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Sample records for petrostructural studies constraints

  1. Petrostructural evolution of the Beni Bousera peridotite massif (Rif belt, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frets, E. C.; Tommasi, A.; Garrido, C. J.; Vauchez, A. R.; Mainprice, D.; Amri, I.; Targuisti, K.

    2012-12-01

    Extension of continental lithosphere occurs in continental rifts, such as the East African, Baikal and Rio Grande rifts, and active convergent continental margins, such as in the Himalayas and the Alps. While the mechanisms of crustal thinning are increasingly understood, the processes governing the thinning of the lithospheric subcontinental mantle still remain barely constrained. Detailed structural and petrological mapping associated with a thorough microstructural study in the Beni Bousera orogenic peridotite (Rif Belt, N Morocco) allows constraining the tectono-metamorphic evolution produced by exhumation of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle in a lithospheric-scale shear zone. The Beni Bousera massif is composed by four tectono-metamorphic domains showing consistent kinematics, marked by a pervasive shallowly-dipping foliation bearing a NW-SE stretching lineation, which progressively rotates towards a N20-N30 trend in the NE, lowermost part of the massif. From top to bottom: garnet-spinel mylonites, Ariègite subfacies fine-grained porphyroclastic spinel peridotites, Ariègite-Seiland subfacies porphyroclastic- and Seiland subfacies coarse-porphyroclastic to coarse-granular spinel peridotites. Microstructures and crystal preferred orientations (CPO) in the four domains are consistent with deformation by dominant dislocation creep, but the continuous increase in average olivine grain size and decrease in the recrystallized volume fraction indicate decreasing work rates from top to bottom. The microstructures are consistent with the variation in synkinematic pressure and temperature conditions, which range from 900°C-2.0 GPa in grt-sp mylonites and 1150°C-1.8 GPa in the Seiland domain. The diffuse compositional layering as well as the microstructures and CPO in the Seiland domain suggest deformation in presence of melt. Gravitational instabilities due to local melt accumulation may account for the small areas bearing a vertical lineation in this domain

  2. An Empirical Study of Structural Constraint Solving Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid Haroon; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    Structural constraint solving allows finding object graphs that satisfy given constraints, thereby enabling software reliability tasks, such as systematic testing and error recovery. Since enumerating all possible object graphs is prohibitively expensive, researchers have proposed a number of techniques for reducing the number of potential object graphs to consider as candidate solutions. These techniques analyze the structural constraints to prune from search object graphs that cannot satisfy the constraints. Although, analytical and empirical evaluations of individual techniques have been done, comparative studies of different kinds of techniques are rare in the literature. We performed an experiment to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of some key structural constraint solving techniques. The experiment considered four techniques using: a model checker, a SAT solver, a symbolic execution engine, and a specialized solver. It focussed on their relative abilities in expressing the constraints and formatting the output object graphs, and most importantly on their performance. Our results highlight the tradeoffs of different techniques and help choose a technique for practical use.

  3. Quasar Outflow Constraints using Broad Absorption Line Variability Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Sean; Shields, Joseph C.; Hamann, Fred; Capellupo, Daniel M.; Gallagher, Sarah; Brandt, W. Niel; Herbst, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Quasar outflows are plausible candidates for AGN feedback processes influencing the host galaxy and may explain the established correlations between the supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the surrounding bulge. In order to better understand feedback and the physical conditions of the outflowing gas, observational constraints on absorber kinematics and energetics are needed. We are utilizing multiple epoch, rest frame UV quasar spectra to establish limits on outflow locations and total column densities for the purpose of estimating wind kinetic energies and momenta. We are also investigating the variability patterns of broad absorption lines (BALs) and mini-BALs across a range of ionization states to probe underlying connections between the various classes of absorbers. This work employs observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Hobby Eberly Telescope, and MDM observatory. We detect BAL variability in 3 out of 12 FeLoBAL quasars over multiple year timescales and conclude that the variable absorbers lie within tens of parsecs of the SMBH based on interpretations of the Fe II and Mg II BALS. We also measure significant BAL changes across daily to yearly timescales in a sample of 71 quasars with plausible detections of the P V 1117,1128 BAL. Detecting phosphorus in absorption is notable because it traces high column density outflows and is therefore relevant for studying AGN feedback. Constraints on outflow energetics and other selected results will be presented.

  4. Infants' perception of actions and situational constraints: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Birgit; Pfeifer, Caroline; Parker, Charlene; Hauf, Petra

    2013-10-01

    Rational action understanding requires that infants evaluate the efficiency of a movement in achieving a goal with respect to situational constraints. In contrast, recent accounts have highlighted the impact of perceptual characteristics of the demonstrated movement or constraints to explain infants' behavior in so-called rational imitation tasks. The current study employed eye tracking to investigate how 13- to 15-month-old infants distribute their visual attention to different aspects of an action demonstration. In three tasks (touchlight, house, and obstacle), infants watched videos in which a model performed an unusual action while she was or was not restricted by situational constraints. Infants' overall looking to the demonstration as well as looking to four segments of the video (initial segment, constraint demonstration, action performance, and final segment) and to specific areas (constraint area of interest [AOI] and action AOI) was analyzed. Overall, infants looked longer at the demonstration in the constraint condition compared with the no-constraint condition. The condition differences occurred in the two video segments where the constraint or action was displayed and were especially profound for the constraint AOI. These findings indicate that infants processed the situational constraints. However, the pattern of condition differences varied slightly in the three tasks. In sum, the data imply that infants process perceptual characteristics of the movement or constraints and that low-level perceptual processes interact with higher level cognitive processes in infants' action perception. PMID:23410481

  5. Narrative Inquiry as Travel Study Method: Affordances and Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cheryl J.; Zou, Yali; Poimbeauf, Rita

    2014-01-01

    This article maps how narrative inquiry--the use of story to study human experience--has been employed as both method and form to capture cross-cultural learning associated with Western doctoral students' travel study to eastern destinations. While others were the first to employ this method in the travel study domain, we are the first to…

  6. Inexact fuzzy-stochastic constraint-softened programming - A case study for waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.P. Huang, G.H. Yang, Z.F. Chen, X.

    2009-07-15

    In this study, an inexact fuzzy-stochastic constraint-softened programming method is developed for municipal solid waste (MSW) management under uncertainty. The developed method can deal with multiple uncertainties presented in terms of fuzzy sets, interval values and random variables. Moreover, a number of violation levels for the system constraints are allowed. This is realized through introduction of violation variables to soften system constraints, such that the model's decision space can be expanded under demanding conditions. This can help generate a range of decision alternatives under various conditions, allowing in-depth analyses of tradeoffs among economic objective, satisfaction degree, and constraint-violation risk. The developed method is applied to a case study of planning a MSW management system. The uncertain and dynamic information can be incorporated within a multi-layer scenario tree; revised decisions are permitted in each time period based on the realized values of uncertain events. Solutions associated with different satisfaction degree levels have been generated, corresponding to different constraint-violation risks. They are useful for supporting decisions of waste flow allocation and system-capacity expansion within a multistage context.

  7. Inexact fuzzy-stochastic constraint-softened programming - A case study for waste management.

    PubMed

    Li, Y P; Huang, G H; Yang, Z F; Chen, X

    2009-07-01

    In this study, an inexact fuzzy-stochastic constraint-softened programming method is developed for municipal solid waste (MSW) management under uncertainty. The developed method can deal with multiple uncertainties presented in terms of fuzzy sets, interval values and random variables. Moreover, a number of violation levels for the system constraints are allowed. This is realized through introduction of violation variables to soften system constraints, such that the model's decision space can be expanded under demanding conditions. This can help generate a range of decision alternatives under various conditions, allowing in-depth analyses of tradeoffs among economic objective, satisfaction degree, and constraint-violation risk. The developed method is applied to a case study of planning a MSW management system. The uncertain and dynamic information can be incorporated within a multi-layer scenario tree; revised decisions are permitted in each time period based on the realized values of uncertain events. Solutions associated with different satisfaction degree levels have been generated, corresponding to different constraint-violation risks. They are useful for supporting decisions of waste flow allocation and system-capacity expansion within a multistage context. PMID:19171474

  8. Syntactic Constraints on Code-Switching: A Quantitative Study of Spanish/English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Carol W.

    This paper reports on a preliminary quantitative study of syntactic constraints on code-switching within discourses in which no change in participants, setting or topic is evident. The goals of the study are to provide a syntactic description of the points at which switches from Spanish to English and English to Spanish are possible and to assess…

  9. Lesbians and Gay Men's Vacation Motivations, Perceptions, and Constraints: A Study of Cruise Vacation Choice.

    PubMed

    Weeden, Clare; Lester, Jo-Anne; Jarvis, Nigel

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the push-pull vacation motivations of gay male and lesbian consumers and examines how these underpin their perceptions and purchase constraints of a mainstream and LGBT(1) cruise. Findings highlight a complex vacation market. Although lesbians and gay men share many of the same travel motivations as their heterosexual counterparts, the study reveals sexuality is a significant variable in their perception of cruise vacations, which further influences purchase constraints and destination choice. Gay men have more favorable perceptions than lesbians of both mainstream and LGBT cruises. The article recommends further inquiry into the multifaceted nature of motivations, perception, and constraints within the LGBT market in relation to cruise vacations. PMID:26983585

  10. A Trade-Off Study Revealing Nested Timescales of Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Wijnants, M. L.; Cox, R. F. A.; Hasselman, F.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Van Orden, G.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates human performance in a cyclic Fitts task at three different scales of observation, either in the presence (difficult condition) or in the absence (easy condition) of a speed–accuracy trade-off. At the fastest scale, the harmonicity of the back and forth movements, which reflects the dissipation of mechanical energy, was measured within the timeframe of single trials. At an intermediate scale, speed and accuracy measures were determined over a trial. The slowest scale pertains to the temporal structure of movement variability, which evolves over multiple trials. In the difficult condition, reliable correlations across each of the measures corroborated a coupling of nested scales of performance. Participants who predominantly emphasized the speed-side of the trade-off (despite the instruction to be both fast and accurate) produced more harmonic movements and clearer 1/f scaling in the produced movement time series, but were less accurate and produced more random variability in the produced movement amplitudes (vice versa for more accurate participants). This implied that speed–accuracy trade-off was accompanied by a trade-off between temporal and spatial streams of 1/f scaling, as confirmed by entropy measures. In the easy condition, however, no trade-offs nor couplings among scales of performance were observed. Together, these results suggest that 1/f scaling is more than just a byproduct of cognition. These findings rather support the claim that interaction-dominant dynamics constitute a coordinative basis for goal-directed behavior. PMID:22654760

  11. Formulation of detailed consumables management models for the development (preoperational) period of advanced space transportation system. Volume 3: Study of constraints/limitations for STS consumables management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    The constraints and limitations for STS Consumables Management are studied. Variables imposing constraints on the consumables related subsystems are identified, and a method determining constraint violations with the simplified consumables model in the Mission Planning Processor is presented.

  12. Understanding Enactivism: A Study of Affordances and Constraints of Engaging Practicing Teachers as Digital Game Designers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qing

    2012-01-01

    This study is intended to deepen our understanding of enactivism, an emergent theoretical paradigm, through empirical exploration of teacher undertakings as digital game creators. Specifically, it explores the affordances and constraints, two important enactivism concepts, of practicing teachers' experiences in designing and developing games for…

  13. An Eye-Tracking Study of Exploitations of Spatial Constraints in Diagrammatic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimojima, Atsushi; Katagiri, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Semantic studies on diagrammatic notations (Barwise & Etchemendy,; Shimojima,; Stenning & Lemon, ) have revealed that the "non-deductive," "emergent," or "perceptual" effects of diagrams (Chandrasekaran, Kurup, Banerjee, Josephson, & Winkler,; Kulpa,; Larkin & Simon,; Lindsay, ) are all rooted in the exploitation of spatial constraints on…

  14. Numerical studies of constraints and gravitational wave extraction in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiske, David Robert

    Within classical physics, general relativity is the theory of gravity. Its equations are non-linear partial differential equations for which relatively few closed form solutions are known. Because of the growing observational need for solutions representing gravitational waves from astrophysically plausible sources, a subfield of general relativity; numerical relativity, has a emerged with the goal of generating numerical solutions to the Einstein equations. This dissertation focuses on two fundamental problems in modern numerical relativity: (1)Creating a theoretical treatment of the constraints in the presence of constraint-violating numerical errors, and (2)Designing and implementing an algorithm to compute the spherical harmonic decomposition of radiation quantities for comparison with observation. On the issue of the constraints, I present a novel and generic procedure for incorporating the constraints into the equations of motion of the theory in a way designed to make the constraint hypersurface an attractor of the evolution. In principle, the prescription generates non- linear corrections for the Einstein equations. The dissertation presents numerical evidence that the correction terms do work in the case of two formulations of the Maxwell equations and two formulations of the linearized Einstein equations. On the issue of radiation extraction, I provide the first in-depth analysis of a novel algorithm, due originally to Misner, for computing spherical harmonic components on a cubic grid. I compute explicitly how the truncation error in the algorithm depends on its various parameters, and I also provide a detailed analysis showing how to implement the method on grids in which explicit symmetries are enforced via boundary conditions. Finally, I verify these error estimates and symmetry arguments with a numerical study using a solution of the linearized Einstein equations known as a Teukolsky wave. The algorithm performs well and the estimates prove true both

  15. Study on singular radius and surface boundary constraint in refractive beam shaper design

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Zhang, Shukui

    2007-10-01

    Abstract: This paper presents analysis on important issues associated with the design of the refractive laser beam shaping system. The concept of â singular radiusâ is introduced along with solutions to minimize its adverse effect on the shaper performance. In addition, the surface boundary constraint is also discussed in details. This study provides useful guidelines against possible general design errors that would degrade the shaper quality or add undesired complication to the system.

  16. Conceptual study of fusion-driven transmutation reactor with ITER physics and engineering constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bong

    2011-10-01

    A conceptual study of fusion-driven transmutation reactor was performed based on ITER physics and engineering constraints. A compact reactor concept is desirable from an economic viewpoint. For the optimal design of a reactor, a radial build of reactor components has to be determined by considering the plasma physics and engineering constraints which inter-relate various reactor components. In a transmutation reactor, design of blanket and shield play a key role in determining the size of a reactor; the blanket should produce enough tritium for tritium self-sufficiency, the transmutation rate of waste has to be maximized, and the shield should provide sufficient protection for the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil. To determine the radial build of the blanket and the shield, not only a radiation transport analysis but also a burnup calculation were coupled with the system analysis and it allowed the self-consistent determination of the design parameters of a transmutation reactor.

  17. Emergent constraints in climate projections: a case study of changes in high latitude temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, Aleksandra; Fischer, Erich M.; Knutti, Reto

    2015-04-01

    Climate model projections include large uncertainties particularly in characteristics beyond large-scale mean such as changes in regional temperature variability. Recently, there has been a lot of work aiming at reducing the uncertainty by means of emerging constraints. The idea is to search for strong correlations between present behaviour and the projected changes in certain variables across a range of models, in order to produce ensembles of models calibrated with present-day observation. The underlying assumption is that models with better present-day behaviour have a better representation of local feedbacks and processes and are thereby more reliable for projections. So far it is unclear how to combine the information gained from emerging constraints across timescales, metrics and spatial scales for highest reduction in spread. This work intends to investigate properties of emerging constraints in a representative case study. CMIP5 models consistently project a reduction in temperature variability over the ocean associated with sea ice retreat. While models disagree on the magnitude of the variability reduction, where find a clear structure that models with high present-day variability show a strong reduction, and vice versa. At the grid-point level correlations between the magnitude of present day variability and its change are very high (-0.9 to -0.8). We use this relation to test how the selection of different metrics and timescales can reduce the spread across calibrated model projections. We show that a robust constraint can be obtained by combining relevant metrics across seasons which results in a strong reduction in spread of model projections. We also show that in some cases using individual metrics could be more effective than aggregating all the available information. We investigate the effectiveness of different types of constraints in the context of different target period (1oC, 1.5oC or 2oC global warming), forcing (RCP8.5 and RCP4.5) and when

  18. [Constraints and opportunities for inter-sector health promotion initiatives: a case study].

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Rosana

    2015-07-01

    This article analyzes the implementation of inter-sector initiatives linked to the Family Grant, Family Health, and School Health Programs in the Manguinhos neighborhood in the North Zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The study was conducted in 2010 and 2011 and included document review, local observation, and 25 interviews with program managers, professionals, and staff. This was an exploratory case study using a qualitative approach that identified constraints and opportunities for inter-sector health experiences, contributing to the debate on the effectiveness of health promotion and poverty relief programs. PMID:26248098

  19. A Comparative Study of Randomized Constraint Solvers for Random-Symbolic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takaki, Mitsuo; Cavalcanti, Diego; Gheyi, Rohit; Iyoda, Juliano; dAmorim, Marcelo; Prudencio, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of constraints is a major obstacle for constraint-based software verification. Automatic constraint solvers are fundamentally incomplete: input constraints often build on some undecidable theory or some theory the solver does not support. This paper proposes and evaluates several randomized solvers to address this issue. We compare the effectiveness of a symbolic solver (CVC3), a random solver, three hybrid solvers (i.e., mix of random and symbolic), and two heuristic search solvers. We evaluate the solvers on two benchmarks: one consisting of manually generated constraints and another generated with a concolic execution of 8 subjects. In addition to fully decidable constraints, the benchmarks include constraints with non-linear integer arithmetic, integer modulo and division, bitwise arithmetic, and floating-point arithmetic. As expected symbolic solving (in particular, CVC3) subsumes the other solvers for the concolic execution of subjects that only generate decidable constraints. For the remaining subjects the solvers are complementary.

  20. Nonlinear tearing mode study using the almost ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, C.; Callen, J.D.; Jensen, T.H.

    1998-12-31

    The tearing mode is an important resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) mode. It perturbs the initial equilibrium magnetic flux surfaces through magnetic field line reconnection to form new flux surfaces with magnetic islands. In the study of the tearing mode, usually the initial equilibria are one dimensional with two ignorable coordinates and the perturbed equilibria are two dimensional with one ignorable coordinate. The tearing mode can be linearly unstable and its growth saturates at a fine amplitude. The neoclassical tearing mode theory shows that the mode can be nonlinearly driven by the bootstrap current even when it is linearly stable to the classical tearing mode. It is important to study the nonlinear behavior of the tearing mode. As an intrinsically nonlinear approach, the use of the almost ideal MHD constraint is suited to study the nonlinear properties of the tearing mode. In this paper, as a validation of the method, the authors study two characteristics of the tearing mode using the almost ideal MHD constraint: (1) the linear stability condition for the initial one dimensional equilibrium; and (2) the final saturation level for the unstable case. In this work, they only consider the simplest case where no gradient of pressure or current density exists at the mode resonant surface.

  1. Experimental study of impact oscillator with one-sided elastic constraint.

    PubMed

    Ing, James; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina; Wiercigroch, Marian; Banerjee, Soumitro

    2008-03-13

    In this paper, extensive experimental investigations of an impact oscillator with a one-sided elastic constraint are presented. Different bifurcation scenarios under varying the excitation frequency near grazing are shown for a number of values of the excitation amplitude. The mass acceleration signal is used to effectively detect contacts with the secondary spring. The most typical recorded scenario is when a non-impacting periodic orbit bifurcates into an impacting one via grazing mechanism. The resulting orbit can be stable, but in many cases it loses stability through grazing. Following such an event, the evolution of the attractor is governed by a complex interplay between smooth and non-smooth bifurcations. In some cases, the occurrence of coexisting attractors is manifested through discontinuous transition from one orbit to another through boundary crisis. The stability of non-impacting and impacting period-1 orbits is then studied using a newly proposed experimental procedure. The results are compared with the predictions obtained from standard theoretical stability analysis and a good correspondence between them is shown for different stiffness ratios. A mathematical model of a damped impact oscillator with one-sided elastic constraint is used in the theoretical studies. PMID:17947209

  2. Performance environment and nested task constraints influence long jump approach run: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Panteli, Flora; Smirniotou, Athanasia; Theodorou, Apostolos

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate possible changes at step pattern and technical performance of the long jump approach run in seven young long jumpers by modifying the performance environment (long jump runway versus track lane) and the nested actions (run-through with take-off versus complete long jump). Our findings suggest that the step pattern and technical aspects of the approach run are affected by environmental context and nested task constraints. In terms of environmental context, it appears that practising the training routine of run-through followed by take-off on the long jump runway allows athletes to simulate competition conditions in terms of step regulation and technical efficacy. The task of run-through followed by take-off on the track lane failed to initiate visual perception, step regulation and technical efficiency at the steps preceding the instant of take-off. In terms of nested task constraints, when run-ups were followed by jump for distance instead of only a take-off, a higher level of consistency was achieved and step regulation was based on perception-action coupling. Practising long jump run-up accuracy at a setting not containing the informational elements of the performance environment fails to develop the key elements of the skill. PMID:26390236

  3. Studies in Creativity and Constraint: An Assessment of the Production of Culture Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettema, James S.

    If there is a dominant theme in the research on the "production of culture," it is the tension between creativity and constraint. Constraints are imposed by the structures and processes of culture-producing industries and organizations in the attempt to cope with the uncertainties of generating and marketing cultural products. Yet the possibility,…

  4. Theoretic Studies of Full Constraints on a Star Tracker's Influential Error Sources for In-orbit Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Cai Hao, Yun; Wang, Li; Long, Ye

    2016-03-01

    To collect star transits data qualified for in-orbit calibration, this study derives the full error constraints to limit star tracker's influential error sources and computes their error boundaries from a theoretical perspective. The full constraints, including not only the minimum variance estimation of position but also the error bound prediction of scale and intensity of Gaussian-shaped starspots, are studied based on the Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) theorem. By imposing these constraints on motion, drift in focal length, and other factors, their boundaries could be determined before launch. Therefore, the in-orbit correction accuracy is expected to be close to CRLB through suitable implementation of these constraints. The correctness of the theoretical position error of motion is demonstrated by the data-fitting procedure against test results of star tracker on dynamic performance. The simulation result shows that the drift in focal length can generate an error with the same magnitude as detector noise and thus might be the dominant error source when star tracker is working under stationary circumstance. Using the accuracy performance of some typical star trackers, this study shows that the CRLB constraint may be very effective to estimate the overall position error of a starspot or one axis, valuable data that can be used for online calibration. The overall position uncertainty analysis shows that a weighted method can be employed for calibration, a process where star data can be given a weight in inverse proportion to the CRLB value.

  5. Minkowski–Weyl Priors for Models With Parameter Constraints: An Analysis of the BioCycle Study

    PubMed Central

    Danaher, Michelle R.; Roy, Anindya; Chen, Zhen; Mumford, Sunni L.; Schisterman, Enrique F.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general framework for performing full Bayesian analysis under linear inequality parameter constraints. The proposal is motivated by the BioCycle Study, a large cohort study of hormone levels of healthy women where certain well-established linear inequality constraints on the log-hormone levels should be accounted for in the statistical inferential procedure. Based on the Minkowski–Weyl decomposition of polyhedral regions, we propose a class of priors that are fully supported on the parameter space with linear inequality constraints, and we fit a Bayesian linear mixed model to the BioCycle data using such a prior. We observe positive associations between estrogen and progesterone levels and F2-isoprostanes, a marker for oxidative stress. These findings are of particular interest to reproductive epidemiologists. PMID:27099406

  6. Is current biochar soil study addressing global soil constraints for sustainable agriculture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Genxing; Zhang, Dengxiao; Yan, Ming; Niu, Yaru; Liu, Xiaoyu; van Zwieten, Lukas; Chen, De; Bian, Rongjun; Cheng, Kun; Li, Lianqing; Joseph, Stephen; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Crowley, David; Filley, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Global soil degradation has been increasingly threatened sustainability of world agriculture. Use of biochar from bio-wastes has been proposed as a global option for its great potential in tackling soil degradation and mitigating climate change in agriculture. For last 10 years, there have been greatly increasing interests in application of charred biomass, more recently termed biochar, as a soil amendment for addressing soil constraints for sustainable agriculture. Biochar soil studies could deliver reliable information for appropriate application of biochar to soils where for sustainable agriculture has been challenged. Here we review the literature of 798 publications reporting biochar soil studies by August, 2015 to address potential gaps in understanding of biochar's role in agriculture. We have found some substantial biases and gaps inherent in the current biochar studies. 1) The majority of published studies were from developed regions where the soils are less constrained and were much more frequent in laboratory and glasshouse pot experiments than field studies under realistic agriculture. 2) The published biochar soil studies have used more often small kiln or lab prepared biochar than commercial scale biochars, more often wood and municipal waste derived biochars than crop straw biochars. Overall, the lack of long-term well designed field studies using biochar produced in commercial processes may have limited our current understanding of biochar's potential to enhance global crop production and climate change mitigation. We have also recommended a global alliance between longer-term research experiments and biochar production facilities to foster the uptake of this important technology at a global scale. Keywords: biochar, soil study, literature review, research gap, global perspective, quantitative assessment, sustainable agriculture

  7. 3D visualization of the scoliotic spine: longitudinal studies, data acquisition, and radiation dosage constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Adler, Roy L.; Margulies, Joseph Y.; Tresser, Charles P.; Wu, Chai W.

    1999-05-01

    Decision making in the treatment of scoliosis is typically based on longitudinal studies that involve the imaging and visualization the progressive degeneration of a patient's spine over a period of years. Some patients will need surgery if their spinal deformation exceeds a certain degree of severity. Currently, surgeons rely on 2D measurements, obtained from x-rays, to quantify spinal deformation. Clearly working only with 2D measurements seriously limits the surgeon's ability to infer 3D spinal pathology. Standard CT scanning is not a practical solution for obtaining 3D spinal measurements of scoliotic patients. Because it would expose the patient to a prohibitively high dose of radiation. We have developed 2 new CT-based methods of 3D spinal visualization that produce 3D models of the spine by integrating a very small number of axial CT slices with data obtained from CT scout data. In the first method the scout data are converted to sinogram data, and then processed by a tomographic image reconstruction algorithm. In the second method, the vertebral boundaries are detected in the scout data, and these edges are then used as linear constraints to determine 2D convex hulls of the vertebrae.

  8. A study of payload specialist station monitor size constraints. [space shuttle orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M., III; Shields, N. L., Jr.; Malone, T. B.

    1975-01-01

    Constraints on the CRT display size for the shuttle orbiter cabin are studied. The viewing requirements placed on these monitors were assumed to involve display of imaged scenes providing visual feedback during payload operations and display of alphanumeric characters. Data on target recognition/resolution, target recognition, and range rate detection by human observers were utilized to determine viewing requirements for imaged scenes. Field-of-view and acuity requirements for a variety of payload operations were obtained along with the necessary detection capability in terms of range-to-target size ratios. The monitor size necessary to meet the acuity requirements was established. An empirical test was conducted to determine required recognition sizes for displayed alphanumeric characters. The results of the test were used to determine the number of characters which could be simultaneously displayed based on the recognition size requirements using the proposed monitor size. A CRT display of 20 x 20 cm is recommended. A portion of the display area is used for displaying imaged scenes and the remaining display area is used for alphanumeric characters pertaining to the displayed scene. The entire display is used for the character alone mode.

  9. Methods for Estimating Environmental Effects and Constraints on NexGen: High Density Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustine, S.; Ermatinger, C.; Graham, M.; Thompson, T.

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the current methods developed by Metron Aviation for the estimate of environmental effects and constraints on the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). This body of work incorporates many of the key elements necessary to achieve such an estimate. Each section contains the background and motivation for the technical elements of the work, a description of the methods used, and possible next steps. The current methods described in this document were selected in an attempt to provide a good balance between accuracy and fairly rapid turn around times to best advance Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) System Modeling and Analysis Division (SMAD) objectives while also supporting the needs of the JPDO Environmental Working Group (EWG). In particular this document describes methods applied to support the High Density (HD) Case Study performed during the spring of 2008. A reference day (in 2006) is modeled to describe current system capabilities while the future demand is applied to multiple alternatives to analyze system performance. The major variables in the alternatives are operational/procedural capabilities for airport, terminal, and en route airspace along with projected improvements to airframe, engine and navigational equipment.

  10. Credit Constraints in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints have recently become important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, as their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  11. Studies of biological aerosols as ice nuclei: Existing constraints and new measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Franc, G. D.; Sullivan, R. C.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The sources, abundance and nature of atmospheric particles that serve as ice nuclei (IN) for cold cloud formation remain some of the most important, yet poorly-characterized, features of aerosol-cloud interactions that indirectly affect climate. Although much is known about mineral dusts as important sources of atmospheric IN, much less is known about various carbonaceous particles, which also make up a significant fraction of atmospheric IN based on past elemental composition measurements. Among carbonaceous IN and other known atmospheric IN, certain biological particles (bacteria with a known IN gene) are the most efficient ice nucleators. These bacteria are highly efficient at freezing water at just a few degrees below 0°C. This characteristic has raised the possibility that these and other biological particles may represent a population in the atmosphere that influences mixed-phase clouds, precipitation and climate in important and dynamic ways. Significant, enigmatic, questions are the activation properties, source strengths, and number concentrations (and their variability) of all biological ice nuclei in cold cloud regions of the free troposphere. In this presentation we describe constraints on the contribution of biological particles to atmospheric IN populations based on our existing IN measurements, and based on measurements of specific known biological IN in air and precipitation made by other groups. Then we describe new measurement efforts targeted toward identification of the proportion of active IN as a function of temperature below 0°C that are of biological origin, using an ice nucleation instrument to activate and measure total IN concentrations, collection of activated particles, and analyses of the IN using the same DNA analyses used for identifying biological particles and biological IN types in total air and precipitation samples. This new method permits direct quantification of the number concentrations of biological IN. Our first studies

  12. Influence of increasing construct constraint in the presence of posterolateral deficiency at knee replacement: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanishka M; Manning, William A; Blain, Alasdair P; Rushton, Steve P; Longstaff, Lee M; Amis, Andrew A; Deehan, David J

    2016-03-01

    When faced with posterolateral corner (PLC) deficiency, surgeons must choose a total knee replacement (TKR) construct that provides the appropriate level of constraint. This should match the internal constraint of the device to the soft tissue host laxity pattern. Little guidance is available peroperatively, with factors influencing final component choice remaining ill defined. This study aimed to quantify the effect of PLC insufficiency on the "envelope of laxity" (EoL) after TKR and the effect of increasingly component constraint upon knee behavior through a functional arc of flexion. Using computer navigation, mixed effect modeling and loaded cadaveric legs--laxity was quantified under separate states: the native knee, after implantation of a posterior stabilized (PS)-TKR, after sectioning the lateral (fibular) collateral ligament and popliteus tendon (PS-TKR-PLC), and after re-implantation with a semi-constrained "total stabilized" knee replacement (TS-TKR). Laxity was quantified from 0 to 110° of flexion for anterior draw, varus-valgus, and internal-external rotation. Implantation of the PS-TKR was consistently associated with increased constraint when compared to the native knee. PLC sectioning led to significantly increased laxity during varus stress from mid to deep flexion. Revision to a TS-TKR construct restored constraint mimicking that of the primary state but only for the arc of motion 0-90°. In a posterolateral deficient state, a fixed bearing semi-constrained TS-TKR restored the knee to near normal kinematics but this was only achieved from an arc of motion 0-90° of flexion. At higher flexion angles, there remained an unfavorable laxity pattern with varus stress opening. PMID:26267425

  13. Parametric study of critical constraints for a canard configured medium range transport using conceptual design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform optimal conceptual design of both canard and conventional configurations of a medium range transport. A number of design constants and design constraints were systematically varied to compare the sensitivities of canard and conventional configurations to a variety of technology assumptions. Main landing gear location and horizontal stabilizer high-lift performance were identified as critical design parameters for a statically stable, subsonic canard transport.

  14. Lensing time delays as a substructure constraint: a case study with the cluster SDSS J1004+4112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Irshad; Saha, Prasenjit; Liesenborgs, Jori

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational lensing time delays are well known to depend on cosmological parameters, but they also depend on the details of the mass distribution of the lens. It is usual to model the mass distribution and use time-delay observations to infer cosmological parameters, but it is naturally also possible to take the cosmological parameters as given and use time delays as constraints on the mass distribution. In this paper we develop a method of isolating what exactly those constraints are, using a principal-components analysis of ensembles of free-form mass models. We find that time delays provide tighter constraints on the distribution of matter in the very highly dense regions of the lensing clusters. We apply it to the cluster lens SDSS J1004+4112, whose rich lensing data include two time delays. We find, assuming a concordance cosmology, that the time delays constrain the central region of the cluster to be rounder and less lopsided than would be allowed by lensed images alone. This detailed information about the distribution of the matter is very useful for studying the dense regions of the galaxy clusters which are very difficult to study by direct measurements. A further time-delay measurement, which is expected, will make this system even more interesting.

  15. Assessing Multivariate Constraints to Evolution across Ten Long-Term Avian Studies

    PubMed Central

    Teplitsky, Celine; Tarka, Maja; Møller, Anders P.; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Balbontín, Javier; Burke, Terry A.; Doutrelant, Claire; Gregoire, Arnaud; Hansson, Bengt; Hasselquist, Dennis; Gustafsson, Lars; de Lope, Florentino; Marzal, Alfonso; Mills, James A.; Wheelwright, Nathaniel T.; Yarrall, John W.; Charmantier, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background In a rapidly changing world, it is of fundamental importance to understand processes constraining or facilitating adaptation through microevolution. As different traits of an organism covary, genetic correlations are expected to affect evolutionary trajectories. However, only limited empirical data are available. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigate the extent to which multivariate constraints affect the rate of adaptation, focusing on four morphological traits often shown to harbour large amounts of genetic variance and considered to be subject to limited evolutionary constraints. Our data set includes unique long-term data for seven bird species and a total of 10 populations. We estimate population-specific matrices of genetic correlations and multivariate selection coefficients to predict evolutionary responses to selection. Using Bayesian methods that facilitate the propagation of errors in estimates, we compare (1) the rate of adaptation based on predicted response to selection when including genetic correlations with predictions from models where these genetic correlations were set to zero and (2) the multivariate evolvability in the direction of current selection to the average evolvability in random directions of the phenotypic space. We show that genetic correlations on average decrease the predicted rate of adaptation by 28%. Multivariate evolvability in the direction of current selection was systematically lower than average evolvability in random directions of space. These significant reductions in the rate of adaptation and reduced evolvability were due to a general nonalignment of selection and genetic variance, notably orthogonality of directional selection with the size axis along which most (60%) of the genetic variance is found. Conclusions These results suggest that genetic correlations can impose significant constraints on the evolution of avian morphology in wild populations. This could have important impacts on evolutionary

  16. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 2: Instrument constraints and interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The instrument constraints and interface specifications for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are discussed. The Land Use Classification Mission using a 7 band Thematic Mapper and a 4 band High Resolution Pointable Imager is stressed. The mission and performance of the instruments were reviewed and expanded to reflect the instrument as a part of the total remote sensing system. A preliminary EOS interface handbook is provided to describe the mission and system, to specify the spacecraft interfaces to potential instrument contractors, and to describe the instrument interface data required by the system integration contractor.

  17. Study of cluster structure in 13C with AMD+HON-constraint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Yohei; Kimura, Masaaki

    2014-12-01

    The 3α + n cluster states of 13C are discussed on the basis of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics with the constraint on the harmonic oscillator quanta. We predict two different kinds of the cluster states, the hoyle analogue state and the linear-chain state. The former is understood as the 0+2 state (Hoyle state) of 12C accompanied by a valence neutron occupying the s-wave. The latter constitute the parity doublet bands of Kπ = 1/2± owing to its parity asymmetric intrinsic structure.

  18. REGRESSION APPROXIMATIONS FOR TRANSPORT MODEL CONSTRAINT SETS IN COMBINED AQUIFER SIMULATION-OPTIMIZATION STUDIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, William M.

    1986-01-01

    Problems involving the combined use of contaminant transport models and nonlinear optimization schemes can be very expensive to solve. This paper explores the use of transport models with ordinary regression and regression on ranks to develop approximate response functions of concentrations at critical locations as a function of pumping and recharge at decision wells. These response functions combined with other constraints can often be solved very easily and may suggest reasonable starting points for combined simulation-management modeling or even relatively efficient operating schemes in themselves.

  19. Structural constraints on the three-dimensional geometry of simple viruses: case studies of a new predictive tool

    PubMed Central

    Keef, Thomas; Wardman, Jessica P.; Ranson, Neil A.; Stockley, Peter G.; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental principles of virus architecture is one of the most important challenges in biology and medicine. Crick and Watson were the first to propose that viruses exhibit symmetry in the organization of their protein containers for reasons of genetic economy. Based on this, Caspar and Klug introduced quasi-equivalence theory to predict the relative locations of the coat proteins within these containers and classified virus structure in terms of T-numbers. Here it is shown that quasi-equivalence is part of a wider set of structural constraints on virus structure. These constraints can be formulated using an extension of the underlying symmetry group and this is demonstrated with a number of case studies. This new concept in virus biology provides for the first time predictive information on the structural constraints on coat protein and genome topography, and reveals a previously unrecognized structural interdependence of the shapes and sizes of different viral components. It opens up the possibility of distinguishing the structures of different viruses with the same T-number, suggesting a refined viral structure classification scheme. It can moreover be used as a basis for models of virus function, e.g. to characterize the start and end configurations of a structural transition important for infection. PMID:23403965

  20. Constraints to educational opportunities of orphans: a community-based study from northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Oleke, C; Blystad, A; Fylkesnes, K; Tumwine, J K

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this article is to assess constraints on educational opportunities of orphans cared for within the extended family system in Lira district, northern Uganda. The data were collected through: review of school census records; ethnographic fieldwork; in-depth interviews with 21 community leaders, 45 heads of households caring for orphans and 35 orphans. Focus group discussions were held with men and women caring for orphans, community leaders and orphans. A household survey was conducted in 402 households caring for orphans. We found that very poor widows living on less than half a dollar per day head 48% of the households caring for orphans. The elderly heads of households were 3 times more likely to have all the children in their household in schools than the younger ones. Furthermore, the widowed and single heads of households were more likely to have all orphans in school than the married, and households that received external support offered better educational opportunities. Poverty, as indicated by lack of food while at school and heavy involvement of orphans in domestic labour, were identified as major constraints on orphans' schooling. There is an urgent need to support orphans' education in northern Uganda beyond the current Universal Primary Education efforts. The most vulnerable households need to be targeted, and the communities need to be sensitized to child labour, school meals and sex abuse. PMID:17453570

  1. Multiple Treatments of Pediatric Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (pCIMT): A Clinical Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Stephanie C; Ramey, Sharon Landesman; Trucks, Mary Rebekah; Wallace, Dorian Ainsworth

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy (pCIMT) is one of the most efficacious treatments for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Distinctive components of pCIMT include constraint of the less impaired upper extremity (UE), high-intensity therapy for the more impaired UE (≥ 3 hr/day, many days per week, for multiple weeks), use of shaping techniques combined with repetitive task practice, and bimanual transfer. A critical issue is whether multiple treatments of pCIMT produce additional benefit. In a clinical cohort (mean age = 31 mo) of 28 children with asymmetrical CP whose parents sought multiple pCIMT treatments, the children gained a mean of 13.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 4.2) new functional skills after Treatment 1; Treatment 2 produced a mean of 7.3 (SD = 4.7) new skills; and Treatment 3, 6.5 (SD = 4.2). These findings support the conclusion that multiple pCIMT treatments can produce clinically important functional gains for children with hemiparetic CP. PMID:26565094

  2. Multiple Treatments of Pediatric Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (pCIMT): A Clinical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramey, Sharon Landesman; Trucks, Mary Rebekah; Wallace, Dorian Ainsworth

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy (pCIMT) is one of the most efficacious treatments for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Distinctive components of pCIMT include constraint of the less impaired upper extremity (UE), high-intensity therapy for the more impaired UE (≥3 hr/day, many days per week, for multiple weeks), use of shaping techniques combined with repetitive task practice, and bimanual transfer. A critical issue is whether multiple treatments of pCIMT produce additional benefit. In a clinical cohort (mean age = 31 mo) of 28 children with asymmetrical CP whose parents sought multiple pCIMT treatments, the children gained a mean of 13.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 4.2) new functional skills after Treatment 1; Treatment 2 produced a mean of 7.3 (SD = 4.7) new skills; and Treatment 3, 6.5 (SD = 4.2). These findings support the conclusion that multiple pCIMT treatments can produce clinically important functional gains for children with hemiparetic CP. PMID:26565094

  3. Numerical study of cathode emission constraints on cylindrical self-field MPD thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    A stability equation relating thruster discharge current, argon propellant mass flow rate, and electrode geometry has been solved for a variety of cylindrical self-field MPD thruster configurations and discharge currents. Realistic values for cathode emission current densities were used to provide additional constraints on the thruster geometries. A two-dimensional MPD code was employed to provide better estimates of the maximum achievable specific impulse, thrust, and flow efficiency for cases of interest. The model results indicate that long life, cylindrical self-field MPD thrusters operated with argon propellant may not be able to provide specific impulse values in excess of 2100s. Alternate electrode geometries, applied magnetic fields, and/or low molecular weight propellants may be necessary to achieve higher values of specific impulse.

  4. Constraints on neutrino masses from the study of the nearby large-scale structure and galaxy cluster counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung

    2016-07-01

    The high precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background by the Planck survey yielded tight constraints on cosmological parameters and the statistics of the density fluctuations at the time of recombination. This provides the means for a critical study of structure formation in the Universe by comparing the microwave background results with present epoch measurements of the cosmic large-scale structure. It can reveal subtle effects such as how different forms of Dark Matter may modify structure growth. Currently most interesting is the damping effect of structure growth by massive neutrinos. Different observations of low redshift matter density fluctuations provided evidence for a signature of massive neutrinos. Here we discuss the study of the cosmic large-scale structure with a complete sample of nearby, X-ray luminous clusters from our REFLEX cluster survey. From the observed X-ray luminosity function and its reproduction for different cosmological models, we obtain tight constraints on the cosmological parameters describing the matter density, Ωm, and the density fluctuation amplitude, σ8. A comparison of these constraints with the Planck results shows a discrepancy in the framework of a pure ΛCDM model, but the results can be reconciled, if we allow for a neutrino mass in the range of 0.17 eV to 0.7 eV. Also some others, but not all of the observations of the nearby large-scale structure provide evidence or trends for signatures of massive neutrinos. With further improvement in the systematics and future survey projects, these indications will develop into a definitive measurement of neutrino masses.

  5. Constraints to healthcare waste treatment in low-income countries - a case study from Somaliland.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, Veronica; Ali, Mansoor; Vaccari, Mentore

    2012-06-01

    In low-income countries, healthcare waste is mixed with the municipal waste stream and rarely receives special attention. This paper presents the lessons learned from a pilot project targeted to improve healthcare waste management in Hargeisa (Somaliland). The interventions were carried out in three of the main hospitals in the city. Consideration was also given to improve the overall situation regarding the management of healthcare waste. Three De Montfort incinerators were built and training was provided to operators, waste workers and healthcare personnel. Although the incinerators were constructed in accordance with the required standards, major constraints were identified in the operational phase: irregular de-ashing procedures, misuse of safety equipment, and ineffective separation of healthcare waste were seen in this phase. The paper concludes that in other small hospitals in the developing world, such as those in Hargeisa, on-site incineration by use of low-cost, small-scale incinerators could be successfully applied as an interim solution, provided that an agreed and acceptable plan of operation and maintenance is in place and responsibilities for the management of the facility are clearly identified. Moreover, when replicating this experience in other settings even greater importance should be given to the technical capacity building of operators and pressure should be exercised on local administrations in order to control and supervise the whole management system. PMID:22128091

  6. Socio-political constraints on primary health care: a case study from Java.

    PubMed

    Williams, G; Satoto

    1980-01-01

    The Alma-Ata 1978 conference emphasized the importance of the concept of primary health care in the health system and overall socioeconomic development of the community. However, theories of development generally do not allow for the complexity of human conditions, and the relevance of contact with the village people. This paper presents the experience of a PHC (primary health care) project on the northern coast of central Java. The case illustrates some of the institutional and sociopolitical constraints which the Indonesian government may face in implementing a PHC program in the next few years, such as village politics; the reluctance of men to allow women to participate in the decision-making process of the program, and; the reluctance of land-owning farmers to allow landless villagers in the decision-making process. The following conditions would create a most favorable sociopolitical climate for starting a PHC program in Indonesia: 1) at the village level, non-pamong desa (village elders), women and landless villagers are encouraged to participate in decision-making processes which affect their interests and to take on positions of responsibility in village affairs; 2) there is a process of frank, 2-way communication marked by mutual respect between government agencies at regency and subdistrict levels village-level organization, and 3) supra-village authorities allow village institution to develop at their own pace, intervening only when interests of poor and underprivileged groups are endangered. PMID:12261889

  7. Studies of Constraints from the Terrestrial Planets, Asteroid Belt and Giant Planet Obliquities on the Early Solar System Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorny, David

    The planetary instability has been invoked as a convenient way to explain several observables in the present Solar System. This theory, frequently referred to under a broad and somewhat ill-defined umbrella as the ‘Nice model’, postulates that at least one of the ice giants suffered scattering encounters with Jupiter and Saturn. This could explain several things, including the excitation of the proper eccentric mode in Jupiter's orbit, survival of the terrestrial planets during giant planet migration, and, if the instability was conveniently delayed, also the Late Heavy Bombardment of the Moon. These properties/events would be unexpected if the migration histories of the outer planets were ideally smooth (at least no comprehensive model has yet been fully developed to collectively explain them). Additional support for the planetary instability comes from the dynamical properties of the asteroid and Kuiper belts, Trojans, and planetary satellites. We created a large database of dynamical evolutions of the outer planets through and 100 Myr past the instability (Nesvorny and Morbidelli 2012. Many of these dynamical histories have been found to match constraints from the orbits of the outer planets themselves. We now propose to test these different scenarios using constraints from the terrestrial planets, asteroid belt and giant planet obliquities. As we explain in the proposal narrative, we will bring all these constraints together in an attempt to develop a comprehensive model of early Solar System's evolution. This will be a significant improvement over the past work, where different constraints were considered piecewise and in various approximations. Our work has the potential to generate support for the Nice-type instability, or to rule it out, which could help in sparking interest in developing better models. RELEVANCE The proposed research is fundamental to understanding the formation and early evolution of the Solar System. This is a central theme of NASA

  8. Studies of systems with nonholonomic constraints: The Segway and the Chaplygin sleigh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Joseph T.

    In this thesis, two systems with nonholonomic systems are investigated: the Segway and the Chaplygin sleigh. Using Lagrangian mechanics, the constrained nonlinear equations of motion for both systems are derived. By use of the nullspace of the constraint matrices, the unconstrained equations of motion can be obtained. For the Segway, these equations are linearized about a zero equilibrium state, placed into state space form and decoupled. A feedback controller is designed about the velocity and heading angle rate reference commands. To compare to the real data from the built Segway, measurement noise was also included in the model. Experimental data is taken for the case of both zero and constant reference commands. The data is then compared to the simulated results. The model is shown to be satisfactory, but better parameter measurements of the Segway is needed for a more conclusive comparison. The unconstrained equations of motion for the Chaplygin sleigh can not be linearized. Thus Lyapunov stability theory was used for analysis. The Chaplygin sleigh with constant input was shown to spiral outward and settle into a circle. If a PD feedback controller was designed about the heading angle, then the Chaplygin sleigh would be driven to the angle, but would eventually coast to a stop. From simulations, the addition of a sinusoidal component appears to move in the desired direction without slowing down. A sinusoidal component was also added to a constant input to result in roulette like paths in the simulation. Future investigation would require a more definite analysis of the sinusoidal term in the input.

  9. Impact of an equality constraint on the class-specific residual variances in regression mixtures: A Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjung; Lamont, Andrea E; Jaki, Thomas; Feaster, Daniel; Howe, George; Van Horn, M Lee

    2016-06-01

    Regression mixture models are a novel approach to modeling the heterogeneous effects of predictors on an outcome. In the model-building process, often residual variances are disregarded and simplifying assumptions are made without thorough examination of the consequences. In this simulation study, we investigated the impact of an equality constraint on the residual variances across latent classes. We examined the consequences of constraining the residual variances on class enumeration (finding the true number of latent classes) and on the parameter estimates, under a number of different simulation conditions meant to reflect the types of heterogeneity likely to exist in applied analyses. The results showed that bias in class enumeration increased as the difference in residual variances between the classes increased. Also, an inappropriate equality constraint on the residual variances greatly impacted on the estimated class sizes and showed the potential to greatly affect the parameter estimates in each class. These results suggest that it is important to make assumptions about residual variances with care and to carefully report what assumptions are made. PMID:26139512

  10. Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Solid Phase Extraction for Urinary Organic Acids: A Comparative Study from a Resource Constraint Setting.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Chandrawati; Varughese, Bijo; Ramji, Siddarth; Kapoor, Seema

    2016-10-01

    Pre analytical process of extraction for accurate detection of organic acids is a crucial step in diagnosis of organic acidemias by GCMS analysis. This process is accomplished either by solid phase extraction (SPE) or by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Both extraction procedures are used in different metabolic laboratories all over the world. In this study we compared these two extraction procedures in respect of precision, accuracy, percent recovery of metabolites, number of metabolites isolated, time and cost in a resource constraint setup. We observed that the mean recovery from SPE was 84.1 % and by LLE it was 77.4 % (p value <0.05). Moreover, the average number of metabolites isolated by SPE and LLE was 161.8 ± 18.6 and 140.1 ± 20.4 respectively. The processing cost of LLE was economical. In a cost constraint setting using LLE may be the practical option if used for organic acid analysis. PMID:27605738

  11. Constraints on conceptual development: a case study of the acquisition of folkbiological and folksociological knowledge in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Rita; Solomon, Gregg E A; Carey, Susan

    2004-01-01

    How different are the concepts held by children who grow up in a North American middle class neighborhood and by children who grow up in a rural Malagasy fishing village? By probing Malagasy children's and adults' conceptual representations of human and animal kind, biological inheritance, innate potential and family relations, the studies presented in this Monograph address current debates about the acquisition and the nature of concepts in the domains of folkbiology and folksociology. Cross-cultural and developmental studies of this kind bear on the hypothesis that conceptual development in these domains is supported and constrained by innate conceptual content. If so, one would expect cross-cultural universality in the relevant adult concepts and their early emergence in childhood regardless of widely different input conditions. We chose to conduct these studies among the Vezo of Madagascar because the ethnographic literature has attributed to them folkbiological and folksociological theories that are radically different, even in commensurable, with those of North American adults. Vezo therefore provide a challenging test for the innate conceptual constraints hypothesis.Four studies probed aspects of biological and sociological reasoning of Vezo children, adolescents and adults through a number of adoption scenarios. Despite ethnographic reports to the contrary, we found cross-cultural convergence in adult concepts of biological inheritance, but the pattern of development of this concept differed greatly from that seen in North America. Moreover, in agreement with the ethnographic literature, we found that Vezo adults have constructed a distinctive theory of social group identity. However, we found that children's reasoning in this domain is under the influence of endogenous constraints that are overturned in the course of development. Finally, we found cross-cultural convergence in adults' concept of species kind, as well as evidence for the early emergence of

  12. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, V. O.

    2015-07-15

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  13. Methodological Complications of Matching Designs under Real World Constraints: Lessons from a Study of Deeper Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiser, Kristina; Rickles, Jordan; Garet, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    To help researchers understand potential issues one can encounter when conducting propensity matching studies in complex settings, this paper describes methodological complications faced when studying schools using deeper learning practices to improve college and career readiness. The study uses data from high schools located in six districts…

  14. The neural mechanism of biomechanical constraints in the hand laterality judgment task: A near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shuang; Oi, Misato; Sekiyama, Kaoru; Saito, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    The mental rotation (MR) task is defined as a discrimination task between mirror-reversed images involving discrepancy in angular orientation. Various studies have shown that the MR task likely causes mental imagery, that is, visual and/or motor imagery, depending on stimulus types. When figures of rotated hands are presented to be identified as a left or right hand, reaction times (RTs) usually show an effect of biomechanical constraints (BC): a hand in a position difficult to reach with a real movement results in longer RTs. The BC effect as a marker of motor imagery has been investigated by brain function measures (fMRI, PET, EEG and MEG) as well as by RTs. Unlike other neuroimaging techniques, NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) imposes few physical constraints on participants and is relatively unaffected by motion artifact, which permits serial assessments of tasks in relaxed and natural environment. Focusing on these advantages, a NIRS study on motor imagery in HLJ was carried out in which we measured the brain activation during the HLJ task and a single character judgment task. In the HLJ task, both the RTs and the activity of the left superior parietal lobe (SPL) showed an interaction between Hand (left, right) and Orientation (135°, 225°) i.e., the BC effect, but not in the character judgment task. More specifically, in the analysis of BC-related activity of SPL, although the Hand×Orientation interaction was significant, the left SPL for the left hand significantly increased from 135° to 225°, but the reversed increase (from 225° to 135°) was not found for the right hand. These results suggest that left SPL is involved in the BC effect and NIRS differentiates left hand awkwardness of right-hander in the HLJ task. PMID:27268040

  15. Double Object Constructions in L3 English: An Exploratory Study of Morphological and Semantic Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agirre, Ainara Imaz; García Mayo, María del Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the acquisition of double object constructions (DOCs) ("Susan gave Peter an apple") by 90 Basque/Spanish learners of English as a third language (L3). The aim of this study was to explore whether (i) learners established a distinction when accepting DOCs vs. prepositional phrase constructions (PPCs)…

  16. Constraints to Changing Pedagogical Practices in Higher Education: An Example from Japanese Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kadir; Sutton-Brown, Camille; Czerniak, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study of college mathematics and science faculty (n = 6) and their engagement in a reform-based program, Japanese lesson study (LS), to change their teaching practices. LS is a process in which a team of four to six teachers jointly design, teach, observe, analyze, and revise a single class lesson. A series of…

  17. Dress Warm, Focus on the Fluids and Be Patient: Studying Ice Habitats and Constraints on Microbial Life at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicken, H.; Junge, K.; Deming, J.

    2002-12-01

    Studies of low-temperature environments on Earth can help guide exploration of other planetary environments that are of interest in the search for potential traces of life (or absence thereof) elsewhere in the solar system. Ice environments and habitats on Earth range from terrestrial permafrost to the polar ice caps or floating sea and lake ice. Despite the complexity of these different environments, the physical chemistry of unfrozen water - generally deemed a prerequisite for active life - and the pore microstructure can help in describing and categorizing different types of ice from an astrobiological perspective. In northern Alaska, we have studied constraints on microbial life in two types of ice, sea and lake ice, that bracket the range of availability of liquid water and solid surfaces. The latter have been found to be important for bacterial activity at very low temperatures, with active bacterial cells in sea ice documented down to temperatures of -20 C. Standard and epi-fluorescence microscopy adapted to studies at very low in-situ temperatures can help in locating individual cells and yield insight into the distribution of liquids, organisms and potential biomarkers in icy habitats. As the distribution of fluids, organisms and impurities is governed by segregation processes on different spatial scales, such work can aid in the planning of exploration campaigns (e.g., on Mars and Europa) and help guide the identification of intensive-study sites or the design of sampling equipment. Apart from such specific lessons, three major conclusions emerge: (1) The use of improved or new methods continues to push the envelope for activity of microbial life to lower temperatures, boding well for planetary exploration campaigns. (2) While the thermodynamics of water activity in ice may constitute an ultimate boundary, the low-temperature kinetic constraints currently present a significant challenge for the study of low-temperature life processes. This may call for

  18. Allocation of Study Time in Chinese Junior School Students: Habitual Responding, Item Difficulty, and Time Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuyun; Qin, Qiwen; Jiang, Yanju

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated factors influencing Chinese junior school students’ study time allocation and the age difference in the effect of habitual responding. Participants were 240 junior school students (120 girls, 120 boys; aged 13–15 years) with half taking part in Experiment 1 and half in Experiment 2, and 240 young adults aged 18–23 years, (120 women and 120 men,) involved in Experiments 3a and 3b, all native Chinese speakers. In Experiments 1 and 3a, Chinese word pairs (e.g., moon–star) were presented on the screen with three items in one array. In each trial, the items were arranged from left to right, either easy, moderate, then difficult, or the reverse. Participants had either 5 s or no time limits to study the word pairs. In Experiments 2 and 3b, word pairs were ordered in a column with the easiest items either at the top or bottom position. Results showed interactions among item difficulty, item order, and time limitation in terms of effects on study time allocation of junior school students. Participants tended to learn the items in order (from left to right and from top to bottom), but the effect of item difficulty was greater than that of item order on item selection. Results indicated that agenda and habitual responding have a combined effect on study time allocation and that the contribution of agenda is greater than that of habitual responding. The effect of habitual responding on the self-paced study and recall performance of junior school students is greater than its effect on young adults, and the study time allocation of junior school students is more likely to be affected by external conditions. PMID:27199865

  19. Constraints to Changing Pedagogical Practices in Higher Education: An example from Japanese lesson study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Kadir; Sutton-Brown, Camille; Czerniak, Charlene

    2012-07-01

    This article describes a qualitative study of college mathematics and science faculty (n = 6) and their engagement in a reform-based program, Japanese lesson study (LS), to change their teaching practices. LS is a process in which a team of four to six teachers jointly design, teach, observe, analyze, and revise a single class lesson. A series of semi-structured, open-ended, interviews was completed with each of the faculty participants. Two sets of assertions were developed from analyses of the data and examples and explanations corroborating each assertion are provided. The results of the study identified issues related to organizational and faculty changes that need to be addressed if faculty responses to pedagogical innovations are to succeed. Implications of the findings for practice and future research are discussed.

  20. Constraints and Limitations in Evaluating Math Curricular Reform Efforts: Pacesetter Math Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camara, Wayne J.

    This paper addresses the challenges and strategies of evaluating curricular reforms in secondary schools by presenting a case study of the College Board's Pacesetter Math course, a fourth level course that was entering its third year in 1995-96. The Pacesetter math course is intended to be an alternative to more traditional pre-calculus courses,…

  1. WATER CONSTRAINTS IN POWER-PLANT SITING AND OPERATION: WISCONSIN POWER PLANT IMPACT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptual study of water quality in the Wisconsin River between Wisconsin Dells and Lake Wisconsin was performed to determine the range of choices that might be available for determining the trade-off between organic waste discharges and heat assimilation from possible power p...

  2. The Constraints of History: Revision and Revolution in American Literary Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carafiol, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Asserts that rigorous historicism might change the following: (1) American literary study, by dropping the traditional nationalist project; (2) the notion of canon, by abandoning it; (3) and the institutional structure that supports academic literary criticism, by interrogating current critical conversation and, by recuperating its history,…

  3. Density matrix renormalization group studies of the effect of constraint release on the viscosity of polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeßens, Matthias; Schütz, Gunter M.

    2002-08-01

    The scaling of the viscosity of polymer melts is investigated with regard to the molecular weight. We present a generalization of the Rubinstein-Duke model, which takes constraint releases into account and calculates the effects on the viscosity by the use of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. Using input from Rouse theory, the rates for the constraint releases are determined in a self-consistent way. We conclude that shape fluctuations of the tube caused by constraint release are not a likely candidate for improving Doi's crossover theory for the scaling of the polymer viscosity.

  4. Constraints on Martian Surface Material from a Study of Volcanic Alteration in Iceland and Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Southard, R. J.; Drief, A.; Verosub, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    Subaerial volcanic activity on Hawaii and subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland has led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxiderich alteration products that may serve as models for chemical alteration on Mars. Multiple samples have been collected from palagonitic tuffs, altered pillow lavas, altered tephra, and S-rich vents for study in the lab. Variations in the kinds of alteration products have been observed depending on the alteration environment of the sample. We are working on building associations between the alteration products and formation conditions that can be used to provide information about environmental conditions on Mars.

  5. Toward a study of gene regulatory constraints to morphological evolution of the Drosophila ocellar region.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Becerra-Alonso, David; García-Morales, Diana; Casares, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    The morphology and function of organs depend on coordinated changes in gene expression during development. These changes are controlled by transcription factors, signaling pathways, and their regulatory interactions, which are represented by gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Therefore, the structure of an organ GRN restricts the morphological and functional variations that the organ can experience-its potential morphospace. Therefore, two important questions arise when studying any GRN: what is the predicted available morphospace and what are the regulatory linkages that contribute the most to control morphological variation within this space. Here, we explore these questions by analyzing a small "three-node" GRN model that captures the Hh-driven regulatory interactions controlling a simple visual structure: the ocellar region of Drosophila. Analysis of the model predicts that random variation of model parameters results in a specific non-random distribution of morphological variants. Study of a limited sample of drosophilids and other dipterans finds a correspondence between the predicted phenotypic range and that found in nature. As an alternative to simulations, we apply Bayesian networks methods in order to identify the set of parameters with the largest contribution to morphological variation. Our results predict the potential morphological space of the ocellar complex and identify likely candidate processes to be responsible for ocellar morphological evolution using Bayesian networks. We further discuss the assumptions that the approach we have taken entails and their validity. PMID:27038024

  6. Trace Element Uptake in Marine Bivalve Shells Constraints from Field- and Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klünder, M.; Hippler, D.; Witbaard, R.; Frei, D.; Immenhauser, A.

    2006-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of the trace element signatures recorded in calcium carbonate skeletons of marine organisms as archives of past and present environmental conditions, such as temperature, salinity or nutrition level. Because of their global occurrence in the modern and ancient oceans, the trace element chemistry of bivalve shells might be used as a potential proxy for present and past environmental conditions. If the composition of bivalve shells, for instance, can be shown to represent the environment in which they lived, then shells can be used to investigate conditions in the lifetime of the animal. And as the shell material is sequentially deposited, an understanding of the internal shell structure will enable time- resolution of the analyses. Therefore, the trace element signature of bivalve shells may provide an important record of climate changes and global geochemical cycles. One of the difficulties of using the trace element signatures of bivalve shells as proxies for environmental conditions is that little is known about the mechanisms by which the trace elements are incorporated into the shells. There has been quite an amount of research into the use of bivalve shell chemistry as proxy for one or more environmental parameters, but there are relatively few datasets in which both bivalve shells and the water in which the animals lived have been analysed. It is as yet not clear to what extent the trace element incorporation into bivalve shells is governed by biological processes, like growth rate and metabolism of the animals, or by physical and crystal chemical parameters. An added difficulty is that the existing data do suggest that trace element uptake in bivalve shells may be species specific. Therefore, studies that investigate the relationships between the content of these elements in the shells and the ambient water and the possible incorporation mechanisms are needed if the potential that bivalve shells offer as

  7. Short-selling constraints as cause for price distortions: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Florian; Huber, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore the influence of the possibility to short stocks and/or borrow money in laboratory markets. A key innovation of our study is that subjects can simultaneously trade two risky assets on two double-auction markets, allowing us to differentiate between assets with relatively high versus low capitalization. Divergence of opinions is created by providing each trader with noisy information on the intrinsic values of both assets. We find that when borrowing money or shorting stocks is restricted prices are systematically distorted. Specifically, stocks with high (low) capitalization are traded at lower (higher) prices than their fundamental value. Lifting the restrictions leads to more efficient prices and more liquidity, thereby also lowering volatility and bid-ask spreads. PMID:26523081

  8. Motivations and Constraints to Family Planning: A Qualitative Study in Rwanda’s Southern Kayonza District

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Didi Bertrand; Berman, Leslie; Ryan, Grace; Habumugisha, Lameck; Basinga, Paulin; Nutt, Cameron; Kamali, Francois; Ngizwenayo, Elias; Fleur, Jacklin St; Niyigena, Peter; Ngabo, Fidele; Farmer, Paul E; Rich, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Background: While Rwanda has achieved impressive gains in contraceptive coverage, unmet need for family planning is high, and barriers to accessing quality reproductive health services remain. Few studies in Rwanda have qualitatively investigated factors that contribute to family planning use, barriers to care, and quality of services from the community perspective. Methods: We undertook a qualitative study of community perceptions of reproductive health and family planning in Rwanda’s southern Kayonza district, which has the country’s highest total fertility rate. From October 2011 to December 2012, we conducted interviews with randomly selected male and female community members (n = 96), community health workers (n = 48), and health facility nurses (n = 15), representing all 8 health centers’ catchment areas in the overall catchment area of the district’s Rwinkwavu Hospital. We then carried out a directed content analysis to identify key themes and triangulate findings across methods and informant groups. Results: Key themes emerged across interviews surrounding: (1) fertility beliefs: participants recognized the benefits of family planning but often desired larger families for cultural and historical reasons; (2) social pressures and gender roles: young and unmarried women faced significant stigma and husbands exerted decision-making power, but many husbands did not have a good understanding of family planning because they perceived it as a woman’s matter; (3) barriers to accessing high-quality services: out-of-pocket costs, stock-outs, limited method choice, and long waiting times but short consultations at facilities were common complaints; (4) side effects: poor management and rumors and fears of side effects affected contraceptive use. These themes recurred throughout many participant narratives and influenced reproductive health decision making, including enrollment and retention in family planning programs. Conclusions: As Rwanda

  9. A transformation similarity constraint for groupwise nonlinear registration in longitudinal neuroimaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Greg M.; Gutman, Boris A.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Thompson, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders often show a similar spatial distribution of volume change throughout the brain over time, but this information is not yet used in registration algorithms to refine the quantification of change. Here, we develop a mathematical basis to incorporate that prior information into a longitudinal structural neuroimaging study. We modify the canonical minimization problem for non-linear registration to include a term that couples a collection of registrations together to enforce group similarity. More specifically, throughout the computation we maintain a group-level representation of the transformations and constrain updates to individual transformations to be similar to this representation. The derivations necessary to produce the Euler-Lagrange equations for the coupling term are presented and a gradient descent algorithm based on the formulation was implemented. We demonstrate using 57 longitudinal image pairs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) that longitudinal registration with such a groupwise coupling prior is more robust to noise in estimating change, suggesting such change maps may have several important applications.

  10. Constraints on the first billion years of the geodynamo from paleointensity studies of zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, John; Cottrell, Rory; Davis, William

    2014-05-01

    Several lines of reasoning, including new ideas on core thermal conductivity, suggest that onset of a strong geomagnetic field might have been delayed by one billion years (or more) after the lunar forming event. Here we extend the Proterozoic/Archean to Paleoarchean record of the geomagnetic field constrained by single crystal paleointensity (SCP) analyses (Tarduno et al., Science, 2010) to older times using zircons containing minute magnetic inclusions. Specifically, we focus on samples from the Jack Hills (Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia). We employ a CO2 laser demagnetization system and a small bore (6.3 mm) 3-component DC SQUID magnetometer; the latter offers the highest currently available moment resolution. Sample age is analyzed using SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology. Preliminary data support the presence of a relatively strong Paleoarchean field produced by a core dynamo, extending the known record by at least 100 million years, to approximately 3.55 Ga. These data only serve to exacerbate the apparent problem posed by the presence of a Paleoarchean dynamo. Alternative dynamo driving mechanisms, or efficient core/lowermost mantle heat loss processes unique to the Paleoarchean (and older times) might have been at work. We will discuss these processes, and our efforts to study even older Eoarchean-Hadean zircons.

  11. Rheological constraints on the deformation of Snake River-type ignimbrites: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Andrews, G. D.; Whittington, A. G.

    2009-12-01

    We compare the rheology of two members of the Miocene Rogerson Formation (Andrews et al., 2008), Snake River Plain volcanic province, USA. We have studied by parallel-plate viscometry the rheology of two ashfall units associated with the eruption of the lava-like (sensu Branney & Kokelaar, 1992) and rheomorphic Grey’s Landing (GL) ignimbrite (a Snake River-type ignimbrite; Branney et al., 2008) and compared the results to the overlying Sand Springs (SS) ignimbrite. The GL and SS members are similar in whole rock and glass shard chemistry and mineralogy, but differ in crystal content and size fraction, porosity, and texture. Lava-like lithofacies of the GL ignimbrite are either crystallized, devitrified, or perlitized, and do not necessarily represent the original material that came out of the vent to be subsequently deposited, welded and deformed by flow (rheomorphism). We therefore chose to use the fused basal co-ignimbrite ashfall tuff and the upper co-ignimbrite tuff as potential “starting material” for the GL ignimbrite. The two ashfall tuffs and the ignimbrite form a single cooling unit; the tuffs are partly-fused against the bottom and top of the ignimbrite. The basal ash is laminated, moderately porous (~15%), and contains 10-20% crystals; in contrast the upper ash is massive, nearly aphyric, glassy and contains ~5% porosity. The non-rheomorphic SS ignimbrite is separated from the underlying GL ignimbrite by a non-welded ignimbrite and several paleosols. It is a strongly-welded, glassy tuff with a thin non-welded base and no underlying ashfall deposit. The basal ashfall tuff of the GL member and the SS ignimbrite have the same apparent viscosity at 900°C (log η = 10.80 & 10.85 Pa.s, respectively), within the resolution of the parallel-plate apparatus for viscosity. This is in agreement with the results of Lavallée et al. (2008) on a sample of the GL ignimbrite, and suggests that the rheology of those two units is melt-dominated, and is not

  12. A Study of Penalty Function Methods for Constraint Handling with Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    is performed in this study. Also, a response surface approach to robust design is used to develop a new penalty function approach. This new penalty function approach is then compared with the other existing penalty functions.

  13. Mesozoic tectonics of the Arctic: New constraints from provenance studies,Taimyr, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Pease, V.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the tectonic development of the Arctic Ocean is important for understanding global tectonics and the framework of petroleum and mineral resources in the Arctic area. The Eurasia and Amerasia basins are the principal physiographic domains of the Arctic Ocean. The Eurasia Basin is known to be the result of slow seafloor spreading; the origin of the Amerasia Basin however remains controversial. Lack of information on the timing, structure, and geochemistry of geological units around the Amerasia Basin limits our ability to understand its development. The Taimyr Peninsula where Mesozoic deformation is well-developed provides a natural laboratory to investigate the tectonic development of the Amerasia Basin. Provenance studies of Taimyr constrain the source areas of Mesozoic sediments in the region and thus identify affinities between them. Detrital zircons from six samples of Triassic and Jurassic sandstone from Southern Taimyr were dated using LA-ICP-MS to test existing models for the opening of the Amerasia Basin. Two Triassic samples present great similarity in detrital zircon population with Triassic sandstone from the paleo-Taimyr river system, including Chukotka, the Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands. These samples all contain Permo-Triassic (236 - 250 Ma), Permo-Carboniferous (260 - 330 Ma), Devonian (340 - 390 Ma) late Precambrian-Silurian (420 - 580 Ma) and Neoproterozoic (620 - 1000 Ma) zircons. These detrital zircon ages suggest Triassic sediments in these locations may have been derived from Siberia Trap, Taimyr and the Ural Mountains of Arctic Russia. It is therefore likely that Taimyr, Chukotka, the Wrangel Island and the New Siberian Islands which are separated at present were close to each other or belonged to the same large drainage system before the opening of the Amerasia Basin. Two Middle Jurassic samples and two Upper Jurassic samples from Taimyr have dominant Permo-Triassic peaks (246 - 260 Ma) suggesting a proximal source

  14. Morphological constraints in children's spoken language comprehension: a visual world study of plurals inside compounds in English.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renita; Gerth, Sabrina; Clahsen, Harald

    2013-11-01

    Many previous studies have shown that the human language processor is capable of rapidly integrating information from different sources during reading or listening. Yet, little is known about how this ability develops from child to adulthood. To gain insight into how children (in comparison to adults) handle different kinds of linguistic information during on-line language comprehension, the current study investigates a well-known morphological phenomenon that is subject to both structural and semantic constraints, the plurals-in-compounds effect, i.e. the dislike of plural (specifically regular plural) modifiers inside compounds (e.g. rats eater). We examined 96 seven-to-twelve-year-old children and a control group of 32 adults measuring their eye-gaze changes in response to compound-internal plural and singular forms. Our results indicate that children rely more upon structural properties of language (in the present case, morphological cues) early in development and that the ability to efficiently integrate information from multiple sources takes time for children to reach adult-like levels. PMID:24007920

  15. Pilot Study of the Efficacy of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Infants and Toddlers with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, Linda Pax; Mayhan, Marianne; Orr, Teresa; Batterson, Nancy; Tonneman, Jill Alyce; Meyer, Angela; Alfano, Lindsay; Wang, Wei; Whalen, Cara N; Nelin, Mary Ann; Lo, Warren David; Case-Smith, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) effectiveness for infants and toddlers with unilateral cerebral palsy is minimal. We performed a pilot study of CIMT using one-month usual care, one-month intervention, and one-month maintenance (return to usual care) phases on five infants (7- to 18-month old). For the CIMT phase, the infants received 2 hr of occupational therapy and 1 hr of parent-implemented home program for five days/week. The infants were casted for the rst 23 days, and bimanual therapy was provided for the last three days. Fine motor skills for the more affected arm and gross motor skills improved significantly during the CIMT; these gains were maintained at one-month follow-up. Individual infant data show mixed effects. This pilot study provides initial evidence that CIMT is feasible for infants with unilateral cerebral palsy, and presents preliminary data for CIMT on fine and gross motor performance. PMID:23848499

  16. Data reporting constraints for the lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration activities in two districts in Ghana: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Aryeetey, Richmond; Boateng, Richard; Anto, Francis; Aikins, Moses; Gyapong, Margaret; Gyapong, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Timely and accurate health data are important for objective decision making and policy formulation. However, little evidence exists to explain why poor quality routine health data persist. This study examined the constraints to data reporting for the lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration programme in two districts in Ghana. This qualitative study focused on timeliness and accuracy of mass drug administration reports submitted by community health volunteers. Methods: The study is nested within a larger study focusing on the feasibility of mobile phone technology for the lymphatic filariasis programme. Using an exploratory study design, data were obtained through in-depth interviews (n = 7) with programme supervisors and focus group discussions (n = 4) with community health volunteers. Results were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: Reasons for delays in reporting were attributed to poor numeracy skills among community health volunteers, difficult physical access to communities, high supervisor workload, poor adherence reporting deadlines, difficulty in reaching communities within allocated time and untimely release of programme funds. Poor accuracy of data was mainly attributed to inadequate motivation for community health volunteers and difficulty calculating summaries. Conclusion: This study has shown that there are relevant issues that need to be addressed in order to improve the quality of lymphatic filariasis treatment coverage reports. Some of the factors identified are problems within the health system; others are specific to the community health volunteers and the lymphatic filariasis programme. Steps such as training on data reporting should be intensified for community health volunteers, allowances for community health volunteers should be re-evaluated and other non-monetary incentives should be provided for community health volunteers. PMID:26770791

  17. Constraints on planetary formation from the discovery & study of transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.

    2011-08-01

    Earth-Sun distance. In Astronomy, we cannot do experiments; we are a part of it. Instead, we search and characterise several similar objects in order to extract information out of them statistically. To answer our question, we needed to find several objects and detect the clues from their past history bringing us back to the processes that led to their formation. There are several manners with which one can find planets. For this thesis, the so-called transit method was used. It consists in detecting a periodic loss of light from a star in front of which a planet passes: a transit. This method is particularly sensitive to the presence of hot Jupiters. During this thesis, about fifty planets of such type have been discovered, about a third of the known hot Jupiters. Those planets are confirmed thanks to radial velocity measurements, the same technique that led to the discovery of the first extrasolar planet, around the star 51 Pegasi. The analysis of the stellar light affected by the presence of a planet around it, notably the light received during transit, allows us to know about the mass, the size of the planet, its orbital period, the shape of its orbit, its temperature, even the chemical composition of its atmosphere. Furthermore, these observations give us the occasion to study the star around which is found the planet, such as its mass, its size, its rotation speed, as well as give estimates on its age. One type of observations was employed in particular: the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. During transit, this effect creates an anomaly compared to the expected radial velocities. Through a modelisation of this anomaly, it is possible to measure the projection of the angle between the orbital plane of the planet and the equatorial plane of the star, on the sky. In our System, all planets are located more or less in a same plane : the ecliptic. The equatorial plane of the Sun is also almost aligned with the ecliptic. This observation led Kant and Laplace to postulate on

  18. [Study on optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump with constraints on blood perfusion and on blood damage indexes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Pan, Youlian; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tianyi; Lu, Lijun

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal objective is determined according to requirements of clinical use. Possible schemes are generally worked out based on structural feature of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal structure is selected from possible schemes with constraints on blood perfusion and blood damage indexes. Using an optimal selection method one can find the optimum structure scheme from possible schemes effectively. The results of numerical simulation of optimal blood pump showed that the method of constraints of blood perfusion and blood damage is competent for the requirements of selection of the optimal blood pumps. PMID:23469557

  19. Study of space shuttle EVA/IVA support requirements. Volume 2: EVA/IVA tasks, guidelines, and constraints definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Copeland, R. J.; Wood, P. W., Jr.; Cox, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The guidelines for EVA and IVA tasks to be performed on the space shuttle are defined. In deriving tasks, guidelines, and constraints, payloads were first identified from the mission model. Payload requirements, together with man and manipulator capabilities, vehicle characteristics and operation, and safety considerations led to a definition of candidate tasks. Guidelines and constraints were also established from these considerations. Scenarios were established, and screening criteria, such as commonality of EVA and IVA activities, were applied to derive representative planned and unplanned tasks. The whole spectrum of credible contingency situations with a potential requirement for EVA/IVA was analyzed.

  20. "Big Brown Dog" or "Brown Big Dog?" An Electrophysiological Study of Semantic Constraints on Prenominal Adjective Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmerer, David; Weber-Fox, Christine; Price, Karen; Zdanczyk, Cynthia; Way, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants read and made acceptability judgments about sentences containing three types of adjective sequences: (1) normal sequences--e.g., "Jennifer rode a huge gray elephant"; (2) reversed sequences that violate grammatical-semantic constraints on linear order--e.g., *"Jennifer rode a…

  1. Constraint monitoring in TOSCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Howard

    1992-01-01

    The Job-Shop Scheduling Problem (JSSP) deals with the allocation of resources over time to factory operations. Allocations are subject to various constraints (e.g., production precedence relationships, factory capacity constraints, and limits on the allowable number of machine setups) which must be satisfied for a schedule to be valid. The identification of constraint violations and the monitoring of constraint threats plays a vital role in schedule generation in terms of the following: (1) directing the scheduling process; and (2) informing scheduling decisions. This paper describes a general mechanism for identifying constraint violations and monitoring threats to the satisfaction of constraints throughout schedule generation.

  2. A Brownian dynamics study on ferrofluid colloidal dispersions using an iterative constraint method to satisfy Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubina, Sean Hyun; Wedgewood, Lewis Edward

    2016-07-01

    Ferrofluids are often favored for their ability to be remotely positioned via external magnetic fields. The behavior of particles in ferromagnetic clusters under uniformly applied magnetic fields has been computationally simulated using the Brownian dynamics, Stokesian dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods. However, few methods have been established that effectively handle the basic principles of magnetic materials, namely, Maxwell's equations. An iterative constraint method was developed to satisfy Maxwell's equations when a uniform magnetic field is imposed on ferrofluids in a heterogeneous Brownian dynamics simulation that examines the impact of ferromagnetic clusters in a mesoscale particle collection. This was accomplished by allowing a particulate system in a simple shear flow to advance by a time step under a uniformly applied magnetic field, then adjusting the ferroparticles via an iterative constraint method applied over sub-volume length scales until Maxwell's equations were satisfied. The resultant ferrofluid model with constraints demonstrates that the magnetoviscosity contribution is not as substantial when compared to homogeneous simulations that assume the material's magnetism is a direct response to the external magnetic field. This was detected across varying intensities of particle-particle interaction, Brownian motion, and shear flow. Ferroparticle aggregation was still extensively present but less so than typically observed.

  3. Asteroseismic constraints for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creevey, O. L.; Thévenin, F.

    2012-12-01

    Distances from the Gaia mission will no doubt improve our understanding of stellar physics by providing an excellent constraint on the luminosity of the star. However, it is also clear that high precision stellar properties from, for example, asteroseismology, will also provide a needed input constraint in order to calibrate the methods that Gaia will use, e.g. stellar models or GSP_Phot. For solar-like stars (F, G, K IV/V), asteroseismic data delivers at the least two very important quantities: (1) the average large frequency separation < Δ ν > and (2) the frequency corresponding to the maximum of the modulated-amplitude spectrum ν_{max}. Both of these quantities are related directly to stellar parameters (radius and mass) and in particular their combination (gravity and density). We show how the precision in < Δ ν >, ν_{max}, and atmospheric parameters T_{eff} and [Fe/H] affect the determination of gravity (log g) for a sample of well-known stars. We find that log g can be determined within less than 0.02 dex accuracy for our sample while considering precisions in the data expected for V˜12 stars from Kepler data. We also derive masses and radii which are accurate to within 1σ of the accepted values. This study validates the subsequent use of all of the available asteroseismic data on solar-like stars from the Kepler field (>500 IV/V stars) in order to provide a very important constraint for Gaia calibration of GSP_Phot} through the use of log g. We note that while we concentrate on IV/V stars, both the CoRoT and Kepler fields contain asteroseismic data on thousands of giant stars which will also provide useful calibration measures.

  4. Dosimetric benefits of placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hailan; Lu, Heming; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Huixian; Wei, Yinglin; Zhang, Yanxian; Liu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus (BP) could provide dosimetric benefits in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Planning CT images for 30 patients with NPC treated with definitive IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Target volumes, the BP and other critical structures were delineated; two separate IMRT plans were designed for each patient: one set no restrictions for the BP; the other considered the BP as a critical structure for which a maximum dose limit of ≤66 Gy was set. No significant differences between the two plans were observed in the conformity index, homogeneity index, maximum dose to the planning target volumes (PTVs), minimum dose to the PTVs, percentages of the volume of the PTVnx and PTVnd receiving more than 110% of the prescribed dose, or percentages of the volume of the PTVs receiving 95% and > 93% of the prescribed dose. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose, mean dose, V45, V50, V54, V60, V66 and V70 to the BP. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose to the BP, V45, V60 and V66 in both N0–1 and N2–3 disease; however, the magnitude of the dosimetric gain for each parameter between N0–1 and N2–3 disease was not significantly different, except for the V60 and V66. In conclusion, placing dose constraints on the BP can significantly decrease the irradiated volume and dose, without compromising adequate dose delivery to the target volume. PMID:25173085

  5. Study of Welding Distortion and Residual Stress Considering Nonlinear Yield Stress Curves and Multi-constraint Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Youmin; Zhang, Guojun; Huang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Inherent strain analysis has been successfully applied to predict welding deformations of large-scale structural components, while thermal-elastic-plastic finite element method is rarely used for its disadvantages of long calculation period and large storage space. In this paper, a hybrid model considering nonlinear yield stress curves and multi-constraint equations to thermal-elastic-plastic analysis is further proposed to predict welding distortions and residual stresses of large-scale structures. For welding T-joint structural steel S355JR by metal active gas welding, the published experiment results of temperature and displacement fields are applied to illustrate the credibility of the proposed integration model. By comparing numerical results of four different cases with the experiment results, it is verified that prediction precision of welding deformations and residual stresses is apparently improved considering the power-law hardening model, and computational time is also obviously shortened about 30.14% using multi-constraint equations. On the whole, the proposed hybrid method can be further used to precisely and efficiently predict welding deformations and residual stresses of large-scale structures.

  6. Do constraints associated with the locomotor habitat drive the evolution of forelimb shape? A case study in musteloid carnivorans.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Anne-Claire; Cornette, Raphael; Goswami, Anjali; Peigné, Stéphane

    2015-06-01

    Convergence in morphology can result from evolutionary adaptations in species living in environments with similar selective pressures. Here, we investigate whether the shape of the forelimb long bones has converged in environments imposing similar functional constraints, using musteloid carnivores as a model. The limbs of quadrupeds are subjected to many factors that may influence their shape. They need to support body mass without collapsing or breaking, yet at the same time resist the stresses and strains induced by locomotion. This likely imposes strong constraints on their morphology. Our geometric morphometric analyses show that locomotion, body mass and phylogeny all influence the shape of the forelimb. Furthermore, we find a remarkable convergence between: (i) aquatic and semi-fossorial species, both displaying a robust forelimb, with a shape that improves stability and load transfer in response to the physical resistance imposed by the locomotor environment; and (ii) aquatic and arboreal/semi-arboreal species, with both groups displaying a broad capitulum. This augments the degree of pronation/supination, an important feature for climbing as well as grasping and manipulation ability, behaviors common to aquatic and arboreal species. In summary, our results highlight how musteloids with different locomotor ecologies show differences in the anatomy of their forelimb bones. Yet, functional demands for limb movement through dense media also result in convergence in forelimb long-bone shape between diverse groups, for example, otters and badgers. PMID:25994128

  7. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baardwijk, Angela van Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre; Dingemans, Anne Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

  8. Highly irregular quantum constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauder, John R.; Little, J. Scott

    2006-05-01

    Motivated by a recent paper of Louko and Molgado, we consider a simple system with a single classical constraint R(q) = 0. If ql denotes a generic solution to R(q) = 0, our examples include cases where R'(ql) ≠ 0 (regular constraint) and R'(ql) = 0 (irregular constraint) of varying order as well as the case where R(q) = 0 for an interval, such as a <= q <= b. Quantization of irregular constraints is normally not considered; however, using the projection operator formalism we provide a satisfactory quantization which reduces to the constrained classical system when planck → 0. It is noteworthy that irregular constraints change the observable aspects of a theory as compared to strictly regular constraints.

  9. Comparative study of single InGaN layers grown on Si(111) and GaN(0001) templates: The role of surface wetting and epitaxial constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, V. J.; Gačević, Ž.; Soto-Rodríguez, P. E. D.; Aseev, P.; Nötzel, R.; Calleja, E.; Sánchez-García, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a comparative study, based mainly on X-ray diffraction analysis, of compact (~100 nm thick) and uniform single crystal InGaN layers (In content <35%) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. InGaN layers have been grown directly on Si(111) substrates and on commercially available GaN(0001)-on-sapphire templates.. A high reactivity of atomic N with Si leads to a formation of amorphous SiN on Si substrate, i.e. an indirect crystal-to-crystal InGaN/SiN/Si contact; the weak InGaN interaction with the underlying substrate (weak epitaxial constraint) further leads to poor surface "wetting" and consequent 3D nucleation. The InGaN growth on GaN is, on the other hand, characterized by a direct crystal-to-crystal InGaN/GaN contact; the strong InGaN interaction with the underlying substrate (strong epitaxial constraint) leads to good surface "wetting" and consequent 2D nucleation. All studied InGaN layers show single epitaxial relationship to both Si(111) and GaN(0001)-on-sapphire substrates as well as a relatively good compositional uniformity (no trace of InGaN phase separation). However, layers grown on Si show significantly lower strain and inferior crystallographic uniformity i.e. higher disorder in crystallographic tilt and twist. The surface "wetting" (poor vs. good) and epitaxial constraint (weak vs. strong) are suggested as the main origins of these discrepancies.

  10. Bilateral brain reorganization with memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy in chronic post-stroke aphasia: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Barbancho, Miguel A; Berthier, Marcelo L; Navas-Sánchez, Patricia; Dávila, Guadalupe; Green-Heredia, Cristina; García-Alberca, José M; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; López-González, Manuel V; Dawid-Milner, Marc S; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Lara, J Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Changes in ERP (P100 and N400) and root mean square (RMS) were obtained during a silent reading task in 28 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of both memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT). Participants received memantine/placebo alone (weeks 0-16), followed by drug treatment combined with CIAT (weeks 16-18), and then memantine/placebo alone (weeks 18-20). ERP/RMS values (week 16) decreased more in the memantine group than in the placebo group. During CIAT application (weeks 16-18), improvements in aphasia severity and ERP/RMS values were amplified by memantine and changes remained stable thereafter (weeks 18-20). Changes in ERP/RMS occurred in left and right hemispheres and correlated with gains in language performance. No changes in ERP/RMS were found in a healthy group in two separated evaluations. Our results show that aphasia recovery induced by both memantine alone and in combination with CIAT is indexed by bilateral cortical potentials. PMID:25932618

  11. A Study of B0 to rho+rho- Decays and Constraints on theCKM Angle alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-05-16

    The authors present results from an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} decays using (383.6 {+-} 4.2) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. The measurements of the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} branching fraction, longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L}, and the CP-violating parameters S{sub long} and C{sub long} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}) = (25.5 {+-} 2.1(stat){sub -3.9}{sup +3.6}(syst)) x 10{sup -6}, f{sub L} = 0.992 {+-} 0.024(stat){sub -0.013}{sup +0.026}(syst), S{sub long} = -0.17 {+-} 0.20(stat){sub -0.06}{sup +0.05}(syst), C{sub long} = 0.01 {+-} 0.15(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). The authors determine the unitarity triangle angle {alpha}, using an isospin analysis of B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays. One of the two solutions, {alpha} = [73.1, 117.0]{sup o} at 68% CL is compatible with standard model-based fits of existing data. Constraints on the unitarity triangle are also evaluated using an SU(3) symmetry based approach.

  12. Creating Positive Task Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mally, Kristi K.

    2006-01-01

    Constraints are characteristics of the individual, the task, or the environment that mold and shape movement choices and performances. Constraints can be positive--encouraging proficient movements or negative--discouraging movement or promoting ineffective movements. Physical educators must analyze, evaluate, and determine the effect various…

  13. Constraint Reasoning Over Strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Golden, Keith; Pang, Wanlin

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to representing and reasoning about constraints over strings. We discuss how many string domains can often be concisely represented using regular languages, and how constraints over strings, and domain operations on sets of strings, can be carried out using this representation.

  14. Perceptual Constraints in Phonotactic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endress, Ansgar D.; Mehler, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Structural regularities in language have often been attributed to symbolic or statistical general purpose computations, whereas perceptual factors influencing such generalizations have received less interest. Here, we use phonotactic-like constraints as a case study to ask whether the structural properties of specific perceptual and memory…

  15. Constraints in Quantum Geometrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, Adrian P.; George, Nathan D.; Miller, Warner A.; Kheyfets, Arkady

    We compare different treatments of the constraints in canonical quantum gravity. The standard approach on the superspace of 3-geometries treats the constraints as the sole carriers of the dynamic content of the theory, thus rendering the traditional dynamical equations obsolete. Quantization of the constraints in both the Dirac and ADM square root Hamiltonian approaches leads to the well known problems of time evolution. These problems of time are of both an interpretational and technical nature. In contrast, the geometrodynamic quantization procedure on the superspace of the true dynamical variables separates the issues of quantization from the enforcement of the constraints. The resulting theory takes into account states that are off-shell with respect to the constraints, and thus avoids the problems of time. We develop, for the first time, the geometrodynamic quantization formalism in a general setting and show that it retains all essential features previously illustrated in the context of homogeneous cosmologies.

  16. Allocating limited resources in a time of fiscal constraints: a priority setting case study from Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitton, Craig; Levy, Adrian; Gorsky, Diane; MacNeil, Christina; Dionne, Francois; Marrie, Tom

    2013-07-01

    Facing a projected $1.4M deficit on a $35M operating budget for fiscal year 2011/2012, members of the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine developed and implemented an explicit, transparent, criteria-based priority setting process for resource reallocation. A task group that included representatives from across the Faculty of Medicine used a program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) framework, which provided an alternative to the typical public-sector approaches to addressing a budget deficit of across-the-board spending cuts and political negotiation. Key steps to the PBMA process included training staff members and department heads on priority setting and resource reallocation, establishing process guidelines to meet immediate and longer-term fiscal needs, developing a reporting structure and forming key working groups, creating assessment criteria to guide resource reallocation decisions, assessing disinvestment proposals from all departments, and providing proposal implementation recommendations to the dean. All departments were required to submit proposals for consideration. The task group approved 27 service reduction proposals and 28 efficiency gains proposals, totaling approximately $2.7M in savings across two years. During this process, the task group faced a number of challenges, including a tight timeline for development and implementation (January to April 2011), a culture that historically supported decentralized planning, at times competing interests (e.g., research versus teaching objectives), and reductions in overall health care and postsecondary education government funding. Overall, faculty and staff preferred the PBMA approach to previous practices. Other institutions should use this example to set priorities in times of fiscal constraints. PMID:23702521

  17. Constraints on Noun Incorporation in Korean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khym, Hangyoo

    1997-01-01

    A study of the noun incorporation phenomenon in Korean suggests that noun incorporation occurs at D-structure and obeys the Head Movement Constraint syntactically, and the Theme-Only Constraint semantically. First, the structure of "sunrise"-type words is identified, showing that before derivation through nominalization of the affix "-i,"…

  18. The Role of Motivation, Perceived Constraints, and Constraint Negotiation Strategies in Students' Internship Selection Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batty, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the factors (i.e., motivation and perceived constraints) and processes (i.e., constraint negotiation) that influence students' selection of and satisfaction with their internship choice. The study was conducted using a quantitative approach, which included a focus group, a pilot study, and a…

  19. Temporal Constraint Reasoning With Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Rossi, Francesca

    2001-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time (specifically, associated with durations or orderings of events) on the basis of preferences. For example. a pair of events might be constrained to occur in a certain order, and, in addition. it might be preferable that the delay between them be as large, or as small, as possible. This paper explores problems in which a set of temporal constraints is specified, where each constraint is associated with preference criteria for making local decisions about the events involved in the constraint, and a reasoner must infer a complete solution to the problem such that, to the extent possible, these local preferences are met in the best way. A constraint framework for reasoning about time is generalized to allow for preferences over event distances and durations, and we study the complexity of solving problems in the resulting formalism. It is shown that while in general such problems are NP-hard, some restrictions on the shape of the preference functions, and on the structure of the preference set, can be enforced to achieve tractability. In these cases, a simple generalization of a single-source shortest path algorithm can be used to compute a globally preferred solution in polynomial time.

  20. Impact responses of the cervical spine: A computational study of the effects of muscle activity, torso constraint, and pre-flexion.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Roger W; Sganga, Jake; Cutcliffe, Hattie; Bass, Cameron R 'Dale'

    2016-02-29

    Cervical spine injuries continue to be a costly societal problem. Future advancements in injury prevention depend on improved physical and computational models, which are predicated on a better understanding of the neck response during dynamic loading. Previous studies have shown that the tolerance of the neck is dependent on its initial position and its buckling behavior. This study uses a computational model to examine three important factors hypothesized to influence the loads experienced by vertebrae in the neck under compressive impact: muscle activation, torso constraints, and pre-flexion angle of the cervical spine. Since cadaver testing is not practical for large scale parametric analyses, these factors were studied using a previously validated computational model. On average, simulations with active muscles had 32% larger compressive forces and 25% larger shear forces-well in excess of what was expected from the muscle forces alone. In the short period of time required for neck injury, constraints on torso motion increased the average neck compression by less than 250N. The pre-flexion hypothesis was tested by examining pre-flexion angles from neutral (0°) to 64°. Increases in pre-flexion resulted in the largest increases in peak loads and the expression of higher-order buckling modes. Peak force and buckling modality were both very sensitive to pre-flexion angle. These results validate the relevance of prior cadaver models for neck injury and help explain the wide variety of cervical spine fractures that can result from ostensibly similar compressive loadings. They also give insight into the mechanistic differences between burst fractures and lower cervical spine dislocations. PMID:26874970

  1. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM GRAVITATIONAL LENS TIME DELAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Dan; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2009-11-20

    Future large ensembles of time delay (TD) lenses have the potential to provide interesting cosmological constraints complementary to those of other methods. In a flat universe with constant w including a Planck prior, The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope TD measurements for approx4000 lenses should constrain the local Hubble constant h to approx0.007 (approx1%), OMEGA{sub de} to approx0.005, and w to approx0.026 (all 1sigma precisions). Similar constraints could be obtained by a dedicated gravitational lens observatory (OMEGA) which would obtain precise TD and mass model measurements for approx100 well-studied lenses. We compare these constraints (as well as those for a more general cosmology) to the 'optimistic Stage IV' constraints expected from weak lensing, supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and cluster counts, as calculated by the Dark Energy Task Force. TDs yield a modest constraint on a time-varying w(z), with the best constraint on w(z) at the 'pivot redshift' of z approx 0.31. Our Fisher matrix calculation is provided to allow TD constraints to be easily compared to and combined with constraints from other experiments. We also show how cosmological constraining power varies as a function of numbers of lenses, lens model uncertainty, TD precision, redshift precision, and the ratio of four-image to two-image lenses.

  2. Disentangling Robust Developmental Constraints from the Instructionally Mutable: Young Children's Epistemic Reasoning about a Study of Their Own Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Kathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines first graders' epistemic reasoning, in tacit "practical epistemologies" reflected in thinking about an investigation of their own design. I analyzed children's epistemic reasoning, following a design experiment scaffolding increasing regulation of scientific inquiry in a domain they studied in depth. Participants consisted of…

  3. A Petrologic Study of the IAB Iron Meteorites: Constraints on the Formation of the IAB-Winonaite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedix, G. K.; McCoy, T. J.; Keil, K.; Love, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    We have studied IAB iron meteorites and their silicate-bearing inclusions to elucidate the origin of their parent body. We have divided IAB irons into five categories which best describe the inclusions and other properties of the irons.

  4. Constraints in Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic programming refers to a class of genetic algorithms utilizing generic representation in the form of program trees. For a particular application, one needs to provide the set of functions, whose compositions determine the space of program structures being evolved, and the set of terminals, which determine the space of specific instances of those programs. The algorithm searches the space for the best program for a given problem, applying evolutionary mechanisms borrowed from nature. Genetic algorithms have shown great capabilities in approximately solving optimization problems which could not be approximated or solved with other methods. Genetic programming extends their capabilities to deal with a broader variety of problems. However, it also extends the size of the search space, which often becomes too large to be effectively searched even by evolutionary methods. Therefore, our objective is to utilize problem constraints, if such can be identified, to restrict this space. In this publication, we propose a generic constraint specification language, powerful enough for a broad class of problem constraints. This language has two elements -- one reduces only the number of program instances, the other reduces both the space of program structures as well as their instances. With this language, we define the minimal set of complete constraints, and a set of operators guaranteeing offspring validity from valid parents. We also show that these operators are not less efficient than the standard genetic programming operators if one preprocesses the constraints - the necessary mechanisms are identified.

  5. Phase II dose escalation study of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Use of dose-volume constraints to achieve rectal isotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Krauss, Daniel; Lockman, David M.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Martinez, Alvaro A. . E-mail: amartinez@beaumont.edu

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: In our Phase II prostate cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) study, the highest possible dose was selected on the basis of normal tissue tolerance constraints. We analyzed rectal toxicity rates in different dose levels and treatment groups to determine whether equivalent toxicity rates were achieved as hypothesized when the protocol was started. Methods and Materials: From 1999 to 2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1 to T3, node-negative prostate cancer were prospectively treated with three-dimensional conformal adaptive RT. A patient-specific confidence-limited planning target volume was constructed on the basis of 5 CT scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images after the first 4 days of treatment. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured in its entirety. The rectal wall was defined by use of a 3-mm wall thickness (median volume: 29.8 cc). The prescribed dose level was chosen using the following rectal wall dose constraints: (1) Less than 30% of the rectal wall volume can receive more than 75.6 Gy. (2) Less than 5% of the rectal wall can receive more than 82 Gy. Low-risk patients (PSA < 10, Stage {<=} T2a, Gleason score < 7) were treated to the prostate alone (Group 1). All other patients, intermediate and high risk, where treated to the prostate and seminal vesicles (Group 2). The risk of chronic toxicity (NCI Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0) was assessed for the different dose levels prescribed. HIC approval was acquired for all patients. Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Results: Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity was experienced by 34 patients (10%) (9% experienced rectal bleeding, 6% experienced proctitis, 3% experienced diarrhea, and 1% experienced rectal pain) at a median interval of 1.1 year. Nine patients (3%) experienced grade 3 or higher chronic rectal toxicity (1 Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 2-year rates of Grade 2 or higher and Grade 3 or higher chronic rectal toxicity were 17% and 3%, respectively. No

  6. Constraints complicate centrifugal compressor depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B. ); Colbert, F.L. )

    1993-05-10

    Blowdown of a centrifugal compressor is complicated by process constraints that might require slowing the depressurization rate and by mechanical constraints for which a faster rate might be preferred. The paper describes design constraints such as gas leaks; thrust-bearing overload; system constraints; flare extinguishing; heat levels; and pressure drop.

  7. The Considerations of the Superintendent in the Development of the School Budget during Times of Fiscal Constraint: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    John Smith is the superintendent of Green Hill Public Schools. This case study follows John through the whole budget process from July 2011 to July 2012. An interpretative perspective was used to tell his story. Ten interviews were given from October 2011 to July 2012. Newspaper articles and the minutes from meetings were analyzed and used as…

  8. Intentional Control and Operational Constraints in Prosodic Phrasing: A Study of Picture-Elicited Narrations by French Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vion, Monique; Colas, Annie

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the determinants of prosodic phrasing in French schoolchildren's narratives. Children (aged 7 to 11) told picture stories to a silent same-age peer. The establishment of temporal and/or causal relations between the events was more or less guided by the drawings (ordered vs. arbitrary sequences). The comprehension of the…

  9. Structural, petro-geochemical and modelling constraints on melt migration by porosity waves in sub-arc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, P.; Connolly, J. A.; Schaltegger, U.; Burg, J.; Chiaradia, M.

    2009-12-01

    Petrographic and structural observations in the mantle lithospheres provided evidence for two end-member processes of melt migration in natural rocks: (1) impregnation features indicate pervasive flow and (2) dykes denote fully segregated flow. Replacive dunite represents an intermediate mode in which porous flow has been channelized. Because the retrograde thermal regime in the upper portion of the mantle wedge is hostile to melt transport, the dominant mechanism by which melts ascend from their source through the mantle remains uncertain. We studied the petro-structural features of melt percolation in a exhumed sub-arc mantle section of the Sapat area in the Kohistan Paleo-Island Arc (NE Pakistan). Our observations indicate a continuum of transport mechanisms ranging from pervasive to fully segregated melt flow: The dominantly harzburgitic mantle section of Sapat exposes tens to hundred of meters size dunitic domains, which comprises clinopyroxene-rich cores associated with gabbroic lenses. The clinopyroxene zones show isolated Cpx blasts, aligned Cpx “trails” and Cpx bands. Gabbro lenses are 3-dimensional lenses terminated horizontally and vertically by clinopyroxene proto-lenses. Proto-lenses refer to Cpx bands prior to plagioclase appearance. Based on bulk and mineral composition, dunite zones formed by orthopyroxene dissolution and olivine crystallization via the peritectic reaction opx + melt = ol; and clinopyroxene-rich parts and gabbros were recognized to have formed from the same melt as dunite. The melt forming gabbros and cpx-rich parts were in near-equilibrium with dunite, but not with the surrounding harzburgite. The structural relationships (i.e parallelism of gabbroic lenses and cpx-trails, and 3D evolution of trails into gabbroic lenses) strengthen the co-genetic origin of the lithologies. Isolated clinopyroxene porphyroblasts evolve into trails that turn into bands in which plagioclase appears. From these observations we infer that the

  10. Provider perspectives on constraints in providing maternal, neonatal and child health services in the Lao People’s democratic republic: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To reduce its high maternal and neonatal mortality rate and meet Millennium Development Goals four and five, Lao PDR has adopted a national ‘Strategy and Planning Framework of Implementation of Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health Services’. This paper reports on implementation constraints identified in three demonstration sites. Methods The objectives of this paper are to analyse health worker perceptions of the implementation of the strategy and constraints faced during implementation. A qualitative design was used with interviews conducted at health facilities in three demonstration provinces. Data were collected through key interviews with provincial/district hospital providers (n = 27), health centre staff (n = 8) and village health volunteers (n = 10). Data was analysed informed by Hanson et al’s health system constraint framework. Results In each of the demonstration sites, the Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health program was generally well-understood and the different activities were being implemented. Perceived implementation constraints related mainly to a mix of supply and demand factors. Supply-side constraints related to inadequate human resources, poor remuneration, weak technical guidance, minimal supervision and limited equipment. Demand-side constraints related mainly to cost, limited access to transport, cultural practices and language. Other constraints related to broader strategic management and cross-sectoral contextual constraints. Contextual constraints included low levels of limited education, women’s position in society and poor transport and communications networks. These factors influenced the implementation process and if not addressed, may reduce the effectiveness of the policy and scale-up. Conclusion The Lao PDR has a well-defined Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health program. Analysis of the constraints experienced by service providers in implementing the program however, is essential for scaling-up the

  11. Constraints on Saturn ring particle properties and ring structure: Studies of Saturn's rings from UV to far IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd

    2013-04-01

    Modeling the changes in brightness, color, temperature and spectral parameters, significant progress can be made in understanding the character of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths with changing viewing geometry. We are studying Saturn's rings over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly being studied using scans of the lit and unlit main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, and particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize regions such as the C ring plateaus and ringlets, where albedo differences may be present. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that IR water ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of

  12. Studies of Saturn's rings from UV to far IR: Constraints on ring particle properties and ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.; Filacchione, G.; Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P.; Colwell, J. E.; Bradley, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    Significant progress can be made in understanding the character of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in brightness, color, temperature and spectral parameters with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly being studied using scans of the lit and unlit main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, and particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize regions such as the C ring plateaus and ringlets, where albedo differences may be present. Over a range of solar elevations the CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that IR water ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and

  13. Neodymium and strontium isotopic study of Australasian tektites - New constraints on the provenance and age of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of Australasian tectites (including two flanged Australian tectites, two low-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites, and three high-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites) and the Nd, Sm, Sr, and Rb concentrations were investigated by isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systematics were used to study the characteristics of the parental material. It is shown that the Nd and Sr isotopic data provide evidence that all Australasian tektites were derived from a single sedimentary formation with a narrow range of stratigraphic ages close to 170 Ma. It is suggested that all of the Australasian tektites were derived from a single impact event and that the australites represent the upper part of a melt sheet ejected at high velocity, whereas the indochinites represent melts formed at a lower level in the target material distributed closer to the area of the impact.

  14. Constraints on core formation from systematic study of metal-silicate partitioning on a great number of siderophile elements

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, J; Ryerson, F J

    2008-10-27

    The abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle are the result of core formation in the early Earth. Many variables are involved in the prediction of metal/silicate siderophile partition coefficients during core segregation: pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, silicate and metal compositions. Despite publications of numerous results of metal-silicate experiments, the experimental database and predictive expressions for elements partitioning are hampered by a lack of systematic study to separate and evaluate the effects of each variable. Only a relatively complete experimental database that describes Ni and Co partitioning now exists but is not sufficient to unambiguously decide between the most popular model for core formation with a single stage core-mantle equilibration at the bottom of a deep magma ocean (e.g. Li and Agee, 2001) and more recent alternative models (e.g. Wade and Wood, 2005; Rubie et al., 2007). In this experimental work, systematic study of metal silicate partitioning is presented for elements normally regarded as moderately siderophile (Mo, As, Ge, W, P, Ni, Co), slightly siderophile (Zn, Ga, Mn, V, Cr) and refractory lithophile (Nb, Ta). Using a new piston-cylinder design assembly allows us to present a suite of isobaric partitioning experiments at 3 GPa within a temperature range from 1600 to 2600 C and over a range of relative oxygen fugacity from IW-1.5 to IW-3.5. Silicate melts range from basaltic to peridotite in composition. The individual effect of pressure is also investigated through a combination of piston cylinder and multi anvil isothermal experiments from 0.5 to 18 GPa at 1900 C. Absolute measurements of partitioning coefficients combining EMP and LA-ICPMS analytical methods are provided. New results are obtained for elements whose partitioning behavior is usually poorly constrained and not integrated into any accretion or core formation models. We find notably that Ge, As, Mo become less siderophile with

  15. Style of Palaeoarchaean tectonics from the SE Kaapvaal and Singhbhum Cratons: Constraints from Metamorphic Studies and Zircon Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, L.; Hofmann, A.; Xie, H.

    2012-04-01

    Direct evidence of Palaeoarchaean collisional tectonics in terms of orogenic metamorphism have so far solely been reported from the Barberton, De Kraalen and Witrivier greenstone belts of SE KaapvaalCraton. These terrains record a high-pressure (~14 kbar) metamorphic event at ~3.2 Ga, indicative of a geothermal gradient of ~15°C/km. Clockwise P-T paths have been recorded from these terrains and other medium pressure amphibolite-facies greenstone belts in the SE KaapvaalCraton, providing conclusive evidence for the operation of collisional tectonics during the Palaeoarchaean period. In this study we present new evidence for Palaeoarchaean high-grade metamorphism from the SE Kaapvaalcraton (Ulundi greenstone belt remnant). We also present for the first time evidence of a high-pressure metamorphic event from the SinghbhumCraton, India. In the Ulundi greenstone belt, calc-silicate boudins occur within hornblende-bearing amphibolites that are tectonically interleaved with tonalitic to granitic gneisses dated at between 3.39 and 3.27Ga using SHRIMP U-Pbon zircon. The boudins contain Grt-Cpx-Pl-Qtz. Garnet often contains epidote inclusions. Epidote-quartz bearing symplectites replace garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase at their margins. Garnet and clinopyroxeneare mostly homogeneous in composition: Grs65Alm28Sps05 and Di16Hd84 respectively. XAn content of Pl is ~53 mol%. Average P (calculated by THERMOCALC) as obtained from the set of independent reactions formed with garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase core compositions and composition of epidote inclusions in garnet indicate that peak metamorphism occurred at ~6.3 kbar. Such pressure value corresponds with a reference temperature of ~500°C. Age of the associated foliated granite indicates that possibly the metamorphic event occurred at ~3.27 Ga The geothermal gradient corresponding to such peak PT conditions is ~30°C/km, similar to that recorded in many other Archaean terrains. In the SinghbhumCraton, supracrustals of the

  16. Advancing Solar Irradiance Measurement for Climate-Related Studies: Accurate Constraint on Direct Aerosol Radiative Effect (DARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Q. Jack

    2011-01-01

    Earth's climate is driven primarily by solar radiation. As summarized in various IPCC reports, the global average of radiative forcing for different agents and mechanisms, such as aerosols or CO2 doubling, is in the range of a few W/sq m. However, when solar irradiance is measured by broadband radiometers, such as the fleet of Eppley Precision Solar Pyranometers (PSP) and equivalent instrumentation employed worldwide, the measurement uncertainty is larger than 2% (e.g., WMO specification of pyranometer, 2008). Thus, out of the approx. 184 W/sq m (approx.263 W/sq m if cloud-free) surface solar insolation (Trenberth et al. 2009), the measurement uncertainty is greater than +/-3.6 W/sq m, overwhelming the climate change signals. To discern these signals, less than a 1 % measurement uncertainty is required and is currently achievable only by means of a newly developed methodology employing a modified PSP-like pyranometer and an updated calibration equation to account for its thermal effects (li and Tsay, 2010). In this talk, we will show that some auxiliary measurements, such as those from a collocated pyrgeometer or air temperature sensors, can help correct historical datasets. Additionally, we will also demonstrate that a pyrheliometer is not free of the thermal effect; therefore, comparing to a high cost yet still not thermal-effect-free "direct + diffuse" approach in measuring surface solar irradiance, our new method is more economical, and more likely to be suitable for correcting a wide variety of historical datasets. Modeling simulations will be presented that a corrected solar irradiance measurement has a significant impact on aerosol forcing, and thus plays an important role in climate studies.

  17. Extensional Tectonics and Paleoclimate of the Albertine and Edward Rifts: Constraints from Integrated Seismic Reflection and Topographic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, T.; McGlue, M. M.; Scholz, C. A.; Kasande, R.; Mugisha, F.

    2004-12-01

    Lakes Albert and Edward are among the largest lakes in Africa and form substantial reservoirs for tropical precipitation within the Upper Nile Watershed (UNW), the equatorial headwaters supporting annual discharge of the main Nile River into the Mediterranean Sea. Extensional processes forming Lakes Albert and Edward have driven landscape evolution, manifested in significant topography and reversed drainages networks. Consequently, the UNW, including Lakes Albert, Edward, Victoria, and Kyoga, and their riverine connections, provide an important case study for drainage basin evolution in actively extending continental lithosphere. In addition to multiple scales of tectonic deformation, high frequency climate change affects the basins in the UNW, which record moisture signals from both the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Paleoclimate proxy data indicate the desiccation of Lake Victoria and cessation of Victoria Nile flow during the Last Glacial Maximum (22 - 18 ka). However, the response of Lakes Albert and Edward during this time period is not fully resolved. In 2003, 1600 line km of multichannel seismic reflection and high resolution echo-sounder data were collected from Lake Albert, while 200 km of 1 kHz seismic reflection data were collected from Lake Edward. In conjunction with recently released digital elevation models, we investigate both tectonic and climatic processes operative in the basins. In Lake Albert, we are able to map depth to pre-rift basement, basin boundary fault as well as intrabasinal fault geometries that control both bathymetry and sediment distribution. Shallow reflections suggest desiccation of the lake, probably during the LGM; these results tie well with published sediment core data. Acoustic data from Lake Edward record two regression events, although this lake apparently escaped LGM desiccation, and may contain a complete, high-resolution archive of Quaternary climate change in its deep-water sequences. Our interpretations provide another

  18. Boolean constraint satisfaction problems for reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seganti, A.; De Martino, A.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.

    2013-09-01

    We define and study a class of (random) Boolean constraint satisfaction problems representing minimal feasibility constraints for networks of chemical reactions. The constraints we consider encode, respectively, for hard mass-balance conditions (where the consumption and production fluxes of each chemical species are matched) and for soft mass-balance conditions (where a net production of compounds is in principle allowed). We solve these constraint satisfaction problems under the Bethe approximation and derive the corresponding belief propagation equations, which involve eight different messages. The statistical properties of ensembles of random problems are studied via the population dynamics methods. By varying a chemical potential attached to the activity of reactions, we find first-order transitions and strong hysteresis, suggesting a non-trivial structure in the space of feasible solutions.

  19. Using formative assessment despite the constraints of high stakes testing and limited resources: A case study of chemistry teachers in Anglophone Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akom, George Viche

    Formative assessment, as a strategy used to improve student learning, encounters several obstacles in its implementation. This study explores changes in teachers' views and practices as they are introduced to formative assessment in a high stakes testing and limited resource environment. The study examines the extent to which teachers use the technique of formative assessment to engage students in authentic learning even while not sacrificing high test scores on summative assessments. A case study methodology was employed to address the research topic. Science teachers in the West African country of Cameroon were engaged in a process of lesson planning and implementation to collaboratively build lessons with large amounts of formative assessment. Qualitative data from written surveys, group discussions, classroom and workshop observations, and from teacher reflections reveal the extent to which lesson fidelity is preserved from views to planning to implementation. The findings revealed that though the teachers possess knowledge of a variety of assessment methods they do not systematically use these methods to collect information which could help in improving student learning. Oral questioning remained the dominant method of student assessment. The study also showed that the teachers made minimal to big changes depending on the particular aspect of formative assessment being considered. For aspects which needed just behavioral adaptations, the changes were significant but for those which needed acquisition of more pedagogic knowledge and skills the changes were minimal. In terms of constraints in the practice of formative assessment, the teachers cited large class size and lack of teaching materials as common ones. When provided with the opportunity to acquire teaching materials, however, they did not effectively utilize the opportunity. The study revealed a need for the acquisition of inquiry skills by the teachers which can serve as a platform for the

  20. Multi-scale constraints of sediment source to sink systems in frontier basins: a forward stratigraphic modeling case study of the Levant region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawie, Nicolas; Deschamps, Remy; Granjeon, Didier; Nader, Fadi-Henri; Gorini, Christian; Müller, Carla; Montadert, Lucien; Baudin, François

    2015-04-01

    Recent scientific work underlined the presence of a thick Cenozoic infill in the Levant Basin reaching up to 12 km. Interestingly; restricted sedimentation was observed along the Levant margin in the Cenozoic. Since the Late Eocene successive regional geodynamic events affecting Afro-Arabia and Eurasia (collision and strike slip deformation)induced fast marginal uplifts. The initiation of local and long-lived regional drainage systems in the Oligo-Miocene period (e.g. Lebanon versus Nile) provoked a change in the depositional pattern along the Levant margin and basin. A shift from carbonate dominated environments into clastic rich systems has been observed. Through this communication we explore the importance of multi-scale constraints (i.e.,seismic, well and field data) in the quantification of the subsidence history, sediment transport and deposition of a Middle-Upper Miocene "multi-source" to sink system along the northernLevant frontier region. We prove through a comprehensive forward stratigraphic modeling workflow that the contribution to the infill of the northern Levant Basin (offshore Lebanon) is split in between proximal and more distal clastic sources as well as in situ carbonate/hemipelagic deposition. In a wider perspective this work falls under the umbrella of multi-disciplinary source to sink studies that investigate the impact of geodynamic events on basin/margin architectural evolutions, consequent sedimentary infill and thus on petroleum systems assessment.

  1. Mars, Always Cold, Sometimes Wet: New Constraints on Mars Denudation Rates and Climate Evolution from Analog Studies at Haughton Crater, Devon Island, High Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Boucher, M.; Desportes, C.; Glass, B. J.; Lim, D.; McKay, C. P.; Osinski, G. R.; Parnell, J.; Schutt, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of crater modification on Mars and at Haughton Crater, Devon Island, High Arctic, which was recently shown to be significantly older than previously believed (Eocene age instead of Miocene) [1], suggest that Mars may have never been climatically wet and warm for geological lengths of time during and since the Late Noachian. Impact structures offer particularly valuable records of the evolution of a planet s climate and landscape through time. The state of exposure and preservation of impact structures and their intracrater fill provide clues to the nature, timing, and intensity of the processes that have modified the craters since their formation. Modifying processes include weathering, erosion, mantling, and infilling. In this study, we compare the modification of Haughton through time with that of impact craters in the same size class on Mars. We derive upper limits for time-integrated denudation rates on Mars during and since the Late Noachian. These rates are significantly lower than previously published and provide important constraints for Mars climate evolution.

  2. Increased perfusion in motor areas after constraint-induced movement therapy in chronic stroke: a single-photon emission computerized tomography study.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Mervi; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Husso-Saastamoinen, Minna; Vanninen, Esko; Vanninen, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Mervaala, Esa; Sivenius, Juhani; Pitkänen, Kauko; Tarkka, Ina M

    2005-12-01

    Hemiparesis is the most common deficit after cerebral stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a new neurorehabilitation method that emphasizes task-relevant repetitive training for the stroke hand. Twelve chronic stroke patients were studied with single-photon emission computerized tomography at rest before and after the two-week CIMT period. Increased perfusion was found in motor control related areas. The specific areas with an increase in perfusion in the affected hemisphere were in the precentral gyrus, premotor cortex (Brodmann's area 6 (BA6)), frontal cortex, and superior frontal gyrus (BA10). In the nonaffected hemisphere, perfusion was increased in the superior frontal gyrus (BA6) and cingulate gyrus (BA31). In the cerebellum increased perfusion was seen bilaterally. The brain areas with increased perfusion receive and integrate the information from different sensory systems and plan the movement execution. Regional cerebral perfusion decreased in the lingual gyrus (BA18) in the affected hemisphere. In the nonaffected frontal cortex, two areas with decreased perfusion were found in the middle frontal gyrus (BA8/10). Also, the fusiform gyrus (BA20) and inferior temporal gyrus (BA37) in the nonaffected hemisphere showed decreased perfusion. Intensive movement therapy appears to change local cerebral perfusion in areas known to participate in movement planning and execution. These changes might be a sign of active reorganization processes after CIMT in the chronic state of stroke. PMID:15931162

  3. A Framework for Dynamic Constraint Reasoning Using Procedural Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Frank, Jeremy D.

    1999-01-01

    Many complex real-world decision and control problems contain an underlying constraint reasoning problem. This is particularly evident in a recently developed approach to planning, where almost all planning decisions are represented by constrained variables. This translates a significant part of the planning problem into a constraint network whose consistency determines the validity of the plan candidate. Since higher-level choices about control actions can add or remove variables and constraints, the underlying constraint network is invariably highly dynamic. Arbitrary domain-dependent constraints may be added to the constraint network and the constraint reasoning mechanism must be able to handle such constraints effectively. Additionally, real problems often require handling constraints over continuous variables. These requirements present a number of significant challenges for a constraint reasoning mechanism. In this paper, we introduce a general framework for handling dynamic constraint networks with real-valued variables, by using procedures to represent and effectively reason about general constraints. The framework is based on a sound theoretical foundation, and can be proven to be sound and complete under well-defined conditions. Furthermore, the framework provides hybrid reasoning capabilities, as alternative solution methods like mathematical programming can be incorporated into the framework, in the form of procedures.

  4. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocations for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its applications to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  5. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  6. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1993-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  7. Structure Constraints in a Constraint-Based Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Wan-Lin; Golden, Keith

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we report our work on a new constraint domain, where variables can take structured values. Earth-science data processing (ESDP) is a planning domain that requires the ability to represent and reason about complex constraints over structured data, such as satellite images. This paper reports on a constraint-based planner for ESDP and similar domains. We discuss our approach for translating a planning problem into a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and for representing and reasoning about structured objects and constraints over structures.

  8. REDUCTION OF CONSTRAINTS FOR COUPLED OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Raszewski, F.; Edwards, T.

    2009-12-15

    The homogeneity constraint was implemented in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to help ensure that the current durability models would be applicable to the glass compositions being processed during DWPF operations. While the homogeneity constraint is typically an issue at lower waste loadings (WLs), it may impact the operating windows for DWPF operations, where the glass forming systems may be limited to lower waste loadings based on fissile or heat load limits. In the sludge batch 1b (SB1b) variability study, application of the homogeneity constraint at the measurement acceptability region (MAR) limit eliminated much of the potential operating window for DWPF. As a result, Edwards and Brown developed criteria that allowed DWPF to relax the homogeneity constraint from the MAR to the property acceptance region (PAR) criterion, which opened up the operating window for DWPF operations. These criteria are defined as: (1) use the alumina constraint as currently implemented in PCCS (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {ge} 3 wt%) and add a sum of alkali constraint with an upper limit of 19.3 wt% ({Sigma}M{sub 2}O < 19.3 wt%), or (2) adjust the lower limit on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} constraint to 4 wt% (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {ge} 4 wt%). Herman et al. previously demonstrated that these criteria could be used to replace the homogeneity constraint for future sludge-only batches. The compositional region encompassing coupled operations flowsheets could not be bounded as these flowsheets were unknown at the time. With the initiation of coupled operations at DWPF in 2008, the need to revisit the homogeneity constraint was realized. This constraint was specifically addressed through the variability study for SB5 where it was shown that the homogeneity constraint could be ignored if the alumina and alkali constraints were imposed. Additional benefit could be gained if the homogeneity constraint could be replaced by the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and sum of

  9. Inferring Broad Regulatory Biology from Time Course Data: Have We Reached an Upper Bound under Constraints Typical of In Vivo Studies?

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy G.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the network biology that regulates the coordinated expression of molecular and cellular markers however questions persist regarding the identifiability of these networks. Here we explore some of the issues relevant to recovering directed regulatory networks from time course data collected under experimental constraints typical of in vivo studies. NetSim simulations of sparsely connected biological networks were used to evaluate two simple feature selection techniques used in the construction of linear Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) models, namely truncation of terms versus latent vector projection. Performance was compared with ODE-based Time Series Network Identification (TSNI) integral, and the information-theoretic Time-Delay ARACNE (TD-ARACNE). Projection-based techniques and TSNI integral outperformed truncation-based selection and TD-ARACNE on aggregate networks with edge densities of 10-30%, i.e. transcription factor, protein-protein cliques and immune signaling networks. All were more robust to noise than truncation-based feature selection. Performance was comparable on the in silico 10-node DREAM 3 network, a 5-node Yeast synthetic network designed for In vivo Reverse-engineering and Modeling Assessment (IRMA) and a 9-node human HeLa cell cycle network of similar size and edge density. Performance was more sensitive to the number of time courses than to sample frequency and extrapolated better to larger networks by grouping experiments. In all cases performance declined rapidly in larger networks with lower edge density. Limited recovery and high false positive rates obtained overall bring into question our ability to generate informative time course data rather than the design of any particular reverse engineering algorithm. PMID:25984725

  10. Direct handling of equality constraints in multilevel optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renaud, John E.; Gabriele, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years there have been several hierarchic multilevel optimization algorithms proposed and implemented in design studies. Equality constraints are often imposed between levels in these multilevel optimizations to maintain system and subsystem variable continuity. Equality constraints of this nature will be referred to as coupling equality constraints. In many implementation studies these coupling equality constraints have been handled indirectly. This indirect handling has been accomplished using the coupling equality constraints' explicit functional relations to eliminate design variables (generally at the subsystem level), with the resulting optimization taking place in a reduced design space. In one multilevel optimization study where the coupling equality constraints were handled directly, the researchers encountered numerical difficulties which prevented their multilevel optimization from reaching the same minimum found in conventional single level solutions. The researchers did not explain the exact nature of the numerical difficulties other than to associate them with the direct handling of the coupling equality constraints. The coupling equality constraints are handled directly, by employing the Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG) method as the optimizer within a multilevel linear decomposition scheme based on the Sobieski hierarchic algorithm. Two engineering design examples are solved using this approach. The results show that the direct handling of coupling equality constraints in a multilevel optimization does not introduce any problems when the GRG method is employed as the internal optimizer. The optimums achieved are comparable to those achieved in single level solutions and in multilevel studies where the equality constraints have been handled indirectly.

  11. Integrated Analysis of Airport Capacity and Environmental Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Shahab; Long, Dou; Hart, George; Eckhause, Jeremy; Hemm, Robert; Busick, Andrew; Graham, Michael; Thompson, Terry; Murphy, Charles; Poage, James

    2010-01-01

    LMI conducted an integrated analysis of airport capacity and environmental constraints. identifying and ranking the key factors limiting achievement of NextGen capacity goals. The primary metric used was projected throughput, which was estimated for the years 2015 and 2025 based on the unconstrained demand forecast from the Federal Aviation Administration, and planned improvements including those proposed in the NextGen plan. A set of 310 critical airports was identified.. collectively accounting for more than 99 percent of domestic air traffic volume; a one-off analytical approach was used to isolate the constraint being assessed. The study considered three capacity constraints (runway.. taxiway, and gate) and three environmental constraints (fuel, NO(x) emissions, and noise). For the ten busiest airports, runway and noise are the primary and secondary constraints in both 2015 and 2025. For the OEP 35 airports and overall for the remaining airports, the most binding constraint is noise. Six of the 10 busiest airports, will face runway constraints in 2025, and 95 will face gate constraints. Nearly every airport will be subject to constraints due to emissions and NOx. Runway and taxi constraints are more concentrated in the large airports: environmental constraints are present at almost every airport regardless of size.

  12. Practical Cleanroom Operations Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David; Ginyard, Amani

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the GSFC Cleanroom Facility i.e., Spacecraft Systems Development and Integration Facility (SSDIF) with particular interest in its use during the development of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The SSDIF is described and a diagram of the SSDIF is shown. A Constraint Table was created for consistency within Contamination Control Team. This table is shown. Another table that shows the activities that were allowed during the integration under given WFC3 condition and activity location is presented. Three decision trees are shown for different phases of the work: (1) Hardware Relocation, Hardware Work, and Contamination Control Operations.

  13. Superresolution via sparsity constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoho, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of recovering a measure mu supported on a lattice of span Delta is considered under the condition that measurements are only available concerning the Fourier Transform at frequencies of Omega or less. If Omega is much smaller than the Nyquist frequency pi/Delta and the measurements are noisy, then stable recovery of mu is generally impossible. It is shown here that if, in addition, it is known that mu satisfies certain sparsity constraints, then stable recovery is possible. This finding validates practical efforts in spectroscopy, seismic prospecting, and astronomy to provide superresolution by imposing support limitations in reconstruction.

  14. Symbolic Constraint Maintenance Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Version 3.1 of Symbolic Constraint Maintenance Grid (SCMG) is a software system that provides a general conceptual framework for utilizing pre-existing programming techniques to perform symbolic transformations of data. SCMG also provides a language (and an associated communication method and protocol) for representing constraints on the original non-symbolic data. SCMG provides a facility for exchanging information between numeric and symbolic components without knowing the details of the components themselves. In essence, it integrates symbolic software tools (for diagnosis, prognosis, and planning) with non-artificial-intelligence software. SCMG executes a process of symbolic summarization and monitoring of continuous time series data that are being abstractly represented as symbolic templates of information exchange. This summarization process enables such symbolic- reasoning computing systems as artificial- intelligence planning systems to evaluate the significance and effects of channels of data more efficiently than would otherwise be possible. As a result of the increased efficiency in representation, reasoning software can monitor more channels and is thus able to perform monitoring and control functions more effectively.

  15. Reduction of Constraints: Applicability of the Homogeneity Constraint for Macrobatch 3

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.

    2001-02-15

    The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is used to determine the acceptability of each batch of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This control system imposes several constraints on the composition of the contents of the SME to define acceptability. These constraints relate process or product properties to composition via prediction models. A SME batch is deemed acceptable if its sample composition measurements lead to acceptable property predictions after accounting for modeling, measurement and analytic uncertainties. The baseline document guiding the use of these data and models is ''SME Acceptability Determination for DWPF Process Control (U)'' by Brown and Postles [1996]. A minimum of three PCCS constraints support the prediction of the glass durability from a given SME batch. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is reviewing all of the PCCS constraints associated with durability. The purpose of this review is to revisit these constraints in light of the additional knowledge gained since the beginning of radioactive operations at DWPF and to identify any supplemental studies needed to amplify this knowledge so that redundant or overly conservative constraints can be eliminated or replaced by more appropriate constraints.

  16. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  17. Relative constraints and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz

    2014-03-01

    Several mathematical models of evolving systems assume that changes in the micro-states are constrained to the search of an optimal value in a local or global objective function. However, the concept of evolution requires a continuous change in the environment and species, making difficult the definition of absolute optimal values in objective functions. In this paper, we define constraints that are not absolute but relative to local micro-states, introducing a rupture in the invariance of the phase space of the system. This conceptual basis is useful to define alternative mathematical models for biological (or in general complex) evolving systems. We illustrate this concept with a modified Ising model, which can be useful to understand and model problems like the somatic evolution of cancer.

  18. Neural constraints on learning.

    PubMed

    Sadtler, Patrick T; Quick, Kristin M; Golub, Matthew D; Chase, Steven M; Ryu, Stephen I; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Yu, Byron M; Batista, Aaron P

    2014-08-28

    Learning, whether motor, sensory or cognitive, requires networks of neurons to generate new activity patterns. As some behaviours are easier to learn than others, we asked if some neural activity patterns are easier to generate than others. Here we investigate whether an existing network constrains the patterns that a subset of its neurons is capable of exhibiting, and if so, what principles define this constraint. We employed a closed-loop intracortical brain-computer interface learning paradigm in which Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) controlled a computer cursor by modulating neural activity patterns in the primary motor cortex. Using the brain-computer interface paradigm, we could specify and alter how neural activity mapped to cursor velocity. At the start of each session, we observed the characteristic activity patterns of the recorded neural population. The activity of a neural population can be represented in a high-dimensional space (termed the neural space), wherein each dimension corresponds to the activity of one neuron. These characteristic activity patterns comprise a low-dimensional subspace (termed the intrinsic manifold) within the neural space. The intrinsic manifold presumably reflects constraints imposed by the underlying neural circuitry. Here we show that the animals could readily learn to proficiently control the cursor using neural activity patterns that were within the intrinsic manifold. However, animals were less able to learn to proficiently control the cursor using activity patterns that were outside of the intrinsic manifold. These results suggest that the existing structure of a network can shape learning. On a timescale of hours, it seems to be difficult to learn to generate neural activity patterns that are not consistent with the existing network structure. These findings offer a network-level explanation for the observation that we are more readily able to learn new skills when they are related to the skills that we already

  19. Neural constraints on learning

    PubMed Central

    Sadtler, Patrick T.; Quick, Kristin M.; Golub, Matthew D.; Chase, Steven M.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Yu, Byron M.; Batista, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Motor, sensory, and cognitive learning require networks of neurons to generate new activity patterns. Because some behaviors are easier to learn than others1,2, we wondered if some neural activity patterns are easier to generate than others. We asked whether the existing network constrains the patterns that a subset of its neurons is capable of exhibiting, and if so, what principles define the constraint. We employed a closed-loop intracortical brain-computer interface (BCI) learning paradigm in which Rhesus monkeys controlled a computer cursor by modulating neural activity patterns in primary motor cortex. Using the BCI paradigm, we could specify and alter how neural activity mapped to cursor velocity. At the start of each session, we observed the characteristic activity patterns of the recorded neural population. These patterns comprise a low-dimensional space (termed the intrinsic manifold, or IM) within the high-dimensional neural firing rate space. They presumably reflect constraints imposed by the underlying neural circuitry. We found that the animals could readily learn to proficiently control the cursor using neural activity patterns that were within the IM. However, animals were less able to learn to proficiently control the cursor using activity patterns that were outside of the IM. This result suggests that the existing structure of a network can shape learning. On the timescale of hours, it appears to be difficult to learn to generate neural activity patterns that are not consistent with the existing network structure. These findings offer a network-level explanation for the observation that we are more readily able to learn new skills when they are related to the skills that we already possess3,4. PMID:25164754

  20. Safety and environmental constraints on space applications of fusion energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. Reece

    1990-01-01

    Some of the constraints are examined on fusion reactions, plasma confinement systems, and fusion reactors that are intended for such space related missions as manned or unmanned operations in near earth orbit, interplanetary missions, or requirements of the SDI program. Of the many constraints on space power and propulsion systems, those arising from safety and environmental considerations are emphasized since these considerations place severe constraints on some fusion systems and have not been adequately treated in previous studies.

  1. Spatial constraints control cell proliferation in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Streichan, Sebastian J.; Hoerner, Christian R.; Schneidt, Tatjana; Holzer, Daniela; Hufnagel, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Control of cell proliferation is a fundamental aspect of tissue formation in development and regeneration. Cells experience various spatial and mechanical constraints depending on their environmental context in the body, but we do not fully understand if and how such constraints influence cell cycle progression and thereby proliferation patterns in tissues. Here, we study the impact of mechanical manipulations on the cell cycle of individual cells within a mammalian model epithelium. By monitoring the response to experimentally applied forces, we find a checkpoint at the G1–S boundary that, in response to spatial constraints, controls cell cycle progression. This checkpoint prevents cells from entering S phase if the available space remains below a characteristic threshold because of crowding. Stretching the tissue results in fast cell cycle reactivation, whereas compression rapidly leads to cell cycle arrest. Our kinetic analysis of this response shows that cells have no memory of past constraints and allows us to formulate a biophysical model that predicts tissue growth in response to changes in spatial constraints in the environment. This characteristic biomechanical cell cycle response likely serves as a fundamental control mechanism to maintain tissue integrity and to ensure control of tissue growth during development and regeneration. PMID:24706777

  2. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  3. Parametric constraints in multi-beam interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrow, Guy M.; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    2012-10-01

    Multi-beam interference (MBI) represents a method of producing one-, two-, and three-dimensional submicron periodic optical-intensity distributions for applications including micro- and nano-electronics, photonic crystals, metamaterial, biomedical structures, optical trapping, and numerous other subwavelength structures. Accordingly, numerous optical configurations have been developed to implement MBI. However, these configurations typically provide limited ability to condition the key parameters of each interfering beam. Constraints on individual beam amplitudes and polarizations are systematically considered to understand their effects on lithographically useful MBI periodic patterning possibilities. A method for analyzing parametric constraints is presented and used to compare the optimized optical-intensity distributions for representative constrained systems. Case studies are presented for both square and hexagonal-lattices produced via three-beam interference. Results demonstrate that constraints on individual-beam polarizations significantly impact patterning possibilities and must be included in the systematic design of an MBI system.

  4. General constraints on the Viking biology investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the constraints pertaining to the Viking mission for detection of life on Mars, within which the Viking experiments were conceived, designed, and developed. The most important limitation to the entire study is the complete information about the nature of Mars, such as the chemical composition of the surface material of Mars and the exact identification of the constituents of that planet. Ways in which celestial mechanics places severe limitations on the Viking biology investigation are discussed. Major engineering constraints are examined relative to the accomodation of biology instrument inside the Viking lander and to the design of the instrument itself. Other constraints discussed concern the operational aspects of the mission and the testing program.

  5. Inference-based constraint satisfaction supports explanation

    SciTech Connect

    Sqalli, M.H.; Freuder, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    Constraint satisfaction problems are typically solved using search, augmented by general purpose consistency inference methods. This paper proposes a paradigm shift in which inference is used as the primary problem solving method, and attention is focused on special purpose, domain specific inference methods. While we expect this approach to have computational advantages, we emphasize here the advantages of a solution method that is more congenial to human thought processes. Specifically we use inference-based constraint satisfaction to support explanations of the problem solving behavior that are considerably more meaningful than a trace of a search process would be. Logic puzzles are used as a case study. Inference-based constraint satisfaction proves surprisingly powerful and easily extensible in this domain. Problems drawn from commercial logic puzzle booklets are used for evaluation. Explanations are produced that compare well with the explanations provided by these booklets.

  6. 10. Exploring the Conformal Constraint Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, Adrian

    One method of studying the asymptotic structure of spacetime is to apply Penrose's conformal rescaling technique. In this setting, the rescaled Einstein equations for the metric and the conformal factor in the unphysical spacetime degenerate where the conformal factor vanishes, namely at the boundary representing null infinity. This problem can be avoided by means of a technique of H. Friedrich, which replaces the Einstein equations in the unphysical spacetime by an equivalent system of equations which is regular at the boundary. The initial value problem for these equations produces a system of constraint equations known as the conformal constraint equations. This work describes some of the properties of the conformal constraint equations and develops a perturbative method of generating solutions near Euclidean space under certain simplifying assumptions.

  7. Boosting Set Constraint Propagation for Network Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Justin; van Hentenryck, Pascal; Gervet, Carmen

    This paper reconsiders the deployment of synchronous optical networks (SONET), an optimization problem naturally expressed in terms of set variables. Earlier approaches, using either MIP or CP technologies, focused on symmetry breaking, including the use of SBDS, and the design of effective branching strategies. This paper advocates an orthogonal approach and argues that the thrashing behavior experienced in earlier attempts is primarily due to a lack of pruning. It studies how to improve domain filtering by taking a more global view of the application and imposing redundant global constraints. The technical results include novel hardness results, propagation algorithms for global constraints, and inference rules. The paper also evaluates the contributions experimentally by presenting a novel model with static symmetric-breaking constraints and a static variable ordering which is many orders of magnitude faster than existing approaches.

  8. Effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy and functional bimanual training on upper extremity function and daily activities in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (m-CIMT) and functional bimanual training, when applied to a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury, on upper extremity function and daily activities. [Subject and Methods] One patient, diagnosed with C4 incomplete spinal cord injury, underwent physical therapy with constraint-induced movement therapy for 3 hours and task-oriented bimanual training for 1 hour, per day. This combined 4-hour session was performed five times a week, for 3 weeks, totaling 15 sessions. Upper extremity function was measured using the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Box & Block Test (BBT). Additionally, Spinal Cord Independence Measure Version III (SCIM-III) and Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) were used to assess functional outcomes. [Results] Mobility of the hand and overall function of upper extremities were enhanced following intervention. Moreover, the subject's quality of life and ability to carry out daily activities also improved. [Conclusion] Modified constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual training was effective in enhancing upper extremity function and performance of daily routines in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury. Further studies, recruiting multiple subjects, should focus on m-CIMT using diverse methods, performed during the course of daily activities. PMID:26834387

  9. Effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy and functional bimanual training on upper extremity function and daily activities in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (m-CIMT) and functional bimanual training, when applied to a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury, on upper extremity function and daily activities. [Subject and Methods] One patient, diagnosed with C4 incomplete spinal cord injury, underwent physical therapy with constraint-induced movement therapy for 3 hours and task-oriented bimanual training for 1 hour, per day. This combined 4-hour session was performed five times a week, for 3 weeks, totaling 15 sessions. Upper extremity function was measured using the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Box & Block Test (BBT). Additionally, Spinal Cord Independence Measure Version III (SCIM-III) and Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) were used to assess functional outcomes. [Results] Mobility of the hand and overall function of upper extremities were enhanced following intervention. Moreover, the subject’s quality of life and ability to carry out daily activities also improved. [Conclusion] Modified constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual training was effective in enhancing upper extremity function and performance of daily routines in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury. Further studies, recruiting multiple subjects, should focus on m-CIMT using diverse methods, performed during the course of daily activities. PMID:26834387

  10. On Matrix Representations of Participation Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Sven; Leck, Uwe; Link, Sebastian

    We discuss the existence of matrix representations for generalised and minimum participation constraints which are frequently used in database design and conceptual modelling. Matrix representations, also known as Armstrong relations, have been studied in literature e.g. for functional dependencies and play an important role in example-based design and for the implication problem of database constraints. The major tool to achieve the results in this paper is a theorem of Hajnal and Szemerédi on the occurrence of clique graphs in a given graph.

  11. Seismological Constraints on Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2004-12-01

    Earth is an open thermodynamic system radiating heat energy into space. A transition from geostatic earth models such as PREM to geodynamical models is needed. We discuss possible thermodynamic constraints on the variables that govern the distribution of forces and flows in the deep Earth. In this paper we assume that the temperature distribution is time-invariant, so that all flows vanish at steady state except for the heat flow Jq per unit area (Kuiken, 1994). Superscript 0 will refer to the steady state while x denotes the excited state of the system. We may write σ 0=(J{q}0ṡX{q}0)/T where Xq is the conjugate force corresponding to Jq, and σ is the rate of entropy production per unit volume. Consider now what happens after the occurrence of an earthquake at time t=0 and location (0,0,0). The earthquake introduces a stress drop Δ P(x,y,z) at all points of the system. Response flows are directed along the gradients toward the epicentral area, and the entropy production will increase with time as (Prigogine, 1947) σ x(t)=σ 0+α {1}/(t+β )+α {2}/(t+β )2+etc A seismological constraint on the parameters may be obtained from Omori's empirical relation N(t)=p/(t+q) where N(t) is the number of aftershocks at time t following the main shock. It may be assumed that p/q\\sim\\alpha_{1}/\\beta times a constant. Another useful constraint is the Mexican-hat geometry of the seismic transient as obtained e.g. from InSAR radar interferometry. For strike-slip events such as Landers the distribution of \\DeltaP is quadrantal, and an oval-shaped seismicity gap develops about the epicenter. A weak outer triggering maxiμm is found at a distance of about 17 fault lengths. Such patterns may be extracted from earthquake catalogs by statistical analysis (Lomnitz, 1996). Finally, the energy of the perturbation must be at least equal to the recovery energy. The total energy expended in an aftershock sequence can be found approximately by integrating the local contribution over

  12. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  13. Credit Constraints for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper exploits a natural experiment that produces exogenous variation on credit access to determine the effect on college enrollment. The paper assess how important are credit constraints to explain the gap in college enrollment by family income, and what would be the gap if credit constraints are eliminated. Progress in college and dropout…

  14. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  15. Constraints on Children's Judgments of Magical Causality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Jacqueline D.; Browne, Cheryl A.; Boerger, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    In 3 studies we addressed the operation of constraints on children's causal judgments. Our primary focus was whether children's beliefs about magical causality, specifically wishing, are constrained by features that govern the attribution of ordinary causality. In Experiment 1, children witnessed situations in which a confederate's wish appeared…

  16. A detailed study of the main sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397: can we derive constraints on the existence of multiple populations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Criscienzo, M.; D'Antona, F.; Ventura, P.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Globular clusters can no longer be regarded as examples of “simple stellar populations” as all those so far examined contain an important fraction of “second generation” stars, in which the light elements are processed through the hot CNO cycle, and helium variations may be present. Clusters apparently “simple” contain a majority of second generation stars. Aims: If NGC 6397 contains a large fraction of “second generation” stars (>70% according to recent analysis), the helium abundance of its stars might also be affected, show some star-to-star variation, and be larger than the standard Big Bang abundance Y ˜ 0.24. Can we derive constraints on this issue from the analysis of the main sequence width and from its luminosity function? Methods: We build up new models for the turnoff masses and the main sequence down to the hydrogen burning minimum mass, adopting two versions of an updated equation of state (EOS) including the OPAL EOS. Models consider different initial helium and CNO abundances to cover the range of possible variations between the first and second generation stars. We compare the models with the observational main sequence. We also make simulations of the theoretical luminosity function, for different choices of the mass function and of the mixture of first and second generation stars and compare them with the observed luminosity function by means of the Kolmogorov Smirnov - KS-test. Results: The new models for very low mass stars compare well with previous models and show that the OPAL EOS is a good description in all the region of temperature and densities of very low mass stars for which it is computable. The analysis of the main sequence width shows that any helium variation must be confined within Δ Y ~ 0.02 in the case of a CNO increase as suggested by literature, and we discuss the consequent implications for the model of self-enrichment. We also show that the KS test on the luminosity functions allows us to derive a

  17. Evolutionary constraints or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection is traditionally viewed as a leading factor of evolution, whereas variation is assumed to be random and non-directional. Any order in variation is attributed to epigenetic or developmental constraints that can hinder the action of natural selection. In contrast I consider the positive role of epigenetic mechanisms in evolution because they provide organisms with opportunities for rapid adaptive change. Because the term “constraint” has negative connotations, I use the term “regulated variation” to emphasize the adaptive nature of phenotypic variation, which helps populations and species to survive and evolve in changing environments. The capacity to produce regulated variation is a phenotypic property, which is not described in the genome. Instead, the genome acts as a switchboard, where mostly random mutations switch “on” or “off” preexisting functional capacities of organism components. Thus, there are two channels of heredity: informational (genomic) and structure-functional (phenotypic). Functional capacities of organisms most likely emerged in a chain of modifications and combinations of more simple ancestral functions. The role of DNA has been to keep records of these changes (without describing the result) so that they can be reproduced in the following generations. Evolutionary opportunities include adjustments of individual functions, multitasking, connection between various components of an organism, and interaction between organisms. The adaptive nature of regulated variation can be explained by the differential success of lineages in macro-evolution. Lineages with more advantageous patterns of regulated variation are likely to produce more species and secure more resources (i.e., long-term lineage selection). PMID:24769155

  18. Infrared Kuiper Belt Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Teplitz, V.L.; Stern, S.A.; Anderson, J.D.; Rosenbaum, D.; Scalise, R.J.; Wentzler, P.

    1999-05-01

    We compute the temperature and IR signal of particles of radius {ital a} and albedo {alpha} at heliocentric distance {ital R}, taking into account the emissivity effect, and give an interpolating formula for the result. We compare with analyses of {ital COBE} DIRBE data by others (including recent detection of the cosmic IR background) for various values of heliocentric distance {ital R}, particle radius {ital a}, and particle albedo {alpha}. We then apply these results to a recently developed picture of the Kuiper belt as a two-sector disk with a nearby, low-density sector (40{lt}R{lt}50{endash}90 AU) and a more distant sector with a higher density. We consider the case in which passage through a molecular cloud essentially cleans the solar system of dust. We apply a simple model of dust production by comet collisions and removal by the Poynting-Robertson effect to find limits on total and dust masses in the near and far sectors as a function of time since such a passage. Finally, we compare Kuiper belt IR spectra for various parameter values. Results of this work include: (1) numerical limits on Kuiper belt dust as a function of ({ital R}, {ital a}, {alpha}) on the basis of four alternative sets of constraints, including those following from recent discovery of the cosmic IR background by Hauser et al.; (2) application to the two-sector Kuiper belt model, finding mass limits and spectrum shape for different values of relevant parameters including dependence on time elapsed since last passage through a molecular cloud cleared the outer solar system of dust; and (3) potential use of spectral information to determine time since last passage of the Sun through a giant molecular cloud. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  19. Balancing Flexible Constraints and Measurement Precision in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Eric L.; Galindo, Jennifer L.; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2012-01-01

    Managing test specifications--both multiple nonstatistical constraints and flexibly defined constraints--has become an important part of designing item selection procedures for computerized adaptive tests (CATs) in achievement testing. This study compared the effectiveness of three procedures: constrained CAT, flexible modified constrained CAT,…

  20. Credit Constraints in Education. NBER Working Paper No. 17435

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints are increasingly important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, since their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  1. A Hybrid Constraint Representation and Reasoning Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Pang, Wan-Lin

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces JNET, a novel constraint representation and reasoning framework that supports procedural constraints and constraint attachments, providing a flexible way of integrating the constraint reasoner with a run- time software environment. Attachments in JNET are constraints over arbitrary Java objects, which are defined using Java code, at runtime, with no changes to the JNET source code.

  2. Optimization of Blade Stiffened Composite Panel under Buckling and Strength Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoroki, Akira; Sekishiro, Masato

    This paper deals with multiple constraints for dimension and stacking-sequence optimization of a blade-stiffened composite panel. In a previous study, a multiple objective genetic algorithm using a Kriging response surface with a buckling load constraint was the target. The present study focuses on dimension and stacking-sequence optimization with both a buckling load constraint and a fracture constraint. Multiple constraints complicate the process of selecting sampling analyses to improve the Kriging response surface. The proposed method resolves this problem using the most-critical-constraint approach. The new approach is applied to a blade stiffened composite panel and the approach is shown to be efficient.

  3. DEEP ABSORPTION LINE STUDIES OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: THE DYNAMICAL-MASS-SIZE RELATION AND FIRST CONSTRAINTS ON THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Toft, S.; Gallazzi, A.; Zirm, A.; Wold, M.; Zibetti, S.; Grillo, C.; Man, A.

    2012-07-20

    We present dynamical and structural scaling relations of quiescent galaxies at z = 2, including the dynamical-mass-size relation and the first constraints on the fundamental plane (FP). The backbone of the analysis is a new, very deep Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectrum of a massive, compact, quiescent galaxy at z = 2.0389. We detect the continuum between 3700 and 22,000 A and several strong absorption features (Balmer series, Ca H+K, G band) from which we derive a stellar velocity dispersion of 318 {+-} 53 km s{sup -1}. We perform detailed modeling of the continuum emission and line indices and derive strong simultaneous constraints on the age, metallicity, and stellar mass. The galaxy is a dusty (A{sub V} = 0.77{sup +0.36}{sub -0.32}) solar metallicity (log(Z/Z{sub Sun }) = 0.02{sup +0.20}{sub -0.41}) post-starburst galaxy, with a mean-luminosity-weighted log(age/yr) of 8.9 {+-} 0.1. The galaxy formed the majority of its stars at z > 3 and currently has little or no ongoing star formation. We compile a sample of three other z {approx} 2 quiescent galaxies with measured velocity dispersions, two of which are also post-starburst like. Their dynamical-mass-size relation is offset significantly less than the stellar-mass-size relation from the local early-type relations, which we attribute to a lower central dark matter fraction. Recent cosmological merger simulations agree qualitatively with the data, but cannot fully account for the evolution in the dark matter fraction. The z {approx} 2 FP requires additional evolution beyond passive stellar aging to be in agreement with the local FP. The structural evolution predicted by the cosmological simulations is insufficient, suggesting that additional, possibly non-homologous, structural evolution is needed.

  4. Integrated Science--Reasons & Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, M.; Oliver, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the philosophy and development of an integrated science program in a British secondary school. Discusses constraints to the program including laboratory facilities, money, and fewer laboratory technicians. (MA)

  5. Constraint-based stereo matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    The major difficulty in stereo vision is the correspondence problem that requires matching features in two stereo images. Researchers describe a constraint-based stereo matching technique using local geometric constraints among edge segments to limit the search space and to resolve matching ambiguity. Edge segments are used as image features for stereo matching. Epipolar constraint and individual edge properties are used to determine possible initial matches between edge segments in a stereo image pair. Local edge geometric attributes such as continuity, junction structure, and edge neighborhood relations are used as constraints to guide the stereo matching process. The result is a locally consistent set of edge segment correspondences between stereo images. These locally consistent matches are used to generate higher-level hypotheses on extended edge segments and junctions to form more global contexts to achieve global consistency.

  6. Fluid convection, constraint and causation

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity—nonlinear dynamics for my purposes in this essay—is rich with metaphysical and epistemological implications but is receiving sustained philosophical analysis only recently. I will explore some of the subtleties of causation and constraint in Rayleigh–Bénard convection as an example of a complex phenomenon, and extract some lessons for further philosophical reflection on top-down constraint and causation particularly with respect to causal foundationalism. PMID:23386955

  7. Foundations of support constraint machines.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, Giorgio; Gori, Marco; Melacci, Stefano; Sanguineti, Marcello

    2015-02-01

    The mathematical foundations of a new theory for the design of intelligent agents are presented. The proposed learning paradigm is centered around the concept of constraint, representing the interactions with the environment, and the parsimony principle. The classical regularization framework of kernel machines is naturally extended to the case in which the agents interact with a richer environment, where abstract granules of knowledge, compactly described by different linguistic formalisms, can be translated into the unified notion of constraint for defining the hypothesis set. Constrained variational calculus is exploited to derive general representation theorems that provide a description of the optimal body of the agent (i.e., the functional structure of the optimal solution to the learning problem), which is the basis for devising new learning algorithms. We show that regardless of the kind of constraints, the optimal body of the agent is a support constraint machine (SCM) based on representer theorems that extend classical results for kernel machines and provide new representations. In a sense, the expressiveness of constraints yields a semantic-based regularization theory, which strongly restricts the hypothesis set of classical regularization. Some guidelines to unify continuous and discrete computational mechanisms are given so as to accommodate in the same framework various kinds of stimuli, for example, supervised examples and logic predicates. The proposed view of learning from constraints incorporates classical learning from examples and extends naturally to the case in which the examples are subsets of the input space, which is related to learning propositional logic clauses. PMID:25380338

  8. Optimal Stopping with Information Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Lempa, Jukka

    2012-10-15

    We study the optimal stopping problem proposed by Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002). In this maximization problem of the expected present value of the exercise payoff, the underlying dynamics follow a linear diffusion. The decision maker is not allowed to stop at any time she chooses but rather on the jump times of an independent Poisson process. Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002), solve this problem in the case where the underlying is a geometric Brownian motion and the payoff function is of American call option type. In the current study, we propose a mild set of conditions (covering the setup of Dupuis and Wang in Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002) on both the underlying and the payoff and build and use a Markovian apparatus based on the Bellman principle of optimality to solve the problem under these conditions. We also discuss the interpretation of this model as optimal timing of an irreversible investment decision under an exogenous information constraint.

  9. Cross-Modal Subspace Learning via Pairwise Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Ran; Zhang, Man; Wang, Liang; Ji, Ye; Yin, Qiyue

    2015-12-01

    In multimedia applications, the text and image components in a web document form a pairwise constraint that potentially indicates the same semantic concept. This paper studies cross-modal learning via the pairwise constraint and aims to find the common structure hidden in different modalities. We first propose a compound regularization framework to address the pairwise constraint, which can be used as a general platform for developing cross-modal algorithms. For unsupervised learning, we propose a multi-modal subspace clustering method to learn a common structure for different modalities. For supervised learning, to reduce the semantic gap and the outliers in pairwise constraints, we propose a cross-modal matching method based on compound ℓ21 regularization. Extensive experiments demonstrate the benefits of joint text and image modeling with semantically induced pairwise constraints, and they show that the proposed cross-modal methods can further reduce the semantic gap between different modalities and improve the clustering/matching accuracy. PMID:26259218

  10. Percolation of spatially constraint networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daqing; Li, Guanliang; Kosmidis, Kosmas; Stanley, H. E.; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-03-01

    We study how spatial constraints are reflected in the percolation properties of networks embedded in one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional lattices. We assume long-range connections between sites on the lattice where two sites at distance r are chosen to be linked with probability p(r)~r-δ. Similar distributions have been found in spatially embedded real networks such as social and airline networks. We find that for networks embedded in two dimensions, with 2<δ<4, the percolation properties show new intermediate behavior different from mean field, with critical exponents that depend on δ. For δ<2, the percolation transition belongs to the universality class of percolation in Erdös-Rényi networks (mean field), while for δ>4 it belongs to the universality class of percolation in regular lattices. For networks embedded in one dimension, we find that, for δ<1, the percolation transition is mean field. For 1<δ<2, the critical exponents depend on δ, while for δ>2 there is no percolation transition as in regular linear chains.

  11. Weak constraints in four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkinson, L. R.; Lawless, A. S.; Nichols, N. K.; Roulstone, I.

    2009-04-01

    The formulation of four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var) allows the incorporation of constraints into the cost function which need only be weakly satisfied. A common constraint imposed in this way is the requirement that the analysis be close to a previous short-range forecast or background field. In many environmental systems certain quantities are known to be conserved exactly or to be approximately conserved, but this knowledge is often not used directly within the assimilation system. In this study we investigate the benefit obtained from imposing these conservation properties as weak constraints in the 4D-Var problem. To study this problem we make use of Kepler's two- and three-body systems for planetary orbits. These are Hamiltonian systems and, as such, are known to exactly conserve the Hamiltonian, which in this case is equal to the total energy. A 4D-Var scheme is designed in which two different constraints on the a priori information can be applied. The first is a standard background constraint, which controls the distance to a background state expressed in terms of the model variables. The second constraint uses the Hamiltonian calculated from the background state as a weak constraint on the Hamiltonian of the analysis. The formulation of this second constraint is shown to change the nature of the gradient equation, with components in different directions to the gradient obtained from the background constraint. Using identical twin experiments we illustrate how the two constraints influence the final analysis in different ways. We show how by constraining the Hamiltonian quantity together with the background state it is possible to obtain a more accurate analysis than when using a background state alone. This is found to be true even if the numerical model respects the conservation properties of the system.

  12. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Holekamp, Kay E.; Swanson, Eli M.; Van Meter, Page E.

    2013-01-01

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility. PMID:23569298

  13. Data assimilation with inequality constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thacker, W. C.

    If values of variables in a numerical model are limited to specified ranges, these restrictions should be enforced when data are assimilated. The simplest option is to assimilate without regard for constraints and then to correct any violations without worrying about additional corrections implied by correlated errors. This paper addresses the incorporation of inequality constraints into the standard variational framework of optimal interpolation with emphasis on our limited knowledge of the underlying probability distributions. Simple examples involving only two or three variables are used to illustrate graphically how active constraints can be treated as error-free data when background errors obey a truncated multi-normal distribution. Using Lagrange multipliers, the formalism is expanded to encompass the active constraints. Two algorithms are presented, both relying on a solution ignoring the inequality constraints to discover violations to be enforced. While explicitly enforcing a subset can, via correlations, correct the others, pragmatism based on our poor knowledge of the underlying probability distributions suggests the expedient of enforcing them all explicitly to avoid the computationally expensive task of determining the minimum active set. If additional violations are encountered with these solutions, the process can be repeated. Simple examples are used to illustrate the algorithms and to examine the nature of the corrections implied by correlated errors.

  14. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility.

    PubMed

    Holekamp, Kay E; Swanson, Eli M; Van Meter, Page E

    2013-05-19

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility. PMID:23569298

  15. Genetic map construction with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Rawlings, C.J.; Soursenot, S.

    1994-12-31

    A pilot program, CME, is described for generating a physical genetic map from hybridization fingerprinting data. CME is implemented in the parallel constraint logic programming language ElipSys. The features of constraint logic programming are used to enable the integration of preexisting mapping information (partial probe orders from cytogenetic maps and local physical maps) into the global map generation process, while parallelism enables the search space to be traversed more efficiently. CME was tested using data from chromosome 2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and was found able to generate maps as well as (and sometimes better than) a more traditional method. This paper illustrates the practical benefits of using a symbolic logic programming language and shows that the features of constraint handling and parallel execution bring the development of practical systems based on Al programming technologies nearer to being a reality.

  16. Magnetotail dynamics under isobaric constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl; Janicke, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Using linear theory and nonlinear MHD simulations, we investigate the resistive and ideal MHD stability of two-dimensional plasma configurations under the isobaric constraint dP/dt = 0, which in ideal MHD is equivalent to conserving the pressure function P = P(A), where A denotes the magnetic flux. This constraint is satisfied for incompressible modes, such as Alfven waves, and for systems undergoing energy losses. The linear stability analysis leads to a Schroedinger equation, which can be investigated by standard quantum mechanics procedures. We present an application to a typical stretched magnetotail configuration. For a one-dimensional sheet equilibrium characteristic properties of tearing instability are rediscovered. However, the maximum growth rate scales with the 1/7 power of the resistivity, which implies much faster growth than for the standard tearing mode (assuming that the resistivity is small). The same basic eigen-mode is found also for weakly two-dimensional equilibria, even in the ideal MHD limit. In this case the growth rate scales with the 1/4 power of the normal magnetic field. The results of the linear stability analysis are confirmed qualitatively by nonlinear dynamic MHD simulations. These results suggest the interesting possibility that substorm onset, or the thinning in the late growth phase, is caused by the release of a thermodynamic constraint without the (immediate) necessity of releasing the ideal MHD constraint. In the nonlinear regime the resistive and ideal developments differ in that the ideal mode does not lead to neutral line formation without the further release of the ideal MHD constraint; instead a thin current sheet forms. The isobaric constraint is critically discussed. Under perhaps more realistic adiabatic conditions the ideal mode appears to be stable but could be driven by external perturbations and thus generate the thin current sheet in the late growth phase, before a nonideal instability sets in.

  17. Including Overweight or Obese Students in Physical Education: A Social Ecological Constraint Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weidong; Rukavina, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we propose a social ecological constraint model to study inclusion of overweight or obese students in physical education by integrating key concepts and assumptions from ecological constraint theory in motor development and social ecological models in health promotion and behavior. The social ecological constraint model proposes…

  18. Constraints to leasing and development of federal resources: OCS oil and gas and geothermal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Chapter I identifies possible technological, economic, and environmental constraints to geothermal resource development. Chapter II discusses constraints relative to outer continental shelf and geothermal resources. General leasing information for each resource is detailed. Chapter III summarizes the major studies relating to development constraints. 37 refs. (PSB)

  19. Teaching People to Manage Constraints: Effects on Creative Problem-Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, David R.; Barrett, Jamie D.; Hester, Kimberly S.; Robledo, Issac C.; Hougen, Dean F.; Day, Eric A.; Mumford, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Constraints often inhibit creative problem-solving. This study examined the impact of training strategies for managing constraints on creative problem-solving. Undergraduates, 218 in all, were asked to work through 1 to 4 self-paced instructional programs focused on constraint management strategies. The quality, originality, and elegance of…

  20. Dark matter constraints from stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, A.; Domínguez, I.; Straniero, O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of dark matter constraints from its effect on star evolution has been discussed in recent years. We propose a star evolution simulation approach to determine those costraints from properties related to star evolutionary stages and propose globular cluster observables in order to check those constraints. My work in progress (my PhD project research) employs FRANEC code to simulate complete star evolution from pre-main sequence to AGB phase, and regards several DM candidates like axions or WIMPs, motivated by different unsolved physical problems. Detailed energy production or energy loss due to DM particles are included, taking into account the expected interaction between dark matter particles and stellar plasma within different models.

  1. Multisensory constraints on awareness

    PubMed Central

    Deroy, Ophelia; Chen, Yi-Chuan; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Given that multiple senses are often stimulated at the same time, perceptual awareness is most likely to take place in multisensory situations. However, theories of awareness are based on studies and models established for a single sense (mostly vision). Here, we consider the methodological and theoretical challenges raised by taking a multisensory perspective on perceptual awareness. First, we consider how well tasks designed to study unisensory awareness perform when used in multisensory settings, stressing that studies using binocular rivalry, bistable figure perception, continuous flash suppression, the attentional blink, repetition blindness and backward masking can demonstrate multisensory influences on unisensory awareness, but fall short of tackling multisensory awareness directly. Studies interested in the latter phenomenon rely on a method of subjective contrast and can, at best, delineate conditions under which individuals report experiencing a multisensory object or two unisensory objects. As there is not a perfect match between these conditions and those in which multisensory integration and binding occur, the link between awareness and binding advocated for visual information processing needs to be revised for multisensory cases. These challenges point at the need to question the very idea of multisensory awareness. PMID:24639579

  2. Assessment under Resource Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Steve; Curtis, Mary G.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and the measurement of learning are receiving increasing emphasis in American higher education. This is a case study that demonstrates a simple, inexpensive method of measuring freshman to senior "gains" or learning using a cross-sectional methodology. Seniors and freshmen within a four-year business program were both given…

  3. Breaking evolutionary constraint with a tradeoff ratchet.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Marjon G J; Dawid, Alexandre; Sunderlikova, Vanda; Tans, Sander J

    2015-12-01

    Epistatic interactions can frustrate and shape evolutionary change. Indeed, phenotypes may fail to evolve when essential mutations are only accessible through positive selection if they are fixed simultaneously. How environmental variability affects such constraints is poorly understood. Here, we studied genetic constraints in fixed and fluctuating environments using the Escherichia coli lac operon as a model system for genotype-environment interactions. We found that, in different fixed environments, all trajectories that were reconstructed by applying point mutations within the transcription factor-operator interface became trapped at suboptima, where no additional improvements were possible. Paradoxically, repeated switching between these same environments allows unconstrained adaptation by continuous improvements. This evolutionary mode is explained by pervasive cross-environmental tradeoffs that reposition the peaks in such a way that trapped genotypes can repeatedly climb ascending slopes and hence, escape adaptive stasis. Using a Markov approach, we developed a mathematical framework to quantify the landscape-crossing rates and show that this ratchet-like adaptive mechanism is robust in a wide spectrum of fluctuating environments. Overall, this study shows that genetic constraints can be overcome by environmental change and that cross-environmental tradeoffs do not necessarily impede but also, can facilitate adaptive evolution. Because tradeoffs and environmental variability are ubiquitous in nature, we speculate this evolutionary mode to be of general relevance. PMID:26567153

  4. Breaking evolutionary constraint with a tradeoff ratchet

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Marjon G. J.; Dawid, Alexandre; Sunderlikova, Vanda; Tans, Sander J.

    2015-01-01

    Epistatic interactions can frustrate and shape evolutionary change. Indeed, phenotypes may fail to evolve when essential mutations are only accessible through positive selection if they are fixed simultaneously. How environmental variability affects such constraints is poorly understood. Here, we studied genetic constraints in fixed and fluctuating environments using the Escherichia coli lac operon as a model system for genotype–environment interactions. We found that, in different fixed environments, all trajectories that were reconstructed by applying point mutations within the transcription factor–operator interface became trapped at suboptima, where no additional improvements were possible. Paradoxically, repeated switching between these same environments allows unconstrained adaptation by continuous improvements. This evolutionary mode is explained by pervasive cross-environmental tradeoffs that reposition the peaks in such a way that trapped genotypes can repeatedly climb ascending slopes and hence, escape adaptive stasis. Using a Markov approach, we developed a mathematical framework to quantify the landscape-crossing rates and show that this ratchet-like adaptive mechanism is robust in a wide spectrum of fluctuating environments. Overall, this study shows that genetic constraints can be overcome by environmental change and that cross-environmental tradeoffs do not necessarily impede but also, can facilitate adaptive evolution. Because tradeoffs and environmental variability are ubiquitous in nature, we speculate this evolutionary mode to be of general relevance. PMID:26567153

  5. Mars Rover Sample Return aerocapture configuration design and packaging constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Shelby J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the aerodynamics requirements, volume and mass constraints that lead to a biconic aeroshell vehicle design that protects the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) mission elements from launch to Mars landing. The aerodynamic requirements for Mars aerocapture and entry and packaging constraints for the MRSR elements result in a symmetric biconic aeroshell that develops a L/D of 1.0 at 27.0 deg angle of attack. A significant problem in the study is obtaining a cg that provides adequate aerodynamic stability and performance within the mission imposed constraints. Packaging methods that relieve the cg problems include forward placement of aeroshell propellant tanks and incorporating aeroshell structure as lander structure. The MRSR missions developed during the pre-phase A study are discussed with dimensional and mass data included. Further study is needed for some missions to minimize MRSR element volume so that launch mass constraints can be met.

  6. Architecture, constraints, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, John C.; Csete, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to bridge progress in neuroscience involving sophisticated quantitative analysis of behavior, including the use of robust control, with other relevant conceptual and theoretical frameworks from systems engineering, systems biology, and mathematics. Familiar and accessible case studies are used to illustrate concepts of robustness, organization, and architecture (modularity and protocols) that are central to understanding complex networks. These essential organizational features are hidden during normal function of a system but are fundamental for understanding the nature, design, and function of complex biologic and technologic systems. PMID:21788505

  7. Engineering within ecological constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Shulze, P.C.

    1996-08-01

    The volume looks at the concepts of scale, resilience, and chaos as they apply to the points where the ecological life support system of nature interacts with the technological life support system created by humankind. Among the questions addressed are: What are the implications of differences between ecological and engineering concepts of efficiency and stability; how can engineering solutions to immediate problems be made compatible with long-term ecological concerns; and how can we transfer ecological principles to economic systems. The book also includes important case studies on such topics as water management in southern Florida and California and oil exploration in rain forests.

  8. Constraints on galaxy formation theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalay, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The present theories of galaxy formation are reviewed. The relation between peculiar velocities, temperature fluctuations of the microwave background and the correlation function of galaxies point to the possibility that galaxies do not form uniformly everywhere. The velocity data provide strong constraints on the theories even in the case when light does not follow mass of the universe.

  9. Contextual Constraints on Adolescents' Leisure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    2003-01-01

    Interlinks crucial cultural themes emerging from preceding chapters, highlighting the contextual constraints in adolescents' use of free time. Draws parallels across the nations discussed on issues related to how school molds leisure time, the balance of passive versus active leisure, timing of leisure pursuits, and the cumulative effect of…

  10. Constraint elimination in dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, R. P.; Likins, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    Large space structures (LSSs) and other dynamical systems of current interest are often extremely complex assemblies of rigid and flexible bodies subjected to kinematical constraints. A formulation is presented for the governing equations of constrained multibody systems via the application of singular value decomposition (SVD). The resulting equations of motion are shown to be of minimum dimension.

  11. Phonotactic Constraints Are Activated across Languages in Bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Max R.; Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Marian, Viorica

    2016-01-01

    During spoken language comprehension, auditory input activates a bilingual’s two languages in parallel based on phonological representations that are shared across languages. However, it is unclear whether bilinguals access phonotactic constraints from the non-target language during target language processing. For example, in Spanish, words with s+ consonant onsets cannot exist, and phonotactic constraints call for epenthesis (addition of a vowel, e.g., stable/estable). Native Spanish speakers may produce English words such as estudy (“study”) with epenthesis, suggesting that these bilinguals apply Spanish phonotactic constraints when speaking English. The present study is the first to examine whether bilinguals access Spanish phonotactic constraints during English comprehension. In an English cross-modal priming lexical decision task, Spanish–English bilinguals and English monolinguals heard English cognate and non-cognate primes containing s+ consonant onsets or controls without s+ onsets, followed by a lexical decision on visual targets with the /e/ phonotactic constraint or controls without /e/. Results revealed that bilinguals were faster to respond to /es/ non-word targets preceded by s+ cognate primes and /es/ and /e/ non-word targets preceded by s+ non-cognate primes, confirming that English primes containing s+ onsets activated Spanish phonotactic constraints. These findings are discussed within current accounts of parallel activation of two languages during bilingual spoken language comprehension, which may be expanded to include activation of phonotactic constraints from the irrelevant language. PMID:27242615

  12. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Omer; Mania, Data; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: mania@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use 21 Hubble parameter versus redshift data points from Simon et al., Gaztanaga et al., Stern et al., and Moresco et al. to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. The inclusion of the eight new measurements results in H(z) constraints more restrictive than those derived by Chen and Ratra. These constraints are now almost as restrictive as those that follow from current Type Ia supernova (SNIa) apparent magnitude versus redshift data, which now more carefully account for systematic uncertainties. This is a remarkable result. We emphasize, however, that SNIa data have been studied for a longer time than the H(z) data, possibly resulting in a better estimate of potential systematic errors in the SNIa case. A joint analysis of the H(z), baryon acoustic oscillation peak length scale, and SNIa data favors a spatially flat cosmological model currently dominated by a time-independent cosmological constant but does not exclude slowly evolving dark energy.

  13. Constraint Handling in Transmission Network Expansion Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallipeddi, R.; Verma, Ashu; Suganthan, P. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Bijwe, P. R.

    Transmission network expansion planning (TNEP) is a very important and complex problem in power system. Recently, the use of metaheuristic techniques to solve TNEP is gaining more importance due to their effectiveness in handling the inequality constraints and discrete values over the conventional gradient based methods. Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) generally perform unconstrained search and require some additional mechanism to handle constraints. In EA literature, various constraint handling techniques have been proposed. However, to solve TNEP the penalty function approach is commonly used while the other constraint handling methods are untested. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of different constraint handling methods like Superiority of Feasible Solutions (SF), Self adaptive Penalty (SP),E-Constraint (EC), Stochastic Ranking (SR) and the ensemble of constraint handling techniques (ECHT) on TNEP. The potential of different constraint handling methods and their ensemble is evaluated using an IEEE 24 bus system with and without security constraints.

  14. Understanding the origin of CMB constraints on dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassal, H. K.; Bagla, J. S.; Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-07-01

    We study the observational constraints of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies on models of dark energy, with special focus on models with variation in properties of dark energy with time. We demonstrate that the key constraint from CMB observations arises from the location of acoustic peaks. An additional constraint arises from the limits on ΩNR from the relative amplitudes of acoustic peaks. Further, we show that the distance to the last scattering surface is not how the CMB observations constrain the combination of parameters for models of dark energy. We also use constraints from supernova observations and show that unlike the gold and silver samples, the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) sample prefers a region of parameter space that has a significant overlap with the region preferred by the CMB observations. This is a verification of a conjecture made by us in an earlier work. We discuss combined constraints from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-yr and SNLS observations. We find that models with w ~= - 1 are preferred for models with a constant equation-of-state parameters. In case of models with a time-varying dark energy, we show that constraints on evolution of dark energy density are almost independent of the type of variation assumed for the equation-of-state parameter. This makes it easy to get approximate constraints from CMB observations on arbitrary models of dark energy. Constraints on models with a time-varying dark energy are predominantly due to CMB observations, with supernova constraints playing only a marginal role.

  15. Stress constraints in optimality criteria design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures described emphasize the processing of stress constraints within optimality criteria designs for low structural weight with stress and compliance constraints. Prescreening criteria are used to partition stress constraints into either potentially active primary sets or passive secondary sets that require minimal processing. Side constraint boundaries for passive constraints are derived by projections from design histories to modify conventional stress-ratio boundaries. Other procedures described apply partial structural modification reanalysis to design variable groups to correct stress constraint violations of unfeasible designs. Sample problem results show effective design convergence and, in particular, advantages for reanalysis in obtaining lower feasible design weights.

  16. Sensitivity of Lumped Constraints Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1999-01-01

    Adjoint sensitivity calculation of stress, buckling and displacement constraints may be much less expensive than direct sensitivity calculation when the number of load cases is large. Adjoint stress and displacement sensitivities are available in the literature. Expressions for local buckling sensitivity of isotropic plate elements are derived in this study. Computational efficiency of the adjoint method is sensitive to the number of constraints and, therefore, the method benefits from constraint lumping. A continuum version of the Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser (KS) function is chosen to lump constraints. The adjoint and direct methods are compared for three examples: a truss structure, a simple HSCT wing model, and a large HSCT model. These sensitivity derivatives are then used in optimization.

  17. Using Formative Assessment Despite the Constraints of High Stakes Testing and Limited Resources: A Case Study of Chemistry Teachers in Anglophone Cameroon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akom, George Viche

    2010-01-01

    Formative assessment, as a strategy used to improve student learning, encounters several obstacles in its implementation. This study explores changes in teachers' views and practices as they are introduced to formative assessment in a high stakes testing and limited resource environment. The study examines the extent to which teachers use the…

  18. Unitarity constraints on trimaximal mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2010-07-01

    When the neutrino mass eigenstate {nu}{sub 2} is trimaximally mixed, the mixing matrix is called trimaximal. The middle column of the trimaximal mixing matrix is identical to tribimaximal mixing and the other two columns are subject to unitarity constraints. This corresponds to a mixing matrix with four independent parameters in the most general case. Apart from the two Majorana phases, the mixing matrix has only one free parameter in the CP conserving limit. Trimaximality results in interesting interplay between mixing angles and CP violation. A notion of maximal CP violation naturally emerges here: CP violation is maximal for maximal 2-3 mixing. Similarly, there is a natural constraint on the deviation from maximal 2-3 mixing which takes its maximal value in the CP conserving limit.

  19. Macroscopic constraints on string unification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    The comparison of sting theory with experiment requires a huge extrapolation from the microscopic distances, of order of the Planck length, up to the macroscopic laboratory distances. The quantum effects give rise to large corrections to the macroscopic predictions of sting unification. I discus the model-independent constraints on the gravitational sector of string theory due to the inevitable existence of universal Fradkin-Tseytlin dilatons. 9 refs.

  20. Managing Restaurant Tables using Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, Alfio; Brown, Kenneth N.; Beck, J. Christopher

    Restaurant table management can have significant impact on both profitability and the customer experience. The core of the issue is a complex dynamic combinatorial problem. We show how to model the problem as constraint satisfaction, with extensions which generate flexible seating plans and which maintain stability when changes occur. We describe an implemented system which provides advice to users in real time. The system is currently being evaluated in a restaurant environment.

  1. Isocurvature constraints on portal couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Nurmi, Sami; Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville

    2016-06-01

    We consider portal models which are ultraweakly coupled with the Standard Model, and confront them with observational constraints on dark matter abundance and isocurvature perturbations. We assume the hidden sector to contain a real singlet scalar s and a sterile neutrino ψ coupled to s via a pseudoscalar Yukawa term. During inflation, a primordial condensate consisting of the singlet scalar s is generated, and its contribution to the isocurvature perturbations is imprinted onto the dark matter abundance. We compute the total dark matter abundance including the contributions from condensate decay and nonthermal production from the Standard Model sector. We then use the Planck limit on isocurvature perturbations to derive a novel constraint connecting dark matter mass and the singlet self coupling with the scale of inflation: mDM/GeV lesssim 0.2λs3/8 (H*/1011 GeV)‑3/2. This constraint is relevant in most portal models ultraweakly coupled with the Standard Model and containing light singlet scalar fields.

  2. Infrared Constraint on Ultraviolet Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2012-08-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM–SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  3. Analysis of Space Tourism Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnal, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    Space tourism appears today as a new Eldorado in a relatively near future. Private operators are already proposing services for leisure trips in Low Earth Orbit, and some happy few even tested them. But are these exceptional events really marking the dawn of a new space age ? The constraints associated to the space tourism are severe : - the economical balance of space tourism is tricky; development costs of large manned - the technical definition of such large vehicles is challenging, mainly when considering - the physiological aptitude of passengers will have a major impact on the mission - the orbital environment will also lead to mission constraints on aspects such as radiation, However, these constraints never appear as show-stoppers and have to be dealt with pragmatically: - what are the recommendations one can make for future research in the field of space - which typical roadmap shall one consider to develop realistically this new market ? - what are the synergies with the conventional missions and with the existing infrastructure, - how can a phased development start soon ? The paper proposes hints aiming at improving the credibility of Space Tourism and describes the orientations to follow in order to solve the major hurdles found in such an exciting development.

  4. Constraint Based Modeling Going Multicellular

    PubMed Central

    Martins Conde, Patricia do Rosario; Sauter, Thomas; Pfau, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Constraint based modeling has seen applications in many microorganisms. For example, there are now established methods to determine potential genetic modifications and external interventions to increase the efficiency of microbial strains in chemical production pipelines. In addition, multiple models of multicellular organisms have been created including plants and humans. While initially the focus here was on modeling individual cell types of the multicellular organism, this focus recently started to switch. Models of microbial communities, as well as multi-tissue models of higher organisms have been constructed. These models thereby can include different parts of a plant, like root, stem, or different tissue types in the same organ. Such models can elucidate details of the interplay between symbiotic organisms, as well as the concerted efforts of multiple tissues and can be applied to analyse the effects of drugs or mutations on a more systemic level. In this review we give an overview of the recent development of multi-tissue models using constraint based techniques and the methods employed when investigating these models. We further highlight advances in combining constraint based models with dynamic and regulatory information and give an overview of these types of hybrid or multi-level approaches. PMID:26904548

  5. Constraints influencing sports wheelchair propulsion performance and injury risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Paralympic Games are the pinnacle of sport for many athletes with a disability. A potential issue for many wheelchair athletes is how to train hard to maximise performance while also reducing the risk of injuries, particularly to the shoulder due to the accumulation of stress placed on this joint during activities of daily living, training and competition. The overall purpose of this narrative review was to use the constraints-led approach of dynamical systems theory to examine how various constraints acting upon the wheelchair-user interface may alter hand rim wheelchair performance during sporting activities, and to a lesser extent, their injury risk. As we found no studies involving Paralympic athletes that have directly utilised the dynamical systems approach to interpret their data, we have used this approach to select some potential constraints and discussed how they may alter wheelchair performance and/or injury risk. Organism constraints examined included player classifications, wheelchair setup, training and intrinsic injury risk factors. Task constraints examined the influence of velocity and types of locomotion (court sports vs racing) in wheelchair propulsion, while environmental constraints focused on forces that tend to oppose motion such as friction and surface inclination. Finally, the ecological validity of the research studies assessing wheelchair propulsion was critiqued prior to recommendations for practice and future research being given. PMID:23557065

  6. A Hybrid Constraint Representation and Reasoning Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Pang, Wanlin

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce JNET, a novel constraint representation and reasoning framework that supports procedural constraints and constraint attachments, providing a flexible way of integrating the constraint system with a runtime software environment and improving its applicability. We describe how JNET is applied to a real-world problem - NASA's Earth-science data processing domain, and demonstrate how JNET can be extended, without any knowledge of how it is implemented, to meet the growing demands of real-world applications.

  7. Design of helicopter rotors to noise constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, E. G.; Sternfeld, H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Results of the initial phase of a research project to study the design constraints on helicopter noise are presented. These include the calculation of nonimpulsive rotor harmonic and broadband hover noise spectra, over a wide range of rotor design variables and the sensitivity of perceived noise level (PNL) to changes in rotor design parameters. The prediction methodology used correlated well with measured whirl tower data. Application of the predictions to variations in rotor design showed tip speed and thrust as having the most effect on changing PNL.

  8. Chemical Constraints on the Early Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Chemical abundances of comets and star-forming regions provide p o w d clues to the conditions which prevailed in the outer solar nebula. Hence comparative spectroscopic studies of cometary and molecular cloud gases provide vital insights into conditions in the solar protoplanetary disk at heliocentric distances beyond 5 AU 4.6 Gyr ago. We proposed a research program which combined optical and sub-millimeter techniques with laboratory spectroscopy, and sought to determine key diagnostic constraints on single-star protoplanetary disk models.

  9. Organizational Constraints on Corporate Public Relations Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Catalogs various internal constraints under which many public relations practitioners work, including constraints on (1) access to management; (2) information collection; (3) dissemination of timely, accurate information; and (4) the public relations mission. Reports that most practitioners see organizational constraints as more of a problem for…

  10. Identification Constraints and Inference in Factor Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loken, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The choice of constraints used to identify a simple factor model can affect the shape of the likelihood. Specifically, under some nonzero constraints, standard errors may be inestimable even at the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE). For a broader class of nonzero constraints, symmetric normal approximations to the modal region may not be…

  11. Cultural and Social Constraints on Portability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray-Lasso, Marco

    1990-01-01

    Describes 12 constraints imposed by culture on educational software portability. Nielsen's seven-level virtual protocol model of human-computer interaction is discussed as a framework for considering the constraints, a hypothetical example of adapting software for Mexico is included, and suggestions for overcoming constraints and making software…

  12. Learning and Parallelization Boost Constraint Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are a powerful way to abstract and represent academic and real-world problems from both artificial intelligence and operations research. A constraint satisfaction problem is typically addressed by a sequential constraint solver running on a single processor. Rather than construct a new, parallel solver, this work…

  13. Revealing Communication Constraints in Extension Communication Strategies: A Case Study of a Project under the World Bank's T & V System, India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melkote, Srinivas R.

    A study looked at an agricultural extension project in south India to examine comprehension of the extension team's intentionality by the poorest farmers. Subjects, 50 farmers in the village of Porandla in the state of Andhra Pradesh, were interviewed and measured to see if their knowledge and comprehension approximated a constant across all…

  14. Successful Resource Allocation in Times of Fiscal Constraint: Case Studies of School-Level Resource Use in Southern California Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyoda-Smart, Kumi

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how five diverse California elementary schools--two underperforming and three high achieving, with statistically significant subgroups of English Learner, socioeconomically disadvantaged, and minority students--have allocated resources to improve student achievement. The applied research contributes new information to the…

  15. Exploring Support for the Extracurriculum in a Time of Fiscal Constraint and Standards-Based Reform: A Case Study of One Pennsylvania School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Mark Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Although much has been researched and written about the value of extracurricular programs in U.S. public schools, few studies have addressed the combined effect that school reform initiatives, including myriad standardized tests, accountability measures, and massive financial crisis which have become more commonplace during periods of economic…

  16. "Miss, How do you Write Hipotesis?" Learning to Teach Science to English Language Learners While Navigating Affordances and Constraints: A Longitudinal Multiple Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Irasema

    Early career science teachers are often assigned to classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELL students). As these teachers learn to become effective practitioners, the circumstances surrounding them merit a thorough examination. This study examines the longitudinal changes in Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) and practices of six early career science teachers who taught in urban schools. The teachers participated in the Alternative Support for Induction Science Teachers (ASIST) program during their initial two years of teaching. Our research team followed the participants over a five-year period. This study focuses on data from Years 1, 3, and 5. The data collected included classroom observations and interviews. In addition, classroom artifacts were collected periodically for the purpose of triangulation. The analysis of the data revealed that with the support of the ASIST program, the teachers implemented inquiry lessons and utilized instructional materials that promoted academic language skills and science competencies among their ELL students. Conversely, standardized testing, teaching assignment, and school culture played a role in constraining the implementation of inquiry-based practices. The results of this study call for collaborative efforts among university science educators and school administrators to provide professional development opportunities and support for the implementation of inquiry and language practices among early career science teachers of ELL students.

  17. Constraints on formation processes of two coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions: a study of mantles, islands and cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeker, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    Many coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) contain features that are inconsistent with equilibrium liquid crystallization models of origin. Spinel-free islands (SFIs) in spinel-rich cores of Type B CAIs are examples of such features. One model previously proposed for the origin of Allende 5241, a Type B1 CAI containing SFIs, involves the capture and assimilation of xenoliths by a liquid droplet in the solar nebula (El Goresy et al, 1985; MacPherson et al 1989). This study reports new textural and chemical zoning data from 5241 and identifies previously unrecognized chemical zoning patterns in the melilite mantle and in a SFI. -from Author

  18. Stochastic population dynamics under resource constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavane, Ajinkya S.; Nigam, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the population growth of a certain species in which every generation reproduces thrice over a period of predefined time, under certain constraints of resources needed for survival of population. We study the survival period of a species by randomizing the reproduction probabilities within a window at same predefined ages and the resources are being produced by the working force of the population at a variable rate. This randomness in the reproduction rate makes the population growth stochastic in nature and one cannot predict the exact form of evolution. Hence we study the growth by running simulations for such a population and taking an ensemble averaged over 500 to 5000 such simulations as per the need. While the population reproduces in a stochastic manner, we have implemented a constraint on the amount of resources available for the population. This is important to make the simulations more realistic. The rate of resource production then is tuned to find the rate which suits the survival of the species. We also compute the mean life time of the species corresponding to different resource production rate. Study for these outcomes in the parameter space defined by the reproduction probabilities and rate of resource production is carried out.

  19. New kinematic constraints on the Cantabrian orocline: A paleomagnetic study from the Peñalba and Truchas synclines, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lozano, Javier; Pastor-Galán, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Franco, Piedad

    2016-06-01

    The Cantabrian orocline is a large structure that bends the Variscan orogen of Western Europe in NW Iberia. The extensively studied kinematics of its core, the foreland of the orogen, indicates that the structure is secondary, i.e. acquired after the formation of the orogenic edifice. However, the extent of the Cantabrian orocline away from its core is under debate. In this paper we study the kinematics of the Cantabrian orocline beyond the foreland. We collected and analyzed samples from the northern and central parts of the Truchas syncline, which provides new data within the hinterland of the orogen in NW Iberia. The analysis of 320 samples shows a late Carboniferous remagnetization with an E to NE declination and shallow downward inclinations. These results suggest a counter-clockwise rotation of ~ 60° and peri-equatorial but still southern hemisphere latitude for Iberia during the uppermost Carboniferous-Early Permian. This rotation fits with the expected kinematic evolution of the Truchas syncline if it indeed was part of the Cantabrian orocline.

  20. Pressure-temperature-fluid constraints for the Emmaville-Torrington emerald deposit, New South Wales, Australia: Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughrey, Lara; Marshall, Dan; Jones, Peter; Millsteed, Paul; Main, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Emmaville-Torrington emeralds were first discovered in 1890 in quartz veins hosted within a Permian metasedimentary sequence, consisting of meta-siltstones, slates and quartzites intruded by pegmatite and aplite veins from the Moule Granite. The emerald deposit genesis is consistent with a typical granite-related emerald vein system. Emeralds from these veins display colour zonation alternating between emerald and clear beryl. Two fluid inclusion types are identified: three-phase (brine+vapour+halite) and two-phase (vapour+liquid) fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion studies indicate the emeralds were precipitated from saline fluids ranging from approximately 33 mass percent NaCl equivalent. Formational pressures and temperatures of 350 to 400 °C and approximately 150 to 250 bars were derived from fluid inclusion and petrographic studies that also indicate emerald and beryl precipitation respectively from the liquid and vapour portions of a two-phase (boiling) system. The distinct colour zonations observed in the emerald from these deposits is the first recorded emerald locality which shows evidence of colour variation as a function of boiling. The primary three-phase and primary two-phase FITs are consistent with alternating chromium-rich `striped' colour banding. Alternating emerald zones with colourless beryl are due to chromium and vanadium partitioning in the liquid portion of the boiling system. The chemical variations observed at Emmaville-Torrington are similar to other colour zoned emeralds from other localities worldwide likely precipitated from a boiling system as well.

  1. New constraints on the Pan-African Orogeny in Central Zambia: A structural and geochronological study of the Hook Batholith and the Mwembeshi Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenov, Kalin V.; Lehmann, Jeremie; Saalmann, Kerstin; Milani, Lorenzo; Kinnaird, Judith A.; Charlesworth, Guy; Frei, Dirk; Rankin, William

    2014-12-01

    In Central Zambia, the Mwembeshi Zone (MwZ) separates two branches of the Pan-African Orogen: the Lufilian Arc and the Zambezi Belt. To the north of the MwZ, the Hook Batholith was emplaced within Neoproterozoic Katangan metasedimentary rocks. Field mapping and structural studies, microstructural observations, interpretation of airborne geophysical images and U-Pb zircon geochronology constrain a new model for the tectonic evolution of this poorly studied part of the orogen. Two temporarily separated and highly oblique orogenic contraction events are defined. D1 is characterised by a regional low-metamorphic grade E-W shortening that produced strain partitioning between N-S trending pure-shear-dominated and NW trending sinistral simple-shear dominated domains. The emplacement of the batholith between ca. 550 and 533 Ma (U-Pb zircon ages) is syn-tectonic to D1. The D2 N-S shortening event was active after ca. 530, which is indicated by the age of the newly dated, deformed molasse of the Hook Batholith. During D2, the MwZ developed as an E- to ENE-striking zone of pure-shear dominated deformation that localised to the south and within the already exhumed Hook Batholith. At the scale of the Pan-African Orogen in Southern Africa, the D1 is considered to be a far field expression of the E-W collision event in the Mozambique Belt. The following Early Cambrian D2 event corresponds to the high angle collision between the Congo and Kalahari Cratons and the stitching of the Lufilian and Zambezi belts along the MwZ. Therefore, in the Hook area, the MwZ cannot be regarded as a continental-scale wrench structure as widely discussed in the literature. The tectonic events in Central Zambia suggest that the amalgamation of Gondwana was accompanied by suturing along highly oblique orogenic belts during plate reorganization at around 530 Ma.

  2. Constraints on the utility of MnO2 cartridge method for the extraction of radionuclides: A case study using 234Th

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskaran, M.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Biddanda, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Large volume (102-103 L) seawater samples are routinely processed to investigate the partitioning of particle reactive radionuclides and Ra between solution and size-fractionated suspended particulate matter. One of the most frequently used methods to preconcentrate these nuclides from such large volumes involves extraction onto three filter cartridges (a prefilter for particulate species and two MnO2-coated filters for dissolved species) connected in series. This method assumes that the extraction efficiency is uniform for both MnO2-coated cartridges, that no dissolved species are removed by the prefilter, and that any adsorbed radionuclides are not desorbed from the MnO2-coated cartridges during filtration. In this study, we utilized 234Th-spiked coastal seawater and deionized water to address the removal of dissolved Th onto prefilters and MnO2-coated filter cartridges. Experimental results provide the first data that indicate (1) a small fraction of dissolved Th (<6%) can be removed by the prefilter cartridge; (2) a small fraction of dissolved Th (<5%) retained by the MnO2 surface can also be desorbed, which undermines the assumption of uniform extraction efficiency for Th; and (3) the absolute and relative extraction efficiencies can vary widely. These experiments provide insight on the variability of the extraction efficiency of MnO 2-coated filter cartridges by comparing the relative and absolute efficiencies and recommend the use of a constant efficiency on the combined activity from two filter cartridges connected in series for future studies of dissolved 234Th and other radionuclides in natural waters using sequential filtration/extraction methods. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. QPO Constraints on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Coleman

    2005-01-01

    The kilohertz frequencies of QPOs from accreting neutron star systems imply that they are generated in regions of strong gravity, close to the star. This suggests that observations of the QPOs can be used to constrain the properties of neutron stars themselves, and in particular to inform us about the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear densities. Here we discuss some relatively model-insensitive constraints that emerge from the kilohertz QPOs, as well as recent developments that may hint at phenomena related to unstable circular orbits outside neutron stars.

  4. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  5. Trajectory constraints in qualitative simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Brajnik, G.; Clancy, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    We present a method for specifying temporal constraints on trajectories of dynamical systems and enforcing them during qualitative simulation. This capability can be used to focus a simulation, simulate non-autonomous and piecewise-continuous systems, reason about boundary condition problems and incorporate observations into the simulation. The method has been implemented in TeQSIM, a qualitative simulator that combines the expressive power of qualitative differential equations with temporal logic. It interleaves temporal logic model checking with the simulation to constrain and refine the resulting predicted behaviors and to inject discontinuous changes into the simulation.

  6. The timing of eclogite facies metamorphism and migmatization in the Orlica–Śnieżnik complex, Bohemian Massif: Constraints from a multimethod geochronological study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocker, M.; Klemd, R.; Cosca, M.; Brock, W.; Larionov, A.N.; Rodionov, N.

    2009-01-01

    The Orlica–Śnieżnik complex (OSC) is a key geological element of the eastern Variscides and mainly consists of amphibolite facies orthogneisses and metasedimentary rocks. Sporadic occurrences of eclogites and granulites record high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic conditions. A multimethod geochronological approach (40Ar–39Ar, Rb–Sr, Sm–Nd, U–Pb) has been used to gain further insights into the polymetamorphic evolution of eclogites and associated country rocks. Special attention was given to the unresolved significance of a 370- to 360 Ma age group that was repeatedly described in previous studies. Efforts to verify the accuracy of c.370 Ma K–Ar phengite and biotite dates reported for an eclogite and associated country-rock gneiss from the location Nowa Wieś suggest that these dates are meaningless, due to contamination with extraneous Ar. Extraneous Ar is also considered to be responsible for a significantly older 40Ar–39Ar phengite date of c. 455 Ma for an eclogite from the location Wojtowka. Attempts to further substantiate the importance of 370–360 Ma zircon dates as an indicator for a melt-forming high-temperature (HT) episode did not provide evidence in support of anatectic processes at this time. Instead, SHRIMP U–Pb zircon dating of leucosomes and leucocratic veins within both orthogneisses and (U)HP granulites revealed two age populations (490–450 and 345–330 Ma respectively) that correspond to protolith ages of the magmatic precursors and late Variscan anatexis. The results of this study further underline the importance of Late Carboniferous metamorphic processes for the evolution of the OSC that comprise the waning stages of HP metamorphism and lower pressure HT overprinting with partial melting. Eclogites and their country rocks provided no chronometric evidence for an UHP and ultrahigh-temperature episode at 387–360 Ma, as recently suggested for granulites from the OSC, based on Lu–Hf garnet

  7. A paleomagnetic study of the Pohue Bay flow and its associated coastal cones, Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii: constraints on their origin and temporal relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado-Chichay, Zinzuni; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Rowland, Scott K.

    1996-10-01

    Detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic studies of the Pohue Bay flow and associated cones on its coastal flat were made to determine if the origin of the cones was due to primary (volcanic) or secondary (littoral) processes. We used paleomagnetism to determine the temporal relationships between the flow and cones. If the flows and cones are from the same eruption, the littoral origin of the cones is strongly favored. A total of 530 specimens from 232 core samples were collected and studied from the Pohue Bay flow and from lava ponded within the cones. Remanent magnetizations are very stable to stepwise alternating field demagnetization and show small angular dispersion and well-defined characteristic magnetizations. Magnetic carriers correspond to members of the titanomagnetite series with single or pseudo-single domain states. The overall mean directions for the Pohue Bay flow (Dec = 10.8°, Inc = 23.6°, k = 287.4 and α95 = 2.3°) and the lavas ponded within the cones (Dec = 12.8°, Inc = 25.2°, k = 353 and α95 = 4.9°) are statistically indistinguishable and have been drawn from a common Fisherian distribution, supporting a close age relationship. Additionally, the angular dispersion for the combination of the main flow and lavas ponded in cones is small, with a paleosecular variation (PSV) estimate of Sf = 4.2°. This small PSV value supports the temporal association between the Pohue Bay flow and associated cones. They can thus be assigned to the same eruption timeframe. Because the source vent of the Pohue Bay flow is far upslope, the cones must therefore be littoral in origin, formed when the Pohue Bay flow entered the ocean. From the secular variation curve and comparison with age-dated flows with similar paleomagnetic directions, we estimate that the Pohue Bay flow was erupted approximately 1300 years ago. We were also able to distinguish both a possibly younger lava flow that later utilized the main tube of the Pohue Bay flow and an earlier sub

  8. Stratigraphic and tectonic studies in the central Aquitaine Basin, northern Pyrenees: Constraints on the subsidence and deformation history of a retro-foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Géraldine; Ford, Mary; Christophoul, Frédéric; Bader, Anne-Gaëlle

    2016-03-01

    The central North-Pyrenean retrowedge developed on a thinned lithosphere, rich in Keuper evaporites. The behavior of this retro-foreland system is studied using subsidence analyses and a sequentially restored cross-section (120 km, Saint-Gaudens to Castelsarrasin) constrained by new chrono- and lithostratigraphy, surface and subsurface data. During the Late Cretaceous, a first episode of foreland subsidence (E1) produced a narrow marine depocenter (Comminges Basin, 30 km wide), supplied from the east. A synchronous early deformation involved inversion of basement faults and gentle shortening (4.5 km) of the Mesozoic strata above a Keuper decoupling layer. A tectonically quiet period (Q, Paleocene), characterized by a condensed succession (marine and continental), was followed by a second episode of subsidence (E2), basin migration and gentle thick- and thin-skinned shortening (8 km). Continental sedimentation, supplied by the uplifting orogen, first filled a narrow flexural basin (E2, M-L Eocene), then expanded across the Aquitaine Platform (E3, Oligocene-Miocene).

  9. Constraints on the collision and the pre-collision tectonic configuration between India and Asia from detrital geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry studies in the lower Indus basin, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Guangsheng; Najman, Yani; Guillot, Stephane; Roddaz, Martin; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Metais, Gregoire; Carter, Andrew; Marivaux, Laurent; Solangi, Sarfraz

    2016-04-01

    The timing of India-Asia suturing in the Western Himalaya is complex, with the relative timings of collision between the Indian plate and Asian plate with the Kohistan Island arc and a proposed Tethyan Himalayan microcontinent, debated. Here we present an integrated provenance study of geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry on the late Cretaceous-Pleistocene sediments from the lower Indus basin on the Indian plate. The detrital zircon U-Pb and fission track data show a reversal in sediment source from a pure Indian signature to increasing inputs from the suture zone and the Asian plate between the middle Paleocene and early Oligocene. The Nd and Sr isotopes narrow down this change to 50 Ma by revealing input of Asian detritus and the establishment of a Nd & Sr isotopic pattern similar to that of the present-day Indus Fan by 50 Ma, with no significant variations up section, contrary to what might be expected if later major collisions had occurred. Our isotopic data indicate that since 50 Ma, Greater India was occupied by a fluvial-deltaic system, analogous to the present-day Indus and named as the Paleo-Indus, which has been transporting Asian detritus southward across the suture zone and Kohistan-Ladakh arc. This suggests that no other ocean basins were located between India and Asia after this time in this region. Our data require that in the west, the India-Asia collision was accomplished by ˜50 Ma.

  10. Geochemical and VOC-constraints on landfill gas age and attenuation characteristics: A case study from a waste disposal facility in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Benjamin; Kerfoot, Henry B; Verwiel, Mark; Matlock, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a multi-tracer approach was applied to a complex, methane-impacted site in Southern California to (1) distinguish between natural gas and landfill gas (LFG)-derived methane impacts at site perimeter gas probes, (2) estimate the relative age of the LFG at these probes, and (3) document natural attenuation trends during a 3-year monitoring period. Relationships between methane and ethane values suggest that at the majority of probes, methane is from LFG and not from natural gas and that the relative contribution of LFG methane at these probes has increased over the monitoring period. To evaluate whether LFG is attenuating in the subsurface, the relative age of LFG was estimated by comparing readily degraded VOCs that are major constituents in LFG (toluene in this case) with those resistant to degradation (Freons). Time-series data trends are consistent with several probes being impacted by fresh LFG from recent releases that occurred after the update of the local LFG collection and control system (LFGCCS). Data further indicate some probes to be only affected by legacy LFG from a past release that occurred prior to the LFGCCS update and that, because of a lack of oxygen in the subsurface, had not been fully degraded. The outlined attenuation evaluation methodology is potentially applicable to other sites or even groundwater contaminants; however, the assessment is limited by the degree of homogeneity of the LFG source composition and non-LFG-derived toluene inputs to the analyzed samples. PMID:26601889

  11. Constraints on the oxidation state of the mantle: An electrochemical and sup 57 Fe Moessbauer study of mantle-derived ilmenites

    SciTech Connect

    Virgo, D.; Luth, R.W. ); Moats, M.A.; Ulmer, G.C. )

    1988-07-01

    Ilmenite samples from four kimberlite localities were studied using electrochemical, Moessbauer spectroscopic, and microprobe analytical techniques in order to infer the oxidation state of their source regions in the mantle. The values of Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe calculated from analyses, using three different electron microanalytical instruments assuming ilmenite stoichiometry, are consistently higher than those derived from the Moessbauer data, by as much as 100%. Furthermore, the range in Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe calculated using the analyses from different instruments and/or different correction schemes is nearly as large. Thus Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe calculated from microprobe analyses should be taken with caution, even if the precision appears high. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy on the electrochemical experiment run products demonstrates that Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe is significantly lower than it is for the natural C-bearing ilmenites. In contrast, the ilmenite that lacked C did not change Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe during the electrochemical experiment. Examination of the reduced samples with SEM established that the natural, single-phase ilmenites exsolved during the electrochemical experiment to form ilmenite{sub ss} + spinel{sub ss}. The initial, reduced trends in the electrochemical experiments for the C-bearing ilmenites are attributed to disequilibrium interactions between the decomposing sample and the evolved gas in the electrochemical cell and do not represent the quenched mantle memory nor the intrinsic f{sub O{sub 2}} of the sample prior to reduction. Furthermore, the oxidized f{sub O{sub 2}} trend is interpreted, for the carbon-bearing samples, are representing the f{sub O{sub 2}} of the ilmenite{sub ss} + spinel{sub ss} assemblage and not the intrinsic f{sub o{sub 2}} of the mantle-derived ilemnite{sub ss}.

  12. Curvature constraints from large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Raccanelli, Alvise; Durrer, Ruth; Kamionkowski, Marc; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2016-06-01

    We modified the CLASS code in order to include relativistic galaxy number counts in spatially curved geometries; we present the formalism and study the effect of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature. The new version of the code is now publicly available. Using a Fisher matrix analysis, we investigate how measurements of the spatial curvature parameter ΩK with future galaxy surveys are affected by relativistic effects, which influence observations of the large scale galaxy distribution. These effects include contributions from cosmic magnification, Doppler terms and terms involving the gravitational potential. As an application, we consider angle and redshift dependent power spectra, which are especially well suited for model independent cosmological constraints. We compute our results for a representative deep, wide and spectroscopic survey, and our results show the impact of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature parameter estimation. We show that constraints on the curvature parameter may be strongly biased if, in particular, cosmic magnification is not included in the analysis. Other relativistic effects turn out to be subdominant in the studied configuration. We analyze how the shift in the estimated best-fit value for the curvature and other cosmological parameters depends on the magnification bias parameter, and find that significant biases are to be expected if this term is not properly considered in the analysis.

  13. Constraints on the collision and the pre-collision tectonic configuration between India and Asia from detrital geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry studies in the lower Indus basin, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Guangsheng; Najman, Yani; Guillot, Stéphane; Roddaz, Martin; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Métais, Grégoire; Carter, Andrew; Marivaux, Laurent; Solangi, Sarfraz H.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the timing of India-Asia collision is a fundamental prerequisite for understanding the evolution of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen and its role in global climate, oceanic chemistry, and ecological evolution. Despite much active research, the basic pre-collision tectonic configuration and the timing of terminal India-Asia suturing remain debated. For example, debates regarding when and how the intervening Kohistan-Ladakh arc was sutured with India and Asia still remain elusive; some models propose the arc collided with Asia at about 100 Ma, with India-Asia collision at ca. 55 Ma, whilst a newer model proposed the arc's collision with India at 50 Ma and subsequently with Asia at 40 Ma. Another example is the recent proposition that an oceanic Greater India Basin separated the Tethyan Himalaya microcontinent from the remaining Indian plate until 20- 25 Ma with the consumption of this oceanic basin marking the final collision at this time. These controversies relate to whether the commonly documented 50 Ma contact represents the terminal India-Asia suturing or the amalgamation between various arcs or microcontinents with India or Asia. Here we present an integrated provenance study of geochronology, thermochronology, and geochemistry on the late Cretaceous-Pleistocene sediments from the lower Indus basin on the Indian plate. The detrital zircon U-Pb and fission track data show a reversal in sediment source from a pure Indian signature to increasing inputs from the suture zone and the Asian plate between the middle Paleocene and early Oligocene. The Nd and Sr isotopes narrow down this change to 50 Ma by revealing input of Asian detritus and the establishment of a Nd & Sr isotopic pattern similar to the present-day Indus Fan by 50 Ma, with no significant variations up section, contrary to what might be expected if later major collisions had occurred. Our isotopic data indicate that Greater India was occupied by a fluvial-deltaic system, analogous to the

  14. Constraints on 10Be and 41Ca distribution in the early solar system from 26Al and 10Be studies of Efremovka CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gopalan; Chaussidon, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Three refractory coarse grained CAIs from the Efremovka CV3 chondrite, one (E65) previously shown to have formed with live 41Ca, were studied by ion microprobe for their 26Al-26Mg and 10Be-10B systematic in order to better understand the origin of 10Be. The high precision Al-Mg data and the inferred 26Al/27Al values attest that the precursors of the three CAIs evolved in the solar nebula over a period of few hundred thousand years before last melting-crystallization events. The initial 10Be/9Be ratios and δ10B values defined by the 10Be isochrons for the three Efremovka CAIs are similar within errors. The CAI 10Be abundance in published data underscores the large range for initial 10Be/9Be ratios. This is contrary to the relatively small range of 26Al/27Al variations in CAIs around the canonical ratio. Two models that could explain the origin of this large 10Be/9Be range are assessed from the collateral variations predicted for the initial δ10B values: (i) closed system decay of 10Be from a "canonical" 10Be/9Be ratio and (ii) formation of CAIs from a mixture of solid precursors and nebula gas irradiated during up to a few hundred thousand years. The second scenario is shown to be the most consistent with the data. This shows that the major fraction of 10Be in CAIs was produced by irradiation of refractory grains, while contributions of galactic cosmic rays trapping and early solar wind irradiation are less dominant. The case for 10Be production by solar cosmic rays irradiation of solid refractory precursors poses a conundrum for 41Ca because the latter is easily produced by irradiation and should be more abundant than what is observed in CAIs. 10Be production by irradiation from solar energetic particles requires high 41Ca abundance in early solar system, however, this is not observed in CAIs.

  15. Origin and Evolution of the Lhasa Terrane, Tibetan Plateau: Constraints from the Petrological and Geochronological Studies of the High-grade Metamorphic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, F.; Lin, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Lhasa terrane, the southern Tibet, between the Bangong-Nujiang suture and the Indus-Yarlung Tsangpo suture zones, experienced the multi-stages of orogenies related to the Tethys subduction and continent collision. Therefore, the Lhasa terrane is the key that reveal the formation and evolution of Tibetan Plateau. A series of high-grade metamorphic rocks outcrop in the central and southern Lhasa terrane. Previous studies show that some metamorphic rocks are the Precambrian metamorphic basement of the Lhasa terrane, named as the Nyainqentanglha rock group, Bomi rock group, Nyingchi rock group or Gangdise rock group. However, our work shows that the protoliths of the high-grade metamorphic rocks consist of Paleozoic, Mesozoic to Cenozoic sedimentary rocks and intrusion rocks, and experienced the multi stages of tectonic-thermal events during Paleozoic to Cenozoic. Most meta-sedimentary rocks of the southern Lhasa terrane were formed during Cambrian to Carboniferous, consisting of gneiss, amphibolite, schist, quartzite and marble. The distribution of inherited detrital zircons ages of meta-sedimentary rocks, together with the regional comparisons, show that the meta-sedimentary rocks have the similar material provenance with the Tethyan Himalayan sequence, recording the tectonic-thermal events related to the Grenville and Pan-African orogenies. The oldest metamorphic intrusion rock is the Cambrian granite (496 Ma) caused by the subduction of oceanic crust beneath the Gondwana supercontinent during Andean-type orogeny. The Late Devonian (367 Ma) meta-granitoids are common in the southern margin of the Lhasa terrane. The Gangdise batholith formed during Mesozoic and Cenozoic is also the main component of high-grade metamorphic rocks of the southern Lhasa terrane. The southern Lhasa terrane understood the multi-stages of metamorphism, including a Triassic metamorphic belt and a Mesozoic to Cenozoic compound metamorphic belt, i.e. the Late Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic

  16. Cognitive constraints on motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Stephan F; Rieger, Martina

    2016-03-01

    Executed bimanual movements are prepared slower when moving to symbolically different than when moving to symbolically same targets and when targets are mapped to target locations in a left/right fashion than when they are mapped in an inner/outer fashion [Weigelt et al. (Psychol Res 71:238-447, 2007)]. We investigated whether these cognitive bimanual coordination constraints are observable in motor imagery. Participants performed fast bimanual reaching movements from start to target buttons. Symbolic target similarity and mapping were manipulated. Participants performed four action conditions: one execution and three imagination conditions. In the latter they indicated starting, ending, or starting and ending of the movement. We measured movement preparation (RT), movement execution (MT) and the combined duration of movement preparation and execution (RTMT). In all action conditions RTs and MTs were longer in movements towards different targets than in movements towards same targets. Further, RTMTs were longer when targets were mapped to target locations in a left/right fashion than when they were mapped in an inner/outer fashion, again in all action conditions. RTMTs in imagination and execution were similar, apart from the imagination condition in which participants indicated the start and the end of the movement. Here MTs, but not RTs, were longer than in the execution condition. In conclusion, cognitive coordination constraints are present in the motor imagery of fast (<1600 ms) bimanual movements. Further, alternations between inhibition and execution may prolong the duration of motor imagery. PMID:25758054

  17. Roter Kamm Impact Crater, Namibia: Age Constraints from K-Ar, Rb-Sr, Fission Track, 10Be-26Al Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, C.; Klein, J.; Matsuda, J.; Nagao, K.; Reimold, W. U.; Storzer, D.

    1992-07-01

    analyzed samples URK-87A (quartzitic melt breccia), URK-87D and URK-92A (schistose melt breccias), and URK- 38 (pseudotachylite). The ages are (in Ma): 87A: 251+-12; 87D: 464+-21; 92A: 479+-22; 38: 255+-12. Thus the "melt" breccias are dominated by incompletely degassed fragments and at least partly retain their original metamorphic ages, which are similar to the 500 Ma ages obtained from Rb-Sr isotopes. Apatite separates from 5 rim granites were measured and yielded the following fission track ages (in Ma): RK-88: 19.8+-1.8; RK- 89: 20.9+-1.4; URK-8: 23.7+-1.9; URK-17: 26.5+-1.9; URK-18: 27.7+-2.4. About 60% of the apatites show dislocations and were not used for the measurements. The ages indicate a regional uplift event, in agreement with earlier data (Storzer et al., 1990). The cosmic-ray-induced in situ production of ^10Be and ^26Al has been used to determine erosion rates and exposure ages of terrestrial rocks and sediments. It provides an intriguing independent method for the age determination of younger meteorite craters (e.g., Nishiizumi et al., 1991). Be and Al were chemically separated from a pure quartz phase, and ^10Be and ^26Al contents are measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (in progress). We are studying quartz from quartz pegmatite from the crater rim that was most probably exposed during the impact. References: Allsopp, H.L., Kostlin, E.O., Welke, H.J., Burger, A.J., Kroner, A., and Blignault, H.J. (1979) Trans. Geol. Soc. S. Afr. 82, 185- 204. Hartung, J.B., Kunk, M., Reimold, W.U., Miller, R., and Grieve, R.A.F. (1991) Meteoritics 26, 342-343. Nishiizumi, K., Kohl, C.P., Shoemaker, E.M., Arnold, J.R., Klein, J., Fink, D., and Middleton, R. (1991) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 55, 2699-2703. Reimold W.U. and Miller R. (1989) Proc. 19th Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., 711-732. Storzer, D., Koeberl, C., and Reimold, W.U. (1990) Meteoritics 25, 411-412.

  18. Reformulating Constraints for Compilability and Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Chris; Braudaway, Wesley; Mohan, Sunil; Voigt, Kerstin

    1992-01-01

    KBSDE is a knowledge compiler that uses a classification-based approach to map solution constraints in a task specification onto particular search algorithm components that will be responsible for satisfying those constraints (e.g., local constraints are incorporated in generators; global constraints are incorporated in either testers or hillclimbing patchers). Associated with each type of search algorithm component is a subcompiler that specializes in mapping constraints into components of that type. Each of these subcompilers in turn uses a classification-based approach, matching a constraint passed to it against one of several schemas, and applying a compilation technique associated with that schema. While much progress has occurred in our research since we first laid out our classification-based approach [Ton91], we focus in this paper on our reformulation research. Two important reformulation issues that arise out of the choice of a schema-based approach are: (1) compilability-- Can a constraint that does not directly match any of a particular subcompiler's schemas be reformulated into one that does? and (2) Efficiency-- If the efficiency of the compiled search algorithm depends on the compiler's performance, and the compiler's performance depends on the form in which the constraint was expressed, can we find forms for constraints which compile better, or reformulate constraints whose forms can be recognized as ones that compile poorly? In this paper, we describe a set of techniques we are developing for partially addressing these issues.

  19. Observational constraints on assisted k-inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Junko; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2011-05-15

    We study observational constraints on the assisted k-inflation models in which multiple scalar fields join an attractor characterized by an effective single field {phi}. This effective single-field system is described by the Lagrangian P=Xg(Y), where X is the kinetic energy of {phi}, {lambda} is a constant, and g is an arbitrary function in terms of Y=Xe{sup {lambda}{phi}}. Our analysis covers a wide variety of k-inflation models such as dilatonic ghost condensate, Dirac-Born-Infeld field, and tachyon, as well as the canonical field with an exponential potential. We place observational bounds on the parameters of each model from the WMAP 7yr data combined with baryon acoustic oscillations and the Hubble constant measurement. Using the observational constraints of the equilateral non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL}{sup equil}, we further restrict the allowed parameter space of dilatonic ghost condensate and Dirac-Born-Infeld models. We extend the analysis to more general models with several different choices of g(Y) and show that the models such as g(Y)=c{sub 0}+c{sub p}Y{sup p} (p{>=}3) are excluded by the joint data analysis of the scalar/tensor spectra and primordial non-Gaussianities.

  20. Dipole operator constraints on composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Matthias; Neubert, Matthias; Straub, David M.

    2014-07-01

    Flavour- and CP-violating electromagnetic or chromomagnetic dipole operators in the quark sector are generated in a large class of new physics models and are strongly constrained by measurements of the neutron electric dipole moment and observables sensitive to flavour-changing neutral currents, such as the branching ratio and . After a model-independent discussion of the relevant constraints, we analyze these effects in models with partial compositeness, where the quarks get their masses by mixing with vector-like composite fermions. These scenarios can be seen as the low-energy limit of composite Higgs or warped extra dimensional models. We study different choices for the electroweak representations of the composite fermions motivated by electroweak precision tests as well as different flavour structures, including flavour anarchy and or flavour symmetries in the strong sector. In models with "wrong-chirality" Yukawa couplings, we find a strong bound from the neutron electric dipole moment, irrespective of the flavour structure. In the case of flavour anarchy, we also find strong bounds from flavour-violating dipoles, while these constraints are mild in the flavour-symmetric models.

  1. Processing Temporal Constraints: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggio, Giosue

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates how linguistic expressions of time--in particular, temporal adverbs and verb tense morphemes--are used to establish temporal reference at the level of brain physiology. First, a formal semantic analysis of tense and temporal adverbs is outlined. It is argued that computing temporal reference amounts to solving a…

  2. Study of design constraints on helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfeld, H., Jr.; Wiedersum, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    A means of estimating the noise generated by a helicopter main rotor using information which is generally available during the preliminary design phase of aircraft development is presented. The method utilizes design charts and tables which do not require an understanding of acoustical theory or computational procedures in order to predict the perceived noise level, a weighted sound pressure level, or C weighted sound pressure level of a single hovering rotor. A method for estimating the effective perceived noise level in forward flight is also included. In order to give the designer an assessment of the relative rotor performance, which may be traded off against noise, an additional chart for estimating the percent of available rotor thrust which must be expended in lifting the rotor and drive system, is included as well as approach for comparing the subjective acceptability of various rotors once the absolute sound pressure levels are predicted.

  3. Constraints of Implementing Free Secondary Education in Mandera West Sub-County, Mandera County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adan, Mohammed Abdi; Orodho, John Aluko

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to find out the constraints of implementing free secondary education (FSE) in secondary schools in Mandera West Sub-County, Mandera County, Kenya. The study is based on the theory of constraints as the researcher examines the factors constraining the achievement of FSE objectives. The study used the survey design. The main…

  4. Effects of Social Constraints on Career Maturity: The Mediating Effect of the Time Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung-Nyun; Oh, Se-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have provided mixed results for the effects of social constraints on career maturity. However, there has been growing interest in these effects from the time perspective. Few studies have examined the effects of social constraints on the time perspective which in turn influences career maturity. This study examines the mediating…

  5. Adaptive laser link reconfiguration using constraint propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crone, M. S.; Julich, P. M.; Cook, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes Harris AI research performed on the Adaptive Link Reconfiguration (ALR) study for Rome Lab, and focuses on the application of constraint propagation to the problem of link reconfiguration for the proposed space based Strategic Defense System (SDS) Brilliant Pebbles (BP) communications system. According to the concept of operations at the time of the study, laser communications will exist between BP's and to ground entry points. Long-term links typical of RF transmission will not exist. This study addressed an initial implementation of BP's based on the Global Protection Against Limited Strikes (GPALS) SDI mission. The number of satellites and rings studied was representative of this problem. An orbital dynamics program was used to generate line-of-site data for the modeled architecture. This was input into a discrete event simulation implemented in the Harris developed COnstraint Propagation Expert System (COPES) Shell, developed initially on the Rome Lab BM/C3 study. Using a model of the network and several heuristics, the COPES shell was used to develop the Heuristic Adaptive Link Ordering (HALO) Algorithm to rank and order potential laser links according to probability of communication. A reduced set of links based on this ranking would then be used by a routing algorithm to select the next hop. This paper includes an overview of Constraint Propagation as an Artificial Intelligence technique and its embodiment in the COPES shell. It describes the design and implementation of both the simulation of the GPALS BP network and the HALO algorithm in COPES. This is described using a 59 Data Flow Diagram, State Transition Diagrams, and Structured English PDL. It describes a laser communications model and the heuristics involved in rank-ordering the potential communication links. The generation of simulation data is described along with its interface via COPES to the Harris developed View Net graphical tool for visual analysis of communications

  6. Photogeological constraints on lunar and planetary vulcanism, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Central volcanic constructs were studied as constraints on the thermal evolution and regional tectonics of the Moon and terrestrial planets. The origins of sub-kilometer lunar craters were examined with regards to implications for mare basalt petrogenesis. The morphology, distribution, age, and tectonic setting of the volcanic constructs were studied using Viking Orbiter data.

  7. Large-Scale Constraint-Based Pattern Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Feida

    2009-01-01

    We studied the problem of constraint-based pattern mining for three different data formats, item-set, sequence and graph, and focused on mining patterns of large sizes. Colossal patterns in each data formats are studied to discover pruning properties that are useful for direct mining of these patterns. For item-set data, we observed robustness of…

  8. Cosmological constraints on pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    1991-01-01

    Particle physics models with pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (PNGBs) are characterized by two mass scales: a global spontaneous symmetry breaking scale, f, and a soft (explicit) symmetry breaking scale, Lambda. General model insensitive constraints were studied on this 2-D parameter space arising from the cosmological and astrophysical effects of PNGBs. In particular, constraints were studied arising from vacuum misalignment and thermal production of PNGBs, topological defects, and the cosmological effects of PNGB decay products, as well as astrophysical constraints from stellar PNGB emission. Bounds on the Peccei-Quinn axion scale, 10(exp 10) GeV approx. = or less than f sub pq approx. = or less than 10(exp 10) to 10(exp 12) GeV, emerge as a special case, where the soft breaking scale is fixed at Lambda sub QCD approx. = 100 MeV.

  9. Constraint Embedding for Multibody System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a constraint embedding approach for the handling of local closure constraints in multibody system dynamics. The approach uses spatial operator techniques to eliminate local-loop constraints from the system and effectively convert the system into tree-topology systems. This approach allows the direct derivation of recursive O(N) techniques for solving the system dynamics and avoiding the expensive steps that would otherwise be required for handling the closedchain dynamics. The approach is very effective for systems where the constraints are confined to small-subgraphs within the system topology. The paper provides background on the spatial operator O(N) algorithms, the extensions for handling embedded constraints, and concludes with some examples of such constraints.

  10. Causality constraints in conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Thomas; Jain, Sachin; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-05-01

    Causality places nontrivial constraints on QFT in Lorentzian signature, for example fixing the signs of certain terms in the low energy Lagrangian. In d dimensional conformal field theory, we show how such constraints are encoded in crossing symmetry of Euclidean correlators, and derive analogous constraints directly from the conformal bootstrap (analytically). The bootstrap setup is a Lorentzian four-point function corresponding to propagation through a shockwave. Crossing symmetry fixes the signs of certain log terms that appear in the conformal block expansion, which constrains the interactions of low-lying operators. As an application, we use the bootstrap to rederive the well known sign constraint on the (∂ ϕ)4 coupling in effective field theory, from a dual CFT. We also find constraints on theories with higher spin conserved currents. Our analysis is restricted to scalar correlators, but we argue that similar methods should also impose nontrivial constraints on the interactions of spinning operators.