolution cementation in a relatively closed, moderately deep burial environment (ca. 0.85-1.9 km burial depth, ca. 33-65 °C) in the early Miocene (ca. 24-18 Ma) from warm, saline-enriched pore fluids by mainly mimic fabric-selective replacement of interparticle, and rarely intraparticle, micrite/matrix. Dolomitisation did not affect skeletal grains or calcite cements or develop any secondary porosity. Mg supply was restricted and was likely sourced internally from micritic inter- and intraparticle precursor material, and from the pressure-dissolution of calcitic skeletons. Importantly, dolomitisation occurred prior to compression-related brittle fracturing of the carbonates, responsible for creating extensive hydrocarbon-bearing fracture networks. Because of the greater susceptibility of the dolomitised limestones to brittle fracturing, their location and distribution may have important implications for hydrocarbon prospectivity and production within the Tikorangi Formation.

  8. Simulated effects of proposed reservoir-development alternatives on streamflow quantity in the White River, Colorado and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuhn, Gerhard; Ellis, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    Numerous reservoirs have been proposed for the White River basin in Colorado and Utah, primarily to provide water for oil-shale development. A multireservoir-flow model was used to simulate the effects of streamflow withdrawal at four of the proposed reservoirs using historical streamflow data from the 1932-81 water years. The proposed reservoirs considered in the study were Avery, Powell Park, Taylor Draw, and White River Reservoirs; construction of Taylor Draw Dam was completed during the study. Annual streamflow depletions from the White River ranging from about 93,000 to 226,000 acre-feet were simulated for the 50 year period. Simulated streamflow throughout the year generally became smaller and more constant as streamflow throughout the year generally became smaller and more constant as streamflow depletion increased. Minimum streamflow requirements would not have been met for a maximum of 13 years and water-use requirements associated with the proposed reservoirs would not have been met for a maximum of 3 years. The current water-use pattern, which depletes about 40,000 acre-feet per year and is dominated by irrigation of hay meadows and pastureland, was maintained in the simulation. Relations between reservoir active capacity and yield applicable to the White River also were developed. These relations show that reservoir storage of about 400,000 acre-feet is the maximum practicable for the White River. (USGS)

  9. A study of reservoir characteristics of the Nanushuk and Colville groups, Umiat test well 11, National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, J.E.; Lambert, P.W.; Pitman, J.K.; Wu, C.H.

    1979-01-01

    Cretaceous sandstones in the Umiat Anticline contain the largest volume of oil discovered to date in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. Umiat test well 11, although dry and abandoned, penetrated the most complete sequence of Cretaceous rocks in the Umiat area. Cretaceous formations cored (oldest to youngest) were the Grandstand, Chandler, and Ninuluk Formations of the Nanushuk Group and the Seabee and Prince Creek Formations of the Colville Group. Cores from sandstone beds in each of the formations penetrated were studied to identify the factors influencing porosity and permeability. Based on lithologic, textural, sedimentary-structural, faunal and floral, and regional paleogeographic evidence, the Cretaceous stratigraphic sequence in the Umiat area can be described as complexly interbedded delta-front and delta-plain facies (named the Umiat delta). The Grandstand Formation and Killik Tongue of the Chandler Formation represent one thick progradational sequence of delta-front and delta-plain facies, respectively. This sequence was followed by deposition of transgressive marine facies of the Ninuluk and Seabee Formations, which were in turn overlain by another progradational delta-plain facies, the Tuluvak Tongue of the Prince Creek Formation. The delta-front sandstone of the Grandstand Formation is well-sorted, fine-grained to very fine grained, angular to subangular chert arenite and phyllarenite. Authigenic cements include dolomite, calcite, siderite, quartz overgrowth, kaolinite, chert, pyrite, and possibly some small flakes of chlorite. The source terrane was southwest of Umiat and, on the basis of the aforementioned petrographic evidence, consisted of low-grade metamorphic rocks and possibly sandstone and cherty limestone. The weighted average porosity, based on well-log analyses, for the lower part of the Grandstand Formation is 15.1 percent and for the upper part is 15.6 percent; the weighted average permeability is 58.6 md for the lower part and 167

  10. Romania's petroleum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanescu, M.O. ); Popescu, B.M. )

    1993-09-01

    In Romania, nine onshore petroleum systems and one offshore petroleum system have recently been identified. Of the onshore systems, three are related to the compressional folded basins: Teleajen-Sita (early Middle Cretaceous marine source rocks), and Puciossa-Fusaru and Alunis-Kliwa (Oligocene-early Miocene marine source rocks). In the same category, we have included the recently discovered Deleni petroleum system with source rocks of not yet identified origin but whose reservoirs certainly belong to a folded basin. In the foreland platform basins, two systems can be distinguished: Rimesti-Fauresti (Middle Jurassic marine source rocks) and Infra-Anhydrite (with presumed Middle Jurassic or middle Miocene marine source rocks). The areas corresponding to the posttectonic basins include three onshore petroleum systems and one offshore system: the Pannonian (Badenian marine and Sarmatian brackish water source rocks), the Valea Caselor-Borsa (oligocene marine source rocks) and the Transylvanian (Badenian marine shales source and Sarmatian brackish water source rocks). Offshore, there is only one petroleum system consisting of Oligocene-Miocene marine source rock and Cretaceous or Eocene reservoirs. The majority of the mentioned petroleum systems reservoirs are Paleozoic to Pliocene clastics, but in the platform areas, carbonate reservoirs are found in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. In all the petroleum systems, despite the different ages of the source rocks, most of the hydrocarbons have been expelled relatively recently during the Late Sarmatian-Pliocene interval. This face is substantiated by examples from two petroleum systems: the Rimesti-Fauresti (duration time 173 m.y., preservation 2 m.y.) and the Alunis-Kliwa (duration time 29-30 m.y., preservation 4 m.y.). The hydrocarbons were first expelled and migrated into described systems reservoirs after Late Styrian and Moldavian overthrusting, i.e. not earlier than 12-14 m.y.