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Sample records for pga pumpesvigt er

  1. Pga1 Is an Essential Component of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Mannosyltransferase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Keisuke; Noda, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae essential gene YNL158w/PGA1 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized membrane protein. We constructed temperature-sensitive alleles of PGA1 by error-prone polymerase chain reaction mutagenesis to explore its biological role. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the pga1ts mutants accumulated the ER-form precursor of Gas1 protein at the restrictive temperature. Transport of invertase and carboxypeptidase Y were not affected. Triton X-114 phase separation and [3H]inositol labeling indicated that the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring was defective in the pga1ts mutants, suggesting that Pga1 is involved in GPI synthesis or its transfer to target proteins. We found GPI18, which was recently reported to encode GPI-mannosyltransferase II (GPI-MT II), as a high-copy suppressor of the temperature sensitivity of pga1ts. Both Gpi18 and Pga1 were detected in the ER by immunofluorescence, and they were coprecipitated from the Triton X-100–solubilized membrane. The gpi18ts and pga1ts mutants accumulated the same GPI synthetic intermediate at the restrictive temperature. From these results, we concluded that Pga1 is an additional essential component of the yeast GPI-MT II. PMID:17615295

  2. gPGA: GPU Accelerated Population Genetics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunbao; Lang, Xianyu; Wang, Yangang; Zhu, Chaodong

    2015-01-01

    Background The isolation with migration (IM) model is important for studies in population genetics and phylogeography. IM program applies the IM model to genetic data drawn from a pair of closely related populations or species based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations of gene genealogies. But computational burden of IM program has placed limits on its application. Methodology With strong computational power, Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been widely used in many fields. In this article, we present an effective implementation of IM program on one GPU based on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which we call gPGA. Conclusions Compared with IM program, gPGA can achieve up to 52.30X speedup on one GPU. The evaluation results demonstrate that it allows datasets to be analyzed effectively and rapidly for research on divergence population genetics. The software is freely available with source code at https://github.com/chunbaozhou/gPGA. PMID:26248314

  3. Orthopaedic applications for PLA-PGA biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, K A; Agrawal, C M; Barber, F A; Burkhart, S S

    1998-10-01

    Biodegradable polymers, especially those belonging to the family of polylactic acid (PLA) and polyglycolic acid (PGA), play an increasingly important role in orthopaedics. These polymers degrade by hydrolysis and enzymatic activity and have a range of mechanical and physical properties that can be engineered appropriately to suit a particular application. Their degradation characteristics depend on several parameters including their molecular structure, crystallinity, and copolymer ratio. These biomaterials are also rapidly gaining recognition in the fledging field of tissue engineering because they can be fashioned into porous scaffolds or carriers of cells, extracellular matrix components, and bioactive agents. Although their future appears to be bright, several questions regarding the biocompatibility of these materials linger and should be addressed before their wide-scale use. In the context of musculoskeletal tissue, this report provides a comprehensive review of properties and applications of biodegradable PLA/PGA polymers and their copolymers. Of special interest are orthopaedic applications, biocompatibility studies, and issues of sterilization and storage of these versatile biomaterials. Also discussed is the fact that terms such as PLA, PGA, or PLA-PGA do not denote one material, but rather a large family of materials that have a wide range of differing bioengineering properties and concomitant biological responses. An analysis of some misconceptions, problems, and potential solutions is also provided. PMID:9788368

  4. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  5. Effect of γ-PGA on the formation of collagen fibrils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cuicui; Zheng, Zhigong; Liu, Xinzhong; Li, Hengda; Zhang, Min

    2016-07-01

    The effect of γ-poly(glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) on the self-assembly of collagen was studied. Under physiological conditions, the kinetic curves for fibril formation showed that the turbidity of collagen/γ-PGA blends at 313 nm was increased with the addition of γ-PGA. Furthermore, it was shown using both field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that fibrils with a larger diameter were obtained following the addition of γ-PGA, probably due to the electrostatic and hydrogen bond interactions between collagen and γ-PGA, which promoted the lateral association of collagen molecules. In addition, both the thermal stability and viscoelastic properties of the hybrid hydrogels, which were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry and rheological measurements, respectively, were improved by the addition of γ-PGA. PMID:26940941

  6. iPGA: incremental principal geodesic analysis with applications to movement disorder classification.

    PubMed

    Salehian, Hesamoddin; Vaillancourt, David; Vemuri, Baba C

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear version of the well known PCA called the Prinicipal Geodesic Analysis (PGA) was introduced in the past decade for statistical analysis of shapes as well as diffusion tensors. PGA of diffusion tensor fields or any other manifold-valued fields can be a computationally demanding task due to the dimensionality of the problem and thus establishing motivation for an incremental PGA (iPGA) algorithm. In this paper, we present a novel iPGA algorithm that incrementally updates the current Karcher mean and the principal sub-manifolds with any newly introduced data into the pool without having to recompute the PGA from scratch. We demonstrate substantial computational and memory savings of iPGA over the batch mode PGA for diffusion tensor fields via synthetic and real data examples. Further, we use the iPGA derived representation in an NN classifier to automatically discriminate between controls, Parkinson's Disease and Essential Tremor patients, given their HARDI brain scans. PMID:25485449

  7. Determinants of Club Head Speed in PGA Professional Golfers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Adam L; Ward, Nick; Bishop, Chris; Maloney, Sean; Turner, Anthony N

    2016-08-01

    Turner, AN. Determinants of club head speed in PGA professional golfers. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2266-2270, 2016-Club head speed (CHS) has been significantly correlated with golf performance, but only in amateurs. The purpose of this study therefore, was to investigate the relationship between field-based measures of strength and power with CHS in Professional Golfers Association (PGA) professional golfers, and further determine differences between age groups. A correlation design was used to test relationships between squat jump (SJ), seated medicine ball throw (SMBT), rotational medicine ball throw (RMBT), and CHS. Twenty participants volunteered to take part in the study (age, 31.95 ± 8.7 years; height, 182.75 ± 6.88 cm; mass, 90.47 ± 15.6 kg). Intraclass correlation coefficients reported high reliability for performance variables (r = 0.85-0.95). Significant correlations (p < 0.01) were found between CHS and SJ (r = 0.817) and SMBT (r = 0.706), but not RMBT (r = 0.572). A stepwise linear regression analysis identified that SJ and SMBT explained 74% of the variance in CHS. When dividing the sample based on age, professionals <30 years (n = 10; 25.6 ± 2.9 years) displayed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher CHS and SJ height compared with professionals >30 (n = 10; 39.7 ± 5.5 years). Correlations to CHS for <30 were significant for SJ (r = 0.801) and SMBT (r = 0.643), but nonsignificant for RMBT. Those >30 had significant correlations to CHS not only in SMBT (r = 0.881) and SJ (r = 0.729), but also in RMBT (r = 0.642). The results of this study suggest that SJ and SMBT have the largest contribution to CHS in PGA professional golfers. When comparing age groups, it appears that younger golfers (<30 years) utilize more leg strength whereas older golfers (>30 years) utilize more upper body strength. Results suggest that strength-based leg exercises and power-based chest exercises may improve CHS in professional golfers. PMID:26849785

  8. γ-PGA Hydrolases of Phage Origin in Bacillus subtilis and Other Microbial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Mamberti, Stefania; Prati, Paola; Cremaschi, Paolo; Seppi, Claudio; Morelli, Carlo F; Galizzi, Alessandro; Fabbi, Massimo; Calvio, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (γ-PGA) is an industrially interesting polymer secreted mainly by members of the class Bacilli which forms a shield able to protect bacteria from phagocytosis and phages. Few enzymes are known to degrade γ-PGA; among them is a phage-encoded γ-PGA hydrolase, PghP. The supposed role of PghP in phages is to ensure access to the surface of bacterial cells by dismantling the γ-PGA barrier. We identified four unannotated B. subtilis genes through similarity of their encoded products to PghP; in fact these genes reside in prophage elements of B. subtilis genome. The recombinant products of two of them demonstrate efficient polymer degradation, confirming that sequence similarity reflects functional homology. Genes encoding similar γ-PGA hydrolases were identified in phages specific for the order Bacillales and in numerous microbial genomes, not only belonging to that order. The distribution of the γ-PGA biosynthesis operon was also investigated with a bioinformatics approach; it was found that the list of organisms endowed with γ-PGA biosynthetic functions is larger than expected and includes several pathogenic species. Moreover in non-Bacillales bacteria the predicted γ-PGA hydrolase genes are preferentially found in species that do not have the genetic asset for polymer production. Our findings suggest that γ-PGA hydrolase genes might have spread across microbial genomes via horizontal exchanges rather than via phage infection. We hypothesize that, in natural habitats rich in γ-PGA supplied by producer organisms, the availability of hydrolases that release glutamate oligomers from γ-PGA might be a beneficial trait under positive selection. PMID:26158264

  9. γ-PGA Hydrolases of Phage Origin in Bacillus subtilis and Other Microbial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mamberti, Stefania; Prati, Paola; Cremaschi, Paolo; Seppi, Claudio; Morelli, Carlo F.; Galizzi, Alessandro; Fabbi, Massimo; Calvio, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (γ-PGA) is an industrially interesting polymer secreted mainly by members of the class Bacilli which forms a shield able to protect bacteria from phagocytosis and phages. Few enzymes are known to degrade γ-PGA; among them is a phage-encoded γ-PGA hydrolase, PghP. The supposed role of PghP in phages is to ensure access to the surface of bacterial cells by dismantling the γ-PGA barrier. We identified four unannotated B. subtilis genes through similarity of their encoded products to PghP; in fact these genes reside in prophage elements of B. subtilis genome. The recombinant products of two of them demonstrate efficient polymer degradation, confirming that sequence similarity reflects functional homology. Genes encoding similar γ-PGA hydrolases were identified in phages specific for the order Bacillales and in numerous microbial genomes, not only belonging to that order. The distribution of the γ-PGA biosynthesis operon was also investigated with a bioinformatics approach; it was found that the list of organisms endowed with γ-PGA biosynthetic functions is larger than expected and includes several pathogenic species. Moreover in non-Bacillales bacteria the predicted γ-PGA hydrolase genes are preferentially found in species that do not have the genetic asset for polymer production. Our findings suggest that γ-PGA hydrolase genes might have spread across microbial genomes via horizontal exchanges rather than via phage infection. We hypothesize that, in natural habitats rich in γ-PGA supplied by producer organisms, the availability of hydrolases that release glutamate oligomers from γ-PGA might be a beneficial trait under positive selection. PMID:26158264

  10. PGA-incorporated collagen: Toward a biodegradable composite scaffold for bone-tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Toosi, Shirin; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Kalalinia, Fatemeh; Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; HosseinKhani, Hossein; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Mirahmadi, Mahdi; Behravan, Javad

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays composite scaffolds based on synthetic and natural biomaterials have got attention to increase healing of non-union bone fractures. To this end, different aspects of collagen sponge incorporated with poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) fiber were investigated in this study. Collagen solution (6.33 mg/mL) with PGA fibers (collagen/fiber ratio [w/w]: 4.22, 2.11, 1.06, 0.52) was freeze-dried, followed by dehydrothermal cross-linking to obtain collagen sponge incorporating PGA fibers. Properties of scaffold for cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that collagen sponge exhibited an interconnected pore structure with an average pore size of 190 μm, irrespective of PGA fiber incorporation. The collagen-PGA sponge was superior to the original collagen sponge in terms of the initial attachment, proliferation rate, and osteogenic differentiation of the bone marrow-MSCs (BM-MSC). The shrinkage of sponges during cell culture was significantly suppressed by fiber incorporation. Incorporation of PGA fiber is a simple and promising way to reinforce collagen sponge without impairing biocompatibility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2020-2028, 2016. PMID:27059133

  11. Comparison of serum procollagen III peptide concentrations and PGA index for assessment of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Teare, J P; Sherman, D; Greenfield, S M; Simpson, J; Bray, G; Catterall, A P; Murray-Lyon, I M; Peters, T J; Williams, R; Thompson, R P

    1993-10-01

    In early hepatic fibrosis, increased amounts of type III collagen are deposited. Persistently high serum concentrations of aminoterminal type III procollagen propeptide (PIIIP) correlate with the activity of the fibrogenic process. Another index for the detection of fibrosis, the PGA index, combines the prothrombin time, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity, and serum apolipoprotein A1 concentration (the latter falls with progressive fibrosis). We compared PIIIP measurements and PGA index in patients with various histological forms of alcoholic liver disease (104), primary biliary cirrhosis (38), and chronic B virus hepatitis (27), and in healthy age-matched controls (30). The ability of each test to identify correctly patients with fibrosis or cirrhosis was assessed with receiver operating curves. The PGA index was much higher in all groups of patients with alcoholic liver disease than in controls (p < 0.0001). PIIIP concentrations were also substantially higher than in controls (p < 0.05 for fatty liver, p < 0.0001 for all other groups), especially in the group with alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. For the detection of cirrhosis the PGA was 91% sensitive and 81% specific and the PIIIP concentration was 94% sensitive and 81% specific. The two tests combined had 85% sensitivity, but 93% specificity. Among patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, both PGA index and PIIIP concentration correlated well with the severity of the disease, determined by the Mayo score (r = 0.72 and 0.66 respectively). The combined tests were 96% sensitive for the detection of fibrosis. All patients with chronic B virus hepatitis had raised PGA and PIIIP values in comparison with controls (p < 0.0001) but there were no differences between subgroups. Substantially raised PIIIP concentrations thus identify the subgroup of alcoholic patients with both hepatitis and cirrhosis. The combination of PGA index and PIIIP concentration may be useful for targeting treatment with antifibrotic drugs

  12. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid (PGA)-Producing Bacillus Species Isolated from Kinema, Indian Fermented Soybean Food

    PubMed Central

    Chettri, Rajen; Bhutia, Meera O.; Tamang, Jyoti P.

    2016-01-01

    Kinema, an ethnic fermented, non-salted and sticky soybean food is consumed in the eastern part of India. The stickiness is one of the best qualities of good kinema preferred by consumers, which is due to the production of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA). Average load of Bacillus in kinema was 107 cfu/g and of lactic acid bacteria was 103 cfu/g. Bacillus spp. were screened for PGA-production and isolates of lactic acid bacteria were also tested for degradation of PGA. Only Bacillus produced PGA, none of lactic acid bacteria produced PGA. PGA-producing Bacillus spp. were identified by phenotypic characterization and also by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Bacillus subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. sonorensis. PMID:27446012

  13. Production of Poly-γ-Glutamate (PGA) Biopolymer by Batch and Semicontinuous Cultures of Immobilized Bacilluslicheniformis strain-R

    PubMed Central

    Berekaa, Mahmoud M.; El Aassar, Samy A.; El-Sayed, Samia M.; EL Borai, Aliaa M.

    2009-01-01

    Production of Polyglutamate (PGA) biopolymer by immobilized Bacillus licheniformis strain-R was intensively investigated. Preliminary experiments were carried out to address the most suitable immobilization methodology. Entrapment of Bacillus cells in alginate–agar led optimal PGA production (36.75 g/l), with 1.32-and 2.18-fold increase in comparison with alginate-or K-carrageenan-immobilized cells, respectively. During semicontinuous cultivation of agar-alginate gel-cell mixture, production of PGA by 10 ml mixture was increased from 2nd to 3rd run whereas, increased till the 4th run using 15ml mixture. Adsorption was the most suitable immobilization technique for production of PGA and the sponge cubes was the preferred matrix recording 43.2 g/l of PGA with the highest cell adsorption. Furthermore, no PGA was detected when B. licheniformis cells were adsorbed on wood and pumice. Although luffa pulp-adsorbed cells recorded the highest PGA production (50.4 g/l), cell adsorption was the lowest. Semicontinuous cultivation of B. licheniformis cells adsorbed on sponge led to increase of PGA production till the 3rd run and reached 55.5 g/l then slightly decreased in the 4th run. The successful use of fixed-bed bioreactor for semicontinuous cultivation of B. licheniformis cells held on sponge cubes (3 runs, 96 hours/run) provides insight for the potential biotechnological production of PGA by immobilized cells. PMID:24031418

  14. Evaluation of PEG and mPEG-co-(PGA-co-PDL) microparticles loaded with sodium diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Tawfeek, Hesham M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize and evaluate novel biodegradable polyesters namely; poly(ethylene glycol)-Poly(glycerol adipate-co-ω-pentadecalactone), PEG-PGA-co-PDL-PEG, and poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether)-Poly(glycerol adipate-co-ω-pentadecalactone), PGA-co-PDL-PEGme as an alternative sustained release carrier for lung delivery compared with non-PEG containing polymer PGA-co-PDL. The co-polymers were synthesized through lipase catalysis ring opening polymerization reaction and characterized using GPC, FT-IR, 1H-NMR and surface contact angle. Furthermore, microparticles containing a model hydrophilic drug, sodium diclofenac, were prepared via spray drying from a modified single emulsion and characterized for their encapsulation efficiency, geometrical particle size, zeta potential, tapped density, primary aerodynamic diameter, amorphous nature, morphology, in vitro release and the aerosolization performance. Microparticles fabricated from mPEG-co-polymer can be targeted to the lung periphery with an optimum in vitro deposition. Furthermore, a significantly higher in vitro release (p > 0.05, ANOVA/Dunnett’s) was observed with the PEG and mPEG-co-polymers compared to PGA-co-PDL. In addition, these co-polymers have a good safety profile upon testing on human bronchial epithelial, 16HBE14o- cell lines. PMID:24227959

  15. Effect of topical prostaglandin PGA2, PGA2 isopropyl ester, and PGF2 alpha isopropyl ester on intraocular pressure in normotensive and glaucomatous canine eyes.

    PubMed

    Gum, G G; Kingsbury, S; Whitley, R D; Garcia, A; Gelatt, K N

    1991-01-01

    Topical instillations of 1.0, 10, and 20 micrograms/50 microliters of prostaglandin PGA2, 0.5 and 1.0 microgram/50 microliters of PGA2 isopropyl ester, and 0.5, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 micrograms/50 microliters of PGF2 alpha isopropyl ester were evaluated in the normal dogs and glaucomatous beagles eyes. Each concentration of drug was evaluated for a seven day period. On Day 1 baseline values were obtained, days 2-4, the drug was instilled (once a day) and on days 5-7 post-treatment values were measured. All concentrations of PGA2 failed to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) in the normal and the glaucomatous (P greater than 0.72) dogs. PGA2 isopropyl ester decreased IOP in the normal dogs and in the glaucomatous beagles (P less than 0.01). The declines in IOP were significant at 1/2 to 1 hour and continued for up to 5 hours. No significant change in IOP occurred in the non-treated fellow eye of the normotensive dog (P less than 0.54) and the glaucomatous beagle (P less than 0.29). All concentrations of PGF2 alpha isopropyl ester significantly decreased IOP in the treated eyes of the normotensive dog (P less than 0.05) and the glaucomatous beagle (P less than 0.01). The significant change in IOP occurred within one hour after the instillation of PGF2 alpha isopropyl ester. The IOP remained lower than the baseline pressures 24 hours post-treatment for both the normotensive and glaucomatous dogs. Maximal change in IOP for normal dogs was a decrease of 9 mm Hg while the glaucomatous beagle had a decrease of 19 mm Hg. No significant change in IOP occurred in the non-treated fellow eye of the normotensive animal (P less than 0.16) and the glaucomatous beagle (P less than 0.40). The side effects of PGF2 alpha isopropyl ester were miosis and mild conjunctival irritation. PMID:1919268

  16. Properties of starch-polyglutamic acid (PGA) graft copolymer prepared by microwave irradiation - the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and rheology studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rheological properties of waxy starch-'-polygutamic acid (PGA) graft copolymers were investigated. The starch-PGA copolymers absorbed water and formed gels, which exhibited concentration-dependent viscoelastic solid properties. Higher starch-PGA concentrations resulted in stronger viscoelastic p...

  17. Influence of weak motion data to magnitude dependence of PGA prediction model in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Data recorded by the STS2-sensors at the Austrian Seismic Network were differentiated and used to derive the PGA prediction model for Austria (Jia and Lenhardt, 2010). Before using it to our hazard assessment and real time shakemap, it is necessary to validate this model and obtain a deep understanding about it. In this paper, influence of weak motion data to the magnitude dependence of our prediction model was studied. In addition, spatial PGA residuals between the measurements and predictions were investigated as well. There are 127 earthquakes with a magnitude between 3 and 5.4 that were used to derive the PGA prediction model published in 2011. Unfortunately, 90% of used PGA measurements were made for the events with a magnitude smaller than 4. Only ten quakes among them have a magnitude larger than 4, which is the important magnitude range that needs our attention and hazard assessment. In this investigation, 127 earthquakes were divided into two groups: the first group only includes events with a magnitude smaller than 4, while the second group contains quakes with a magnitude larger than 4. By using the same modeling for estimating PGA attenuation in 2011, coefficients of the model were inverted from the measurements in two groups and compared to the one based on the complete data set. It was found that the group with the weak quakes returned results that only have small differences to the one from all 127 events, while the group with strong quakes (ml> 4) gave greater magnitude dependence than the model published in 2011. The distance coefficients stayed nearly unchanged for all three inversions. As the second step, spatial PGA residuals between the measurements and the predictions from our model were investigated. As explained in Jia and Lenhardt (2013), there are some differences in the site amplifications between the West- and the East-Austria. For a fair comparison, residuals were normalized for each station before the investigation. Then normalized

  18. The pgaABCD Locus of Escherichia coli Promotes the Synthesis of a Polysaccharide Adhesin Required for Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Preston, James F.; Romeo, Tony

    2004-01-01

    Production of a polysaccharide matrix is a hallmark of bacterial biofilms, but the composition of matrix polysaccharides and their functions are not widely understood. Previous studies of the regulation of Escherichia coli biofilm formation suggested the involvement of an unknown adhesin. We now establish that the pgaABCD (formerly ycdSRQP) locus affects biofilm development by promoting abiotic surface binding and intercellular adhesion. All of the pga genes are required for optimal biofilm formation under a variety of growth conditions. A pga-dependent cell-bound polysaccharide was isolated and determined by nuclear magnetic resonance analyses to consist of unbranched β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, a polymer previously unknown from the gram-negative bacteria but involved in adhesion by staphylococci. The pga genes are predicted to encode envelope proteins involved in synthesis, translocation, and possibly surface docking of this polysaccharide. As predicted, if poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc (PGA) mediates cohesion, metaperiodate caused biofilm dispersal and the release of intact cells, whereas treatment with protease or other lytic enzymes had no effect. The pgaABCD operon exhibits features of a horizontally transferred locus and is present in a variety of eubacteria. Therefore, we propose that PGA serves as an adhesin that stabilizes biofilms of E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:15090514

  19. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26221956

  20. Seismic Intensity, PGA and PGV for the South Napa Earthquake, August 24, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Pickering, A.; Mooney, W. D.; Crewdson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the statistical relationship between Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) and peak ground acceleration (PGA) and peak ground velocity (PGV). The Mw 6.0 South Napa (California) earthquake of August 24, 2014 provides valuable data to examine these relationships for both urban and rural environments within northern California. The finite fault model (D. Dreger, 2014) indicates that the fault rupture propagated predominantly NNW and up-dip from a 11-km-deep hypocenter. The epicentral location was 8 km SSW of downtown Napa. Recorded PGA north of the epicenter is as high as 600 cm/s2 and PGV locally reaches 80 cm/s. Field studies by two teams of investigators were conducted on August 24-26 and September 8-11, 2014 to assign MMI values at 108 sites. The highest MMI values are strongly localized along the NNW-SSE rupture trend north of the epicenter. Parts of the city of Napa and some communities several km farther north on Dry Creek Road were found to have experienced shaking intensities of MMI VII to VIII. The observed effects include houses moved off their foundations, chimney collapse or damage, cracked foundations and/or interior walls, broken windows, and the lateral displacement of heavy furniture. Communities to the east and west of this zone of high seismic intensity reported significantly lower values of MMI, typically IV and V even at distances as close as 10 km from the mapped surface rupture. In comparison with previous estimates by Wald et al. (1999) and Dangkua and Cramer (2011), we find that MMI III-VIII uniformly correspond to significantly larger (>150%) PGA and PGV values, as reported by the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data (2014). We attribute this observation to two primary factors: (1) improved earthquake engineering in the post-Loma Prieta earthquake era that has led to building construction, both new and retrofitted, that is more resistant to earthquake strong ground motions; and (2) a frequency band relevant

  1. rPbPga1 from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Activates Mast Cells and Macrophages via NFkB

    PubMed Central

    Valim, Clarissa Xavier Resende; da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Assis, Mariana Aprigio; Fernandes, Fabricio Freitas; Coelho, Paulo Sergio Rodrigues; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2015-01-01

    Background The fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the leading etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic granulomatous disease that typically affects the lungs. Cell wall components of P. brasiliensis interact with host cells and influence the pathogenesis of PCM. In yeast, many glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are important in the initial contact with the host, mediating host-yeast interactions that culminate with the disease. PbPga1 is a GPI anchored protein located on the surface of the yeast P. brasiliensis that is recognized by sera from PCM patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Endogenous PbPga1 was localized to the surface of P. brasiliensis yeast cells in the lungs of infected mice using a polyclonal anti-rPbPga1 antibody. Furthermore, macrophages stained with anti-CD38 were associated with P. brasiliensis containing granulomas. Additionally, rPbPga1 activated the transcription factor NFkB in the macrophage cell line Raw 264.7 Luc cells, containing the luciferase gene downstream of the NFkB promoter. After 24 h of incubation with rPbPga1, alveolar macrophages from BALB/c mice were stimulated to release TNF-α, IL-4 and NO. Mast cells, identified by toluidine blue staining, were also associated with P. brasiliensis containing granulomas. Co-culture of P. Brasiliensis yeast cells with RBL-2H3 mast cells induced morphological changes on the surface of the mast cells. Furthermore, RBL-2H3 mast cells were degranulated by P. brasiliensis yeast cells, but not by rPbPga1, as determined by the release of beta-hexosaminidase. However, RBL-2H3 cells activated by rPbPga1 released the inflammatory interleukin IL-6 and also activated the transcription factor NFkB in GFP-reporter mast cells. The transcription factor NFAT was not activated when the mast cells were incubated with rPbPga1. Conclusions/Significance The results indicate that PbPga1 may act as a modulator protein in PCM pathogenesis and serve as a useful target for

  2. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes.

    PubMed

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García-Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  3. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García- Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  4. Estimation of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) for Peninsular Malaysia using geospatial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri Manafizad, Amir; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Abdullahi, Saleh

    2016-06-01

    Among the various types of natural disasters, earthquake is considered as one of the most destructive events which impose a great amount of human fatalities and economic losses. Visualization of earthquake events and estimation of peak ground motions provides a strong tool for scientists and authorities to predict and mitigate the aftereffects of earthquakes. In addition it is useful for some businesses like insurance companies to evaluate the amount of investing risk. Although Peninsular Malaysian is situated in the stable part of Sunda plate, it is seismically influenced by very active earthquake sources of Sumatra's fault and subduction zones. This study modelled the seismic zones and estimates maximum credible earthquake (MCE) based on classified data for period 1900 to 2014. The deterministic approach was implemented for the analysis. Attenuation equations were used for two zones. Results show that, the PGA produced from subduction zone is from 2-64 (gal) and from the fault zone varies from 1-191(gal). In addition, the PGA generated from fault zone is more critical than subduction zone for selected seismic model.

  5. Immobilization and Characterization of Penicillin G Acylase (PGA) Immobilized on Magnetic Ni₀.₅Zn₀.₅Fe₂O₄ Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruijiang; Fan, Jiawen; Zhang, Yewang; Wang, Peng; Shen, Xiangqian

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Ni₀.₅Zn₀.₅Fe₂O₄ nanoparticles were prepared via the solution combustion process and their microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The as-prepared magnetic Ni₀.₅Zn₀.₅Fe₂O₄ nanoparticles are characterized with average grain size of about 20 nm and magnetization of 90.3 Am²/kg. The surface of magnetic Ni₀.₅Zn₀.₅Fe₂O₄ nanoparticles was modified by use of sodium silicate and N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride, and the penicillin G acylase (PGA) was successfully immobilized on the surface-modified magnetic Ni₀.₅Zn₀.₅Fe₂O₄ nanoparticles. The results show that the activity for the immobilized PGA is affected less by pH and temperature than that for the free PGA, and the immobilized PGA exhibits a high effective activity, good stability of enzyme catalyst. This immobilized PGA on magnetic Ni₀.₅Zn₀.₅Fe₂O₄ nanoparticles can be separated from the solution by the external magnetic field for cyclic utilization, and they could retain about 70% of initial enzyme activity after 11 consecutive operations. The kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) were determined, and the value of Km for the immobilized PGA (204.53 mmol/L) is higher than that of the free enzyme (3.50 mmol/L), while Vmax (1.93 mmol/min) is also larger than that of the free enzyme (0.838 mmol/min). PMID:27398443

  6. Observation to empirical PGA ratio estimates the relative thickness of sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzli, M.; Abidin, Z.; Sunarjo

    2016-05-01

    The amplification of earthquake seismic waves near the surface can vary significantly spatially due to differences in the thickness of sediments above the bedrock. Normally, the determination of sediment thickness is done by comparing the amplitude of the earthquake waveform recorded on the surface with the waveforms recorded on the sensors located on bedrock or borehole. This method, however, is still difficult to use, especially in Indonesia due to the small number of borehole sensors. As an alternative we propose a method to estimate the relative thickness of sediment in a region. It can be done by calculating the PGA ratio between the waveform recorded on the surface with the one calculated using an empirical formula. We then validate these results using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) method.

  7. Prediction of the variation of PGA strength during hydrolysis by a combination of empirical equation, density functional theory calculation, and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Ju, Shin-Pon; Huang, Wei-Chun; Lin, Jenn-Sen; Chen, Chien-Chia

    2014-07-01

    The strength variation of polyglycolic acid (PGA) during the hydrolysis process was predicted by the Flory-Fox model with all required parameters obtained by the theoretical approach. The density functional theory (DFT) calculation with the simple transition theory was used to derive the degradation rate constants of PGA intermediate at different temperatures and external load. The ultimate strength of PGA with infinite chain length, can be obtained by linearly extrapolating the ultimate strengths of three PGA materials with shorter chains. Although this Flory-Fox model formula combined with DFT calculation and MD simulation can only provide a qualitative comparison to those by experimental approaches, the current theoretical approach can provide an economical and quick way to assess the variation of PGA ultimate strength during hydrolysis.

  8. Strong motion PGA prediction for southwestern China from small earthquake records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhengru; Tao, Xiaxin; Cui, Anping

    2016-05-01

    For regions without enough strong ground motion records, a seismology-based method is adopted to predict motion PGA (peak ground acceleration) values on rock sites with parameters from small earthquake data, recorded by regional broadband digital monitoring networks. Sichuan and Yunnan regions in southwestern China are selected for this case study. Five regional parameters of source spectrum and attenuation are acquired from a joint inversion by the micro-genetic algorithm. PGAs are predicted for earthquakes with moment magnitude (Mw) 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 respectively and a series of distances. The result is compared with limited regional strong motion data in the corresponding interval Mw ± 0.5. Most of the results ideally pass through the data clusters, except the case of Mw7.0 in the Sichuan region, which shows an obvious slow attenuation due to a lack of observed data from larger earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7.0). For further application, the parameters are adopted in strong motion synthesis at two near-fault stations during the great Wenchuan Earthquake M8.0 in 2008.

  9. A Synthetic Bandwidth Method for High-Resolution SAR Based on PGA in the Range Dimension.

    PubMed

    Li, Jincheng; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic bandwidth technique is an effective method to achieve ultra-high range resolution in an SAR system. There are mainly two challenges in its implementation. The first one is the estimation and compensation of system errors, such as the timing deviation and the amplitude-phase error. Due to precision limitation of the radar instrument, construction of the sub-band signals becomes much more complicated with these errors. The second challenge lies in the combination method, that is how to fit the sub-band signals together into a much wider bandwidth. In this paper, a novel synthetic bandwidth approach is presented. It considers two main errors of the multi-sub-band SAR system and compensates them by a two-order PGA (phase gradient auto-focus)-based method, named TRPGA. Furthermore, an improved cut-paste method is proposed to combine the signals in the frequency domain. It exploits the redundancy of errors and requires only a limited amount of data in the azimuth direction for error estimation. Moreover, the up-sampling operation can be avoided in the combination process. Imaging results based on both simulated and real data are presented to validate the proposed approach. PMID:26131679

  10. A Synthetic Bandwidth Method for High-Resolution SAR Based on PGA in the Range Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jincheng; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic bandwidth technique is an effective method to achieve ultra-high range resolution in an SAR system. There are mainly two challenges in its implementation. The first one is the estimation and compensation of system errors, such as the timing deviation and the amplitude-phase error. Due to precision limitation of the radar instrument, construction of the sub-band signals becomes much more complicated with these errors. The second challenge lies in the combination method, that is how to fit the sub-band signals together into a much wider bandwidth. In this paper, a novel synthetic bandwidth approach is presented. It considers two main errors of the multi-sub-band SAR system and compensates them by a two-order PGA (phase gradient auto-focus)-based method, named TRPGA. Furthermore, an improved cut-paste method is proposed to combine the signals in the frequency domain. It exploits the redundancy of errors and requires only a limited amount of data in the azimuth direction for error estimation. Moreover, the up-sampling operation can be avoided in the combination process. Imaging results based on both simulated and real data are presented to validate the proposed approach. PMID:26131679

  11. End-Group Effects on the Properties of PEG-co-PGA Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Bencherif, Sidi A.; Srinivasan, Abiraman; Sheehan, Jeffrey A.; Walker, Lynn M.; Gayathri, Chakicherla; Gil, Roberto; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Washburn, Newell R.

    2009-01-01

    A series of resorbable poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(glycolic acid) macromonomers have been synthesized with the chemistries from three different photopolymerizable end-groups (acrylates, methacrylates, and urethane methacrylates). The aim of the study is to examine the effects of the chemistry of the cross-linker group on the properties of photocross-linkable hydrogels. PEG-co-PGA (4KG5) hydrogels were prepared by photopolymerization with high vinyl group conversion as confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy using DOSY 1D pulse sequence. Our study reveals that the nature of end-groups in a moderately amphiphilic polymer can adjust the distribution and size of the micellar configuration in water leading to changes in the macroscopic structure of hydrogels. By varying the chemistry of the cross-linker group (diacrylates; DA, dimethacrylates; DM, and urethane dimethacrylates; UDM), we determined that the hydrophobocity of a single core polymer consisting of poly(glycolic acid) could be fine-tuned leading to significant variations in the mechanical, swelling, and degradation properties of the gels. In addition, the effects of cross-linker chemistry on cytotoxicity and proliferation were examined. Cytotoxicity assays showed that all the three types of hydrogels (4KG5 DA, DM, and UDM) were biocompatible and the introduction of RGD ligand enhanced cell adhesion. However, differences in gel properties and stability differentially affected the spreading and proliferation of myoblast C2C12 cells. PMID:19328754

  12. Improved specific productivity in cephalexin synthesis by immobilized PGA in silica magnetic micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Susana M S A; Fernandes, Pedro; Fonseca, Luís P

    2010-12-01

    There is a marked trend in pharmaceutical industry towards the replacement of classical organic methods by "green" alternatives that minimize or eliminate the generation of waste and avoid, where possible, the use of toxic and/or hazardous reagents and solvents. In this work the kinetically controlled synthesis of cephalexin by soluble and penicillin G acylase immobilized in sol-gel micro-particles with magnetic properties was performed in aqueous media with PGME and 7-ADCA as substrates, at different concentrations of substrate, temperature, pH, enzyme to substrate ratio and acyl donor to nucleophile ratio. Excess acyl donor had a strong effect on cephalexin productivity. A PGME/7-ADCA ratio of 3 was considered optimum. A maximum specific productivity of 5.9 mmol h(-1), gbiocatalyst(-1) at 160 mM 7-ADCA, 480 mM PGME and low enzyme to substrate ratio at 32.5 U mmol(-1) 7-ADCA was obtained with immobilized PGA in full aqueous medium, suggesting that diffusional limitations were minimized when compared with other commercial biocatalysts. A half-life of 133 h for the immobilized biocatalyst was estimated during cephalexin synthesis in the presence of 100 mM 7-ADCA and 300 mM PGME, in 50 mM Tris/HCl at pH 7.2 and 14°C. These results compare quite favorably with those previously reported for the kinetically controlled synthesis of cephalexin. PMID:20632377

  13. Improved antifungal activity of amphotericin B-loaded TPGS-b-(PCL-ran-PGA) nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaolong; Jiao, Ronghong; Xie, Chunmei; Xu, Lifa; Huo, Zhen; Dai, Jingjing; Qian, Yunyun; Xu, Weiwen; Hou, Wei; Wang, Jiang; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To develop amphotericin B-loaded biodegradable TPGS-b-(PCL-ran-PGA) nanoparticles (PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs) for fungal infection treatment, PLGA-TPGS NPs and PLGA NPs were synthesized by a modified double emulsion method and characterized in terms of size and size distribution, morphology and zeta potential. Drug encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, and in vitro/vivo tests against Candida glabrata were completed. The data showed that both of the two AMB-loaded NPs (PLGA-AMB NPs, PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs) achieved significantly higher level of antifungal effects than water suspended AMB. In comparison with PLGA-AMB NPs, PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs had a stronger protective effect against candidiasis and gained an advantage of prolonged antifungal efficacy. In conclusion, PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs system significantly improves AMB bioavailability by increasing the aqueous dispersibility and improving the antifungal activity. And this would be an excellent choice for the antifungal treatment of the entrapped drug because of its low toxicity and higher effectiveness. PMID:26131089

  14. A digitally controlled AGC loop circuitry for GNSS receiver chip with a binary weighted accurate dB-linear PGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Jin; Yiqi, Zhuang; Yue, Yin; Miao, Cui

    2015-03-01

    A novel digitally controlled automatic gain control (AGC) loop circuitry for the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver chip is presented. The entire AGC loop contains a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an AGC circuit and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is implemented in a 0.18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and measured. A binary-weighted approach is proposed in the PGA to achieve wide dB-linear gain control with small gain error. With binary-weighted cascaded amplifiers for coarse gain control, and parallel binary-weighted trans-conductance amplifier array for fine gain control, the PGA can provide a 64 dB dynamic range from -4 to 60 dB in 1.14 dB gain steps with a less than 0.15 dB gain error. Based on the Gaussian noise statistic characteristic of the GNSS signal, a digital AGC circuit is also proposed with low area and fast settling. The feed-backward AGC loop occupies an area of 0.27 mm2 and settles within less than 165 μs while consuming an average current of 1.92 mA at 1.8 V.

  15. Antifungal efficacy of itraconazole-loaded TPGS-b-(PCL-ran-PGA) nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lixin; Hu, Bicheng; Chen, Hongbo; Li, Shanshan; Hu, Yuqian; Zheng, Yi; Wu, Xinxing

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to formulate biodegradable itraconazole (ITZ)-loaded d-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-b-poly(e-caprolactone-ran-glycolide) (TPGS-b-(PCL-ran-PGA); TPP) nanoparticles (NPs) (designed as ITZ-loaded TPP NPs) to improve antifungal efficacy. ITZ-loaded TPP NPs were prepared by a modified double-emulsion method, and their size distribution, morphology, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug-release profile, and antifungal effects were characterized. The cytotoxicity of ITZ-loaded-TPP NPs on HeLa cells and fibroblasts was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. The in vivo antifungal activity of ITZ-loaded-TPP NPs was examined in mice by administrating 5×105 colony forming units of Candida albicans through the tail vein. The survival rate and survival time of the mice was observed. The fungal count and pathology of lung tissue was analyzed. The data showed that ITZ-loaded-TPP NPs have size of 265±5.8 nm, zeta potential of −31±0.5 mV, high encapsulation efficiency (95%), and extended drug-release profile. ITZ-loaded-TPP NPs at a high concentration of 25 mg/mL had no cytotoxicity on HeLa cells and fibroblasts. Furthermore, ITZ-loaded-TPP NPs achieved a higher level of antifungal activity both in vitro and in vivo. The survival rate and duration was higher in mice treated by ITZ-loaded-TPP NPs than in the other groups (P<0.05). In conclusion, ITZ-loaded-TPP NPs significantly improved ITZ bioavailability by increasing its aqueous dispersibility and extending the duration of drug release, thereby improving the antifungal efficacy of the ITZ agent. PMID:25733833

  16. Dry powder pulmonary delivery of cationic PGA-co-PDL nanoparticles with surface adsorbed model protein.

    PubMed

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Alfagih, Iman M; Dennison, Sarah R; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Merchant, Zahra; Hutcheon, Gillian A; Saleem, Imran Y

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary delivery of macromolecules has been the focus of attention as an alternate route of delivery with benefits such as; large surface area, thin alveolar epithelium, rapid absorption and extensive vasculature. In this study, a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was adsorbed onto cationic PGA-co-PDL polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by a single emulsion solvent evaporation method using a cationic surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) at 2% w/w (particle size: 128.64±06.01 nm and zeta-potential: +42.32±02.70 mV). The optimum cationic NPs were then surface adsorbed with BSA, NP:BSA (100:4) ratio yielded 10.01±1.19 μg of BSA per mg of NPs. The BSA adsorbed NPs (5 mg/ml) were then spray-dried in an aqueous suspension of L-leucine (7.5 mg/ml, corresponding to a ratio of 1:1.5/NP:L-leu) using a Büchi-290 mini-spray dryer to produce nanocomposite microparticles (NCMPs) containing cationic NPs. The aerosol properties showed a fine particle fraction (FPF, dae<4.46 μm) of 70.67±4.07% and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 2.80±0.21 μm suggesting a deposition in the respiratory bronchiolar region of the lungs.The cell viability was 75.76±03.55% (A549 cell line) at 156.25 μg/ml concentration after 24 h exposure. SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism (CD) confirmed that the primary and secondary structure of the released BSA was maintained. Moreover, the released BSA showed 78.76±1.54% relative esterolytic activity compared to standard BSA. PMID:26169146

  17. iNKT Cells Are Responsible for the Apoptotic Reduction of Basophils That Mediate Th2 Immune Responses Elicited by Papain in Mice Following γPGA Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sung Won; Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Bacillus subtilis-derived poly-gamma glutamic acid (γPGA) treatment suppresses the development of allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Although basophils, an innate immune cell, are known to play critical roles in allergic immune responses and repeated long-term administration of γPGA results in decreased splenic basophils in an AD murine model, the underlying mechanisms by which γPGA regulates basophil frequency remain unclear. To investigate how γPGA modulates basophils, we employed basophil-mediated Th2 induction in vivo model elicited by the allergen papain protease. Repeated injection of γPGA reduced the abundance of basophils and their production of IL4 in mice, consistent with our previous study using NC/Nga AD model mice. The depletion of basophils by a single injection of γPGA was dependent on the TLR4/DC/IL12 axis. CD1d-dependent Vα14 TCR invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are known to regulate a variety of immune responses, such as allergy. Because iNKT cell activation is highly sensitive to IL12 produced by DCs, we evaluated whether the effect of γPGA on basophils is mediated by iNKT cell activation. We found that in vivo γPGA treatment did not induce the reduction of basophils in iNKT cell-deficient CD1d KO mice, suggesting the critical role of iNKT cells in γPGA-mediated basophil depletion at the early time points. Furthermore, increased apoptotic basophil reduction triggered by iNKT cells upon γPGA stimulation was mainly attributed to Th1 cytokines such as IFNγ and TNFα, consequently resulting in inhibition of papain-induced Th2 differentiation via diminishing basophil-derived IL4. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that γPGA-induced iNKT cell polarization toward the Th1 phenotype induces apoptotic basophil depletion, leading to the suppression of Th2 immune responses. Thus, elucidation of the crosstalk between innate immune cells will contribute to the design and

  18. iNKT Cells Are Responsible for the Apoptotic Reduction of Basophils That Mediate Th2 Immune Responses Elicited by Papain in Mice Following γPGA Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Bacillus subtilis-derived poly-gamma glutamic acid (γPGA) treatment suppresses the development of allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Although basophils, an innate immune cell, are known to play critical roles in allergic immune responses and repeated long-term administration of γPGA results in decreased splenic basophils in an AD murine model, the underlying mechanisms by which γPGA regulates basophil frequency remain unclear. To investigate how γPGA modulates basophils, we employed basophil-mediated Th2 induction in vivo model elicited by the allergen papain protease. Repeated injection of γPGA reduced the abundance of basophils and their production of IL4 in mice, consistent with our previous study using NC/Nga AD model mice. The depletion of basophils by a single injection of γPGA was dependent on the TLR4/DC/IL12 axis. CD1d-dependent Vα14 TCR invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are known to regulate a variety of immune responses, such as allergy. Because iNKT cell activation is highly sensitive to IL12 produced by DCs, we evaluated whether the effect of γPGA on basophils is mediated by iNKT cell activation. We found that in vivo γPGA treatment did not induce the reduction of basophils in iNKT cell-deficient CD1d KO mice, suggesting the critical role of iNKT cells in γPGA-mediated basophil depletion at the early time points. Furthermore, increased apoptotic basophil reduction triggered by iNKT cells upon γPGA stimulation was mainly attributed to Th1 cytokines such as IFNγ and TNFα, consequently resulting in inhibition of papain-induced Th2 differentiation via diminishing basophil-derived IL4. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that γPGA-induced iNKT cell polarization toward the Th1 phenotype induces apoptotic basophil depletion, leading to the suppression of Th2 immune responses. Thus, elucidation of the crosstalk between innate immune cells will contribute to the design and

  19. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of pGA45, a 140,698-bp IncFIIY Plasmid Encoding bla IMI-3-Mediated Carbapenem Resistance, from River Sediment.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid pGA45 was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River using Escherichia coli CV601 (gfp-tagged) as recipients and indigenous bacteria from sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to imipenem which belongs to carbapenem group. Plasmid pGA45 was fully sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The complete sequence of plasmid pGA45 was 140,698 bp in length with an average G + C content of 52.03%. Sequence analysis shows that pGA45 belongs to IncFIIY group and harbors a backbone region which shares high homology and gene synteny to several other IncF plasmids including pNDM1_EC14653, pYDC644, pNDM-Ec1GN574, pRJF866, pKOX_NDM1, and pP10164-NDM. In addition to the backbone region, plasmid pGA45 harbors two notable features including one bla IMI-3-containing region and one type VI secretion system region. The bla IMI-3-containing region is responsible for bacteria carbapenem resistance and the type VI secretion system region is probably involved in bacteria virulence, respectively. Plasmid pGA45 represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of the bla IMI-harboring plasmid from environment sample and the sequencing of this plasmid provided insight into the architecture used for the dissemination of bla IMI carbapenemase genes. PMID:26941718

  20. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of pGA45, a 140,698-bp IncFIIY Plasmid Encoding blaIMI-3-Mediated Carbapenem Resistance, from River Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid pGA45 was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River using Escherichia coli CV601 (gfp-tagged) as recipients and indigenous bacteria from sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to imipenem which belongs to carbapenem group. Plasmid pGA45 was fully sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The complete sequence of plasmid pGA45 was 140,698 bp in length with an average G + C content of 52.03%. Sequence analysis shows that pGA45 belongs to IncFIIY group and harbors a backbone region which shares high homology and gene synteny to several other IncF plasmids including pNDM1_EC14653, pYDC644, pNDM-Ec1GN574, pRJF866, pKOX_NDM1, and pP10164-NDM. In addition to the backbone region, plasmid pGA45 harbors two notable features including one blaIMI-3-containing region and one type VI secretion system region. The blaIMI-3-containing region is responsible for bacteria carbapenem resistance and the type VI secretion system region is probably involved in bacteria virulence, respectively. Plasmid pGA45 represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of the blaIMI-harboring plasmid from environment sample and the sequencing of this plasmid provided insight into the architecture used for the dissemination of blaIMI carbapenemase genes. PMID:26941718

  1. Investigating the role of source mechanism, surface topography, and attenuation on the observed PGA pattern in May 28, 2004, Mw 6.2 Baladeh earthquake (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkooti, Ehsan; Shomali, Zaher Hossein; Pakzad, Mehrdad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we use seismic waveform simulation to investigate the influence of source mechanism complexity, surface topography, and quality factor on the observed peak ground motions in May 28, 2004, moment magnitude (Mw) 6.2 Baladeh earthquake. The observed peak ground acceleration (PGA) pattern in this event, which is the biggest earthquake to hit the Central Alborz Mountains of Iran in modern instrumental era, is irregular in some respects. First, the observed PGA contours are elongated toward north-west and, second, the maximum observed PGA value of 1049 cm/s2 on the horizontal component of Hasan Keyf station 50 km away from the epicenter is quite high and irregular for an earthquake of this magnitude, at such long distance. In this study, we employ the spectral element method, implemented in SPECFEM3D software package to simulate the 3D wave propagation from several source models in the area. Our results suggest directivity effect is the main cause of the anomalous observations in this earthquake and could account for the elongation of PGA contours and also the anomalous maximum PGA value observed at Hasan Keyf strong motion station. We show that the surface topography has minor effect on the observed peak ground acceleration and the resulting PGA maps. Also by finding the bounds of seismic quality factor effect on the peak ground acceleration values, we show that this factor could not account for the elongation of iso-acceleration contours in the north-west direction.

  2. The structure of the deacetylase domain of Escherichia coli PgaB, an enzyme required for biofilm formation: a circularly permuted member of the carbohydrate esterase 4 family.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Takashi; Noguchi, Hiroki; Yoshida, Hisashi; Park, Sam Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is an extremely widespread phenomenon involving the secretion of a protective exopolysaccharide matrix which helps the bacteria to attach to surfaces and to overcome a variety of stresses in different environments. This matrix may also include proteins, lipids, DNA and metal ions. Its composition depends on the bacterial species and growth conditions, but one of the most widely found components is polymeric β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA). Several studies have suggested that PGA is an essential component of biofilm and it is produced by numerous bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Yersinia pestis, Bordetella spp. and Actinobacillus spp. In E. coli, PGA production and export are dependent on four genes that form a single operon, pgaABCD, which appears to have been transferred between various species. Biofilms themselves are recognized as environments in which such horizontal gene transfer may occur. The pga operon of E. coli, which is even found in innocuous laboratory strains, is highly homologous to that from the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis, and biofilm is believed to play an important role in the transmission of Yersinia. The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of PgaB, which has deacetylase activity, is described and compared with models of other deacetylases. PMID:23275162

  3. Effect of biomimetic conditions on mechanical and structural integrity of PGA/P4HB and electrospun PCL scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Klouda, Leda; Vaz, Claudia M; Mol, Anita; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2008-03-01

    The selection of an appropriate scaffold represents one major key to success in tissue engineering. In cardiovascular applications, where a load-bearing structure is required, scaffolds need to demonstrate sufficient mechanical properties and importantly, reliable retention of these properties during the developmental phase of the tissue engineered construct. The effect of in vitro culture conditions, time and mechanical loading on the retention of mechanical properties of two scaffold types was investigated. First candidate tested was a poly-glycolic acid non-woven fiber mesh, coated with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (PGA/P4HB), the standard scaffold used successfully in cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. As an alternative, an electrospun poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) scaffold was used. A 15-day dynamic loading protocol was applied to the scaffolds. Additionally, control scaffolds were incubated statically. All studies were performed in a simulated physiological environment (phosphate-buffered saline solution, T=37 degrees C). PGA/P4HB scaffolds showed a dramatic decrease in mechanical properties as a function of incubation time and straining. Mechanical loading had a significant effect on PCL scaffold properties. Degradation as well as fiber fatigue caused by loading promote loss of mechanical properties in PGA/P4HB scaffolds. For PCL, fiber reorganization due to straining seems to be the main reason behind the brittle behavior that was pronounced in these scaffolds. It is suggested that those changes in scaffolds' mechanical properties must be considered at the application of in vitro tissue engineering protocols and should ideally be taken over by tissue formation to maintain mechanically stable tissue constructs. PMID:17701317

  4. Imaging the bone marrow stem cells morphogenesis in PGA scaffold by multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic (SHG) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Teng, Shu-Wen; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Lo, Wen; Sun, Yen; Lin, Tze-Yu; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Jiang, Ching-Chuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The ability to image tissue engineering products without damaging histological procedures is important for the understanding of the dynamics of tissue reorganization and formation. In this work, we test the ability of multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy to image engineered tissues following chrondrogenic induction. The system we used is human bone marrow stem cells seeded in the scaffold polyglycolic acid (PGA). Our results show that autofluorescence can be used to image cells while second harmonic generation signal can be used to visualize the synthesis of extracellular matrix. This approach demonstrates the ability of multiphoton imaging in the study of tissue engineering products.

  5. ToF-SIMS evaluation of calcium-containing silica/γ-PGA hybrid systems for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daming; Nakamura, Jin; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Jones, Julian R.; McPhail, David S.

    2014-08-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrids have great potential for the production of bioactive scaffolds which have tailored mechanical properties and degradation rates suitable for tissue engineering. For bone regeneration, calcium incorporation into hybrids at low temperatures is important due to its ability to stimulate new bone formation. As a consequence, understanding the homogeneity of the critical inorganic and organic components will be the key to the development of such hybrids. The aim of this interdisciplinary study was to use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to determine the homogeneity of these critical components. We evaluated various sol-gel silica/γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) hybrid systems produced using different routes to introduce the calcium, thereby tailoring and optimizing hybrid syntheses and processing routes. Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) was used to improve the inorganic/organic coupling and its influence on the homogeneity of the hybrid structures was also examined. The results revealed that the calcium salt form of γ-PGA was promising for calcium incorporation since homogeneous products could be obtained. The ToF-SIMS data also indicated that the reaction time of hybrid synthesis and the timing of the addition of DMC can affect the homogeneity of hybrids.

  6. HB-EGF embedded in PGA/PLLA scaffolds via subcritical CO2 augments the production of tissue engineered intestine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchun; Nelson, Tyler; Cromeens, Barrett; Rager, Terrence; Lannutti, John; Johnson, Jed; Besner, Gail E

    2016-10-01

    The ability to deliver sustained-release, biologically active growth factors through custom designed tissue engineering scaffolds at sites of tissue regeneration offers great therapeutic opportunity. Due to the short in vivo half-lives of most growth factors, it is challenging to deliver these proteins to sites of interest where they may be used before being degraded. The application of subcritical CO2 uses gas-phase CO2 at subcritical pressures ranging from 41 to 62 bar (595-913 PSI) which avoids foaming by reducing the amount of CO2 dissolved in the polymer and maintains completely reversible plasticization. In the current study, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was embedded into polyglycolic acid (PGA)/Poly-l-latic acid (PLLA) scaffolds via subcritical CO2 exposure for the production of tissue engineered intestine (TEI). PGA fiber morphology after subcritical CO2 exposure was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the distribution of HB-EGF embedded in the scaffold fibers was detected by HB-EGF immunofluorescent staining. In vivo implantation of HB-EGF-embedded scaffolds confirmed significantly improved TEI structure as a result of local delivery of the trophic growth factor. These findings may be critical for the production of TEI in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome in the future. PMID:27380441

  7. A comparative study of different PGA attenuation and error models: Case of 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarki, Ahmed

    2009-03-01

    In order to evaluate the horizontal peak ground acceleration (HPGA) during earthquakes, the author studies the respective efficiency of two existing attenuation models [Mébarki, A., 2003a, Risques sismiques: aléas, vulnérabilité et aide à la décision par cartes SIG. Proceedings of International Conference on "Risks, Vulnerability and Reliability in Construction. Towards a reduction of disasters". ISBN: 9961-891-01-5, pp. 82-97. Algiers, October 11-12, Mébarki, A., 2003b. Proposal of a parametric attenuation model and comparison with some worldwide earthquakes. VII o Congreso Venezolano de Sismologia y Ingenieria Sísmica, Barquisimeto, Venezuela. November 12-13, (CD-ROM), Mébarki A., 2004. Modèle d'atténuation sismique: prédiction probabiliste des pics d'accélération, RFGC — Revue Française de Génie Civil, Hermès Ed., 8 (9-10), 1071-1086]. A comparative study of their performances is done in the case of 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (Taiwan). The reported PGA (Peak Ground Accelerations) values correspond to hypocentral distances ranging from 15 up to 180 km with observed acceleration peaks ranging from (0.04 g) up to (1.16 g). The author considers two kinds of probabilistic distributions for the error model in order to describe the uncertainty and the variability that affect the values of the PGA: a Gamma distribution and a Log-normal distribution. The adopted error models assume that the variability of the PGA is such that its coefficient of variation is equal to 55% [Mébarki, A., 2003a. Risques sismiques: aléas, vulnérabilité et aide à la décision par cartes SIG. Proceedings of International Conference on "Risks, Vulnerability and Reliability in Construction. Towards a reduction of disasters". ISBN: 9961-891-01-5, pp. 82-97. Algiers, October 11-12, Mébarki, A., 2003b. Proposal of a parametric attenuation model and comparison with some worldwide earthquakes. VII o Congreso Venezolano de Sismologia y Ingenieria Sísmica, Barquisimeto, Venezuela

  8. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT).

    PubMed

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J; Scott, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK's first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600-1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  9. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT)

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK’s first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600–1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  10. ER-2 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this film clip, we see an ER-2 on its take off roll and climb as it departs from runway 22 at Edwards AFB, California. In 1981, NASA acquired its first ER-2 aircraft. The agency obtained a second ER-2 in 1989. These airplanes replaced two Lockheed U-2 aircraft, which NASA had used to collect scientific data since 1971. The U-2, and later the ER-2, were based at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, until 1997. In 1997, the ER-2 aircraft and their operations moved to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Since the inaugural flight for this program, August 31, 1971, NASA U-2 and ER-2 aircraft have flown more than 4,000 data missions and test flights in support of scientific research conducted by scientists from NASA, other federal agencies, states, universities, and the private sector. NASA is currently using two ER-2 Airborne Science aircraft as flying laboratories. The aircraft, based at NASA Dryden, collect information about our surroundings, including Earth resources, celestial observations, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, and oceanic processes. The aircraft also are used for electronic sensor research and development, satellite calibration, and satellite data validation. The ER-2 is a versatile aircraft well-suited to perform multiple mission tasks. It is 30 percent larger than the U-2 with a 20 feet longer wingspan and a considerably increased payload over the older airframe. The aircraft has four large pressurized experiment compartments and a high-capacity AC/DC electrical system, permitting it to carry a variety of payloads on a single mission. The modular design of the aircraft permits rapid installation or removal of payloads to meet changing mission requirements. The ER-2 has a range beyond 3,000 miles (4800 kilometers); is capable of long flight duration and can operate at altitudes up to 70,000 feet (21.3 kilometers) if required. Operating at an altitude of 65,000 feet (19.8 kilometers) the ER-2 acquires data

  11. Surface modification of TPGS- b-(PCL- ran-PGA) nanoparticles with polyethyleneimine as a co-delivery system of TRAIL and endostatin for cervical cancer gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Hongbo; Zeng, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhigang; Xiao, Xiaojun; Zhu, Yongqiang; Gu, Dayong; Mei, Lin

    2013-04-01

    The efficient delivery of therapeutic genes into cells of interest is a critical challenge to broad application of non-viral vector systems. In this research, a novel TPGS- b-(PCL- ran-PGA) nanoparticle modified with polyethyleneimine was applied to be a vector of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and endostatin for cervical cancer gene therapy. Firstly, a novel biodegradable copolymer, TPGS- b-(PCL- ran-PGA), was synthesized and characterized. The nanoparticles were fabricated by an emulsion/solvent evaporation method and then further modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI) carrying TRAIL and/or endostatin genes. The uptake of pIRES2-EGFP and/or pDsRED nanoparticles by HeLa cells were observed by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The cell viability of TRAIL/endostatin-loaded nanoparticles in HeLa cells was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2 H-tetrazolium bromide assay. Severe combined immunodeficient mice carrying HeLa tumor xenografts were treated in groups of six including phosphate-buffered saline control, blank TPGS- b-(PCL- ran-PGA) nanoparticles, blank TPGS- b-(PCL- ran-PGA)/PEI nanoparticles, and three types of gene nanoparticles. The activity was assessed using average increase in survival time, body weight, and solid tumor volume. All the specimens were then prepared as formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections for hematoxylin-eosin staining. The data showed that the nanoparticles could efficiently deliver plasmids into HeLa cells. The cytotoxicity of the HeLa cells was significantly increased by TRAIL/endostatin-loaded nanoparticles when compared with control groups. The use of TPGS in combination with TRAIL and endostatin had synergistic antitumor effects. In conclusion, the TRAIL/endostatin-loaded nanoparticles offer considerable potential as an ideal candidate for in vivo cancer gene delivery.

  12. Abundance analysis, spectral variability, and search for the presence of a magnetic field in the typical PGa star HD 19400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Castelli, F.; González, J. F.; Carroll, T. A.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Drake, N. A.; Korhonen, H.; Briquet, M.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to carry out an abundance determination, to search for spectral variability and for the presence of a weak magnetic field in the typical PGa star HD 19400. High-resolution, high signal-to-noise High Accuracy Radial-velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectropolarimetric observations of HD 19400 were obtained at three different epochs in 2011 and 2013. For the first time, we present abundances of various elements determined using an ATLAS12 model, including the abundances of a number of elements not analysed by previous studies, such as Ne I, Ga II, and Xe II. Several lines of As II are also present in the spectra of HD 19400. To study the variability, we compared the behaviour of the line profiles of various elements. We report on the first detection of anomalous shapes of line profiles belonging to Mn and Hg, and the variability of the line profiles belonging to the elements Hg, P, Mn, Fe, and Ga. We suggest that the variability of the line profiles of these elements is caused by their non-uniform surface distribution, similar to the presence of chemical spots detected in HgMn stars. The search for the presence of a magnetic field was carried out using the moment technique and the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method. Our measurements of the magnetic field with the moment technique using 22 Mn II lines indicate the potential existence of a weak variable longitudinal magnetic field on the first epoch. The SVD method applied to the Mn II lines indicates = -76 ± 25 G on the first epoch, and at the same epoch the SVD analysis of the observations using the Fe II lines shows = -91 ± 35 G. The calculated false alarm probability values, 0.008 and 0.003, respectively, are above the value 10-3, indicating no detection.

  13. Ge Nanocluster Enhanced Er Photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Julian; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Haller, Eugene E.

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the enhancement of the Er^3+ photoluminescence (PL) at 1540 nm by the incorporation of Ge nanoclusters into Er-doped silica using ion beams. We found that the Er^3+ PL enhancement is due to the presence of Ge and not to the radiation damage from the ion-implantation process. We determined that the Er^3+ PL depends on the Ge content, postgrowth annealing, and crystallinity of the Ge nanoclusters. Furthermore, we observed that the Er^3+ PL signal is maximized after annealing at 685 C for 1 h. This is the temperature at which Ge nanoclusters begin to crystallize. Transmission electron microscopy studies were conducted to determine the size distribution of the Ge nanoclusters. Moreover, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements performed at the Ge-K and Er-LIII edges revealed that there is negligible Ge-Er bonding. This suggests that Er is either fully oxidized or that it is not located in the Ge nanoclusters. Therefore, we believe that the energy transfer process from the Ge nanoclusters to the Er ions occurs through a non-optical resonant dipole transfer (F"orster ProcessfootnotetextT. F"orster, Discuss. Faraday Soc. 27, 7 (1959). similar to what has been proposed for the Si nanocrystal case.footnotetextM. Fujii, M. Yoshida, S. Hayashi, and K. Yamamoto, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 4525 (1998).

  14. Characterization of GaN nanowires grown on PSi, PZnO and PGaN on Si (111) substrates by thermal evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekari, Leila; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Thahab, Sabah M.; Hassan, Zainuriah

    2012-06-20

    In this research, we used an easy and inexpensive method to synthesize highly crystalline GaN nanowires (NWs); on different substrates such as porous silicon (PSi), porous zinc oxide (PZnO) and porous gallium nitride (PGaN) on Si (111) wafer by thermal evaporation using commercial GaN powder without any catalyst. Micro structural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of different substrates in the morphology, nucleation and alignment of the GaN nanowires. The degree of alignment of the synthesized nanowires does not depend on the lattice mismatch between wires and their substrates. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high resolution X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate that the nanowires are of single-crystal hexagonal GaN. The quality and density of grown GaN nanowires for different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the nanowires and their substrates and also on the size of the porosity of the substrates. Nanowires grown on PGaN have the best quality and highest density as compared to nanowires on other substrates. By using three kinds of porous substrates, we are able to study the increase in the alignment and density of the nanowires.

  15. Characterization of GaN nanowires grown on PSi, PZnO and PGaN on Si (111) substrates by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekari, Leila; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Thahab, Sabah M.; Hassan, Zainuriah

    2012-06-01

    In this research, we used an easy and inexpensive method to synthesize highly crystalline GaN nanowires (NWs); on different substrates such as porous silicon (PSi), porous zinc oxide (PZnO) and porous gallium nitride (PGaN) on Si (111) wafer by thermal evaporation using commercial GaN powder without any catalyst. Micro structural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of different substrates in the morphology, nucleation and alignment of the GaN nanowires. The degree of alignment of the synthesized nanowires does not depend on the lattice mismatch between wires and their substrates. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high resolution X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate that the nanowires are of single-crystal hexagonal GaN. The quality and density of grown GaN nanowires for different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the nanowires and their substrates and also on the size of the porosity of the substrates. Nanowires grown on PGaN have the best quality and highest density as compared to nanowires on other substrates. By using three kinds of porous substrates, we are able to study the increase in the alignment and density of the nanowires.

  16. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  17. The Structure- and Metal-dependent Activity of Escherichia coli PgaB Provides Insight into the Partial De-N-acetylation of Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Poloczek, Joanna; Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In Escherichia coli, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the periplasmic protein PgaB is required for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of PgaB in complex with Ni2+ and Fe3+ have been determined to 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively, and its activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers has been characterized. The structure of PgaB reveals two (β/α)x barrel domains: a metal-binding de-N-acetylase that is a member of the family 4 carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) and a domain structurally similar to glycoside hydrolases. PgaB displays de-N-acetylase activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers but not on the β-1,4-(GlcNAc)4 oligomer chitotetraose and is the first CE4 member to exhibit this substrate specificity. De-N-acetylation occurs in a length-dependent manor, and specificity is observed for the position of de-N-acetylation. A key aspartic acid involved in de-N-acetylation, normally seen in other CE4s, is missing in PgaB, suggesting that the activity of PgaB is attenuated to maintain the low levels of de-N-acetylation of PNAG observed in vivo. The metal dependence of PgaB is different from most CE4s, because PgaB shows increased rates of de-N-acetylation with Co2+ and Ni2+ under aerobic conditions, and Co2+, Ni2+ and Fe2+ under anaerobic conditions, but decreased activity with Zn2+. The work presented herein will guide inhibitor design to combat biofilm formation by E. coli and potentially a wide range of medically relevant bacteria producing polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilms. PMID:22810235

  18. Fractional spin textures in the frustrated magnet SrCr(9p)Ga(12-9p)O₁₉.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Damle, Kedar; Moessner, Roderich

    2011-03-25

    We consider the archetypal frustrated antiferromagnet SrCr(9p)Ga(12-9p)O₁₉ in its well-known spin-liquid state, and demonstrate that a Cr(3+) spin S=3/2 ion in direct proximity to a pair of vacancies (in disordered p<1 samples) is cloaked by a spatially extended spin texture that encodes the correlations of the parent spin liquid. In this spin-liquid regime, our analytic theory predicts that the combined object has a magnetic response identical to a classical spin of length S/2=3/4, which dominates over the small intrinsic susceptibility of the pure system. This fractional-spin texture leaves an unmistakable imprint on the measured ⁷¹Ga nuclear magnetic resonance line shapes, which we compute using Monte Carlo simulations and compare with experimental data. PMID:21517349

  19. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  20. Ames ER-2 ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R., Jr.; Vedder, James F.; Starr, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study ozone (O3) in the stratosphere. Measurements of the ozone mixing ratio at 1 s intervals are obtained with an ultraviolet photometer which flies on the ER-2 aircraft. The photometer determines the amount of ozone in air by measuring the transmission of ultraviolet light through a fixed path with and without ambient O3 present.

  1. ERS Focus On: Educating Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This issue of "Focus On" examines where boys are underachieving and some possible reasons for their under-achievement, including biological and environmental factors. It also offers strategies that teachers can employ in their classrooms in order to address the educational needs of boys. Books in Brief; Web Resources; and Related ERS Resources are…

  2. Two-quasiparticle structures and isomers in {sup 168}Er, {sup 170}Er, and {sup 172}Er.

    SciTech Connect

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Lane, G. J.; Kondev, F. G.; Watanabe, H.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Stefanescu, I.; Australian National Univ.; RIKEN; Univ. of Maryland

    2010-05-01

    The stable and neutron-rich isotopes 168Er, 170Er, and 172Er have been studied with Gammasphere using inelastic excitation with energetic 136Xe beams. The previously assigned structures based on the proposed K?=4- isomeric intrinsic states in both 168Er and 170Er have been re-evaluated and an equivalent band identified in 172Er. In 170Er, the identification of a K?=6- band with transitions close in energy to those of the 4- band leads to a modified interpretation, since the overlap would have compromised previous analyses. The gK-gR values for the 4- bands deduced from the in-band ?-ray intensities for the sequence of isotopes suggest a predominantly two-neutron configuration in 168Er, an equally mixed two-neutron, two-proton configuration in 170Er, and a two-proton configuration in 172Er. A comprehensive decay scheme for the previously proposed 6+ isomer in 172Er has also been established, as well as band structures built on this isomer that closely resemble the 6+ and 7- two-neutron structures known in the isotone 174Yb. The implied K hindrances are discussed. The main decay path of the 6+ isomer occurs through the newly identified 4- isomer. The measured lifetimes of the 4- and 6+ isomers in 172Er are 57(3) and 822(90) ns, respectively. Multiquasiparticle calculations support the suggested configuration changes across the isotopic chain.

  3. NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The contents include: 1) ER-2 Specifications; 2) ER-2 Basic Configuration; 3) ER-2 Payload Areas: Nose Area; 4) ER-2 Payload Areas: SuperPod Fore and Aftbody; 5) ER-2 Payload Areas: SuperPod Midbody; 6) ER-2 Payload Areas: Q-Bay; 7) ER-2 Payload Areas: Q-Bay Hatch Designs; 8) ER-2 Payload Areas: External Pods; 9) ER-2 Electrical/Control Interface; 10) ER-2 Typical Flight Profile; 11) Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling TC-4; 12) TC-4 Timeline; 13) TC4 Area of Interest; 14) ER-2 TC4 Payload; 15) A/C ready for fuel; 16) ER-2 Pilot being suited; 17) ER-2 Taxing; 18) ER-2 Pilot post flight debrief; and 19) NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F G; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER-mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  5. Electronic state of Er in sputtered AlN:Er films determined by magnetic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, V.; Seehra, M. S.; Korakakis, D.

    2014-12-07

    The optoelectronic and piezoelectric properties of AlN:Er thin films have been of great recent interest for potential device applications. In this work, the focus is on the electronic state of Er in AlN:Er thin films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering on (001) p-type Si substrate. X-ray diffraction shows that Er doping expands the lattice and the AlN:Er film has preferential c-plane orientation. To determine whether Er in AlN:Er is present as Er metal, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, or Er{sup 3+} substituting for Al{sup 3+}, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature dependence (2 K–300 K) of the magnetization M at a fixed magnetic field H along with the M vs. H data at 2 K up to H = 90 kOe are presented. The presence of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Er metal is ruled out since their characteristic magnetic transitions are not observed in the AlN:Er sample. Instead, the observed M vs. T and M vs. H variations are consistent with Er present as Er{sup 3+} substituting for Al{sup 3+} in AlN:Er at a concentration x = 1.08% in agreement with x = 0.94% ± 0.20% determined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The larger size of Er{sup 3+} vs. Al{sup 3+}explains the observed lattice expansion of AlN:Er.

  6. UBV photometry of ER Vulpeculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R. K.; Padalia, T. D.; Srivastava, J. B.

    1991-08-01

    UBV photometry of the RS CVn-type eclipsing binary system ER Vulpeculae has been presented. The period comes out to be 0.698093d. The average depths of primary and secondary minima are, respectively, 0.21 and 0.12m. The colors at various phases have been given. A dip is seen around phase 0.73P as was seen in the observations of Arevalo et al. (1988). Large scatter is present in the observations as noticed earlier, and may be due to activity of the components.

  7. Next Generation Attenuation of Ground Motions in Ilan, Taiwan: Establishment and Analysis of Attenuation Relations for Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and Peak Ground Velocity (PGV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.

    2009-12-01

    An evaluation of seismic hazards requires an estimate of the expected ground motion at the site of interest. The most common means of estimating this ground motion in engineering practice is the use of an attenuation relation. A number of developments have arisen recently to suggest that a new generation of attenuation relationships is warranted. The project named Next Generation Attenuation of Ground Motions (NGA) Project was developed by Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) in response to a core objective: reducing uncertainty in earthquake ground motion estimation. This objective reflects recognition from industry sponsors that improvements in earthquake ground motion estimation will result in significant cost savings and will result in improved system performance in the event of a large earthquake. The Central Weather Bureau has implemented the Taiwan Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP) to collect high-quality instrumental recordings of strong earthquake shaking.It is necessary for us to study the strong ground motion characteristics at the Ilan area of northeastern Taiwan. Further analyses using a good quality data base that includes 486 events and 4172 recordings of magnitude greater than 4.0 are required to derive the next generation attenuation of ground motion in Ilan area. In addition, Liu and Tsai (2007) used a catalog of more than 1840 shallow earthquakes with homogenized Mw magnitude ranging from 5.0 to 8.2 in 1900-2007 to estimate the seismic hazard potential in Taiwan. As a result, the PGA and PGV contour patterns of maximum ground motion show that Ilan Plain has high values of 0.2g and 80cm/sec with respect to MMI intensity VII and IX, respectively. Furthermore, from the mean ground motion and the seismic intensity rate analyses, they show that a high annul probability of MMI > VI greater than 35 percents are located at the Chianan area of western Taiwan and Ilan Plain in northeastern Taiwan. However, these results was

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER–mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  9. Luminescence and Thermal Properties of Er:GSGG and Yb,Er:GSGG Laser Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dun-Lu; Luo, Jian-Qiao; Xiao, Jing-Zhong; Zhang, Qing-Li; Chen, Jia-Kang; Liu, Wen-Peng; Kang, Hong-Xiang; Yin, Shao-Tang

    2012-05-01

    Er3+-doped and Yb3+/Er3+ co-doped Gd3Sc2Ga3O12 (abbreviated as Er:GSGG and Yb,Er:GSGG, respectively) laser crystals are investigated by using a combination of spectroscopic measurements and thermal characterizations. An absorption peak of Yb,Er:GSGG crystal shifts to 970 nm and its absorption band broadens obviously, which makes the crystal suitable for pumping by a 970 nm laser diode (LD). This crystal also exhibits a shorter lifetime of a lower laser level, a larger emission cross section and higher thermal conductivity than those of Er:GSGG. All these factors suggest that Yb3+/Er3+ co-doping has a positive effect on improving the spectroscopic and thermal performances in GSGG based laser crystals, and imply that double-doped Yb,Er:GSGG crystal is a potential candidate as an excellent LD pumped 2.79 μm laser material.

  10. Understanding the Magnitude Dependence of PGA and PGV: A look at differences between mainshocks and aftershocks in the NGA-West2 data and ground motion from small magnitude Anza data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltay, A.; Hanks, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    We build an earthquake-source based model to explain the magnitude dependence of PGA (peak ground acceleration) and PGV (peak ground velocity) observable in the NGA-West2 ground motion database and empirically based ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). This simple model is based on a point-source, constant stress drop (Δσ) Brune model, including the high-frequency attenuation parameter (fmax or κ), random vibration theory (RVT) and a finite-fault assumption. This simple approach explains the magnitude dependence of PGA and PGV in the NGA-West2 ground motion data, and matches the GMPEs well. Using this model as a reference condition, we explore secondary dependencies, such as the difference in ground motion between mainshocks and aftershocks, and the magnitude dependence of ground motion from small magnitude earthquakes. In the NGA-West2 database, which consists of over 20,000 records of events from 3< M < 8, mainshocks are defined as Class 1 events, and on-fault aftershocks as Class 2. By comparing the median ground motion of these events with our source-based model, we can distinguish overall differences in stress drop associated with Class 1 vs. Class 2 events. We find that when taken all together, Class 2 events have slightly lower stress drop than Class 1 events. This suggests that the Class 2 events, on-fault aftershocks, may be re-rupturing damaged fault areas yielding lower stress drops. We observe more scatter in this model-based stress drop for the Class 2 events as compared to the mainshocks, similar to what is observed in seismologically based source studies. We also consider the magnitude dependence of very small magnitude data, 0PGA and PGV on magnitude, a consistent magnitude scale is necessary. Anza data are typically reported with local magnitude, ML, so we make a theoretically based empirical correction to convert to moment magnitude M. The

  11. Decay of /sup 150/Er

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M.; Toth, K.S.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.A.; Cole, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    A new activity, T/sub 1/2/ = 20 +- 2 sec, was observed in /sup 12/C bombardments of /sup 144/Sm. Only one ..gamma.. ray, 476.0 +- 0.1 keV, was found to be associated with this nuclide. We identify the new isotope as /sup 150/Er and propose that it decays mainly to one level in /sup 150/Ho at an excitation energy of approx.476 keV by an allowed ..beta.. transition which connects states with the following configurations: O/sup +/(..pi..h/sub 11/2/, ..pi..h/sub 11/2/)..-->..1/sup +/(..pi..h/sub 11/2/,..nu..h/sub 9/2/). As part of the investigation, the decay properties of the high- and low-spin /sup 150/Ho isomers were reexamined.

  12. Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-07-25

    A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant. 29 figs.

  13. Are Wnts Retrogradely Transported to the ER?

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-11-01

    A recent report showed that Drosophila miR-307a initiates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in wingless (wg)-expressing cells by suppression of the evolutionarily conserve Wnt secretion factor Wntless (Wls). Interestingly, the authors noted that wg has a putative C-terminal dilysine motif (KKVY), which is required for its apparent retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport. Wls suppression resulted in ER stress, which was phenocopied by several other manipulations that impaired wg secretion in flies, as well as Wnt5a secretion in mammalian cells. The authors surmised that their data "reveals a previously unknown Golgi-to-ER retrograde route of wg, and elucidates a correlation between Wnt secretion and ER stress." However, there are obvious caveats to this interpretation, as ER stress resulting from Wnt secretion impairment could be readily explained by its inability to leave the ER, and not resulting from Golgi-to-ER retrograde transport. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2315-2316, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916992

  14. Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-07-25

    A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant.

  15. BOREAS Level-0 ER-2 Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Dominquez, Roseanne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    For BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), the ER-2 and other aerial photography was collected to provide finely detailed and spatially extensive documentation of the condition of the primary study sites. The ER-2 aerial photography consists of color-IR transparencies collected during flights in 1994 and 1996 over the study areas.

  16. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  17. Edible Pot Sends Toddlers to Colorado ERs

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Edible Pot Sends Toddlers to Colorado ERs Cannabis-laced candy, baked goods look irresistible to kids, ... became the first two states to legalize recreational marijuana. Shortly after, a sharp increase occurred in the ...

  18. Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-07-01

    This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

  19. FIRE_ACE_ER2_MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging ... SSFR Location:  Northern Alaska Arctic Ocean Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  20. ER Screenings Could Help Prevent Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158246.html ER Screenings Could Help Prevent Suicide: Study Checking patients for risk factors should be ... News) -- Routine screening of emergency room patients for suicide risk might be an effective way to prevent ...

  1. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca(2+) Probe D4ER.

    PubMed

    Greotti, Elisa; Wong, Andrea; Pozzan, Tullio; Pendin, Diana; Pizzo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represents the major intracellular Ca(2+) store and the free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) within its lumen ([Ca(2+)]ER) can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca(2+) sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca(2+) probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd) for Ca(2+), low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca(2+)] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca(2+) affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca(2+)] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca(2+)]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer's Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2). The lower Ca(2+) affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca(2+) content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls. PMID:27598166

  2. Topography over South America from ERS altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Anita; Frey, Herb; DiMarzio, John; Tsaoussi, Lucia

    1997-01-01

    The results of the surface topography mapping of South America during the ERS-1 geodetic mission are presented. The altimeter waveforms, the range measurement, and the internal and Doppler range corrections were obtained. The atmospheric corrections and solid tides were calculated. Comparisons between Shuttle laser altimetry and ERS-1 altimetry grid showed good agreement. Satellite radar altimetry data can be used to improve the topographic knowledge of regions for which only poor elevation data currently exist.

  3. Arctigenin alleviates ER stress via activating AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuan; Sun, Xiao-xiao; Ye, Ji-ming; He, Li; Yan, Shou-sheng; Zhang, Hao-hao; Hu, Li-hong; Yuan, Jun-ying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effects of arctigenin (ATG), a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan from Arctium lappa L (Compositae), against ER stress in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: A cell-based screening assay for ER stress regulators was established. Cell viability was measured using MTT assay. PCR and Western blotting were used to analyze gene and protein expression. Silencing of the CaMKKβ, LKB1, and AMPKα1 genes was achieved by RNA interference (RNAi). An ATP bioluminescent assay kit was employed to measure the intracellular ATP levels. Results: ATG (2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/L) inhibited cell death and unfolded protein response (UPR) in a concentration-dependent manner in cells treated with the ER stress inducer brefeldin A (100 nmol/L). ATG (1, 5 and 10 μmol/L) significantly attenuated protein synthesis in cells through inhibiting mTOR-p70S6K signaling and eEF2 activity, which were partially reversed by silencing AMPKα1 with RNAi. ATG (1-50 μmol/L) reduced intracellular ATP level and activated AMPK through inhibiting complex I-mediated respiration. Pretreatment of cells with the AMPK inhibitor compound C (25 μmol/L) rescued the inhibitory effects of ATG on ER stress. Furthermore, ATG (2.5 and 5 μmol/L) efficiently activated AMPK and reduced the ER stress and cell death induced by palmitate (2 mmol/L) in INS-1 β cells. Conclusion: ATG is an effective ER stress alleviator, which protects cells against ER stress through activating AMPK, thus attenuating protein translation and reducing ER load. PMID:22705729

  4. Recent Advances with ER Targeted Intrabodies.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Andrea L J; Dübel, Stefan; Böldicke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ER intrabodies are recombinant antibody fragments produced and retained in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) of a cell or an organism with the purpose to induce phenotypes generated by interfering with the intracellular processing or by changing the location of the recognized antigen. The most common application is the generation of functional knockdowns of membrane proteins, which cannot reach their natural location on the cell surface when they are retained in the ER by the intrabody. Phenotypes generated by interfering with the secretion of extracellular or plasma proteins can be analyzed in a similar way. So far, most ER intrabody studies relied on scFv fragments subcloned from hybridoma lines. Recently, several large international research consortia have started to provide antibodies, with the final goal to cover substantial parts of the human proteome. For practical reasons of throughput and effort, in these consortia the most appropriate method to generate the necessary large numbers of monoclonal antibodies is in vitro selection, typically employing phage or yeast display. These methods provide the antibody genes right from the start, thereby facilitating the application of ER antibody approaches. On the other end, the first transgenic mice expressing an ER intrabody has recently been described. This moves the ER intrabody approach finally to level with classic in vivo knockout strategies - but also offers novel capabilities to the researchers. Promising new perspectives may originate from the fact that the knockdown is restricted to the protein level, that a graded knockdown strength can be achieved, or that the targeting of individual posttranslational modifications will be possible with previously impossible specificity. Finally, the link of today's high throughput recombinant antibody generation to a knock down phenotype is now possible with a single cloning step. It can therefore be expected that we will see a much quicker growth of the number of

  5. Mechanisms of oestrogen receptor (ER) gene regulation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J S

    2016-07-01

    Most breast cancers are driven by a transcription factor called oestrogen receptor (ER). Understanding the mechanisms of ER activity in breast cancer has been a major research interest and recent genomic advances have revealed extraordinary insights into how ER mediates gene transcription and what occurs during endocrine resistance. This review discusses our current understanding on ER activity, with an emphasis on several evolving, but important areas of ER biology. PMID:26884552

  6. ARM CLASIC ER2 CRS/EDOP

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Heymsfield

    2010-12-20

    Data was taken with the NASA ER-2 aircraft with the Cloud Radar System and other instruments in conjunction with the DOE ARM CLASIC field campaign. The flights were near the SGP site in north Central Oklahoma and targeted small developing convection. The CRS is a 94 GHz nadir pointing Doppler radar. Also on board the ER-2 was the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Seven science flights were conducted but the weather conditions did not cooperate in that there was neither developing convection, or there was heavy rain.

  7. 20 CFR 228.10 - Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse. 228.10... component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse....

  8. 20 CFR 228.10 - Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse. 228.10... component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse....

  9. 20 CFR 228.10 - Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse. 228.10... component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse....

  10. 20 CFR 228.10 - Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse. 228.10... component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse....

  11. 20 CFR 228.10 - Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Computation of the tier I annuity component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse. 228.10... component for a widow(er), disabled widow(er), remarried widow(er), and a surviving divorced spouse....

  12. Low temperature properties of some Er-rich intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Gshneidner,jr; A.O. Pecharsky; L.Hale; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The low temperature volumetric heat capacity ({approx}3.5 to 350 K) and magnetic susceptibility ({approx}4 to 320 K) of Er{sub 3}Rh, Er{sub 3}Ir, Er{sub 3}Pt, Er{sub 2}Al, and Er{sub 2}Sn have been measured. All of the compounds order antiferromagnetically (or ferrimagnetically), and most exhibit more than one magnetic ordering transition. The volumetric heat capacities in general are smaller than those of the prototype magnetic regenerator materials, except for Er{sub 3}Ir in the 12 to 14 K temperature range.

  13. The QuEChERS revolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technique of QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) is only 7 years old, yet it is revolutionizing the manner in which multiresidue, multiclass pesticide analysis (and perhaps beyond) is performed. Columnist Ron Majors sits down with inventors Steve Lehotay and Michelangelo An...

  14. Creating Smart-er Cities: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allwinkle, Sam; Cruickshank, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The following offers an overview of what it means for cities to be "smart." It draws the supporting definitions and critical insights into smart cities from a series of papers presented at the 2009 Trans-national Conference on Creating Smart(er) Cities. What the papers all have in common is their desire to overcome the all too often…

  15. European Space Agency, ERS-1 program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, A.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives selected for ERS-1 which are primarily intended to facilitate the exploitation of coastal oceans, including ice infested waters, and to facilitate the development of improved global weather information through the provision of information on the weather conditions over the oceans of the word are outlined. Additionally, land objectives will be addressed using the synthetic aperture radar incorporated in the payload.

  16. ER – the key to the highway

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Giovanni; Hawes, Chris; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the key organelle at the start of the secretory pathway and the list of its functions is continually growing. The ER organization as a tubular/cisternal network at the cortex of plant cells has recently been shown to be governed by the membrane tubulation proteins of the reticulon family working alongside plant atlastin homologues, members of the RHD3 group of proteins. Such a network has intimate connections with other organelles such as peroxisomes via peroxules, chloroplasts, Golgi bodies and at the cell cortex to the plasma membrane with cytoskeleton at so called “anchor/contact sites”. The ER network is by no means static displaying a range of different movements and acting as a sub-cellular highway supports the motility of organelles such as peroxisomes, mitochondria and Golgi bodies plus the transport of macromolecules such as viral movement proteins, nucleocapsid proteins and RNA. Here we highlight recent and exciting discoveries on the maintenance of the ER structure and its role on movement and biology of other organelles. PMID:25259957

  17. Er3+ fluorescence in rare-earth aluminate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Richard; Hampton, Scott; Nordine, Paul C.; Key, Thomas; Scheunemann, Richard

    2005-08-01

    Er3+ ion fluorescence was excited with a 980-nm pump laser in Er-doped rare-earth aluminate (REAl) glasses with Er-dopant concentrations from 0.5-30mol% (oxides basis). The spectral and decay characteristics were measured at ˜1550nm from Er3+I13/24 and at ˜2750nm from Er3+I11/24. Red and green light emissions were also observed, from Er3+F9/24 and S3/24+H11/22, respectively. The fluorescence decay rates are described by a model that yields an accurate fit of results at Er concentrations from 0.5to7mol%. The radiative lifetime of Er3+I13/24 in Er:REAl glass is 6.12±0.26ms. Hydroxyl ion quenching occurs at a rate given by 9.88×10-20 aOHnEr Hz, where aOH is the glass absorption coefficient (in cm-1) at a wavelength of 2950nm and nEr is the total Er ion concentration. The I13/24 upconversion rate constant increases with the Er concentration to 1.35+0.05×10-18width="0.3em"/>cm3/s at and above 7-mol% Er2O3. Er3+I11/24 fluorescence decays primarily by multiphonon quenching to I13/24, at 7700±800Hz, a rate that is slightly less than in tellurite glasses. The addition of 20-mol% silica to the glass has only a small influence on the fluorescence decay rates and greatly improves glass formation from the liquid to allow melting and casting of Er-doped REAl glass from platinum crucibles. The application of these Er-doped glasses in laser and optical device applications is briefly discussed.

  18. Lattice and magnetic properties of ErVO4 and ErPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Skanthakumar, S.; Loong, C.-K.; Wakabayashi, N.; Boatner, L. A.

    2002-07-01

    The crystal-field energy-level structure of the Er3+ ground-state multiplet in ErVO4 was investigated by inelastic neutron scattering and magnetic susceptibility methods. The quantitative determination of the crystal-field-level energetics in conjunction with elastic-constant data was used to carry out a detailed analysis of the magnetoelastic contribution to the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters. X-ray-diffraction measurements show that the magnetoelastic effect is small, but the anisotropy with respect to the tetragonal c axis is unusual among the rare-earth orthovanadate and orthophosphate series. It was concluded that in ErVO4 the sixth-order multipole contribution is essential for explaining the observed thermal-expansion anomaly. A similar situation also occurs in the case of ErPO4. This result is contrary to the dominating role of the quadrupole effect found previously in many rare-earth orthovanadates and orthophosphates.

  19. 150. Credit ER. Building reinforced concrete portion of Coleman Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    150. Credit ER. Building reinforced concrete portion of Coleman Canal inverted siphon #2. Longitudinal steel reinforcing rods are visible at bottom. (ER, v. 64 1911 p. 702). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  20. 155. Credit ER. Hand cleaning and trimming of Coleman canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Credit ER. Hand cleaning and trimming of Coleman canal after excavation by steam shovel. (ER, v. 64 1911 p. 701). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  1. The cervical malignant cells display a down regulation of ER-α but retain the ER-β expression

    PubMed Central

    López-Romero, Ricardo; Garrido-Guerrero, Efraín; Rangel-López, Angélica; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Lazos-Ochoa, Minerva; Mantilla-Morales, Alejandra; Bandala, Cindy; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The human cervix is a tissue target of sex steroid hormones as estradiol (E2) which exerts its action through of the estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ER-α and ER-β). In this study we investigated the expression of ER-α and ER-β in human invasive cervical carcinomas using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analyses and compared with that observed in the corresponding normal tissue. The results show nuclear expression of ER-α mainly in the first third of normal cervical epithelium, however, decreased or absent expression were present in invasive cervical carcinoma, indicating that expression of ER-α is lost in cervical cancer. Nevertheless, by RT-PCR we were able to demonstrate mRNA expression of ER-α in invasive cervical tissues. These results suggest that loss of ER-α could be due to a mechanism of post-transcriptional and/or post-translational regulation of its gene during the progression to invasive carcinoma. On the other hand, ER-β was expressed in normal cervix with an expression pattern similar to ER-α. In addition to its nuclear localization, cytoplasmic immunoreaction of ER-β was present in the epithelium of invasive cervical carcinomas, suggesting an association between cytoplasmic ER-β expression and invasive phenotype in the cervical tumors. In summary, the results show that the cervical malignant cells tend to loss the ER-α but maintain the ER-β actively expressed. Loss of expression of ER-α in neoplastic tissue suggests that the estrogenic effects could be conducted through the ER-β in human neoplastic cervical tissue. More detailed studies are needed to confirm this suggestion and to determine the role of ER-β in cervical cancer. PMID:23923078

  2. Ethylene Perception by the ERS1 Protein in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anne E.; Findell, Jennifer L.; Schaller, G. Eric; Sisler, Edward C.; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2000-01-01

    Ethylene perception in Arabidopsis is controlled by a family of five genes, including ETR1, ERS1 (ethylene response sensor 1), ERS2, ETR2, and EIN4. ERS1, the most highly conserved gene with ETR1, encodes a protein with 67% identity to ETR1. To clarify the role of ERS1 in ethylene sensing, we biochemically characterized the ERS1 protein by heterologous expression in yeast. ERS1, like ETR1, forms a membrane-associated, disulfide-linked dimer. In addition, yeast expressing the ERS1 protein contains ethylene-binding sites, indicating ERS1 is also an ethylene-binding protein. This finding supports previous genetic evidence that isoforms of ETR1 also function in plants as ethylene receptors. Further, we used the ethylene antagonist 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) to characterize the ethylene-binding sites of ERS1 and ETR1. We found 1-MCP to be both a potent inhibitor of the ethylene-induced seedling triple response, as well as ethylene binding by yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1. Yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1 showed nearly identical sensitivity to 1-MCP, suggesting that the ethylene-binding sites of ETR1 and ERS1 have similar affinities for ethylene. PMID:10938361

  3. Ground-motion prediction equations for the average horizontal component of PGA, PGV, and 5%-damped PSA at spectral periods between 0.01 s and 10.0 s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Atkinson, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper contains ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for average horizontal-component ground motions as a function of earthquake magnitude, distance from source to site, local average shear-wave velocity, and fault type. Our equations are for peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and 5%-damped pseudo-absolute-acceleration spectra (PSA) at periods between 0.01 s and 10 s. They were derived by empirical regression of an extensive strong-motion database compiled by the 'PEER NGA' (Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center's Next Generation Attenuation) project. For periods less than 1 s, the analysis used 1,574 records from 58 mainshocks in the distance range from 0 km to 400 km (the number of available data decreased as period increased). The primary predictor variables are moment magnitude (M), closest horizontal distance to the surface projection of the fault plane (RJB), and the time-averaged shear-wave velocity from the surface to 30 m (VS30). The equations are applicable for M=5-8, RJB<200 km, and VS30= 180-1300 m/s. ?? 2008, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  4. ER-12-1 completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

  5. Meyers Großer Sternenatlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Serge; Fujii, Akira

    Unendliche Weiten mal ganz aus der Nähe betrachtet. Meyers Großer Sternenatlas ist ein außergewöhnlicher Bildband über den Sternenhimmel, der die Sternbilder erstmals im gleichen Größenverhältnis zeigt, wie sie am Himmel erscheinen. Die sensationellen Astrofotos und aktuellen Aufnahmen des Hubble-Weltraumteleskops werden Gelegenheitsbeobachter und Hobbyastronomen gleichermaßen begeistern.

  6. Optical properties of RbMnF3:Er3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, M. V.; Sibley, W. A.

    1980-03-01

    Absorption, emission, excitation, and lifetime data are presented for RbMnF3:Er3+. Evidence for Mn2+ --> Er3+ energy transfer was found from the Er3+ excitation spectra and the temperature dependence of the Mn2+ and Er3+ emissions. The presence of Er3+ in the lattice slightly changed the temperature dependence of the Mn2+ lifetime. Radiative and radiationless transitions are discussed in terms of the model of Flaherty and Di Bartolo and the quantum-mechanical single-configuration coordinate model of Struck and Fonger.

  7. MicroRNAs meet calcium: joint venture in ER proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Finger, Fabian; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment that has a key function in protein translation and folding. Maintaining its integrity is of fundamental importance for organism's physiology and viability. The dynamic regulation of intraluminal ER Ca(2+) concentration directly influences the activity of ER-resident chaperones and stress response pathways that balance protein load and folding capacity. We review the emerging evidence that microRNAs play important roles in adjusting these processes to frequently changing intracellular and environmental conditions to modify ER Ca(2+) handling and storage and maintain ER homeostasis. PMID:25372053

  8. ER contact sites direct late endosome transport.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Neefjes, Jacques; Berlin, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    Endosomes shuttle select cargoes between cellular compartments and, in doing so, maintain intracellular homeostasis and enable interactions with the extracellular space. Directionality of endosomal transport critically impinges on cargo fate, as retrograde (microtubule minus-end directed) traffic delivers vesicle contents to the lysosome for proteolysis, while the opposing anterograde (plus-end directed) movement promotes recycling and secretion. Intriguingly, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a key player in spatiotemporal control of late endosome and lysosome transport, through the establishment of physical contacts with these organelles. Earlier studies have described how minus-end-directed motor proteins become discharged from vesicles engaged at such contact sites. Now, Raiborg et al. implicate ER-mediated interactions, induced by protrudin, in loading plus-end-directed motor kinesin-1 onto endosomes, thereby stimulating their transport toward the cell's periphery. In this review, we recast the prevailing concepts on bidirectional late endosome transport and discuss the emerging paradigm of inter-compartmental regulation from the ER-endosome interface viewpoint. PMID:26440125

  9. Present statue of Japanese ERS-1 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishiwada, Yasufumi; Nemoto, Yoshiaki

    1986-01-01

    Earth Resources Satellite 1 (ERS-1) will be launched in the FY 1990 with the H-1 rocket from Tanegashima Space Center. ERS-1 will seek to firmly establish remote sensing technologies from space by using synthetic aperture radar and optical sensors, as well as primarily exploring for non-renewable resources and also monitoring for land use, agriculture, forestry, fishery, conservation of environment, prevention of disasters, and surveillance of coastal regions. ERS-1 is a joint project in which the main responsibility for the development of the mission equipment is assumed by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, MITI, and the Technology Research Association of Resources Remote Sensing System, while that for the satellite itself and launching rocket is assumed by the Science and Technology Agency (STA) and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA). In relation to this project, users have maintained a close working relationship with the manufacturers after submitting their requirements in 1984 on the specifications of the mission equipments. This missions parameters are outlined.

  10. Ternary system Er-Ni-In at T=870 K

    SciTech Connect

    Dzevenko, M.; Tyvanchuk, Yu.; Bratash, L.; Zaremba, V.; Havela, L.; Kalychak, Ya.

    2011-10-15

    Isothermal section of the Er-Ni-In system at T=870 K was constructed by means of X-ray powder diffraction and EDX-analyses. Nine ternary compounds, namely ErNi{sub 9}In{sub 2} (YNi{sub 9}In{sub 2}-type), Er{sub 1-1.22}Ni{sub 4}In{sub 1-0.78} (MgCu{sub 4}Sn-type), Er{sub 10}Ni{sub 9.07}In{sub 20} (Ho{sub 10}Ni{sub 9}In{sub 20}-type), ErNi{sub 1-0.60}In{sub 1-1.40} (ZrNiAl-type), Er{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}In (Mn{sub 2}AlB{sub 2}-type), Er{sub 2}Ni{sub 1.78}In (Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}-type), Er{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}In{sub 4} (Lu{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}In{sub 4}-type), Er{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}In (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}-type), and Er{sub 13.53}Ni{sub 3.14}In{sub 3.33} (Lu{sub 14}Co{sub 2}In{sub 3}-type), exist in the Er-Ni-In system at this temperature. The substitution of Ni for In was observed for ErNi{sub 1-0.60}In{sub 1-1.40} and In for Er in the case of related compounds ErNi{sub 2} and ErNi{sub 4}In. Er can enter NiIn (CoSn-type) leading to including-substitution type of compound Er{sub 0-0.12}NiIn{sub 1-0.89}. Basic magnetic properties of the Er{sub 0.04}NiIn{sub 0.97}, ErNi{sub 2}, Er{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}In{sub 0.1}, and ErNi{sub 4}In phases were inspected. Electrical-resistivity studies were performed on the ErNiIn, ErNi{sub 0.9}In{sub 1.1}, and ErNi{sub 4}In phases. - Graphical Abstract: Phase relations in the ternary system Er-Ni-In have been established for the isothermal section at T=870 K based on X-ray phase and EDX-analyses. Nine ternary compounds were observed. Highlights: > Isothermal section of Er-Ni-In system at T=870 K was constructed. > Nine ternary compounds were detected. > Basic magnetic properties of Er{sub 0.04}NiIn{sub 0.97} and ErNi{sub 4}In phases were inspected.

  11. The role of ER stress in lipid metabolism and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jaeseok; Kaufman, Randal J

    2016-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular organelle important for regulating calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism, protein synthesis, and posttranslational modification and trafficking. Numerous environmental, physiological, and pathological insults disturb ER homeostasis, referred to as ER stress, in which a collection of conserved intracellular signaling pathways, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR), are activated to maintain ER function for cell survival. However, excessive and/or prolonged UPR activation leads to initiation of self-destruction through apoptosis. Excessive accumulation of lipids and their intermediate products causes metabolic abnormalities and cell death, called lipotoxicity, in peripheral organs, including the pancreatic islets, liver, muscle, and heart. Because accumulating evidence links chronic ER stress and defects in UPR signaling to lipotoxicity in peripheral tissues, understanding the role of ER stress in cell physiology is a topic under intense investigation. In this review, we highlight recent findings that link ER stress and UPR signaling to the pathogenesis of peripheral organs due to lipotoxicity. PMID:27146479

  12. Tamoxifen Action in ER-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Subrata; Holz, Marina K.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease. Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator and is mainly indicated for the treatment of breast cancer in postmenopausal women and postsurgery neoadjuvant therapy in ER-positive breast cancers. Interestingly, 5–10% of the ER-negative breast cancers have also shown sensitivity to tamoxifen treatment. The involvement of molecular markers and/or signaling pathways independent of ER signaling has been implicated in tamoxifen sensitivity in the ER-negative subgroup. Studies reveal that variation in the expression of estrogen-related receptor alpha, ER subtype beta, tumor microenvironment, and epigenetics affects tamoxifen sensitivity. This review discusses the background of the research on the action of tamoxifen that may inspire future studies to explore effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ER-negative and triple-negative breast cancers, the latter being an aggressive disease with worse clinical outcome. PMID:26989346

  13. Bulk Er:YAP and Er:Yb:YAP optical emission studies for eyesafe laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Efstratios; Boquillon, Jean-Pierre; Musset, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Emission and excitation spectra of Er-doped YAP crystals reveal a broad emission band in the eyesafe region with peaks around 1545-nm and 1608-nm and pump-bands suitable for common 800-nm and 970-nm diode lasers, suggesting YAP as a candidate crystalline host for diode-pumped laser in the 1.5-μm eyesafe regime. Erbium-doped YAP-crystal results are comparable with analogous measurements on Er:Yb:YAG, which has already demostrated efficient lasing action in the eyesafe region.

  14. On the Use of an ER-213 Detonator to Establish a Baseline for the ER-486

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Keith A.; Liechty, Gary H.; Jaramillo, Dennis C.; Munger, Alan C.; McHugh, Douglas C.; Kennedy, James E.

    2014-08-19

    This report documents a series of tests using a TSD-115 fireset coupled with an ER-213, a gold exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. These tests were designed to fire this EBW with a smaller fireset to obtain current and voltage data as well as timing information at voltage levels below, above, and throughout the threshold firing region. This study could then create a database for comparison to our current ER-486 EBW development, which is designed to be a lower voltage (<500V) device.

  15. BOREAS Level-0 ER-2 Navigation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard; Dominguez, Roseanne; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS Staff Science effort covered those activities that were BOREAS community-level activities or required uniform data collection procedures across sites and time. These activities included the acquisition, processing, and archiving of aircraft navigation/attitude data to complement the digital image data. The level-0 ER-2 navigation data files contain aircraft attitude and position information acquired during the digital image and photographic data collection missions. Temporally, the data were acquired from April to September 1994. Data were recorded at intervals of 5 seconds. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  16. Dysfunction of Wntless triggers the retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport of Wingless and induces ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Lujun; Pei, Chunli; Lin, Xinhua; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2016-01-01

    Secreted Wnts play diverse roles in a non-cell-autonomous fashion. However, the cell-autonomous effect of unsecreted Wnts remains unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is observed in specialized secretory cells and participates in pathophysiological processes. The correlation between Wnt secretion and ER stress remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that Drosophila miR-307a initiates ER stress specifically in wingless (wg)-expressing cells through targeting wntless (wls/evi). This phenotype could be mimicked by retromer loss-of-function or porcupine (porc) depletion, and rescued by wg knockdown, arguing that unsecreted Wg triggers ER stress. Consistently, we found that disrupting the secretion of human Wnt5a also induced ER stress in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we showed that a C-terminal KKVY-motif of Wg is required for its retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport, thus inducing ER stress. Next, we investigated if COPI, the regulator of retrograde transport, is responsible for unsecreted Wg to induce ER stress. To our surprise, we found that COPI acts as a novel regulator of Wg secretion. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unknown Golgi-to-ER retrograde route of Wg, and elucidates a correlation between Wnt secretion and ER stress during development. PMID:26887613

  17. TFG Promotes Organization of Transitional ER and Efficient Collagen Secretion.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Janine; Miller, Victoria J; Stevenson, Nicola L; Brown, Anna K; Budnik, Annika; Heesom, Kate J; Alibhai, Dominic; Stephens, David J

    2016-05-24

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the animal kingdom. It is of fundamental importance during development for cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis as well as in pathological processes such as fibrosis and cancer cell migration. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of procollagen secretion remains limited. Here, we show that TFG organizes transitional ER (tER) and ER exit sites (ERESs) into larger structures. Depletion of TFG results in dispersion of tER elements that remain associated with individual ER-Golgi intermediate compartments (ERGICs) as largely functional ERESs. We show that TFG is not required for the transport and packaging of small soluble cargoes but is necessary for the export of procollagen from the ER. Our work therefore suggests a key relationship between the structure and function of ERESs and a central role for TFG in optimizing COPII assembly for procollagen export. PMID:27184855

  18. Fluvoxamine alleviates ER stress via induction of Sigma-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Omi, T; Tanimukai, H; Kanayama, D; Sakagami, Y; Tagami, S; Okochi, M; Morihara, T; Sato, M; Yanagida, K; Kitasyoji, A; Hara, H; Imaizumi, K; Maurice, T; Chevallier, N; Marchal, S; Takeda, M; Kudo, T

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) expression through the PERK pathway, which is one of the cell's responses to ER stress. In addition, it has been demonstrated that induction of Sig-1R can repress cell death signaling. Fluvoxamine (Flv) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with a high affinity for Sig-1R. In the present study, we show that treatment of neuroblastoma cells with Flv induces Sig-1R expression by increasing ATF4 translation directly, through its own activation, without involvement of the PERK pathway. The Flv-mediated induction of Sig-1R prevents neuronal cell death resulting from ER stress. Moreover, Flv-induced ER stress resistance reduces the infarct area in mice after focal cerebral ischemia. Thus, Flv, which is used frequently in clinical practice, can alleviate ER stress. This suggests that Flv could be a feasible therapy for cerebral diseases caused by ER stress. PMID:25032855

  19. ESR study of AuEr dilute alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokter, H. D.; Davidov, D.; Hoekstra, F. R.; Nieuwenhuys, G. J.

    1981-06-01

    ESR linewidth and signal intensity measurements of AuEr (0.2%, 1%, 3%) dilute alloys have been carried out as a function of temperature in order to resolve previous discrepancies regarding the crystal field splitting. The data analysis indicates a splitting of (16 ± 4) K between the Γ 7 ground state and the Γ (1)8 first excited state. No evidence for an additional broadening mechanism associated with Er-Er exchange interactions was observed.

  20. June 1997 ER-2 Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Irby W.

    2003-01-01

    Within our current understanding of the atmospheric ionizing radiation, the ER-2 flight package was designed to provide a complete characterization of the physical fields and evaluate various dosimetric techniques for routine monitoring. A flight plan was developed to sample the full dynamic range of the atmospheric environment especially at altitudes relevant to the development of the High Speed Civil Transport. The flight of the instruments occurred in June of 1997 where predictive models indicated a maximum in the high altitude radiation environment occurring approximately nine months after the minimum in the solar sunspot cycle. The flights originated at Moffett field at the Ames Research Center on ER-2 aircraft designated as 706. The equipment was shipped mid- May 1997 for unpacking and checkout, size fitting, systems functional test, and preflight testing on aircraft power with flight readiness achieved on May 30, 1997. The equipment was qualified on its first engineering flight on June 2, 1997 and the subsequent science gathering flights followed during the period of June 5-15, 1997. Herein we give an account of the flight operations.

  1. Validation of ERS-1 environmental data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodberlet, Mark A.; Swift, Calvin T.; Wilkerson, John C.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of the launch-version algorithms used by the European Space Agency (ESA) to derive wind field and ocean wave estimates from measurements of sensors aboard the European Remote Sensing satellite, ERS-1, has been accomplished through comparison of the derived parameters with coincident measurements made by 24 open ocean buoys maintained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). During the period from November 1, 1991 through February 28, 1992, data bases with 577 and 485 pairs of coincident sensor/buoy wind and wave measurements were collected for the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) and Radar Altimeter (RA) respectively. Based on these data, algorithm retrieval accuracy is estimated to be plus or minus 4 m/s for AMI wind speed, plus or minus 3 m/s for RA wind speed and plus or minus 0.6 m for RA wave height. After removing 180 degree ambiguity errors, the AMI wind direction retrieval accuracy was estimated at plus or minus 28 degrees. All of the ERS-1 wind and wave retrievals are relatively unbiased. These results should be viewed as interim since improved algorithms are under development. As final versions are implemented, additional assessments should be conducted to complete the validation.

  2. Radiation Hydrodynamics with FLOW-ER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcello, Dominic; Tohline, J. E.; Motl, P. M.

    2008-03-01

    The effects of radiative transport are an important aspect of many astrophysical fluid problems, such as binary star accretion discs and common envelope evolution. Unfortunately, the full radiative transport problem is seven dimensional and outside the realm of current computational capabilities. The gray field flux limited diffusion (FLD) approximation has been shown to provide a feasible four dimensional approximation to the full radiative transport problems in many cases. The flux is approximated through an algebraic expression which interpolates between the two extremes of diffusive and free streaming radiation. FLD allows for the exchange of energy and momentum between the fluid and radiation field. We are implementing this into our current Newtonian astrophysical fluid simulation code named FLOW-ER. Unlike other FLD codes, FLOW-ER handles shocks without the use of artificial viscosity. At this point, the code runs in 1D and 2D on a single processor. The ultimate goal is a fully 3D parallel code running on an adaptive mesh. Presented are results for test cases in 1D and 2D, compared to analytic results where available, and to ZeusMP2 when not. This research has been supported, in part, by NSF grants AST-0407070 and AST-0708551.

  3. ER Import Sites and Their Relationship to ER Exit Sites: A New Model for Bidirectional ER-Golgi Transport in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Lerich, Alexander; Hillmer, Stefan; Langhans, Markus; Scheuring, David; van Bentum, Paulien; Robinson, David G

    2012-01-01

    Per definition, ER exit sites are COPII vesiculation events at the surface of the ER and in higher plants are only visualizable in the electron microscope through cryofixation techniques. Fluorescent COPII labeling moves with Golgi stacks and locates to the interface between the ER and the Golgi. In contrast, the domain of the ER where retrograde COPI vesicles fuse, i.e., ER import sites (ERIS), has remained unclear. To identify ERIS we have employed ER-located SNAREs and tethering factors. We screened several SNAREs (SYP81, the SYP7 family, and USE1) to find a SNARE whose overexpression did not disrupt ER-Golgi traffic and which gave rise to discrete fluorescent punctae when expressed with an XFP tag. Only the Qc-SNARE SYP72 fulfilled these criteria. When coexpressed with SYP72-YFP, both the type I-membrane protein RFP-p24δ5 and the luminal marker CFP-HDEL whose ER localization are due to an efficient COPI-mediated recycling, form nodules along the tubular ER network. SYP72-YFP colocalizes with these nodules which are not seen when RFP-p24δ5 or CFP-HDEL is expressed alone or when SYP72-YFP is coexpressed with a mutant form of RFP-p24δ5 that cannot exit the ER. SYP72-YFP does not colocalize with Golgi markers, except when the Golgi stacks are immobilized through actin depolymerization. Endogenous SYP7 SNAREs, also colocalize with immobilized COPII/Golgi. In contrast, XFP-tagged versions of plant homologs to TIP20 of the Dsl1 COPI-tethering factor complex, and the COPII-tethering factor p115 colocalize perfectly with Golgi stacks irrespective of the motile status. These data suggest that COPI vesicle fusion with the ER is restricted to periods when Golgi stacks are stationary, but that when moving both COPII and COPI vesicles are tethered and collect in the ER-Golgi interface. Thus, the Golgi stack and an associated domain of the ER thereby constitute a mobile secretory and recycling unit: a unique feature in eukaryotic cells. PMID:22876251

  4. Ire1 supports normal ER differentiation in developing Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zuyuan; Chikka, Madhusudana Rao; Xia, Hongai; Ready, Donald F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves virtually all aspects of cell physiology and, by pathways that are incompletely understood, is dynamically remodeled to meet changing cell needs. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (Ire1), a conserved core protein of the unfolded protein response (UPR), participates in ER remodeling and is particularly required during the differentiation of cells devoted to intense secretory activity, so-called ‘professional’ secretory cells. Here, we characterize the role of Ire1 in ER differentiation in the developing Drosophila compound eye photoreceptors (R cells). As part of normal development, R cells take a turn as professional secretory cells with a massive secretory effort that builds the photosensitive membrane organelle, the rhabdomere. We find rough ER sheets proliferate as rhabdomere biogenesis culminates, and Ire1 is required for normal ER differentiation. Ire1 is active early in R cell development and is required in anticipation of peak biosynthesis. Without Ire1, the amount of rough ER sheets is strongly reduced and the extensive cortical ER network at the rhabdomere base, the subrhabdomere cisterna (SRC), fails. Instead, ER proliferates in persistent and ribosome-poor tubular tangles. A phase of Ire1 activity early in R cell development thus shapes dynamic ER. PMID:26787744

  5. ER trapping reveals Golgi enzymes continually revisit the ER through a recycling pathway that controls Golgi organization

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Satpute-Krishnan, Prasanna; Seo, Arnold Y.; Burnette, Dylan T.; Patterson, George H.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Whether Golgi enzymes remain localized within the Golgi or constitutively cycle through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is unclear, yet is important for understanding Golgi dependence on the ER. Here, we demonstrate that the previously reported inefficient ER trapping of Golgi enzymes in a rapamycin-based assay results from an artifact involving an endogenous ER-localized 13-kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP13) competing with the FKBP12-tagged Golgi enzyme for binding to an FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB)-tagged ER trap. When we express an FKBP12-tagged ER trap and FRB-tagged Golgi enzymes, conditions precluding such competition, the Golgi enzymes completely redistribute to the ER upon rapamycin treatment. A photoactivatable FRB-Golgi enzyme, highlighted only in the Golgi, likewise redistributes to the ER. These data establish Golgi enzymes constitutively cycle through the ER. Using our trapping scheme, we identify roles of rab6a and calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) in Golgi enzyme recycling, and show that retrograde transport of Golgi membrane underlies Golgi dispersal during microtubule depolymerization and mitosis. PMID:26598700

  6. Untangling the web: Mechanisms underlying ER network formation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Uma; Blackstone, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The ER is a continuous membrane system consisting of the nuclear envelope, flat sheets often studded with ribosomes, and a polygonal network of highly-curved tubules extending throughout the cell. Although protein and lipid biosynthesis, protein modification, vesicular transport, Ca2+dynamics, and protein quality control have been investigated in great detail, mechanisms that generate the distinctive architecture of the ER have been uncovered only recently. Several protein families including the reticulons and REEPs/DP1/Yop1p harbor hydrophobic hairpin domains that shape high-curvature ER tubules and mediate intramembrane protein interactions. Members of the atlastin/RHD3/Sey1p family of dynamin-related GTPases interact with the ER-shaping proteins and mediate the formation of three-way junctions responsible for the polygonal structure of the tubular ER network, with Lunapark proteins acting antagonistically. Additional classes of tubular ER proteins including some REEPs and the M1 spastin ATPase interact with the microtubule cytoskeleton. Flat ER sheets possess a different complement of proteins such as p180, CLIMP-63 and kinectin implicated in shaping, cisternal stacking and cytoskeletal interactions. The ER is also in constant motion, and numerous signaling pathways as well as interactions among cytoskeletal elements, the plasma membrane, and organelles cooperate to position and shape the ER dynamically. Finally, many proteins involved in shaping the ER network are mutated in the most common forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia, indicating a particular importance for proper ER morphology and distribution in large, highly-polarized cells such as neurons. PMID:23602970

  7. Spectroscopy of the Er-doped lithium tetraborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padlyak, B. V.; Lisiecki, R.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.

    2016-04-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption, and luminescence (emission and excitation) spectra as well as luminescence kinetics of the Er-doped glasses with Li2B4O7 composition were investigated and analysed. The high optical quality glasses with Li2B4O7:Er composition containing 0.5 and 1.0 mol.% Er2O3 were obtained from corresponding polycrystalline compound by standard glass synthesis. The EPR spectroscopy in the 4.2-300 K temperature range and optical spectroscopy at 300 K show that the Er impurity is incorporated into the network of Li2B4O7 glass as Er3+ (4f11, 4I15/2) ions, exclusively. The local structure of the Er3+ luminescence centres in Li sites of the glass network is proposed. Based on the standard Judd-Ofelt theory the oscillator strength (Pcal) and experimental oscillator strength (Pexp) for observed absorption transitions as well as phenomenological intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4, Ω6) for Er3+ centres in the Li2B4O7:Er glass containing 1.0 mol.% Er2O3 were calculated. Spectroscopic parameters of relevance for laser applications, including emission probabilities of transitions (Wr), branching ratios (β), and radiative lifetime (τrad) have been calculated for main observed emission transitions of the Er3+ centres in Li2B4O7:Er glasses. Experimental and calculated lifetimes were compared and quantum efficiency (η) for green (4S3/2 → 4I15/2 transition) and infrared (4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition) emission bands has been estimated.

  8. Technology for the ERS-1 SAR antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.

    1984-09-01

    The metallization of CFRP waveguides, the Deployable Truss Structure (DTS) and verification in terrestrial environment of the 10 x 1 m SAR antenna of ERS-1 (ESA satellite) are discussed. Waveguide metallization was achieved indirectly with metallization of the mandrel prior to CFRP lay-up, and directly, by electroplating of manufactured CFRP components. Both techniques proved unsatisfactory, but a surface treatment applied to the metal layer in the indirect technique improves adhesion strength by an order of magnitude, and enables the waveguides to meet requirements. The DTS satisfies launch, deployment, and inflight specifications for a 5 panel/2 wing structure. Ground tests include analytical simulation of deployment with and without gravity effects, and a gravity compensation technique for tests.

  9. Final Technical Report for Award # ER64999

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, William W.

    2014-10-08

    This report provides a summary of activities for Award # ER64999, a Genomes to Life Project funded by the Office of Science, Basic Energy Research. The project was entitled "Methanogenic archaea and the global carbon cycle: a systems biology approach to the study of Methanosarcina species". The long-term goal of this multi-investigator project was the creation of integrated, multiscale models that accurately and quantitatively predict the role of Methanosarcina species in the global carbon cycle under dynamic environmental conditions. To achieve these goals we pursed four specific aims: (1) genome sequencing of numerous members of the Order Methanosarcinales, (2) identification of genomic sources of phenotypic variation through in silico comparative genomics, (3) elucidation of the transcriptional networks of two Methanosarcina species, and (4) development of comprehensive metabolic network models for characterized strains to address the question of how metabolic models scale with genetic distance.

  10. Reaction Diffusion Modeling of Calcium Dynamics with Realistic ER Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Means, Shawn; Smith, Alexander J.; Shepherd, Jason; Shadid, John; Fowler, John; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J. H.; Mazel, Tomas; Smith, Gregory D.; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a finite-element model of mast cell calcium dynamics that incorporates the endoplasmic reticulum's complex geometry. The model is built upon a three-dimensional reconstruction of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from an electron tomographic tilt series. Tetrahedral meshes provide volumetric representations of the ER lumen, ER membrane, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane. The reaction-diffusion model simultaneously tracks changes in cytoplasmic and ER intraluminal calcium concentrations and includes luminal and cytoplasmic protein buffers. Transport fluxes via PMCA, SERCA, ER leakage, and Type II IP3 receptors are also represented. Unique features of the model include stochastic behavior of IP3 receptor calcium channels and comparisons of channel open times when diffusely distributed or aggregated in clusters on the ER surface. Simulations show that IP3R channels in close proximity modulate activity of their neighbors through local Ca2+ feedback effects. Cytoplasmic calcium levels rise higher, and ER luminal calcium concentrations drop lower, after IP3-mediated release from receptors in the diffuse configuration. Simulation results also suggest that the buffering capacity of the ER, and not restricted diffusion, is the predominant factor influencing average luminal calcium concentrations. PMID:16617072

  11. CW YVO4:Er Laser with Resonant Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachenya, K. N.; Kisel, V. E.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Matrosov, V. N.; Tolstik, N. A.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The lasing characteristics of a YVO4:Er laser with resonant pumping in the 1.5-1.6 μm range are studied. Lasing is obtained at λ = 1603 nm with a differential efficiency of up to 61%. YVO4:Er crystals are found to offer promise for use in efficient resonantly (in-band) pumped lasers.

  12. How to Avoid the ER If You Have Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Avoid the ER if You Have Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > How to Avoid the ER if You Have Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... is the last resort for someone who has asthma. If a flare-up is really out of ...

  13. Erbium induced magnetic properties of Er/ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayachandraiah, C.; Sivakumar, K.; Divya, A.; Krishnaiah, G.

    2016-05-01

    Pure and Er (2, 3 and 4 at. %) doped ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. EDS spectrum confirmed the presence of Zn, O and Er in the synthesized samples. The XRD measurements confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO for all samples. The crystallite size of the samples decreases with increase in concentration and are compatible with the results that obtained from TEM analysis.EPR spectra exhibitedferromagnetic signals the substitution Er The possible ferromagnetic zinc interstials signal is appeared for 2 at. % of Er dopant. The room temperature ferromagnetic is observed only for 2 at. % of Er while all other samples exhibiting weak ferromagnetic nature.

  14. 20 CFR 228.17 - Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled widow..., disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried widow(er)'s tier I annuity amount. (a) If the employee died before attaining age 62 and after 1978 and the widow(er), disabled...

  15. 20 CFR 228.17 - Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled..., disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried widow(er)'s tier I annuity amount. (a) If the employee died before attaining age 62 and after 1978 and the widow(er), disabled...

  16. 20 CFR 228.17 - Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled..., disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried widow(er)'s tier I annuity amount. (a) If the employee died before attaining age 62 and after 1978 and the widow(er), disabled...

  17. 20 CFR 228.17 - Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled widow..., disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried widow(er)'s tier I annuity amount. (a) If the employee died before attaining age 62 and after 1978 and the widow(er), disabled...

  18. 20 CFR 228.17 - Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustments to the widow(er)'s, disabled..., disabled widow(er)'s, surviving divorced spouse's, and remarried widow(er)'s tier I annuity amount. (a) If the employee died before attaining age 62 and after 1978 and the widow(er), disabled...

  19. GRP78 Interacting Partner Bag5 Responds to ER Stress and Protects Cardiomyocytes From ER Stress-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish K; Tahrir, Farzaneh G; Knezevic, Tijana; White, Martyn K; Gordon, Jennifer; Cheung, Joseph Y; Khalili, Kamel; Feldman, Arthur M

    2016-08-01

    Bag5 is a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone regulators and is unusual in that it consists of five BAG domains, which function as modulators of chaperone activity. Bag family proteins play a key role in cellular as well as in cardiac function and their differential expression is reported in heart failure. In this study, we examined the importance of a Bag family member protein, Bag5, in cardiomyocytes during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We found that expression of Bag5 in cardiomyocytes is significantly increased with the induction of ER stress in a time dependent manner. We have taken gain-in and loss-of functional approaches to characterize Bag5 protein function in cardiomyocytes. Adenoviral mediated expression of Bag5 significantly decreased cell death as well as improved cellular viability in ER stress. Along with this, ER stress-induced CHOP protein expression is significantly decreased in cells that overexpress Bag5. Conversely, we found that siRNA-mediated knockdown of Bag5 caused cell death, increased cytotoxicity, and decreased cellular viability in cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, we found that Bag5 protein expression is significantly increased in the ER during ER stress and that this in turn modulates GRP78 protein stability and reduces ER stress. This study suggests that Bag5 is an important regulator of ER function and so could be exploited as a tool to improve cardiomyocyte function under stress conditions. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1813-1821, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26729625

  20. Up Conversion Measurements in Er:YAG; Comparison with 1.6 Micrometer Laser Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Walsh, Brian M.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George E.; Carrion, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Up conversion significantly affects Er:YAG lasers. Measurements performed here for low Er concentration are significantly different than reported high Er concentration. The results obtained here are used to predict laser performance and are compared with experimental results.

  1. Ultraviolet upconversion fluorescence of Er3+ in Yb3+/Er3+-codoped Gd2O3 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kezhi; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Daisheng; Liu, Zhenyu; Qin, Weiping

    2011-11-01

    Under 980 nm excitation, room-temperature ultraviolet (UV) upconversion (UC) emissions of Er3+ from the 4G(9/2), 2K(13/2), and 2P(3/2) states were observed in Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ nanotubes, which were synthesized via a simple wet-chemical route at low temperature and ambient pressure followed by a subsequent heat treatment at 800 degrees C. The experimental results exhibited that these UV emissions came from four-photon UC processes. In the Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ nanocrystals, the energy transfers (ETs) from Yb3+ to Er3+ played important roles in populating the high-energy states of Er3+ ions. This material provides a possible candidate for building UV compact solid-state lasers or fiber lasers. PMID:22413290

  2. In Vitro Study of Er:YAG and Er, Cr:YSGG Laser Irradiation on Human Gingival Fibroblast Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Talebi-Ardakani, Mohammad Reza; Torshabi, Maryam; Karami, Elahe; Arbabi, Elham; Rezaei Esfahrood, Zeinab

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate goal of the periodontal treatments is a regeneration of periodontium. Recently, laser irradiations are commonly used to improve wound repair. Because of many controversies about the effects of laser on soft tissue regeneration, more in vitro studies are still needed. The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the effects of different doses of Er:YAG (erbium-doped:yttrium, aluminum, garnet) and Er, Cr:YSGG (erbium, chromium-doped: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser treatment on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) proliferation. In this randomized single-blind controlled in vitro trial, HGF cells were irradiated using Er:YAG and Er, Cr:YSGG laser for 10 and 30 seconds or remained unexposed as a control group. After a culture period of 24 and 48 hours, HGF cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. The data were subjected to one-sided analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparison tests. Our results showed Er:YAG application for 10 and 30 seconds as well as Er, Cr:YSGG irradiation for 10 and 30 seconds induced statistically significant (P<0.05) proliferation of HGF cells as compared with the control at 24 hours up to 18.39%, 26.22%, 21.21%, and 17.06% respectively. In 48 hour incubations, Er:YAG and Er, Cr:YSGG irradiation for 10 and 30 seconds significantly increased cellular proliferation up to 22.9%, 32.24%, 30.52% and 30.02% respectively (P<0.05). This study demonstrates that Er:YAG and Er, Cr:YSGG laser significantly increased HGF cell proliferation compared to the control specimens. This higher proliferation can lead to increased wound repair in clinical conditions. PMID:27309266

  3. Er3+ diffusion in LiTaO3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Long; Zhang, Qun; Wong, Wing-Han; Pun, Edwin Yue-Bun

    2015-12-01

    Some Er3+-doped LiTaO3 plates were prepared by in-diffusion of Er-metal film locally coated onto congruent Z-cut substrate in air at a wide temperature range from 1000 to 1500 °C. After diffusion, Er3+-doping effect on LiTaO3 refractive index and Li2O out-diffusion arising from Er3+ in-diffusion were studied at first. Refractive indices at the doped and undoped surface parts were measured by prism coupling technique and the surface composition was estimated. The results show that Er3+ dopant has small contribution to the LiTaO3 index. Li2O out-diffusion is slight (Li2O content loss <0.3 mol%) for the temperature below 1300 °C while is moderate (Li2O content loss <0.6 mol%) for the temperature above 1400 °C. The Er3+ profile was studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The study shows that the diffused Er3+ ions follow either a complementary error function or a Gaussian profile. Characteristic parameters including diffusivity, diffusion constant, activation energy, solubility, solubility constant and heat of solution were obtained and compared with the LiNbO3 case. The comparison shows that the diffusivity and solubility in LiTaO3 are considerably smaller than in LiNbO3 because of the difference of Ta and Nb in atomic weight.

  4. Ammonia synthesis and ER-MCFC-technology - a profitable combination?

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, G.P.J.; Vervoort, J.; Daniels, R.J.E.; Luteijn, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    Similar to stand-alone ER-MCFC power systems industrial ammonia production facilities include hydrogen-rich synthesis-gas production. Therefore, integration of ER-MCFC stacks in a conventional industrial ammonia plant was investigated. By preliminary process design calculations three promising process structures were evaluated: (1) ER-MCFC is fed by the ammonia plant`s steam-reformer; anode off-gas to firing (2) similar to structure 1; in this case the anode off-gas is redirected to the ammonia process (3) ER-MCFC is fed by ammonia-synthesis purge gas The results indicate that for options 1 and 3 a return-on-investment for the ER-MCFC of around 8% is achievable at a stack cost of $250/kW and a revenue of 7c/kWh. Option 2 is not profitable, because of the associated reduction in ammonia production. The degree of hydrogen-utilization in the ER-MCFC to be selected for maximum profit varies with the process structure and indicates that there is scope for ER-MCFC stacks which operate at low hydrogen-utilization.

  5. Coupled ER to Golgi Transport Reconstituted with Purified Cytosolic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barlowe, Charles

    1997-01-01

    A cell-free vesicle fusion assay that reproduces a subreaction in transport of pro-α-factor from the ER to the Golgi complex has been used to fractionate yeast cytosol. Purified Sec18p, Uso1p, and LMA1 in the presence of ATP and GTP satisfies the requirement for cytosol in fusion of ER-derived vesicles with Golgi membranes. Although these purified factors are sufficient for vesicle docking and fusion, overall ER to Golgi transport in yeast semi-intact cells depends on COPII proteins (components of a membrane coat that drive vesicle budding from the ER). Thus, membrane fusion is coupled to vesicle formation in ER to Golgi transport even in the presence of saturating levels of purified fusion factors. Manipulation of the semi-intact cell assay is used to distinguish freely diffusible ER- derived vesicles containing pro-α-factor from docked vesicles and from fused vesicles. Uso1p mediates vesicle docking and produces a dilution resistant intermediate. Sec18p and LMA1 are not required for the docking phase, but are required for efficient fusion of ER- derived vesicles with the Golgi complex. Surprisingly, elevated levels of Sec23p complex (a subunit of the COPII coat) prevent vesicle fusion in a reversible manner, but do not interfere with vesicle docking. Ordering experiments using the dilution resistant intermediate and reversible Sec23p complex inhibition indicate Sec18p action is required before LMA1 function. PMID:9382859

  6. ER Stress-induced Aberrant Neuronal Maturation and Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Koichi; Iekumo, Takaaki; Kaneko, Masayuki; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Okuma, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders, which include autism spectrum disorder, are congenital impairments in the growth and development of the central nervous system. They are mainly accentuated during infancy and childhood. Autism spectrum disorder may be caused by environmental factors, genomic imprinting of chromosome 15q11-q13 regions, and gene defects such as those in genes encoding neurexin and neuroligin, which are involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic signaling. However, regardless of the many reports on neurodevelopmental disorders, the pathogenic mechanism and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders remain unclear. Conversely, it has been reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress is increased by environmental factors such as alcohol consumption and smoking. Here we show the recent results on ER stress-induced neurodevelopmental disorders. ER stress led to a decrease in the mRNA levels of the proneural factors Hes1/5 and Pax6, which maintain an undifferentiated state of the neural cells. This stress also led to a decrease in nestin expression and an increase in beta-III tubulin expression. In addition, dendrite length was shortened by ER stress in microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) positive cells. However, the ubiquitin ligase HRD1 expression was increased by ER stress. By suppressing HRD1 expression, the ER stress-induced decrease in nestin and MAP-2 expression and increase in beta-III tubulin returned to control levels. Therefore, we suggest that ER stress induces abnormalities in neuronal differentiation and maturation via HRD1 expression. These results suggest that targeting ER stress may facilitate quicker approaches toward the prevention and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27252060

  7. Laser cooling of Er3+-doped solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2010-10-01

    We consider theoretically a mechanism for laser cooling in rare-earth-doped low-phonon materials based simultaneously on two cooling cycles: a traditional cooling cycle with an anti-Stokes fluorescence transition as well as an infrared-to-visible upconversion cycle, to overcome the self-termination effects in either anti-Stokes or upconversion cooling on its own. Our simulations, performed for erbium-doped potassium-lead chloride crystal ( Er3+:KPl 2Cl 5) known to be an extremely low phonon energy host, uses two pump wavelengths corresponding to the long wavelength tails of the absorption spectra of the 4I15/2 → 4I13/2 and 4I15/2 → 4I9/2 transitions. The contribution of each pump source to the cooling process is comprehensively investigated. We show that, although the energy gap between 4I15/2 and 4I9/2 levels exceeds the energy gap between 4I15/2 and 4I13/2 levels and cooling process is more efficient with the cycle based on the 4I15/2 → 4I13/2 transition, the second cooling cycle based on the 4I15/2 → 4I9/2 transition can be used as a supplementary one.

  8. ER to synapse trafficking of NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Martin; Petralia, Ronald S.; Kaniakova, Martina; Sans, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. There are three distinct subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) that have been identified including 2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo-1,2-oxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid receptors (AMPARs), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and kainate receptors. The most common GluRs in mature synapses are AMPARs that mediate the fast excitatory neurotransmission and NMDARs that mediate the slow excitatory neurotransmission. There have been large numbers of recent reports studying how a single neuron regulates synaptic numbers and types of AMPARs and NMDARs. Our current research is centered primarily on NMDARs and, therefore, we will focus in this review on recent knowledge of molecular mechanisms occurring (1) early in the biosynthetic pathway of NMDARs, (2) in the transport of NMDARs after their release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); and (3) at the plasma membrane including excitatory synapses. Because a growing body of evidence also indicates that abnormalities in NMDAR functioning are associated with a number of human psychiatric and neurological diseases, this review together with other chapters in this issue may help to enhance research and to gain further knowledge of normal synaptic physiology as well as of the etiology of many human brain diseases. PMID:25505872

  9. ER to synapse trafficking of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Horak, Martin; Petralia, Ronald S; Kaniakova, Martina; Sans, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. There are three distinct subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) that have been identified including 2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo-1,2-oxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid receptors (AMPARs), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and kainate receptors. The most common GluRs in mature synapses are AMPARs that mediate the fast excitatory neurotransmission and NMDARs that mediate the slow excitatory neurotransmission. There have been large numbers of recent reports studying how a single neuron regulates synaptic numbers and types of AMPARs and NMDARs. Our current research is centered primarily on NMDARs and, therefore, we will focus in this review on recent knowledge of molecular mechanisms occurring (1) early in the biosynthetic pathway of NMDARs, (2) in the transport of NMDARs after their release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); and (3) at the plasma membrane including excitatory synapses. Because a growing body of evidence also indicates that abnormalities in NMDAR functioning are associated with a number of human psychiatric and neurological diseases, this review together with other chapters in this issue may help to enhance research and to gain further knowledge of normal synaptic physiology as well as of the etiology of many human brain diseases. PMID:25505872

  10. Characterization of the Ers Regulon of Enterococcus faecalis▿

    PubMed Central

    Riboulet-Bisson, Eliette; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Auffray, Yanick; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Ers has been qualified as the PrfA-like transcriptional regulator of Enterococcus faecalis. In a previous study we reported that Ers is important for the survival within macrophages of this opportunist pathogenic bacterium. In the present work we have used proteomic and microarray expression profiling of E. faecalis JH2-2 and an ers-deleted mutant (Δers mutant) strains to define the Ers regulon. In addition to EF_0082 (encoding a putative facilitator family transporter), already known to be under Ers regulation, three genes or operons displayed a significant decrease (confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR) in expression in the Δers mutant. The first locus corresponds to three genes: arcA, arcB, and arcC1 (arcABC). These genes are members of the ADI operon, encoding enzymes of the arginine deiminase system. The second is the EF_1459 gene, which encodes a hypothetical protein and is located within a putative phage genetic element. Lastly, Ef_3319 is annotated as the alpha subunit of the citrate lyase encoded by citF. citF is a member of a putative 12-gene operon involved in citrate catabolism. Moreover, the promoter sequence, similar to the “PrfA box” and found in the promoter regions of ers and EF_0082, has been shown to be included in the DNA segment recognized by Ers. Phenotypic analysis of the Δers mutant strain revealed a growth defect when cultured with arginine or citrate as the energy source; this was not seen for the wild type. As expected, similar results were obtained with mutants in which arcA and citF were inactivated. In addition, in the mouse peritonitis model of virulence, the Δers mutant appeared significantly less lethal than the JH2-2 wild-type strain. Taken together, these results indicate that the regulator Ers has a pleiotropic effect, especially in the cellular metabolism and virulence of E. faecalis. PMID:18426870

  11. Arctic geodynamics: Arctic science and ERS-1 satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Sandwell, David T.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed gravity field map of the mid Arctic Ocean, spreading ridge system was produced on the basis of ERS-1 satellite altimetry data. Areas of special concern, the Barents and Kara Seas, and areas surrounding the islands of Svalbard, Frans Josef Land and Novoya Zemlya are reviewed. ERS-1 altimetry covers unique Arctic and Antarctic latitudes above 72 degrees. Before ERS-1 it was not possible to study these areas with satellite altimetry. Gravity field solutions for the Barents Sea, portions of the Arctic Ocean and the Norwegian sea are shown. The largest gravity anomalies occur along the Greenland fracture zone as well as along transform faults near Svalbard.

  12. Large-scale ER-damper for seismic protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Scott; Makris, Nicos

    1997-05-01

    A large scale electrorheological (ER) damper has been designed, constructed, and tested. The damper consists of a main cylinder and a piston rod that pushes an ER-fluid through a number of stationary annular ducts. This damper is a scaled- up version of a prototype ER-damper which has been developed and extensively studied in the past. In this paper, results from comprehensive testing of the large-scale damper are presented, and the proposed theory developed for predicting the damper response is validated.

  13. Inhibitors of Protein Translocation Across the ER Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Römisch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) constitutes the first step of protein secretion. ER protein import is essential in all eukaryotic cells and is particularly critical in fast-growing tumour cells. Thus, the process can serve as target both for potential cancer drugs and for bacterial virulence factors. Inhibitors of protein transport across the ER membrane range from broad-spectrum to highly substrate-specific and can interfere with virtually any stage of this multistep process, and even with transport of endocytosed antigens into the cytosol for cross-presentation. PMID:26122014

  14. Electron spin resonance study of Er-concentration effect in GaAs;Er,O containing charge carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Elmasry, F.; Okubo, S.; Ohta, H.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2014-05-21

    Er-concentration effect in GaAs;Er,O containing charge carriers (n-type, high resistance, p-type) has been studied by X-band Electron spin resonance (ESR) at low temperature (4.7 K < T < 18 K). Observed A, B, and C types of ESR signals were identical to those observed previously in GaAs:Er,O without carrier. The local structure around Er-2O centers is not affected by carriers because similar angular dependence of g-values was observed in both cases (with/without carrier). For temperature dependence, linewidth and lineshape analysis suggested the existence of Er dimers with antiferromagnetic exchange interaction of about 7 K. Moreover, drastic decrease of ESR intensity for C signal in p-type sample was observed and it correlates with the decrease of photoluminescence (PL) intensity. Possible model for the Er-2O trap level in GaAs:Er,O is discussed from the ESR and PL experimental results.

  15. Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone at the ER-Mitochondrion Interface Mediates the Mitochondrion-ER-Nucleus Signaling for Cellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Teruo; Hayashi, Eri; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a cell forms contacts directly with mitochondria whereby the contact is referred to as the mitochondrion-associated ER membrane or the MAM. Here we found that the MAM regulates cellular survival via an MAM-residing ER chaperone the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) in that the Sig-1R chaperones the ER stress sensor IRE1 to facilitate inter-organelle signaling for survival. IRE1 is found in this study to be enriched at the MAM in CHO cells. We found that IRE1 is stabilized at the MAM by Sig-1Rs when cells are under ER stress. Sig-1Rs stabilize IRE1 and thus allow for conformationally correct IRE1 to dimerize into the long-lasting, activated endonuclease. The IRE1 at the MAM also responds to reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria. Therefore, the ER-mitochondrion interface serves as an important subcellular entity in the regulation of cellular survival by enhancing the stress-responding signaling between mitochondria, ER, and nucleus. PMID:24204710

  16. Return of Collective Rotation in {sup 157}Er and {sup 158}Er at Ultrahigh Spin

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E. S.; Twin, P. J.; Evans, A. O.; Choy, P. T. W.; Nolan, P. J.; Pipidis, A.; Riley, M. A.; Campbell, D. B.; Simpson, J.; Appelbe, D. E.; Joss, D. T.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Fallon, P.; Goergen, A.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Ward, D.; Ragnarsson, I.

    2007-01-05

    A new frontier of discrete-line {gamma}-ray spectroscopy at ultrahigh spin has been opened in the rare-earth nuclei {sup 157,158}Er. Four rotational structures, displaying high moments of inertia, have been identified, which extend up to spin {approx}65({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and bypass the band-terminating states in these nuclei which occur at {approx}45({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations suggest that these structures arise from well-deformed triaxial configurations that lie in a valley of favored shell energy which also includes the triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 161-167}Lu.

  17. Er3+ infrared fluorescence affected by spatial distribution synchronicity of Ba2+ and Er3+ in Er3+-doped BaO-SiO2 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuno, Atsunobu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Glasses with the composition xBaO-(99.9 - x)SiO2-0.1ErO3/2 (0 ≤x ≤ 34.9) were fabricated by a levitation technique. The glasses in the immiscibility region were opaque due to chemical inhomogeneity, while the other glasses were colorless and transparent. The scanning electron microscope observations and electron probe microanalysis scan profiles revealed that more Er3+ ions were preferentially distributed in the regions where more Ba2+ ions existed in the chemically inhomogeneous glasses. The synchronicity of the spatial distributions of the two ions initially increased with increasing x and then decreased when the Ba2+ concentration exceeded a certain value. The peak shape and lifetime of the fluorescence at 1.55 μm depended on x as well as the spatial distribution of both ions. These results indicate that although ErOn polyhedra are preferentially coordinated with Ba2+ ions and their local structure is affected by the coordination of Ba2+, there is a maximum in the amount of Ba2+ ions that can coordinate ErOn polyhedra since the available space for Ba2+ ions is limited. These findings provide us with efficient ways to design the chemical composition of glasses with superior Er3+ fluorescence properties for optical communication network systems.

  18. Properties of ER Fluids Comprised of Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Akio; Ide, Yoichiroh; Maniwa, Shyunji; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Oda, Hiroji

    Side-chain liquid crystalline polysiloxanes (LCS) diluted with solvents show a large increase in viscosity and a newtonian flow under an electric field. Two types of solvent-diluted LCSs, A and B, are presented and their properties are described in this paper. Type A shows a large temperature-dependent ER effect a quick response of msec. order to an electric field and a dynamic behavior similar to that of a low molecular weight liquid crystal. Type B shows a stable ER effect throughout a wide range of temperatures up to 150°C, a two-step response of shear stress curve upon application of DC electric field and a micron-sized droplets structure which deforms with the electric field. The generation mechanisms of ER effect on the two types were discussed with the data of dynamic and morphological changes, referring those on a low molecular liquid crystal and a particle dispersion type ER fluid.

  19. ER-2 High Altitude Solar Cell Calibration Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Matthew G.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The first flights of the ER-2 solar cell calibration demonstration were conducted during September-October of 2014. Three flights were performed that not only tested out the equipment and operational procedures, but also demonstrated the capability of this unique facility by conducting the first short-circuit measurements on a variety of test solar cells. Very preliminary results of these first flights were presented at the 2014 Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology (SPRAT) Conference in Cleveland, OH shortly following these first flights. At the 2015 Space Power Workshop, a more detailed description of these first ER-2 flights will be presented, along with the final flight data from some of the test cells that were flown and has now been reduced and corrected for ER-2 atmospheric flight conditions. Plans for ER-2 flights during the summer of 2015 will also be discussed.

  20. The Grand Banks ERS-1 SAR wave spectra validation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, P. W.; Dobson, F. W.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, R. J.; Buckley, J. R.; Allingham, M.; Vandemark, D.; Walsh, E. J.; Khandekar, M.; Lalbeharry, R.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the ERS-1 validation program, the ERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) wave spectra validation experiment was carried out over the Grand Banks of Newfoundland (Canada) in Nov. 1991. The principal objective of the experiment was to obtain complete sets of wind and wave data from a variety of calibrated instruments to validate SAR measurements of ocean wave spectra. The field program activities are described and the rather complex wind and wave conditions which were observed are summarized. Spectral comparisons with ERS-1 SAR image spectra are provided. The ERS-1 SAR is shown to have measured swell and range traveling wind seas, but did not measure azimuth traveling wind seas at any time during the experiment. Results of velocity bunching forward mapping and new measurements of the relationship between wind stress and sea state are also shown.

  1. ERS-1 and Almaz ocean wave monitoring experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.; Tilley, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from two ocean wave monitoring experiments conducted in 1991 using the high-altitude ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and the low-altitude ex-USSR Almaz 1 SAR are presented. ERS-1 imagery of the Gulf Stream supports the idea that a future wide-swath scansar will be a valuable tool for monitoring large-scale ocean dynamics at high resolution. A direct comparison of ERS-1 and Almaz 1 ocean wave spectra shows major deficiencies in the ERS-1 high range-to-velocity ratio R/V sensor that are partially resolved with the lower-altitude Almaz platform. Optimum wave imaging from space will require both a low R/V and low off-nadir angle.

  2. Play 'Pokemon Go' without Landing in The ER

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159911.html Play 'Pokemon Go' Without Landing in the ER Distracted walking a ... in pursuit of digital monsters via the "Pokemon Go" game. But players distracted by their smartphones risk ...

  3. ER stress induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Lebeaupin, C; Proics, E; de Bieville, C H D; Rousseau, D; Bonnafous, S; Patouraux, S; Adam, G; Lavallard, V J; Rovere, C; Le Thuc, O; Saint-Paul, M C; Anty, R; Schneck, A S; Iannelli, A; Gugenheim, J; Tran, A; Gual, P; Bailly-Maitre, B

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of chronic liver disease is constantly increasing, owing to the obesity epidemic. However, the causes and mechanisms of inflammation-mediated liver damage remain poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an initiator of cell death and inflammatory mechanisms. Although obesity induces ER stress, the interplay between hepatic ER stress, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death signaling has not yet been explored during the etiology of chronic liver diseases. Steatosis is a common disorder affecting obese patients; moreover, 25% of these patients develop steatohepatitis with an inherent risk for progression to hepatocarcinoma. Increased plasma LPS levels have been detected in the serum of patients with steatohepatitis. We hypothesized that, as a consequence of increased plasma LPS, ER stress could be induced and lead to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death associated with steatohepatitis progression. In livers from obese mice, administration of LPS or tunicamycin results in IRE1α and PERK activation, leading to the overexpression of CHOP. This, in turn, activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, subsequently initiating hepatocyte pyroptosis (caspase-1, -11, interleukin-1β secretion) and apoptosis (caspase-3, BH3-only proteins). In contrast, the LPS challenge is blocked by the ER stress inhibitor TUDCA, resulting in: CHOP downregulation, reduced caspase-1, caspase-11, caspase-3 activities, lowered interleukin-1β secretion and rescue from cell death. The central role of CHOP in mediating the activation of proinflammatory caspases and cell death was characterized by performing knockdown experiments in primary mouse hepatocytes. Finally, the analysis of human steatohepatitis liver biopsies showed a correlation between the upregulation of inflammasome and ER stress markers, as well as liver injury. We demonstrate here that ER stress leads to hepatic NLRP3 inflammasome pyroptotic death, thus contributing as a novel mechanism of

  4. 5 d-4 f luminescence of Er 3+ in YAG:Er 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksanyan, Eduard; Harutunyan, Vachagan; Kostanyan, Radik; Feldbach, Eduard; Kirm, Marco; Liblik, Peeter; Makhov, Vladimir N.; Vielhauer, Sebastian

    2009-04-01

    Interconfigurational 4 f105 d ↔ 4 f11 transitions of the Er 3+ ion in the YAG host were studied under both VUV photon (synchrotron radiation) and electron beam excitation. It was found that the lowest low-spin 5 d level of the Er 3+ ion has a rather large energy gap to the next lower 4 f2D(2) 5/2 crystal-field level, which results in a relatively low rate of nonradiative transitions from this 5 d level leading to the appearance of weak spin-allowed 5 d-4 f luminescence at low temperature. The lowest high-spin 5 d level, from which spin-forbidden 5 d-4 f radiative transitions could occur potentially, is situated only at ˜500 cm -1 above the 4D1/2 level. Such close location allows fast depopulation of the 5 d level resulting in the absence of spin-forbidden 5 d-4 f luminescence and appearance of 4D1/2 4 f-4 f luminescence.

  5. Comparison of laser phacovaporization using the Er:YAG and the Er:YSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailitis, Raymond P.; Patterson, Scott W.; Samuels, Mark A.; Hagen, Kerry B.; Ren, Qiushi; Waring, George O., III

    1992-08-01

    Future advances in cataract surgery aim to remove the crystalline lens through a small opening such that the capsular bag, once devoid of lens epithelial cells, may be refilled with a clear polymer which may exhibit the elastic properties of a young lens and restore accommodation. Several different lasers are currently being investigated for laser cataract surgery including the excimer, pulsed visible and short infrared, and mid infrared lasers. Taking advantage of the strong water absorption peak at 2.94 micrometers , we have investigated the laser tissue interaction of the Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ) and Er:YSGG (2.79 micrometers ) which have water absorption coefficients of 13,000 cm-1 and 7,000 cm-1, respectively. We have devised a delivery system which measures the ablation time versus radiant energy through a known thickness on a lens nucleus in free air for these two wavelengths. The current presentation compares the ablation rates versus radiant exposure of these two lasers in human lens nuclei. We also show the histopathology from ablated lenses of these two different wavelengths at different radiant exposures. Integration with fiberoptics and clinical applications is discussed.

  6. Oceanographic results from analysis of ERS-1 altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Shum, C. K.; Chambers, D. P.; Peterson, G. E.; Ries, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Large scale dynamic ocean topography and its variations were observed using ERS-1 radar altimeter measurements. The altimeter measurements analyzed are primarily from the ESA ocean product (OPR02) and from the Interim Geophysical Data Records (IGDR) generated by NOAA from the fast delivery (FD) data during the ERS-1 35 day repeat orbit phase. The precise orbits used for the dynamic topography solution are computed using dual satellite crossover measurements from ERS-1 and TOPEX (Topology Ocean Experiment)/Poseidon (T/P) as additional tracking data, and using improved models and constants which are consistent with T/P. Analysis of the ERS-1 dynamic topography solution indicates agreement with the T/P solution at the 5 cm root mean square level, with regional differences as large as 15 cm tide gauges at the 8 to 9 cm level. There are differences between the ERS-1 OPR02 and IGDR determined dynamic topography solutions on the order of 5 cm root mean square. Mesoscale oceanic variability time series obtained using collinear analysis of the ERS-1 altimeter data show good qualitative agreement when compared with the T/P results.

  7. Co- and Post-Translational Protein Folding in the ER.

    PubMed

    Ellgaard, Lars; McCaul, Nicholas; Chatsisvili, Anna; Braakman, Ineke

    2016-06-01

    The biophysical rules that govern folding of small, single-domain proteins in dilute solutions are now quite well understood. The mechanisms underlying co-translational folding of multidomain and membrane-spanning proteins in complex cellular environments are often less clear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) produces a plethora of membrane and secretory proteins, which must fold and assemble correctly before ER exit - if these processes fail, misfolded species accumulate in the ER or are degraded. The ER differs from other cellular organelles in terms of the physicochemical environment and the variety of ER-specific protein modifications. Here, we review chaperone-assisted co- and post-translational folding and assembly in the ER and underline the influence of protein modifications on these processes. We emphasize how method development has helped advance the field by allowing researchers to monitor the progression of folding as it occurs inside living cells, while at the same time probing the intricate relationship between protein modifications during folding. PMID:26947578

  8. Lockheed ER-2 #806 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 806, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  9. Lockheed ER-2 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 706, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  10. Lockheed ER-2 #809 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 809, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  11. Lockheed ER-2 #809 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 809, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  12. Lockheed ER-2 #806 high altitude research aircraft during landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 806, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  13. Memantine ER/Donepezil: A Review in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    A once-daily, fixed-dose combination of memantine extended-release (ER)/donepezil 28/10 mg (Namzaric™) is available in the USA for patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) on stable memantine and donepezil therapy. The fixed-dose formulation is bioequivalent to coadministration of the individual drugs. In a 24-week, phase III trial in patients with moderate to severe AD, addition of memantine ER 28 mg once daily to stable cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) therapy was more effective than add-on placebo on measures of cognition, global clinical status, dementia behaviour and semantic processing ability, although between-group differences on a measure of daily function did not significantly differ. In subgroup analyses in donepezil-treated patients, add-on memantine ER was more effective than add-on placebo on measures of cognition, dementia behaviour and semantic processing, although there were no significant between-group differences on measures of global clinical status and daily function. Memantine ER plus ChEI combination therapy was generally well tolerated in the phase III trial, with diarrhoea, dizziness and influenza occurring at least twice as often with add-on memantine ER as add-on placebo in donepezil-treated patients. Thus, memantine ER plus donepezil combination therapy is an effective and well tolerated treatment option for patients with moderate to severe AD. The fixed-dose combination is potentially more convenient than coadministration of the individual agents. PMID:26519339

  14. ER signaling is activated to protect human HaCaT keratinocytes from ER stress induced by environmental doses of UVB

    SciTech Connect

    Mera, Kentaro; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Tada, Ko-ichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Kanekura, Takuro

    2010-06-25

    Proteins are folded properly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Various stress such as hypoxia, ischemia and starvation interfere with the ER function, causing ER stress, which is defined by the accumulation of unfolded protein (UP) in the ER. ER stress is prevented by the UP response (UPR) and ER-associated degradation (ERAD). These signaling pathways are activated by three major ER molecules, ATF6, IRE-1 and PERK. Using HaCaT cells, we investigated ER signaling in human keratinocytes irradiated by environmental doses of ultraviolet B (UVB). The expression of Ero1-L{alpha}, an upstream signaling molecule of ER stress, decreased at 1-4 h after 10 mJ/cm{sup 2} irradiation, indicating that the environmental dose of UVB-induced ER stress in HaCaT cells, without growth retardation. Furthermore, expression of intact ATF6 was decreased and it was translocated to the nuclei. The expression of XBP-1, a downstream molecule of IRE-1, which is an ER chaperone whose expression is regulated by XBP-1, and UP ubiquitination were induced by 10 mJ/cm{sup 2} UVB at 4 h. PERK, which regulates apoptosis, was not phosphorylated. Our results demonstrate that UVB irradiation generates UP in HaCaT cells and that the UPR and ERAD systems are activated to protect cells from UVB-induced ER stress. This is the first report to show ER signaling in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes.

  15. Bond strength of composites on Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-irradiated enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Christian; Gutknecht, Norbert

    1999-02-01

    In an in vitro study the bond strength of composite materials on Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-radiated enamel was examined. The results achieved on enamel surfaces conditioned conventionally using the acid etching method served as a control. On 80 extracted cariesfree third molars an enamel area of 4 X 4 mm was conditioned with three different systems. The Er:YAG laser was used at pulse frequencies of 8 Hz, 10 Hz, 12 Hz and 15 Hz using an energy of 120 mJ at each setting. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser was used at the settings of 20 Hz/50 mJ, 20 Hz/100 mJ and 20 Hz/150 mJ. The repetition rate for this device is constantly 20 Hz. In the reference group 10 teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid. In order to be able to perform the tensile tests under standard conditions metal brackets were placed on the conditioned surfaces. The 'Orthodontic-Bonding-System' was used as an adhesive system. The brackets were pulled off from the etched surfaces vertically to the tooth using a tensile testing machine. The results confirmed the highest bond strengths in the group of enamel surfaces which have been conditioned with acid etching gel. The bond strength of the Er:YAG laser (8, 10 and 12 Hz)- and Er,Cr:YSGG laser (20 Hz/150 mJ)-conditioned enamel surfaces was not significantly lower.

  16. ER-phagy mediates selective degradation of endoplasmic reticulum independently of the core autophagy machinery

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Sebastian; Gallagher, Ciara M.; Walter, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selective autophagy of damaged or redundant organelles is an important mechanism for maintaining cell homeostasis. We found previously that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes massive ER expansion and triggers the formation of large ER whorls. Here, we show that stress-induced ER whorls are selectively taken up into the vacuole, the yeast lysosome, by a process termed ER-phagy. Import into the vacuole does not involve autophagosomes but occurs through invagination of the vacuolar membrane, indicating that ER-phagy is topologically equivalent to microautophagy. Even so, ER-phagy requires neither the core autophagy machinery nor several other proteins specifically implicated in microautophagy. Thus, autophagy of ER whorls represents a distinct type of organelle-selective autophagy. Finally, we provide evidence that ER-phagy degrades excess ER membrane, suggesting that it contributes to cell homeostasis by controlling organelle size. PMID:25052096

  17. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015. PMID:27451109

  18. Effects of Y3+/Er3+ ratio on the 2.7 μm emission of Er3+ ions in oxyfluoride glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiyong; Liu, Chao; Xia, Mengling; Wang, Jing; Han, Jianjun; Xie, Jun; Zhao, Xiujian

    2016-04-01

    Y3+/Er3+ ions co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramics were investigated to realize efficient 2.7 μm emission. Incorporation of Er3+ ions into the fluoride nanocrystals was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction patterns, absorption spectra, emission spectra and Judd-Ofelt analysis. With an increase in the Y3+/Er3+ ratio, radiative lifetime, quantum efficiency and emission cross section of the 2.7 μm emission from Er3+ ions were greatly improved, due to the reduced effective concentration of Er3+ ions and suppressed cross relaxation processes among Er3+ ions in the fluoride nanocrystals. Compared to other Er3+-doped glasses, Y3+/Er3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramics showed a promising potential for gain medium.

  19. ER bodies in plants of the Brassicales order: biogenesis and association with innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Ryohei T.; Yamada, Kenji; Bednarek, Paweł; Nishimura, Mikio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms highly organized network structures composed of tubules and cisternae. Many plant species develop additional ER-derived structures, most of which are specific for certain groups of species. In particular, a rod-shaped structure designated as the ER body is produced by plants of the Brassicales order, which includes Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analyses and characterization of A. thaliana mutants possessing a disorganized ER morphology or lacking ER bodies have provided insights into the highly organized mechanisms responsible for the formation of these unique ER structures. The accumulation of proteins specific for the ER body within the ER plays an important role in the formation of ER bodies. However, a mutant that exhibits morphological defects of both the ER and ER bodies has not been identified. This suggests that plants in the Brassicales order have evolved novel mechanisms for the development of this unique organelle, which are distinct from those used to maintain generic ER structures. In A. thaliana, ER bodies are ubiquitous in seedlings and roots, but rare in rosette leaves. Wounding of rosette leaves induces de novo formation of ER bodies, suggesting that these structures are associated with resistance against pathogens and/or herbivores. ER bodies accumulate a large amount of β-glucosidases, which can produce substances that potentially protect against invading pests. Biochemical studies have determined that the enzymatic activities of these β-glucosidases are enhanced during cell collapse. These results suggest that ER bodies are involved in plant immunity, although there is no direct evidence of this. In this review, we provide recent perspectives of ER and ER body formation in A. thaliana, and discuss clues for the functions of ER bodies. We highlight defense strategies against biotic stress that are unique for the Brassicales order, and discuss how ER structures could contribute to these strategies. PMID

  20. Er:YAG laser debonding of porcelain veneers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buu, Natalie; Morford, Cynthia; Finzen, Frederick; Sharma, Arun; Rechmann, Peter

    2010-02-01

    The removal of porcelain veneers using Er:YAG lasers has not been previously described in the scientific literature. This study was designed to systematically investigate the efficacy of an Er:YAG laser on veneer debonding without damaging the underlying tooth structure, as well as preserving a new or misplaced veneer. Initially, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used on flat porcelain veneer samples (IPS Empress Esthetic; Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY) to assess which infrared laser wavelengths are transmitted through the veneer. Additionally, FTIR spectra from a veneer bonding cement (RelyX Veneer Cement A1; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) were obtained. While the veneer material showed no characteristic water absorption bands in the FTIR, the bonding cement has a broad H2O/OH absorption band coinciding with the ER:YAG laser emission wavelength. Consequently Er:YAG laser energy transmission through different veneer thicknesses was measured. The porcelain veneers transmitted 11 - 18 % of the incident Er:YAG laser energy depending on their thicknesses (Er:YAG laser: LiteTouch by Syneron; wavelength 2,940 nm, 10 Hz repetition rate, pulse duration 100 μs at 133 mJ/pulse; straight sapphire tip 1,100 μm diameter; Syneron, Yokneam, Israel). Initial signs of cement ablation occurred at approximately 1.8 - 4.0 J/cm2. This can be achieved by irradiating through the veneer with the fiber tip positioned at a distance of 3-6 mm from the veneer surface, and operating the Er:YAG laser with 133 mJ output energy. All eleven veneers bonded on extracted anterior incisor teeth were easily removed using the Er:YAG laser. The removal occurred without damaging underlying tooth structure as verified by light microscopic investigation (Incident Light Microscope Olympus B 50, Micropublisher RTV 3.3 MP, Image Pro software, Olympus). The debonding mainly occurred at the cement/veneer interface. When the samples were stored in saline solution for 5 days and/or an air-waterspray was

  1. Hippocampal ER stress and learning deficits following repeated pyrethroid exposure.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Richardson, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as a significant contributor to neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction. Previously, we reported that the widely used pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin causes ER stress-mediated apoptosis in SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. Whether or not this occurs in vivo remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that repeated deltamethrin exposure (3 mg/kg every 3 days for 60 days) causes hippocampal ER stress and learning deficits in adult mice. Repeated exposure to deltamethrin caused ER stress in the hippocampus as indicated by increased levels of C/EBP-homologous protein (131%) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (96%). This was accompanied by increased levels of caspase-12 (110%) and activated caspase-3 (50%). To determine whether these effects resulted in learning deficits, hippocampal-dependent learning was evaluated using the Morris water maze. Deltamethrin-treated animals exhibited profound deficits in the acquisition of learning. We also found that deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased BrdU-positive cells (37%) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, suggesting potential impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that repeated deltamethrin exposure leads to ER stress, apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus, and deficits in hippocampal precursor proliferation, which is associated with learning deficits. PMID:25359175

  2. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hines, William C; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; Chu, Berbie; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Sampayo, Rocío; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha; Borowsky, Alexander D; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER(+) adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent with "luminal B" intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44(High) subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44(Low) cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER(+) cancers. This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development. PMID:26661596

  3. Mechanisms determining the morphology of the peripheral ER.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoko; Shemesh, Tom; Prinz, William A; Palazzo, Alexander F; Kozlov, Michael M; Rapoport, Tom A

    2010-11-24

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of the nuclear envelope and a peripheral network of tubules and membrane sheets. The tubules are shaped by the curvature-stabilizing proteins reticulons and DP1/Yop1p, but how the sheets are formed is unclear. Here, we identify several sheet-enriched membrane proteins in the mammalian ER, including proteins that translocate and modify newly synthesized polypeptides, as well as coiled-coil membrane proteins that are highly upregulated in cells with proliferated ER sheets, all of which are localized by membrane-bound polysomes. These results indicate that sheets and tubules correspond to rough and smooth ER, respectively. One of the coiled-coil proteins, Climp63, serves as a "luminal ER spacer" and forms sheets when overexpressed. More universally, however, sheet formation appears to involve the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p, which localize to sheet edges and whose abundance determines the ratio of sheets to tubules. These proteins may generate sheets by stabilizing the high curvature of edges. PMID:21111237

  4. ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), (Edwards, California, USA) has two Lockheed Martin Corporation (Bethesda, Maryland) Earth Research-2 (ER-2) aircraft that serve as high-altitude and long-range flying laboratories. The ER-2 has been utilized to conduct scientific studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, land-use mapping, disaster assessment, preliminary testing and calibration and validation of satellite sensors. The ER-2 aircraft provides experimenters with a wide array of payload accommodation areas with suitable environment control with required electrical and mechanical interfaces. Missions may be flown out of DFRC or from remote bases worldwide. The NASA ER-2 is utilized by a variety of customers, including U.S. Government agencies, civilian organizations, universities, and state governments. The combination of the ER-2 s range, endurance, altitude, payload power, payload volume and payload weight capabilities complemented by a trained maintenance and operations team provides an excellent and unique platform system to the science community.

  5. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  6. Ultra-High Spin Spectroscopy In Er Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J.

    2008-11-01

    The discoveries observed in the ongoing conflict between collective and single-particle nuclear behaviour with increasing angular momentum have driven the field of nuclear spectroscopy for many decades and have given rise to new nuclear phenomena. Recently a new frontier of γ spectroscopy at ultra-high spin has been opened in the rare-earth region with rotational bands that bypass the classic band-terminating states that appear at spin 45ℏ in the N 90 Er nuclei. These weakly populated rotational structures have characteristics of triaxial strongly-deformed bands. Such structures have been observed in 157,158,160Er, following a series of experiments using the Gammasphere spectrometer. These observations herald a return to collective excitations at spins of about 50 to 65ℏ. This talk reviews the status of the spectroscopy and understanding of the observed structures in these Er and neighbouring nuclei.

  7. On the accuracy of ERS-1 orbit predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Rolf; Li, H.; Massmann, Franz-Heinrich; Raimondo, J. C.; Rajasenan, C.; Reigber, C.

    1993-01-01

    Since the launch of ERS-1, the D-PAF (German Processing and Archiving Facility) provides regularly orbit predictions for the worldwide SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking network. The weekly distributed orbital elements are so called tuned IRV's and tuned SAO-elements. The tuning procedure, designed to improve the accuracy of the recovery of the orbit at the stations, is discussed based on numerical results. This shows that tuning of elements is essential for ERS-1 with the currently applied tracking procedures. The orbital elements are updated by daily distributed time bias functions. The generation of the time bias function is explained. Problems and numerical results are presented. The time bias function increases the prediction accuracy considerably. Finally, the quality assessment of ERS-1 orbit predictions is described. The accuracy is compiled for about 250 days since launch. The average accuracy lies in the range of 50-100 ms and has considerably improved.

  8. A Frame Manipulation Algebra for ER Logical Stage Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, Antonio L.; Casanova, Marco A.; Breitman, Karin K.; Barbosa, Simone D. J.

    The ER model is arguably today's most widely accepted basis for the conceptual specification of information systems. A further common practice is to use the Relational Model at an intermediate logical stage, in order to adequately prepare for physical implementation. Although the Relational Model still works well in contexts relying on standard databases, it imposes certain restrictions, not inherent in ER specifications, which make it less suitable in Web environments. This paper proposes frames as an alternative to move from ER specifications to logical stage modelling, and treats frames as an abstract data type equipped with a Frame Manipulation Algebra (FMA). It is argued that frames, with a long tradition in AI applications, are able to accommodate the irregularities of semi-structured data, and that frame-sets generalize relational tables, allowing to drop the strict homogeneity requirement. A prototype logic-programming tool has been developed to experiment with FMA. Examples are included to help describe the use of the operators.

  9. ER Protein Processing Under Oxidative Stress: Implications and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mahmoud F; Valenzuela, Carlos; Sisniega, Daniella; Skouta, Rachid; Narayan, Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of mitochondrial nitrosative stress have been associated with the pathogenesis of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The mechanism involves catalytic poisoning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident oxidoreductase chaperone, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the subsequent accumulation of ER-processed substrate proteins. Using a model system to mimic mitochondrial oxidative and nitrosative stress, we demonstrate a PDI-independent mechanism whereby reactive oxygen species (ROS) compromise regeneration rates of disulfide bond-containing ER-processed proteins. Under ROS-duress, the secretion-destined traffic adopts disulfide-exposed structures making the protein flux retrotranslocation biased. We also demonstrate that ROS-compromised protein maturation rates can be rescued by the polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). Our results are significant in that they reveal an additional mechanism which could promote neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, our data reveal that EA possesses therapeutic potential as a lead prophylactic agent against oxidative/nitrosative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26983927

  10. Ultra-High Spin Spectroscopy In Er Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.

    2008-11-11

    The discoveries observed in the ongoing conflict between collective and single-particle nuclear behaviour with increasing angular momentum have driven the field of nuclear spectroscopy for many decades and have given rise to new nuclear phenomena. Recently a new frontier of {gamma} spectroscopy at ultra-high spin has been opened in the rare-earth region with rotational bands that bypass the classic band-terminating states that appear at spin 45({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) in the N 90 Er nuclei. These weakly populated rotational structures have characteristics of triaxial strongly-deformed bands. Such structures have been observed in {sup 157,158,160}Er, following a series of experiments using the Gammasphere spectrometer. These observations herald a return to collective excitations at spins of about 50 to 65({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). This talk reviews the status of the spectroscopy and understanding of the observed structures in these Er and neighbouring nuclei.

  11. The Role of ER Bodies in Brassicaceae Resistance under Clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanchuk, S. M.; Kordyum, E. L.

    2013-02-01

    Results of the electron-microscopic investigation of root apices of Arabidopsis thaliana 3- and 7-day old seedlings grown in the stationary conditions and under clinorotation are presented. It was shown the similarity in the root apex cell ultrastructure in control and under clinorotation. In the same time there were some differences in the ultrustructure of statocytes and the distal elongation zone under clinorotation. For the first time, the sensitivity of ER-bodies, which are derivative of granular endoplasmic reticulum and contain a β-glucosidase enzyme, to the influence of simulated microgravity that was demonstrated by increasing quantity and area of ER-bodies per cell section, as well as by higher variability of their shape under clinorotation. A degree of these changes correlated with the duration of clinorotation. On the basis of obtained data, a protective role of ER-bodies in adaptation of plants to microgravity is discussed.

  12. Mitochondrial Dynamics and the ER: The Plant Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Stefanie J.; Reski, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Whereas contact sites between mitochondria and the ER have been in the focus of animal and fungal research for several years, the importance of this organellar interface and the molecular effectors are largely unknown for plants. This work gives an introduction into known evolutionary differences of molecular effectors of mitochondrial dynamics and interactions between animals, fungi, and plants. Using the model plant Physcomitrella patens, we provide microscopic evidence for the existence of mitochondria-ER interactions in plants and their correlation with mitochondrial constriction and fission. We further investigate a previously identified protein of unknown function (MELL1), and show that it modulates the amount of mitochondrial association to the ER, as well as mitochondrial shape and number. PMID:26779478

  13. Er:YAG laser metal and ceramic bracket debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, Tat'jana; Remeš, Marek; Jelínková, Helena; Å ulc, Jan; Němec, Michal; Vyhlídal, David

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the study was investigation of Er:YAG radiation (wavelength 2.94 μm) interaction with various metal and ceramic brackets and adhesive materials. The source of radiation was a free-running Er: YAG laser generating pulses with energy 280 mJ, 250 μs long and repetition rate 6 Hz (mean power 1.7 W). During the treatment lasting 140 s, water cooling was implemented and only the brackets were irradiated. It has been observed that the brackets were removed easily after the Er:YAG laser irradiation, and temperature rise was limited also for metal brackets. SEM investigation has confirmed less damage of enamel in comparison with non-irradiated samples.

  14. Phosphoinositide kinase signaling controls ER-PM cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Omnus, Deike J.; Manford, Andrew G.; Bader, Jakob M.; Emr, Scott D.; Stefan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipid dynamics must be precisely regulated for normal cellular function, and disruptions in lipid homeostasis are linked to the progression of several diseases. However, little is known about the sensory mechanisms for detecting membrane composition and how lipid metabolism is regulated in response to membrane stress. We find that phosphoinositide (PI) kinase signaling controls a conserved PDK-TORC2-Akt signaling cascade as part of a homeostasis network that allows the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to modulate essential responses, including Ca2+-regulated lipid biogenesis, upon plasma membrane (PM) stress. Furthermore, loss of ER-PM junctions impairs this protective response, leading to PM integrity defects upon heat stress. Thus PI kinase–mediated ER-PM cross-talk comprises a regulatory system that ensures cellular integrity under membrane stress conditions. PMID:26864629

  15. Luminescent properties of Er and Si co-implanted silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, P.; Garrido, B.; Lebour, Y.; Moreno, J. A.; Garcia, C.; Morante, J. R.; Bettotti, P.; Pavesi, L.; Prassas, M.

    2005-02-01

    An extensive research for optical active materials at 1540 nm is currently being carried out, on the steam of the strong need for optoelectronic devices which can be integrated with the mainstream Si technology. The formation of silica films doped with Er and Si clusters has been shown as one of the promising approaches. We explored the emission properties of different silicate glasses co-implanted with silicon and Er ions to various doses. As starting materials we used soda-lime and aluminium silicates, glasses which show a larger optical bandwidth than silica at 1540 nm. A Si multi-implantation scheme has been adopted for a planar profile. The best conditions to precipitate Si and activate the Er atoms have been investigated. Optimal annealing temperatures have been found around 500 °C, depending on the particular composition of the original glass substrate. The structural analysis of the resulting structures ensures that the best emission properties are the ones for which a phase separation between the implanted Si and the matrix occurs, even without the formation of crystalline aggregates. A comprehensive study of the emission properties is given as a function of the matrix characteristics, Si and Er content, excitation wavelength and power density. It is shown an increase of the emission enhancement of the Er atoms due to the presence of Si cluster when increasing the excitation power. Modelling of the interaction between the absorbing Si nanoprecipitates and the emitting Er atoms has been carried out, in order to estimate the relevant physical parameters which describe the PL process.

  16. Imiquimod induces ER stress and Ca(2+) influx independently of TLR7 and TLR8.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, William A; Espinosa, Alexander

    2016-05-13

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a physiological response to protein overload or misfolded proteins in the ER. Certain anti-cancer drugs, e.g. bortezomib and nelfinavir, induce ER stress implying that this could be a successful therapeutic strategy against several forms of cancer. To find novel ER-stress inducers we screened a panel of natural and synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists against human keratinocytes and identified the anti-cancer drug imiquimod (IMQ) as a potent inducer of ER stress. Other TLR7 and TLR8 agonists, including resiquimod and gardiquimod, did not induce ER stress, demonstrating that IMQ induces ER stress independently of TLR7 and TLR8. We further confirmed this by showing that IMQ could still induce ER stress in mouse Tlr7(-/-) cells. IMQ also induced a rapid and transient influx of extracellular Ca(2+) together with the release of Ca(2+) from internal stores. Depletion of Ca(2+) from the ER is a known cause of ER stress suggesting that IMQ induces ER stress via depletion of ER Ca(2+). The ER-stress inducing property of IMQ is possibly of importance for its efficacy in treating basal cell carcinoma, in situ melanoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Our data could potentially be harnessed for rational design of even more potent ER-stress inducers and new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27003259

  17. Computational modelling of Er(3+): Garnet laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Lee H.

    1994-01-01

    The Er(3+) ion has attracted a lot of interest for four reasons: (1) Its (4)I(sub 13/2) yields (4)I(sub 15/2) transition lases in the eyesafe region near 1.5 micron; (2) the (4)I(sub 13/2) transition lases near 2.8 micron, an important wavelength for surgical purposes; (3) it displays surprisingly efficient upconversion with lasing observed at 1.7, 1.2, 0.85, 0.56, 0.55, and 0.47 micron following 1.5 micron pumping; and (4) it has absorption bands at 0.96 and 0.81 micron and thus can be diode pumped. However, properties desirable for upconversion reduce the efficiency of 1.5 and 3 micron laser operation and vice versa. Since all of the processes are influenced by the host via the crystal field induced stark splittings in the Er levels, this project undertook modelling of the host influence on the Er lasinng behavior. While growth and measurement of all ten Er(3+) doped garnets is the surest way of identifying hosts which maximize upconversion (or conversly, 1.5 and 3 micron performance), it is also expensive - costing approximately $10,000/material or approximately $100,000 for the materials computationally investigated here. The calculations were performed using a quantum mechanical point charge model developed by Clyde Morrison at Harry Diamond Laboratories. The programs were used to fit the Er:YAG experimental energy levels so that the crystal field parameters, B(sub nm) could be extracted. From these radial factors, rho (sub n) were determined for Er(3+) in garnets. These, in combination with crystal field components, Anm, available from X-ray data, were used to predict energy levels for Er in the other nine garnet hosts. The levels in Er:YAG were fit with an rms error of 12.2/cm over a 22,000/cm range. Predicted levels for two other garnets for which literature values were available had rms errors of less than 17/cm , showing the calculations to be reliable. Based on resonances between pairs of calculated stark levels, the model predicts GSGG as the best host

  18. ADMiER-ing thin but complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, Amarin G.; Bhattacharjee, Pradipto K.; Pan, Sharadwata; Hill, David; Danquah, Michael K.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Prabhakar, Ranganathan

    2011-12-01

    The Acoustics Driven Microfluidic Extensional Rheometer (ADMiER) utilises micro litre volumes of liquid, with viscosities as low as that of water, to create valid and observable extensional flows, liquid bridges that pinch off due to capillary forces in this case. ADMiER allows the study fluids that have been beyond conventional methods and also study more subtle fluid properties. We can observe polymeric fluids with solvent viscosities far below those previously testable, accentuating elastic effects. Also, it has enabled the testing of aqueous solutions of living motile particles, which significantly change fluid properties, opening up the potential for diagnostic applications.

  19. Next generation Er:YAG fractional ablative laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Vizhanyo, A.; Krammer, P.; Summer, S.; Gross, S.; Bragagna, T.; Böhler, C.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Biosolutions AG presents a portable fractional ablative laser system based on a miniaturized diode pumped Er:YAG laser. The system can operate at repetition rates up to 500 Hz and has an incorporated beam deflection unit. It is smaller, lighter and cost efficient compared to systems based on lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers and incorporates a skin layer detection to guarantee precise control of the microporation process. The pulse parameters enable a variety of applications in dermatology and in general medicine, as demonstrated by first results on transdermal drug delivery of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone).

  20. Integral field spectroscopy of SN 2002er with PMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L.; Becker, T.; Jahnke, K.; Kelz, A.; Roth, M. M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Wisotzki, L.

    2003-04-01

    We present observations of the Type Ia supernova SN 2002er during the brightening phase. The observations were performed with the Potsdam Multi Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS) integral field instrument. Due to the 8arcsecx8 arcsec field of view of the spectrograph an accurate background subtraction was possible. Results from analyses of the evolution of absorption features in comparisons with other SNe show that SN 2002er is a fairly bright Type Ia supernova with a peak brightness of MB=-19.6+/-0.1.

  1. High power, diode pumped Er:YAG for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C.; Heinrich, A.; Nussbaumer, B.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Medical Laser presents a diode pumped Er:YAG laser for dental and hard tissue applications. The diode pumped laser is practically maintenance free and ensures reliable operation over several thousand hours. The high repetition rate with up to 15 W average output power, allows treatments otherwise not feasible with low repetition rate, lamp pumped Er:YAG systems. The variable pulse duration of 10 to 200 μs combined with the good beam quality ensures precise and fast treatment. First results on enamel ablation as well as the power scalability of the technology to 200 mJ and 30 W average power are also shown.

  2. Computational modelling of Er(3+): Garnet laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Lee H.

    1994-12-01

    The Er(3+) ion has attracted a lot of interest for four reasons: (1) Its (4)I(sub 13/2) yields (4)I(sub 15/2) transition lases in the eyesafe region near 1.5 micron; (2) the (4)I(sub 13/2) transition lases near 2.8 micron, an important wavelength for surgical purposes; (3) it displays surprisingly efficient upconversion with lasing observed at 1.7, 1.2, 0.85, 0.56, 0.55, and 0.47 micron following 1.5 micron pumping; and (4) it has absorption bands at 0.96 and 0.81 micron and thus can be diode pumped. However, properties desirable for upconversion reduce the efficiency of 1.5 and 3 micron laser operation and vice versa. Since all of the processes are influenced by the host via the crystal field induced stark splittings in the Er levels, this project undertook modelling of the host influence on the Er lasinng behavior. While growth and measurement of all ten Er(3+) doped garnets is the surest way of identifying hosts which maximize upconversion (or conversly, 1.5 and 3 micron performance), it is also expensive - costing approximately $10,000/material or approximately $100,000 for the materials computationally investigated here. The calculations were performed using a quantum mechanical point charge model developed by Clyde Morrison at Harry Diamond Laboratories. The programs were used to fit the Er:YAG experimental energy levels so that the crystal field parameters, B(sub nm) could be extracted. From these radial factors, rho (sub n) were determined for Er(3+) in garnets. These, in combination with crystal field components, Anm, available from X-ray data, were used to predict energy levels for Er in the other nine garnet hosts. The levels in Er:YAG were fit with an rms error of 12.2/cm over a 22,000/cm range. Predicted levels for two other garnets for which literature values were available had rms errors of less than 17/cm , showing the calculations to be reliable. Based on resonances between pairs of calculated stark levels, the model predicts GSGG as the best host

  3. Ocean wind field measurement performance of the ERS-1 scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans, P.; Schuessler, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Active Microwave Instrumentation (AMI), which will be implemented on the ERS-1, is a 5.3 GHz multipurpose radar for land surface imaging, ocean wave spectrum measurement and wind observations over oceans. The imaging and wave measurements apply Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques, while wind field detection is performed by the Scatterometer as part of the AMI. The Scatterometer system design was developed and optimized with the aid of a performance simulator. This paper, aimed at giving an overview, is presented about the: (1) ERS-1 Scatterometer system design; (2) Error budget; and the (3) Overall calibration concept.

  4. Thermal effects in Er:strengthened-glass laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilleman, Michael M.; Jackel, Steven M.; Moshe, Inon

    1998-06-01

    We report the development of a high-power Er:strengthened- glass laser emitting at the eye-safe 1.535 μm wavelength. The flashlamp pumped Cr:Yb:Er:glass produced 330 mJ output @ 0.45% slope efficiency. Thermo-optical measurements indicated strong thermal lensing, of 16 diopter/kW and mild birefringence induced depolarization of 5% at 200 W. In terms of radial and birefringence elastooptical coefficients these data determine the values of 0.075 +/- 0.002 and 0.0094, respectively. For a hemispherical resonator configuration a TEM00 beam was achieved.

  5. Pilot James Barrilleaux with ER-2 aircraft on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    James Barrilleaux is the assistant chief pilot for ER-2s in the Flight Crew Branch of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The ER-2s--civilian variants of the military U-2S reconnaissance aircraft--are part of NASA's Airborne Science program. The ER-2s can carry airborne scientific payloads of up to 2,600 pounds to altitudes of about 70,000 feet to investigate such matters as earth resources, celestial phenomena, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, and oceanic processes. Barrilleaux has held his current position since February 1998. Barrilleaux joined NASA in 1986 as a U-2/ER-2 pilot with NASA's Airborne Science program at Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. He flew both the U-2C (until 1989) and the ER-2 on a wide variety of missions both domestic and international. Barrilleaux flew high-altitude operations over Antarctica in which scientific instruments aboard the ER-2 defined the cause of ozone depletion over the continent, known as the ozone hole. He has also flown the ER-2 over the North Pole. Barrilleaux served for 20 years in the U.S. Air Force before he joined NASA. He completed pilot training at Reese Air Force Base, Lubbock, Texas, in 1966. He flew 120 combat missions as a F-4 fighter pilot over Laos and North Vietnam in 1970 and 1971. He joined the U-2 program in 1974, becoming the commander of an overseas U-2 operation in 1982. In 1983, he became commander of the squadron responsible for training all U-2 pilots and SR-71 crews located at Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, California. He retired from the Air Force as a lieutenant colonel in 1986. On active duty, he flew the U-2, F-4 Phantom, the T-38, T-37, and the T-33. His decorations included two Distinguished Flying Crosses, 12 Air Medals, two Meritorious Service Medals, and other Air Force and South Vietnamese awards. Barrilleaux earned a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering from Texas A&M University, College Station, in 1964 and a master of science

  6. Clinical highlights from the 2011 ERS Congress in Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Spruit, Martijn A.; Chavannes, Niels H.; Herth, Felix J.F.; Poletti, Venerino; Ley, Sebastian; Burghuber, Otto C.; Clini, Enrico; Cottin, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on selected papers pertinent to the most important clinical problems in the field of respiratory medicine. Expert authors from the Clinical Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) have selected updated reports related to presentations given at the 2011 ERS Annual Congress, which was held in Amsterdam (the Netherlands) and attended by more than 20,000 participants. The hot topics and selected abstracts from the scientific groups of the Clinical Assembly are discussed here in the context of recent literature. PMID:22408196

  7. ERS-1 scatterometer measurements over the Southern Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freilich, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Backscatter cross section measurements from the ERS-1 Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) scatterometer were reprocessed to vector winds using the Freilich-Dunbar model function and a meteorologically aided ambiguity removal scheme. This consistent data set was used to examine the wind field over the Southern Ocean from 20 to 60 deg South. The large number of ERS-1 measurements allows relatively accurate calculation of annual mean wind, stress, and curl fields as well as overall statistics of the winds at mid to high southern latitudes. The long duration of the data time series allows preliminary examination of low frequency (semi annual) wind variability.

  8. Inelastic-neutron-scattering study of the Er3+ energy levels in ErBa2Cu3O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderholm, L.; Loong, C.-K.; Kern, S.

    1992-05-01

    Magnetic excitation spectra of ErBa2Cu3O7 have been measured by use of inelastic neutron scattering. Optimal experimental conditions allow the resolution of the transitions between the Er3+ ground state and all seven excited states within the 4I15/2 Russell-Saunders ground multiplet. The data are analyzed in terms of an intermediate-coupling crystal-field model, calculated using spherical-tensor techniques. Calculated spectra based on the results of this analysis are consistent with all experimental spectra, including those obtained at higher temperatures. The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues obtained from this analysis are used to calculate the magnetic properties expected of Er3+ in this crystal environment.

  9. ER-α36, a novel isoform of ER-α66, is commonly over-expressed in apocrine and adenoid cystic carcinomas of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Vranic, Semir; Gatalica, Zoran; Deng, Hao; Frkovic-Grazio, Snjezana; Lee, Lisa M J; Gurjeva, Olga; Wang, Zhao-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background ER-α36 is a novel 36 kDa isoform of the full-length oestrogen receptor alpha (ER-α66). ER-α36 primarily localises to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane, and responds to membrane-initiated oestrogen and antioestrogen signalling pathways. Aim To examine the expression of ER-α36 in apocrine and adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast, both of which are consistently ER-α66 negative and currently lack effective targeted therapeutic options. Methods 19 pure apocrine carcinomas (17 invasive and two in-situ carcinomas) and 11 adenoid cystic carcinomas of the breast were evaluated for ER-α36 expression, along with expressions of ER-α66, progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR) using immunohistochemical methods. Results All pure apocrine carcinomas showed a characteristic steroid receptor expression profile (ER-α66 and PR negative, AR strongly positive). ER-α36 expression was detected in 18/19 pure apocrine carcinomas (94.7%, 95% CI 75.1 to 98.7) in predominantly membranous and cytoplasmic distribution. When positive, pure apocrine carcinomas uniformly (100% of cells) expressed ER-α36. All adenoid cystic carcinomas were uniformly negative for all three classic steroid receptors, but ER-α36 was detected in 8/11 cases (72.7%, 95% CI 42.8 to 90) with the similar sub-cellular pattern of expression as in the pure apocrine carcinomas. When positive, adenoid cystic carcinomas expressed ER-α36 in the majority of cells (average 76%). Conclusion ER-α36, a novel isoform of ER-α66, is frequently over-expressed in apocrine and adenoid cystic carcinomas of the breast. These results indicate a potential for a novel targeted treatment in these cancers. PMID:21045236

  10. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. PMID:26253462

  11. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Ruskauff

    2011-12-01

    This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

  12. Determination of the Er3+ to Yb3+ energy transfer efficiency in Er3+/Yb3+-codoped YVO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Paolo, R. E.; Cantelar, E.; Wang, X. M.; Tsuboi, T.; Cussó, F.

    2001-09-01

    The energy transfer efficiency from Er3+ to Yb3+ ions in yttrium orthovanadate single crystals (YVO4) is experimentally obtained, by using a method based on the simultaneous and multiwavelength measurement of photoacoustic and luminescent signals after pulsed laser excitation. The result is reached by comparing with the predictions from Judd-Ofelt analysis and the lifetime measurements. The energy transfer between the ions, from Er3+ to Yb3+, must be considered in order to fit the experimental results. A value of energy transfer efficiency (Ψ = 0.16) is obtained.

  13. Optical transitions of Er3+ ions in fluorozirconate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, M. D.; Sibley, W. A.; Drexhage, M. G.; Brown, R. N.

    1983-06-01

    Optical-absorption, -emission, and -excitation spectra are presented for Er3+ ions in fluorozirconate glass. Measured oscillator strengths of the transitions between J manifolds at 300 and 15 K are compared with calculated electric and magnetic dipole oscillator strengths. Radiative rates for five luminescing states were calculated. The nonradiative rates from these excited states were determined by calculating the difference between the measured rates and the calculated radiative rates. The low-temperature nonradiative rates are in agreement with the phenomenological energy-gap law followed by rare-earth ions in a number of crystals and glasses. The temperature dependence of the lifetimes was analyzed using the Huang-Rhys theory of multiphonon emission. Values for the 4I112 radiative and nonradiative rates obtained by the above methods are compared with those obtained applying the method Flaherty and DiBartolo used to study MnF2: Er3+. The multiphonon emission rates in fluorozirconate glass are much lower than the rates for the same levels of Er3+ in oxide glasses. Measurements of the bandwidths of the ground and excited states of Er3+ and the nearly exponential decay of the emissions indicate a relatively narrow distribution of site symmetries compared to oxide glasses.

  14. Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-6

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The Well Cluster ER-20-6 drilling and completion project was conducted during February, March, and April of 1996 in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This project is part of the DOE`s Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject at the NTS. The primary UGTA tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, and hydrological data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality as well as pathways and rates of groundwater migration at the NTS. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented as part of the UGTA subproject to obtain site-specific data on the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides produced by an underground nuclear explosion. The ER-20-6 near-field drilling project was originally planned to be very similar to that recently conducted at Well Cluster ER-20-5, which was designed to obtain data on the existing hydrologic regime near the site of an underground nuclear explosion (IT, 1995; IT, 1996a). However, after further consideration of the goals of the near-field drilling program and the characteristics of the BULLION site, the TWG recommended that the ER-20-6 project be redesigned to accommodate a forced-gradient experiment. This proposed experiment is expected to yield more realistic estimates of transport parameters than can be deduced from sampling and testing natural groundwater flow systems.

  15. Calcium and ER stress mediate hepatic apoptosis after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Song, Juquan; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Cox, Robert A.; Barral, José M.; Herndon, David N.; Boehning, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A hallmark of the disease state following severe burn injury is decreased liver function, which results in gross metabolic derangements that compromise patient survival. The underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction after burn are essentially unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction and apoptosis after burn. Rats were randomized to either control (no burn) or burn (60% total body surface area burn) and sacrificed at various time‐points. Liver was either perfused to isolate primary rat hepatocytes, which were used for in vitro calcium imaging, or liver was harvested and processed for immunohistology, transmission electron microscopy, mitochondrial isolation, mass spectroscopy or Western blotting to determine the hepatic response to burn injury in vivo. We found that thermal injury leads to severely depleted endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium stores and consequent elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Burn‐induced ER calcium depletion caused depressed hepatocyte responsiveness to signalling molecules that regulate hepatic homeostasis, such as vasopressin and the purinergic agonist ATP. In vivo, thermal injury resulted in activation of the ER stress response and major alterations in mitochondrial structure and function – effects which may be mediated by increased calcium release by inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate receptors. Our results reveal that thermal injury leads to dramatic hepatic disturbances in calcium homeostasis and resultant ER stress leading to mitochondrial abnormalities contributing to hepatic dysfunction and apoptosis after burn injury. PMID:20141609

  16. Staff Survey Results, 2000-2001. E&R Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Wanda N.

    Evaluation and Research (E&R) staff of the Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS), North Carolina, have conducted spring surveys of school staff since 1992. This report contains information from the survey distributed in March 2001. Completed surveys were returned by 5,755 staff members. Survey results indicate that in the year 2000, more staff…

  17. OpenER, a Dutch Initiative in Open Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuwer, Robert; Mulder, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Over the period 2006-2008, the Dutch Open Universiteit Nederland conducted an experiment in which Open Educational Resources (OER) were offered in an effort to bridge the gap between informal and formal learning and to establish a new style of entry portal to higher education with no barriers at all. OpenER received considerable attention both in…

  18. School Officials and the Courts: Update 1984. ERS Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckham, Joseph C.

    This is the seventh in a series of Educational Research Service (ERS) monographs designed to summarize judicial decisions on elementary and secondary education issues by state and federal courts. These cases, dating from June 30, 1983 to June 30, 1984, were selected on the basis of their relevance to contemporary problems in public schools, their…

  19. Historisches Rätsel Er hatte den Durchblick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loos, Andreas

    2002-03-01

    Seine Jugend ist voller Schicksalsschläge: Mit zwölf Jahren wird er als elftes und jüngstes Kind eines Glasermeisters Vollwaise, mit vierzehn stürzt das Haus seines Pflegevaters und Lehrherren über ihm zusammen. Auch ist ihm kein langes Leben vergönnt: Mit gerade 39 Jahren ereilt ihn die Lungen- und Nervenschwindsucht.

  20. Er:YAG laser dentistry in special needs patients

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Fontana, Matteo; Cella, Luigi; Oppici, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Between a quarter and a third of adults with intellectual disability is estimated to have dental anxiety. Unpleasant stimuli, such as the injection of local anaesthesia or the noise and vibration of rotary instruments, may provoke anxiety and subsequent low compliance until the opposition to the treatment. The use of Er:YAG laser in conservative dentistry had a great development in these last years thank to new devices and also to their advantages when compared to the conventional instruments. The aim of this clinical study was to show the advantages of the Er:YAG laser in the conservative treatment of Special Care patients. Methods: Four cases are here described to show the Er:YAG laser use in our Unit on special needs patients. Results and conclusions: Based on the experience gained on conservative laser-assisted treatments performed in a time of 5 years at our Dentistry, Special Needs and Maxillo-Facial Surgery Unit we may affirm that Er:YAG laser may be considered as a good way to improve the cooperation, to reduce anxiety related to rotating instruments and to reach better results with equal or shorter operating times. PMID:26557733

  1. Spectroscopic properties of Nd, Er codoped glasses for solar pumped fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Shintaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Hiroyuki; Hughes, Mark A.; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2011-03-01

    The absorption and fluorescence characteristics of Er doped and Nd, Er codoped fluoride glasses were investigated under illumination of the simulated sunlight, laser or a monochromatic light filtered from a Xe lamp. Er was used as a sensitizing agent enhancing the energy conversion and the emission efficiency of Nd ions in fluoride glass intended for the sunlight excitation. Er doped fluoride glasses showed four emission peaks under simulated sunlight illumination at the wavelengths of 550, 848, 980, and 1530 nm attributed to the electronic transitions of Er3+ ions. The quantum efficiency of the emission from all of the bands had a peak at x = 0.5 mol. % Er and with the maximum of 73 %. The intensity of each emission band showed different ratios for various ErF3 contents. It is expected that concentration quenching of 4S3/2 state is easy to occur with high concentration of ErF3 compared to the other states. The energy transfer from Er to Nd was studied using a monochromatic light illumination which is absorbed by Er3+ ions only. Strong contribution of Er absorption to the 1.05 μm emission of Nd, Er co-doped fluoride glass was observed. Er was confirmed as a suitable sensitizer for the enhanced energy conversion and emission efficiency of Nd ions in ZBLAN glasses which are proposed for highly efficient solar pumped fiber lasers.

  2. Functional characterization of estrogen receptor subtypes, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, mediating vitellogenin production in the liver of rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Leanos-Castaneda, Olga Kraak, Glen van der

    2007-10-15

    The estrogen-dependent process of vitellogenesis is a key function on oviparous fish reproduction and it has been widely used as an indicator of xenoestrogen exposure. The two estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, are often co-expressed in the liver of fish. The relative contribution of each ER subtype to modulate vitellogenin production by hepatocytes was studied using selected compounds known to preferentially interact with specific ER subtypes: propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT) an ER{alpha} selective agonist, methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (MPP) an ER{alpha} selective antagonist, and diarylpropionitrile (DPN) an ER{beta} selective agonist. First, the relative binding affinity of the test compounds to estradiol for rainbow trout hepatic nuclear ER was determined using a competitive ligand binding assay. All the test ligands achieved complete displacement of specific [{sup 3}H]-estradiol binding from the nuclear ER extract. This indicates that the test ligands have the potential to modify the ER function in the rainbow trout liver. Secondly, the ability of the test compounds to induce or inhibit vitellogenin production by primary cultures of rainbow trout hepatocytes was studied. Estradiol and DPN were the only compounds that induced a dose-dependent increase on vitellogenin synthesis. The lack of vitellogenin induction by PPT indicates that ER{alpha} could not have a role on this reproductive process whereas the ability of DPN to induce vitellogenin production supports the participation of ER{beta}. In addition, this hypothesis is reinforced by the results obtained from MPP plus estradiol. On one hand, the absence of suppressive activity of MPP in the estradiol-induced vitellogenin production does not support the participation of ER{alpha}. On the other hand, once blocked ER{alpha} with MPP, the only manifestation of agonist activity of estradiol would be achieved via ER{beta}. In conclusion, the present results indicate that vitellogenin production is

  3. Systemic effects of AGEs in ER stress induction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Adamopoulos, Christos; Mihailidou, Chrysovalantou; Grivaki, Christofora; Papavassiliou, Kostas A; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Piperi, Christina; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in human tissues may contribute to cell injury, inflammation and apoptosis through induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Human metabolism relies on ER homeostasis for the coordinated response of all metabolic organs by controlling the synthesis and catabolism of various nutrients. In vitro studies have demonstrated AGE-induced enhancement of unfolded protein response (UPR) in different cell types including endothelial, neuronal, pancreatic cells and podocytes, suggesting this crosstalk as an underlying pathological mechanism that contributes to metabolic diseases. In this minireview, we describe in vivo studies undertaken by our group and others that demonstrate the diverse systemic effects of AGEs in ER stress induction in major metabolic tissues such as brain, kidney, liver and pancreas of normal mice. Administration of high-AGEs content diet to normal mice for the period of 4 weeks upergulates the mRNA and protein levels of ER chaperone Bip (GRP78) indicative of UPR initiation in all major metabolic organs and induces activation of the pivotal transcription factor XBP1 that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, animals with genetic ablation of UPR-activated transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein CHOP allocated in high-AGEs diet, exhibited relative resistance to UPR induction (BiP levels) and XBP1 activation in major metabolic organs. Since CHOP presents a critical mediator that links accumulation and aggregation of unfolded proteins with induction of oxidative stress and ER stress-related apoptosis, it is revealed as an important molecular target for the management of metabolic diseases. PMID:27236787

  4. Precise satellite orbit determination with particular application to ERS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria Joana Afonso Pereira

    The motivation behind this study is twofold. First to assess the accuracy of ERS-1 long arc ephemerides using state of the art models. Second, to develop improved methods for determining precise ERS-1 orbits using either short or long arc techniques. The SATAN programs, for the computation of satellite orbits using laser data were used. Several facilities were added to the original programs: the processing of PRARE range and altimeter data, and a number of algorithms that allow more flexible solutions by adjusting a number of additional parameters. The first part of this study, before the launch of ERS-1, was done with SEAS AT data. The accuracy of SEASAT orbits computed with PRARE simulated data has been determined. The effect of temporal distribution of tracking data along the arc and the extent to which altimetry can replace range data have been investigated. The second part starts with the computation of ERS-1 long arc solutions using laser data. Some aspects of modelling the two main forces affecting ERS-l's orbit are investigated. With regard to the gravitational forces, the adjustment of a set of geopotential coefficients has been considered. With respect to atmospheric drag, extensive research has been carried out on determining the influence on orbit accuracy of the measurements of solar fluxes (P10.7 indices) and geomagnetic activity (Kp indices) used by the atmospheric model in the computation of atmospheric density at satellite height. Two new short arc methods have been developed: the Constrained and the Bayesian method. Both methods are dynamic and consist of solving for the 6 osculating elements. Using different techniques, both methods overcome the problem of normal matrix ill- conditioning by constraining the solution. The accuracy and applicability of these methods are discussed and compared with the traditional non-dynamic TAR method.

  5. Soluble tyrosinase is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation substrate retained in the ER by calreticulin and BiP/GRP78 and not calnexin.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Costin I; Paduraru, Crina; Dwek, Raymond A; Petrescu, Stefana M

    2005-04-01

    Tyrosinase is a type I membrane protein regulating the pigmentation process in humans. Mutations of the human tyrosinase gene cause the tyrosinase negative type I oculocutaneous albinism (OCAI). Some OCAI mutations were shown to delete the transmembrane domain or to affect its hydrophobic properties, resulting in soluble tyrosinase mutants that are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To understand the specific mechanisms involved in the ER retention of soluble tyrosinase, we have constructed a tyrosinase mutant truncated at its C-terminal end and investigated its maturation process. The mutant is retained in the ER, and it is degraded through the proteasomal pathway. We determined that the mannose trimming is required for an efficient degradation process. Moreover, this soluble ER-associated degradation substrate is stopped at the ER quality control checkpoint with no requirements for an ER-Golgi recycling pathway. Co-immmunoprecipitation experiments showed that soluble tyrosinase interacts with calreticulin and BiP/GRP78 (and not calnexin) during its ER transit. Expression of soluble tyrosinase in calreticulin-deficient cells resulted in the export of soluble tyrosinase of the ER, indicating the calreticulin role in ER retention. Taken together, these data show that OCAI soluble tyrosinase is an ER-associated degradation substrate that, unlike other albino tyrosinases, associates with calreticulin and BiP/GRP78. The lack of specificity for calnexin interaction reveals a novel role for calreticulin in OCAI albinism. PMID:15677452

  6. ER stress-induced protein, VIGG, disturbs plant cation homeostasis, which is correlated with growth retardation and robustness to ER stress

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Hironori; Fujita, Keiko; Takuhara, Yuki; Ogawa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shunji

    2011-02-18

    Highlights: {yields} VIGG is an ER stress-induced protein in plant. {yields} We examine the characteristics of VIGG-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants. {yields} VIGG-overexpressing plants reveal growth retardation and robustness to ER stress. {yields} VIGG disturbs cation homeostasis in plant. -- Abstract: VIGG is a putative endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein induced by virus infection and ER stress, and is correlated with fruit quality in grapevine. The present study was undertaken to determine the biological function of VIGG in grapevine. Experiments using fluorescent protein-VIGG fusion protein demonstrated that VIGG is localized in ER and the ER targeting sequence is in the N-terminus. The overexpression of VIGG in Arabidopsis plant led to growth retardation. The rosette leaves of VIGG-overexpressing plants were smaller than those of the control plants and rolled at 42 days after seeding. VIGG-overexpressing plants revealed robustness to ER stress as well as the low expression of ER stress marker proteins, such as the luminal binding proteins. These characteristics of VIGG-overexpressing plants were supported by a microarray experiment that demonstrated the disruption of genes related to ER stress response and flowering, as well as cation mobility, in the plants. Finally, cation homeostasis in the plants was disturbed by the overexpression of VIGG. Taken together, these results suggest that VIGG may disturb cation homeostasis in plant, which is correlated with the robustness to ER stress and growth retardation.

  7. SEAP activity serves for demonstrating ER stress induction by glucolipotoxicity as well as testing ER stress inhibitory potential of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lenin, Raji; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is emerging as a unifying paradigm and one of the underlying mechanisms in the genesis of diabetes and its complications. While this has prompted the development of ER stress inhibitors, there is a limitation in monitoring of ER stress in vitro and in vivo by reliable methodologies. We validated the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) activity as a surrogate marker of ER stress in mouse β-TC6 cells exposed to glucolipotoxicity or tunicamycin and studied insulin secretion along with alterations in ER stress markers. SEAP activity assay was measured using the Great EscAPe SEAP kit, insulin levels were determined by Mercodia reagents and mRNA expression of ER stress markers was quantified by real-time PCR. SEAP activity in β-cells was significantly decreased (indicating increased ER stress) on exposure either to glucolipotoxicity or tunicamycin. This was accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of ER stress markers (GRP-78, PERK, IRE1α, ATF6, XBP-1, and CHOP) and decreased insulin secretion. Treating the cells with phenylbutyric acid normalized SEAP activity, decreased mRNA expression of ER stress markers and improved insulin secretion. Interestingly, cells exposed to different classes of anti-diabetes agents or compounds such as resveratrol resisted ER stress. Methylglyoxal also induces ER stress and this was counteracted by aminoguanidine. Out study demonstrates SEAP activity as a novel ER stress monitoring assay to investigate the therapeutic value of agents with ER stress inhibitory potential. Future studies should focus on the exercise of adopting this reporter assay for high-throughput screening mode of drug discovery. PMID:25776571

  8. NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows views of the ER-2, NASA's Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing. The presentation briefly reviews the successes of the ER-2, and what the facility provides.

  9. 78 FR 40484 - Determination That METADATE ER (Methylphenidate Hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablet, 10...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That METADATE ER (Methylphenidate... Administration (FDA) has determined that METADATE ER (methylphenidate hydrochloride (HCl)) extended-release... determination will allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for methylphenidate...

  10. Measuring Trends in Salaries and Wages in Public Schools: ERS Composite Indicator of Changes. ERS Information Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    The composite indicator, published annually by the Educational Research Service (ERS), was designed to reflect overall changes in average salaries and wages paid by public school systems. The purpose of this book is to describe the nature of the indicator, how it is compiled on a national and state basis, and how local school systems can compile…

  11. Site symmetry of Er3+ in In0.5Ga0.5P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, B. S.; Hong, Y. K.; An, J. Y.; Choi, J. C.; Chung, C. H.; Park, H. L.

    1995-01-01

    The site and site symmetry of Er3+ in LPE grown In0.5Ga0.5P have been investigated for the first time through Raman and polarized luminescence spectroscopic techniques. The Er3+ site was found to be ErIn in In0.5Ga0.5P. The site symmetry of Er3+ in In0.5Ga0.5P was positively confirmed asC2v.

  12. Glucocorticoids alleviate intestinal ER stress by enhancing protein folding and degradation of misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Das, Indrajit; Png, Chin Wen; Oancea, Iulia; Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; Lourie, Rohan; Proctor, Martina; Eri, Rajaraman D.; Sheng, Yong; Crane, Denis I.; Florin, Timothy H.

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in intestinal secretory cells has been linked with colitis in mice and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Endogenous intestinal glucocorticoids are important for homeostasis and glucocorticoid drugs are efficacious in IBD. In Winnie mice with intestinal ER stress caused by misfolding of the Muc2 mucin, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) suppressed ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), substantially restoring goblet cell Muc2 production. In mice lacking inflammation, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist increased ER stress, and DEX suppressed ER stress induced by the N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (Tm). In cultured human intestinal secretory cells, in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner, DEX suppressed ER stress and UPR activation induced by blocking N-glycosylation, reducing ER Ca2+ or depleting glucose. DEX up-regulated genes encoding chaperones and elements of ER-associated degradation (ERAD), including EDEM1. Silencing EDEM1 partially inhibited DEX’s suppression of misfolding-induced ER stress, showing that DEX enhances ERAD. DEX inhibited Tm-induced MUC2 precursor accumulation, promoted production of mature mucin, and restored ER exit and secretion of Winnie mutant recombinant Muc2 domains, consistent with enhanced protein folding. In IBD, glucocorticoids are likely to ameliorate ER stress by promoting correct folding of secreted proteins and enhancing removal of misfolded proteins from the ER. PMID:23650437

  13. ER-Mitochondria contact sites: A new regulator of cellular calcium flux comes into play.

    PubMed

    Krols, Michiel; Bultynck, Geert; Janssens, Sophie

    2016-08-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria membrane contacts are hotspots for calcium signaling. In this issue, Raturi et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201512077) show that the thioredoxin TMX1 inhibits the calcium pump SERCA2b at ER-mitochondria contact sites, thereby affecting ER-mitochondrial calcium transfer and mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:27528654

  14. Return to sender: use of Plasmodium ER retrieval sequences to study protein transport in the infected erythrocyte and predict putative ER protein families.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Gehde, Nina; Przyborski, Jude M

    2009-06-01

    We have investigated how knowledge of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retrieval signals can be used to study specific trafficking pathways in the malaria-infected erythrocyte. We show that addition of various lumenal ER retrieval signals to soluble green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimaera causes retrieval of the fusion protein in the parasite's ER. In contrast, adding these signals to the C-terminus of a membrane bound protein does not affect its eventual sub-cellular localization. This demonstrates proof of principle that ER retrieval signals can be used to study the solubility state of Plasmodium falciparum proteins during their transport to the host erythrocyte. Furthermore, using our knowledge of ER retrieval signals, we identify Plasmodium ER protein families and assign putative functions to them. PMID:19294420

  15. Er and Yb isotope fractionation in planetary materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalat, Emmanuelle; Telouk, Philippe; Albarède, Francis

    2012-11-01

    Terrestrial planets are depleted in volatile elements relative to solar abundances. Little is known, however, about volatility at the high temperatures relevant to asteroidal collisions and to the giant lunar impact. Although refractory rare-earth elements have overall similar crystallochemical properties, some differ in their temperatures of condensation from the nebular gas. This is the case for Yb, which condenses at ˜1490K and in the vapor is mostly in elemental form. By contrast, Er, largely present as ErO, condenses at ˜1660K. We analyzed the Er and Yb isotopic compositions in 33 terrestrial basalts, garnets, different classes of chondrites and achondrites, and lunar samples by MC-ICP-MS. The range of mass-dependent isotope fractionation is larger for Yb (0.43‰ per amu) than Er (0.23‰) isotopes. For terrestrial rocks, a positive correlation between δYb and La/Yb suggests that the isotopic differences between Er and Yb can be accounted for by the presence of small fractions of Yb2+. Yb is isotopically heavy in kimberlite and light in garnets. Ytterbium behaves similarly to Fe, with Yb3+ being more incompatible than the much less abundant Yb2+. In addition, the coexistence of divalent and trivalent sites in the garnet structure and the preference of heavy isotopes for stable bonds makes Yb in garnet isotopically light. The deficit of heavy Yb isotopes in lunar basaltic samples relative to the Earth, chondrites, and eucrites provides new evidence that the Moon formed by the condensation of silicate vapor in the aftermath of the giant lunar impact. Separation of vapor from melt and of heavy from light isotopes is first expected during the adiabatic expansion of the initial vapor plume. Subsequently, friction between melt and gas tends to further enrich the Moon feeding zone in silicate vapor to compensate the inward migration of melt out of the pre-lunar disk. A major consequence of interpreting the present lunar data by vapor/melt segregation is that the

  16. Involvement of ER stress in retinal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Inokuchi, Yuta; Ito, Yasushi; Murata, Hiroshi; Aihara, Makoto; Miura, Masayuki; Araie, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To clarify whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in retinal cell death, using cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5, a rat ganglion cell line transformed with E1A virus), and transgenic mice ER stress-activated indicator (ERAI) mice carrying a human XBP1 and venus a variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion gene. Methods RGC-5 damage was induced by tunicamycin, and cell viability was measured by double nuclear staining (Hoechst 33342 and either YO-PRO-1 or propidium iodide). The expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78(GRP78)/BiP, the phosphorylated form of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), and C/EBP-homologous (CHOP) protein after tunicamycin (in vitro or in vivo) or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; in vivo) treatment were measured using immunoblot or immunostaining. ERAI mice carrying the F-XBP1-DBD-venus expression gene were used to monitor ER-stress in vivo. Twenty-four hours after intravitreal injection of tunicamycin or NMDA, or after raising intraocular pressure (IOP), the retinal fluorescence intensity was visualized in anesthetized animals using an ophthalmoscope and in retinal flatmount or cross-section specimens using laser confocal microscopy. Results Treatment with tunicamycin induced apoptotic cell death in RGC-5 and also induced production of ER stress-related proteins (BiP, the phosphorylated form of eIF2α, and CHOP protein). In vivo, tunicamycin induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and thinning of the inner plexiform layer, 7 days after intravitreal injection. In flatmounted retinas of ERAI mice, the fluorescence intensity arising from the XBP-1-venus fusion protein, indicating ER-stress activation, was increased at 24 h after tunicamycin, NMDA, or IOP elevation. In transverse cross-sections from ERAI mice, the fluorescence intensity was first increased in cells of the ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers at 12 and 24 h, respectively, after NMDA injection, and it was localized to ganglion and

  17. Identification of novel estrogen receptor (ER) agonists that have additional and complementary anti-cancer activities via ER-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taelim; Kim, Hye-In; An, Ji-Young; Lee, Jun; Lee, Na-Rae; Heo, Jinyuk; Kim, Ji-Eun; Yu, Jihyun; Lee, Yong Sup; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Nam-Jung

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a series of bis(4-hydroxy)benzophenone oxime ether derivatives such as 12c, 12e and 12h were identified as novel estrogen receptor (ER) agonists that have additional and complementary anti-proliferative activities via ER-independent mechanism in cancer cells. These compounds are expected to overcome the therapeutic limitation of existing ER agonists such as estradiol and tamoxifen, which have been known to induce the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26905830

  18. Efficient visible upconversion luminescence in Er3+ and Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped Y2O3 phosphors obtained by solution combustion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Haritha, P.; Venkatramu, V.; Kim, S. H.

    Combustion derived Er3+ -doped Y2O3 and Er3+/Yb3+co-doped Y2O3 powders have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and laser excited spectroscopy. Formation of Y2O3 phosphor was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The vibrational properties of Y2O3 powder was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The luminescence spectra of Er3+ -doped and Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped Y2O3 powders were studied under 379 nm excitation. The strong up-conversion luminescence for Er3+ -doped and Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped Y2O3 powders have been observed under 978 nm laser excitation. The effect of Yb3+ addition on optical and luminescence properties of Er3+:Y2O3 powders were studied. The ratio of red to green intensity has been enhanced when Er3+ -doped Y2O3 is co-doped with Yb3+ ions. The effect of co-doping of Yb3+ ions on the visible luminescence intensity of Er3+ has been studied and the mechanism responsible for the variation in the green and red intensity is discussed.

  19. Efficient visible upconversion luminescence in Er3+ and Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped Y2O3 phosphors obtained by solution combustion reaction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Haritha, P; Venkatramu, V; Kim, S H

    2014-05-21

    Combustion derived Er(3+) -doped Y2O3 and Er(3+)/Yb(3+)co-doped Y2O3 powders have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and laser excited spectroscopy. Formation of Y2O3 phosphor was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The vibrational properties of Y2O3 powder was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The luminescence spectra of Er(3+) -doped and Er(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped Y2O3 powders were studied under 379nm excitation. The strong up-conversion luminescence for Er(3+) -doped and Er(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped Y2O3 powders have been observed under 978nm laser excitation. The effect of Yb(3+) addition on optical and luminescence properties of Er(3+):Y2O3 powders were studied. The ratio of red to green intensity has been enhanced when Er(3+) -doped Y2O3 is co-doped with Yb(3+) ions. The effect of co-doping of Yb(3+) ions on the visible luminescence intensity of Er(3+) has been studied and the mechanism responsible for the variation in the green and red intensity is discussed. PMID:24682034

  20. Development of a stable ERroGFP variant suitable for monitoring redox dynamics in the ER

    PubMed Central

    Hoseki, Jun; Oishi, Asami; Fujimura, Takaaki; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential organelle for cellular metabolic homeostasis including folding and maturation of secretory and membrane proteins. Disruption of ER proteostasis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases such as diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The ER redox state, which is an oxidative environment suitable for disulfide-bond formation, is essential for ER protein quality control. Hence, detection of the ER redox state, especially in living cells, is essential to understand the mechanism by which the redox state of the ER is maintained. However, methods to detect the redox state of the ER have not been well-established because of inefficient folding and stability of roGFP variants with oxidative redox potential like roGFP-iL. Here we have improved the folding efficiency of ER-targeted roGFP-iL (ERroGFP-iL) in cells by introducing superfolder GFP (sfGFP) mutations. Four specific amino acid substitutions (S30R, Y39N, T105N and I171V) greatly improved folding efficiency in Escherichia coli and in the ER of HeLa cells, as well as the thermostability of the purified proteins. Introduction of these mutations also enhanced the dynamic range for redox change both in vitro and in the ER of living cells. ER-targeted roGFP-S4 (ERroGFP-S4) possessing these four mutations could detect physiological redox changes within the ER. ERroGFP-S4 is therefore a novel probe suitable for monitoring redox change in the ER. ERroGFP-S4 can be applied to detect aberrant ER redox states associated with various pathological conditions and to identify the mechanisms used to maintain the redox state of the ER. PMID:26934978

  1. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) ER-2 Preflight Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Hsiang; Wilson, John W.; Maiden, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) produces chemically active radicals in biological tissues that alter the cell function or result in cell death. The AIR ER-2 flight measurements will enable scientists to study the radiation risk associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport. The ER-2 radiation measurement flights will follow predetermined, carefully chosen courses to provide an appropriate database matrix which will enable the evaluation of predictive modeling techniques. Explicit scientific results such as dose rate, dose equivalent rate, magnetic cutoff, neutron flux, and air ionization rate associated with those flights are predicted by using the AIR model. Through these flight experiments, we will further increase our knowledge and understanding of the AIR environment and our ability to assess the risk from the associated hazard.

  2. Multiple magnetic transitions in Er2Ni2Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinchure, Aravind D.; Muñoz-Sandoval, E.; Mydosh, J. A.

    2001-07-01

    We have fabricated single-phase samples and measured the bulk properties for one (Er) of a series of ternary, heavy rare-earth, 221 ``plumbide'' intermetallic compounds R2Ni2Pb (R=rare earths). These materials form in the orthorhombic (space group Cmmm) structure which is isostructural to Mn2AlB2 compounds. Our results of susceptibility, magnetization, heat capacity, and (magneto) resistivity on Er2Ni2Pb show (sharp) multiple antiferromagnetic transitions and strong field dependences in all bulk properties for the temperature range 2-10 K. We relate this magnetic behavior to the unusual R symmetry (partially frustrated) of the highly anisotropic plumbide crystal structure.

  3. Techniques and applications of SAR interferometry for ERS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Charles L.; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Zebker, Howard A.

    1993-01-01

    The ERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) demonstrated that it is possible to measure high resolution topography over large areas using interferometry with repeat orbit data sets. Given that the ERS-1 orbit is known with high precision, an automatic system for generation of interferograms is presented. Least squares estimation using ground control points provides an accurate method for determining the precise interferometric baseline. The system parameters which affect the accuracy of the Digital Elevation Models (DEM's) are errors in the interferometric baseline, decorrelation caused by baseline separation, thermal noise, and surface change. An adaptive filter based on the local interferometric coherence was developed to improve phase unwrapping of the interferogram. Final accuracies of the DEM's generated for single scene pairs in Alaska (U.S.) and Bonn (Germany) are on the order of 5 to 10 m.

  4. Polarization maintaining linear cavity Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heesuk; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Kim, Seungman; Lee, Keunwoo; Han, Seongheum; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    We present a polarization-maintaining (PM) type of Er-doped fiber linear oscillator designed to produce femtosecond laser pulses with high operational stability. Mode locking is activated using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) attached to one end of the linear PM oscillator. To avoid heat damage, the SESAM is mounted on a copper-silicon-layered heat sink and connected to the linear oscillator through a fiber buffer dissipating the residual pump power. A long-term stability test is performed to prove that the proposed oscillator design maintains a soliton-mode single-pulse operation without breakdown of mode locking over a week period. With addition of an Er-doped fiber amplifier, the output power is raised to 180 mW with 60 fs pulse duration, from which an octave-spanning supercontinuum is produced.

  5. Er:YAG and adhesion in conservative dentistry : clinical overview

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The notion of utilizing laser technology in conservative dentistry was proposed in 1990 by Hibst and Keller, who introduced the possibility of using an Er:YAG laser as alternative to conventional instruments such as the turbine and micro-motor. In subsequent years a continuing effort has been made by clinicians, researchers and commercial companies to improve the technology. The aim of this clinical study is to demonstrate, by the description of different clinical cases, the possibilities and the advantages of using Er:YAG lasers in conservative dentistry and to show that better results may be achieved in terms of stronger adhesion, less invasiveness, reduced pain as well as greater comfort and satisfaction of patients. PMID:24155547

  6. Preliminary analysis of ERS-1 SAR for forest ecosystem studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, M. G.; Pierce, Leland; Sarabandi, Kamal; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Sharik, Terry

    1992-01-01

    An image obtained by the C-band VV-polarized ERS-1 SAR is examined with respect to potential land applications. A scene obtained near noon on August 15, 1991, along the U.S.-Canadian border near Sault Ste. Marie is calibrated relative to an array of trihedral corner reflectors and active radar calibrators distributed across the swath. Extensive contemporaneous ground observations of forest stands are used to predict the radar backscattering coefficient sigma at the time of the SAR overpass using a first-order vector radiative transfer model. These predictions generally agree with the calibrated ERS-1 data to within 1 dB. It is demonstrated that the dynamic range of sigma is sufficient to perform limited discrimination of various forest and grassland communities even for a single-date observation. Furthermore, retrieval of near-surface soil moisture is feasible for grass-covered soils when plant biomass is less than 1 tonne/ha.

  7. Thermal lensing and stress in Cr,Er:YSGG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollihar, William A.; Margo, Satrijo T.; DeShazer, Larry G.; Kennedy, Chandler J.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal and stress lensing effects have been measured in a Cr,Er:YSGG rod by observing a transmitted 1064 nm Nd:YAG beam diverging from an operating Cr,Er:YSGG laser. The results compare favorably with theory and estimated thermal-optic properties of YSGG, which is intermediate between YAG and GSGG. Numerical simulations of the laser agree substantially with the threshold and power observed and show a heat generation rate which is consistent with our observations of lensing. Thermal fracture of the rod has been observed on several occasions, leading to an estimate of the thermal fracture figure of merit which is also intermediate between YAG and GSGG. Back focal distances of less than 20 cm occur in the vicinity of half the thermal rupture limit.

  8. Alaska SAR processor implementation of E-ERS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddy, David; Chen, Ming-Je; Bicknell, Tom

    1992-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data processing algorithm used by the Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) for the European Space Agency's first Remote-Sensing Satellite (E-ERS-1) SAR data are examined. Preprocessing highlights two features: signal measurement, which includes signal-to-noise ratio, replica measurement, and noise measurement; and Doppler measurement, which includes clutter lock and autofocus. The custom pipeline architecture performs the main processing with controls at the input interface, range correlator, corner-turn memory, azimuth correlator, and multi-look memory. The control software employs a flexible control scheme. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) format encapsulates the ASF products. System performance for SAR image processing of E-ERS-1 data is reviewed.

  9. Tunable eye-safe Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, M.; Šulc, J.; Indra, L.; Fibrich, M.; Jelínková, H.

    2015-01-01

    Er:YAG crystal was investigated as the gain medium in a diode (1452 nm) pumped tunable laser. The tunability was reached in an eye-safe region by an intracavity birefringent filter. The four tuning bands were obtained peaking at wavelengths 1616, 1632, 1645, and 1656 nm. The broadest continuous tunability was 6 nm wide peaking at 1616 nm. The laser was operating in a pulsed regime (10 ms pulse length, 10 Hz repetition rate). The maximum mean output power was 26.5 mW at 1645 nm. The constructed system demonstrated the tunability of a resonantly diode-pumped Er:YAG laser which could be useful in the development of compact diode-pumped lasers for spectroscopic applications.

  10. 100-megawatt power Q-switched Er-glass laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, John; Taboada, John M.; Stolarski, David J.; Zohner, Justin J.; Chavey, Lucas J.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Kumru, Semih S.; Cain, Clarence P.

    2006-02-01

    A very high energy Q-switched Er-glass laser is reported. We incorporated a rotating, resonant mirror/Porro-cavity reflector optical arrangement to achieve very high shutter speeds on the cavity Q of a laser designed for energetic, flashlamp-pumped, 600-μs, 1540-nm pulses. Reproducible 3.75-J, 35-ns, 1533-nm laser pulses were obtained at a repetition rate less than 1 minute. Our work shows that reliable, very high energy, Q-switched, Er-glass laser pulses at 1533 nm can be generated mechanically with no apparent damage to laser cavity components. We demonstrate the applications of this "eye safe" wavelength to energetic processes such as LIBS and materials processing. The laser could also serve as a new tool for bioeffects studies and targeting applications.