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Sample records for ph curing time

  1. Effect of curing Helicobacter pylori infection on intragastric pH during treatment with omeprazole.

    PubMed Central

    Verdú, E F; Armstrong, D; Idström, J P; Labenz, J; Stolte, M; Dorta, G; Börsch, G; Blum, A L

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that omeprazole treatment produces higher intragastric pH values in Helicobacter pylori positive subjects than in H pylori negative subjects. This study aimed to investigate the effect of curing H pylori on the intragastric pH in both the presence and absence of omeprazole therapy. Twenty four hour intragastric pH recordings were performed before and after a one week course of omeprazole (20 mg once daily) in 18 H pylori positive subjects and were repeated after the infection had been cured. In the absence of omeprazole, the total 24 hour pH values before cure did not differ from those afterwards. During omeprazole treatment the 24 hour pH values were much higher before (median (95% CI) 5.4: 4.3, 6.0), than after cure of infection (3.6: 2.1, 4.4; p < 0.001). The omeprazole induced fall in H+ activity before cure of H pylori did not, however, differ from that afterwards. It is concluded that the apparently greater antisecretory effect of omeprazole during H pylori infection may be a result of the production of acid neutralising compounds by the H pylori. Although a direct interaction between H pylori and omeprazole cannot be excluded, it seems unlikely. PMID:8537042

  2. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    PubMed Central

    de CASTRO, Fabrício Luscino Alves; CAMPOS, Bruno Barbosa; BRUNO, Kely Firmino; REGES, Rogério Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8x2 mm) were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI). Three temperatures (10º C, 25º C and 60º C) and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s) were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1); B: 7 days after storage (M2); C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3). The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%). Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p<0.05). At 60º C, the composite sorption showed an inverse relationship with the curing time (p<0.05). The composite cured for 5 s showed higher sorption for the 40 s or 60 s curing times when compared with all temperatures (p<0.05). Curing times of 20 s and 40 s showed similar sorption data for all temperatures (p>0.05). The 60º C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10º C temperature (p<0.05). The same results were found when comparing 10º C and 25º C (p<0.05), except that the 20 s and 40 s curing times behaved similarly (p>0.05). Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05), but was higher at 10º C than at 60º C for all curing times (p<0.05). When the composite was cured at 25º C, similar solubility values were found when comparing the 5 s and 10 s or 20 s and 40 s curing times (p>0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and

  3. SureCure ®-A new material to reduces curing time and improve curing reproducibility of lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, David P.; Loosemore, Daniel V.; Botts, G. Dean

    This paper introduces a technology that considerably reduces the time to cure the positive plates of lead-acid batteries. In each of several full-scale trials at automotive and industrial battery manufacturers, the simple replacement of 1 wt.% of leady oxide with finely-divided tetrabasic lead sulfate (SureCure™ by Hammond Group Inc.) is shown to accelerate significantly the conversion of tribasic lead sulfate (3BS) to tetrabasic lead sulfate (4BS) in the curing process while improving crystal structure and reproducibility. Shorter curing times result in reduced labour and energy costs, as well as reduced fixed (curing chambers and plant footprint) and working (plate inventory) capital investment.

  4. Time course of isocyanate emission from curing polyurethane adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirts, M.; Grunwald, D.; Schulze, D.; Uhde, E.; Salthammer, T.

    The time course of isocyanate emission from curing polyurethane (PUR) resins and adhesives was studied in two different emission test chambers. The measured emissions were strongly dependent on the type of experiment. The adhesives under investigation contained different types of diisocyanates and are used for different applications, e.g. for fixing of textile floor coverings. The influence of the curing mechanism on emission was studied by comparing the emission curves of one-component adhesives (OCA) and two-component adhesives (TCA). For TCA, the decrease in isocyanate emission was found to follow a two-step process during curing. In the first step, the emission is dominated by surface evaporation, and the decay of emission is mainly caused by the decrease in monomer content due to reaction. In the second step, the release is limited by internal diffusion. The influence of monomer reactivity on the emission profile could be demonstrated for 2,4'- and 4,4'-MDI. The less-reactive 2,4'-MDI caused prolonged emission. A strong dependence of emission rates on temperature and adhesive viscosity was also obvious. The evaluation of emission rates of different commercially available PUR adhesives showed the highest emission from systems that are applied at high temperatures. The high reactivity of diisocyanates requires special techniques for sampling and analysis. Therefore, an analytical method using HPLC-MS/MS was developed that enables limits of quantitation of <5 ng/m 3 with a sampling volume of 100 l.

  5. Effects of Ph gene-associated versus induced resistance to tobacco cyst nematode in flue-cured tobacco.

    PubMed

    Parkunan, Venkatesan; Johnson, Charles S; Eisenback, Jon D

    2009-12-01

    Effects of the systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-inducing compound acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and the plant-growth promoting rhizobacterial mixture Bacillus subtilis A13 and B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a (GB99+GB122) were assessed on the reproduction of a tobacco cyst nematode (TCN- Globodera tabacum solanacearum) under greenhouse conditions. Two sets of two independent experiments were conducted, each involving soil or root sampling. Soil sample experiments included flue-cured tobacco cultivars with (Ph(p)+: NC71 and NC102) and without (Ph(p)-: K326 and K346) a gene (Ph(p)) suppressing TCN parasitism. Root sample experiments examined TCN root parasitism of NC71 and K326. Cultivars possessing the Ph(p) gene (Ph(p)+) were compared with Ph(p)- cultivars to assess the effects of resistance mediated via Ph(p) gene vs. induced resistance to TCN. GB99+GB122 consistently reduced nematode reproductive ratio on both Ph(p)+ and Ph(p)- cultivars, but similar effects of ASM across Ph(p)- cultivars were less consistent. In addition, ASM application resulted in leaf yellowing and reduced root weight. GB99+GB122 consistently reduced nematode development in roots of both Ph(p)+ and Ph(p)- cultivars, while similar effects of ASM were frequently less consistent. The results of this study indicate that GB99+GB122 consistently reduced TCN reproduction in all flue-cured tobacco cultivars tested, while the effects of ASM were only consistent in Ph(p)+ cultivars. Under most circumstances, GB99+GB122 suppressed nematode reproduction more consistently than ASM compared to the untreated control. PMID:22736824

  6. Whisker-reinforced heat-cured dental resin composites: effects of filler level and heat-cure temperature and time.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H

    2000-06-01

    Currently available dental resin composites are inadequate for use in large stress-bearing crown and multiple-unit restorations. The aim of this study was to reinforce heat-cured composites with ceramic whiskers. It was hypothesized that whiskers substantially strengthen heat-cured composites. It was further hypothesized that whisker filler level and heat-cure temperature and time significantly influence composite properties. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whiskers for improved retention in the matrix. The whisker filler mass fraction was varied from 0% to 79%, the heat-cure temperature from 80 degrees C to 180 degrees C, and cure time from 10 min to 24 hrs. Flexural strength, work-of-fracture, and fracture toughness of the composites were measured, and specimen fracture surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy. Filler level had a significant effect on composite properties. The whisker composite with 70% filler level had a flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 248 +/- 23, significantly higher than 120 +/- 16 of an inlay/onlay composite control and 123 +/- 21 of a prosthetic composite control (Tukey's multiple comparison test; family confidence coefficient = 0.95). Heat-cure time also played a significant role. At 120 degrees C, the strength of composite cured for 10 min was 178 +/- 17, lower than 236 +/- 14 of composite cured for 3 hrs. The strength of whisker composite did not degrade after water-aging for 100 d. In conclusion, heat-cured composites were substantially reinforced with whiskers. The reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be whiskers bridging and resisting cracks. The strength and fracture toughness of whisker composite were nearly twice those of currently available inlay/onlay and prosthetic composites. PMID:10890718

  7. Effects of pH, sodium chloride, and curing salt on the infectivity of Toxoplasma gondii tissue cysts.

    PubMed

    Pott, S; Koethe, M; Bangoura, B; Zöller, B; Daugschies, A; Straubinger, R K; Fehlhaber, K; Ludewig, M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common zoonotic parasites in the world. The parasite causes no or mild symptoms in immunocompetent humans. However, a high potential hazard exists for seronegative pregnant women and immunocompromised patients. The consumption of meat containing tissue cysts or oocyst-contaminated vegetables and fruits or the handling of cat feces poses a high risk of infection with T. gondii. It is known that raw minced meat, raw fresh sausages, and locally produced raw meat products are possible causes of T. gondii infection. The infectivity of T. gondii tissue cysts in meat products depends, among other factors, on the pH and the salt concentration. Therefore, the impact of these two factors on the tissue cysts was examined. For this purpose, dissected musculature and brain from experimentally infected mice (donor mice) were placed in a cell culture medium (RPMI 1640). The medium was adjusted to different pH values (pH 5, 6, and 7) with lactic acid and to different salt concentrations (2.0, 2.5, and 3.0%) with sodium chloride (NaCl) or nitrite-enriched curing salt (NCS) for the various tests. After storage at 4°C for different time periods, the materials were fed to bioassay mice. Later, the brains were examined for presence of T. gondii to assess the infectivity. The data show that T. gondii tissue cysts have a high pH tolerance. Cysts were infectious in the muscle for up to 26 days (pH 5). In contrast to their tolerance to pH, cysts were very sensitive to salt. Muscle cysts survived at an NaCl concentration of up to 2.0% only, and for no longer than 8 days. At NaCl concentrations of 2.5 and 3.0%, the cysts lost their infectivity after 1 day. When NCS instead of NaCl was used under the same conditions, T. gondii muscle cysts retained infectivity for only 4 days at 2.0%. Consequently, NCS (NaCl plus 0.5% nitrite) has a stronger effect on T. gondii cysts than does common table salt. Sausages produced with low NaCl concentration and short

  8. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. “Light-emitting diode” light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm2 and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm2. The “quartz-tungsten-halogen” LCU (400 mW/cm2) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Results: Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Conclusion: Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity. PMID:27095897

  9. A cure for AIDS: a matter of timing?

    PubMed

    Shytaj, Iart Luca; Savarino, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Despite the huge clinical success of antiretroviral therapy, several factors such as side effects, requirement of life-long adherence, high cost, incomplete access to therapies and development of drug resistance make the quest for an ultimate cure of HIV/AIDS a worldwide priority of biomedical research. In this respect, several sterilizing or functional cures have been reported in the last years in both non-human primates and humans. This review provides a summary of the main results achieved so far, outlining their strengths as well as their limitations. A synthetic interpretation of these results could be pivotal in order to develop an effective and widely available cure. PMID:24267982

  10. The pH effect of solvent in silanization on fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing fluoride-releasing filler.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Natha; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization on the amount of fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing a silanized fluoride-releasing filler. The experimental groups were divided into 4 groups; non-silanized, acidic-adjusted pH, non-adjusted pH, and no filler as control. For fluoride measurement, each specimen was placed in deionized water which was changed every day for 7 days, every week for 7 weeks and measured. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were evaluated after aging for 48 h, 1, and 2 months. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among groups, storage times, and its interaction in fluoride measurement and flexural modulus. For flexural strength, there was significant difference only among groups. Acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization enhanced the amount of fluoride released from acrylic resin, while non-adjusted pH of solvent exhibited better flexural strength of acrylic resin. PMID:27252000

  11. Optical and Thermal Analysis of the Time Evolution of Curing in Resins by Photothermal Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Zambrano-Arjona, M.; Aguilar, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Four shades of a commercial visible-light curing dental resin are analyzed using photothermal techniques. The thermal effusivities of the dental resin shades before curing are measured using a variant of the conventional photoacoustic technique. The thermal diffusivities before and after curing are measured using infrared photothermal radiometry in the forward emission configuration. The time evolution process of the photocuring resin is monitored by photothermal radiometry in the forward and backward emission configurations. Inversion of the time evolution signal of the different configurations used permits one to obtain the time evolution of the thermal and optical properties during the photocuring. The thermal effusivity and thermal diffusivity exhibit exponential growth, while the optical absorption decreases exponentially due to the curing process. The relationship of these phenomena with the decrease of monomer concentration induced by the curing is discussed.

  12. Effect of post cure time and temperature on the properties of two phenolic-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.; Price, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    Some effects of post-cure time and temperature on the physicomechanical properties of a phenolic-asbestos and a phenolic-glass composite are studied. The molding and post-curing procedures are discussed along with physical and mechanical test results. It is found that the specific gravity of the panels tested decreased slightly but the hardness always increased with post cure, and that the mechanical properties had different patterns of response to increasing post-cure time and temperature. For tensile properties, strength decreased, modulus increased, and elongation at break exhibited little change. In general, the phenolic-asbestos showed more positive response to post cure than did the phenolic-glass. Mold venting is found to impart better properties to the composites concerned.

  13. Effect of pH on the rate of curing and bioadhesive properties of dopamine functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Cencer, Morgan; Liu, Yuan; Winter, Audra; Murley, Meridith; Meng, Hao; Lee, Bruce P

    2014-08-11

    The remarkable underwater adhesion strategy employed by mussels has inspired bioadhesives that have demonstrated promise in connective tissue repair, wound closure, and local delivery of therapeutic cells and drugs. While the pH of oxygenated blood and internal tissues is typically around 7.4, skin and tumor tissues are significantly more acidic. Additionally, blood loss during surgery and ischemia can lead to dysoxia, which lowers pH levels of internal tissues and organs. Using 4-armed PEG end-capped with dopamine (PEG-D) as a model adhesive polymer, the effect of pH on the rate of intermolecular cross-linking and adhesion to biological substrates of catechol-containing adhesives was determined. Adhesive formulated at an acidic pH (pH 5.7-6.7) demonstrated reduced curing rate, mechanical properties, and adhesive performance to pericardium tissues. Although a faster curing rate was observed at pH 8, these adhesives also demonstrated reduced mechanical and bioadhesive properties when compared to adhesives buffered at pH 7.4. Adhesives formulated at pH 7.4 demonstrated a good balance of fast curing rate, elevated mechanical properties and interfacial binding ability. UV-vis spectroscopy evaluation revealed that the stability of the transient oxidation intermediate of dopamine was increased under acidic conditions, which likely reduced the rate of intermolecular cross-linking and bulk cohesive properties for hydrogels formulated at these pH levels. At pH 8, competing cross-linking reaction mechanisms and reduced concentration of dopamine catechol due to auto-oxidation likely reduced the degree of dopamine polymerization and adhesive strength for these hydrogels. pH plays an important role in the adhesive performance of mussel-inspired bioadhesives and the pH of the adhesive formulation needs to be adjusted for the intended application. PMID:25010812

  14. Stability of α-tocotrienol and α-tocopherol in salami-type sausages and curing brine depending on nitrite and pH.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Eva-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    We studied the stability of the valuable vitamer nutrients α-tocotrienol and α-tocopherol and options for their protection in salami-type sausages (blended with α-tocotrienol-rich barley oil) and curing brine. Four different sausage formulations were produced containing nitrite curing salt; nitrite curing salt and ascorbic acid (300mg/kg); nitrite curing salt and carnosic acid (45mg/kg); or sodium chloride. Initial vitamer contents (100mg/kg) did not decrease significantly during ripening and decreased only slightly during storage. Ascorbic acid and carnosic acid were found to be effective in preserving the vitamers in fresh sausages. Freeze-drying of sausages resulted in a significant loss of vitamers (97%), particularly after 14-day storage at room temperature, even in the presence of shielding gases. The vitamer content in the curing brine decreased with decreasing pH in the presence of nitrite. A nitrite concentration of 136mg/L at pH4 resulted in significant loss (90%) of the vitamers. Sufficient stability of the vitamers in salami-type sausage and curing brine can be achieved by processing, formulation, and storage conditions. PMID:25089791

  15. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Time to Cure of Incontinence Present at Nursing Home Admission

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E.; Harms, Susan; Wyman, Jean F.

    2015-01-01

    As many as half of older people that are admitted to nursing homes (NHs) are incontinent of urine and/or feces. Not much is known about the rate of cure of incontinence present at NH admission, but available reports suggest the rate is low. There have been racial and ethnic disparities in incontinence treatment, but the role of disparities in the cure of incontinence is understudied. Using the Peters-Belson method and multilevel predictors, our findings showed that there were disparities in the time to cure of incontinence for Hispanic NH admissions. A significantly smaller proportion of older Hispanic admissions were observed to have their incontinence cured and cured later than expected had they been White. Reducing disparities in incontinence cure will improve health outcomes of Hispanic NH admissions. Significant predictors in our model suggest strategies to reduce the disparity including attention to managing fecal incontinence and incontinence in those with cognitive impairment, improving residents’ functional status, and increasing resources to NHs admitting older Hispanics with incontinence to develop innovative and cost effective ways to provide equitable quality care. PMID:26295010

  16. Compressive strength development of concrete with different curing time and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.K.; Moon, Y.H.; Eo, S.H.

    1998-12-01

    In this experimental and analytic research, the strength development for various curing histories was investigated with particular regard to the influences of curing time points with given temperatures. For this purpose, four different points of curing time were considered with an individual interval of 24 h. Two different temperatures of 5 C and 40 C were applied for the selective intervals, whereas the rest period days were under the reference curing condition of 20 C. A new model for the strength prediction was suggested based on the rate constant model. In this model, the equivalent ages introduced in the Saul and Arrhenius models were modified to show the effects of curing temperature at different ages. Test results show that the concrete subjected to a high temperature at an early age attains higher early-age strength but eventually attains lower later-age strength. The concrete subjected to a low temperature at an early age leads to lower early-age strength but almost the same later-age strength. Moreover, the proposed model showed better agreement with the test results than the existing models.

  17. Shear bond strength of orthodontic color-change adhesives with different light-curing times

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Shahin; Ghassemi, Amirreza; Manafi, Safa; Delavarian, Mohadeseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing time on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two orthodontic color-change adhesives (CCAs). Materials and Methods: A total of 72 extracted premolars were randomly assigned into 6 groups of 12 teeth each. Subsequent to primer application, a metal bracket was bonded to the buccal surface using an orthodontic adhesive. Two CCAs (Greengloo and Transbond Plus) were tested and one conventional light-cured adhesive (Resilience) served as control. For each adhesive, the specimens were light-cured for two different times of 20 and 40 s. All the specimens underwent mechanical testing using a universal testing machine to measure the SBS. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the remnant adhesive material on the tooth surface. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software. The significance level for all statistical tests was set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: The SBSs of the tested groups were in the range of 14.05-31.25 MPa. Greengloo adhesive showed the highest SBS values when light-cured for 40 s, and Transbond Plus adhesive showed the lowest values when light-cured for 20 s. ARI scores of Transbond Plus adhesive were significantly higher than those of controls, while other differences in ARI values were not significant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of his study, decreasing the light-curing time from 40 to 20 s decreased the SBS of the tested adhesives; however, this decline in SBS was statistically significant only in Transbond Plus adhesive PMID:26005468

  18. Effects of Light Curing Method and Exposure Time on Mechanical Properties of Resin Based Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Alpöz, A. Riza; Ertuḡrul, Fahinur; Cogulu, Dilsah; Ak, Asli Topaloḡlu; Tanoḡlu, Metin; Kaya, Elçin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate microhardness and compressive strength of composite resin (Tetric-Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent), compomer (Compoglass, Ivoclar, Vivadent), and resin modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, GC Corp) polymerized using halogen light (Optilux 501, Demetron, Kerr) and LED (Bluephase C5, Ivoclar Vivadent) for different curing times. Methods Samples were placed in disc shaped plastic molds with uniform size of 5 mm diameter and 2 mm in thickness for surface microhardness test and placed in a diameter of 4 mm and a length of 2 mm teflon cylinders for compressive strength test. For each subgroup, 20 samples for microhardness (n=180) and 5 samples for compressive strength were prepared (n=45). In group 1, samples were polymerized using halogen light source for 40 seconds; in group 2 and 3 samples were polymerized using LED light source for 20 seconds and 40 seconds respectively. All data were analyzed by two way analysis of ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results Same exposure time of 40 seconds with a low intensity LED was found similar or more efficient than a high intensity halogen light unit (P>.05), however application of LED for 20 seconds was found less efficient than 40 seconds curing time (P=.03). Conclusions It is important to increase the light curing time and use appropriate light curing devices to polymerize resin composite in deep cavities to maximize the hardness and compressive strength of restorative materials. PMID:19212507

  19. More Part-Time Work as a Cure for Unemployment? Results of an International Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walwei, Ulrich; Werner, Heinz

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of policies encouraging more part-time employment as a cure for unemployment in Germany was examined through a comparison of the employment policies and labor markets of selected Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries and the United States. OECD labor force statistics for the years 1972-1992 were analyzed to…

  20. Titin-derived peptides as processing time markers in dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Aristoy, M Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-01-15

    The complex proteolysis in Spanish dry-cured ham processing generates large amounts of small peptides and free amino acids which are responsible for the characteristic texture and flavour of this traditional product. The aim of this work was to study the degradation of the giant protein titin throughout the dry-curing process (2, 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 9 months) through the use of proteomic tools. A total of 320 peptides have been identified by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, being some of them identified only at 9 months of processing. In order to confirm the absence of these peptides at other times of processing, MALDI-TOF MS was also employed as a fast and easier technique. Only four peptides, KDEAAKPKGPIKGVAKK, KKLRPGSGGEK, KNTDKWSECAR and ISIDEGKVL, were exclusively identified at 9 months of curing by using both methodologies so that these peptides could be used as potential biomarkers of dry-cured ham processing time. PMID:25148995

  1. [Methods Used for Monitoring Cure Reactions in Real-time in an Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John B.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the research was to investigate methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time in an autoclave. This is of particular importance to NASA Langley Research Center because polyimides were proposed for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program. Understanding the cure chemistry behind the polyimides would allow for intelligent processing of the composites made from their use. This work has led to two publications in peer-reviewed journals and a patent. The journal articles are listed as Appendix A which is on the instrument design of the research and Appendix B which is on the cure chemistry. Also, a patent has been awarded for the instrumental design developed under this grant which is given as Appendix C. There has been a significant amount of research directed at developing methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time within the autoclave. The various research efforts can be categorized as methods providing either direct chemical bonding information or methods that provide indirect chemical bonding information. Methods falling into the latter category are fluorescence, dielectric loss, ultrasonic and similar type methods. Correlation of such measurements with the underlying chemistry is often quite difficult since these techniques do not allow monitoring of the curing chemistry which is ultimately responsible for material properties. Direct methods such as vibrational spectroscopy, however, can often be easily correlated with the underlying chemistry of a reaction. Such methods include Raman spectroscopy, mid-IR absorbance, and near-IR absorbance. With the recent advances in fiber-optics, these spectroscopic techniques can be applied to remote on-line monitoring.

  2. Effect of UV curing time on physical and electrical properties and reliability of low dielectric constant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Kai-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lung; Chang, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Yu-Min; Leu, Jihperng

    2014-11-01

    This study comprehensively investigates the effect of ultraviolet (UV) curing time on the physical, electrical, and reliability characteristics of porous low-k materials. Following UV irradiation for various periods, the depth profiles of the chemical composition in the low-k dielectrics were homogeneous. Initially, the UV curing process preferentially removed porogen-related CH{sub x} groups and then modified Si-CH{sub 3} and cage Si-O bonds to form network Si-O bonds. The lowest dielectric constant (k value) was thus obtained at a UV curing time of 300 s. Additionally, UV irradiation made porogen-based low-k materials hydrophobic and to an extent that increased with UV curing time. With a short curing time (<300 s), porogen was not completely removed and the residues degraded reliability performance. A long curing time (>300 s) was associated with improved mechanical strength, electrical performance, and reliability of the low-k materials, but none of these increased linearly with UV curing time. Therefore, UV curing is necessary, but the process time must be optimized for porous low-k materials on back-end of line integration in 45 nm or below technology nodes.

  3. Ballistics ordnance gelatine - How different concentrations, temperatures and curing times affect calibration results.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Fisk, Wesley; Wachsberger, Christian; Byard, Roger W

    2015-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether different concentrations of ordnance gelatine, water types, temperatures and curing times would have an effect on projectile penetration of a gelatine tissue surrogate. Both Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) specified gelatines were compared against the FBI calibration standard. 10% w/w and 20% w/w concentrations of gelatine with Bloom numbers of 250 and 285 were prepared and cured at variable temperatures (3-20°C) for 21 hours-3 weeks. Each block was shot on four occasions on the same range using steel calibre 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) air rifle at the required standard velocity of 180 ± 4.5 m/s, to ascertain the mean penetration depth. The results showed no significant difference in mean penetration depth using the three different water types (p > 0.05). Temperature changes and curing times did affect penetration depth. At 10°C, mean penetration depth with 20% gelatine 285 Bloom for the two water types tested was 49.7 ± 1.5 mm after 21 h curing time, whereas the same formulation at 20°C using two different water types was 79.1 ± 2.1 mm after 100 h curing time (p < 0.001). Neither of the NATO 20% concentrations of gelatine at 10°C or a 20% concentration of 285 Bloom gelatine at 10°C met the same calibration standard as the FBI recommended 10% formulation at 4°C. A 20% concentration of 285 Bloom at 20°C met the same calibration/penetration criteria as a 10% concentration of 250 Bloom at 4 °C after 100 h of curing, therefore matching the FBI calibration standard for a soft tissue simulant for wound ballistics research. These results demonstrate significant variability in simulant properties. Failure to standardise ballistic simulants may invalidate experimental results. PMID:26165674

  4. Ultraviolet blood irradiation: Is it time to remember "the cure that time forgot"?

    PubMed

    Wu, Ximing; Hu, Xiaoqing; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet blood irradiation (UBI) was extensively used in the 1940s and 1950s to treat many diseases including septicemia, pneumonia, tuberculosis, arthritis, asthma, and even poliomyelitis. The early studies were carried out by several physicians in USA and published in the American Journal of Surgery. However, with the development of antibiotics, the use of UBI declined and it has now been called "the cure that time forgot." Later studies were mostly performed by Russian workers, and in other Eastern countries, and the modern view in Western countries is that UBI remains highly controversial. This review discusses the potential of UBI as an alternative approach to current methods used to treat infections, as an immune-modulating therapy and as a method for normalizing blood parameters. Low and mild doses of UV kill microorganisms by damaging the DNA, while any DNA damage in host cells can be rapidly repaired by DNA repair enzymes. However, the use of UBI to treat septicemia cannot be solely due to UV-mediated killing of bacteria in the bloodstream, as only 5-7% of blood volume needs to be treated with UV to produce the optimum benefit, and higher doses can be damaging. There may be some similarities to extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) using psoralens and UVA irradiation. However, there are differences between UBI and ECP in that UBI tends to stimulate the immune system, while ECP tends to be immunosuppressive. With the recent emergence of bacteria that are resistant to all known antibiotics, UBI should be more investigated as an alternative approach to infections, and as an immune-modulating therapy. PMID:26894849

  5. Sample size calculation for the proportional hazards cure model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songfeng; Zhang, Jiajia; Lu, Wenbin

    2012-12-20

    In clinical trials with time-to-event endpoints, it is not uncommon to see a significant proportion of patients being cured (or long-term survivors), such as trials for the non-Hodgkins lymphoma disease. The popularly used sample size formula derived under the proportional hazards (PH) model may not be proper to design a survival trial with a cure fraction, because the PH model assumption may be violated. To account for a cure fraction, the PH cure model is widely used in practice, where a PH model is used for survival times of uncured patients and a logistic distribution is used for the probability of patients being cured. In this paper, we develop a sample size formula on the basis of the PH cure model by investigating the asymptotic distributions of the standard weighted log-rank statistics under the null and local alternative hypotheses. The derived sample size formula under the PH cure model is more flexible because it can be used to test the differences in the short-term survival and/or cure fraction. Furthermore, we also investigate as numerical examples the impacts of accrual methods and durations of accrual and follow-up periods on sample size calculation. The results show that ignoring the cure rate in sample size calculation can lead to either underpowered or overpowered studies. We evaluate the performance of the proposed formula by simulation studies and provide an example to illustrate its application with the use of data from a melanoma trial. PMID:22786805

  6. Time course of pH change in plant epidermis using microscopic pH imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Risako; Shimizu, Megumi; Kazama, Haruko; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    We established a microscopic pH imaging system to track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis in vivo. In the previous research, we have found out that anthocyanin containing cells have higher pH. However, it was not clear whether the anthocyanin increased the pH or anthocyanin was synthesized result from the higher pH. Therefore, we further investigated the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change. To track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis, we established a system using luminescent imaging technique. We used HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-Trisulfonate) as pH indicator and applied excitation ratio imaging method. Luminescent image was converted to a pH distribution by obtained in vitro calibration using known pH solution. Cellular level observation was enabled by merging microscopic color picture of the same region to the pH change image. The established system was applied to epidermal cells of red-tip leaf lettuce, Lactuca Sativa L. and the time course was tracked in the growth process. We would discuss about the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change in plant epidermis.

  7. Dependence of curing time, peak temperature, and mechanical properties on the composition of bone cement.

    PubMed

    Brauer, G M; Steinberger, D R; Stansbury, J W

    1986-01-01

    Commercial bone cements usually contain hydroquinone as the polymerization inhibitor and N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine as the accelerator in the benzoyl peroxide-initiated redox polymerization. The former compounds have certain shortcomings in their biocompatibility profile. Measurements of the setting times, polymerization exotherms, and postpolymerization strengths of the cured monomer-polymer compositions show that the hydroquinone can be replaced by food grade di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (BHT). The more reactive 4-N,N-(dimethylamino)phenethanol can replace 4-N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, yielding cements with shorter setting times and increased strengths. Excessive heat liberated on polymerization can be reduced by partial substitution of higher-molecular-weight methacrylates, e.g., dicyclopentenyloxyethyl methacrylate for methyl methacrylate, but there is a decrease in strength of the resulting polymer. More successful has been the addition to the monomer of 1% or 2% of the chain transfer agent pentaerythritol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate), which lowers the peak temperature without changing the physical properties of the cement. Compositions with short curing times, lower exotherms, and mechanical properties that exceed those of a commercial material have been formulated. PMID:3722218

  8. Temperature Rise Induced by Light Curing Unit Can Shorten Enamel Acid-Etching Time

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Panahandeh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the thermal effect of light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit on the enamel etching time. Materials and Methods: Three treatment groups with 15 enamel specimens each were used in this study: G1: Fifteen seconds of etching, G2: Five seconds of etching, G3: Five seconds of etching plus LED light irradiation (simultaneously). The micro shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to enamel was measured. Results: The mean μSBS values ± standard deviation were 51.28±2.35, 40.47±2.75 and 50.00±2.59 MPa in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.013) and between groups 2 and 3 (P=0.032) in this respect, while there was no difference between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.932). Conclusion: Simultaneous application of phosphoric acid gel over enamel surface and light irradiation using a LED light curing unit decreased enamel etching time to five seconds without compromising the μSBS. PMID:27559352

  9. Effects of curing time and frequency on ultrasonic wave velocity in grouted rock bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madenga, V.; Zou, D. H.; Zhang, C.

    2006-05-01

    Grouted rock bolts are widely used to reinforce excavated ground in mining and civil engineering structures. To date, opportunities for testing the quality of the grout in grouted rock bolts have been limited to the pull-out tests and the over-coring methods. Both these methods are destructive, time-consuming and costly. These deficiencies have fueled research into the use of ultrasonic methods for testing the quality of the grout in rock bolts. However, only partial success has been achieved in these efforts chiefly due to inadequate knowledge of the ultrasonic wave characteristics such as wave velocity in grouted rock bolts. This paper presents results of an experimental study into the effects of curing time and testing frequency on the velocity of ultrasonic waves propagating along rock bolts grouted in concrete. A substantial wave velocity decrease, as much as 47.7% at certain frequencies, was recorded in rock bolts grouted in fully cured concrete in comparison to non-grouted bolts. The results demonstrate the importance of optimizing the selection of test frequencies as well as suggesting the possibility of a new approach based on wave velocity decrease for testing the grout quality of rock bolts.

  10. Effect of curing time on the bond strength of a bracket-bonding system cured with a light-emitting diode or plasma arc light.

    PubMed

    Dall'Igna, Carine Maccarini; Marchioro, Ernani Menezes; Spohr, Ana Maria; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of two light units, a light-emitting diode (LED) and a plasma arc light (PAC), on the shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded to enamel. Ninety bovine teeth were divided into six groups, according to the light-curing unit and exposure times used. In the LED (Ortholux; 3M-Unitek) group, the specimens were light cured for 5, 10, and 15 seconds. In the PAC (Apollo 95E; DenMed Technologies) group, the specimens were light cured for 3, 6, and 9 seconds. The brackets were bonded with Transbond XT (3M-Unitek), stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 hours and then submitted to SBS testing in a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to evaluate the amount of adhesive remaining on the teeth. According to analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons test, the highest mean SBS was obtained with the LED at 15 seconds (16.68 MPa), which did not significantly differ from the LED 10 (14.76 MPa) or 5 (13.92 MPa) second groups (P > 0.05). The LED 10 and 5 second groups were not significantly different from the PAC 9 second group (12.66 MPa) or from the PAC 6 second group (9.96 MPa). The lowest mean SBS was obtained with the PAC 3 second group (8.29 MPa), which did not differ significantly from the PAC 6 second group. The method of light curing did not influence the ARI, with score 3 predominant. The LED at 5 seconds and the PAC at 3 seconds provided sufficient mean SBS to resist either orthodontic or masticatory forces. PMID:20558589

  11. Susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemics on networks with general infection and cure times.

    PubMed

    Cator, E; van de Bovenkamp, R; Van Mieghem, P

    2013-06-01

    The classical, continuous-time susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) Markov epidemic model on an arbitrary network is extended to incorporate infection and curing or recovery times each characterized by a general distribution (rather than an exponential distribution as in Markov processes). This extension, called the generalized SIS (GSIS) model, is believed to have a much larger applicability to real-world epidemics (such as information spread in online social networks, real diseases, malware spread in computer networks, etc.) that likely do not feature exponential times. While the exact governing equations for the GSIS model are difficult to deduce due to their non-Markovian nature, accurate mean-field equations are derived that resemble our previous N-intertwined mean-field approximation (NIMFA) and so allow us to transfer the whole analytic machinery of the NIMFA to the GSIS model. In particular, we establish the criterion to compute the epidemic threshold in the GSIS model. Moreover, we show that the average number of infection attempts during a recovery time is the more natural key parameter, instead of the effective infection rate in the classical, continuous-time SIS Markov model. The relative simplicity of our mean-field results enables us to treat more general types of SIS epidemics, while offering an easier key parameter to measure the average activity of those general viral agents. PMID:23848738

  12. Susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemics on networks with general infection and cure times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cator, E.; van de Bovenkamp, R.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2013-06-01

    The classical, continuous-time susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) Markov epidemic model on an arbitrary network is extended to incorporate infection and curing or recovery times each characterized by a general distribution (rather than an exponential distribution as in Markov processes). This extension, called the generalized SIS (GSIS) model, is believed to have a much larger applicability to real-world epidemics (such as information spread in online social networks, real diseases, malware spread in computer networks, etc.) that likely do not feature exponential times. While the exact governing equations for the GSIS model are difficult to deduce due to their non-Markovian nature, accurate mean-field equations are derived that resemble our previous N-intertwined mean-field approximation (NIMFA) and so allow us to transfer the whole analytic machinery of the NIMFA to the GSIS model. In particular, we establish the criterion to compute the epidemic threshold in the GSIS model. Moreover, we show that the average number of infection attempts during a recovery time is the more natural key parameter, instead of the effective infection rate in the classical, continuous-time SIS Markov model. The relative simplicity of our mean-field results enables us to treat more general types of SIS epidemics, while offering an easier key parameter to measure the average activity of those general viral agents.

  13. Curing time effect on the fraction of {sup 137}Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay composition

    SciTech Connect

    Plecas, Ilija; Dimovic, Slavko

    2007-07-01

    To assess the safety of disposal of radioactive waste material in cement, curing conditions and time of leaching radionuclides {sup 137}Cs have been studied. Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the cement materials determines how much hydration product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates R{sub n}(cm/d) of {sup 137}Cs from cement ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix after 180 days were measured. The results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20-year concrete testing project which will influence the design of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing center. (authors)

  14. Effect of resin thickness, and curing time on the micro-hardness of bulk-fill resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Shaymaa M.; Moharam, Lamiaa M.; Zaazou, Mohamed H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bulk-fill resin composite has been introduced, their manufacturers claimed that they can be applied in bulks of 4mm, without necessitating a prolonged curing time, or a light curing unit with increased irradiance. Thus this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of resin thickness, and curing time on the micro-hardness of two bulk -fill resin composites; Tetric Evo-Ceram [TE], and X-trafil [XF]. Material and Methods 120 cylindrical specimens were prepared, and divided into 24 groups (n=5/group), representing the two bulk-fill resin composites, three different material thicknesses (2, 3 and 4 mm) and the four curing times used in the study (10, 20, 40, and 60 seconds). The specimens were light-cured from the top surface only. Specimens were stored in light proof containers in complete darkness at 37°C for 24 hours. Micro-hardness test was conducted on both top and bottom surfaces using Vickers micro-hardness tester with 500 g load and a dwell time of 15 seconds. Data were statistically analyzed by Four-way ANOVA of Variance. The significance level was set at P ≤ 0.05. Pearson Correlation used to determine significant correlations between mean micro-hardness (top) and (bottom) surfaces. Results Four way-ANOVA shows that different tested materials produce a statistically significant effect on mean micro-hardness (VHN) at p≤0.001, while thickness, curing time, and surface revealed statistically non significant effect on mean micro-hardness (VHN) at p≥0.05. [XF] (92.01±3.15 VHN) showed statistically significant higher mean micro-hardness than [TE] (54.13±4.96 VHN). Pearson Correlation revealed that there was a significant direct correlation between micro-hardness (bottom) and mean micro-hardness (top) (mm), r = 0.985, p (2-tailed) ≤0.001. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, the bulk-fill resin composites used in this study can be placed and cured properly in the 4 mm bulk. Key words:Bulk-fill resin composite, micro

  15. Light-curing time and aging effects on the nanomechanical properties of methacrylate- and silorane-based restorations.

    PubMed

    Catelan, A; Pollard, T; Bedran-Russo, Ak; Santos, Ph Dos; Ambrosano, Gmb; Aguiar, Fhb

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this study was to assess the influence of light-curing time on the nanohardness (H) and reduced elastic modulus (Er) of components (underlying dentin, hybrid layer, adhesive, and composite) of methacrylate- and silorane-based restorations after 24 hours and six months of storage. Class II slot preparations were carried out in human molars (n=3) and restored with methacrylate (Clearfil SE Bond [Kuraray] + Filtek Z250 [3M ESPE]) or silorane (LS restorative system [3M ESPE]) restorative systems and light-cured using light-emitting diode at 1390 mW/cm(2) for the recommended manufacturers' time or double time. Restorations were sectioned, and bonded dentin-resin interfaces were embedded in epoxy resin and polished for evaluation with a Berkovich fluid cell tip (TI 700 Ubi-1 nanoindenter, Hysitron). Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). Overall, the H and Er values were higher for methacrylate-based restorations than for silorane materials (p≤0.05), an increase in curing time did not improve the H and Er of the bonded interface components of either material (p>0.05), and aging significantly decreased the mechanical properties of interface components of both resin-based restorative systems (p≤0.05). In general, nanomechanical properties decreased after six months of storage, the methacrylate restorative system exhibited higher H and Er than silorane, and light-curing time did not influence the properties tested. PMID:24967984

  16. The Impact of Ripening Time on Technological Quality Traits, Chemical Change and Sensory Characteristics of Dry-cured Loin

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Pil Nam; Park, Kyoung Mi; Kang, Geun Ho; Cho, Soo Hyun; Park, Beom Young; Van Ba, Hoa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ripening time on the technological quality traits, fatty acid compositions and sensory characteristics of dry-cured loin was studied. Pork loins (n = 102) at 24 h post-mortem were used to produce dry-cured loins. The dry-cured loins were assessed at 30, 60, and 90 days of ripening for the aforementioned characteristics. Our results showed that the water activity (aw) decreased (p<0.05) up to 60 days and did not change thereafter. The lipid oxidation and weight loss levels significantly (p<0.05) increased with increased ripening time. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) L* decreased for 90 days while CIE a* increased for 60 days and did not increase thereafter. More noticeably, the levels of most of unsaturated fatty acids and total polyunsaturated fatty acids significantly decreased as increasing ripening time up to 90 days. The 30 days-ripened loins had lower (p<0.05) color, flavor and overall acceptability scores than the loins ripened for 60 and 90 days, however, no differences in sensory traits occurred between the 60 and 90 day-ripened samples. Based on the results obtained in the present study, it is suggested that the ripening duration between 30 and 60 days could be more appropriate for producing dry-cured loin product with higher quality and economic benefits. PMID:25715685

  17. Optimization of the Temperature-Time Curve for the Curing Process of Thermoset Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksendrić, Dragan; Carlone, Pierpaolo; Ćirović, Velimir

    2016-05-01

    An intelligent optimization model aiming at off-line or pre-series optimization of the thermal curing cycle of polymer matrix composites is proposed and discussed. The computational procedure is based on the coupling of a finite element thermochemical process model, dynamic artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms. Objective of the optimization routine is the maximization of the composite degree of cure by the definition of the autoclave temperature. Obtained outcomes evidenced the capability of the method as well as its efficiency with respect to hard computing or experimental procedures.

  18. Comparison of variation in the light curing cycle with a time gap and its effect on polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion and microhardness of a nanohybrid composite

    PubMed Central

    Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Pearlin Mary, Newbegin Selvakumar Gold; Suresh, Malathi; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Dhakshinamoorthy, Malarvizhi; Sukumaran, Vridhachalam Ganapathy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Giving a time gap and distance during curing can decrease the polymerization shrinkage. Aim: To evaluate the effect of time gap and distance between the curing tip and restoration on the polymerization shrinkage, degree of monomer conversion (DOC), and microhardness of a nanohybrid composite. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 standardized cylindrical specimens (Z350, 3M ESPE) were fabricated using a brass mould. The curing was done in contact with the sample surface for 20 seconds in the control group. In the four experimental groups, curing was initiated at 1-cm distance, followed by variation in the time gap and the curing cycle. The polymerization shrinkage, DOC, microhardness was calculated. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc-Dunnett test were used to analyze the data. Results: Curing at 1-cm distance for 10 seconds with a gap of 10 seconds and finishing the curing cycle with 20 seconds at 0 cm proved to be an appropriate technique to reduce the polymerization shrinkage without significantly affecting the DOC and microhardness. Conclusion: A simple innovative modification of varying the distance of curing and a time gap in the curing cycle can decrease the polymerization shrinkage without affecting the DOC and microhardness. PMID:25829697

  19. The effect of UV intensities and curing time on polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) display: A detailed analysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Farzana; Jamil, Muhammad; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Seo Rok; Jeon, Young Jae

    2016-08-01

    In current study polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) films whose composition based on nematic liquid crystal (LC) E7 and prepolymeric NOA65 were formed via the photo induced phase separation method, in a wide intensity range of the UV light (I = 0.33-1.8 mW/cm2) and curing duration (t = 120-600 sec). The PDLC characteristics were monitored by surface morphology, electro optical studies, as well as by phase separation process through measuring the FTIR absorption of the composite layers. Increase of curing light intensity accelerates the phase separation and drastically influences the final morphology of LC droplets inside PDLCs. Likewise by widening the curing duration the enhancement in phase separation was observed. Increase of light intensity from 0.89 mW/cm2 and duration t = 120-240 sec resulted into transition from large LC domains of irregular shape (due to aggregation of droplets) to fine mono dispersed LC droplets. This morphology caused increase in optical scattering on zero voltage and high driving voltage. However unexpectedly, this response was not directly related with the curing conditions (intensity and time). These findings extend the potential applications of thiol-ene based PDLCs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Effects of light-curing time on the cytotoxicity of a restorative composite resin on odontoblastlike cells

    PubMed Central

    ARANHA, Andreza Maria Fábio; GIRO, Elisa Maria Aparecida; HEBLING, Josimeri; LESSA, Fernanda Campos Rosetti; COSTA, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the cytotoxicity of an experimental restorative composite resin subjected to different light-curing regimens. Methods Forty round-shaped specimens were prepared and randomly assigned to four experimental groups (n=10), as follows: in Group 1, no light-curing; in Groups 2, 3 and 4, the composite resin specimens were light-cured for 20, 40 or 60 s, respectively. In Group 5, filter paper discs soaked in 5 μL PBS were used as negative controls. The resin specimens and paper discs were placed in wells of 24-well plates in which the odontoblast-like cells MDPC-23 (30,000 cells/cm2) were plated and incubated in a humidified incubator with 5% CO2 and 95% air at 37ºC for 72 h. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the cell metabolism (MTT assay) and cell morphology (SEM). The data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann- Whitney tests (p<0.05). Results In G1, cell metabolism decreased by 86.2%, indicating a severe cytotoxicity of the non-light-cured composite resin. On the other hand, cell metabolism decreased by only 13.3% and 13.5% in G2 and G3, respectively. No cytotoxic effects were observed in G4 and G5. In G1, only a few round-shaped cells with short processes on their cytoplasmic membrane were observed. In the other experimental groups as well as in control group, a number of spindle-shaped cells with long cytoplasmic processes were found. Conclusion Regardless of the photoactivation time used in the present investigation, the experimental composite resin presented mild to no toxic effects to the odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells. However, intense cytotoxic effects occurred when no light-curing was performed. PMID:21085801

  1. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of the Effects of Curing Time on Tensile Mechanical Properties of Thin Spray-on Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guner, D.; Ozturk, H.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of curing time on tensile elastic material properties of thin spray-on liners (TSLs) were investigated in this study. Two different TSL products supplied by two manufacturers were tested comparatively. The "dogbone" tensile test samples that were prepared in laboratory conditions with different curing times (1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days) were tested based on ASTM standards. It was concluded that longer curing times improves the tensile strength and the Young's Modulus of the TSLs but decreases their elongation at break. Moreover, as an additional conclusion of the testing procedure, it was observed that during the tensile tests, the common malpractice of measuring sample displacement from the grips of the loading machine with a linear variable displacement transducer versus the sample's gauge length had a major impact on modulus and deformation determination of TSLs. To our knowledge, true stress-strain curves were generated for the first time in TSL literature within this study. Numerical analyses of the laboratory tests were also conducted using Particle Flow Code in 2 Dimensions (PFC2D) in an attempt to guide TSL researchers throughout the rigorous PFC simulation process to model support behaviour of TSLs. A scaling coefficient between macro- and micro-properties of PFC was calculated which will help future TSL PFC modellers mimic their TSL behaviours for various tensile loading support scenarios.

  2. Embedded piezoelectric sensor-based real-time strength monitoring during curing process of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Changgil; Chang, Hajoo; Park, Seunghee

    2011-04-01

    Recently, novel methods to monitor the strength development of concrete during curing process have been reported based on electro-mechanical impedance measurement using piezoelectric sensors. However, the previous research works could not provide the information about the absolute strength of concrete. In order to estimate the absolute strength directly, an embedded piezoelectric sensor system based strength monitoring technique was proposed in this study. To avoid the degradation of a piezoelectric sensor due to external and internal impacts and/or environmental variations, the piezoelectric sensor soldered with a lead wire is inserted into a small concrete block and then this block is embedded in larger concrete specimen. While the concrete is cured, the electro-mechanical impedance and guided wave signals, self-measured from the embedded piezoelectric sensor, would be changed because those are related to the material properties of the concrete such as the strength and the stiffness. Hence, the strength of concrete can be monitored by analyzing the root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of the impedance signals and the amplitude variation of the guided wave signals. Specific equations to estimate the strength of the concrete are derived using a regression analysis based on the features extracted from the signal variations. Finally, to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach, a series of experimental studies using miscellaneous concrete specimens are conducted and further research issues will be discussed for real-world implementation of the proposed approach.

  3. Influence of the light-curing unit, storage time and shade of a dental composite resin on the fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, R. S.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Gaiao, U.; Cuin, A.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of three light-curing units, storage times and colors of the dental composite resin on the fluorescence. The specimens (diameter 10.0 ± 0.1 mm, thickness 1.0 ± 0.1 mm) were made using a stainless steel mold. The mold was filled with the microhybrid composite resin and a polyethylene film covered each side of the mold. After this, a glass slide was placed on the top of the mold. To standardize the top surface of the specimens a circular weight (1 kg) with an orifice to pass the light tip of the LCU was placed on the top surface and photo-activated during 40 s. Five specimens were made for each group. The groups were divided into 9 groups following the LCUs (one QTH and two LEDs), storage times (immediately after curing, 24 hours, 7 and 30 days) and colors (shades: A2E, A2D, and TC) of the composite resin. After photo-activation, the specimens were storage in artificial saliva during the storage times proposed to each group at 37°C and 100% humidity. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s posthoc tests showed no significant difference between storage times (immediately, 24 hours and 30 days) ( P > 0.05). The means of fluorescence had difference significant to color and light-curing unit used to all period of storage ( P < 0.05). The colors had difference significant between them (shades: A2D < A2E < TC) ( P < 0.05). The Ultraled (LED) and Ultralux (QTH) when used the TC shade showed higher than Radii (LED), however to A2E shade and A2D shade any difference were found ( P > 0.05).

  4. Effect of curing time and concentration for a chemical treatment that improves surface gliding for extrasynovial tendon grafts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshikazu; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treatment time and concentration of these reagents have an effect on the resulting gliding resistance. Forty peroneus longus (PL) tendons were used, from 20 adult mongrel dogs, along with the A2 pulley obtained from the ipsilateral hind paw. After the baseline gliding resistance was measured, the PL tendons were treated with one of three concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) mixed with 10% gelatin for various times (5, 30, and 60 min). Tendon friction was measured over 1000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. Gliding resistance of the untreated PL tendons had no significant difference among the groups. After surface treatment with low concentration of HA and EDC/NHS for 5-min cure, the gliding resistance was similar to that of the untreated PL tendon and significantly higher than its 30- and 60-min treatment. For the rest of high concentration of HA and EDC/NHS groups, the gliding resistance was lower than that of untreated PL tendon. However, there was no significant difference among the timing points. It is possible to optimize the effect of surface treatment on friction and durability by regulating cure time and concentration of reagents in a canine extrasynovial tendon in vitro. PMID:16752399

  5. Supporting Quality Timely PhD Completions: Delivering Research Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasson, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The case study used a three-phase organising process to explain how design and implementation of an accessible and interactive electronic thesis submission form streamlined quality assurance of theses and their timely dissemination via an online thesis repository. The quality of the theses submitted is assured by key academics in their final sign…

  6. Prediction of the curing time to achieve maturity of the nano-cement based concrete using the Weibull distribution model: A complementary data set

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit; Kim, Heon

    2015-01-01

    This data article provides a comparison data for nano-cement based concrete (NCC) and ordinary Portland cement based concrete (OPCC). Concrete samples (OPCC) were fabricated using ten different mix design and their characterization data is provided here. Optimization of curing time using the Weibull distribution model was done by analyzing the rate of change of compressive strength of the OPCC. Initially, the compressive strength of the OPCC samples was measured after completion of four desired curing times. Thereafter, the required curing time to achieve a particular rate of change of the compressive strength has been predicted utilizing the equation derived from the variation of the rate of change of compressive strength with the curing time, prior to the optimization of the curing time (at the 99.99% confidence level) using the Weibull distribution model. This data article complements the research article entitled “Prediction of the curing time to achieve maturity of the nano-cement based concrete using the Weibull distribution model” [1]. PMID:26217804

  7. Prediction of the curing time to achieve maturity of the nano-cement based concrete using the Weibull distribution model: A complementary data set.

    PubMed

    Jo, Byung Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit; Kim, Heon

    2015-09-01

    This data article provides a comparison data for nano-cement based concrete (NCC) and ordinary Portland cement based concrete (OPCC). Concrete samples (OPCC) were fabricated using ten different mix design and their characterization data is provided here. Optimization of curing time using the Weibull distribution model was done by analyzing the rate of change of compressive strength of the OPCC. Initially, the compressive strength of the OPCC samples was measured after completion of four desired curing times. Thereafter, the required curing time to achieve a particular rate of change of the compressive strength has been predicted utilizing the equation derived from the variation of the rate of change of compressive strength with the curing time, prior to the optimization of the curing time (at the 99.99% confidence level) using the Weibull distribution model. This data article complements the research article entitled "Prediction of the curing time to achieve maturity of the nano-cement based concrete using the Weibull distribution model" [1]. PMID:26217804

  8. Slide Rule For Calculating Curing Schedules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heater, Don

    1995-01-01

    Special-purpose slide rule devised for calculating schedules for storing and curing adhesives, sealants, and other materials characterized by known curing times and shelf lives. Prevents mistakes commonly made in determining storage and curing schedules.

  9. Effect of Curing Time on the Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Beef Jerky Replaced Salt with Soy Sauce, Red Pepper Paste and Soybean Paste

    PubMed Central

    Lim, H. J.; Kim, G. D.; Jung, E. Y.; Seo, H. W.; Joo, S. T.; Jin, S. K.; Yang, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was done to investigate the quality properties of beef jerky with soy sauce, red pepper paste, and soybean paste replacing salt. Sliced beef samples were cured in salt (control), soy sauce, red pepper paste, and soybean paste for 24 or 48 h and then dried at 70°C for 8 h. Treatments showed higher final moisture content and lower Na+ concentration than the control after drying for 8 h. The lightness and shear force values were lower in all treatment samples than in the control during 48 h of curing time. In particular, lower lipid oxidation was found in the jerky cured with red pepper paste than in the control. Sensory evaluation showed that color, flavor, and tenderness of jerky samples were improved by replacing salt with soy sauce, red pepper paste and soybean paste, and higher likeability scores of the beef jerky were obtained among those treatments after 48 h of curing time. PMID:25083112

  10. Reporting the sensory properties of dry-cured ham using a new language: Time intensity (TI) and temporal dominance of sensations (TDS).

    PubMed

    Lorido, Laura; Hort, Joanne; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of salt content (normal and reduced) and feeding system (montanera and concentrate) on the dynamic sensory characteristics of dry-cured hams using time-intensity (TI) and Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS) techniques. Differences in the temporal sensory information given by the two different techniques were found. Significant differences in the temporal perception of flavour and texture were detected between normal and reduced salt content dry-cured hams which are a Spanish pricy meat product very appreciated by consumers due to its particular sensory characteristics. The effect of the feeding system was mainly observed on flavour attributes such as saltiness and cured flavour and texture attributes such as juiciness. The application of TDS technique to study temporal sensory attributes of dry-cured ham is reported for the first time in the present article. PMID:27322593

  11. Curing time effect on the fraction of {sup 137}Cs from immobilized radioactive evaporator sludge by cement

    SciTech Connect

    Dimovic, Slavko; Plecas, Ilija

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Traditional methods of processing evaporator concentrates from NPP are evaporation and cementation. These methods allow to transform a liquid radioactive waste into the rather inert form, suitable for a final disposal. To assess the safety for disposal of radioactive mortar-waste composition, the leaching of {sup 137}Cs from immobilized radioactive evaporator concentrate into a surrounding fluid has been studied. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the cement materials determines how much hydration product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates Rn(cm/d) of {sup 137}Cs from evaporator concentrates after 180 days were measured. The results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20-year concrete testing project which will influence the design of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing center. (authors)

  12. Cure SMA

    MedlinePlus

    ... real progress toward a treatment and a cure. Latest News August 29, 2016 2016 SMA Researcher Meeting ... Fundraisers Connect with Us Sign up for the latest SMA information Let us help you connect to ...

  13. pH Dependence of the Photoactive Yellow Protein Photocycle Investigated by Time-Resolved Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Šrajer, Vukica; Purwar, Namrta; Henning, Robert; Schmidt, Marius

    2012-05-24

    Visualizing the three-dimensional structures of a protein during its biological activity is key to understanding its mechanism. In general, protein structure and function are pH-dependent. Changing the pH provides new insights into the mechanisms that are involved in protein activity. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is a signaling protein that serves as an ideal model for time-dependent studies on light-activated proteins. Its photocycle is studied extensively under different pH conditions. However, the structures of the intermediates remain unknown until time-resolved crystallography is employed. With the newest beamline developments, a comprehensive time series of Laue data can now be collected from a single protein crystal. This allows us to vary the pH. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of a short-lived protein-inhibitor complex formed in the pB state of the PYP photocycle at pH 4. A water molecule that is transiently stabilized in the chromophore active site prevents the relaxation of the chromophore back to the trans configuration. As a result, the dark-state recovery is slowed down dramatically. At pH 9, PYP stops cycling through the pB state altogether. The electrostatic environment in the chromophore-binding site is the likely reason for this altered kinetics at different pH values.

  14. pH Dependence of the Photoactive Yellow Protein Photocycle Investigated by Time-Resolved Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Šrajer, Vukica; Purwar, Namrta; Henning, Robert; Schmidt, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Visualizing the three-dimensional structures of a protein during its biological activity is key to understanding its mechanism. In general, protein structure and function are pH-dependent. Changing the pH provides new insights into the mechanisms that are involved in protein activity. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is a signaling protein that serves as an ideal model for time-dependent studies on light-activated proteins. Its photocycle is studied extensively under different pH conditions. However, the structures of the intermediates remain unknown until time-resolved crystallography is employed. With the newest beamline developments, a comprehensive time series of Laue data can now be collected from a single protein crystal. This allows us to vary the pH. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of a short-lived protein-inhibitor complex formed in the pB state of the PYP photocycle at pH 4. A water molecule that is transiently stabilized in the chromophore active site prevents the relaxation of the chromophore back to the trans configuration. As a result, the dark-state recovery is slowed down dramatically. At pH 9, PYP stops cycling through the pB state altogether. The electrostatic environment in the chromophore-binding site is the likely reason for this altered kinetics at different pH values. PMID:22339869

  15. Defining cure.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Paul; Robinson, Dudley

    2011-06-01

    This paper is a summary of the presentations made as Proposal 2-"Defining cure" to the 2nd Annual meeting of the ICI-Research Society, in Bristol, 16th June 2010. It reviews definitions of 'cure' and 'outcome', and considers the impact that varying definition may have on prevalence studies and cure rates. The difference between subjective and objective outcomes is considered, and the significance that these different outcomes may have for different stakeholders (e.g. clinicians, patients, carers, industry etc.) is discussed. The development of patient reported outcome measures and patient defined goals is reviewed, and consideration given to the use of composite end-points. A series of proposals are made by authors and discussants as to how currently validated outcomes should be applied, and where our future research activity in this area might be directed. PMID:21661023

  16. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine on pH, calcium release and setting time of a resinous MTA-based root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Linhares-Farina, Giane; Sposito, Otávio da Silva; Zanchi, César Henrique; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The addition of chlorhexidine (CHX) to a resinous experimental Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (E-MTA) based root-end filling material is an alternative to boost its antimicrobial activity. However, the influence of chlorhexidine on the properties of this material is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2% chlorhexidine on the pH, calcium ion release and setting time of a Bisphenol A Ethoxylate Dimethacrylate/Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (Bis-EMA/MTA) based dual-cure experimental root-end filling material (E-MTA), in comparison with E-MTA without the addition of CHX and with conventional white MTA (W-MTA). The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes, and immersed in deionized water to determine pH (digital pH meter) and calcium ion release (atomic absorption spectrometry technique). The setting time of each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles. The data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of 5%. E-MTA + CHX showed an alkaline pH in the 3 h period of evaluation, the alkalinity of which decreased but remained as such for 15 days. The pH of E-MTA + CHX was higher than the other two materials after 7 days, and lower after 30 days (p < 0.05). All of the materials were found to release calcium ions throughout the 30 days of the study. The addition of CHX increased the calcium ion release of E-MTA to levels statistically similar to W-MTA. E-MTA showed shorter initial and final setting time, compared with W-MTA (p < 0.05). The addition of 2% CHX to MTA prevented setting of the material. The addition of CHX to E-MTA increased its pH and calcium ion release. However, it also prevented setting of the material. PMID:25715035

  17. Assessment of Tandem Measurements of pH and Total Gut Transit Time in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajczyk, Adam E; Watson, Sydeaka; Surma, Bonnie L; Rubin, David T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The variation of luminal pH and transit time in an individual is unknown, yet is necessary to interpret single measurements. This study aimed to assess the intrasubject variability of gut pH and transit time in healthy volunteers using SmartPill devices (Covidien, Minneapolis, MN). Methods: Each subject (n=10) ingested two SmartPill devices separated by 24 h. Mean pH values were calculated for 30 min after gastric emptying (AGE), before the ileocecal (BIC) valve, after the ileocecal (AIC) valve, and before body exit (BBE). Intrasubject variability was determined by comparing mean values from both ingestions for an individual subject using standard deviations, 95% limits of agreement, and Bland-Altman plots. Results: Tandem device ingestion occurred without complication. The median (full range) intrasubject standard deviations for pH were 0.02 (0.0002–0.2048) for AGE, 0.06 (0.0002–0.3445) for BIC, 0.14 (0.0018–0.3042) for AIC, and 0.08 (0.0098–0.5202) for BBE. There was a significant change in pH for AIC (mean difference: −0.45±0.31, P=0.0015) observed across all subjects. The mean coefficients of variation for transit time were 12.0±7.4% and 25.8±15.8% for small and large bowels, respectively (P=0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrates the safety and feasibility of tandem gut transit and pH assessments using the SmartPill device. In healthy individuals and over 24 h, the gut pH profile does not markedly fluctuate in a given region with more variation seen in the colon compared with the small bowel, which has important implications for future physiology and drug delivery studies. PMID:26158610

  18. What motivates participation in HIV cure trials? A call for real-time assessment to improve informed consent

    PubMed Central

    Peay, Holly L; Henderson, Gail E

    2015-01-01

    HIV cure research, a diverse set of studies aimed at eradicating or greatly reducing HIV in latent reservoirs, has become a strategic priority for global AIDS research. However, in early-phase HIV cure research there are ethical challenges related to the uncertainty around potential risks and the risk–benefit balance. Similar to clinical trials in other disease areas, these concerns may impact clinical trial participants' comprehension and decision making. Here we suggest attention to the terminology used to describe HIV cure research that may promote therapeutic misconception, and exploration of the decision-making influences and processes of those who accept and decline participation in HIV cure trials. These data will facilitate efforts to improve protocols and informed consent based on an understanding of participant preferences and needs. PMID:25866844

  19. 25 CFR 162.592 - What will BIA do if a lessee does not cure a violation of a WSR lease on time?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What will BIA do if a lessee does not cure a violation of a WSR lease on time? 162.592 Section 162.592 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Wsr Lease...

  20. 25 CFR 162.592 - What will BIA do if a lessee does not cure a violation of a WSR lease on time?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What will BIA do if a lessee does not cure a violation of a WSR lease on time? 162.592 Section 162.592 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Wsr Lease...

  1. Effect of Packaging Method and Storage Time on Physicochemical Characteristics of Dry-Cured Pork Neck Products at 10°C

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Suk; Jin, Sang-Keun; Yang, Mi-Ra; Ahn, Dong Uk; Park, Jae-Hong; Kang, Suk-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Dry-cured pork neck samples were stored at 10°C for 90 days under vacuum packaging (VP) or modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 25% CO2+75% N2) conditions. The pH, moisture, water activity, total aerobic bacteria, and Enterobacteriaceae counts of dry-cured pork neck products with MAP were significantly lower than those with VP (p<0.05) after 90 days of storage. However, CIE b* and 2-thiobarbituric acid reacted substance (TBARS) values of the pork product with MAP were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those with VP. Total aerobic bacterial counts and Enterobacteriaceae counts of samples with MAP were lower than those with VP after 30 days of storage. Sensory results indicated that aroma, flavor and tenderness scores of the samples with both VP and MAP decreased during storage and the scores after >60 days of storage were lower than those at Day 1. In conclusion, despite presenting higher lipid oxidation, the samples stored in packages containing 25% CO2 for 90 days at 10°C have lower bacterial counts than vacuum-packed samples. Therefore, further studies should be performed on the packaging of dry-cured meat at adjusted concentrations of CO2. PMID:25358323

  2. Rapid characterization of dry cured ham produced following different PDOs by proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS).

    PubMed

    Del Pulgar, José Sánchez; Soukoulis, Christos; Biasioli, Franco; Cappellin, Luca; García, Carmen; Gasperi, Flavia; Granitto, Pablo; Märk, Tilmann D; Piasentier, Edi; Schuhfried, Erna

    2011-07-15

    In the present study, the recently developed proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) technique was used for the rapid characterization of dry cured hams produced according to 4 of the most important Protected Designations of Origin (PDOs): an Iberian one (Dehesa de Extremadura) and three Italian ones (Prosciutto di San Daniele, Prosciutto di Parma and Prosciutto Toscano). In total, the headspace composition and respective concentration for nine Spanish and 37 Italian dry cured ham samples were analyzed by direct injection without any pre-treatment or pre-concentration. Firstly, we show that the rapid PTR-ToF-MS fingerprinting in conjunction with chemometrics (Principal Components Analysis) indicates a good separation of the dry cured ham samples according to their production process and that it is possible to set up, using data mining methods, classification models with a high success rate in cross validation. Secondly, we exploited the higher mass resolution of the new PTR-ToF-MS, as compared with standard quadrupole based versions, for the identification of the exact sum formula of the mass spectrometric peaks providing analytical information on the observed differences. The work indicates that PTR-ToF-MS can be used as a rapid method for the identification of differences among dry cured hams produced following the indications of different PDOs and that it provides information on some of the major volatile compounds and their link with the implemented manufacturing practices such as rearing system, salting and curing process, manufacturing practices that seem to strongly affect the final volatile organic profile and thus the perceived quality of dry cured ham. PMID:21645714

  3. In Site Analysis of a High Temperature Cure Reaction in Real Time Using Modulated Fiber-Optic FT-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Aust, Jeffrey F.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J.

    1999-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of a high temperature (330 C) polymerization reaction was successfully monitored in real time using a modulated fiber-optic FT-Raman spectrometer. A phenylethynyl terminated monomer was cured, and spectral evidence for two different reaction products was acquired. The products are a conjugated polyene chain and a cyclized trimer. This is the first report describing the use of FT-Raman spectroscopy to monitor a high temperature (greater than 250 C) reaction in real time.

  4. Time to the Doctorate and Labor Demand for New PhD Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the influence of labor demand for new PhD recipients on time to the doctorate. I use student-level data on all doctorates awarded by U.S. universities in seven humanities and social science fields together with the annual number of job listings by field from 1975 to 2005. An increase in the number of job listings in a field…

  5. Comparative static curing versus dynamic curing on tablet coating structures.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Genty, Muriel; Fayard, Barbara; Tfayli, Ali; Boiret, Mathieu; Lecoq, Olivier; Baron, Michel; Chaminade, Pierre; Péan, Jean Manuel

    2013-09-10

    Curing is generally required to stabilize film coating from aqueous polymer dispersion. This post-coating drying step is traditionally carried out in static conditions, requiring the transfer of solid dosage forms to an oven. But, curing operation performed directly inside the coating equipment stands for an attractive industrial application. Recently, the use of various advanced physico-chemical characterization techniques i.e., X-ray micro-computed tomography, vibrational spectroscopies (near infrared and Raman) and X-ray microdiffraction, allowed new insights into the film-coating structures of dynamically cured tablets. Dynamic curing end-point was efficiently determined after 4h. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the influence of curing conditions on film-coating structures. Results demonstrated that 24h of static curing and 4h of dynamic curing, both performed at 60°C and ambient relative humidity, led to similar coating layers in terms of drug release properties, porosity, water content, structural rearrangement of polymer chains and crystalline distribution. Furthermore, X-ray microdiffraction measurements pointed out different crystalline coating compositions depending on sample storage time. An aging mechanism might have occur during storage, resulting in the crystallization and the upward migration of cetyl alcohol, coupled to the downward migration of crystalline sodium lauryl sulfate within the coating layer. Interestingly, this new study clearly provided further knowledge into film-coating structures after a curing step and confirmed that curing operation could be performed in dynamic conditions. PMID:23792043

  6. In Situ Analysis of a High-Temperature Cure Reaction in Real Time Using Modulated Fiber-Optic FT-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aust, Jeffrey F.; Cooper, John B.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J.

    1999-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of a high-temperature (330 C) polymerization reaction was successfully monitored in real time with the use of a modulated fiber-optic Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectrometer. A phenylethynyl-terminated monomer was cured, and spectral evidence for two different reaction products was acquired. The products are a conjugated polyene chain and a cyclized trimer. This is the first report describing the use of FT-Raman spectroscopy to monitor a high temperature (greater than 250 C) reaction in real time.

  7. Real-Time Drug Release Analysis of Enzyme and pH Responsive Polysaccharide Nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Poothayil Subash; Deshpande, Nilesh Umakant; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2015-08-20

    The accurate estimation of drug release kinetics of polymeric vehicles is an indispensable prerequisite for the developments of successful drug carriers for cancer therapy. The present investigation reports the development of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic approach for the real-time release kinetics of fluorophore loaded polysaccharide vesicles that are potential vectors in cancer treatment. The polysaccharide vesicles were custom designed with appropriate enzyme and pH responsiveness and loaded with water-soluble biocompatible fluorophore Rhodamine B (Rh-B). The semipermeable membrane dialysis method along with steady state absorbance spectroscopic technique was found to be inaccurate for the estimation of drug release. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique was found to exhibit significant difference in excited state decay profiles and fluorescent lifetime of Rh-B in the free and polymer bound states. This enabled the establishment of real-time drug release protocols by TCSPC method for polysaccharide vesicles that are responsible to pH and enzyme with respect to intracellular compartments. Real-time analysis predicted the release kinetics 20-25% higher accuracy when compared to the dialysis method under in vitro conditions. Moreover, the ability of enzyme to cleave the polysaccharide vesicles was further validated by docking studies. The positioning of the molecules in active site of enzyme and the binding energy data were generated using AUTODOCK program to study the rupture of polysaccharide vesicles. This new TCSPC technique could be very useful for studying the drug release pattern of synthetic polymer vesicles loaded with Rh-B fluorophore. PMID:26237375

  8. Nano-chemo-mechanical signature of conventional oil-well cement systems: Effects of elevated temperature and curing time

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Musso, Simone; James, Simon; Akono, Ange-Therese; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2015-01-15

    With ever more challenging (T,p) environments for cementing applications in oil and gas wells, there is a need to identify the fundamental mechanisms of fracture resistant oil well cements. We report results from a multi-technique investigation of behavior and properties of API class G cement and silica-enriched cement systems subjected to hydrothermal curing from 30 °C to 200 °C; including electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, electron microscopy, neutron scattering (SANS), and fracture scratch testing. The results provide a new insight into the link between system chemistry, micro-texture and micro-fracture toughness. We suggest that the strong correlation found between chemically modulated specific surface and fracture resistance can explain the drop in fracture properties of neat oil-well cements at elevated temperatures; the fracture property enhancement in silica-rich cement systems, between 110° and 175 °C; and the drop in fracture properties of such systems through prolonged curing over 1 year at 200 °C.

  9. Revisiting the Posttherapeutic Cure Criterion in Chagas Disease: Time for New Methods, More Questions, Doubts, and Polemics or Time to Change Old Concepts?

    PubMed Central

    de Lana, Marta; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2015-01-01

    One of the most relevant issues beyond the effectiveness of etiological treatment of Chagas disease is the lack of consensual/feasible tools to identify and certify the definitive parasitological cure. Several methods of distinct natures (parasitological, serological, and molecular) have been continuously proposed and novel perspectives are currently under investigation. Although the simultaneous use of distinct tests may offer better contributions and advances, it also leads to controversies of interpretation, with lack of mutual consent of cure criterion amongst researchers and physicians. In fact, when distinct host compartments (blood/tissues) are evaluated and explored, novel questions may arise due to the nature and sensitivity limit of each test. This short analytical review intends to present a chronological and critical overview and discuss the state-of-the-art distinct devices available for posttherapeutic cure assessment in Chagas disease, their contributions, meanings, and interpretation, aiming to point out the major gaps and propose novel insight for future perspectives of posttherapeutic management of Chagas disease patients. PMID:26583124

  10. Time-to-Fatigue and Intramuscular pH measured via NIRS during Handgrip Exercise in Trained and Sedentary Individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Lee, S. M. C.; Stroud, L.; Scott, P.; Hagan, R. D.; Soller, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    In exercising muscles force production and muscular endurance are impaired by a decrease in intramuscular pH. The effects of aerobic training (AT) on preventing acidosis and prolonging exercise time in muscles not specifically targeted by the training are unknown. Purpose: To compare interstitial pH, measured non-invasively with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) during rhythmic handgrip exercise in sedentary subjects and those who participate in AT activities that target the lower body. Methods: Maximal isometric force (MIF) was measured on three separate days in AT (n=5) and sedentary (n=8) subjects using a handgrip dynamometer (HGD). Isometric muscular endurance (IME) was measured during five trials, each separated by at least 48 hrs. For each IME trial subjects rhythmically squeezed (4 sec at 40% of MVC) and relaxed (2 sec) to fatigue or failure to reach the target force in three consecutive contractions or four non-consecutive contractions. Interstitial pH was derived from spectra collected using a NIRS sensor adhered to the skin over the FDP. The first four IME trials served to familiarize subjects with the protocol; the fifth trial was used for analysis. NIRS-derived pH was averaged in 30 sec increments. Between group differences in MIF and exercise time were tested using paired t-tests. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze effects of AT and exercise time on pH. Results: MIF was not different between groups (mean SD; aerobic=415.6 95.4 N vs. sedentary =505.1 107.4 N). Time to fatigue was greater in the AT than in the sedentary group (mean SD: 611 173 sec vs. 377 162 sec, p<0.05). pH was not different between groups at any time point. Average pH decreased (p<0.05) in both groups from rest (pH=7.4) through 90 sec of exercise (pH=6.9), but did not decrease further throughout the remainder of exercise. Conclusion: Although between group differences in pH were not detected, differences during the onset of exercise

  11. Effect of curing conditions on the dimensional and thermal stability of calcium phosphate cement for elevated temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Blom, Johan; Rahier, Hubert; Wastiels, Jan

    2014-12-15

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are attractive materials for elevated temperature applications, like moulds to process thermoplastics up to 300 °C. The CPC resulting from the reaction of wollastonite with phosphoric acid cured at room temperature however contains hydrated phases like brushite, and is thus not stable when exposed to temperatures above 200 °C. A non-contact method based on digital image correlation demonstrated that isothermal curing at 60 °C reduces the thermal shrinkage up to 300 °C by 25%. This curing method results in the direct formation of the more stable monetite in a shorter curing time. The correlated results of TGA, pH of the filtration water, and DSC analysis on partially cured material indicate this. XRD diffractograms and SEM images in combination with EDX show the evolution of the transformation of wollastonite into monetite, and the structure and morphology of the formed material.

  12. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of dry-cured Halal goat meat. Effect of salting time and addition of olive oil and paprika covering.

    PubMed

    Cherroud, Sanâa; Cachaldora, Aida; Fonseca, Sonia; Laglaoui, Amin; Carballo, Javier; Franco, Inmaculada

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to define a simple technological process for dry-cured Halal goat meat elaboration. The aims of this study were to analyze physicochemical parameters and to enumerate the microbial population at the end of the different manufacturing processes (two salting times and the addition of olive oil and paprika covering) on 36 units of meat product. A total of 532 strains were isolated from several selective culture media and then identified using classical and molecular methods. In general, salt effect and the addition of olive oil and paprika were significant for all the studied microbial groups as well as on NaCl content and water activity. Molecular analysis proves that staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus equorum, were the most common naturally occurring microbiota. The best manufacturing process would be obtained with a longer salting time and the addition of the olive oil and paprika covering. PMID:24950081

  13. Wide range pH measurements using a single H(+)-selective chromoionophore and a time-based flow method.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Rostamzadeh, Abolfazl; Maesum, Saeed

    2006-02-28

    A hydrophilic transparent triacetyl cellulose membrane was adopted as a pH optode by immobilizing highly selective and sensitive Nile blue indicator on the membrane. Contrary to the common procedure for determinations using optodes, in which a steady state response is measured, a new approach is introduced in which the dynamic response of the optode is used as the analytical signal. While in common procedures, pH optodes exhibit limited linear dynamic range (often 2-4 pH units only), it is shown that in a time-based flow method, an optode with only one acid-base indicator can be used for measurement in the pH range of 0-10. The procedure is simple, inexpensive and rapid. PMID:18970487

  14. Influence of the salting time on volatile compounds during the manufacture of dry-cured pork shoulder "lacón".

    PubMed

    Purriños, Laura; Franco, Daniel; Carballo, Javier; Lorenzo, José M

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the length of salting time on volatile compounds throughout the manufacture of dry-cured "lacón" was studied using a purge-and-trap extraction and GC/MS analysis. For this study, six treatments of "lacón" were salted with different amounts of salt (LS (3 days of salting), MS (4 days of salting) and HS (5 days of salting)). The total area of volatile compounds increased significantly (P<0.001) as the length of salting time increased. Significant differences were found for the total area of all aldehydes for each salting time at the end of process. Hexanal presented the most relative abundance, showing highest content in HS treatments while LS treatments showed the lowest one at the end of salting, post-salting and drying-ripening stage. The influence of salting time on the content of 3-Octen-2-one was significant on salting stage (P<0.001) and drying-ripening stage (P<0.01). The salting time affected (P<0.001) the relative abundance of esters at the end of salting and at the end of drying-ripening stage. The salting time affected significantly (P<0.001) on alcohols content at the end of drying-ripening process. However, no significant effect of salt level (P>0.05) was detected on total hydrocarbons and total furans at the end of process. PMID:22749430

  15. Time variability of the north-western Mediterranean Sea pH over 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Marcellin Yao, Koffi; Marcou, Olivier; Goyet, Catherine; Guglielmi, Véronique; Touratier, Franck; Savy, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Factors controlling ocean acidification and its temporal variations were studied over the 1995-2011 period at the Dyfamed site at 10 m depth, in the North Mediterranean Sea. The results indicated a mean annual decrease of 0.003 ± 0.001 pH units on the seawater scale. The seasonal variability was characterized by a pH decrease during springtime and a strong pH increase in late fall. Anthropogenic CO2 (CANT) absorption by the ocean was the key driver of seawater acidification in this region, accounting for about 70% of the observed drop in pH, followed by water temperature (about 30%). The total inorganic carbon (CT) data showed a CT increase of 30.0 ± 1.0 μmol kg(-1) per decade. This decadal increase is mainly due to the CANT penetration (43.2 μmol kg(-1) per decade) in surface waters, which is mitigated for by relatively small opposing changes in CT due to physical and biological processes. PMID:26994464

  16. A Time-Accurate Upwind Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Compressible Flow with Cure of Pathological Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2007-01-01

    A time-accurate, upwind, finite volume method for computing compressible flows on unstructured grids is presented. The method is second order accurate in space and time and yields high resolution in the presence of discontinuities. For efficiency, the Roe approximate Riemann solver with an entropy correction is employed. In the basic Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme, many concepts of high order upwind schemes are adopted: the surface flux integrals are carefully treated, a Cauchy-Kowalewski time-stepping scheme is used in the time-marching stage, and a multidimensional limiter is applied in the reconstruction stage. However even with these up-to-date improvements, the basic upwind scheme is still plagued by the so-called "pathological behaviors," e.g., the carbuncle phenomenon, the expansion shock, etc. A solution to these limitations is presented which uses a very simple dissipation model while still preserving second order accuracy. This scheme is referred to as the enhanced time-accurate upwind (ETAU) scheme in this paper. The unstructured grid capability renders flexibility for use in complex geometry; and the present ETAU Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme is capable of handling a broad spectrum of flow regimes from high supersonic to subsonic at very low Mach number, appropriate for both CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and CAA (computational aeroacoustics). Numerous examples are included to demonstrate the robustness of the methods.

  17. Modeling HIV Cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelson, Alan; Conway, Jessica; Cao, Youfang

    A large effort is being made to find a means to cure HIV infection. I will present a dynamical model of post-treatment control (PTC) or ``functional cure'' of HIV-infection. Some patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy have been taken off of therapy and then spontaneously control HIV infection such that the amount of virus in the circulation is maintained undetectable by clinical assays for years. The model explains PTC occurring in some patients by having a parameter regime in which the model exhibits bistability, with both a low and high steady state viral load being stable. The model makes a number of predictions about how to attain the low PTC steady state. Bistability in this model depends upon the immune response becoming exhausted when over stimulated. I will also present a generalization of the model in which immunotherapy can be used to reverse immune exhaustion and compare model predictions with experiments in SIV infected macaques given immunotherapy and then taken off of antiretroviral therapy. Lastly, if time permits, I will discuss one of the hurdles to true HIV eradication, latently infected cells, and present clinical trial data and a new model addressing pharmacological means of flushing out the latent reservoir. Supported by NIH Grants AI028433 and OD011095.

  18. Heteroscedastic transformation cure regression models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chyong-Mei; Chen, Chen-Hsin

    2016-06-30

    Cure models have been applied to analyze clinical trials with cures and age-at-onset studies with nonsusceptibility. Lu and Ying (On semiparametric transformation cure model. Biometrika 2004; 91:331?-343. DOI: 10.1093/biomet/91.2.331) developed a general class of semiparametric transformation cure models, which assumes that the failure times of uncured subjects, after an unknown monotone transformation, follow a regression model with homoscedastic residuals. However, it cannot deal with frequently encountered heteroscedasticity, which may result from dispersed ranges of failure time span among uncured subjects' strata. To tackle the phenomenon, this article presents semiparametric heteroscedastic transformation cure models. The cure status and the failure time of an uncured subject are fitted by a logistic regression model and a heteroscedastic transformation model, respectively. Unlike the approach of Lu and Ying, we derive score equations from the full likelihood for estimating the regression parameters in the proposed model. The similar martingale difference function to their proposal is used to estimate the infinite-dimensional transformation function. Our proposed estimating approach is intuitively applicable and can be conveniently extended to other complicated models when the maximization of the likelihood may be too tedious to be implemented. We conduct simulation studies to validate large-sample properties of the proposed estimators and to compare with the approach of Lu and Ying via the relative efficiency. The estimating method and the two relevant goodness-of-fit graphical procedures are illustrated by using breast cancer data and melanoma data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887342

  19. A New Kind of Curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A new curing method using automated tape placement (ATP) with electron beam (EB), or e-beam, produces a combination known as in situ e-beam curing. Through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Science Research Laboratory, Inc., created the in situ e-beam curing technique, which uses a low-energy electron beam gun to cure various composite materials. One important benefit is the technique's utilization of room temperature curing, which lessens the chance of mismatching the thermal expansion coefficients of different materials. For instance, metals and composites will expand at different rates when heated, but the low-energy e-beam gun reduces the expansion differential. Using a low-energy gun also results in less x-ray shielding, significantly reduced capital costs, reduced facility space, and increased processing capabilities for larger parts. However, using a low-energy gun also means that each tape layer is treated individually because the gun can penetrate only one layer at a time. The e-beam gun emits lower energy x-rays, which are more easily shielded than those emitted by previous guns. The low-energy system is relatively portable due to its light weight and small size. The gun weighs about 70 pounds and can be easily mounted on a robotic arm or an ATP head.

  20. Continuous Glucose Monitors and the Burden of Tight Glycemic Control in Critical Care: Can They Cure the Time Cost?

    PubMed Central

    Signal, Matthew; Pretty, Christopher G.; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Le Compte, Aaron; Shaw, Geoffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tight glycemic control (TGC) in critical care has shown distinct benefits but has also proven to be difficult to obtain. The risk of severe hypoglycemia (<40 mg/dl) raises significant concerns for safety. Added clinical burden has also been an issue. Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) offer frequent automated measurement and thus the possibility of using them for early detection and intervention of hypoglycemic events. Additionally, regular measurement by CGM may also be able to reduce clinical burden. Aim An in silico study investigates the potential of CGM devices to reduce clinical effort in a published TGC protocol. Methods This study uses retrospective clinical data from the Specialized Relative Insulin Nutrition Titration (SPRINT) TGC study covering 20 patients from a benchmark cohort. Clinically validated metabolic system models are used to generate a blood glucose (BG) profile for each patient, resulting in 33 continuous, separate BG episodes (6881 patient hours). The in silico analysis is performed with three different stochastic noise models: two Gaussian and one first-order autoregressive. The noisy, virtual CGM BG values are filtered and used to drive the SPRINT TGC protocol. A simple threshold alarm is used to trigger glucose interventions to avert potential hypoglycemia. The Monte Carlo method was used to get robust results from the stochastic noise models. Results Using SPRINT with simulated CGM noise, the BG time in an 80–110 mg/dl band was reduced no more than 4.4% to 45.2% compared to glucometer sensors. Antihypoglycemic interventions had negligible effect on time in band but eliminated all recorded hypoglycemic episodes in these simulations. Assuming 4–6 calibration measurements per day, the nonautomated clinical measurements are reduced from an average of 16 per day to as low as 4. At 2.5 min per glucometer measurement, a daily saving of ∼25–30 min per patient could potentially be achieved. Conclusions This paper has analyzed

  1. Real-time optical pH measurement in a standard microfluidic cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Einar B; Halldorsson, Skarphedinn; Fleming, Ronan M T; Leosson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    The rapid growth of microfluidic cell culturing in biological and biomedical research and industry calls for fast, non-invasive and reliable methods of evaluating conditions such as pH inside a microfluidic system. We show that by careful calibration it is possible to measure pH within microfluidic chambers with high accuracy and precision, using a direct single-pass measurement of light absorption in a commercially available phenol-red-containing cell culture medium. The measurement is carried out using a standard laboratory microscope and, contrary to previously reported methods, requires no modification of the microfluidic device design. We demonstrate the validity of this method by measuring absorption of light transmitted through 30-micrometer thick microfluidic chambers, using an inverted microscope fitted with a scientific-grade digital camera and two bandpass filters. In the pH range of 7-8, our measurements have a standard deviation and absolute error below 0.05 for a measurement volume smaller than 4 nL. PMID:24049695

  2. Radiation curing of epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.; Singh, Ajit

    The literature on radiation polymerization of epoxy compounds has been reviewed to assess the potential use of radiation for curing these industrially important monomers. Chemical curing of epoxies may proceed by either cationic or anionic mechanisms depending on the nature of the curing agent, but most epoxies polymerize by cationic mechanisms under the influence of high-energy radiation. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxy compounds is inhibited by trace quantities of water because of proton transfer from the chain-propagating epoxy cation to water. Several different methods with potential for obtaining high molecular weight polymers by curing epoxies with high-energy radiation have been studied. Polymeric products with epoxy-like properties have been produced by radiation curing of epoxy oligomers with terminal acrylate groups and mixtures of epoxies with vinyl monomers. Both of these types of resin have good potential for industrial-scale curing by radiation treatment.

  3. RTEMIS: Real-time Tumoroid and Environment Monitoring Using Impedance Spectroscopy and pH Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Frank A., Jr.

    This research utilizes Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy, a technique classically used for electrochemical analysis and material characterization, as the basis for a non-destructive, label-free assay platform for three dimensional (3D) cellular spheroids. In this work, a linear array of microelectrodes is optimized to rapidly respond to changes located within a 3D multicellular model. In addition, this technique is coupled with an on chip micro-pH sensor for monitoring the environment around the cells. Finally, the responses of both impedance and pH are correlated with physical changes within the cellular model. The impedance analysis system realized through this work provides a foundation for the development of high-throughput drug screening systems that utilize multiple parallel sensing modalities including pH and impedance sensing in order to quickly assess the efficacy of specific drug candidates. The slow development of new drugs is mainly attributed to poor predictability of current chemosensitivity and resistivity assays, as well as genetic differences between the animal models used for tests and humans. In addition, monolayer cultures used in early experimentation are fundamentally different from the complex structure of organs in vivo. This requires the study of smaller 3D models (spheroids) that more efficiently replicate the conditions within the body. The main objective of this research was to develop a microfluidic system on a chip that is capable of deducing viability and morphology of 3D tumor spheroids by monitoring both the impedance of the cellular model and the pH of their local environment. This would provide a fast and reliable method for screening pharmaceutical compounds in a high-throughput system.

  4. It's time for a change in the way we educate physiology PhD candidates.

    PubMed

    Tallitsch, R B

    1996-12-01

    Graduate students in physiology programs today are faced with a job market that is significantly different from that which many of us faced 25, 10, or even 5 years ago. As a result, physiology educators need to change the content and style of their programs to prepare graduates for their futures. Programs must continue to prepare graduates for research postdoctoral positions, but they also should prepare them for employment at smaller institutions that have higher teaching demands and that encourage, but do not require, research. Changes are suggested in the way PhD candidates are taught and in the way professors mentor students seeking employment at smaller institutions. PMID:8997411

  5. Colon-targeted delivery of budesonide using dual pH- and time-dependent polymeric nanoparticles for colitis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad; Choi, Moonjeong; Cao, Jiafu; Lee, Yujeong; Ikram, Muhammad; Yoon, Sik; Lee, Jaewon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Single pH-dependent drug delivery systems have been widely used for colon-targeted delivery, but their efficiency is often hampered by the variation in gut pH. To overcome the limitation of single pH-dependent delivery systems, in this study, we developed and evaluated the therapeutic potential of budesonide-loaded dual pH/time-dependent nanoparticles (NPs) for the treatment of colitis. Eudragit FS30D was used as a pH-dependent polymer, and Eudragit RS100 as a time-dependent controlled release polymer. Single pH-dependent NPs (pH_NPs), single time-dependent NPs (Time_NPs), and dual pH/time-dependent NPs (pH/Time_NPs) were prepared using the oil-in-water emulsion method. The physicochemical properties and drug release profiles of these NPs in gastrointestinal (GI) tract conditions were investigated. The therapeutic potential and in vivo distribution of the NPs were evaluated in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice model. The pH/Time_NPs prevented a burst drug release in acidic pH conditions and showed sustained release at a colonic pH. The in vivo distribution study in the mice GI tract demonstrated that pH/Time_NPs were more efficiently delivered to the inflamed colon than pH_NPs were. Compared to the single pH_NPs-treated group, the pH/Time_NPs-treated group showed increased body weight and colon length and markedly decreased disease activity index, colon weight/length ratios, histological damage, and inflammatory cell infiltration in colon tissue. Our results demonstrate that the dual pH/time-dependent NPs are an effective oral colon-targeted delivery system for colitis therapy. PMID:26229440

  6. Colon-targeted delivery of budesonide using dual pH- and time-dependent polymeric nanoparticles for colitis therapy.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Muhammad; Choi, Moonjeong; Cao, Jiafu; Lee, Yujeong; Ikram, Muhammad; Yoon, Sik; Lee, Jaewon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Single pH-dependent drug delivery systems have been widely used for colon-targeted delivery, but their efficiency is often hampered by the variation in gut pH. To overcome the limitation of single pH-dependent delivery systems, in this study, we developed and evaluated the therapeutic potential of budesonide-loaded dual pH/time-dependent nanoparticles (NPs) for the treatment of colitis. Eudragit FS30D was used as a pH-dependent polymer, and Eudragit RS100 as a time-dependent controlled release polymer. Single pH-dependent NPs (pH_NPs), single time-dependent NPs (Time_NPs), and dual pH/time-dependent NPs (pH/Time_NPs) were prepared using the oil-in-water emulsion method. The physicochemical properties and drug release profiles of these NPs in gastrointestinal (GI) tract conditions were investigated. The therapeutic potential and in vivo distribution of the NPs were evaluated in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice model. The pH/Time_NPs prevented a burst drug release in acidic pH conditions and showed sustained release at a colonic pH. The in vivo distribution study in the mice GI tract demonstrated that pH/Time_NPs were more efficiently delivered to the inflamed colon than pH_NPs were. Compared to the single pH_NPs-treated group, the pH/Time_NPs-treated group showed increased body weight and colon length and markedly decreased disease activity index, colon weight/length ratios, histological damage, and inflammatory cell infiltration in colon tissue. Our results demonstrate that the dual pH/time-dependent NPs are an effective oral colon-targeted delivery system for colitis therapy. PMID:26229440

  7. Predictors of full-time faculty appointment among MD–PhD program graduates: a national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Andriole, Dorothy A.; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The authors sought to identify variables associated with MD–PhD program graduates’ academic medicine careers. Methods We analyzed data for a national cohort of MD–PhD program graduates from 2000 to 2005, using multivariable logistic regression to identify independent predictors of full-time academic medicine faculty appointment through 2013. Results Of 1,860 MD–PhD program graduates in 2000–2005, we included 1,846 (99.2%) who had completed residency training before 2014. Of these 1,846 graduates, 968 (52.4%) held full-time faculty appointments. Graduates who attended schools with Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) funding (vs. no MSTP funding; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14–1.74) and participated in ≥1 year of research during residency (vs. no documented research year; aOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.50–2.28) were more likely to have held full-time faculty appointments. Asian/Pacific Islander (aOR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60–0.93) and under-represented minority (URM; aOR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48–0.98) graduates (each vs. white graduates), graduates who reported total debt of ≥$100,000 (vs. no debt) at graduation (aOR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.39–0.88), and graduates in surgical practice (aOR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48–0.84) and other practice (aOR, 0.66, 95% CI, 0.54–0.81) specialties (each vs. ‘medicine, pediatrics, pathology, or neurology’) were less likely to have held full-time faculty appointments. Gender was not independently associated with likelihood of full-time faculty appointment. Conclusions Over half of all MD–PhD program graduates in our study had full-time faculty appointments. Our findings regarding variables independently associated with full-time faculty appointments can inform the design of strategies to promote academic medicine career choice among MD–PhD program graduates. Further research is warranted to identify other factors amenable to intervention, in addition to those included in our study

  8. Short communication: The effect of storage conditions over time on bovine colostral immunoglobulin G concentration, bacteria, and pH.

    PubMed

    Cummins, C; Lorenz, I; Kennedy, E

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to measure the effect of storing colostrum in different conditions for varying amounts of time on IgG concentration, bacteria, and pH. In experiment 1, colostrum from 12 Holstein-Friesian cows (6 primiparous and 6 multiparous) was collected within 3h of calving, and colostrum from another 12 multiparous cows was collected within 3h of calving (6 cows) and >9h postpartum (6 cows). Aliquots were refrigerated or stored at room temperature for up to 72h, depending on treatment. In experiment 2, colostrum was collected from 6 multiparous cows within 9h of calving, and aliquots were stored for up to 72h in temperature-controlled units set at 4, 13, and 20°C. All colostrum samples were analyzed for IgG concentration, total bacteria count, and pH after 0, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72h of storage. Storage conditions did not affect the IgG concentration of colostrum. Bacterial growth was most rapid in the first 6h of storage, reducing thereafter, but bacteria multiplied at a significantly greater rate when stored in warmer conditions (i.e., >4°C). The pH of colostrum was not significantly altered when stored at temperatures <13°C, but when stored at 20°C the pH significantly decreased after 24h of storage. Storing colostrum in warmer conditions significantly alters both total bacteria count and pH; consequently, colostrum should be stored at ≤4°C. PMID:26995126

  9. Nonpost mold cure compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiro

    1997-08-01

    The recent low price trend of electronic products has made IC manufacturing efficiency a top priority in the semiconductor industry. Post mold cure (PMC) process, which generally involves heating the packages in the oven at 175 C for 4 to 8 hours, takes up much longer time than most other assembly processes. If this PMC process can be reduced or eliminated, semiconductor makers will be rewarded with a much higher cost merit. We define the purpose of Non-PMC as 'to get high reliability with suitable physical and electrical properties without PMC'. We compared carious properties of molding compound before and after PMC. We found that curing reaction has almost complete through DSC and C-NMR measurement, but several properties have not stabilized yet, and that not all properties after PMC were better than before PMC. We developed new grade of molding compound considering these facts. And we found that main factors to accomplish non-PMC compound are curability and flowability, and more, increasing of fundamental properties. To accomplish non-PMC, at first, molding compound need to have very high curability. Generally speaking, too high curability causes low flowability, and causes incomplete filing, wire sweep, pad shift, and weak adhesion to inner parts of IC packages. To prevent these failures, various compound properties were studied, and we achieved in adding good flowability to very high curable molding compound. Finally, anti-popcorn property was improved by adding low moisture, high adhesion, high Tg, and high flexural strengths at high temperature. Through this study, we developed new compound grade for various package, especially large QFP using standard ECN resin.

  10. Dry-cured ham restructured with fibrin.

    PubMed

    Romero de Ávila, M D; Hoz, L; Ordóñez, J A; Cambero, M I

    2014-09-15

    The viability of a fibrinogen-thrombin system (FT) to bind fresh deboned hams for incorporation in the salting and ripening processes, to produce cured ham, was studied. The effects of the different processing variables (pH, NaCl concentration, temperature and gelation time) on FT, a meat emulsion mixed with FT, fresh pork portions and deboned hams restructured with FT were analyzed. The most stable and firmest fibrin gels were obtained after 6h of adding the FT, with less than 2% NaCl and pH 7-8.4. Scanning electron microscopy of the fibrin gel showed fibrillar structures with a high degree of cross-linking and a high density. Two structures were found in the binding area of restructured meat; one in the central part with similar characteristics to fibrin gels and, another in the area of contact between the meat surfaces, where a filamentous structure connected the fibrin gels with the muscle bundles. PMID:24767091

  11. Cationic cure kinetics of a polyoxometalate loaded epoxy nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.

    2012-08-06

    The reaction cure kinetics of a novel polyoxometalate (POM) loaded epoxy nanocomposite is described. The POM is dispersed in the epoxy resin up to volume fractions of 0.1. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements show the cure of the epoxy resin to be sensitive to the POM loading. A kinetics study of the cure exotherm confirms that POM acts as a catalyst promoting cationic homopolymerization of the epoxy resin. The cure reaction is shown to propagate through two cure regimes. A fast cure at short time is shown to be propagation by the activated chain end (ACE) mechanism. A slow cure at long time is shown to be propagation by the activated monomer (AM) mechanism. The activation energies for the fast and slow cure regimes agree well with other epoxy based systems that have been confirmed to propagate by the ACE and AM mechanisms.

  12. Improved cure method for single component silicone rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippitt, M. W.

    1969-01-01

    Water is incorporated in a carrier and then thoroughly mixed with the single component silicone rubber containing acetic anhydride as a curing agent. Because curing occurs with the water supplied internally, controlled curing is possible within a reasonable period of time, regardless of the thickness of the material.

  13. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C. J.; Howell, Dave; Norris, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  14. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Effect of light-cure initiation time on polymerization and orthodontic bond strength with a resin-modified glass-ionomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jess

    Introduction: The polymerization and acid-base reactions in resin-modified glass-ionomers (RMGI) are thought to compete with and inhibit one another. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of visible light-cure (VLC) delay on the polymerization efficiency and orthodontic bond strength of a dual-cured RMGI. Methods: An RMGI light-cured immediately, 2.5, 5, or 10 minutes after mixing comprised the experimental groups. Isothermal and dynamic temperature scan differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of the RMGI was performed to determine extents of VLC polymerization and acid-base reaction exotherms. Human premolars (n = 18/group) were bonded with the RMGI. Shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were determined. Results: DSC results showed the 10 minute delay RMGI group experienced significantly (P <0.05) lower VLC polymerization compared to the other groups. Acid-base reaction exotherms were undetected in all groups except the 10 minute delay group. No significant differences (P >0.05) were noted among the groups for mean shear bond strength. A chi-square test showed no significant difference (P = 0.428) in ARI scores between groups. Conclusions: Delay in light-curing may reduce polymerization efficiency and alter the structure of the RMGI, but orthodontic shear bond strength does not appear to be compromised.

  16. A cure for dyslexia?

    PubMed

    2007-02-01

    A company is promoting behavioral exercises as a cure for dyslexia. Scientists worry that evaluation of the program is compromised by design flaws and conflicts of interest and that responses to critics restrict academic freedom. PMID:17259957

  17. Temporal Adjustment in Academic Labor Markets: Time to Ph.D. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuh, Charlotte V.

    A research project is described that concerns "temporal adjustment" as one form of a non-wage adjustment in the academic labor market. Receipt of the doctorate, the number and length of post-doctoral fellowships, and the achievement of tenure are temporal factors in academic careers. The change in timing of these factors is a form of adjustment to…

  18. Real time identification of large space structures. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, Janice E.

    1987-01-01

    Identification of frequencies, damping ratios, and mode shapes of large space structures (LSSs) are examined in real time. Real time processing allows for quick updates of model processing after a reconfiguration of structural failure. Recursive lattice least squares (RLLS) was selected as the baseline algorithm for the identification. Simulation results on a one dimensional LSS demonstrated that it provides good estimates, was not ill-conditioned in the presence of under-excited modes, allowed activity by a supervisory control system which prevented damage to the LSS or excessive drift, and was capable of real-time processing for typical LSS models. A suboptimal version of RLLS, which is equivalent to simulated parallel processing, was derived. A NASTRAN model of the dual keel U.S. space station was used to demonstrate the input/identification algorithm package in a more realistic simulation. Because the first eight flexible modes were very close together, the identification was much more difficult than in the simple examples. Even so, the model was accurately identified in real time.

  19. Real-time intravital imaging of pH variation associated with osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroki; Kowada, Toshiyuki; Kikuta, Junichi; Furuya, Masayuki; Shirazaki, Mai; Mizukami, Shin; Ishii, Masaru; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    Intravital imaging by two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) has been widely used to visualize cell functions. However, small molecular probes (SMPs), commonly used for cell imaging, cannot be simply applied to intravital imaging because of the challenge of delivering them into target tissues, as well as their undesirable physicochemical properties for TPEM imaging. Here, we designed and developed a functional SMP with an active-targeting moiety, higher photostability, and a fluorescence switch and then imaged target cell activity by injecting the SMP into living mice. The combination of the rationally designed SMP with a fluorescent protein as a reporter of cell localization enabled quantitation of osteoclast activity and time-lapse imaging of its in vivo function associated with changes in cell deformation and membrane fluctuations. Real-time imaging revealed heterogenic behaviors of osteoclasts in vivo and provided insights into the mechanism of bone resorption. PMID:27272564

  20. Stability and Relative Stability of Linear Systems with Many Constant Time Delays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Larry Keith

    1976-01-01

    A method of determining the stability of linear systems with many constant time delays is developed. This technique, an extension of the tau-decomposition method, is used to examine not only the stability but also the relative stability of retarded systems with many delays and a class of neutral equations with one delay. Analytical equations are derived for partitioning the delay space of a retarded system with two time delays. The stability of the system in each of the regions defined by the partitioning curves in the parameter plane is determined using the extended tau-decomposition method. In addition, relative stability boundaries are defined using the extended tau-decompositon method in association with parameter plane techniques. Several applications of the extended tau-decomposition method are presented and compared with stability results obtained from other analyses. In all cases the results obtained using the method outlined herein coincide with and extend those of previous investigations. The extended tau-decomposition method applied to systems with time delays requires less computational effort and yields more complete stability analyses than previous techniques.

  1. Time-dependent pH sensing phenomena using CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in EIS structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent pH sensing phenomena of the core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) sensors in EIS (electrolyte insulator semiconductor) structure have been investigated for the first time. The quantum dots are immobilized by chaperonin GroEL protein, which are observed by both atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. The diameter of one QD is approximately 6.5 nm. The QDs are not oxidized over a long time and core-shell CdSe/ZnS are confirmed by X-ray photon spectroscopy. The sensors are studied for sensing of hydrogen ions concentration in different buffer solutions at broad pH range of 2 to 12. The QD sensors show improved sensitivity (38 to 55 mV/pH) as compared to bare SiO2 sensor (36 to 23 mV/pH) with time period of 0 to 24 months, owing to the reduction of defects in the QDs. Therefore, the differential sensitivity of the QD sensors with respect to the bare SiO2 sensors is improved from 2 to 32 mV/pH for the time period of 0 to 24 months. After 24 months, the sensitivity of the QD sensors is close to ideal Nernstian response with good linearity of 99.96%. Stability and repeatability of the QD sensors show low drift (10 mV for 10 cycles) as well as small hysteresis characteristics (<10 mV). This QD sensor is very useful for future human disease diagnostics. PMID:24725352

  2. Time dependent deformation and stress in the lithosphere. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, M.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient computer programs incorporating frontal solution and time stepping procedure were developed for the modelling of geodynamic problems. This scheme allows for investigating the quasi static phenomena including the effects of the rheological structure of a tectonically active region. From three dimensional models of strike slip earthquakes, it was found that lateral variation of viscosity affects the characteristics of surface deformations. The vertical deformation is especially informative about the viscosity structure in a strike slip fault zone. A three dimensional viscoelastic model of a thrust earthquake indicated that the transient disturbance on plate velocity due to a great plate boundary earthquake is significant at intermediate distances, but becomes barely measurable 1000 km away from the source.

  3. Rate and time dependent behavior of structural adhesives. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on two adhesives (Metlbond 1113 and 1113-2) identified as having applications in the bonding of composite materials are presented. Constitutive equations capable of describing changes in material behavior with strain rate are derived from various theoretical approaches. It is shown that certain unique relationships exist between these approaches. It is also shown that the constitutive equation derived from mechanical models can be used for creep and relaxation loading. A creep to failure phenomenon is shown to exist and is correlated with a delayed yield equation proposed by Crochet. Loading-unloading results are presented and are shown to correlate well with the proposed form of the loading-unloading equations for the modified Bingham model. Experimental results obtained for relaxation tests above and below the glass transition temperature are presented. It is shown that the adhesives obey the time-temperature superposition principle.

  4. Psychophysical Models for Signal Detection with Time Varying Uncertainty. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gai, E.

    1975-01-01

    Psychophysical models for the behavior of the human operator in detection tasks which include change in detectability, correlation between observations and deferred decisions are developed. Classical Signal Detection Theory (SDT) is discussed and its emphasis on the sensory processes is contrasted to decision strategies. The analysis of decision strategies utilizes detection tasks with time varying signal strength. The classical theory is modified to include such tasks and several optimal decision strategies are explored. Two methods of classifying strategies are suggested. The first method is similar to the analysis of ROC curves, while the second is based on the relation between the criterion level (CL) and the detectability. Experiments to verify the analysis of tasks with changes of signal strength are designed. The results show that subjects are aware of changes in detectability and tend to use strategies that involve changes in the CL's.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of colon-specific pH and time-dependent flurbiprofen tablets.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar; Veerareddy, Prabhakar Reddy; Devadasu, Venkat Ratnam

    2015-09-01

    Present research deals with the development of compression-coated flurbiprofen colon-targeted tablets to retard the drug release in the upper gastro intestinal system, but progressively release the drug in the colon. Flurbiprofen core tablets were prepared by direct compression method and were compression coated using sodium alginate and Eudragit S100. The formulation is optimized based on the in vitro drug release study and further evaluated by X-ray imaging and pharmacokinetic studies in healthy humans for colonic delivery. The optimized formulation showed negligible drug release (4.33 ± 0.06 %) in the initial lag period followed by progressive release (100.78 ± 0.64 %) for 24 h. The X-ray imaging in human volunteers showed that the tablets reached the colon without disintegrating in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The C max of colon-targeted tablets was 12,374.67 ng/ml at T max 10 h, where as in case of immediate release tablets the C max was 15,677.52 ng/ml at T max 3 h, that signifies the ability of compression-coated tablets to target the colon. Development of compression-coated tablets using combination of time-dependent and pH-sensitive approaches was suitable to target the flurbiprofen to colon. PMID:24916715

  6. What Cure Models Can Teach us About Genome-Wide Survival Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Sven; Denys, Damiaan; Kahn, René S; Derks, Eske M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of logistic regression is to estimate genetic effects on disease risk, while survival analysis aims to determine effects on age of onset. In practice, genetic variants may affect both types of outcomes. A cure survival model analyzes logistic and survival effects simultaneously. The aim of this simulation study is to assess the performance of logistic regression and traditional survival analysis under a cure model and to investigate the benefits of cure survival analysis. We simulated data under a cure model and varied the percentage of subjects at risk for disease (cure fraction), the logistic and survival effect sizes, and the contribution of genetic background risk factors. We then computed the error rates and estimation bias of logistic, Cox proportional hazards (PH), and cure PH analysis, respectively. The power of logistic and Cox PH analysis is sensitive to the cure fraction and background heritability. Our results show that traditional Cox PH analysis may erroneously detect age of onset effects if no such effects are present in the data. In the presence of genetic background risk even the cure model results in biased estimates of both the odds ratio and the hazard ratio. Cure survival analysis takes cure fractions into account and can be used to simultaneously estimate the effect of genetic variants on disease risk and age of onset. Since genome-wide cure survival analysis is not computationally feasible, we recommend this analysis for genetic variants that are significant in a traditional survival analysis. PMID:26552795

  7. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, L.W.

    1993-05-18

    The composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  8. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, Leo W.

    1993-01-01

    A composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  9. Tracking Polymer Cure Via Embedded Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, David L.; Davidson, T. Fred

    1993-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy applied in interior of specimen of material by bringing infrared light through specimen in optical fiber. Light interacts with material via evanescent-wave effect. Spectra obtained in this way at various times during curing process also combined with data from ultrasonic, thermographic, and dielectric-impedance monitoring, and other measurement techniques to obtain more complete characterization of progress of curing process.

  10. Development of a downhole tool measuring real-time concentration of ionic tracers and pH in geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Ryan F.; Boyle, Timothy J.; Limmer, Steven; Yelton, William G.; Bingham, Samuel; Stillman, Greg; Lindblom, Scott; Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    For enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) geothermal brine is pumped to the surface via the production wells, the heat extracted to turn a turbine to generate electricity, and the spent brine re-injected via injection wells back underground. If designed properly, the subsurface rock formations will lead this water back to the extraction well as heated brine. Proper monitoring of these geothermal reservoirs is essential for developing and maintaining the necessary level of productivity of the field. Chemical tracers are commonly used to characterize the fracture network and determine the connectivity between the injection and production wells. Currently, most tracer experiments involve injecting the tracer at the injection well, manually collecting liquid samples at the wellhead of the production well, and sending the samples off for laboratory analysis. While this method provides accurate tracer concentration data at very low levels of detection, it does not provide information regarding the location of the fractures which were conducting the tracer between wellbores. Sandia is developing a high-temperature electrochemical sensor capable of measuring tracer concentrations and pH downhole on a wireline tool. The goal of this effort is to collect real-time pH and ionic tracer concentration data at temperatures up to 225 °C and pressures up to 3000 psi. In this paper, a prototype electrochemical sensor and the initial data obtained will be presented detailing the measurement of iodide tracer concentrations at high temperature and pressure in a newly developed laboratory scale autoclave.

  11. Mapping the pharyngeal and intestinal pH of Caenorhabditis elegans and real-time luminal pH oscillations using extended dynamic range pH-sensitive nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Veeren M; Orsi, Gianni; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2013-06-25

    Extended dynamic range pH-sensitive ratiometric nanosensors, capable of accurately mapping the full physiological pH range, have been developed and used to characterize the pH of the pharyngeal and intestinal lumen of Caenorhabditis elegans in real-time. Nanosensors, 40 nm in diameter, were prepared by conjugating pH-sensitive fluorophores, carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and Oregon Green (OG) in a 1:1 ratio, and a reference fluorophore, 5-(and-6)-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) to an inert polyacrylamide matrix. Accurate ratiometric pH measurements were calculated through determination of the fluorescence ratio between the pH-sensitive and reference fluorophores. Nanosensors were calibrated with an automated image analysis system and validated to demonstrate a pH measurement resolution of ±0.17 pH units. The motility of C. elegans populations, as an indicator for viability, showed nematodes treated with nanosensors, for concentrations ranging from 50.00 to 3.13 mg/mL, were not statistically different to nematodes not challenged with nanosensors up to a period of 4 days (p < 0.05). The nanosensors were also found to remain in the C. elegans lumen >24 h after nanosensor challenge was removed. The pH of viable C. elegans lumen was found to range from 5.96 ± 0.31 in the anterior pharynx to 3.59 ± 0.09 in the posterior intestine. The pharyngeal pumping rate, which dictates the transfer of ingested material from the pharynx to the intestine, was found to be temperature dependent. Imaging C. elegans at 4 °C reduced the pharyngeal pumping rate to 7 contractions/min and enabled the reconstruction of rhythmic pH oscillations in the intestinal lumen in real-time with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:23668893

  12. Radiation curing: Science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The science and technology of radiation curing have progressed substantially within the last 20 years. Nevertheless, radiation-curable compositions typically command relatively small shares in many of their competitive markets. This situation signifies that potential advantages of radiation curing are not generally perceived to overcome their limitations. An important objective of this book is to address this issue, within the scope of the subjects offered, by providing the present state of knowledge and by identifying the directions and challenges for future studies. The first chapter introduces radiation curing. Chapter 2 offers the first systematic presentation of inorganic and organometallic photoinitiators. Chapters 3 and 4 present the analytical techniques of photocalorimetry and real-time infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Recent advances in resin technology are offered in Chapters 5 and 6, which constitute the first comprehensive accounts of (meth)acrylated silicones and vinyl ethers, respectively. Radiation-curable coatings, printing inks, and adhesives are discussed in Chapters 7-9, respectively. Chapter 10 offers a discussion on photopolymer imaging systems.

  13. Reflection-mode micro-spherical fiber-optic probes for in vitro real-time and single-cell level pH sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Hanzheng; Lan, Xinwei; Cheng, Baokai; Chen, Sisi; Shi, Honglan; Xiao, Hai; Ma, Yinfa

    2014-01-01

    pH sensing at the single-cell level without negatively affecting living cells is very important but still a remaining issue in the biomedical studies. A 70 μm reflection-mode fiber-optic micro-pH sensor was designed and fabricated by dip-coating thin layer of organically modified aerogel onto a tapered spherical probe head. A pH sensitive fluorescent dye 2′, 7′-Bis (2-carbonylethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) was employed and covalently bonded within the aerogel networks. By tuning the alkoxide mixing ratio and adjusting hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) priming procedure, the sensor can be optimized to have high stability and pH sensing ability. The in vitro real-time sensing capability was then demonstrated in a simple spectroscopic way, and showed linear measurement responses with a pH resolution up to an average of 0.049 pH unit within a narrow, but biological meaningful pH range of 6.12–7.81. Its novel characterizations of high spatial resolution, reflection mode operation, fast response and high stability, great linear response within biological meaningful pH range and high pH resolutions, make this novel pH probe a very cost-effective tool for chemical/biological sensing, especially within the single cell level research field. PMID:25530670

  14. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  15. Alternative Approach To Modeling Bacterial Lag Time, Using Logistic Regression as a Function of Time, Temperature, pH, and Sodium Chloride Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Junko

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a probabilistic model to predict the end of lag time (λ) during the growth of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells as a function of temperature, pH, and salt concentration using logistic regression. The developed λ model was subsequently combined with a logistic differential equation to simulate bacterial numbers over time. To develop a novel model for λ, we determined whether bacterial growth had begun, i.e., whether λ had ended, at each time point during the growth kinetics. The growth of B. cereus was evaluated by optical density (OD) measurements in culture media for various pHs (5.5 ∼ 7.0) and salt concentrations (0.5 ∼ 2.0%) at static temperatures (10 ∼ 20°C). The probability of the end of λ was modeled using dichotomous judgments obtained at each OD measurement point concerning whether a significant increase had been observed. The probability of the end of λ was described as a function of time, temperature, pH, and salt concentration and showed a high goodness of fit. The λ model was validated with independent data sets of B. cereus growth in culture media and foods, indicating acceptable performance. Furthermore, the λ model, in combination with a logistic differential equation, enabled a simulation of the population of B. cereus in various foods over time at static and/or fluctuating temperatures with high accuracy. Thus, this newly developed modeling procedure enables the description of λ using observable environmental parameters without any conceptual assumptions and the simulation of bacterial numbers over time with the use of a logistic differential equation. PMID:22729541

  16. Alternative approach to modeling bacterial lag time, using logistic regression as a function of time, temperature, pH, and sodium chloride concentration.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shige; Nonaka, Junko

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a probabilistic model to predict the end of lag time (λ) during the growth of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells as a function of temperature, pH, and salt concentration using logistic regression. The developed λ model was subsequently combined with a logistic differential equation to simulate bacterial numbers over time. To develop a novel model for λ, we determined whether bacterial growth had begun, i.e., whether λ had ended, at each time point during the growth kinetics. The growth of B. cereus was evaluated by optical density (OD) measurements in culture media for various pHs (5.5 ∼ 7.0) and salt concentrations (0.5 ∼ 2.0%) at static temperatures (10 ∼ 20°C). The probability of the end of λ was modeled using dichotomous judgments obtained at each OD measurement point concerning whether a significant increase had been observed. The probability of the end of λ was described as a function of time, temperature, pH, and salt concentration and showed a high goodness of fit. The λ model was validated with independent data sets of B. cereus growth in culture media and foods, indicating acceptable performance. Furthermore, the λ model, in combination with a logistic differential equation, enabled a simulation of the population of B. cereus in various foods over time at static and/or fluctuating temperatures with high accuracy. Thus, this newly developed modeling procedure enables the description of λ using observable environmental parameters without any conceptual assumptions and the simulation of bacterial numbers over time with the use of a logistic differential equation. PMID:22729541

  17. Curing Children's Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALL is a cancer of the white blood cells, which fight infection. It is the most common cancer in children, representing 23 percent of all cancers among those 15 or younger. Forty years ago, ALL was incurable. Today, in the United States, its cure rate is a major success story—as many ...

  18. New advanced shotcrete admixtures: Internal curing

    SciTech Connect

    Melbye, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    Tunnels and other underground construction projects have one of the worst curing conditions due to the ventilation that blows continuously dry (cold or hot) air into the tunnel. It can be compared with concrete exposed to a windy area. One would think that tunnels have ideal curing conditions with high humidity (water leakage), no wind and no sun exposure. However, this is not the case. MBT has developed a new system for more efficient and secure curing of wet shotcrete, repair mortars as well as concrete. Internal curing means that a special admixture is added to the concrete/mortar during batching as a normal admixture. This admixture produces an internal barrier in the shotcrete/concrete which secures safer hydration and better chemical resistance than the application of conventional curing agents. The benefits resulting from the new technology are impressive: The time consuming application and, in the case of various shotcrete layers, removal of curing agents are no longer necessary; curing is guaranteed from the very beginning of hydration; and there is no negative influence on bonding between layers. As a consequence of th is optimum curing effect, all other shotcrete characteristics are improved: density, final strengths, freeze/thaw and chemical resistances, watertightness, less cracking and shrinkage. In addition, MEYCO TCC 735 also improves pumpability and workability of shotcrete, even with low-grade aggregates. It particularly improves the pumpability of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete mixes. In combination with the MEYCO TCC system it contrives to even increase the beneficial effects of the slump killing system by further improving fiber orientation, reducing fiber rebound and thus raising toughness values.

  19. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  20. An ultrasensitive method of real time pH monitoring with complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-02-01

    CMOS sensors are becoming a powerful tool in the biological and chemical field. In this work, we introduce a new approach on quantifying various pH solutions with a CMOS image sensor. The CMOS image sensor based pH measurement produces high-accuracy analysis, making it a truly portable and user friendly system. pH indicator blended hydrogel matrix was fabricated as a thin film to the accurate color development. A distinct color change of red, green and blue (RGB) develops in the hydrogel film by applying various pH solutions (pH 1-14). The semi-quantitative pH evolution was acquired by visual read out. Further, CMOS image sensor absorbs the RGB color intensity of the film and hue value converted into digital numbers with the aid of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to determine the pH ranges of solutions. Chromaticity diagram and Euclidean distance represent the RGB color space and differentiation of pH ranges, respectively. This technique is applicable to sense the various toxic chemicals and chemical vapors by situ sensing. Ultimately, the entire approach can be integrated into smartphone and operable with the user friendly manner. PMID:25597802

  1. Argon Ion Laser Polymerized Acrylic Resin: A Comparative Analysis of Mechanical Properties of Laser Cured, Light Cured and Heat Cured Denture Base Resins

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dentistry in general and prosthodontics in particular is evolving at greater pace, but the denture base resins poly methyl methacrylate. There has been vast development in modifying chemically and the polymerization techniques for better manipulation and enhancement of mechanical properties. One such invention was introduction of visible light cure (VLC) denture base resin. Argon ion lasers have been used extensively in dentistry, studies has shown that it can polymerize restorative composite resins. Since composite resin and VLC resin share the same photo initiator, Argon laser is tested as activator for polymerizing VLC resin. In the Phase 1 study, the VLC resin was evaluated for exposure time for optimum polymerization using argon ion laser and in Phase 2; flexural strength, impact strength, surface hardness and surface characteristics of laser cured resin was compared with light cure and conventional heat cure resin. Materials and Methods: Phase 1; In compliance with American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 12, 80 samples were prepared with 10 each for different curing time using argon laser and evaluated for flexural strength on three point bend test. Results were compared to established performance requirement specified. Phase 2, 10 specimen for each of the mechanical properties (30 specimen) were polymerized using laser, visible light and heat and compared. Surface and fractured surface of laser, light and heat cured resins were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: In Phase 1, the specimen cured for 7, 8, 9 and 10 min fulfilled ADA requirement. 8 min was taken as suitable curing time for laser curing. Phase 2 the values of mechanical properties were computed and subjected to statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test. The means of three independent groups showed significant differences between any two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Triad VLC resin can be polymerized by argon ion laser with

  2. The Effect of pH and Time on the Extractability and Speciation of Uranium(VI) Sorbed to SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Wang, Zheming; Boily, Jean F.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M.; Smith, Steven C.

    2012-05-22

    The effect of pH and contact time on uranium extractability from quartz surfaces was investigated using either acidic or carbonate (CARB) extraction solutions, time-delayed spikes of different U isotopes (i.e., 238U and 233U), and liquid helium temperature time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LHeT TRLFS). Quartz powders were reacted with 238U(VI) bearing solutions that were equilibrated with atmospheric CO2 at pH 6, 7, and 8. After a 42 day equilibration period with 238U(VI), the suspensions were spiked with 233U(VI) and reacted for an additional 7 days. Sorbed U was then extracted with either dilute nitric acid or CARB. For the CARB extraction there was a systematic decrease in extraction efficiency for both isotopes from pH 6 to 8. This was mimicked by less desorption of 238U, after the 233U spike, from pH 6 to 8. Further, the efficiency of 233U extraction was consistently greater than that of 238U, indicating a strong temporal component to the strength of U association with the surface that was accentuated with increasing pH. LHeT TRLFS revealed a strong correlation between carbonate extraction efficiency and differences in sorbed U speciation as a function of pH. In contrast, the acid extraction was consistently more efficient than the CARB extraction, with a smaller dependence on both pH and aging time. Collectively, the observations show that aging and pH are critical factors in determining the form and strength of uranium-silica interactions.

  3. Process for curing bismaleimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A. (Inventor); OTHY S.imides alone. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to vinyl pyridine group containing compounds and oligomers, their advantageous copolymerization with bismaleimide resins, and the formation of reinforced composites based on these copolymers. When vinyl pyridines including vinyl stilbazole materials and vinyl styrylpyridine oligomer materials are admixed with bismaleimides and cured to form copolymers the cure temperatures of the copolymers are substantially below the cure temperatures of the bismaleimides alone.

  4. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  5. Effect of adhesive hydrophilicity and curing-time on the permeability of resins bonded to water vs. ethanol-saturated acid-etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Cadenaro, Milena; Breschi, Lorenzo; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Agee, Kelli; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Carrilho, Marcela; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the ability of five comonomer blends (R1-R5) of methacrylate-based experimental dental adhesives solvated with 10 mass% ethanol, at reducing the permeability of acid-etched dentin. The resins were light-cured for 20, 40 or 60 s. The acid-etched dentin was saturated with water or 100% ethanol. Method Human unerupted third molars were converted into crown segments by removing the occlusal enamel and roots. The resulting crown segments were attached to plastic plates connected to a fluid-filled system for quantifying fluid flow across smear layer-covered dentin, acid-etched dentin and resin-bonded dentin. The degree of conversion of the resins was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Result Application of the most hydrophobic comonomer blend (R1) to water-saturated dentin produced the smallest reductions in dentin permeability (31.9, 44.1 and 61.1% after light-curing for 20, 40 or 60 s respectively). Application of the same blend to ethanol-saturated dentin reduced permeability of 74.1, 78.4 and 81.2%, respectively (p<0.05). Although more hydrophilic resins produced larger reductions in permeability, the same trend of significantly greater reductions in ethanol-saturated dentin over that of water-saturated dentin remained. This result can be explained by the higher solubility of resins in ethanol vs. water. Significance The largest reductions in permeability produced by resins were equivalent but not superior, to those produced by smear layers. Resin sealing of dentin remains a technique-sensitive step in bonding etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin. PMID:18571228

  6. Interaction of quinine sulfate with anionic micelles of sodium dodecylsulfate: A time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy at different pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D.

    2015-09-01

    Photophysical behavior and rotational relaxation dynamics of quinine sulfate (QS) in anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) at different pH have been studied using steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It has been observed that the cationic form of quinine sulfate (at pH 2) forms a fluorescent ion pair complex with the surfactant molecules at lower concentrations of surfactant. However, for higher concentrations of SDS, the probe molecules bind strongly with the micelles and reside at the water-micelle interface. At pH 7, QS is singly protonated in bulk aqueous solution. At lower concentrations of SDS aggregation between probe and surfactant molecules has been observed. However, for higher concentrations of SDS, an additional fluorescence peak corresponding to dicationic form of QS appears and this has been attributed to double protonation of the QS molecule in micellar solution. At pH 7, in the presence of SDS micelles, the photophysical properties of QS showed substantial changes compared to that in the bulk water solution. At pH 12, an increase in fluorescence intensity and lifetime has been observed and this has been attributed to the increase in radiative rate due to the incorporation of QS at the micelle-water interface. The local pH at micellar surface has been found different from the pH of bulk solution.

  7. Interaction of quinine sulfate with anionic micelles of sodium dodecylsulfate: A time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy at different pH.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D

    2015-09-01

    Photophysical behavior and rotational relaxation dynamics of quinine sulfate (QS) in anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) at different pH have been studied using steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It has been observed that the cationic form of quinine sulfate (at pH 2) forms a fluorescent ion pair complex with the surfactant molecules at lower concentrations of surfactant. However, for higher concentrations of SDS, the probe molecules bind strongly with the micelles and reside at the water-micelle interface. At pH 7, QS is singly protonated in bulk aqueous solution. At lower concentrations of SDS aggregation between probe and surfactant molecules has been observed. However, for higher concentrations of SDS, an additional fluorescence peak corresponding to dicationic form of QS appears and this has been attributed to double protonation of the QS molecule in micellar solution. At pH 7, in the presence of SDS micelles, the photophysical properties of QS showed substantial changes compared to that in the bulk water solution. At pH 12, an increase in fluorescence intensity and lifetime has been observed and this has been attributed to the increase in radiative rate due to the incorporation of QS at the micelle-water interface. The local pH at micellar surface has been found different from the pH of bulk solution. PMID:25863459

  8. Influence of potential, chlorides, pH, and precharging time on embrittlement of cathodically polarized prestressing steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hartt, W.H.; Kumria, C.C. ); Kessler, R.J. )

    1993-05-01

    Corrosion of prestressing steel in concrete has become a major technological problem in highways, buildings, and pipeline structures. While cathodic protection is recognized as an appropriate technique to mitigate corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete, the possibility of environmental cracking (hydrogen embrittlement) in the case of prestressing tendon has limited application to this usage. To establish the appropriateness of cathodic protection for prestressing steel, constant extension rate testing was performed on smooth and notched wire specimens in deaerated Ca(OH)[sub 2] solutions as a function of potential, [Cl-], pH, and precharging time. Results indicated potential is the most important of these variables, and a threshold value of [minus]0.90 V[sub SCE] was identified below which embrittlement is enhanced. Notched specimens, which may best simulate the geometry of corroded tendon, particularly were susceptible when compared to smooth tendon. Failure of some tendons in this condition could occur upon application of cathodic protection, even when potential is positive to [minus]0.90 V[sub SCE]. Other aspects of cathodic protection utility for prestressed concrete are reviewed.

  9. A comparison of ultraviolet-curing and self-curing polymers in preventive, restorative and orthodontic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Orlowski, J A; Rogers, B J

    1976-06-01

    Both self-cured and UV-cured resin-base dental materials are used in preventive, restorative, and orthodontic dentistry. Polymerization is initiated in both systems by free radicals. Self-curing materials generate free radicals by means of chemical compounds included in their formulation. UV-curing systems rely upon externally-supplied, long wavelength, ultraviolet radiation to produce free radicals within the material. Therefore, although the major chemical components of both systems are similar in many respects, each system has particular advantages and disadvantages over the other, which must be recognized by the practitioner. Substantial differences exist, for example, in the color stability of these two types of materials, because of the fact that the UV-cured system cannot include UV absorbers, which protect the self-cured systems from discoloration after exposure to sunlight. UV-cured systems require a limitation on the maximum depth of filled restorative that can be cured at one time, since the filler particles attenuate UV radiation. The limit-layer is generally established as 1-1-5 mm maximum thickness. Therefore, UV-cured filled systems are more time-consuming in restorations of deeper cavities. This liability is also in evidence as it affects the degree of polymerization of UV-cured filled systems. The uncertainty of complete polymerization is apparently responsible for highly erratic compressive strength data found with UV-cured restoratives. Normally, the amount of unpolymerized monomer is much less predictable in UV-cured systems, over that which is obtained in self-cured materials. The presence of a larger fraction of unpolymerized monomer creates a greater potential for pulpal injury from UV-cured restorative materials. The catalyst used in several UV-cured systems is benzoin methyl ether, a compound of rather high toxicity (LD50:300 mg/kg). The safety of using UV radiation in the vicinity of oral mucosa has not been firmly established. The design

  10. Characterization of the relationship of the cure cycle chemistry to cure cycle processing properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic dielectric analysis (DDA) is used to study curing polymer systems and thermoplastics. Measurements are made over a frequency range of six decades. This wide range of frequencies increases the amount of information which can be obtained. The data is analyzed in terms of the frequency dependence of the complex permittivity epsilon sup *, specific conductivity sigma (ohm/cm) and the relaxation time tau, parameters which are characteristic of the cure state of the material and independent of the size of the sample.

  11. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. PMID:26686485

  12. Extracellular amylases of starch-fermenting yeast: pH effect on export and residence time in the periplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, G.B.; Levy-Rick, S.R.; Nasim, A.; Lusena, C.V.

    1987-01-01

    Aerobic cultures of S. alluvius in Wickerham's yeast-nitrogen-base medium with starch as sole carbon source become strongly acidic and contain no detectable extra-cellular amylolytic activity during stationary phase, when the activity in buffered cultures is maximal. The extracellular amylases are irreversibly inactivated at the low pH value (less than 3.5) attained by the cultures. When adequately buffered, the medium yields maximal extracellular amylolytic activity. About 0.2 M phosphate buffer is adequate for substrate concentrations of up to 0.5% starch; higher starch concentrations require more buffer. Unbuffered cultures that are adjusted once with alkali to pH 5.5 also allow maximal extracellular amylolytic activity, provided the adjustment is made prior to the end of exponential growth. Automatic pH control allows use of high starch concentrations of up to 4%. Export is optimal at pH values higher than the optima for enzyme activity and stability and for population growth. The need for pH adjustment prior to the appearance of amylolytic activity in the medium suggests pH dependence of the export process itself and/or acid inactivation of enzymes transiently resident in the periplasm. (Refs. 23).

  13. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence of ribonuclease T1. A pH and substrate analogue binding study.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L X; Longworth, J W; Fleming, G R

    1987-01-01

    The tryptophyl fluorescence of ribonuclease T1 decays monoexponentially at pH 5.5, tau = 4.04 ns but on increasing pH, a second short-lived component of 1.5 ns appears with a midpoint between pH 6.5 and 7.0. Both components have the same fluorescence spectrum. Acrylamide quenches both fluorescence components, and the short-lived component is quenched fivefold faster than the predominant long component. Binding of the substrate analogue 2'-guanylic acid at pH 5.5 quenches the fluorescence by 20% and introduces a second decay component, tau = 1.16 ns. Acrylamide quenches both tryptophyl decay components, with similar quenching rates. The fluorescence anisotropy decay of ribonuclease T1 was consistent with a molecule the size of ribonuclease T1 surrounded by a single layer of water at pH 7.4, even though the anisotropy decay at pH 5.5 deviated from Stokes-Einstein behavior. The fluorescence data were interpreted with a model where the tryptophyl residue exists in two conformations, remaining in a hydrophobic pocket. The acrylamide quenching is interpreted with electron transfer theory and suggests that one conformer has the nearest atom approximately 3 A from the protein surface, and the other, approximately 2 A. PMID:3038204

  14. Time esophageal pH < 4 overestimates the prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Lauren B; Triadafilopoulos, George; Sahbaie, Peyman; Young, Winston; Sloan, Sheldon; Robinson, Malcolm; Miner, Philip B; Gardner, Jerry D

    2008-01-01

    Background A Stanford University study reported that in asymptomatic GERD patients who were being treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), 50% had pathologic esophageal acid exposure. Aim We considered the possibility that the high prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux might simply have resulted from calculating acidity as time pH < 4. Methods We calculated integrated acidity and time pH < 4 from the 49 recordings of 24-hour gastric and esophageal pH from the Stanford study as well as from another study of 57 GERD subjects, 26 of whom were treated for 8 days with 20 mg omeprazole or 20 mg rabeprazole in a 2-way crossover fashion. Results The prevalence of pathologic 24-hour esophageal reflux in both studies was significantly higher when measured as time pH < 4 than when measured as integrated acidity. This difference was entirely attributable to a difference between the two measures during the nocturnal period. Nocturnal gastric acid breakthrough was not a useful predictor of pathologic nocturnal esophageal reflux. Conclusion In GERD subjects treated with a PPI, measuring time esophageal pH < 4 will significantly overestimate the prevalence of pathologic esophageal acid exposure over 24 hours and during the nocturnal period. PMID:18498663

  15. Effect of Curing Profile on Kaolin-based Geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heah, C. Y.; Kamarudin, H.; Bakri, A. M. Mustafa Al; Binhussain, M.; Luqman, M.; Nizar, I. Khairul; Ruzaidi, C. M.; Liew, Y. M.

    Depending on the processing conditions, geopolymers can exhibit a wide variety of properties and characteristics. Curing profile serves as a crucial parameter in synthesis of geopolymers. In this paper, the influence of curing temperature and curing time on the properties of kaolin-based geopolymer was studied. The samples were separated into several curing conditions; including curing at ambient temperature, 40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C and 100 °C for 1 day, and up to 3 days. The compressive strength and SEM analysis of geopolymer products were evaluated. Results showed that curing condition has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of kaolin-based geopolymer. Generally, curing at ambient temperature was not feasible, while increase in temperature favored the strength development. In addition, prolonged curing time improved the geopolymerization process, and led to higher strength gain. However, curing at high temperature for a long period of time caused failure of the sample at a later age.

  16. The Lourdes Medical Cures Revisited†

    PubMed Central

    François, Bernard; Sternberg, Esther M.; Fee, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the cures recorded in Lourdes, France, between 1858, the year of the Visions, and 1976, the date of the last certified cure of the twentieth century. Initially, the records of cures were crude or nonexistent, and allegations of cures were accepted without question. A Medical Bureau was established in 1883 to examine and certify the cures, and the medical methodology improved steadily in the subsequent years. We discuss the clinical criteria of the cures and the reliability of medical records. Some 1,200 cures were said to have been observed between 1858 and 1889, and about one hundred more each year during the “Golden Age” of Lourdes, 1890–1914. We studied 411 patients cured in 1909–14 and thoroughly reviewed the twenty-five cures acknowledged between 1947 and 1976. No cure has been certified from 1976 through 2006. The Lourdes phenomenon, extraordinary in many respects, still awaits scientific explanation. Lourdes concerns science as well as religion. PMID:22843835

  17. Cytosolic pH gradients in cultured neuronal cell lines studied by laser scanning confocal microscopy, real-time confocal microscopy, and spectral imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Armass, Sergio; Sennoune, Souad; Martinez, Gloria M.; Ortega, Filiberta; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2002-06-01

    Changes in intracellular pH are important for the regulation of many physiological processes including: cell growth and differentiation, exocytosis, synaptic transmission, cell motility and invasion, to name a few. In pathological states such as cancer and diabetes, pH regulation is known to be altered. Nevertheless the physiological and pathological significance of this ion, there are still many gaps in our knowledge. The advent of fluorescent pH probes to monitor this ion, has substantially accelerated its study. New advances in the methods of detection of this ion by fluorescence-based approaches have also helped us to understand more about the regulation of cytosolic pH. This study evaluates the usefulness of real time confocal imaging microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and spectral imaging microscopy to the study of pH. These approaches exhibit unsurpassed temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution and are complementary. We employed cell lines derived from the brain exhibiting soma and dendrites. The existence of cell polarity suggests that the different protein composition/micro environment in discrete subcellular domains may affect the properties of fluorescent ion indicators. We performed in situ calibration of pH probes in discrete cellular regions of the neuronal cell lines to eliminate any bias in data interpretation because of differences in cell thickness/micro environment. We show that there are distinct in situ calibration parameters in different cellular domains. These indicate that in situ titrations in discrete cellular domains are needed to assign pH values. We concluded that there are distinct pH micro domains in discrete cellular regions of neuronal cell lines.

  18. Annealing time dependence of the physical, electrical and pH response characteristics of spin coated TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkefle, M. A.; Rahman, R. A.; Yusoff, K. A.; Abdullah, W. F. H.; Rusop, M.; Herman, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin film was deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate and used as sensing membrane of EGFET pH sensor. The thin film was fabricated using sol- gel spin coating method. All samples were annealed at 400 °C but the annealing time was varied. This is done to study the effects of annealing time on physical and electrical properties of titanium dioxide thin film. The sensitivity of each sample towards H+ ion was measured and result shows that sample annealed for 45 minutes has the highest sensitivity (52.6 mV/pH). It is found that increasing annealing duration will increase the pH sensitivity but a limit will be reached at certain point. Longer annealing processes done beyond this point will results in lower pH sensitivity.

  19. Prevent and cure disuse bone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.

    1994-01-01

    Anabolic agents like parathyroid hormone and postagladin E-like substances were studied in dogs and rats to determine their effectiveness in the prevention and cure of bone loss due to immobilization. It was determined that postagladin E2 administration prevented immobilization while at the same time it added extra bone in a dose responsive manner. Although bone mass returns, poor trabecular architecture remains after normal ambulation recovery from immobilization. Disuse related bone loss and poor trabecular architecture were cured by post-immobilization postagladin E2 treatment.

  20. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at −2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives. PMID:26282730

  1. Lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were performed to achieve a lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimide. The use of m-aminostyrene as the end-cap instead of the monoalkyl ester of 5-normbornene-2,3 dicarboxylic acid was investigated in typical PMR formulations. Model compound studies were also performed. Differential scanning calorimetry studies were performed on model compounds and neat resins to establish their melting and curing characteristics. The elevated temperature weight loss characteristics of neat resins and graphite fiber composites were determined. The room temperature and short-time 260 C (500 F) mechanical properties of the composites were also determined. The use of m-aminostyrene end-caps reduced the final cure temperature of PMR resins by about 55 C (100 F), but the composites prepared with these resins are limited to use temperatures of about 260 C (500 F).

  2. Over Time, How Do Post-Ph.D. Scientists Locate Teaching and Supervision within Their Academic Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    While building a strong research profile is usually seen as key for those seeking a traditional academic position, teaching is also understood as central to academic practice. Still, we know little of how post-Ph.D. researchers seeking academic posts locate teaching and supervision in their academic practice, nor how their views may shift as they…

  3. Effects of pH and storage time on the adhesive and rheological properties of cottonseed meal-based products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesive bonding is a key factor for efficiently utilizing timber and other lignocellulosic resources. To increase the basic knowledge of cottonseed meal-based adhesives and optimize the operational parameters for practical applications, in this study, we investigated the effects of pH and storage t...

  4. Dielectric cure monitoring: Preliminary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B. E.; Semmel, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been conducted on two types of dielectric cure monitoring systems employing both epoxy resins and phenolic composites. An Audrey System was used for 23 cure monitoring runs with very limited success. Nine complete cure monitoring runs have been investigated using a Micromet System. Two additional measurements were performed to investigate the Micromet's sensitivity to water absorption in a post-cure carbon-phenolic material. While further work is needed to determine data significance, the Micromet system appears to show promise as a feedback control device during processing.

  5. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-16

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding.

  6. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  7. Is the soft-start polymerisation concept still relevant for modern curing units?

    PubMed

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Jelen, Esther; Hickel, Reinhard

    2011-02-01

    Shrinkage stress, degree of cure and mechanical properties are contradicting properties, forcing to a compromise between an adequate curing and low stress at the interface tooth-restoration. The purpose of this study was to quantify this relations for a micro-hybrid composite, by analysing in real time the development of degree of cure at depths of 2 and 6 mm, shrinkage stress and curing time until gelation, as well as the variation of micro-mechanical properties with depth, after curing with 13 regimes of one halogen and two light-emitting diode (LED) curing units. A nano-dynamic mechanical test was additionally performed on selected regimes (Ramp, Pulse and Fast Cure) of the same curing unit. The present study showed that the soft-start polymerization concept is still valid for less deep cavities (2 mm), even by curing with high-power LED curing units, since a soft-cure polymerization resulted in a delayed gel point and a lower shrinkage stress, keeping simultaneously the degree of cure and mechanical properties constant. At 6 mm depth, curing with soft-start regimes resulted in a significant decrease in degree of cure, although this decrease was less than 10%, while the mechanical properties were maintained. PMID:19937074

  8. Effect of Annealing Time Process on the pH Sensitivity of Spin-coated TiO2/ ZnO Bilayer Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, R. A.; Zulkefle, M. A.; Yusof, K. A.; Abdullah, W. F. H.; Rusop, M.; Herman, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) bilayer film, which is used as sensing membrane for extended-gate field effect transistor (EGFET) for pH sensing application. TiO2/ZnO thin films were deposited using sol-gel spin coating method on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. After the deposition, the bilayer films were annealed at constant temperatures which is 400 °C for 15, 30, 40 and 60 minutes. The sensitivity of the TiO2 thin film towards pH buffer solution was measured by dipping the sensing membrane in pH4, pH7 and pH10 buffer solution. By varying the annealing time, we found that the TiO2/ZnO thin film annealed at 400°C for 15 minutes gave the highest sensitivity compared to other annealing conditions, with the value of 64.87 mV/pH.

  9. Influence of drug incorporation, temperature and storage time on the pH, textural and rheological properties of different poloxamer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hugo; Amaral, Maria Helena; Lobão, Paulo; Lobo, José Manuel Sousa

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, Poloxamers had attracted a particular interest in the design of dermal and transdermal delivery systems in order to improve or retard drug permeation through the skin. In the present study, the influence of different parameters, such as, temperature, storage time, type of polymer (Lutrol(®) F-127 and Lutrol(®) F-108) and the addition of two types of drugs (ibuprofen and hydrocortisone) in the pH, texture and rheological behavior of topical pharmaceutical formulations containing poloxamers was assessed. In fact, the type of polymer used in the preparation of the hydrogels, the type of drug incorporated, the temperature and the storage time caused changes in the pH, texture and rheological behavior of topical formulations containing Lutrol(®) F-127 and Lutrol(®) F-108. Lutrol(®) F-127 hydrogels showed higher values of pH, firmness, adhesiveness and viscosity than Lutrol(®) F-108 hydrogels. The chemical nature of the drugs incorporated in these poloxamer hydrogels influence the pH of the preparations. Low percentages of drug incorporated into both types of hydrogels didn't affect significantly their textural and rheological characteristics. The hydrogels prepared with Lutrol(®) F- 127 proved to be more resistant to temperature variations, maintaining their rheological behavior over time. PMID:23886320

  10. Simultaneous removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn from stormwater using high-efficiency industrial sorbents: Effect of pH, contact time and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Genç-Fuhrman, Hülya; Mikkelsen, Peter S; Ledin, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The effect of contact time, solution pH, and the presence of humic acid (HA) on the combined removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn is investigated in batch tests using alumina, granulated activated carbon (GAC), and bauxsol coated sand (BCS) as sorbents. It is found that the equilibrium time for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn is about 4h, while no clear equilibrium is observed for As and Cr. It is also found that increasing the pH until pH~8 enhanced Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn removal, but increasing the pH above this point had no major effect. In the cases of As and Cr, higher pH values (i.e. >7) decreased their removal. The presence of both 20 and 100mg/L HA suppressed the heavy metal removal except for Cr, and the suppression was higher at the higher HA concentration. Geochemical simulations suggest that this is due to the formation of dissolved HA-metal complexes preventing effective metal sorption. In the case of Cr, the presence of HA increased the removal when using alumina or BCS, while hindering the removal when using GAC. The findings show that the pH-value of the stormwater to be treated must be in the range of 6-7 in order to achieve removal of the full spectrum of metals. The results also show that natural organic matter may severely influence the removal efficiency, such that, for most metals the removal was reduced to the half, while for Cr it was increased to the double for alumina and BCS. Consequently, a properly working filter set up may not work properly anymore when receiving high loads of natural organic acids during the pollen season in spring or during defoliation in autumn and early winter, and during mixing of runoff with snowmelt having a low pH. PMID:27213673

  11. Early warning smartphone diagnostics for water security and analysis using real-time pH mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-12-01

    Early detection of environmental disruption, unintentional or otherwise, is increasingly desired to ensure hazard minimization in many settings. Here, using a field-portable, smartphone fluorimeter to assess water quality based on the pH response of a designer probe, a map of pH of public tap water sites has been obtained. A custom designed Android application digitally processed and mapped the results utilizing the global positioning system (GPS) service of the smartphone. The map generated indicates no disruption in pH for all sites measured, and all the data are assessed to fall inside the upper limit of local government regulations, consistent with authority reported measurements. This implementation demonstrates a new security concept: network environmental forensics utilizing the potential of novel smartgrid analysis with wireless sensors for the detection of potential disruption to water quality at any point in the city. This concept is applicable across all smartgrid strategies within the next generation of the Internet of Things and can be extended on national and global scales to address a range of target analytes, both chemical and biological.

  12. Infiltration/cure modeling of resin transfer molded composite materials using advanced fiber architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, Alfred C.; Weideman, Mark H.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Kinsley, Philip J.; Hart, Sean M.

    1991-01-01

    A model was developed which can be used to simulate infiltration and cure of textile composites by resin transfer molding. Fabric preforms were resin infiltrated and cured using model generated optimized one-step infiltration/cure protocols. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing (FDEMS) was used to monitor in situ resin infiltration and cure during processing. FDEMS measurements of infiltration time, resin viscosity, and resin degree of cure agreed well with values predicted by the simulation model. Textile composites fabricated using a one-step infiltration/cure procedure were uniformly resin impregnated and void free. Fiber volume fraction measurements by the resin digestion method compared well with values predicted using the model.

  13. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  14. Effects of pH and sugar concentration in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii growth and time for spoilage in concentrated grape juice at isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Rojo, M C; Arroyo López, F N; Lerena, M C; Mercado, L; Torres, A; Combina, M

    2014-04-01

    The effect of pH (1.7-3.2) and sugar concentration (64-68 °Brix) on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MC9 using response surface methodology was studied. Experiments were carried out in concentrated grape juice inoculated with Z. rouxii at isothermal conditions (23 °C) for 60 days. pH was the variable with the highest effect on growth parameters (potential maximum growth rate and lag phase duration), although the effect of sugar concentration were also significant. In a second experiment, the time for spoilage by this microorganism in concentrated grape juice was evaluated at isothermal (23 °C) and non-isothermal conditions, in an effort to reproduce standard storage and overseas shipping temperature conditions, respectively. Results show that pH was again the environmental factor with the highest impact on delaying the spoilage of the product. Thereby, a pH value below 2.0 was enough to increase the shelf life of the product for more than 60 days in both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The information obtained in the present work could be used by producers and buyers to predict the growth and time for spoilage of Z. rouxii in concentrated grape juice. PMID:24290637

  15. Gastrointestinal pH and Transit Time Profiling in Healthy Volunteers Using the IntelliCap System Confirms Ileo-Colonic Release of ColoPulse Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Jacoba M.; Schellekens, Reinout C. A.; van Rieke, Hèlen M.; Wanke, Christoph; Iordanov, Ventzeslav; Stellaard, Frans; Wutzke, Klaus D.; Dijkstra, Gerard; van der Zee, Margot; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ColoPulse tablets are an innovative development in the field of oral dosage forms characterized by a distal ileum and colon-specific release. Previous studies in humans showed release in the ileo-colonic region, but the relationship between gastrointestinal pH and release was not experimentally proven in vivo. This information will complete the in vivo release-profile of ColoPulse tablets. Materials and Methods Release from ColoPulse tablets was studied in 16 healthy volunteers using the dual label isotope strategy. To determine gastrointestinal pH profiles and transit times the IntelliCap system was used. A ColoPulse tablet containing 13C-urea and an uncoated, immediate release tablet containing 15N2-urea were taken simultaneously followed by a standardized breakfast after three hours. Five minutes after intake of the tablets the IntelliCap capsule was swallowed and pH was measured until excretion in the feces. Breath and urine samples were collected for isotope analysis. Results Full analysis could be performed in 12 subjects. Median bioavailability of 13C -urea was 82% (95% CI 74–94%, range 61–114%). The median lag time (5% release of 13C) was 5:42 h (95% CI 5:18–6:18 h, range 2:36–6:36 h,) There was no statistically significant difference between lag time based on isotope signal and colon arrival time (CAT) based on pH (median 5:42 vs 5:31 h p = 0.903). In all subjects an intestinal pH value of 7.0 was reached before release of 13C from the ColoPulse tablet occurred. Discussion and Conclusions From the combined data from the IntelliCap system and the 13C -isotope signal it can be concluded that release from a ColoPulse tablet in vivo is not related to transit times but occurs in the ileo-colonic region after pH 7.0 is reached. This supports our earlier findings and confirms that the ColoPulse system is a promising delivery system for targeting the distal ileum and colon. Trial Registration ISRCTN Registry 18301880 PMID:26177019

  16. Adhesive curing options for photonic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Steven C.; Hubert, Manfred; Tam, Robin

    2002-06-01

    Varying the intensity of illumination used to cure photoactivated adhesives has been applied in medical and dental applications to improve the performance of polymer materials. For example, it has been observed that dental polymer composite materials express reduced shrinkage, important for durability of non-amalgam restorations, by introducing a phased time-intensity cure schedule. This work identified that curing conditions could influence the final properties of materials, and suggested the possibility of extending the characteristics that could be influenced beyond shrinkage to humidity resistance, Tg, outgassing and other important material properties. Obviously, these results have important ramifications for the photonic industry, with current efforts focused on improved manufacturing techniques. Improvement in low cost packaging solutions, including adhesives, will have to be made to bring the component cost down to address the needs of Metro and similar markets. However, there are perceived problems with the widespread use of adhesives, the most prevalent of these involving long term durability of the bond. Devices are typically aligned to sub-micron precision using active feedback and then must be locked in position to maintain performance. In contrast to traditional fastening methods, adhesive bonding is a highly attractive option due to the ease of deployment, lower equipment costs, and improved flexibility. Moreover, using methods analogous to those employed in dental applications, materials properties of photonic adhesives may be tailored using a programmed cure approach.

  17. Large natural pH, CO2 and O2 fluctuations in a temperate tidal salt marsh on diel, seasonal, and interannual time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Hannes; Wallace, Ryan; Tagliaferri, Tristen N.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine organisms experience dynamic pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions in their natural habitats, which may impact their susceptibility to long-term anthropogenic changes. Robust characterizations of all temporal scales of natural pH and DO fluctuations in different marine habitats are needed; however, appropriate time series of pH and DO are still scarce. We used multiyear (2008–2012), high-frequency (6 min) monitoring data to quantify diel, seasonal, and interannual scales of pH and DO variability in a productive, temperate tidal salt marsh (Flax Pond, Long Island, US). pHNBS and DO showed strong and similar seasonal patterns, with average (minimum) conditions declining from 8.2 (8.1) and 12.5 (11.4) mg l−1 at the end of winter to 7.6 (7.2) and 6.3 (2.8) mg l−1 in late summer, respectively. Concomitantly, average diel fluctuations increased from 0.22 and 2.2 mg l−1 (February) to 0.74 and 6.5 mg l−1 (August), respectively. Diel patterns were modulated by tides and time of day, eliciting the most extreme minima when low tides aligned with the end of the night. Simultaneous in situ pCO2 measurements showed striking fluctuations between ∼330 and ∼1,200 (early May), ∼2,200 (mid June), and ∼4,000 μatm (end of July) within single tidal cycles. These patterns also indicate that the marsh’s strong net heterotrophy influences its adjacent estuary by ‘outwelling’ acidified and hypoxic water during ebb tides. Our analyses emphasize the coupled and fluctuating nature of pH and DO conditions in productive coastal and estuarine environments, which have yet to be adequately represented by experiments.

  18. Fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor. II. Performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai-Yuen; Afromowitz, Martin A.

    1995-09-01

    The performance of a fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor, as previously proposed, depends on the optical properties and the reaction kinetics of the epoxy. The reaction kinetics of a typical epoxy system are presented. It is a third-order autocatalytic reaction with a peak observed in each isothermal reaction-rate curve. A model is derived to describe the performance characteristics of the epoxy cure sensor. If a composite coupon is cured at an isothermal temperature, the sensor signal can be used to predict the time when the gel point occurs and to monitor the cure process. The sensor is also shown to perform well in nonstoichiometric epoxy matrices. In addition the sensor can detect the end of the cure without calibration.

  19. Effect of rapid curing procedures on polymer implant materials.

    PubMed

    Gettleman, L; Nathanson, D; Myerson, R L

    1977-01-01

    This investigation of standard curing methods for PMMA implants has demonstrated that alternate means of using the air oven may produce good strength properties along with a considerable degree of porosity, when desired, in a relatively short period of time. Curing of polymers in a pressure pot offers few advantages owing to the length of time required to produce, at best, equivalent strength for the porous materials. The method also poses dangers inherent in the use of superheated salt solution or hot glycerin. The autoclave is widely used in dental offices for sterilizing and will fully and consistently cure polymers within 30 minutes. The best properties for the PMMA resin were achieved with this method (61 MPa or 9,130 p.s.i., tensile strength). The microwave oven has become relatively inexpensive in recent years, and it offers time savings of up to 90 per cent which would be beneficial in implant dentistry or in dental laboratory procedures in general. The exact condition for curing particular polymers must be carefully determined to adjust the time of irradiation in order not to under- or overcure the polymer object. Curing polymers which contain intrinsic foaming agents under pressure conditions slightly reduced the total pore volume. But, pore volume and pore diameter in the large-bead polymers are determined predominantly by packing conditions, not curing conditions. Biologic tolerance to materials cured by these methods in primates is presently being evaluated. PMID:264323

  20. Towards a 'cure' for IBD.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    To discuss a cure for IBD, one should first define the concept 'a cure'. If it is intended as the general restoration of health, this is already possible, as many current therapies do a good job in inducing long periods of remission in Crohn's disease, and colectomy can technically cure ulcerative colitis. If it is more strictly defined as the complete and permanent elimination of the cause, predisposing and permissive factors, reinstatement of normal microbial ecology and restoration of mucosal immune homeostasis, then a cure for IBD is out of reach, at least for now. Regardless of the definition, major strides have been made in attempting to cure IBD by addressing the key components of its pathogenesis: the environment (exposome), the genetic makeup (genome), the gut microbiota (microbiome) and the immune system (immunome). However, the isolated modulation of each component is insufficient to provide a cure, and different requirements may be needed depending on the stage of the disease and each patient subset. To achieve a cure, one key approach is currently missing: the integration of knowledge from all the pathogenic components. We continue to learn more and more about each component using traditional 'canonical' systems, which allow the accumulation of data without taking into consideration the other components. We are still not studying the 'omes' of IBD, we should be using 'omics' technologies that can generate a more global vision of IBD pathogenesis on which to base novel, multiple pathway-integrated therapies. PMID:22796811

  1. Bioaccumulation of metals by lichens: Uptake of aqueous uranium by Peltigera membranacea as a function of time and pH

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.R.; Bailey, E.H.; Purvis, O.W.

    1998-11-01

    Uranium sorption experiments were carried out at {approximately}25 C using natural samples of the lichen Peltigera membranacea. Thalli were incubated in solutions containing 100 ppm U for up to 24 h at pH values from 2 to 10. Equilibrium sorption was not observed at less than {approximately}6 h under any pH condition. U sorption was strongest in the pH range 4--5, with maximum sorption occurring at a pH of 4.5 and an incubation time of 24 h. Maximum U uptake by P. membranacea averaged {approximately}42,000 ppm, or {approximately}4.2 wt% U. This appears to represent the highest concentration of biosorbed U, relative to solution U activity, of any lichen reported to date. Investigation of post-experimental lichen tissues using electron probe microanalysis (EPM) reveals that U uptake is spatially heterogeneous within the lichen body, and that U attains very high local concentrations on scattered areas of the upper cortex. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis reveals that strong U uptake correlates with P signal intensity, suggesting involvement of biomass-derived phosphate ligands or surface functional groups in the uptake process.

  2. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tweets Tweets by @AcceleratedCure Front The Accelerated Cure Project for MS is a non-profit, 501(c)( ... determines its causes and mechanisms. © 2016 Accelerated Cure Project. All rights reserved. Site Map Contact Us Privacy ...

  3. Mathematical Model Of Curing Behavior Of A Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, Willard C.; Beyer, Rodney B.; Liu, Edmund K. S.

    1995-01-01

    Mathematical model predicts selected aspects of chemical, thermal and mechanical responses of polymeric liner and propellant materials during curing process. Predictions made both prior to processing and during process in quasi-real time. Developed specifically for use in designing and analyzing process in which bondline materials (including polymeric liners) and propellant cast and cured in rocket motor. With modifications, model applicable to curing of other polymeric materials. Further development may provide direct "in-line" program for calculations, including comparisons, in real time. This will constitute basis for more sophisticated control of process.

  4. Curing HIV: Moving Forward Faster.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marcella; Johnston, Rowena

    2016-02-01

    There is enormous enthusiasm in the scientific community for finding a cure for HIV. Although much remains to be discovered regarding the mechanisms of viral persistence and how it may be disrupted, some assumptions regarding the goals of a cure, applicability to target populations, and what is required of the assays we employ, may lead to missed opportunities and discoveries and hamper the discovery of a product that will safely cure tens of millions of HIV-infected people around the world. The field will benefit from an awareness and critical interrogation of assumptions that may be implicit in their scientific pursuits. PMID:26862662

  5. 34 CFR Appendix C to Part 682 - Procedures for Curing Violations of the Due Diligence in Collection and Timely Filing of Claims...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... timely filing requirements in 34 CFR 682.511. c. Borrower Deemed in Default Under Certain Circumstances... loans. Public Law 99-272 established new default periods of 180 and 240 days (as set out in 34 CFR 682... overbillings made on loans evidencing such violations. See 34 CFR 682.507, 682.511.1 These procedures allow...

  6. Characterization of the relationship of the cure cycle chemistry to cure cycle processing properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic Dielectric measurements made over a wide range of frequency provide a sensitive and convenient means for monitoring the cure process in thermosets and thermoplastics. The measurement of dielectric relaxation is one of only a few instrumental techniques available for studying molecular properties in both the liquid and solid states. Furthermore, it is probably the only convenient experimental technique for studying the polymerization process of going from a monomeric liquid of varying viscosity to a crosslinked, insoluble, high temperature solid. The objective of the research is to develop on-line dielectric instrumentation for quantitative nondestructive material evaluation and closed loop smart cure cycle control. The key is to relate the chemistry of the cure cycle process to the dielectric properties of the polymer system by correlating the time, temperature, and frequency dependent dielectric measurements with chemical characterization measurements. Measurement of the wide variation in magnitude of the complex permittivity with both frequency and state of cure, coupled with chemical characterization work, have been shown in the laboratory to have the potential to determine: resin quality, composition and age; cure cycle window boundaries; onset of flow and point of maximum flow; extent of and completion of reaction; evolution of volatiles; T sub g; and, crosslinking and molecular weight buildup.

  7. Effect of three types of light-curing units on 5-year colour changes of light-cured composite.

    PubMed

    Tak, Onjen; Altintas, Subutay Han; Ozturk, Nilgun; Usumez, Aslihan

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine colour changes in a composite cured with tungsten-halogen, light-emitting diode (LED) or a plasma arc after 5 years. Five specimens 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height were prepared using Hybrid (Clearfil AP-X) composite for each test group. The corresponding specimens were cured with a tungsten-halogen curing light, a LED unit or with a plasma arc. Specimens were stored in light-proof boxes for 5 years after the curing procedure to avoid further exposure to light and stored in 37 degrees C in 100% humidity. Colorimetric values of the specimens immediately after curing and after 5 years were measured using colorimeter. The DeltaE*( ab ) values varied significantly depending on the curing unit used (p < 0.001). Curing time did not affect the colour changes of the specimens (p = 0.4). The results of this study suggest that composite materials undergo measurable changes due to the curing unit exposure. PMID:18769947

  8. Variation of Resin Properties Through the Thickness of Cured Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    It is the purpose of this work to gain knowledge of the glassy materials used as matrices in composites and to study the homogeneity resulting from the curing process. An attempt is made to link the glass transition quantitatively with the presence of a given material. Expoxy resins containing various amounts of hardener (TGDDM/DDS system) were cured in a muffle furnace at 473 K for seven hours. The glass transition temperature, T sub g versus weight minus percent of hardener in the epoxy resin were measured. A limit was rapidly reached in T sub g at only two percent hardener. Thus, the glass transition of the fully cured epoxy-amine matrix seems not much different from the epoxide-epoxide cure. The T sub g versus cure-time for the epoxide-epoxide reaction was also studied. My 720 was cured by itself in an oil bath at 473 K for different lengths of time. The T sub g was found to increase exponentially with the cure time, and a maximum T sub g of about 450 K was reached after eleven hours. The reaction was found to be inhibited by running the sample under argon.

  9. Antibiotics Cure Anthrax in Animal Models▿

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Shay; Kobiler, David; Levy, Haim; Pass, Avi; Ophir, Yakir; Rothschild, Nili; Tal, Arnon; Schlomovitz, Josef; Altboum, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory anthrax, in the absence of early antibiotic treatment, is a fatal disease. This study aimed to test the efficiency of antibiotic therapy in curing infected animals and those sick with anthrax. Postexposure prophylaxis (24 h postinfection [p.i.]) of guinea pigs infected intranasally with Bacillus anthracis Vollum spores with doxycycline, ofloxacin, imipenem, and gentamicin conferred protection. However, upon termination of treatment, the animals died from respiratory anthrax. Combined treatment with antibiotics and active vaccination with a protective antigen-based vaccine leads to full protection even after cessation of treatment. Delaying the initiation of antibiotic administration to over 24 h p.i. resulted in treatment of animals with anthrax exhibiting various degrees of bacteremia and toxemia. Treatment with doxycycline or ciprofloxacin cured sick guinea pigs and rabbits exhibiting bacteremia levels up to 105 CFU/ml. Addition of anti-protective antigen (PA) antibodies augmented the efficiency of protection, allowing the cure of guinea pigs and rabbits with 10- to 20-fold-higher bacteremia levels, up to 7 × 105 CFU/ml and 2 × 106 CFU/ml, respectively. Treatment with ciprofloxacin and a monoclonal anti-PA antibody rescued rabbits with bacteremia levels up to 4 × 106 CFU/ml. During antibiotic administration, all surviving animals developed a protective immune response against development of a fatal disease and subcutaneous challenge with Vollum spores. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that antibiotic treatment can prevent the development of fatal disease in respiratory-anthrax-infected animals and can cure animals after disease establishment. A therapeutic time window of 40 h to 48 h from infection to initiation of efficient antibiotic-mediated cure was observed. PMID:21263056

  10. [Little histories of magnetic cures].

    PubMed

    Pinet, Patrice

    2009-02-01

    Men were very early fascinated by magnetism because of its manifest and particular working at distance, which looked different of gravity. It was tryed to be explained by mecanism, for exemple Descartes and Boyle. Paracelse valued the therapeutics with magnets and conceived medicines as working by a magnetic virtue. Gilbert limited the medicinal properties of magnet but helded it to be animated. Many authors praised remedies that work at distance of the evil as Bacon, Van Helmont, Croll, Porta, Goclenius, Digby. Such a belief related to magic ideas of this time. In the Bacon's way Boyle collected facts of magnetic cures, and his actual testing of the divisibility of bodies led him to conceive imponderable corpuscles. Newton supposed a subtil and universel fluid going through every solid body. Mesmer misappropriated this idea by founding the animal magnetism of which physical working was only proceeding from the inside of the patient by an effect of suggestion (psychosomatic). Homeopathy took again the notion of remedies having an infinite or a magnetic virtue, which partly issued from Paracelse's and Mesmer's doctrines, which were extolled in Germany at the time of Hahnemann. The latter decided in favour of a spiritualist and not corpuscular interpretation of the working of his homeopathic medicines. PMID:19579649

  11. Diamine curing agents for polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Three aromatic diamines have properties that make them promising candidates as curing agents for converting isocyanates to polyurethanes with higher adhesive strengths, higher softening temperatures, better toughness, and improved abrasion resistance.

  12. Start up partial nitrification at low temperature with a real-time control strategy based on blower frequency and pH.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shengbo; Wang, Shuying; Yang, Qing; Yang, Pei; Peng, Yongzhen

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the performance of partial nitrification via nitrite at low temperature was investigated in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with a working volume of 7.0m(3). A novel real-time control strategy, based on blower frequency (BF) and pH, was designed and evaluated. The nitrogen break point (NBP) in the BF curve and the nitrate/nitrite apex point (NAP) in the pH curve were used to identify the endpoint of the aerobic and anoxic phases, respectively. The nitrite accumulation rate (NAR) rapidly increased from 19.8% to 90%. Partial nitrification was achieved at low temperature (11-16°C) in 40 days and was stably maintained for as long as 140 days by applying a real-time control strategy based on pH and BF. Fluorescence in situ hybirdization (FISH) results demonstrated that ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) had developed into the dominant nitrifying bacteria compared to nitrite oxidation bacteria (NOB) in the system. PMID:22414573

  13. (31)P-MRS of healthy human brain: ATP synthesis, metabolite concentrations, pH, and T1 relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2015-11-01

    The conventional method for measuring brain ATP synthesis is (31)P saturation transfer (ST), a technique typically dependent on prolonged pre-saturation with γ-ATP. In this study, ATP synthesis rate in resting human brain is evaluated using EBIT (exchange kinetics by band inversion transfer), a technique based on slow recovery of γ-ATP magnetization in the absence of B1 field following co-inversion of PCr and ATP resonances with a short adiabatic pulse. The unidirectional rate constant for the Pi → γ-ATP reaction is 0.21 ± 0.04 s(-1) and the ATP synthesis rate is 9.9 ± 2.1 mmol min(-1)  kg(-1) in human brain (n = 12 subjects), consistent with the results by ST. Therefore, EBIT could be a useful alternative to ST in studying brain energy metabolism in normal physiology and under pathological conditions. In addition to ATP synthesis, all detectable (31)P signals are analyzed to determine the brain concentration of phosphorus metabolites, including UDPG at around 10 ppm, a previously reported resonance in liver tissues and now confirmed in human brain. Inversion recovery measurements indicate that UDPG, like its diphosphate analogue NAD, has apparent T1 shorter than that of monophosphates (Pi, PMEs, and PDEs) but longer than that of triphosphate ATP, highlighting the significance of the (31)P-(31)P dipolar mechanism in T1 relaxation of polyphosphates. Another interesting finding is the observation of approximately 40% shorter T1 for intracellular Pi relative to extracellular Pi, attributed to the modulation by the intracellular phosphoryl exchange reaction Pi ↔ γ-ATP. The sufficiently separated intra- and extracellular Pi signals also permit the distinction of pH between intra- and extracellular environments (pH 7.0 versus pH 7.4). In summary, quantitative (31)P MRS in combination with ATP synthesis, pH, and T1 relaxation measurements may offer a promising tool to detect biochemical alterations at early stages of brain dysfunctions and diseases

  14. Photothermal Monitoring Of Curing Of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared radiometry (TRIR) adapted to monitoring curing of some polymers in production. Proposal part of continuing effort to perfect production of hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene for use in liners of solid-fuel rocket motors. Applicable to monitoring changing states of many other materials in process. TRIR, non-contact technique implemented with remotely situated equipment and better suited to use in production.

  15. Fulvic acid sorption on muscovite mica as a function of pH and time using in situ X-ray reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Park, Changyong; Nagy, Kathryn L

    2008-08-01

    Interfacial structures of the basal surface of muscovite mica in 100 mg kg (-1) Elliott Soil Fulvic Acid II solutions were investigated using in situ X-ray reflectivity. Molecular-scale variations in the thickness and internal structure of the fulvic acid (FA) film were observed and quantified as a function of pH (2-12) and reaction time (3-500 h at pH 3.7). At pH < or =6, the electron-density profile of the FA layer sorbed on the muscovite surface was composed of one near-surface peak followed by a broad peak that diminished in electron density with distance from the surface. The presence of the near-surface peak is attributed to condensation of FA molecules during sorption. The apparent thickness of the FA layer decreased from 12.3 to 7.2 to 6.4 A as pH increased from 2 to 3.7 to 6, respectively. At pH > or =8.5, a distinct interfacial structure was observed, consisting of sharper peaks similar to those previously observed for muscovite in the absence of FA. These peaks are most likely composed of smaller aqueous species, such as H 2O molecules, metal ion impurities from FA, and Na (+) from NaOH. The FA sorbed on the muscovite surface at pH 3.7 maintained a relatively constant thickness after 3 hours. However, the electron density of the near-surface FA peak increased by about 24% from 3 to 12 hours, and remained relatively constant from 12 to 500 hours. The electron density of the more distant part of the sorbed FA layer increased slightly after 12-50 hours of reaction but then decreased, and the broad peak flattened by 500 hours. Internal structural changes are possibly due to the slow sorption rate of FA molecules, or a fractionation effect, i.e., continuous subsitution of smaller FA molecules by larger FA molecules. PMID:18616301

  16. Comprehensive study of dynamic curing effect on tablet coating structure.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Genty, Muriel; da Silva, Julio César; Tfayli, Ali; Boiret, Mathieu; Lecoq, Olivier; Baron, Michel; Chaminade, Pierre; Péan, Jean Manuel

    2012-08-01

    The dissolution method is still widely used to determine curing end-points to ensure long-term stability of film coatings. Nevertheless, the process of curing has not yet been fully investigated. For the first time, joint techniques were used to elucidate the mechanisms of dynamic curing over time from ethylcellulose (Aquacoat)-based coated tablets. X-ray micro-computed tomography (XμCT), Near Infrared (NIR), and Raman spectroscopies as well as X-ray microdiffraction were employed as non-destructive techniques to perform direct measurements on tablets. All techniques indicated that after a dynamic curing period of 4h, reproducible drug release can be achieved and no changes in the microstructure of the coating were any longer detected. XμCT analysis highlighted the reduced internal porosity, while both NIR and Raman measurements showed that spectral information remained unaltered after further curing. X-ray microdiffraction revealed densification of the coating layer with a decrease in the overall coating thickness of about 10 μm as a result of curing. In addition, coating heterogeneity attributed to cetyl alcohol was observed from microscopic images and Raman analysis. This observation was confirmed by X-ray microdiffraction that showed that crystalline cetyl alcohol melted and spread over the coating surface with curing. Prior to curing, X-ray microdiffraction also revealed the existence of two coating zones differing in crystalline cetyl alcohol and sodium lauryl sulfate concentrations which could be explained by migration of these constituents within the coating layer. Therefore, the use of non-destructive techniques allowed new insights into tablet coating structures and provided precise determination of the curing end-point compared to traditional dissolution testing. This thorough study may open up new possibilities for process and formulation control. PMID:22561957

  17. Arterial pH and Blood Lactate Levels of Anesthetized Mongolian Khulan ( Equus hemionus hemionus) in the Mongolian Gobi Correlate with Induction Time.

    PubMed

    Gerritsmann, Hanno; Stalder, Gabrielle L; Kaczensky, Petra; Buuveibaatar, Bayarbaatar; Payne, John; Boldbaatar, Sukhbaatar; Walzer, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Research and conservation of wide-ranging wild equids in most cases necessitate capture and handling of individuals. For free-roaming Mongolian khulan ( Equus hemionus hemionus), also known as the khulan, capture involves a strenuous, high-speed chase, and physiologic responses have yet to be elucidated. We analyzed sequential arterial blood gas (ABG) samples as a proxy for respiratory and metabolic status of khulan during capture-related anesthesia. We recorded precise chase and induction times and monitored vital parameters and ABG from free-ranging khulan during anesthesia performed for GPS collaring. At the initiation of anesthesia, animals had ABG values similar to those recorded for thoroughbred horses ( Equus caballus ) after maximal exercise. Longer induction times resulted in higher arterial pH (P<0.001) and lower blood lactate (P<0.002). This trend of improvement continued over the course of anesthesia. The most important factor explaining pH and lactate was the time that elapsed between cessation of the chase and obtaining the first ABG sample, which, under field conditions, is tightly linked to induction time. All animals recovered uneventfully. Our data show that khulan recover and shift their metabolic status back toward expected normal values during opioid-based field anesthesia. PMID:27243152

  18. Contactless optoelectronic technique for monitoring epoxy cure.

    PubMed

    Cusano, A; Buonocore, V; Breglio, G; Calabrò, A; Giordano, M; Cutolo, A; Nicolais, L

    2000-03-01

    We describe a novel noninvasive optical technique to monitor the refractive-index variation in an epoxy-based resin that is due to the polymerization process. This kind of resin is widely used in polymer matrix composites. It is well known that the process of fabricating a thermoset-based composite involves mass and heat transfer coupled with irreversible chemical reactions that induce physical changes. To improve the quality and the reliability of these materials, monitoring the cure and optimization of the manufacturing process are of key importance. We discuss the basic operating principles of an optical system based on angle deflection measurements and present typical cure-monitoring results obtained from optical characterization. The method provides a flexible, high-sensitivity, material-independent, low-cost, noninvasive tool for monitoring real-time refractive-index variation. PMID:18337994

  19. What Will It Take to Cure HIV?

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Investigational strategies to attempt HIV cure or remission include very early initiation of antiretroviral therapy to limit the latent HIV reservoir and preinfection vaccination. In the setting of viral suppression, strategies include reactivation of latently infected cells (eg, through "shock" therapy with histone deacetylase inhibitors or other agents); use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, therapeutic vaccines, immunotoxins, or other immune-based therapies to kill latently infected cells; and gene editing to induce target cell resistance (eg, by eliminating the CC chemokine receptor 5 [CCR5] coreceptor). Improved ability to detect and quantify very low levels of virus is needed. This article summarizes a presentation by Jintanat Ananworanich, MD, PhD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in New York, New York, in October 2014. PMID:26200707

  20. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  1. Factors affecting dry-cured ham consumer acceptability.

    PubMed

    Morales, R; Guerrero, L; Aguiar, A P S; Guàrdia, M D; Gou, P

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of the present study were (1) to compare the relative importance of price, processing time, texture and intramuscular fat in purchase intention of dry-cured ham through conjoint analysis, (2) to evaluate the effect of dry-cured ham appearance on consumer expectations, and (3) to describe the consumer sensory preferences of dry-cured ham using external preference mapping. Texture and processing time influenced the consumer preferences in conjoint analysis. Red colour intensity, colour uniformity, external fat and white film presence/absence influenced consumer expectations. The consumer disliked hams with bitter and metallic flavour and with excessive saltiness and piquantness. Differences between expected and experienced acceptability were found, which indicates that the visual preference of consumers does not allow them to select a dry-cured ham that satisfies their sensory preferences of flavour and texture. PMID:23816516

  2. DBP formation in hot and cold water across a simulated distribution system: effect of incubation time, heating time, pH, chlorine dose, and incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2013-10-15

    This paper demonstrates that disinfection byproducts (DBP) concentration profiles in heated water were quite different from the DBP concentrations in the cold tap water. Chloroform concentrations in the heated water remained constant or even decreased slightly with increasing distribution system water age. The amount of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was much higher in the heated water than in the cold water; however, the maximum levels in heated water with different distribution system water ages did not differ substantially. The levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in the heated water were similar to the TCAA levels in the tap water, and a slight reduction was observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. Regardless of water age, significant reductions of nonregulated DBPs were observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. For tap water with lower water ages, there were significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), chloropicrin (CP), and 1,1-dichloropropane (1,1-DCP) after a short period of heating. Heating of the tap water with low pH led to a more significant increase of chloroform and a more significant short-term increase of DCAN. High pH accelerated the loss of the nonregulated DBPs in the heated water. The results indicated that as the chlorine doses increased, levels of chloroform and DCAA in the heated water increased significantly. However, for TCAA, the thermally induced increase in concentration was only notable for the chlorinated water with very high chlorine dose. Finally, heating may lead to higher DBP concentrations in chlorinated water with lower distribution system temperatures. PMID:24044418

  3. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    D, Krishnakanth Reddy; V, Kishore M S; Safeena, Safeena

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine shear bond strength and the effect on the bracket/ adhesive failure mode when an acidic primer and other etchants were used to condition the enamel surface before bonding. Materials & Methods: Group I: Brackets bonded with Ultimate cure-on-light Light-cure composite adhesive system. Group II: Brackets bonded with Ortho-one no-mix. Self-cure composite adhesive system. Group III: Brackets bonded with Light-cure glass ionomer adhesive system. Group IV: Brackets bonded with Transbond plus self etching primer. Results: The results of this study indicated that the shear bond strength when using Transbond plus self etching primer showed the highest bond strength Group- IV(8.69 2.54 MPa) followed by Ultimate cure-on-light Group-I (8.62 1.84 MPa), Ortho-one no-mix (Bisco Inc. USA)Group-II (8.07 1.72 MPa), and least bond strength was seen in G.C. Fuji Ortho L.C. Group-III (6.01 1.6) MPa Conclusion: Use of self etching primer saves chairside time and satisfactory high bond strength was obtained. Care should be taken during debonding of ceramic brackets How to cite this article: Reddy K D, Kishore M S V, Safeena S. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):73-78. PMID:24155606

  4. Curing Behavior and Viscoelasticity of Dual-Curable Adhesives Based on High-Reactivity Azo Initiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Shim, Gyu-Seong; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Moon, Sang-Eun; Kim, Young-Kwan; No, Dong-Hun; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the curing behavior of dual-curable acrylic resin to solve problems associated with curing of adhesives in shaded areas during display manufacture. A low-temperature curing-type thermal initiator, 2,2'-azobis (4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile), with a 30°C half-life decomposition temperature was used in the investigation. Dual-curable adhesives were prepared according to the thermal initiator content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation dose. The effects of thermal initiator and UV irradiation on the curing behavior and viscoelasticity were investigated. Using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and gel-fraction analysis, an evaluation was carried out to determine the degree of curing after dual UV/thermal curing. In addition, the real-time curing behavior was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and a UV/advanced rheometric expansion system. A lift-off test was carried out to verify the effects of dual curing on adhesion performance. Application of UV irradiation before thermal curing suppressed the thermal curing efficiency. Also, the network structure formed after dual curing with low UV dose showed higher crosslinking density. Therefore, the thermal initiator radical effectively influenced uncured areas with low curing temperature and initiator content without causing problems in UV-curable zones.

  5. Curing Behavior and Viscoelasticity of Dual-Curable Adhesives Based on High-Reactivity Azo Initiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Shim, Gyu-Seong; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Moon, Sang-Eun; Kim, Young-Kwan; No, Dong-Hun; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the curing behavior of dual-curable acrylic resin to solve problems associated with curing of adhesives in shaded areas during display manufacture. A low-temperature curing-type thermal initiator, 2,2'-azobis (4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile), with a 30°C half-life decomposition temperature was used in the investigation. Dual-curable adhesives were prepared according to the thermal initiator content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation dose. The effects of thermal initiator and UV irradiation on the curing behavior and viscoelasticity were investigated. Using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and gel-fraction analysis, an evaluation was carried out to determine the degree of curing after dual UV/thermal curing. In addition, the real-time curing behavior was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and a UV/advanced rheometric expansion system. A lift-off test was carried out to verify the effects of dual curing on adhesion performance. Application of UV irradiation before thermal curing suppressed the thermal curing efficiency. Also, the network structure formed after dual curing with low UV dose showed higher crosslinking density. Therefore, the thermal initiator radical effectively influenced uncured areas with low curing temperature and initiator content without causing problems in UV-curable zones.

  6. Effects of the Treating Time on Microstructure and Erosion Corrosion Behavior of Salt-Bath-Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Mingxing; Fan, Hongyuan; Zeng, Dezhi; Xiong, Ji

    2013-08-01

    The effects of salt-bath nitriding time on the microstructure, microhardness, and erosion-corrosion behavior of nitrided 17-4PH stainless steel at 703 K (430 °C) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and erosion-corrosion testing. The experimental results revealed that the microstructure and phase constituents of the nitrided surface alloy are highly process condition dependent. When 17-4PH stainless steel was subjected to complex salt-bathing nitriding, the main phase of the nitrided layer was expanded martensite ( α`), expanded austenite (S), CrN, Fe4N, and Fe2N. The thickness of nitrided layers increased with the treating time. The salt-bath nitriding improves effectively the surface hardness. The maximum values measured from the treated surface are observed to be 1100 HV0.1 for 40 hours approximately, which is about 3.5 times as hard as the untreated material (309 HV0.1). Low-temperature nitriding can improve the erosion-corrosion resistance against two-phase flow. The sample nitrided for 4 hours has the best corrosion resistance.

  7. Electron beam curing of epoxy resins by cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners has been established to develop high performance Electron Beam (EB) curable polymer matrix composites. EB curing of composites has a number of advantages over conventional thermal curing. Composites cured by EB have much shorter cure times, lower overall energy requirements, and reduced thermal stresses in the cured part. Furthermore, less expensive tooling can be used since the process occurs at lower temperatures. Preliminary investigations have determined that conventional epoxy resins can be cured at selectable temperatures with high glass transition temperatures (essentially the same as with thermal curing), while still exhibiting equivalent or comparable mechanical properties. A cationic photoinitiator at a concentration of 1-3 parts per hundred of the epoxy resin is required for this process. Gamma cell screening of cationic photoinitiators with bisphenol A, bisphenol F, and cycloaliphatic epoxies demonstrated that diaryliodonium salts of weakly nucleophilic anions such as hexafluoroantimonate are most effective. Diaryliodonium salts were also found to be the most effective initiators for the cationic polymerization of epoxy resins when a high energy/power electron beam accelerator was used as the source of ionizing radiation. For example Dow Tactix 123 (bisphenol A epoxy) containing 3 phr (4-octyloxyphenyl) phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate was irradiated at a total dosage of 100 kGy. Glass transition temperature (tan delta) of the cured material as determined by dynamic mechanical analysis was 182{degrees}C as compared to 165{degrees}C for the thermally cured material.

  8. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  9. Measurement of surface stay times for physical adsorption of gases. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Univ.; [using molecular beam time of flight technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A molecular beam time-of-flight technique is studied as a means of determining surface stay times for physical adsorption. The experimental approach consists of pulsing a molecular beam, allowing the pulse to strike an adsorbing surface and detecting the molecular pulse after it has subsequently desorbed. The technique is also found to be useful for general studies of adsorption under nonequilibrium conditions including the study of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. The shape of the detected pulse is analyzed in detail for a first-order desorption process. For mean stay times, tau, less than the mean molecular transit times involved, the peak of the detected pulse is delayed by an amount approximately equal to tau. For tau much greater than these transit times, the detected pulse should decay as exp(-t/tau). However, for stay times of the order of the transit times, both the molecular speed distributions and the incident pulse duration time must be taken into account.

  10. Time-domain finite elements in optimal control with application to launch-vehicle guidance. PhD. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A time-domain finite element method is developed for optimal control problems. The theory derived is general enough to handle a large class of problems including optimal control problems that are continuous in the states and controls, problems with discontinuities in the states and/or system equations, problems with control inequality constraints, problems with state inequality constraints, or problems involving any combination of the above. The theory is developed in such a way that no numerical quadrature is necessary regardless of the degree of nonlinearity in the equations. Also, the same shape functions may be employed for every problem because all strong boundary conditions are transformed into natural or weak boundary conditions. In addition, the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are very sparse. Use of sparse matrix solvers allows for the rapid and accurate solution of very difficult optimization problems. The formulation is applied to launch-vehicle trajectory optimization problems, and results show that real-time optimal guidance is realizable with this method. Finally, a general problem solving environment is created for solving a large class of optimal control problems. The algorithm uses both FORTRAN and a symbolic computation program to solve problems with a minimum of user interaction. The use of symbolic computation eliminates the need for user-written subroutines which greatly reduces the setup time for solving problems.

  11. Advances in light curing adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Andy

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a new family of light curing adhesives containing a new reactive additive previously not used in optical grade light curing adhesives are obtained with the addition of functionalized cellulositics. Outgassing as low as 10-6 grams/gram has been observed based on headspace sampling. Other additives have lowered the shrinkage rates of positioning adhesives from near 1 percent to less than 0.1 percent with fractional, percentage movements over thermal range of -40 degrees C to +200 degrees C.

  12. The viscoelasticity of curing thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Martin, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    As a crosslinking polymer cures, dramatic changes in molecular architecture occur. These structural changes in turn affect the viscoelastic behavior of the material. At a critical extent of reaction (the gel point), the polymer undergoes a transition from a viscous liquid to an elastic solid. We have monitored the evolution of structure and viscoelasticity in an epoxy encapsulant used at Sandia, the diglycidyl ether of Bisphenol A (BADGE) cured with diethanolamine (DEA). The structure evolves according to percolation theory, and the viscoelasticity evolves according to out dynamic scaling theory for branched polymers. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Challenging Roadblocks to Cancer Cure.

    PubMed

    Loda, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    The Pezcoller Symposium in Trento, Italy, June 2015, focused entirely on the question of why advanced cancer cure is so uncommon despite the extraordinarily rapid growth of invaluable therapeutic information. Participants were asked to define and to critically evaluate real and potential obstacles to permanent disease eradication. High-level concepts on potential road blocks to cures as well as opportunities for intervention in diverse areas of investigation ranging from genomic alterations to metabolism, microenvironment, immunity, and mechanotransduction were discussed. Provocative concepts and novel therapeutic avenues were proposed. What follows is a critical analysis of the highlights of this meeting. Cancer Res; 76(17); 4924-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27520451

  14. Dynamically cured thermoplastic olefin polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, D.R.; Puydak, R.C.; Booth, D.A.

    1986-08-19

    A thermoplastic composition is described comprising a polyolefin resin, a first rubber component selected from the group consisting of polyisobutylene, and ethylene propylene copolymer (EPM) and EPDM and a second rubber component selected from the group consisting of halogenated butyl rubber and polychoroprene, the second rubber component being cured utilizing a curative other than a peroxide, which is a vulcanizing agent for the second rubber but not for the first rubber, the second rubber being cured to a fully vulcanized state by dynamic vulcanization in the presence of the polyolefin resin and first rubber compound.

  15. Real-time detection and data acquisition system for the left ventricular outline. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiber, J. H. C.

    1976-01-01

    To automate the data acquisition procedure, a real-time contour detection and data acquisition system for the left ventricular outline was developed using video techniques. The X-ray image of the contrast-filled left ventricle is stored for subsequent processing on film (cineangiogram), video tape or disc. The cineangiogram is converted into video format using a television camera. The video signal from either the TV camera, video tape or disc is the input signal to the system. The contour detection is based on a dynamic thresholding technique. Since the left ventricular outline is a smooth continuous function, for each contour side a narrow expectation window is defined in which the next borderpoint will be detected. A computer interface was designed and built for the online acquisition of the coordinates using a PDP-12 computer. The advantage of this system over other available systems is its potential for online, real-time acquisition of the left ventricular size and shape during angiocardiography.

  16. Transformation of deoxynivalenol and its acetylated derivatives in Chinese steamed bread making, as affected by pH, yeast, and steaming time.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Wang, Bujun

    2016-07-01

    We hereby report the transformation of deoxynivalenol (DON) and its acetylated derivatives (3-ADON and 15-ADON) by spiking targeted mycotoxins to Fusarium mycotoxin-free flour in the process of making Chinese steamed bread (CSB). The impacts of pH, yeast level, and steaming time on the transformation of 3-ADON to DON were investigated. DON, 3-ADON, and 15-ADON were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Spiked DON was stable throughout the CSB making process. Spiked 3-ADON and 15-ADON were partially deacetylated and transformed to DON during kneading (54.1-60.0% and 59.3-77.5%, respectively), fermentation (64.0-76.9% and 78.2-91.6%, respectively), and steaming (47.2-52.7% and 52.4-61.9%, respectively). The ADONs level increased after steaming compared with their level in the previous step. The pH level and steaming duration significantly (P<0.05) affected the conversion of 3-ADON during the CSB making process. Briefly, alkaline conditions and short steaming times favored the deacetylation of 3-ADON. The level of yeast did not remarkably (P<0.05) alter the transformation between ADONs and DON. PMID:26920279

  17. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-08-12

    Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

  18. Cure characterization of thick polyester composite structures using dielectric and finite difference analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.R.

    1993-12-31

    Disposable and permanently mounted dielectric sensors were used to characterize the cure in polyester sheet molding compound (SMC) at various locations through the thickness of the part in a simulated molding environment. Using established techniques, the dielectric and temperature information were combined to yield local cure state information for each sensor. Parts under five millimeters thick were found to cure rather uniformly while parts greater than this had increasing degrees of nonuniformity in cure behavior through the thickness. These observed cure state data were compared to finite difference model predictions. The model predictions, which were confirmed by the sensor cure data, may be used to optimize part design and production by predicting the curing behavior and molding cycle time required for new structures.

  19. Better than a cure.

    PubMed

    Adshead, Fiona; Thorpe, Allison

    2006-11-01

    A brief glance through the national papers and medical press shows the depth of concern with the cost of delivering high quality, free at the point of access healthcare to the population. However, at a time of increasingly greater demands being placed on public health systems across the globe, the question of how we can make health and healthcare both accessible to everyone and sustainable in the long term is being posed. In this paper we provide an insight into how England is responding to these challenges. PMID:17034824

  20. Electron Beam-Cure Polymer Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, G.; Frame, B.; Jensen, B.; Nettles, A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from NASA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are evaluating a series of electron beam curable composites for application in reusable launch vehicle airframe and propulsion systems. Objectives are to develop electron beam curable composites that are useful at cryogenic to elevated temperatures (-217 C to 200 C), validate key mechanical properties of these composites, and demonstrate cost-saving fabrication methods at the subcomponent level. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites is an enabling capability for production of aerospace structures in a non-autoclave process. Payoffs of this technology will be fabrication of composite structures at room temperature, reduced tooling cost and cure time, and improvements in component durability. This presentation covers the results of material property evaluations for electron beam-cured composites made with either unidirectional tape or woven fabric architectures. Resin systems have been evaluated for performance in ambient, cryogenic, and elevated temperature conditions. Results for electron beam composites and similar composites cured in conventional processes are reviewed for comparison. Fabrication demonstrations were also performed for electron beam-cured composite airframe and propulsion piping subcomponents. These parts have been built to validate manufacturing methods with electron beam composite materials, to evaluate electron beam curing processing parameters, and to demonstrate lightweight, low-cost tooling options.

  1. Lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.

    1982-01-01

    Partial substitution of a p-aminostyrene end-cap for the monomethyl ester of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid lowered the final cure temperature of typical PMR resins from 600 F to 500 F. The weight loss characteristics of neat resins and graphite fiber composites prepared by using the mixed end-cap approach were determined at 600 F. The room temperature and short-time elevated temperature mechanical properties of the composites at 550 F and 600 F were determined. The mechanical property retention characteristics of the composites at 550 F and 600 F are discussed.

  2. Changes on physico-chemical, textural, lipolysis and volatile compounds during the manufacture of dry-cured foal "cecina".

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, José M

    2014-01-01

    The changes in the physico-chemical and textural properties, lipolysis and volatile compounds during the manufacture of dry-cured foal "cecina" were studied. The pH increased during the last stages of processing but gradually declined over the curing period. TBARS values, hardness and chewiness increased with processing time from 0.14, 2.74 and 0.83 to 3.49 mg malonaldehyde/kg, 20.33 kg and 5.05 kg∗mm, respectively. Ripening time also affected the colour parameters: lightness (L*), redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) (P<0.001). The total average content of free fatty acid (FFA) increased significantly from 433.7 mg/100 g of fat in the raw pieces to 2655.5 mg/100 g of fat at the end of the drying-ripening stage. The main FFA at the end of the manufacturing process was palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by oleic (C18:1cis9), stearic (C18:0) and linoleic (C18:2n-6). A total of fifty five volatile compounds were identified during the manufacture of dry-cured foal "cecina", including esters, aldehydes, aliphatic hydrocarbons, branched hydrocarbons, alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, furans, ketones. Aldehydes reached their maximum level at the end of the post-salting stage. In the final product, esters became the dominant chemical compounds. PMID:23916960

  3. Out-of-Autoclave Cure Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    As the size of aerospace composite parts exceeds that of even the largest autoclaves, the development of new out-of-autoclave processes and materials is necessary to ensure quality and performance. Many out-of-autoclave prepreg systems can produce high-quality composites initially; however, due to long layup times, the resin advancement commonly causes high void content and variations in fiber volume. Applied Poleramic, Inc. (API), developed an aerospace-grade benzoxazine matrix composite prepreg material that offers more than a year out-time at ambient conditions and provides exceptionally low void content when out-of-autoclave cured. When compared with aerospace epoxy prepreg systems, API's innovation offers significant improvements in terms of out-time at ambient temperature and the corresponding tack retention. The carbon fiber composites developed with the optimized matrix technology have significantly better mechanical performance in terms of hot-wet retention and compression when compared with aerospace epoxy matrices. These composites also offer an excellent overall balance of properties. This matrix system imparts very low cure shrinkage, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and low density when compared with most aerospace epoxy prepreg materials.

  4. Effect of pH, ionic strength, dissolved organic carbon, time, and particle size on metals release from mine drainage impacted streambed sediments.

    PubMed

    Butler, Barbara A

    2009-03-01

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) input to a stream typically results in the stream having a reduced pH, increased concentrations of metals and salts, and decreased biological productivity. Removal and/or treatment of these AMD sources is desired to return the impacted stream(s) to initial conditions, or at least to conditions suitable for restoration of the aquatic ecosystem. Some expected changes in the water chemistry of the stream following removal of AMD input include an increase in pH, a decrease in ionic strength, and an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations from increased biological activity in the absence of toxic metals concentrations. These changes in water chemistry may cause the existing contaminated bed sediments to become a source of metals to the stream water. Streambed sediments, collected from North Fork Clear Creek (NFCC), Colorado, currently impacted by AMD, were assessed for the effects of pH, ionic strength, DOC concentration, time, and particle size on metals release using a factorial design. The design included two levels for each chemical parameter (ionic strength = 40 and 80% lower than ambient; pH = 6 and 8; and DOC = 1 and 3 mg/l higher than ambient), ten sampling times (from zero to 48 h), and two size fractions of sediments (63 microm < or = x < 2 mm and < 63 microm). Greater concentrations of metals were released from the smaller sized sediments compared with the larger, with the exception of Cu. A mild acid digestion (0.6M HCl) evaluated the amount of each metal that could be removed easily from each of the sediment size fractions. Release of all metals over all time points, treatments, and from both sediment sizes was less than 1% of the extractable concentrations, with the exception of Mn, which ranged from 4 to 7% from the smaller sized sediment. Greater percentages of the 0.6M HCl-extractable concentrations of Cu, Fe, and Zn were released from the larger sized sediment, while this was true for release of Cd and Mn from

  5. 7 CFR 30.10 - Cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cure. 30.10 Section 30.10 Agriculture Regulations of... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.10 Cure. To dry the sap from newly harvested tobacco by either natural or artificial process. Proper curing...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1412 - Well cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well cured. 51.1412 Section 51.1412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1412 Well cured. Well cured means that...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1412 - Well cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well cured. 51.1412 Section 51.1412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1412 Well cured. Well cured means that...

  8. HBV cure: why, how, when?

    PubMed

    Levrero, Massimo; Testoni, Barbara; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Current HBV treatments control replication and liver disease progression in the vast majority of treated patients. However, HBV patients often require lifelong therapies due to the persistence of transcriptionally active viral cccDNA mini-chromosome in the nucleus, which is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A true complete cure of HBV would require clearance of intranuclear cccDNA from all infected hepatocytes. An intermediate but still relevant step forward that would allow treatment cessation would be reaching a functional cure, equivalent to resolved acute infection, with a durable HBsAg loss±anti-HBs seroconversion, undetectable serum DNA and persistence of cccDNA in a transcriptionally inactive status. Recent advances in technologies and pharmaceutical sciences, including the cloning of the mayor HBV receptor (i.e. the NTCP transporter) and the development in vitro HBV infection models, have heralded a new horizon of innovative antiviral and immune-therapeutic approaches. PMID:27447092

  9. Chromothriptic cure of WHIM syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDermott, David H; Gao, Ji-Liang; Liu, Qian; Siwicki, Marie; Martens, Craig; Jacobs, Paejonette; Velez, Daniel; Yim, Erin; Bryke, Christine R; Hsu, Nancy; Dai, Zunyan; Marquesen, Martha M; Stregevsky, Elina; Kwatemaa, Nana; Theobald, Narda; Long Priel, Debra A; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark A; Calvo, Katherine R; Maric, Irina; Desmond, Ronan; Holmes, Kevin L; Kuhns, Douglas B; Balabanian, Karl; Bachelerie, Françoise; Porcella, Stephen F; Malech, Harry L; Murphy, Philip M

    2015-02-12

    Chromothripsis is a catastrophic cellular event recently described in cancer in which chromosomes undergo massive deletion and rearrangement. Here, we report a case in which chromothripsis spontaneously cured a patient with WHIM syndrome, an autosomal dominant combined immunodeficiency disease caused by gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. In this patient, deletion of the disease allele, CXCR4(R334X), as well as 163 other genes from one copy of chromosome 2 occurred in a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) that repopulated the myeloid but not the lymphoid lineage. In competitive mouse bone marrow (BM) transplantation experiments, Cxcr4 haploinsufficiency was sufficient to confer a strong long-term engraftment advantage of donor BM over BM from either wild-type or WHIM syndrome model mice, suggesting a potential mechanism for the patient's cure. Our findings suggest that partial inactivation of CXCR4 may have general utility as a strategy to promote HSC engraftment in transplantation. PMID:25662009

  10. Influence of light-curing protocols on polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage force of a dual-cured core build-up resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas; Krejci, Ivo

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of time delay and duration of photo-activation on linear polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of a dual-cured core build-up resin composite. The test material (Rebilda DC) was light-cured for 20 or 60 s either early (2 min) or late (7 min) after the start of mixing. Non-irradiated self-cured specimens served as controls. Linear shrinkage and shrinkage force were measured for 60 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Self-cured controls, showing a linear shrinkage similar to that of specimens early light-cured for 20 s generated the lowest shrinkage force and hardness. A shorter light exposure time (20 s vs. 60 s) reduced linear shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardness when early light-curing was performed, but did not affect the three properties in specimens light-cured late after the start of mixing. Late photo-activation increased linear shrinkage, irrespective of irradiation time, and resulted in a higher shrinkage force and hardness for short light exposure time. A moderate correlation was found between the two shrinkage properties studied (r(2) = 0.65). In conclusion, improvements in shrinkage behavior of the tested core build-up material were associated with inferior hardening, making it important to adapt curing protocols to the clinical situation. PMID:20662918

  11. Cure shrinkage of thermoset composites

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The shrinkage of thermoset composites during cure was studied using a volumetric dilatometer. The material systems studied were AS4 carbon fiber/Hercules' 3501-6 epoxy, IM7 carbon fiber/Hercules 8551-7A toughened epoxy and IM7 carbon fiber/BASF's 5250-4 bismaleimide. Shrinkage of the samples due to both polymerization and thermal expansion effects was seen. The volume changes of the materials during cure were then compared to results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dielectric cure monitoring. Maximums in volume corresponded to minimums in storage and loss modulus from DMA and maximums in the dielectric loss factor. Resin shrinkage during the 177 deg C (350 F) hold corresponded to the onset of polymerization seen by the rapid increase in the storage modulus and the decrease in the dielectric loss factor response due to reduced ion mobility. These results show that volumetric dilatometry can be an effective tool in the development of materials processing strategies and can be useful in studying residual stresses in composites. 9 refs.

  12. Freud's psychoanalysis: a moral cure.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Johan

    2014-08-01

    That psychoanalytical treatment in its classical Freudian sense is primarily a moral or ethical cure is not a very controversial claim. However, it is far from obvious how we are to understand precisely the moral character of psychoanalysis. It has frequently been proposed that this designation is valid because psychoanalysis strives neither to cure psychological symptoms pharmaceutically, nor to superficially modify the behaviour of the analysand, but to lead the analysand through an interpretive process during which he gradually gains knowledge of the unconscious motives that determine his behaviour, a process that might ideally liberate him to obtain, in relation to his inner desires, the status of a moral agent. There resides something appealing in these claims. But it is the author's belief that there is an even deeper moral dimension applying to psychoanalytical theory and praxis. Freudian psychoanalysis is a moral cure due to its way of thematizing psychological suffering as moral suffering. And this means that the moral subject - the being that can experience moral suffering - is not primarily something that the psychoanalytical treatment strives to realize, but rather the presupposition for the way in which psychoanalysis theorizes psychological problems as such. PMID:24720632

  13. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  14. Peptidomics as a tool for quality control in dry-cured ham processing.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Toldrá, Fidel

    2016-09-16

    Spanish dry-cured ham is a high quality product whose economic value is mainly given by its curing time. An intense proteolysis takes place throughout the dry-cured processing, which results in the generation of a high amount of peptides and free amino acids responsible for the final quality of dry-cured hams. In this work, a peptidomics approach has been used to study the evolution of peptides throughout the ham dry-curing process, identifying and quantifying the generated peptides in order to define potential quality biomarkers. For this purpose, dry-cured ham extracts at different processing times (0, 2, 3.5, 5, 6.5 and 9months) were fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography and analysed by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Differences obtained in the relative quantification of peptides by using a label-free methodology were useful to establish differences between processing times, being peptides generated by the degradation of myosin light chain 1 protein mainly responsible for the observed differences during the last stages of curing. In particular, APAPAPAPPKEEKI and PAPAPAPAPAPAPAPPKE, exclusively identified at 9months of curing, would be potential markers to control the time of curing and thus the final quality of dry-cured hams. Biological significance A peptidomics approach has been used to study the evolution of peptides throughout the ham dry-curing process, identifying peptides APAPAPAPPKEEKI and PAPAPAPAPAPAPAPPKE, which were only detected at 9months of process. So, they would constitute good potential markers to control the time of processing and thus the final quality of dry-cured hams. PMID:26926439

  15. Measurement of the degree of cure in epoxies with ultrasonic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Parker, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of ultrasonic longitudinal velocity values to measure the degree of cure (defined for an epoxide system as the concentration of epoxide/amine bonds divided by the initial epoxide concentration) in epoxy resins is investigated. The experimental setup used to measure the changes in longitudinal velocity with time is described, together with the technique used to calculate the degree of cure from the acoustic data, using the principle of additive module. Measurements were done with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin cured with an amine adduct agent. Good qualitative agreement was shown between the time dependence of the acoustically measured degree of cure and the predicted rate of reaction.

  16. Resolving Early Stages of Homogeneous Iron(III) Oxyhydroxide Formation from Iron(III) Nitrate Solutions at pH 3 Using Time-Resolved SAXS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements coupled to a stopped-flow device has permitted the observation of the kinetics of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (FeOx) formation and transformation from around 1 s to 30 min after initiation under environmentally relevant conditions at pH 3. The Unified Model approach was used to determine the evolution of multiple key parameters (particle scattering mass, mean particle volume, particle concentration, particle dimensionality, and particle size) for two separate structural levels as a function of time, with the results obtained enabling clarification of the mechanisms underlying FeOx formation and transformation under these conditions. Colloidal primary particles (radius of gyration 2–10 nm) that were observable by SAXS formed within 1 s of stopping the flow and subsequently grew over several minutes, first by cluster–cluster addition and then by a monomer-addition mechanism. Aggregation of these primary particles via a secondary cluster–cluster addition mechanism simultaneously resulted in a distinct population of larger (25–40 nm radius of gyration) secondary particles. The primary particles evolved into compact spheroidal forms with fractally rough surfaces, while the secondary particles were relatively open mass fractal structures. Comparison of the observed rates of these processes with those predicted for Fe polymerization indicates that kinetics of primary particle formation were likely controlled initially by rates of exchange between water molecules coordinated with Fe and those in the bulk solution. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying FeOx formation and transformation, and the kinetics of these mechanisms, at pH 3. PMID:24601665

  17. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  18. Photo-Curing: UV Radiation curing of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    The Polymers Branch of the Materials Division is dedicated to the development of high-performance for a variety of applications. Areas of significant interest include high- temperature polymers, low density, and high strength insulating materials, conductive polymers, and high density polymer electrolytes. This summer our group is working diligently on a photo-curing project. There is interest in the medical community feel the need for a new and improved balloon that will be used for angioplasty (a form of heart surgery). This product should maintain flexibility but add many other properties. Like possibly further processability and resistance to infection. Our group intends on coming up with this product by using photo-enolization (or simply, photo-curing) by Diels-Alder trapping. The main objective was to synthesize a series of new polymers by Diels-Alder cycloaddition of photoenols with more elastomeric properties. Our group was responsible for performing the proper photo-curing techniques of the polymers with diacrylates and bismaleimides, synthesizing novel monomers, and evaluating experimental results. We attempted to use a diacrylate to synthesize the polymer because of previous research done within the Polymers Branch here at NASA. Most acrylates are commercially available, have more elastometric properties than a typical rigid aromatic structure has and they contain ethylene oxides in the middle of their structure that create extensive flexibility. The problem we encountered with the acrylates is that they photo chemically and thermally self polymerize and create diradicals at low temperatures; these constraints caused a lot of unnecessary side reactions. We want to promote solely, diketone polymerization because this type of polymerization has the ability to cause very elastic polymers. We chose to direct our attention towards the usage of maleimides because they are known for eliminating these unnecessary side reactions.

  19. HIV cure research in South Africa: a preliminary exploration of stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Keymanthri; Staunton, Ciara; de Roubaix, Malcolm; Cotton, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Innovative strategies for HIV cure are in development and research studies are being designed and planned globally. South Africa is no exception. However, little is known about stakeholders' knowledge, understanding and expectations of future cure research. This study aimed to obtain in-depth qualitative insights into stakeholder perspectives at this formative stage of HIV cure research. Fifteen stakeholders were interviewed in an HIV research clinic in the Western Cape, South Africa with their consent. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic content analysis. Broad themes that emerged included the meaning of cure, awareness of HIV cure research, risks and benefits of such research. General awareness and understanding of HIV cure research was lower than expected. Some participants expressed a fatalistic attitude to HIV and described it as an "end-time illness" with no prospect of cure. In general, HIV cure research was regarded as risky - biologically psychologically and socially. If study designs were to include treatment interruption, participants would comply only if success was guaranteed. Given these perceptions of HIV cure research, significant challenges to consent processes and participant recruitment can be anticipated. Authentic community engagement and intensive educational interventions will be necessary prior to future cure research in South Africa. PMID:26565595

  20. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Wilethane 44 Cure

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Weigle

    2006-10-01

    Wilethane 44 is a polyurethane adhesive developed by the Materials Team within ESA-MEE at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a replacement for Hexcel Corporation Urethane 7200. Urethane 7200 is used in numerous weapon systems, but it was withdrawn from the market in 1989. The weapons complex requires a replacement material for use in the W76-1 LEP and the W88, as well as for assembly of JTAs for other warheads. All polyurethane systems are susceptible to moisture reacting with unreacted isocyanate groups. This side reaction competes with the curing reaction and results in CO{sub 2} formation. Therefore, a polyurethane adhesive can exhibit foaming if appropriate environmental controls are not in place while it cures. A designed experiment has been conducted at TA-16-304 to determine the effects of ambient conditions on the properties of cured Wilethane 44. Temperature was varied from 15 C to 30 C and relative humidity from 15% to 40%. The density, hardness at 24 hours, and butt tensile strength on aluminum substrates were measured and fitted to quadratic equations over the experimental space. Additionally, the loss and storage moduli during cure were monitored as a function of cure temperature. These experiments provide a stronger basis for establishing appropriate environmental conditions and cure times when using Wilethane 44. The current guidelines are a working time of 90 minutes, a cure time of 18 hours, and a relative humidity of less than 25%, regardless of ambient temperature. Viscosity measurements revealed that the working time is a strong function of temperature and can be as long as 130 minutes at 15 C or as short as 90 minutes at 30 C. The experiments also showed that the gel time is much longer than originally thought, as long as 13 hours at 15 C. Consequently, it may be necessary to extend the required cure time at temperatures below 20 C. Allowable humidity varies as a function of temperature from 34% at 15 C to 15% at 30 C.

  1. Electron beam curing of EPDM

    SciTech Connect

    Vroomen, G.L.M.; Visser, G.W.; Gehring, J.

    1991-11-01

    Normally EPDM rubbers are vulcanized by systems based on sulphur, resin or peroxide. The common feature of these systems is that they all require activator energy in the form of heat. The (extremely) high temperatures (approximately 180C) have the disadvantage that the final properties of the finished product may be affected in one way or another by a variety of uncontrolled side reactions which may occur. Radiation curing, on the other hand, is a process which differs from those mentioned above in that the final curing is carried out at about 20C under closely controlled conditions (such as radiation dose, penetration depth, etc.), and this form of curing ultimately results in a more well-defined end product. In the rubber industry, this technique is used by large rubber processors (for example, in roof sheeting and cable production). Its widespread use is, however, impeded by the high investment costs. One way of avoiding these high costs is to arrange for the products to be irradiated by contractors. The optimum radiation dose for EPDM is determined by the required pattern of properties. From this study it may be concluded that the network is primarily built up at a radiation dose of up to approximately 100 kGy. The degree to which it is built up depends partly on the coactivator used and the EPDM type used. In choosing the coactivator, allowance has to be made for its solubility in EPDM. The type of oil chosen and any stabilizer additions will affect the crosslinking efficiency. Contrary to studies published earlier, in this study it was found that when EDMA is used as a coactivator, no difference can be detected between a DCPD type (4%) and an ENB type (4%), provided both have an identical molecular weight distribution. Increasing the ENB content has less effect on the final crosslink density than using a type having a broader molecular weight distribution.

  2. Dynamic cure measurement of dental polymer composites using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Palin, Will M.; Shortall, Adrian C.

    2008-02-01

    Dental amalgam is being increasingly replaced by Light-activated resin-based dental composites. However, these materials are limited by inefficient setting reactions as a function of depth, constraining the maximum extent of cure and reducing biocompatibility. In this paper we demonstrate a novel metrological tool for dynamic monitoring of refractive index and thickness change through curing resins using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We present real-time measurements from pre- to post-cure of a series of un-filled bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resins with different inhibitor concentrations. Our results demonstrate that refractive index measurements are sensitive to the extent of cure of such resins and that the inhibitor concentration strongly affects the cure dynamics and final extent of cure.

  3. Segmental dynamics of the cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte band 3 determined by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy: sensitivity to pH and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Thevenin, B J; Periasamy, N; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1994-03-01

    Interactions between the erythrocyte membrane and its skeleton are mediated primarily by binding of cytoskeletal components to a conformationally sensitive structure, the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3). To examine the nanosecond segmental motions of cdb3, band 3 was labeled selectively by fluorescein maleimide at Cys-201 near the proposed hinge in cdb3 about which pH-dependent conformational changes occur. Time-resolved anisotropy of labeled cdb3 in isolated form and in stripped erythrocyte membranes was measured by parallel-acquisition frequency-domain microfluorimetry. Samples had a single-component fluorescein lifetime of approximately 4 ns. Multifrequency phase and modulation data (5-200 MHz) fitted well to a segmental motion model containing two correlation times (tau 1c and tau 2c) and two limiting anisotropies (r1infinity and r2infinity). Measurements in protease-cleaved and denatured samples indicated that tau 1c (100-150 ps) corresponded to rapid rotation of bound fluorescein and tau 2c (2-5 ns) corresponded to segmental motion of cdb3. Both motions were hindered as quantified by nonzero r1infinity and r2infinity. The strong pH dependence of segmental motion correlated with that of cdb3 conformation measured by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Significant changes in cdb3 segmental motion occurred upon interactions with the small ligands 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate and calcium and several glycolytic enzymes known to bind to the N terminus of band 3. These time-resolved fluorescence measurements of the nanosecond segmental dynamics of a labeled membrane protein provide evidence for the sensitivity of cdb3 conformation to ligand binding and suggest long-range structural communication through cdb3. PMID:8127875

  4. Overexpression of PhEXPA1 increases cell size, modifies cell wall polymer composition and affects the timing of axillary meristem development in Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed

    Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Dal Santo, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; de Groot, Peter; Sordo, Sara; Citterio, Sandra; Monti, Francesca; Pezzotti, Mario

    2011-08-01

    • Expansins are cell wall proteins required for cell enlargement and cell wall loosening during many developmental processes. The involvement of the Petunia hybrida expansin A1 (PhEXPA1) gene in cell expansion, the control of organ size and cell wall polysaccharide composition was investigated by overexpressing PhEXPA1 in petunia plants. • PhEXPA1 promoter activity was evaluated using a promoter-GUS assay and the protein's subcellular localization was established by expressing a PhEXPA1-GFP fusion protein. PhEXPA1 was overexpressed in transgenic plants using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and chemical analysis were used for the quantitative analysis of cell wall polymers. • The GUS and GFP assays demonstrated that PhEXPA1 is present in the cell walls of expanding tissues. The constitutive overexpression of PhEXPA1 significantly affected expansin activity and organ size, leading to changes in the architecture of petunia plants by initiating premature axillary meristem outgrowth. Moreover, a significant change in cell wall polymer composition in the petal limbs of transgenic plants was observed. • These results support a role for expansins in the determination of organ shape, in lateral branching, and in the variation of cell wall polymer composition, probably reflecting a complex role in cell wall metabolism. PMID:21534969

  5. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2) Thin Film Using a Chemical Bath Deposition Method with Improved Deposition Time, Temperature and pH

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimiasl, Saeideh; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan; Kassim, Anuar; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2) thin films were prepared on glass substrates by a simple chemical bath deposition method. Triethanolamine was used as complexing agent to decrease time and temperature of deposition and shift the pH of the solution to the noncorrosive region. The films were characterized for composition, surface morphology, structure and optical properties. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that SnOx thin films consist of a polycrystalline structure with an average grain size of 36 nm. Atomic force microscopy studies show a uniform grain distribution without pinholes. The elemental composition was evaluated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average O/Sn atomic percentage ratio is 1.72. Band gap energy and optical transition were determined from optical absorbance data. The film was found to exhibit direct and indirect transitions in the visible spectrum with band gap values of about 3.9 and 3.7 eV, respectively. The optical transmittance in the visible region is 82%. The SnOx nanocrystals exhibit an ultraviolet emission band centered at 392 nm in the vicinity of the band edge, which is attributed to the well-known exciton transition in SnOx. Photosensitivity was detected in the positive region under illumination with white light. PMID:22163690

  6. Urine pH, container composition, and exposure time influence adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Matthew H; McCue, Joseph J; Klette, Kevin L

    2005-10-01

    11-nor-delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH) is the primary cannabinoid present in the urine of individuals who have used marijuana and is the target analyte identified at forensic urinalysis drug testing laboratories. The preparation, storage, transport, and processing of control materials for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of human urine specimens is critical to accurate compound identification and quantification. Previous studies have suggested that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is influenced by container composition and storage temperature. In this study, urine solutions of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH (7.5, 15, 60, and 500 ng/mL) at three physiologically-relevant pHs (4.6, 6.5, and 8.4) were prepared and subjected to storage and processing in containers of different compositions (polypropylene and borosilicate glass). Analyte identification and quantification were achieved using tetramethylammonium hydroxide/iodomethane-based derivatization followed by GC separation and electron-impact MS. These analyses demonstrate that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is a phenomenon found in acidic urine solutions and is relatively absent in urine solutions that are near-neutral or basic. Furthermore, the data indicate that the adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is dependent on solution-container exposure time and is similar between containers of two distinct compositions. These results suggest that for optimal analytical control performance, solution pH and control processing times are critical elements. PMID:16419391

  7. Performance of concrete under different curing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Gjorv, O.E.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of curing conditions on strength and permeability of concrete was studied. Test results showed that after 3 and 7 days moist curing only the concretes with w/c ratios equal to or less than 0.4 were accepted, while after 28 days of moist curing however, even the concrete with w/c of 0.6 could be accepted. Silica fume has a significant effect on the resistance to water penetration. For the concretes both with and without silica fume and with w/c + s of 0.5, the 28-day compressive strengths of 3 and 7 days moist curing were higher than those of 28 days moist curing, and the silica fume concrete seemed to be less sensitive to early drying. The curing temperatures did not affect the water penetration of concrete, but affected the chloride penetration and compressive strength of concrete significantly.

  8. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-01-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  9. Investigation of Film Curing by Dielectric Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guma, Noemi Candelaria

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric analysis (DEA) relies on the response of molecules to a changing electric field. Permittivity (epsilon^') is a parameter obtained from DEA, which is proportional to the amount of molecular alignment (or motion). A DEA methodology was developed to evaluate and classify the degree of cure of films, and to demonstrate the mechanism of the curing phenomenon at a molecular level. The model material employed in the study was Eudragit^circler RS30D, an aqueous-based film forming polymeric material, containing 20% acetyl tributyl citrate as plasticizer. The data showed changes in the dielectric behavior of the polymer molecules in films that were subjected to accelerated stability or improper curing conditions. These dielectric changes were also manifested as changes in the permeability characteristics of the film, which ultimately influenced the final performance of the dosage form. By monitoring the dielectric behavior of the coating material during a curing cycle, a classification of three stages of curing was developed, namely undercured, optimally cured, and overcured. The changes in dielectric properties of the film reflected the changes in molecular structure, which correlated with changes in permeability and surface morphology. Based on the data, a mechanism of improper cure was proposed, which contends that the curing phenomenon is driven by two major forces, namely: the heterogenous loss and/or redistribution of plasticizer molecules during the curing process and the development of strain in the film structure during the coating process. A mathematical equation was derived to predict the epsilon^' of film-coated beads based on the epsilon^ ' data of free films cured under the same conditions. The model is based on the premise that "equal epsilon^' denotes equal mobility" for the same material, whether as free film or applied onto a substrate. The DEA technique developed and the proposed rationale of the curing phenomenon may be useful in optimizing the

  10. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  11. Modeling of salt diffusion in raw hide: an optimization of the curing process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most common method of preserving raw hides is brine curing with sodium chloride. However, this process has three important disadvantages: first, the length of time that it takes, which is a minimum of 18 hours; second, the insufficient degree of curing reached in some hides due to an overload a...

  12. Modeling of Salt Diffusion in Raw Hide: An Optimization of the Curing Process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most common method of preserving raw hides is brine curing with sodium chloride. However, this process has three important disadvantages: first, the length of time that it takes, which is a minimum of 18 hours; second, the insufficient degree of curing reached in some hides due to an overload a...

  13. Effect of time on the interfacial and foaming properties of beta-lactoglobulin/acacia gum electrostatic complexes and coacervates at pH 4.2.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christophe; da Silva, Tânia Palma; Bovay, Claudine; Rami-Shojaei, Sabrina; Frossard, Philippe; Kolodziejczyk, Eric; Leser, Martin E

    2005-08-16

    The electrostatic complexation between beta-lactoglobulin and acacia gum was investigated at pH 4.2 and 25 degrees C. The binding isotherm revealed a spontaneous exothermic reaction, leading to a DeltaHobs = -2108 kJ mol(-1) and a saturation protein to polysaccharide weight mixing ratio of 2:1. Soluble electrostatic complexes formed in these conditions were characterized by a hydrodynamic diameter of 119 +/- 0.6 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.097. The effect of time on the interfacial and foaming properties of these soluble complexes was investigated at a concentration of 0.1 wt % at two different times after mixing (4 min, referred as t approximately 0 h and t = 24 h). At t approximately 0 h, the mixture is mainly made of aggregating soluble electrostatic complexes, whereas after 24 h these complexes have already insolubilize to form liquid coacervates. The surface elasticity, viscosity and phase angle obtained at low frequency (0.01 Hz) using oscillating bubble tensiometry revealed higher fluidity and less rigidity in the film formed at t approximately 0 h. This observation was confirmed by diminishing bubble experiments coupled with microscopy of the thin film. It was thicker, more homogeneous and contained more water at t approximately 0 h as compared to t = 24 h (thinner film, less water). This led to very different gas permeability's of Kt approximately 0 h = 0.021 cm s(-1) and Kt=24 h) = 0.449 cm s(-1), respectively. Aqueous foams produced with the beta-lactoglobulin/acacia gum electrostatic complexes or coacervates exhibited very different stability. The former (t approximately 0 h) had a stable volume, combining low drainage rate and mainly air bubble disproportionation as the destabilization mechanism. By contrast, using coacervates aged for 24 h, the foam was significantly less stable, combining fast liquid drainage and air bubble destabilization though fast gas diffusion followed by film rupture and bubble coalescence. The strong effect of time on

  14. Raman spectroscopic studies of the cure of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S. E.; Brown, E. C.; Corrigan, N.; Coates, P. D.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2005-10-01

    The cure of polydicyclopentadiene conducted by ring-opening metathesis polymerisation in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst was studied using non-invasive Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of the monomer precursor and polymerised product were fully characterised and all stages of polymerisation monitored. Because of the monomer's high reactivity, the cure process is adaptable to reaction injection moulding and reactive rotational moulding. The viscosity of the dicyclopentadiene undergoes a rapid change at the beginning of the polymerisation process and it is critical that the induction time of the viscosity increase is determined and controlled for successful manufacturing. The results from this work show non-invasive Raman spectroscopic monitoring to be an effective method for monitoring the degree of cure, paving the way for possible implementation of the technique as a method of real-time analysis for control and optimisation during reactive processing. Agreement is shown between Raman measurements and ultrasonic time of flight data acquired during the initial induction period of the curing process.

  15. [Nonnius and the Spa cure].

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J; Lemli, J; Marganne, M H; Melard, M

    1996-01-01

    The 12th of July 1635, Jan van Beverwyck wrote a letter from Dordrecht to his esteemed friend Luis Nunez, in Antwerp. He asked him for indications about the cure of kidney stones of which he was suffering. He had just passed two calculi very painfully. Nunez answered on July 31. His letter summarized his own experience with this disease. In such cases, temperate diuretics and emollients are well indicated: ingestion of light decoctions of Malva and Viola, Caerefolium and Parieteria as well as Marshmallow syrup. No purge and no 'chemicals'. However, the best remedy was drinking Spa water. Usually the best way to absorb it is to come to the springs, in the Ardennes, part of the independent Principality of Liège. However, considering the horrors of the war (the Thirty Years War) endangering the country, van Beverwyck would be wise to drink imported water during 40 or 50 days, while staying home quietly, in Dordrecht. The letter points out the importance of provoked diuresis in the treatment of kidney stones. On the other hand the letter is an illustration of the continuing contacts between the United Provinces and the Spanish territories and of the commercial traffic between Antwerp, Dordrecht and Spa. The exported water was bottled from many 'pouhons'. It was acid, ferruginous, sulfurous and saturated with carbon dioxide; no pathogen germs, at least at the spring. Nunez quoted the large number of his patients cured with Spa water in Antwerp. This is an illustration of its commercial expansion even during this critical period. PMID:8848877

  16. Hepatitis C, stigma and cure

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Rui Tato; Barreira, David Pires

    2013-01-01

    The infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the most important global chronic viral infections worldwide. It is estimated to affect around 3% of the world population, about 170-200 million people. Great part of the infections are asymptomatic, the patient can be a chronic carrier for decades without knowing it. The most severe consequences of the chronic infection are liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, which appears in 20%-40% of the patients, leading to hepatic failure and death. The HCV was discovered 25 years ago in 1989, is a RNA virus and classified by the World Health Organization as an oncogenic one. Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most important cancers, the fifth worldwide in terms of mortality. It has been increasing in the Ocidental world, mainly due to chronic hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is not only a liver disease and a cause of cirrhosis, but also a mental, psychological, familiar, and social disease. The stigma that the infected person sometimes carries is tremendous having multiple consequences. The main cause is lack of adequate information, even in the health professionals setting. But, besides the “drama” of being infected, health professionals, family, society and the infected patients, must be aware of the chance of real cure and total and definitive elimination of the virus. The treatment for hepatitis C has begun in the last 80´s with a percentage of cure of 6%. Step by step the efficacy of the therapy for hepatitis C is rapidly increasing and nowadays with the very new medications, the so called Direct Antiviral Agents-DAAs of new generation, is around 80%-90%. PMID:24187444

  17. Changes on degree of conversion of dual-cure luting light-cured with blue LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandéca, M. C.; El-Mowafy, O.; Saade, E. G.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-05-01

    The indirect adhesive procedures constitute recently a substantial portion of contemporary esthetic restorative treatments. The resin cements have been used to bond tooth substrate and restorative materials. Due to recently introduction of the self-bonding resin luting cement based on a new monomer, filler and initiation technology has become important to study the degree of conversion of these new materials. In the present work the polymerization reaction and the filler content of dual-cured dental resin cements were studied by means of infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry (TG). Twenty specimens were made in a metallic mold (8 mm diameter × 1 mm thick) from each of 2 cements, Panavia® F2.0 (Kuraray) and RelyX™ Unicem Applicap (3M/ESPE). Each specimen was cured with blue LED with power density of 500 mW/cm2 for 30 s. Immediately after curing, 24 and 48 h, and 7 days DC was determined. For each time interval 5 specimens were pulverized, pressed with KBr and analyzed with FT-IR. The TG measurements were performed in Netzsch TG 209 under oxygen atmosphere and heating rate of 10°C/min from 25 to 700°C. A two-way ANOVA showed DC (%) mean values statistically significance differences between two cements ( p < 0.05). The Tukey’s test showed no significant difference only for the 24 and 48 h after light irradiation for both resin cements ( p > 0.05). The Relx-Y™ Unicem mean values were significantly higher than Panavia® F 2.0. The degree of conversion means values increasing with the storage time and the filler content showed similar for both resin cements.

  18. Towards the real-time monitoring of glucose in tear fluid: holographic glucose sensors with reduced interference from lactate and pH.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoping; Pan, Xiaohan; Blyth, Jeff; Lowe, Christopher R

    2008-01-18

    Glucose-selective holographic sensors were fabricated from unique tetrahedral 2-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (2-APB) incorporated with co-monomers poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (PEG), (3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (ATMA) and [2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl]-trimethylammonium chloride (AETA) into thin hydrogel films which were transformed into volume holograms using a diffusion method coupled with holographic recording using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The results showed that the 2-APB-based holographic sensors contracted upon addition of glucose due to the formation of a 2:1 complex between the tetrahedral 2-APB and glucose. More significantly, the 2-APB-based holographic sensors had greatly reduced lactate dependence and a hugely reduced pH effect over the physiological range of pH. These features are vital for development of contact lens-based glucose sensor, where the pH variability is greater (pH 5.8-7.8) and the lactate concentration is substantially higher than in blood. Furthermore, the 2-APB-based holographic sensors also displayed fast response to glucose. The successful union of holograms and the tetrahedral 2-APB receptor for glucose detection in artificial tear fluid is also demonstrated. This new type of holographic sensors responding to glucose with features of minor pH effect and negligible interference from lactate is applicable to the detection of glucose concentrations in tear fluid for the management of diabetes. PMID:18060763

  19. Colour and organic removal of biologically treated coffee curing wastewater by electrochemical oxidation method.

    PubMed

    Bejankiwar, Rajesh S; Lokesh, K S; Gowda, T P Halappa

    2003-05-01

    The treatment of biologically treated wastewater of coffee-curing industry by the electrochemical oxidation using steel anode was investigated. Bench-scale experiments were conducted for activated sludge process on raw wastewater and the treated effluents were further treated by electrochemical oxidation method for its colour and organic content removal. The efficiency of the process was determined in terms of removal percentage of COD, BOD and colour during the course of reaction. Several operating parameters like time, pH and current density were examined to ascertain their effects on the treatment efficiency. Steel anode was found to be effective for the COD and colour removal with anode efficiency of 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) and energy consumption 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD at pH 9. The decrease in pH from 9 to 3 found to increase the anode efficiency from 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) to 0.144 kWh x kg(-1) of COD while decrease the energy consumption from 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD to 12.86 kWh x kg(-1) of COD. The pH of 5 was considered an ideal from the present treatment process as it avoids the addition of chemicals for neutralization of treated effluents and also economical with respect to energy consumption. An empirical relation developed for relationship between applied current density and COD removal efficiency showed strong predictive capability with coefficient of determination of 96.5%. PMID:12938980

  20. A new hypothesis on HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Hladik, Florian

    2015-01-01

    In this opinion article, I provide the rationale for my hypothesis that nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) may prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cure by promoting the survival of cells with integrated provirus. If correct, we may be closer to a cure than we realize. PMID:26380071

  1. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  2. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research

    PubMed Central

    Policicchio, Benjamin B.; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal. PMID:26858716

  3. Framing expectations in early HIV cure research.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Karine; Henderson, Gail E; Margolis, David M

    2014-10-01

    Language used to describe clinical research represents a powerful opportunity to educate volunteers. In the case of HIV cure research there is an emerging need to manage expectations by using the term 'experiment'. Cure experiments are proof-of-concept studies designed to evaluate novel paradigms to reduce persistent HIV-1 reservoirs, without any expectation of medical benefit. PMID:25280965

  4. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research.

    PubMed

    Policicchio, Benjamin B; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal. PMID:26858716

  5. Cure Chemistry of Phenylethynyl Terminated Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Karen H.; Orwoll, Robert A.; Young, Philip R.; Jensen, Brian J.; McNair, Harold M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to process high performance polymers into quality, void-free composites has been significantly advanced using oligomers terminated with reactive groups which cure or crosslink at elevated temperature without the evolution of volatile byproducts. Several matrix resin systems of considerable interest to the aerospace community utilize phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) technology to achieve this advantage. The present paper addresses the cure chemistry of PETI oligomers. The thermal cure of a low molecular weight model compound was studied using a variety of analytical techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The studies indicate an extremely complex cure process. Many stable products were isolated and this paper reports current work on identification of those products. The intent of this research is to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of the cured PETI engineering materials so that performance and durability can be more fully assessed.

  6. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  7. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519...

  12. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  13. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  14. Knowledge based control for microwave curing of polymer composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.; Sticklen, J.; Hawley, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    Traditionally, the majority of thermoset composite materials have been autoclave cured. Some alternatives to curing in an autoclave include E-Beam and microwave curing. In the Microwave Research Group at MSU, microwave curing technology is being pursued for the purpose of achieving higher throughput, lower cost and higher energy efficiency, relative to autoclave curing.

  15. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  16. EFFECT OF pH, IONIC STRENGTH, DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON, TIME, AND PARTICLE SIZE ON METALS RELEASE FROM MINE DRAINAGE IMPACTED STREAMBED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) input to a stream typically results in the stream having a reduced pH, increased concentrations of metals and salts, and decreased biological productivity. Removal and/or treatment of these AMD sources is desired to return the impacted stream(s) to initi...

  17. Effects of Various Salts on Physicochemical Properties and Sensory Characteristics of Cured Meat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Kim, Hyun-Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of refined, solar, and bamboo salt on the physico-chemical properties and sensory characteristics of cured pork loin. Moisture, protein, fat, and ash content, lightness, yellowness, cooking yield, and color, juiciness, and tenderness of sensory properties on curing pork loin exhibited no significant differences regardless of the nature of salts. The pH of raw and cooked cured pork loin with added bamboo salt was higher that of other salt treatments. However, the cooking loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force of cured pork loin with added refined salt was lower than those of solar and bamboo salt pork loins cured. The flavor and overall acceptability scores of treatments with refined salt was higher than those of solar and bamboo salt treatments. The unique flavor of bamboo salt can render it as a functional material for marinating meat products. In addition, the results of this study reveal potential use of bamboo salt in meat curing. PMID:27194922

  18. Spontaneous "cures": Norman Reider's forgotten paper, part II.

    PubMed

    Boesky, Dale

    2014-04-01

    Part I of this paper combined an introduction to Norman Reider's original 1955 paper with a republication of the paper itself. Part II is a discussion of the complexities of a comparison of past and present psychoanalytic literature. The concept of enactment is proposed as one of many possible alternative views in considering Reider's notion of spontaneous "cures." A careful consideration of these spontaneous cures within the ordinary ups and downs of any psychoanalytic treatment sheds important light on our continuing confusion about how we define the term cure, and therefore about the nature of change during psychoanalytic treatment. This alternative perspective is only one of many plausible ones for present-day readers. The purpose of this republication is not to propose an explanation for "what really happened" with Reider and his patients; rather, it is to reconsider the fallacy of evaluating his paper outside its historical context and thereby failing to appreciate his courage in presenting what at the time were radical views. Questions about the complexity and confusion regarding cure and change require reexamination of the neglect of epistemology on the part of psychoanalysis in prolonging the confusion about distinguishing psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. PMID:24777370

  19. LED Curing Lights and Temperature Changes in Different Tooth Sites

    PubMed Central

    Armellin, E.; Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Pasquantonio, G.; Cerroni, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess thermal changes on tooth tissues during light exposure using two different LED curing units. The hypothesis was that no temperature increase could be detected within the dental pulp during polymerization irrespective of the use of a composite resin or a light-curing unit. Methods. Caries-free human first molars were selected, pulp residues were removed after root resection, and four calibrated type-J thermocouples were positioned. Two LED lamps were tested; temperature measurements were made on intact teeth and on the same tooth during curing of composite restorations. The data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson's χ2. After ANOVA, the Bonferroni multiple comparison test was performed. Results. Polymerization data analysis showed that in the pulp chamber temperature increase was higher than that without resin. Starlight PRO, in the same condition of Valo lamp, showed a lower temperature increase in pre- and intrapolymerization. A control group (without composite resin) was evaluated. Significance. Temperature increase during resin curing is a function of the rate of polymerization, due to the exothermic polymerization reaction, the energy from the light unit, and time of exposure. PMID:27195282

  20. Effect of post-curing on thermal and mechanical behavior of GFRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. S.; Shukla, M. J.; Mahato, K. K.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2015-02-01

    Curing cycle has a strong impact on the thermal and mechanical behavior of thermosetting polymers. The extent of cross-linking which is a strong function of curing temperature and time is directly linked to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the thermosetting polymer. This transition temperature speaks about the transformation of the polymer from glassy state to rubbery state, hence decides the applicability of the material at certain temperature with certain degree of safety and reliability. Hence assessment of Tg and its possible improvement is quite essential from material point of view. The present study is emphasized on the impact of post curing parameters on thermal as well as mechanical behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite. Post curing was carried out at 3 different temperatures (80°C, 110°C and 140°C) for different time periods (2h, 4h, 6h, 8h and 12h). Short beam Shear (SBS) test was performed on each of the post cured samples to determine the apparent Interlaminar Shear Strength (ILSS) and the corresponding Tg was also evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The results revealed that the ILSS and Tg are significantly affected with post curing parameters. No significant change in ILSS was obtained at 80°C over the entire curing time. In case of 110°C a smooth increment in ILSS was observed with time (even till 12 hrs). For samples post cured at 140°C a rapid improvement in ILSS takes place with time followed by saturation. With all the possible combinations of curing temperature and time, optimum values are noticed at 140°C for 6 hrs.

  1. Injectable Polymerized High Internal Phase Emulsions with Rapid in Situ Curing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsions (polyHIPEs) have been utilized in the creation of injectable scaffolds that cure in situ to fill irregular bone defects and potentially improve tissue healing. Previously, thermally initiated scaffolds required hours to cure, which diminished the potential for clinical translation. Here, a double-barrel syringe system for fabricating redox-initiated polyHIPEs with dramatically shortened cure times upon injection was demonstrated with three methacrylated macromers. The polyHIPE cure time, compressive properties, and pore architecture were investigated with respect to redox initiator chemistry and concentration. Increased concentrations of redox initiators reduced cure times from hours to minutes and increased the compressive modulus and strength without compromising the pore architecture. Additionally, storage of the uncured emulsion at reduced temperatures for 6 months was shown to have minimal effects on the resulting graft properties. These studies indicate that the uncured emulsions can be stored in the clinic until they are needed and then rapidly cured after injection to rigid, high-porosity scaffolds. In summary, we have improved upon current methods of generating injectable polyHIPE grafts to meet translational design goals of long storage times and rapid curing (<15 min) without sacrificing porosity or mechanical properties. PMID:25006990

  2. Effect of commercially available egg cures on the survival of juvenile salmonids.

    PubMed

    Clements, Shaun; Chitwood, Rob; Schreck, Carl B

    2011-01-01

    There is some concern that incidental consumption of eggs cured with commercially available cures for the purpose of sport fishing causes mortality in juvenile salmon. We evaluated this by feeding juvenile spring Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) with eggs cured with one of five commercially available cures. We observed significant levels of mortality in both pre-smolts and smolts. Depending on the experiment, 2, 3, or 4 of the cures were associated with mortality. Mortality tended to be higher in the smolts than in the parr, but there was no clear species effect. The majority of mortality occurred within the first 10 d of feeding. Removal of sodium sulfite from the cure significantly reduced the level of mortality. Soaking the eggs prior to feeding did not reduce mortality. We observed a clear relationship between the amount of cured egg consumed each day and the survival time. We conclude that consumption of eggs cured with sodium sulfite has the potential to cause mortality in juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon in the wild. PMID:21738653

  3. Effect of commercially available egg cures on the survival of juvenile salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Chitwood, R.; Schreck, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    There is some concern that incidental consumption of eggs cured with commercially available cures for the purpose of sport fishing causes mortality in juvenile salmon. We evaluated this by feeding juvenile spring Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) with eggs cured with one of five commercially available cures. We observed significant levels of mortality in both pre-smolts and smolts. Depending on the experiment, 2, 3, or 4 of the cures were associated with mortality. Mortality tended to be higher in the smolts than in the parr, but there was no clear species effect. The majority of mortality occurred within the first 10 d of feeding. Removal of sodium sulfite from the cure significantly reduced the level of mortality. Soaking the eggs prior to feeding did not reduce mortality. We observed a clear relationship between the amount of cured egg consumed each day and the survival time. We conclude that consumption of eggs cured with sodium sulfite has the potential to cause mortality in juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon in the wild.

  4. Study of catalyst cured LaRC-160/Celion 6000 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, R.

    1980-01-01

    LaRC 160 polyimide was modified with a high temperature peroxide catalyst, USP-138, in an attempt to reduce the final cure temperature to below 316 C. This effort was directed at obtaining a material for 177 C use that would cure at similar temperatures to a high performance epoxy while still maintaining the good moisture resistance of a polymide material. Attempts to prepare a laminate made from Celion 6000 fiber and 5% catalyzed LaRC 160 resin gave a material with minimal properties after curing at 193 C. Acceptable properties were not obtained until a final cure temperature of 260 C was used. A control laminate containing no catalyst and cured under the same conditions had only half the level of shear strength. The catalyzed LaRC 160 prepreg was also used to examine the possibility of shortening the conventional LaRC 160 cure at 316 C. Maximum properties were obtained using a 2.5% catalyzed product with a final cure temperature of 316 C held for fifteen minutes. Differences in properties between catalyzed and uncatalyzed product disappeared, however, when the cure time at 316 C was extended to 45 minutes.

  5. Effect of rheological parameters on curing rate during NBR injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyas, Kamil; Stanek, Michal; Manas, David; Skrobak, Adam

    2013-04-01

    In this work, non-isothermal injection molding process for NBR rubber mixture considering Isayev-Deng curing kinetic model, generalized Newtonian model with Carreau-WLF viscosity was modeled by using finite element method in order to understand the effect of volume flow rate, index of non-Newtonian behavior and relaxation time on the temperature profile and curing rate. It was found that for specific geometry and processing conditions, increase in relaxation time or in the index of non-Newtonian behavior increases the curing rate due to viscous dissipation taking place at the flow domain walls.

  6. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far. PMID:26365737

  7. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  8. Development of a rapid cure polydimethylsiloxane replication process with near-zero shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badshah, Mohsin Ali; Jang, Hyungjun; Kim, Young Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Kim, Seok-min

    2014-07-01

    Replicated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro/nanostructures are widely used in various research fields due to their inexpensiveness, flexibility, low surface energy, good optical properties, biocompatibility, chemical inertness, high durability, and easy fabrication process. However, the application of PDMS micro/nanostructures is limited when an accurate pattern shape or position is required because of the shrinkage that occurs during the PDMS curing process. In this study, we analyzed the effects of processing parameters in the PDMS replication process on the shrinkage of the final structure. Although the shrinkage can be decreased by decreasing the curing temperature, this reduction also increases the unnecessary curing time. To minimize the inherent shrinkage in the PDMS replica without an accompanying curing time increase, we propose a PDMS replication process on a high modulus substrate (glass and polymer films) with compression pressure, in which the adhesion force between the substrate and the PDMS, and the compression pressure prevent shrinkage during the curing process. Using the proposed method, a PDMS replica with less than 0.1% in-plane and vertical shrinkage was obtained at a curing temperature of 150°C and a curing time of 10 min.

  9. Light output from six battery operated dental curing lights.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji; Turbino, Míriam Lacalle; Harlow, Jessie Eudora; Price, Hannah Louise; Price, Richard Bengt

    2016-12-01

    Light Curing Units (LCUs) are used daily in almost every dental office to photocure resins, but because the light is so bright, the user is unable to tell visually if there are any differences between different LCUs. This study evaluated the light output from six dental LCUs: Elipar Deep Cure-S (3M ESPE), Bluephase G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent), Translux 2Wave (Heraeus Kulzer), Optilight Prime (Gnatus), Slim Blast (First Medica) and Led.B (Guilin Woodpecker) with a fully charged battery, after 50, and again after 100, 20second light exposures. For each situation, the radiant power was measured 10 times with a laboratory-grade power meter. Then, the emission spectrum was measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer followed by an analysis of the light beam profile. It was found there were significant differences in the LCU power and the irradiance values between the LCUs (p<0.01). The Optilight Prime and Slim Blast LCUs showed a significant reduction in light output after a 50 and 100 exposures, while Bluephase G2 exhibited a significant reduction only after 100 exposures (p<0.01). The Bluephase G2 and Translux 2Wave delivered an emission spectrum that had two distinct wavelength emission peaks. Only the Elipar Deep Cure-S and Bluephase G2 LCUs displayed homogeneous light beam profiles, the other LCUs exhibited highly non-homogeneous light beam profiles. It was concluded that contemporary LCUs could have very different light output characteristics. Both manufacturers and researchers should provide more information about the light output from LCUs. PMID:27612800

  10. Curing of Furfuryl Alcohol-Impregnated Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, J. W.; Brayden, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination problem in reinforced carbon/carbon parts impregnated with oxalic acid-catalyzed furfuryl alcohol overcome by instituting two additional quality-control tests on alcohol and by changing curing conditions.

  11. Financing cures in the United States.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban

    2015-02-01

    True cures in health care are rare but likely not for long. The high price tag that accompanies a cure along with its rapid uptake create challenges in the financing of cures by public and private payers. In the US, the disaggregated nature of health insurance system adds to this challenge as patients frequently churn across multiple health plans. This creates a 'free-rider' problem, where no one health plan has the incentive to invest in cure since the returns will be scattered over many health plans. Here, a new health currency is proposed as a generalized version of a social impact bond that has the potential to solve this free-rider problem, as it can be traded not only between public and private payers but also within the private sector. An ensuing debate as to whether and how to develop such a currency can serve the US health care system well. PMID:25482146

  12. Thread-Pull Test Of Curing Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Hardness (and degree of cure) of adhesive layer measured by pulling previously inserted thread out of layer. Strength of bond measured directly on assembly rather than on samples, which can be misleading.

  13. Inelastic micromechanics of curing stresses in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The combined finite element/laminate analysis method is used to study the thermal curing stresses in composite materials with a nonlinearly elastic matrix subject to creep. The application of this analysis to boron/epoxy composites shows that curing stress levels in the laminate are of sufficient magnitude to cause widespread yielding in the matrix. The stress levels, based on the creep analysis of a typical laminate cure cycle, indicate that the residual stresses can vary from 80 to 100% of the residual stress estimates based on linear thermoelastic analysis. It is shown that there is virtually no change in the static longitudinal or shear response of unidirectional and cross-ply boron/epoxy laminates as a result of curing stresses. Results of a series of constant-stress, high temperature creep tests are presented.

  14. Susan G. Komen for the Cure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming -INTERNATIONAL- Bahamas Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Georgia Germany Greece Italy Tanzania Uzbekistan ... TX Saturday, October 1, 2016 Susan G. Komen Bosnia and Herzegovina Race for the Cure Sarajevo, N/ ...

  15. Development and evaluation of a real-time pH and conductivity rain monitor. Final report for 1984-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Paur, R.J.

    1987-04-01

    Acidic wet deposition (acid rain) is thought to be responsible for a variety of deleterious effects on ecosystems and on natural and man-made materials. Determining and quantitating these effects is complicated by the fact that rain is a low-ionic-strength solution of many different salts and organic compounds. The report describes the features and performance of a monitor that was designed to fractionate a rain event into samples corresponding to 0.3 mm of rain, determine the pH and conductivity of the sample within approximately one minute of collection, and store the remainder of the sample for more-detailed analysis.

  16. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  17. Inorganic polymers from alkali activation of metakaolin: Effect of setting and curing on structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lancellotti, Isabella; Ponzoni, Chiara; Leonelli, Cristina

    2013-04-15

    Geopolymers, obtained by chemical reaction between aluminosilicate oxides and silicates under highly alkaline conditions, are studied in this paper. The proposed mechanism of geopolymer setting and hardening or curing consists of a dissolution, a transportation or an orientation, as well as a polycondensation step. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the curing time and temperature, the relative humidity and the reagents temperature on the geopolymerization process in order to obtain a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous wastes. The evolution of the process from the precursors dissolution to final geopolymer matrix hardening has been followed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/EDS and leaching tests. The results show the significant influence of both curing temperature in the curing stage and of the mould materials on the matrix stability. The easy-to-run preparation procedure for a chemically stable metakaolin geopolymer individuated can be summarized as reagents setting and curing at room temperature and material mould which permits moisture level around 40%. - Graphical abstract: Chemical stability as a function of curing conditions. Highlights: ► Metakaolin in highly alkaline solutions produced solid materials at room temperature. ► Curing time and temperature, relative humidity, reagents temperature were optimized. ► Leaching tests were used to confirm final hardening. ► FTIR spectroscopy, SEM analysis and X-ray diffractometry were used to interpret matrix stability.

  18. Materials for single-etch double patterning process: surface curing agent and thermal cure resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young C.; Liu, Yi; Cardolaccia, Thomas; McDermott, John C.; Trefonas, Peter; Spizuoco, Ken; Reilly, Michael; Pikon, Amandine; Joesten, Lori; Zhang, Gary G.; Barclay, George G.; Simon, Julia; Gaurigan, Stéphanie

    2009-03-01

    Two different pattern curing techniques were developed to stabilize first lithographic images for the single-etch double patterning process. The first method uses a surface curing agent (SCA) that is coated on top of the patterned surface to form a protective coating layer during the curing bake process. It was found that the surface curing process with SCA offers minimum CD changes before and after the double patterning process. Virtually no CD change was observed with the first lithographic images at various curing bake temperatures ranging from 120 ~160°C indicating the curing reaction is limited on the patterned surface. The second method uses a thermal cure resist (TCR) that is a special 193nm photoresist with a crosslinkable functional group to form an insoluble network upon heating at higher temperature. A single-step curing process of the first lithographic images was achieved using TCR by baking the patterned images at 180°C for 60sec. A cross-line contact hole double patterning method was used to evaluate these two different curing techniques and both SCA and TCR successfully demonstrated their capability to print 45nm contact holes with excellent CD uniformity in immersion lithography (1.35NA) with a 45nm half pitch mask. It was also confirmed that both SCA and TCR can be extended to the top-coat free immersion double patterning process using an embedded barrier layer technique.

  19. High-speed curing by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Christian

    1999-05-01

    Laser-assisted processing of multifunctional systems is a very efficient method for achieving high-speed curing of photosensitive resins. With acrylate functionalized monomers and polymers, crosslinking was achieved upon a few millisecond exposure to a UV laser beam, in the presence of a radical-type photoinitiator. The polymerization reaction was followed in real-time by infrared spectroscopy and shown to proceed with long kinetic chains (up to 20,000 functional groups polymerized per initiating radical). An acrylate functionalized polyester proved to be the most reactive system, with formation of a tightly cross-linked and strickly insoluble polymer. Its high sensitivity makes this photoresist particularly well suited for laser direct imaging applications. Similar results have been obtained with epoxy and vinyl ether functionalized polymers, which undergo a fast cationic polymerization in the presence of a photogenerated protonic acid. Interpenetrating polymer networks have been synthetized by laser irradiation of blends of acrylate and epoxy-functionalized oligomers to obtain polymers that combine the elastomeric character of cross-linked polyurethanes and the toughness of epoxy polymers. These laser-sensitive polymers are to be used as photoresists to produce microcircuits, as protective coatings of optical fibers, as recording media in holography and as photocurable resins in stereolithography.

  20. Optimal cure cycle design for autoclave processing of thick composites laminates: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal analysis and the calculation of thermal sensitivity of a cure cycle in autoclave processing of thick composite laminates were studied. A finite element program for the thermal analysis and design derivatives calculation for temperature distribution and the degree of cure was developed and verified. It was found that the direct differentiation was the best approach for the thermal design sensitivity analysis. In addition, the approach of the direct differentiation provided time histories of design derivatives which are of great value to the cure cycle designers. The approach of direct differentiation is to be used for further study, i.e., the optimal cycle design.

  1. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  2. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  3. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions..., pole-burn, and shed-burn in damp weather. Air-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  6. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  7. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  8. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions..., pole-burn, and shed-burn in damp weather. Air-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or...

  9. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions..., pole-burn, and shed-burn in damp weather. Air-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  11. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  12. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions..., pole-burn, and shed-burn in damp weather. Air-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or...

  13. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3002 Section 29.3002 Agriculture... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent house-burn and barn-burn in damp weather....

  14. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  15. 7 CFR 58.412 - Coolers or curing rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coolers or curing rooms. 58.412 Section 58.412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....412 Coolers or curing rooms. Coolers or curing rooms where cheese is held for curing or storage...

  16. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2016-03-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m(3) of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m(3) of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96-100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m(3) of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water. PMID:26862577

  17. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2015-01-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m3 of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m3 of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96–100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m3 of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water. PMID:26862577

  18. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO−2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources. PMID:26761900

  19. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  20. Determination of 5-log reduction times for Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, or Listeria monocytogenes in acidified foods with pH 3.5 or 3.8 3.

    PubMed

    Breidt, F; Kay, K; Cook, J; Osborne, J; Ingham, B; Arritt, F

    2013-07-01

    A critical factor in ensuring the safety of acidified foods is the establishment of a thermal process that assures the destruction of acid-resistant vegetative pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. For acidified foods such as dressings and mayonnaises with pH values of 3.5 or higher, the high water phase acidity (acetic acid of 1.5 to 2.5% or higher) can contribute to lethality, but there is a lack of data showing how the use of common ingredients such as acetic acid and preservatives, alone or in combination, can result in a 5-log reduction for strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes in the absence of a postpackaging pasteurization step. In this study, we determined the times needed at 10° C to achieve a 5-log reduction of E. coli O157:H7, S. enterica, and L. monocytogenes in pickling brines with a variety of acetic and benzoic acid combinations at pH 3.5 and 3.8. Evaluation of 15 different acid-pH combinations confirmed that strains of E. coli O157:H7 were significantly more acid resistant than strains of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes. Among the acid conditions tested, holding times of 4 days or less could achieve a 5-log reduction for vegetative pathogens at pH 3.5 with 2.5% acetic acid or at pH 3.8 with 2.5% acetic acid containing 0.1% benzoic acid. These data indicate the efficacy of benzoic acid for reducing the time necessary to achieve a 5-log reduction in target pathogens and may be useful for supporting process filings and the determination of critical controls for the manufacture of acidified foods. PMID:23834800

  1. 22 CFR 204.22 - Right of A.I.D. to cure default.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Right of A.I.D. to cure default. 204.22 Section... CONDITIONS Procedure for Obtaining Compensation § 204.22 Right of A.I.D. to cure default. Within sixty (60) days after the Date of Application for Compensation, A.I.D. may at any time make payments to the...

  2. The first narrow-band XeCl-excilamp application for complex psoriasis curing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitruck, Vadim S.; Sosnin, Edward A.; Obgol'tz, Irina A.

    2006-05-01

    Clinical efficiency estimation of XeCl-excilamp application for psoriasis curing in comparison with other methods of phototherapy for has been carried out for the first time. Curing psoriasis by XeCl-excilamp assistance is shown to be an effective and present-date method. Such a phototherapy advantages suggested are the good tolerance, and absence of intact skin irradiation. The use of chemicals is no longer relevant, and the total doze of irradiation happens to be rather low.

  3. Cured Meat Consumption, Lung Function, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among United States Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Paik, David C.; Hankinson, John L.; Barr, R. Graham

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Cured meats are high in nitrites. Nitrites generate reactive nitrogen species that may cause nitrative and nitrosative damage to the lung resulting in emphysema. Objective: To test the hypothesis that frequent consumption of cured meats is associated with lower lung function and increased odds of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Cross-sectional study of 7,352 participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 45 years of age or more, who had adequate measures of cured meat, fish, fruit, and vegetable intake, and spirometry. Results: After adjustment for age, smoking, and multiple other potential confounders, frequency of cured meat consumption was inversely associated with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC but not FVC. The adjusted differences in FEV1 between individuals who did not consume cured meats and those who consumed cured meats 1 to 2, 3 to 4, 5 to 13, and 14 or more times per month were −37.6, −11.5, −42.0, and −110 ml, respectively (p for trend < 0.001). Corresponding differences for FEV1/FVC were −0.91, −0.54, −1.13, and −2.13% (p for trend = 0.001). These associations were not modified by smoking status. The multivariate odds ratio for COPD (FEV1/FVC ⩽ 0.7 and FEV1 < 80% predicted) was 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.29–2.47) comparing the highest with the lowest category of cured meat consumption. The corresponding odds ratios for mild, moderate, and severe COPD were 1.11, 1.46, and 2.41, respectively. Conclusions: Frequent cured meat consumption was associated independently with an obstructive pattern of lung function and increased odds of COPD. Additional studies are required to determine if cured meat consumption is a causal risk factor for COPD. PMID:17255565

  4. UV curing of nanoparticle reinforced acrylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F.; Flyunt, R.; Czihal, K.; Ernst, H.; Naumov, S.; Buchmeiser, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    To improve the surface hardness of radiation cured acrylate coatings, both silica nanoparticles and alumina particles with a few microns in size have been embedded into acrylate formulations. Regular mixing of nanoparticles into acrylate formulations, however, leads to highly viscous solutions inappropriate for coating procedures. The incompatibility of inorganic fillers and organic polymers can be avoided by surface modification of nanoparticles using trialkoxysilanes, which provide an interface between the two dissimilar materials. Nanoparticles modified by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MEMO) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMO), both having polymerisation-active groups, may be crosslinked with the acrylate resin. UV curing of the nanocomposites revealed an unexpected lower reactivity of the vinyl groups of VTMO modified silica compared to MEMO grafted on silica. For VTMO modification, DFT calculations showed a decrease of Mulliken atomic charge for the olefinic carbons pointing to a lower reactivity. For UV cured nano/microhybrid composites, a significant improvement of abrasion resistance was obtained.

  5. The research of UV curing injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pengcheng; Chang, Le; Song, Le; Cai, Tianze; Ding, Yumei; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    The micro-injection molding technology and the UV (ultraviolet) curing technique are combined to bring about a new plastic forming method, UV curing injection molding. The mean weight of micro-product is an important process characteristic for UV curing injection molding as well as the surface quality of micro-features is another important process characteristic for this new plastic forming method. This research investigates three effects of processing factors on the mass-change rate of micro-product and the surface quality of micro-features. In every particular, the following two factors are considered: UV material system temperature and the packing pressure. The study revealed that as usual, the micro-products gain weight with the imported increasing UV material system temperature and the improved packing pressure. Meanwhile, the increasing packing pressure also improves the surface quality, yet, warming the UV system temperature up has no effect on the quality of the product.

  6. Outdoor durability of radiation-cured coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.; Kennedy, R.

    1997-12-31

    Radiation cured coatings are used almost exclusively on products which have little or no exposure to moisture or the weather; inks, furniture varnishes, floor varnishes and coatings for electronic components. However there is considerable interest in being able to use this technology in exterior environments as a substitute for solvent-borne coatings. A 3-year study examining the possible reasons for the poor durability of radiation curable coatings showed that the resistance of the monomers and oligomers to hydrogen abstraction was crucially important, and the water permeability of the cured coating influenced the long-term adhesion performance. The project concluded that with the appropriate combination of curing technology and monomer/oligomer selection, the prospects of UV curable coatings for outdoor exposure are very encouraging.

  7. Cure-in-place process for seals

    DOEpatents

    Hirasuna, Alan R.

    1981-01-01

    A cure-in-place process which allows a rubber seal element to be deformed to its service configuration before it is cross-linked and, hence, is a plastic and does not build up internal stress as a result of the deformation. This provides maximum residual strength to resist the differential pressure. Furthermore, the process allows use of high modulus formulations of the rubber seal element which would otherwise crack if cured and then deformed to its service configuration, resulting in a seal which has better gap bridging capability. Basically, the process involves positioning an uncured seal element in place, deforming it to its service configuration, heating the seal element, curing it in place, and then fully seating the seal.

  8. Surface and pulpal temperature comparison of tooth whitening using lasers and curing lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel M.; Pelino, Jose; Rodrigues, Rively; Zwhalen, Brian J.; Nguyen, Max H.; Wu, Emily

    2000-03-01

    Chemical action of bleaching agents applied to tooth surface is accelerated by increase in temperature. This in vitro study measured the temperature rises on the surface and in the pulp of teeth during whitening using a diode laser, a plasma arc curing (PAC) light and conventional curing lights. Extracted, non-carious single-rooted teeth were exposed to PAC light and laser at times ranging from 10 to 60 seconds and energy ranges of 2 W, 4 W, and 6 W, and to low-intensity curing lights from 1 to 4 minutes. Maximum temperature rises were analyzed for both pulpal and surface temperature. Diode laser exposures at 2 W for all times and at 4 watts for 10 seconds and PAC light exposures at 10 seconds all produced acceptably safe pulpal rises equivalent to conventional light-curing exposures. Exposures at these settings also attained surface temperature rises that were significantly higher than those using conventional light-curing. The diode laser demonstrated bleaching results equivalent to the PAC light, and both were achieved in significantly less times than conventional light- curing.

  9. [Monitoring of Curing Temperature of Pouring Explosive Based on Fiber Bragg Grating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Wang, Gao; Liang, Hai-jian; Yuan, Jun-ming; Chang, Shuang-jun; Liu, Yu-cun; Wang, Heng-fei; Zhao, Yu

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, we real time measured released reaction heat between the binder and the curing agent in the curing process of cast explosive using fiber Bragg grating. In order to obtain the temperature in the process of pouring explosive casting real time and accurately, we designed the temperature monitoring system based on fiber Bragg grating. Given the risk of explosive component, long curing time and the requirements of constant temperature, a suitable measurement method for direct real-time monitoring has not been found. In recent years, due to its superior characteristics, fiber Bragg grating is widely used in the field of communication and sensing. We will make the collected reflection wavelength to convert real-time temperature displaying, utilizing linear relationship between fiber Bragg grating and temperature. Through WDM technology, seven grating points are written in two optical fibers to measure at the same time, and distribution trend of explosives internal temperature can be displayed in real time by multi-point distributed measurement. The curved design of the sensor not only improves the connection between sensor and jumper, but also benefits to place in oven. The txt data is made to draw a graph using origin software, and the changes in temperature in the curing process are displayed intuitively. The results show that this method is simple and high-precision, and meets the testing requirements of curing temperature of explosives. PMID:26197618

  10. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-07-01

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame`s arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame.

  11. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  12. Cure-WISE: HETDEX data reduction with Astro-WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigula, J. M.; Cornell, M. E.; Drory, N.; Fabricius, Max.; Landriau, M.; Hill, G. J.; Gebhardt, K.

    2012-09-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) is a blind spectroscopic survey to map the evolution of dark energy using Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at redshifts 1:9 < z < 3:5 as tracers. The survey instrument, VIRUS, consists of 75 IFUs distributed across the 22-arcmin field of the upgraded 9.2-m HET. Each exposure gathers 33,600 spectra. Over the projected five year run of the survey we expect about 170 GB of data per night. For the data reduction we developed the Cure pipeline. Cure is designed to automatically find and calibrate the observed spectra, subtract the sky background, and detect and classify different types of sources. Cure employs rigorous statistical methods and complete pixel-level error propagation throughout the reduction process to ensure Poisson-limited performance and meaningful significance values. To automate the reduction of the whole dataset we implemented the Cure pipeline in the Astro-WISE framework. This integration provides for HETDEX a database backend with complete dependency tracking of the various reduction steps, automated checks, and a searchable interface to the detected sources and user management. It can be used to create various web interfaces for data access and quality control. Astro-WISE allows us to reduce the data from all the IFUs in parallel on a compute cluster. This cluster allows us to reduce the observed data in quasi real time and still have excess capacity for rerunning parts of the reduction. Finally, the Astro-WISE interface will be used to provide access to reduced data products to the general community.

  13. On the probability of cure for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The probability of a cure in radiation therapy (RT)—viewed as the probability of eventual extinction of all cancer cells—is unobservable, and the only way to compute it is through modeling the dynamics of cancer cell population during and post-treatment. The conundrum at the heart of biophysical models aimed at such prospective calculations is the absence of information on the initial size of the subpopulation of clonogenic cancer cells (also called stem-like cancer cells), that largely determines the outcome of RT, both in an individual and population settings. Other relevant parameters (e.g. potential doubling time, cell loss factor and survival probability as a function of dose) are, at least in principle, amenable to empirical determination. In this article we demonstrate that, for heavy-ion RT, microdosimetric considerations (justifiably ignored in conventional RT) combined with an expression for the clone extinction probability obtained from a mechanistic model of radiation cell survival lead to useful upper bounds on the size of the pre-treatment population of clonogenic cancer cells as well as upper and lower bounds on the cure probability. The main practical impact of these limiting values is the ability to make predictions about the probability of a cure for a given population of patients treated to newer, still unexplored treatment modalities from the empirically determined probability of a cure for the same or similar population resulting from conventional low linear energy transfer (typically photon/electron) RT. We also propose that the current trend to deliver a lower total dose in a smaller number of fractions with larger-than-conventional doses per fraction has physical limits that must be understood before embarking on a particular treatment schedule.

  14. Influence of light-curing mode on the cytotoxicity of resin-based surface sealants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surface sealants have been successfully used in the prevention of erosive tooth wear. However, when multiple tooth surfaces should be sealed, the light-curing procedure is very time-consuming. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced light-curing time (while maintaining similar energy density) has an influence on resin-based surface sealant cytotoxicity. Methods Bovine dentine discs were treated as follows: group 1: untreated, groups 2–5: Seal&Protect and groups 6–9: experimental sealer. Groups 2 and 6 were light-cured (VALO LED light-curing device) for 40 s (1000 mW/cm2), groups 3 and 7 for 10 s (1000 mW/cm2), groups 4 and 8 for 7 s (1400 mW/cm2) and groups 5 and 9 for 3 s (3200 mW/cm2). Later, materials were extracted in culture medium for 24 h, and released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity as a measure of cytotoxicity was determined photometrically after cells (dental pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts) were exposed to the extracts for 24 h. Three independent experiments, for both sample preparation and cytotoxicity testing, were performed. Results Overall, lowest cytotoxicity was observed for the unsealed control group. No significant influence of light-curing settings on the cytotoxicity was observed (p = 0.537 and 0.838 for pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts, respectively). No significant difference in the cytotoxicity of the two sealants was observed after light-curing with same light-curing settings (group 2 vs. 6, 3 vs. 7, 4 vs. 8 and 5 vs. 9: p > 0.05, respectively). Conclusions Shortening the light-curing time, while maintaining constant energy density, resulted in no higher cytotoxicity of the investigated sealants. PMID:24885810

  15. FTIR Monitoring Of Curing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druy, Mark A.; Stevenson, William A.; Young, Philip R.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared-sensing optical fiber system developed to monitor principal infrared absorption bands resulting from vibrations of atoms and molecules as chemical bonds form when resin cured. System monitors resin chemistry more directly. Used to obtain Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum from graphite fiber/polyimide matrix resin prepreg. Embedded fiber optic FTIR sensor used to indicate state of cure of thermosetting composite material. Developed primarily to improve quality of advanced composites, many additional potential applications exist because principal of operation applicable to all organic materials and most inorganic gases. Includes monitoring integrities of composite materials in service, remote sensing of hazardous materials, and examination of processes in industrial reactors and furnaces.

  16. [Light-cured glass ionomer cements].

    PubMed

    Nordbø, H

    1989-12-01

    An attempt at improving the properties of glass-ionomer cements is represented by the incorporation of light-cure resin systems. This produces materials which have mechanical properties and moisture sensitivity superior to those of present glass-ionomer cements. Such hybrid materials cure by two different mechanisms: polymerization and salt formation. In particular, the early mechanical properties and water sensitivity of the materials are improved due to the formation of a polymer matrix. The tendency to undergo surface crazing during desiccation is also reduced. Three commercially available products are shortly described. PMID:2640704

  17. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  18. Degradation of LIM domain-binding protein three during processing of Spanish dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Fraser, Paul D; Aristoy, María-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2014-04-15

    Extensive proteolysis takes place during the processing of dry-cured ham due to the action of muscle peptidases. The aim of this work was to study the degradation of LIM domain binding protein 3 (LDB3), which is located at the Z-lines of the sarcomere, at different times during the Spanish dry-cured ham processing (2, 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 9 months). A total of 107 peptides have been identified by mass spectrometry, most of them generated from the first region of the protein sequence (position 1-90) providing evidence for the complexity and variability of proteolytic reactions throughout the whole process of dry-curing. Methionine oxidation has been observed in several peptides by the end of the process. The potential of some of the identified peptides to be used as biomarkers of dry-cured ham processing has also been considered. PMID:24295685

  19. Stress and flow analyses of ultraviolet-curable resin during curing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezaki, Eisaku; Okano, Akira; Koyama, Hiroto

    2014-06-01

    The stress and flow generated in ultraviolet (UV)-curable resin during curing in molds were measured to investigate their relationship. The specimens were molds consisting of glass plates and acrylic bars, and UV-curable liquid resin. The specimens were illuminated from above with UV rays. Photoelastic and visual images were separately obtained at a constant time interval using cameras during curing. To help obtain the visual images, acrylic powder was mixed with the liquid resin. The stress was obtained from the photoelastic images by a digital photoelastic technique with phase stepping, and the flow was obtained from the visual images by a particle-tracking velocimetry technique. Results indicate that the stress generated in the UV-curable resin during curing depends on the degree of contact between the mold and the cured area of the resin, and is hardly related to the flow.

  20. Curing rate and flowing properties of silicone rubber at injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, M.; Nakamura, T. )

    1992-04-01

    Generally, silicone rubbers are mold-cured after mixing the rubber and peroxide curing agent with a two-roll mill or a kneader. Typically this is done at pressures of 5 MPa to 10 MPa and at temperatures between 120 to 200 C. Compression molding, transfer molding and injection molding are common molding ways for silicone rubbers. Recently, injection molding techniques are developing rapidly that have the advantages of molding automatically with high cycle mechanisms. To reduce the molding time and to make a precision part, both the flowing and curing properties of a particular rubber compound will be important. In this article, correlations between the curing and the flowing properties of silicone rubber are investigated by using the Rheovulkameter device.

  1. The effect of the pulse-delay cure technique on residual strain in composites.

    PubMed

    Suh, B I; Feng, L; Wang, Y; Cripe, C; Cincione, F; de Rjik, W

    1999-02-01

    Polymerization-induced shrinkage of composites leads to residual stress in the final restoration. For composites with a high modulus of elasticity, the level of stress can have significant clinical consequences, including crack formation in the enamel or microscopic separations at the preparation/restoration interface. The pulse-delay cure technique cures composites by providing low-energy pulse initially (e.g., 200 mW/cm2 for 3 seconds), followed by a waiting period of 3 to 5 minutes for strain relief, during which the composite can be finished and polished. The final cure is obtained by exposure to a high-intensity light source of 500 mW/cm2 for the recommended time. In vitro data obtained by strain gauges show that the pulse-delay cure technique can reduce residual strain in the composite by as much as 34%. PMID:11908411

  2. Characterization of cure in model photocrosslinking acrylate systems: Relationships among tensile properties, Tg and ultraviolet dose

    SciTech Connect

    Rakas, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    The extent of cure of a thermosetting polymer is governed largely by polymerization kinetics and the difference between the polymerization temperature and the material`s ultimate glass transition temperature (Tg). For prepolymers which cure when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, other factors which strongly determine the extent of cure are the UV intensity and exposure time, and the interrelationship between the optical absorbance of the photoinitiator (PI) and the rate of formation of excited state PI radicals. Beers` Law can be used to understand the relationship between the PI`s molar absorptivity, its concentration, and adhesive film thickness. Many adhesives users are more concerned with bulk properties such as tensile modulus and Tg rather than a numerical measurement of degree of cure. Therefore, this research employed model acrylate formulations and determined changes in tensile properties and Tg as a function of film thickness and UV dose. These results enabled correlation of bulk and photoinitiator properties.

  3. Effects of TiO₂ and curing temperatures on flame retardant finishing of cotton.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chin-Kuen; Kan, Chi-Wai

    2015-05-01

    The performance of flame retardancy of cotton cellulose can be influenced by curing conditions. In this study, cotton cellulose was imparted durable flame retardant properties by a reaction between a flame retardant agent (Pyrovatex CP New) and a cross linking agent (Knittex CHN), in the presence of catalysts phosphoric acid and titanium dioxide (TiO2). After treating cotton fabrics at different curing temperatures for different curing time, its flame retardant performance was evaluated by 45° fabric flammability standard test method. For cotton fabrics cured at 150 and 170°C, good flame retardant characteristics were retained even after three home laundering cycles. The use of TiO2 as a co-catalyst in the treatment improved the flame retardant properties and reduced the loss of tearing strength of cotton fabrics. No significant negative effect in the whiteness index was observed, as compared with conventional flame retardant treatment. PMID:25659721

  4. Censorship: Challenges, Concerns and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B.

    While censorship pressures emanate from all points on the political spectrum at different times, the current censorship movement comes mostly from political conservatives. Censorship efforts by the Reagan administration include barring entry of foreign speakers whose views do not coincide with those of the administration, inhibiting the free flow…

  5. Finding a Cure for Senioritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puente, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The senior year of high school has long been considered a lost year, a time when many students have earned most of their high school credits and have been accepted into college. With few requirements and little pressure, students often slack off in a common affliction known as "senioritis." The year of slacking off, however, may have negative…

  6. The effect of curing modes on polymerization contraction stress of a dual cured composite.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Suh, B I

    2006-01-01

    Although a lower curing rate is often cited as the reason why a chemical cured (CC) dental composite produces lower polymerization contraction stress (PCS) than a light cured (LC) composite, the exact mechanism is still unclear. In addition, the comparison is often made by using different brands of composites. The comparison's fairness is questionable because the two composites have different compositions and preparation procedures. The goal of the present work was to determine if the curing mode alone can produce different PCS. We formulated a dual cured composite and prepared it the same way for both CC and LC modes. We measured PCS by a strain gauge method, shrinkage by a video-imagining technique, degree of conversion (DC) by infrared spectroscopy, and flexural modulus by the three-point bending test. The CC specimens showed lower PCS and lower flexural modulus than the LC specimens, although both possessed an identical chemical composition and physical texture before cure. This finding indicates that the curing mode alone can affect PCS. Because the CC and LC specimens produced a similar shrinkage and DC, the lower modulus is considered to be one of the reasons for the lower stress. Using a structural inhomogeneity model, we explained how a resin composite with an identical DC can have different physical properties such as the modulus. PMID:16047326

  7. Thermal emission and curing efficiency of LED and halogen curing lights.

    PubMed

    Vandewalle, Kraig S; Roberts, Howard W; Tiba, Amer; Charlton, David G

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the thermal emission and curing efficiency of LED (LEDemetron 1, SDS/Kerr) and QTH (VIP, BISCO) curing lights at maximum output and similar power, power density and energy density using the same light guide. Also, another LED curing light (Allegro, Den-Mat) and the QTH light at reduced power density were tested for comparison. Increase in temperature from the tips of the light guides was measured at 0 and 5 mm in air (23 degrees C) using a temperature probe (Fluke Corp). Pulpal temperature increase was measured using a digital thermometer (Omega Co) and a K-type thermocouple placed on the central pulpal roof of human molars with a Class I occlusal preparation. Measurements were made over 90 seconds with an initial light activation of 40 seconds. To test curing efficiency, resin composites (Z100, A110, 3M/ESPE) were placed in a 2-mm deep and 8-mm wide plastic mold and cured with the LED and QTH curing lights at 1- and 5-mm curing distances. Knoop Hardness Numbers (KHN) were determiped on the top and bottom surfaces (Leco). Bottom hardness values were expressed as a percentage of maximum top hardness. No significant differences were found in maximum thermal emission or KHN ratios between the LED (LEDemetron 1) and the QTH (VIP) at maximum output and similar energy densities (ANOVA/Tukey's; alpha=0.05). PMID:15853113

  8. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. PMID:26635279

  9. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  10. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  11. PH-NEUTRAL CONCRETE FOR ATTACHED MICROALGAE AND ENHANCED CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION - PHASE I

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry M. Dooley; F. Carl Knopf; Robert P. Gambrell

    1999-05-31

    The novelty/innovation of the proposed work is as follows. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO {sub 2})-based extrusion and molding technology can be used to produce significantly improved (in terms of strength/unit weight, durability, hardness and chemical resistance) cement-based products. SC-CO{sub 2} can rapidly convert the calcium hydroxide in cured cement to calcium carbonate, which increases the density and unconfined compressive strength in the treated region. In cured concrete, this treated region is typically a several-mm thick layer (generally <{approx}5mm, unless treatment time is excessive). However, we have found that by treating the entire cement matrix with SC-CO{sub 2} as part of the curing process, we can carbonate it rapidly, regardless of the thickness. By ''rapidly'' we mean simultaneous carbonation/curing in < 5 ks even for large cement forms, compared to typical carbonation times of several days or even years at low pressures. Carbonation changes the pH in the treated region from {approx}13 to {approx}8, almost exactly compatible with seawater. Therefore the leaching rates from these cements is reduced. These cement improvements are directed to the development of strong but thin artificial reefs, to which can be attached microalgae used for the enhanced fixation of CO{sub 2}. It is shown below that attached microalgae, as algal beds or reefs, are more efficient for CO{sub 2} fixation by a factor of 20, compared to the open ocean on an area basis. We have performed preliminary tests of the pH-neutral cements of our invention for attachment of microalgae populations. We have found pH-neutral materials which attach microalgae readily. These include silica-enriched (pozzolanic) cements, blast-furnace slags and fly ash, which are also silica-rich. We have already developed technology to simultaneously foam, carbonate and cure the cements; this foaming process further increases cement surface areas for microalgae attachment, in some cases to >10 m

  12. Heat transfer properties and thermal cure of glass-ionomer dental cements.

    PubMed

    Gavic, Lidia; Gorseta, Kristina; Glavina, Domagoj; Czarnecka, Beata; Nicholson, John W

    2015-10-01

    Under clinical conditions, conventional glass-ionomer dental cements can be cured by application of heat from dental cure lamps, which causes acceleration in the setting. In order for this to be successful, such heat must be able to spread sufficiently through the cement to enhance cure, but not transmit heat so effectively that the underlying dental pulp of the tooth is damaged. The current study was aimed at measuring heat transfer properties of modern restorative glass-ionomers to determine the extent to which they meet these twin requirements. Three commercial glass ionomer cements (Ionofil Molar, Ketac Molar and Equia™ Fill) were used in association with three different light emitting diode cure lamps designed for clinical use. In addition, for each cement, one set of specimens was allowed to cure without application of a lamp. Temperature changes were measured at three different depths (2, 3 and 4 mm) after cure times of 20, 40 and 60 s. The difference among the tested groups was evaluated by ANOVA (P < 0.05) and post hoc Newman-Keuls test. All brands of glass-ionomer showed a small inherent setting exotherm in the absence of heat irradiation, but much greater temperature increases when exposed to the cure lamp. However, temperature rises did not exceed 12.9 °C. Application of the cure lamp led to the establishment of a temperature gradient throughout each specimen. Differences were typically significant (P < 0.05) and did not reflect the nominal power of the lamps, because those lamps have variable cooling systems, and are designed to optimize light output, not heating effect. Because the thermal conductivity of glass-ionomers is low, temperature rises at 4 mm depths were much lower than at 2 mm. At no time did the temperature rise sufficiently to cause concern about potential damage to the pulp. PMID:26411445

  13. Cure-rate data for silicone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C.; Fisher, A.

    1978-01-01

    Report describes work with concentrations down to 0.07 percent and is useful when applying adhesives in terrestrial and space applications. Cured Silicone retains low-outgassing properties as well as its snap, elongation, and resilience. Tests for hardness of silicone material also showed good results. No gross hysteresis observable on recovery from stretching nor was there any decrease in hardness.

  14. Campus Violence: Kinds, Causes, and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Leighton C., Ed.; Pollard, Jeffrey W., Ed.

    This volume offers 14 papers on the types, sources, and possible cures of violence on college campuses from prominent workers in higher education. Following a preface the titles are: (1) "Conceptualizing Campus Violence: Definitions, Underlying Factors, and Effects" by Mary L. Roark; (2) "Administrative Perspectives on Disruptive Student Conduct"…

  15. Resin Characterization in Cured Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular-level characterization of polymeric matrix resin in cured graphite-reinforced composite materials now determined through analysis of diffuse reflectance (DR) with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Improved analytical method based on diffuse reflectance. DR/ FTIR technique successfully applied to analysis of several different composites and adhesives impossible to analyze by conventional methods.

  16. Finally: A Cure for the Skills Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauschenberger, John

    2001-01-01

    The Manufacturing Skill Standards Council was established to create a system of skill standards, assessments, and certification designed to ensure a qualified, mobile work force to meet the needs of the economy in the 21st century. The system would provide a long-term cure for the skills gap confronting manufacturers. (JOW)

  17. Factors in pig production that impact the quality of dry-cured ham: a review.

    PubMed

    Candek-Potokar, M; Skrlep, M

    2012-02-01

    This study reviews the factors of pig production that impact the quality of dry-cured ham. When processing is standardized, the quality of the final dry-cured product is primarily determined by the quality of the meat before curing (green ham). This has been defined as the aptitude for seasoning and is determined by the green ham weight, adipose tissue quantity and quality, meat physico-chemical properties and the absence of visual defects. Various ante-mortem factors including pig age and weight, genetic type, diet, feeding strategy and slaughter conditions determine green ham properties such as the dynamics of water loss, salt intake and, as a consequence, proteolysis and lipolysis. Muscle conditions (pH, salt concentration, water content and availability, temperature) influence enzymatic activity and development of characteristic texture and flavor. Generally, hams of older and heavier pigs present better seasoning aptitude because of higher adiposity. Adiposity is also positively correlated with fat saturation, which is desired to avoid rancidity and oiliness. The fatty acid profile of tissue lipids can be manipulated by diet composition. Feeding strategy affects tissue accretion and protein turnover, thus directly impacting proteolysis. With respect to the impact of pig genotype on dry-cured ham quality, local breeds are generally considered more suitable for producing quality dry hams; however, the majority of dry-cured hams on the market today are from modern pig breeds raised in conventional systems, providing lean hams. The importance of all these factors of pig production is discussed and synthesized, with an emphasis on the main difficulties encountered in dry-cured ham production. PMID:22436192

  18. The dental curing light: A potential health risk.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard B T; Labrie, Daniel; Bruzell, Ellen M; Sliney, David H; Strassler, Howard E

    2016-08-01

    Powerful blue-light emitting dental curing lights are used in dental offices to photocure resins in the mouth. In addition, many dental personnel use magnification loupes. This study measured the effect of magnification loupes on the "blue light hazard" when the light from a dental curing light was reflected off a human tooth. Loupes with 3.5x magnification (Design for Vision, Carl Zeiss, and Quality Aspirator) and 2.5x magnification (Design for Vision and Quality Aspirator) were placed at the entrance of an integrating sphere connected to a spectrometer (USB 4000, Ocean Optics). A model with human teeth was placed 40 cm away and in line with this sphere. The light guide tip of a broad-spectrum Sapphire Plus (Den-Mat) curing light was positioned at a 45° angle from the facial surface of the central incisor. The spectral radiant power reflected from the teeth was recorded five times with the loupes over the entrance into the sphere. The maximum permissible cumulative exposure times in an 8-hr day were calculated using guidelines set by the ACGIH. It was concluded that at a 40 cm distance, the maximum permissible cumulative daily exposure time to light reflected from the tooth was approximately 11 min without loupes. The weighted blue irradiance values were significantly different for each brand of loupe (Fisher's PLSD p < 0.05) and were up to eight times greater at the pupil than when loupes were not used. However, since the linear dimensions of the resulting images would be 2.5 to 3.5x larger on the retina, the image area was increased by the square of the magnification and the effective blue light hazard was reduced compared to without the loupes. Thus, although using magnification loupes increased the irradiance received at the pupil, the maximum cumulative daily exposure time to reflected light was increased up to 28 min. Further studies are required to determine the ocular hazards of a focused stare when using magnification loupes and the effects of other

  19. Focusing on Cause or Cure?

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Lauren C.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomedical research is influenced by many factors, including the involvement of stakeholder groups invested in research outcomes. Stakeholder involvement in research efforts raise questions of justice as their specific interests and motivations play a role in directing research resources that ultimately produce knowledge shaping how different conditions (and affected individuals) are understood and treated by society. This issue is highly relevant to child psychiatry research where diagnostic criteria and treatment strategies are often controversial. Biological similarities and stakeholder differences between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) provide an opportunity to explore this issue by comparing research foci and stakeholder involvement in these conditions. Methods A subset of ADHD and ASD research articles published between 1970-2010 were randomly selected from the PubMed database and coded for research focus, funding source(s), and author-reported conflicts of interest (COIs). Chi-square analyses were performed to identify differences between and within ADHD and ASD research across time. Results The proportion of ADHD research dedicated to basic, description, and treatment research was roughly similar and remained stable over time, while ASD research showed a significant increase in basic research over the past decade. Government was the primary research funder for both conditions, but for-profit funders were a notable presence in ADHD research, while joint-funding efforts between non-profit and government funders were a notable presence in ASD research. Lastly, COIs were noted more frequently in ADHD than in ASD research. Conclusions Our study shows significant differences in research foci and funding sources between the conditions, and identifies the specific involvement of for-profit and non-profit groups in ADHD and ASD, respectively. Our findings highlight the relationship between stakeholders

  20. Dual and self-curing potential of self-adhesive resin cements as thin films.

    PubMed

    Moraes, R R; Boscato, N; Jardim, P S; Schneider, L F J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the dual- and self-curing potential of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) as thin, clinically-relevant cement films was investigated. The SARCs tested were: BisCem (BSC; Bisco), Maxcem Elite (MXE; Kerr), RelyX Unicem clicker (UNI; 3M ESPE), seT capsule (SET; SDI), and SmartCem 2 (SC2; Dentsply Caulk). The conventional cement RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) was tested as a reference. The degree of conversion (DC) as a function of time was evaluated by real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) device. The cements were either photoactivated for 40 seconds (dual-cure mode) or not photoactivated (self-cure mode). The cement film thickness was 50 ± 10 μm. The DC (%) was evaluated 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after placing the cement on the ATR cell. Data for DC as a function of time were analyzed by two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). DC values at 30 minutes for the self- and dual-cure modes were submitted to one-way ANOVA. Post hoc comparisons were performed using the Student-Newman-Keuls test (p<0.05). The rate and the extent of conversion were lower for the SARCs compared with the conventional cement. Means ± standard deviations (SD) for the dual-cure mode at 30 minutes were: 75 ± 5 (ARC)a, 73 ± 8 (SET)a, 61 ± 4 (MXE)b, 51 ± 9 (BSC)c, 51 ± 4 (UNI)c, and 48 ± 3 (SC2)c, while in the self-cure mode means and SD were 62 ± 6 (ARC)a, 54 ± 3 (MXE)b, 40 ± 6 (SC2)c, 35 ± 2 (UNI)c, 35 ± 3 (SET)c, and 11 ± 3 (BSC)d. The DC for the dual-cure mode was generally higher than the self-cure, irrespective of the time. Discrepancies in DC between the dual- and self-cure modes from 11% to 79% were observed. In conclusion, SARCs may present slower rate of polymerization and lower final DC than conventional resin cements, in either the dual- or self-cure mode. PMID:21864125

  1. Curing light intensity effects on wear resistance of two resin composites.

    PubMed

    St-Georges, Annie J; Swift, Edward J; Thompson, Jeffrey Y; Heymann, Harald O

    2002-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the wear resistance of resin composite polymerized using four different light-curing systems. For this, a well-defined cylindrical cavity preparation (4.0 mm in diameter x 3.0 mm in depth) was made in a ceramic block (n=4 per material/light condition). Uncured material, either a universal hybrid composite (Herculite XRV) or a flowable hybrid composite (Revolution Formula 2), was packed and light-cured from the top surface only with one of the four light-curing units: 1) a conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen light, 2) a soft-start light, 3) an argon-ion laser or 4) a plasma-arc curing light. After storing the specimens in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the excess cured material was ground through successive grits up to a final 1200-grit SiC abrasive. The specimens were placed in deionized water at 37 degrees C for an additional 24 hours. Wear simulation was performed using a four-station Leinfelder-type three-body wear device. A slurry of water and unplasticized polymethylmethacrylate beads, simulating an artificial food bolus, was placed on the surface of each resin-composite-restored ceramic block. The entire cycling procedure was carried out 400,000 times. Impressions of each resin composite surface were taken with polyvinylsiloxane and epoxy replicas were made. Wear analyses were conducted by generating tracings across the worn surface of epoxy replicas using profilometer scans. For the universal hybrid composite and the flowable hybrid composite, the lowest wear occurred in specimens that were cured using the conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen light, and the highest wear was detected on those specimens made using the argon-ion laser. For both resin composites, the mean wear for specimens cured using the argon-ion laser was significantly higher than that of the specimens cured with the three other lights, which were statistically similar. PMID:12120780

  2. Effect of plasma arc curing on polymerization shrinkage of orthodontic adhesive resins.

    PubMed

    Bang, H-C; Lim, B-S; Yoon, T-H; Lee, Y-K; Kim, C-W

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage of three orthodontic adhesive resins when polymerized with a high-energy plasma arc light (1340 mW cm(-2)) and a conventional halogen light (500 mW cm(-2)), and to correlate the polymerization shrinkage with the degree of conversion. To equalize the total light energy delivered to the adhesive resin, irradiation time was varied between 3 or 6 s for a plasma arc-curing unit, and 8 or 16 s for a halogen light-curing unit. The polymerization shrinkage of adhesive resins during the light-curing process was measured using a computer-controlled mercury dilatometer and the degree of conversion was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A plasma arccuring unit produced significantly lower polymerization shrinkage than a halogen light-curing unit when the equivalent total light energy was irradiated to the orthodontic adhesive resins (P < 0.05). The magnitude of polymerization shrinkage was significantly different depending on the kind of adhesive resins (P < 0.05), but there was no significant correlation between the filler fraction and the polymerization shrinkage (r2 = 0.039). There was strong correlation (r2 = 0.787) between the polymerization shrinkage and the degree of conversion with a halogen light-curing unit, but poor correlation (r2 = 0.377) was observed with a plasma arc-curing unit. PMID:15265218

  3. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  4. Resin Flow of an Advanced Grid-Stiffened Composite Structure in the Co-Curing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qizhong; Ren, Mingfa; Chen, Haoran

    2013-06-01

    The soft-mold aided co-curing process which cures the skin part and ribs part simultaneously was introduced for reducing the cost of advanced grid-stiffened composite structure (AGS). The co-curing process for a typical AGS, preformed by the prepreg AS4/3501-6, was simulated by a finite element program incorporated with the user-subroutines `thermo-chemical' module and the `chemical-flow' module. The variations of temperature, cure degree, resin pressure and fiber volume fraction of the AGS were predicted. It shows that the uniform distributions of temperature, cure degree and viscosity in the AGS would be disturbed by the unique geometrical pattern of AGS. There is an alternation in distribution of resin pressure at the interface between ribs and skin, and the duration time of resin flow is sensitive to the thickness of the AGS. To obtain a desired AGS, the process parameters of the co-curing process should be determined by the geometry of an AGS and the kinds of resin.

  5. The Effect of Curing Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Fiberglass Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas J.

    The curing reaction in a thermoset polymer matrix composite is often accelerated by the addition of heat in an oven or autoclave. The heat added increases the rate of the polymerization reaction and cross-linking in the material. The cure cycle used (temperature, pressure and time) can therefore alter the final material properties. This research focuses on how the curing temperature (250, 275, 300 °F) affects the yield strength and the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, GI, of a unidirectional S-2 glass epoxy composite. The test method that was used for the tension test was ASTM D3039 and the test method for the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, the double cantilever beam (DCB) test, was ASTM D5528. The DCB specimens were fabricated with a non-adhesive insert at the midplane of the composite that serves as the initiatior of the delamination. Opening forces were then applied to the specimen, causing the crack propagation. The results show that increasing the cure temperature by 50 °F increased the tensile strength by 10% (86.54 - 94.73 ksi) and decreased the fracture toughness 20% (506.23 - 381.31 J/m 2). Thus, the curing temperature can cause a trade-off between these two properties, which means that the curing cycle will need to be altered based on the intended use and the required material properties.

  6. About the cure kinetics in natural rubber/styrene Butadiene rubber blends at 433 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2012-08-01

    Vulcanized blends of elastomers are employed in several goods mainly to improve physical properties and reduce costs. One of the most used blends of this kind is that composed by natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). The cure kinetic of these blends depends mainly on the compound formulation and the cure temperature and time. The preparation method of the blends can influence the mechanical properties of the vulcanized compounds. In this work the cure kinetic at 433 K of NR/SBR blends vulcanized with the system sulfur/TBBS (N-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) is analyzed in samples prepared by mechanical mixing and solution blending. The two methods produce elastomer domains of NR and SBR, which present different microstructure due to the cure level attained during vulcanization. The cure kinetics is studied by means of rheometer tests and the model proposed by Kamal and Sourour. The analysis of the cure rate is presented and is related to the structure obtained during the vulcanization process.

  7. Curing the SW Sex Syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Cataclysmic variables {CVs} are outstanding accretion laboratories. As a result, insights gleaned from CVs have critically shaped our conceptual picture of accretion processes in astrophysical systems on all scales. In particular, the accretion disks found in nova-like cataclysmic variables {NLCVs} have long been thought of as *the* classic examples of standard, steady-state disks.However, there is a group of NLCVs - the SW Sex stars - whose remarkable properties clearly do NOT fit the standard disk model. Many other NLCVs also show some symptoms of the SW Sex syndrome, as does at least one neutron star low-mass X-ray binary system. The existence of the SW Sex stars throws serious doubt on the validity of the standard picture in NLCVs and other disk-accreting systems. It is therefore vital to uncover the cause of this phenomenon. The SW Sex star DW UMa is ideally suited for an HST study that will achieve this goal. Because DW UMa is located in the CVZ, we can use STIS to obtain time-resolved, far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of the system for two complete, consecutive binary orbits. The resulting data set will allow us to resolve the SW Sex controversy by distinguishing clearly between all competing models.

  8. Cured shape prediction of the bistable hybrid composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fu-hong; Zhang, Bo-ming; Du, Shan-yi

    2009-07-01

    A bistable unsymmetric hybrid composite laminate with quite high stiffness and large shape change is presented. Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to predict the cured shape and the predited results agree well with the experimentals. The critical loads switching between different shapes are tested. It shows that the critical load for hybrid composite laminates increases greatly (up to 10 times) compared with the pure fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite laminates. The influence of different geometric and material properites on the bistable shape is discussed. It reveals that the present hybrid bistable laminate is more designable and miscellaneous.

  9. Evaluation of the dependence of CEST-EPI measurement on repetition time, RF irradiation duty cycle and imaging flip angle for enhanced pH sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe Sun, Phillip; Lu, Jie; Wu, Yin; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-09-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast mechanism that can detect dilute CEST agents and microenvironmental properties, with a host of promising applications. Experimental measurement of the CEST effect is complex, and depends on not only CEST agent concentration and exchange rate, but also experimental parameters such as RF irradiation amplitude and scheme. Although echo planar imaging (EPI) has been increasingly used for CEST MRI, the relationship between CEST effect and repetition time (TR), RF irradiation duty cycle (DC) and EPI flip angle (α) has not been fully evaluated and optimized to enhance CEST MRI sensitivity. In addition, our study evaluated gradient echo CEST-EPI by quantifying the CEST effect and its signal-to-noise ratio per unit time (SNRput) as functions of TR, DC and α. We found that CEST effect increased with TR and DC but decreased with α. Importantly, we found that SNRput peaked at intermediate TRs of about twice the T1 and α, at approximately 75°, and increased with RF DC. The simulation results were validated using a dual-pH creatine-gel CEST phantom. In summary, our study provides a useful framework for optimizing CEST MRI experiments.

  10. A Study of Upgraded Phenolic Curing for RSRM Nozzle Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smartt, Ziba

    2000-01-01

    A thermochemical cure model for predicting temperature and degree of cure profiles in curing phenolic parts was developed, validated and refined over several years. The model supports optimization of cure cycles and allows input of properties based upon the types of material and the process by which these materials are used to make nozzle components. The model has been refined to use sophisticated computer graphics to demonstrate the changes in temperature and degree of cure during the curing process. The effort discussed in the paper will be the conversion from an outdated solid modeling input program and SINDA analysis code to an integrated solid modeling and analysis package (I-DEAS solid model and TMG). Also discussed will be the incorporation of updated material properties obtained during full scale curing tests into the cure models and the results for all the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle rings.

  11. Curing chemistry of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers: Model compounds, carbon-13 labeling and cure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher Chad

    1998-11-01

    Phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers (PETI) are currently considered the state-of-the-art high performance resins for aerospace applications. The processing of these resins is more facile because of their low molecular weight, but PETI's cure to form a tough, solvent-resistant material. However, the final cure structure was a complete mystery. Hence, the present study was set forth with three essential goals. The determination of the final structure of the crosslinked polymer is of obvious importance. Second, the crosslinking mechanism and controlling factors is also of interest. Lastly, the final structure of the crosslinked polymers was correlated with mechanical and thermal properties, thereby helping to establish the structure-processing-properties relationships for PETI resins. These goals were accomplished by using a combination of synthesis of model compounds synthesis and proposed cure products, sp{13}C labeling of the ethynyl endgroup in PETI's, monitoring of the thermal cure using solid state sp{13}C NMR and ESR and molecular modeling techniques. Phenylethynyl endcapping agents, 4-(phenylethynyl)phthalic anhydride (PEPA) and 3-(phenylethynyl)aniline (3PEA), were synthesized via the palladium-catalyzed coupling of phenylacetylene with 4-bromophthalic anhydride or 3-iodonitrobenzene followed by reduction to 3PEA, respectively. Isolated yields of 41 and 86% for 3PEA and PEPA were obtained, respectively. Model compounds were synthesized from 3PEA and PEPA by reacting with them the appropriate aniline or phthalic anhydride derivative. Model compounds included N-pentafluorophenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F5An), N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F3CAn), N-lbrack 3-(phenylethynyl)phenylrbrack\\ phthalimide (3PEA/PA), N-phenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/An), N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/POAn), and N-(1-naphthyl)-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/Anaph). Proposed cure products such as

  12. Dynamic measurement of local displacements within curing resin-based dental composite using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Rahman, Mohammed Wahidur; Donnan, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using optical coherence elastography to measure internal displacements during the curing phase of a light-activated, resin-based composite material. Displacement vectors were spatially mapped over time within a commercial dental composite. Measurements revealed that the orientation of cure-induced displacement vectors varied spatially in a complex manner; however, each vector showed a systematic evolution with time. Precision of individual displacements was estimated to be ˜1 to 2 μm, enabling submicrometer time-varying displacements to be detected.

  13. Modelization of structural changes in ultra low k materials during ultraviolet cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert, G.; Vo-Than, D.; Trouiller, C.; Lorut, F.

    2013-12-01

    As of 45 nm node, ultralow k (ULK) materials (ɛr < 2.55) are widely used in microelectronic interconnects to reduce signal propagation delay. In order to get such low dielectric constant, most of these ULK are obtained using subtractive method: after co-deposition of matrix and porogen a UV cure process is used to remove labile species (porogen). During this process, porosity is created and films are densified as shrinkage increases. This paper presents an in-depth study of the UV cure process. Two kinetic models are presented to describe shrinkage rate: the nth order and the autocatalytic model. These models also used to describe photo-polymerization shrinkage-strain of dental composite, gives predictions that are in good agreement with experimental data. We find that nth-order model is best suited to describe ULK transformations during UV cure process. CHx bonds loss and carbon content can also be modeled using same kinetic model. In order to be able to build the model, initial SiOCH-CxHy film has to be over-cured to determine the maximum conversion that film can reach when submitted to extra-long cure times. Results show that such SiOCH materials have to be cured more than 250 times their nominal cure time to reach maximum shrinkage (˜50%) and a complete loss of carbon, making them looking like SiO2. When structural changes are observed at different temperature, activation energy of reactions can be determined. In this way, shrinkage reaction has an activation energy close to 1000-1100 kJ/mol and CHx bonds or carbon loss reactions have activation energy in the range of 250-400 kJ/mol, which is pretty close to C-H binding energy.

  14. New type of measuring and intelligent instrument for curing tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chui-Jie; Huang, Xieqing; Chen, Tianning; Xia, Hong

    1993-09-01

    A new type of measuring intelligent instrument for cured tobacco is presented in this paper. Based on fuzzy linguistic control principles the instrument is used to controlling the temperature and humidity during cured tobacco taking 803 1 singlechip computer as a center controller. By using methods of fuzzy weighted factors the cross coupling in curing procedures is decoupled. Results that the instrument has producted indicate the fuzzy controller in the instrument has perfect performance for process of cured tobacco as shown in figure

  15. UV curing with water based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, E.; Haeussling, L.; Jaeger, U.

    1995-12-01

    Conventional coatings technology requires a large effort to reduce emissions of organic solvents and other volatile organic components. Alleviations, yet not a solution to this problem are high solids coatings formulations or even powder coatings technology. An entirely different concept is used in radiation curing of coatings, where all the elements of the originally low molar mass components of the coating formulation are polymerized into one large network. Thus there should be no emissions of low molar mass compounds from UV- or Electron beam cured films. Water as a diluent in UV-curable formulations can either be used directly as a solvent or in emulsions (with the help of emulsifying agents) without a loss in performance of coatings properties, such as hardness, elasticity and reactivity. To the contrary, the prearrangement of functionalities in the final coating due to the prior phase separation in the emulsion seems to slightly increase hardness and adhesion as well as elasticity.

  16. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1995-03-07

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  17. Aloe vera as cure for lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Patil, Bharati A; Bhaskar, Hebbar Pragati; Pol, Jyoti S; Sodhi, Amandeep; Madhu, Asha V

    2013-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a difficult condition to treat because of its chronic nature. Various treatment modalities have resulted in partial regression of symptoms but not a complete cure. Aloe vera, a product with minimal adverse effects, can be tried to treat this disorder. A 38-year-old male patient diagnosed with lichen planus of the skin and the oral mucosa was suffering from severe pain and a burning sensation intraorally and pruritus of the skin lesions. Considering the extensive involvement, an herbal alternative was considered. The patient was prescribed aloe vera juice and gel application for two months. At the nine-month follow-up, the patient was symptom-free and totally cured of the intraoral and skin lesions. PMID:24245466

  18. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  19. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  20. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1993-11-09

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  1. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  2. Human serum transferrin: a tale of two lobes. Urea gel and steady state fluorescence analysis of recombinant transferrins as a function of pH, time, and the soluble portion of the transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.

    2009-01-01

    Iron release from human serum transferrin (hTF) has been studied extensively; however, the molecular details of the mechanism(s) remain incomplete. This is in part due to the complexity of this process, which is influenced by lobe–lobe interactions, the transferrin receptor (TFR), the salt effect, the presence of a chelator, and acidification within the endosome, resulting in iron release. The present work brings together many of the concepts and assertions derived from previous studies in a methodical, uniform, and visual manner. Examination of earlier work reveals some uncertainty due to sample and technical limitations. We have used a combination of steady-state fluorescence and urea gels to evaluate the effect of conformation, pH, time, and the soluble portion of the TFR (sTFR) on iron release from each lobe of hTF. The use of authentic recombinant monoferric and locked species removes any possibility of cross-contamination by acquisition of iron. Elimination of detergent by use of the sTFR provides a further technical advantage. We find that iron release from the N-lobe is very sensitive to the conformation of the C-lobe, but is insensitive to the presence of the sTFR or to changes in pH (between 5.6 and 6.4). Specifically, when the cleft of the C-lobe is locked, the urea gels indicate that only about half of the iron is completely removed from the cleft of the N-lobe. Iron release from the C-lobe is most affected by the presence of the sTFR and changes in pH, but is unaffected by the conformation of the N-lobe. A model for iron release from diferric hTF is provided to delineate our findings. PMID:19290554

  3. Is There a Cure for Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Small Business Programs Activities and opportunities geared toward small businesses Peer Review Review of the scientific & technical merit of grant applications Contacts for NICHD Funding Information ... It also is possible that a person cured of Cushing’s disease might not recover their previous mental strength, including memory, but any functional difference is usually small. 4 , 5 People whose Cushing’s syndrome was caused ...

  4. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  5. Using Sex to Cure the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    The diversification of prokaryotes is accelerated by their ability to acquire DNA from other genomes. However, the underlying processes also facilitate genome infection by costly mobile genetic elements. The discovery that cells can uptake DNA by natural transformation was instrumental to the birth of molecular biology nearly a century ago. Surprisingly, a new study shows that this mechanism could efficiently cure the genome of mobile elements acquired through previous sexual exchanges. PMID:26987049

  6. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brophy, Brenor L.; Gonsalves, Peter R.; Maghsoodi, Sina; Colson, Thomas E.; Yang, Yu S.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.

    2016-04-19

    Disclosed is a coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly, systems and methods for curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using high temperature air-knives, infrared emitters and direct heat applicators are disclosed.

  7. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brophy, Brenor L; Maghsoodi, Sina; Neyman, Patrick J; Gonsalves, Peter R; Hirsch, Jeffrey G; Yang, Yu S

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed are coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly systems and methods for skin curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using a high temperature air-knife are disclosed.

  8. Mark Plotkin, PhD: in search of plants that heal. Interview by Bonnie Horrigan.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, M

    1996-03-01

    Ethnobotantist Mark Plotkin, PhD, spent much of the last decade in the rain forests of South America, learning about curative plants and medical practices from the tribal shamans. Through his work with indigenous people in Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname, and Venezuela, he has categorized more than 300 shaman plant cures. Plotkin studied ethnobotany at Harvard, Yale, and Tufts, and is the first botanist to receive the San Diego Zoological Society's Conservation Medal. He previously served as director of plant conservation at the World Wildlife Fund, the world's largest conservation organization, and as vice president of Conservation International. Founder of the "Shaman's Apprentice Program," which encourages younger tribal members to apprentice under the aging shamans, Plotkin currently devotes his time to curative plant research, consultation, lecturing, writing, and fund raising for his new organization, the Conservation and Ethnobiology Alliance. He has published numerous scientific articles and is the author of the popular book, Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice. PMID:8795891

  9. Color changes in resin cement polymerized with different curing lights under indirect restorations

    PubMed Central

    Bayindir, Funda; Ilday, Nurcan Ozakar; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Karataş, Ozcan; Gurpinar, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different interface materials and curing units on color changes in a resin cement material. Materials and Methods: Three interface materials and different curing systems, quartz-tungsten-halogen and polywave and monowave light-emitting diode (LED) light curing units, were studied at two-time intervals. Polystyrene strip was used as a control group. All measurements were made on a white background for standard color measurement. According to the CIE L*a*b* color space, the baseline color values of each specimen were measured. Differences between the measurements were calculated as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests (α = 0.05) with SPSS 20.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). ANOVA revealed significance for interface materials and curing units and time for ΔE (P < 0.05). Results: Interaction between polymerizing units, material and time was not significant (P > 0.05). Monowave LED exhibited significantly higher color changes than the other units ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 2.94 ± 0.44]). QTH promoted composite specimens significantly less color change ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 0.87 ± 0.41]). Conclusion: This study concluded that color of resin cement used in the adhesion of indirect restorations was affected by curing device light and indirect restoration material type. PMID:26957793

  10. Surface pH of resin-modified glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements.

    PubMed

    Woolford, M J; Chadwick, R G

    1992-12-01

    The recently developed group of materials known as light-activated, or resin-modified, glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements have been produced in response to clinical demands for a command set cavity base material. This study monitored the surface pH of three commercially available resin-modified glass ionomer cements over a 60-min period following either mixing alone or mixing followed by a 30-s exposure to a curing lamp. The results indicate that each material behaves in a unique manner. For all materials and conditions the pH reached after a 60-min period was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than the initial value. Light curing the materials significantly increased (P < 0.01) the surface pH of two of the materials (Baseline VLC and Vitrebond) as compared to the same materials in the uncured state. In the case of XR-Ionomer, however, no significant (P > 0.05) effect of light curing upon the surface pH was apparent. The precise clinical consequences of a low surface pH are unclear but may be an aetiological factor in postoperative pulpal sensitivity. It is therefore recommended that a sublining of a proprietary calcium hydroxide lining material should be placed routinely beneath these materials and every effort made to ensure effective light curing. PMID:1452877

  11. Spontaneous recovery of bone mass after cure of endogenous hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Maria Elena; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Vanzulli, Angelo; Loli, Paola

    2012-06-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) develop osteopenia-osteoporosis. The present study evaluates the recovery of bone mass within 2 years after remission of hypercortisolism and in long term follow up, an issue rarely addressed. Twenty patients (6M, 14F, 3 post-menopausal, 15-64 years old), 15 with Cushing's disease, 2 with ectopic ACTH syndrome, 3 with ACTH-independent CS were studied. BMD, T and Z scores at lumbar spine and proximal femur were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and 7-33 months after treatment of hypercortisolism. Five patients were treated with bisphosphonates. Four patients had hypogonadism and 4 GH-deficiency. At baseline all patients showed osteopenia/osteoporosis and the spine appeared more damaged than the femur; femur BMD was positively related with body mass index (BMI). No correlations were observed between spine and femur bone parameters and duration of disease or severity of hypercortisolism. Bone parameters did not differ in patients with or without GH or other pituitary deficiencies. After cure of hypercortisolism a significant improvement in spine BMD, Z and T scores and in femur Z and T scores was observed with normalization in 3 patients; there was no significant difference in percent improvement between femur and spine. The increase in bone parameters at spine and femur was independent from values at baseline. The percent increase in spine T and Z scores was positively related with time elapsed since cure. Bisphosphonates did not influence the recovery of bone mineralization. In long term follow up, after a median period of 7 years a further improvement in bone density was observed in 100% of patients at spine and in 9/11 at femur, although 8/11 patients still had femoral and/or vertebral T score in the range of osteopenia/osteoporosis. Spontaneous improvement of osteoporosis after cure of hypercortisolism occurs both at spine and femur, is independent from basal conditions and not affected by bisphosphonates

  12. Performance and model of a novel multi-sparger multi-stage airlift loop membrane bioreactor to treat high-strength 7-ACA pharmaceutical wastewater: effect of hydraulic retention time, temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao-bo; He, Zhang-wei; Tang, Cong-cong; Hu, Dong-xue; Cui, Yu-bo; Wang, Ai-jie; Zhang, Ying; Yan, Li-long; Ren, Nan-qi

    2014-09-01

    In this study, three novel multi-sparger multi-stage airlift loop membrane bioreactors (Ms(2)ALMBRs) were set up in parallel for treating synthetic high-strength 7-ACA pharmaceutical wastewater under different HRTs, temperatures and pHs, respectively. During the 200-day operating time, average COD removal efficiencies were 94.96%, 96.05% and 93.9%. While average 7-ACA removal efficiencies were 66.44%, 59.04% and 59.60%, respectively. The optimal conditions were 10h, 15-35°C and 7-9 for HRT, temperature and pH, respectively. Moreover, the sludge characteristics and microorganism drug-resistances were explored. Results showed that different temperatures and pHs influenced contaminant removals by affecting MLSS concentration and β-lactamase activity significantly. In addition, mathematical statistical models, built on the polynomial and linear regression techniques, were developed for exploring the inner relationships between HRT, temperature and pH changes and MLSS concentrations, β-lactamase activities and contaminant removals of the Ms(2)ALMBR system. PMID:24994681

  13. PRKAG3 and CAST genetic polymorphisms and quality traits of dry-cured hams--I. Associations in Spanish dry-cured ham Jamón Serrano.

    PubMed

    Gou, P; Zhen, Z Y; Hortós, M; Arnau, J; Diestre, A; Robert, N; Claret, A; Čandek-Potokar, M; Santé-Lhoutellier, V

    2012-12-01

    The functional single polymorphisms identified in the calpastatin (CAST) gene have been related to the rate of meat tenderization and the protein turnover after slaughter, and the Ile199Val polymorphism identified in the coding region of the protein kinase AMP-activated (PRKAG3) gene has been proven to affect ultimate pH in muscle. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of these genetic polymorphisms on the quality traits of Spanish dry-cured ham Jamón Serrano. A tissue sample from 665 crossbreed pigs were genotyped for PRKAG3 Ile199Val, CAST Arg249Lys and CAST Ser638Arg polymorphisms, and a subsample of 120 dry cured hams was selected to perform physico-chemical, rheological, instrumental colour and sensory analyses. Associations between the polymorphisms and several quality traits of dry-cured ham, mainly related to flavour and texture, were found. The genotypes PRKAG3 Ile/Ile, CAST249 Arg/Arg and CAST638 Arg/Arg, and the haplotype CAST 249Arg-638Arg were the most favourable for Jamón Serrano production. PMID:22762995

  14. Antimicrobial finish of textiles by chitosan UV-curing.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Franco; Periolatto, Monica

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this research work was to develop a textile finish based on the radical UV-curing of chitosan on textiles to confer antimicrobial properties. Chitosan is a biopolymer with unique properties such as biodegradability, non-toxicity, antimicrobial activity. In this work cotton or silk fabrics and synthetic filter fabrics were impregnated with an acid solution of chitosan added of the photoinitiator in the proper amount and cured at room temperature by exposure to UV lamp. Process conditions such as percentage add-on, dilution, chitosan-fabric contact time, irradiation time and power, were optimized. The antimicrobial activity of finished fabrics was tested according to ASTM E 2149-01 standard test performed with Escherichia Coli ATCC 8739. Moreover dyeing test with Turquoise Telon dye were carried out to evaluate the treatment homogeneity while the amino group content was determined by ninhydrin assay. Moreover on cotton and silk fabrics the treatment fastness to domestic laundering was tested, according to UNI EN ISO105-C01. Obtained results showed a strong antimicrobial activity conferred by the treatment, homogeneous on fabric surface. It is evident already at low add-on, without affecting the hand properties of natural fabrics and the filtration characteristics of the synthetic filter fabrics. Finally, washing fastness was better for samples prepared with a better penetration of chitosan inside the fibers. PMID:22905533

  15. Cure-WISE: HETDEX Data Reduction with Astro-WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigula, J. M.; Drory, N.; Fabricius, M.; Landriau, M.; Montesano, F.; Hill, G. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Cornell, M. E.

    2014-05-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX, Hill et al. 2012b) is a blind spectroscopic survey to map the evolution of dark energy using Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at redshifts 1.9< ɀ <3.5 as tracers. The survey will use an array of 75 integral field spectrographs called the Visible Integral field Replicable Unit (IFU) Spectrograph (VIRUS, Hill et al. 2012c). The 10m HET (Ramsey et al. 1998) currently receives a wide-field upgrade (Hill et al. 2012a) to accomodate the spectrographs and to provide the needed field of view. Over the projected five year run of the survey we expect to obtain approximately 170 GB of data each night. For the data reduction we developed the Cure pipeline, to automatically find and calibrate the observed spectra, subtract the sky background, and detect and classify different types of sources. Cure employs rigorous statistical methods and complete pixel-level error propagation throughout the reduction process to ensure Poisson-limited performance and meaningful significance values. To automate the reduction of the whole dataset we implemented the Cure pipeline in the Astro-WISE framework. This integration provides for HETDEX a database backend with complete dependency tracking of the various reduction steps, automated checks, and a searchable interface to the detected sources and user management. It can be used to create various web interfaces for data access and quality control. Astro-WISE allows us to reduce the data from all the IFUs in parallel on a compute cluster. This cluster allows us to reduce the observed data in quasi real time and still have excess capacity for rerunning parts of the reduction. Finally, the Astro-WISE interface will be used to provide access to reduced data products to the general community.

  16. Effect of electron water curing and electron charging curing on concrete strength

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Q.; Sugita, S.; Sawayama, K.; Isojima, Y.

    1998-09-01

    By charging normal water under an appropriate electric voltage, electron water can be produced. With its small molecule cluster and high activity, the water has been found to have applications in many fields. This study showed that: (1) by curing concrete specimens in electron water, concrete strength was increased by at least 5% and by more than 15% at early ages in comparison to that of the concrete cured in normal water at the same temperature; and (2) by electron charging curing the strength of concrete could also be improved, especially its 1-day strength, which was increased by as high as 50% relative to that of control specimens. The possible reason for the strength increase of concrete by both curing methods is that the curing water and the water in concrete both have small molecule clusters and high activity caused by the charging treatment, resulting in the improvement on cement hydration and the decrease in average pore size and the volumes of large pores of concrete.

  17. Microhardness and Young's modulus of a bonding resin cured with different curing units.

    PubMed

    Yamauti, Monica; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the microhardness and Young's modulus of a photocurable bonding resin, Clearfil SE Bond (SE), cured with four curing units at different distances. The curing units used were: Candelux (Quartz-tungsten halogen), Lux-O-Max (Blue light emitting diode), Arc-light (Plasma-arc), and Rayblaze (Metal halide). Discs of bonding resin were prepared using vinyl molds and were photocured at the top surface with light tip at three different distances (contact, 2 and 4 mm). After 24 hours of storage in water at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned into halves, embedded in epoxy resin, and polished. The microhardness and Young's modulus of this bonding resin were measured using a nanoindentation tester. Six specimens were prepared for each group. The data was statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA test and Tukey multiple comparison test (p < 0.01). The microhardness of SE was affected by light source and distance, as was Young's modulus. Candelux and Rayblaze presented the highest hardness and Young's modulus results. Both properties presented high values when the curing unit tip was maintained in contact with the irradiated surface. Increasing the distance between the curing unit tip and the irradiated surface decreased the hardness and Young's modulus of SE. PMID:15688707

  18. A Simulation Based Metaheuristic Optimization of the Thermal Cure Cycle of Carbon-Epoxy Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Palazzo, Gaetano S.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper a simulation based optimization procedure, based on the combination of the Simulated Annealing and the Nelder Mead algorithms, for the time reduction of the thermal cure cycle of composite laminates, has been proposed and discussed. The cycle time has been assumed as the objective function to be minimized, taking into account technological limitations by the means of a penalty function. Several simulations have been performed to test the proposed method and investigate the influence of the optimization algorithm parameters on the quality of the solution and the convergence rate of the algorithm, evidencing the capability of the procedure to converge to an optimal process window for cure cycle design.

  19. IMPACT OF CURING TEMPERATURE ON THE SATURATED LIQUID PERMEABILITY OF SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F.; Harbour, J.

    2011-02-14

    E and hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, it is possible to use E values to estimate the values of hydraulic conductivity. Measurement of Young's modulus is much easier than the measurement of permeability of Saltstone mixes and facilitates the measurement of the time dependence hydraulic conductivity. The results presented in this report show that changes in permeability as a function of curing temperature appear to be related to microstructural changes in the cured Saltstone mixes. Backscattered electron microscopy images revealed significant differences between the samples cured at different temperatures.

  20. Reproduction of Globodera tabacum solanacearum in Seven Flue-Cured Tobacco-Producing Soils

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, S. L.; JOHNSON, C. S.; Eisenback, J. D.; Reed, T. D.

    2000-01-01

    The tobacco cyst nematode (Globodera tabacum solanacearum) continues to pose a serious threat to flue-cured tobacco production in Virginia and nearby states. Soils were sampled from five uninfested and two infested flue-cured tobacco-producing locations. Twenty-three edaphic factors were characterized to determine if any were correlated with G. t. solanacearum reproduction. Comparisons were also made between pasteurized and natural soils to determine if biological suppression of G. t. solanacearum reproduction might be occurring in currently uninfested areas. Differences in G. t. solanacearum reproduction were noted among the soils, but results were inconsistent across the three trials conducted in this study. Only soil pH correlated significantly with nematode reproduction, and then only in one of three trials. Globodera tabacum solanacearum reproduced with similar efficiency in natural and pasteurized soils. PMID:19270999

  1. Cure Monitoring of an Unsaturated Polyester Resin Using Near-Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Chong S. P.; Grunden, Bradley L.

    1998-03-01

    The applicability of both near-infrared (NIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy for the purpose of cure monitoring an unsaturated polyester (UPE) resin was investigated. Based on standard reference mixtures, peak assignments in the NIR region of the spectrum were made. It was determined that the peak at 1629 nm was due to the first overtone band of RHC=CH2 stretching modes in styrene, while a combination of RHC=CHR and -C=C- stretching modes in diethyl fumarate were responsible for the peak observed at 2087 nm. NIR spectra of the UPE resin during isothermal cure at 75 C exhibited decreases in peak absorbance at 1629 and 2087 nm due to conversion of styrene and vinylene bonds, respectively. Conversion of styrene and vinylene with time calculated using NIR spectra showed similar trends found with FTIR analysis throughout the entire conversion range. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor the isothermal curing reaction of the UPE resin by exciting styrene at 250 nm. Emission intensity at ca. 306 nm remained unchanged for the initial 60-80 minutes then increased with cure time due to a reduced self-quenching effect as cure proceeded. The increase in fluorescence intensity was concurrent with an increase in styrene conversion up to 93% styrene conversion.

  2. Curing kinetics and morphology of a nanovesicular epoxy/stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, K; Lavrenova, A; Spoelstra, A B; Boyard, N; Goderis, B

    2015-08-21

    Brittle epoxy based thermosets can be made tougher by introducing structural inhomogeneities at the micro- or nanoscale. In that respect, nano vesicles and worm-like micelles from self-assembling blockcopolymers have been shown to be very effective. This paper describes the curing kinetics and morphology of an epoxy composed of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA), modified by 20% of the surfactant stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide). Time resolved, synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrates that at any time during the epoxy curing process, the surfactant predominantly adopts a bilayer vesicular nano-morphology. Transmission electron microscopy on fully cured systems reveals the coexistence of spherical and worm-like micelles. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments prove that the presence of surfactant reduces the epoxy curing rate but that ultimately full curing is accomplished. The material glass transition temperature falls below that of the pure resin due to plasticization. It is suggested that favorable secondary interactions between the PEO segments and the epoxy resin are responsible for the observed phenomena. PMID:26144526

  3. Chemical analysis of electron beam curing of positive photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Matthew F.; Christensen, Lorna D.; Magvas, John

    1994-05-01

    In this paper the chemical and thermal properties of electron beam cured photoresist were investigated and compared with conventional thermal curing methods. The photoresist used in this investigation was AZ P.4620, a positive novolak based photoresist formulated for thick film applications. The films were exposed with varying dosages using an electron beam photoresist curing system. The photoresist films were then analyzed for residual solvent content, photoactive compound decomposition, percentage of crosslinking, and film shrinkage as a function of exposure dose. These properties were then compared with the properties of resist films cured using conventional thermal curing methods. A model of photoresist curing chemistry as a function of dose is proposed as well as a method for optimizing the cure of the photoresist for different applications.

  4. Modeling the curing process of thick-section autoclave cured composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, A. C.; Dara, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature gradients are significant during cure of large area, thick-section composites. Such temperature gradients result in nonuniformly cured parts with high void contents, poor ply compaction, and variations in the fiber/resin distribution. A model was developed to determine the temperature distribution in thick-section autoclave cured composites. Using the model, long with temperature measurements obtained from the thick-section composites, the effects of various processing parameters on the thermal response of the composites were examined. A one-dimensional heat transfer model was constructed for the composite-tool assembly. The governing differential equations and associated boundary conditions describing one-dimensional unsteady heat-conduction in the composite, tool plate, and pressure plate are given. Solution of the thermal model was obtained using an implicit finite difference technique.

  5. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  6. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-08

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world`s largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide.

  7. The scientific quest for lasting youth: prospects for curing aging.

    PubMed

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2014-10-01

    People have always sought eternal life and everlasting youth. Recent technological breakthroughs and our growing understanding of aging have given strength to the idea that a cure for human aging can eventually be developed. As such, it is crucial to debate the long-term goals and potential impact of the field. Here, I discuss the scientific prospect of eradicating human aging. I argue that curing aging is scientifically possible and not even the most challenging enterprise in the biosciences. Developing the means to abolish aging is also an ethical endeavor because the goal of biomedical research is to allow people to be as healthy as possible for as long as possible. There is no evidence, however, that we are near to developing the technologies permitting radical life extension. One major difficulty in aging research is the time and costs it takes to do experiments and test interventions. I argue that unraveling the functioning of the genome and developing predictive computer models of human biology and disease are essential to increase the accuracy of medical interventions, including in the context of life extension, and exponential growth in informatics and genomics capacity might lead to rapid progress. Nonetheless, developing the tools for significantly modifying human biology is crucial to intervening in a complex process like aging. Yet in spite of advances in areas like regenerative medicine and gene therapy, the development of clinical applications has been slow and this remains a key hurdle for achieving radical life extension in the foreseeable future. PMID:25132068

  8. The Scientific Quest for Lasting Youth: Prospects for Curing Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract People have always sought eternal life and everlasting youth. Recent technological breakthroughs and our growing understanding of aging have given strength to the idea that a cure for human aging can eventually be developed. As such, it is crucial to debate the long-term goals and potential impact of the field. Here, I discuss the scientific prospect of eradicating human aging. I argue that curing aging is scientifically possible and not even the most challenging enterprise in the biosciences. Developing the means to abolish aging is also an ethical endeavor because the goal of biomedical research is to allow people to be as healthy as possible for as long as possible. There is no evidence, however, that we are near to developing the technologies permitting radical life extension. One major difficulty in aging research is the time and costs it takes to do experiments and test interventions. I argue that unraveling the functioning of the genome and developing predictive computer models of human biology and disease are essential to increase the accuracy of medical interventions, including in the context of life extension, and exponential growth in informatics and genomics capacity might lead to rapid progress. Nonetheless, developing the tools for significantly modifying human biology is crucial to intervening in a complex process like aging. Yet in spite of advances in areas like regenerative medicine and gene therapy, the development of clinical applications has been slow and this remains a key hurdle for achieving radical life extension in the foreseeable future. PMID:25132068

  9. Paediatric HIV: Progress on Prevention, Treatment and Cure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Maria H; Ahmed, Saeed; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an update on current developments with prevention, treatment and cure strategies in the field of pediatric HIV. Recent findings/Summary There has been tremendous progress in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV infection. With new strategies for prevention of mother-to-child transmission, we are growing ever closer towards elimination of pediatric HIV, though challenges with retention of pregnant woman and their HIV-exposed infants remain. Ongoing vigilance regarding the potential hazards of in utero ART exposure to infants continues with no significant alarms yet identified. Though cure has not been achieved, evidence of the impact of early treatment on reducing HIV-1 reservoir size with subsequent prolonged remission has enlivened efforts to rapidly identify and treat HIV-infected newborns. There is an increasing array of treatment options for pediatric patients and reassuring evidence regarding long-term complications of ART. Unfortunately, despite evidence suggesting the benefit of early treatment, timely identification and treatment of children remains a challenge. Better strategies for effective case-finding and engagement in care are urgently needed in addition to an improved understanding of how to retain HIV-positive children and adolescents on treatment. However, further emboldened by recent international commitments and robust global support, the future is hopeful. PMID:26709366

  10. Reaction cured glass and glass coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B.; Katvala, V. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to reaction cured glass and glass coatings prepared by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, other boron silicides, boron and mixtures with a reactive glass frit composed of a porous high silica borosilicate glass and boron oxide. The glassy composites of the present invention are useful as coatings on low density fibrous porous silica insulations used as heat shields and for articles such as reaction vessels that are subjected to high temperatures with rapid heating and cooling and that require resistance to temperature and repeated thermal shock at temperatures up to about 1482C (2700PF).

  11. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  12. Immune-spaying as an alternative to surgical spaying in Iberian × Duroc females: Effect on the VOC profile of dry-cured shoulders and dry-cured loins as detected by PTR-ToF-MS.

    PubMed

    Gamero-Negrón, Rafael; Sánchez del Pulgar, José; Cappellin, Luca; García, Carmen; Gasperi, Flavia; Biasioli, Franco

    2015-12-01

    Immunocastration in pigs has been proposed as a cruelty-free alternative to surgical castration. In this work the effect of immune-spaying of female pigs on the volatile compound profile of Iberian dry-cured products was evaluated. The head-space volatile compound of dry-cured shoulders and loins from surgically spayed, immune-spayed and entire Iberian × Duroc females was characterized by proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry. It was not possible to identify a significant effect of the castration modality on dry-cured shoulders, probably because of the heterogeneity of samples. Contrarily, Principal Component Analysis of dry-cured loins indicates a better homogeneity of samples and the separation of loins from surgically spayed and immune-spayed females. Some mass peaks tentatively identified as important flavor compounds in dry-cured products, 3-methylbutanal, 2,3-butanedione and 3-methylbutanoic acid, were significantly higher in the immune-spayed females. Therefore, immune-spaying seems to have a negligible effect on the volatile compound profile of dry-cured shoulders, whereas it could affect the VOC profile in the case of dry-cured loins. PMID:26233671

  13. Degree of conversion of two dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kim, Young-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study was to measure the degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks with different thicknesses using various light-curing methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia ceramic disks (KT12) with three different thicknesses (1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mm) were prepared. The light transmittance of the disks was measured using ultraviolet visible near-infrared spectroscopy. Four different light-curing protocols were used by combining two curing light modes (Elipar TriLight (standard mode) and bluephase G2 (high power mode)) with light-exposure times of 40 and 120 seconds. The DCs of the two dual-cured resin cements (Duo-Link and Panavia F2.0) light-irradiated through the disks was analyzed at three time intervals (3, 7, and 10 minutes) by FTIR spectroscopy. The data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α=.05).Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test were used to analyze the 10 minute DC results. RESULTS The 1.0 mm thick disk exhibited low light transmittance (<25%), and the transmittance decreased considerably with increasing disk thickness. All groups exhibited significantly higher 10 minute DC values than the 3 or 7 minute values (P<.05), but some exceptions were observed in Duo-Link. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the influence of the zirconia disk thickness on the 10 minute DC was dependent on the light-curing methods (P<.001). This finding was still valid even at 4.0 mm thickness, where substantial light attenuation took place. CONCLUSION The curing of the dual-cured resin cements was affected significantly by the light-curing technique, even though the additional chemical polymerization mechanism worked effectively. PMID:24353887

  14. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  15. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  16. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  17. Parameters affecting downhole pH

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Jangama, V.R.; Willmon, J.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

  18. [Curing effects of chlorination, ozone and UV treatments on plasmid DNAs].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S

    1990-09-01

    Curing effects of chlorine, ozone and ultraviolet (UV) on plasmid DNAs were investigated as one of the measures of bio-hazards due to recombinant plasmids. For donor strains of plasmids, Pseudomonas aeruginosa RM 2046 harboring the self-transmissible plasmid R68 and RM 2021 harboring the cloning vector R1162, Escherichia coli C 600 ML 4903 and ML 1410 harboring the self-transmissible plasmid Rts-1 and RP4, and E. coli JM 109 harboring the cloning vector pBR 322 were used. The curing rate showed a tendency to increase with treatment time in a L-shaped curve for each plasmid DNA. The rates reached steady state after more than 5-10 minutes of the chlorination and ozone treatment, or 5-10 seconds of the UV treatment, independent of the treatment intensity. It became clear by use of replica technique that effective curing took place by chlorination for Rts-1, R1162 and pBR322, by ozone treatment for R68, and by UV treatment for PR4, respectively. Of the three disinfection treatments excellent curing effect occurred with chlorination, as more than 90% of the curing rate was obtained by that treatment for all donor strains. PMID:2132391

  19. Stakeholder Engagement in HIV Cure Research: Lessons Learned from Other HIV Interventions and the Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ying-Ru; Chu, Carissa; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Excler, Jean-Louis; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-07-01

    Clinical and basic science advances have raised considerable hope for achieving an HIV cure by accelerating research. This research is dominated primarily by issues about the nature and design of current and future clinical trials. Stakeholder engagement for HIV cure remains in its early stages. Our analysis examines timing and mechanisms of historical stakeholder engagement in other HIV research areas for HIV-uninfected individuals [vaccine development and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)], and HIV-infected individuals (treatment as prevention, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and treatment of acute HIV infection) and articulate a plan for HIV cure stakeholder engagement. The experience from HIV vaccine development shows that early engagement of stakeholders helped manage expectations, mitigating the failure of several vaccine trials, while paving the way for subsequent trials. The relatively late engagement of HIV stakeholders in PrEP research may partly explain some of the implementation challenges. The treatment-related stakeholder engagement was strong and community-led from the onset and helped translation from research to implementation. We outline five steps to initiate and sustain stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research and conclude that stakeholder engagement represents a key investment in which stakeholders mutually agree to share knowledge, benefits, and risk of failure. Effective stakeholder engagement prevents misconceptions. As HIV cure research advances from early trials involving subjects with generally favorable prognosis to studies involving greater risk and uncertainty, success may depend on early and deliberate engagement of stakeholders. PMID:26061668

  20. Stakeholder Engagement in HIV Cure Research: Lessons Learned from Other HIV Interventions and the Way Forward

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carissa; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Excler, Jean-Louis; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clinical and basic science advances have raised considerable hope for achieving an HIV cure by accelerating research. This research is dominated primarily by issues about the nature and design of current and future clinical trials. Stakeholder engagement for HIV cure remains in its early stages. Our analysis examines timing and mechanisms of historical stakeholder engagement in other HIV research areas for HIV-uninfected individuals [vaccine development and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)], and HIV-infected individuals (treatment as prevention, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and treatment of acute HIV infection) and articulate a plan for HIV cure stakeholder engagement. The experience from HIV vaccine development shows that early engagement of stakeholders helped manage expectations, mitigating the failure of several vaccine trials, while paving the way for subsequent trials. The relatively late engagement of HIV stakeholders in PrEP research may partly explain some of the implementation challenges. The treatment-related stakeholder engagement was strong and community-led from the onset and helped translation from research to implementation. We outline five steps to initiate and sustain stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research and conclude that stakeholder engagement represents a key investment in which stakeholders mutually agree to share knowledge, benefits, and risk of failure. Effective stakeholder engagement prevents misconceptions. As HIV cure research advances from early trials involving subjects with generally favorable prognosis to studies involving greater risk and uncertainty, success may depend on early and deliberate engagement of stakeholders. PMID:26061668

  1. Weight change of various light-cured restorative materials after water immersion.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Y; Yamamoto, H; Sato, W; Kawai, K; Torii, M; Ebisu, S

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated weight changes of various light-cured glass-ionomer cements and other restorative materials during water immersion and compared findings with those of conventional glass-ionomer cement and light-cured resin composites. Three light-cured glass-ionomer cements, two polyacid-modified composite resins, one conventional glass-ionomer cement, and one light-cured composite resin were evaluated in this study. The weight changes of these specimens after water immersion were measured using an electronic analytical balance and adjusted according to water solubility measured at the same time weight change was measured. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffé's F test at P < 0.05. The weight change of Photac-Fil Aplicap was the largest, and there were significant differences among the materials (P < 0.05). Weight change after 6 weeks' water immersion was noted in the following order: Fuji Ionomer Type II LC, Vitremer, Fuji Ionomer Type II, VariGlass VLC, Geristore V, and Clearfil AP-X. It is suggested that the amount of water sorption of light-cured glass-ionomer cements is greater than that of polyacid-modified composite resins. PMID:9656924

  2. Monitoring Fiber Stress During Curing of Single Fiber Glass- and Graphite-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in thermal expansion characteristics of epoxy matrices and graphite fibers can produce significant residual stresses in the fibers during curing of composite materials. Tests on single fiber glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite specimens were conducted in which the glass and graphite fibers were preloaded in tension, and the epoxy matrix was cast around the fibers. The fiber tension was monitored while the matrix was placed around the fiber and subjected to the temperature-time curing cycle. Two mechanisms responsible for producing stress in embedded fibers were identified as matrix thermal expansion and contraction and matrix cure shrinkage. A simple analysis based on the change in fiber tension during the curing cycle was conducted to estimate the produced stresses. Experimental results on single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites show that the fiber was subjected to significant tensile stresses when the temperature was raised from the first to the second dwell period. When initial fiber pretension is about 60 percent of the fiber failure load, these curing-induced stresses can cause tensile fracture of the embedded fiber.

  3. Inorganic polymers from alkali activation of metakaolin: Effect of setting and curing on structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, Isabella; Catauro, Michelina; Ponzoni, Chiara; Bollino, Flavia; Leonelli, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    Geopolymers, obtained by chemical reaction between aluminosilicate oxides and silicates under highly alkaline conditions, are studied in this paper. The proposed mechanism of geopolymer setting and hardening or curing consists of a dissolution, a transportation or an orientation, as well as a polycondensation step. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the curing time and temperature, the relative humidity and the reagents temperature on the geopolymerization process in order to obtain a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous wastes. The evolution of the process from the precursors dissolution to final geopolymer matrix hardening has been followed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/EDS and leaching tests. The results show the significant influence of both curing temperature in the curing stage and of the mould materials on the matrix stability. The easy-to-run preparation procedure for a chemically stable metakaolin geopolymer individuated can be summarized as reagents setting and curing at room temperature and material mould which permits moisture level around 40%.

  4. Effect of Particular Breed on the Chemical Composition, Texture, Color, and Sensorial Characteristics of Dry-cured Ham

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Pil Nam; Park, Kuyng Mi; Kang, Sun Moon; Kang, Geun Ho; Cho, Soo Hyun; Park, Beom Young; Van Ba, Hoa

    2014-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the impact of specific breed on the characteristics of dry-cured ham. Eighty thighs from Korean native pig (KNP), crossbreed (Landrace×Yorkshire)♀×Duroc♂ (LYD), Berkshire (Ber), and Duroc (Du) pig breeds (n = 10 for each breed) were used for processing of dry-cured ham. The thighs were salted with 6% NaCl (w/w) and 100 ppm NaNO2, and total processing time was 413 days. The effects of breed on the physicochemical composition, texture, color and sensory characteristics were assessed on the biceps femoris muscle of the hams. The results revealed that the highest weight loss was found in the dry-cured ham of LYD breed and the lowest weight loss was found in Ber dry-cured ham. The KNP dry-cured ham contain higher intramuscular fat level than other breed hams (p<0.05). It was observed that the dry-cured ham made from KNP breed had the lowest water activity value and highest salt content, while the LYD dry-cure ham had higher total volatile basic nitrogen content than the Ber and Du hams (p<0.05). Zinc, iron and total monounsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in KNP ham while polyunsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in Du ham when compared to other breed hams (p<0.05). Additionally, the KNP dry-cured ham possessed higher Commission International de l’Eclairage (CIE) a* value, while the Du dry-cured ham had higher L*, CIE b* and hue angle values (p<0.05). Furthermore, breed significantly affected the sensory attributes of dry-cured hams with higher scores for color, aroma and taste found in KNP dry-cured ham as compared to other breed hams (p<0.05). The overall outcome of the study is that the breed has a potential effect on the specific chemical composition, texture, color and sensorial properties of dry-cured hams. These data could be useful for meat processors to select the suitable breeds for economical manufacturing of high quality dry-cured hams. PMID:25083111

  5. Time-dependent activity of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 and homeostasis of intracellular pH in astrocytes exposed to CoCl2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Kan, Quancheng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Suyan

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxia causes injury to the central nervous system during stroke and has significant effects on pH homeostasis. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is important in the mechanisms of hypoxia and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. As a well-established hypoxia-mimetic agent, CoCl2 stabilizes and increases the expression of hypoxia inducible factor‑1α (HIF-1α), which regulates several genes involved in pH balance, including NHE1. However, it is not fully understood whether NHE1 is activated in astrocytes under CoCl2 treatment. In the current study, pHi and NHE activity were analyzed using the pHi‑sensitive dye BCECF‑AM. Using cariporide (an NHE1‑specific inhibitor) and EIPA (an NHE nonspecific inhibitor), the current study demonstrated that it was NHE1, not the other NHE isoforms, that was important in regulating pHi homeostasis in astrocytes during CoCl2 treatment. Additionally, the present study observed that, during the early period of CoCl2 treatment (the first 2 h), NHE1 activity and pHi dropped immediately, and NHE1 mRNA expression was reduced compared with control levels, whereas expression levels of the NHE1 protein had not yet changed. In the later period of CoCl2 treatment, NHE1 activity and pHi significantly increased compared with the control levels, as did the mRNA and protein expression levels of NHE1. Furthermore, the cell viability and injury of astrocytes was not changed during the initial 8 h of CoCl2 treatment; their deterioration was associated with the higher levels of pHi and NHE1 activity. The current study concluded that NHE1 activity and pHi homeostasis are regulated by CoCl2 treatment in a time-dependent manner in astrocytes, and may be responsible for the changes in cell viability and injury observed under hypoxia-mimetic conditions induced by CoCl2 treatment. PMID:27035646

  6. Dual cure low-VOC coating process. Final technical report, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzer, K.E.

    1993-12-01

    US EPA is implementing increasingly stringent environmental regulations on the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which amount to about 7 {times} 10{sup 9} lb/year, largely from paints and other coating systems in industry. Objective of this project is to develop Dual Cure Photocatalyst coating technology for aerospace topcoats (urethane/acrylate), aerospace primers (epoxy/acrylate), and solventless tape backings. Some problems (moisture etc.) were encountered in the primer area. Cost, economic, and energy analyses were conducted. The dual cure technology has already been commercialized in 3M`s flexible diamond resin products. Tabs.

  7. Lethal acute demyelinization with encephalo-myelitis as a complication of cured Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Hieronimus, S; Vandenbos, F; Delmont, E; Cua, E; Cherick, F; Paquis, P; Michiels, J-F; Fenichel, P; Brucker-Davis, F

    2010-12-01

    Cushing's disease is usually associated with higher mortality rate, especially from cardiovascular causes. Development or exacerbation of autoimmune or inflammatory diseases is known to occur in patients with hypercortisolism after cure. We report for the first time a 34-year old woman with a psychiatric background, who developed four months after the surgical cure of Cushing's disease an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting initially as a psychiatric illness. We hypothesize that the recent correction of hypercortisolism triggered ADEM and that the atypical presentation, responsible for diagnosis delay, led to the death of this patient. PMID:20850107

  8. Evaluation of new UV-cured adhesives and effects of post-cure UV exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, John G.

    2002-09-01

    Recent developments in adhesives have yielded products well suited for optical applications. Ultraviolet light-cured adhesives can be cured in seconds and are an attractive candidate. Selection of the adhesive properties can be made to achieve optimum performance. For improved alignment stability and reduced stress, low shrinkage adhesives have been needed. New UV-cured adhesives are evaluated with shrinkage values of less than 0.2%. In addition to controlled bonding for alignment stability, the effects of post-cure UV laser exposure (266 nm) are evaluated. Adhesives needed for systems employing UV lasers must consider off-axis exposure that can cause photo-reactive degradation. Relatively low power laser exposure is used as a simulated source for off-axis or scattered irradiation. None of these candidate adhesives are intended for in-the-light path use at 266 nm, but rather as structural adhesives. Evaluation of these candidates included a outgassing screening test that may be employed to select materials.

  9. Curing chemistry of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers: Model compounds, carbon-13 labeling and cure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher Chad

    1998-11-01

    Phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers (PETI) are currently considered the state-of-the-art high performance resins for aerospace applications. The processing of these resins is more facile because of their low molecular weight, but PETI's cure to form a tough, solvent-resistant material. However, the final cure structure was a complete mystery. Hence, the present study was set forth with three essential goals. The determination of the final structure of the crosslinked polymer is of obvious importance. Second, the crosslinking mechanism and controlling factors is also of interest. Lastly, the final structure of the crosslinked polymers was correlated with mechanical and thermal properties, thereby helping to establish the structure-processing-properties relationships for PETI resins. These goals were accomplished by using a combination of synthesis of model compounds synthesis and proposed cure products, sp{13}C labeling of the ethynyl endgroup in PETI's, monitoring of the thermal cure using solid state sp{13}C NMR and ESR and molecular modeling techniques. Phenylethynyl endcapping agents, 4-(phenylethynyl)phthalic anhydride (PEPA) and 3-(phenylethynyl)aniline (3PEA), were synthesized via the palladium-catalyzed coupling of phenylacetylene with 4-bromophthalic anhydride or 3-iodonitrobenzene followed by reduction to 3PEA, respectively. Isolated yields of 41 and 86% for 3PEA and PEPA were obtained, respectively. Model compounds were synthesized from 3PEA and PEPA by reacting with them the appropriate aniline or phthalic anhydride derivative. Model compounds included N-pentafluorophenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F5An), N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F3CAn), N-lbrack 3-(phenylethynyl)phenylrbrack\\ phthalimide (3PEA/PA), N-phenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/An), N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/POAn), and N-(1-naphthyl)-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/Anaph). Proposed cure products such as

  10. CURE: Clean use of reactor energy

    SciTech Connect

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a joint Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study that considered the feasibility of treating radioactive waste before disposal to reduce the inventory of long-lived radionuclides, making the waste more suitable for geologic disposal. The treatment considered here is one in which waste would be chemically separated so that long-lived radionuclides can be treated using specific processes appropriate for the nuclide. The technical feasibility of enhancing repository performance by this type of treatment is considered in this report. A joint Westinghouse Hanford-PNL study group developed a concept called the Clean Use of Reactor Energy (CURE), and evaluated the potential of current technology to reduce the long-lived radionuclide content in waste from the nuclear power industry. The CURE process consists of three components: chemical separation of elements that have significant quantities of long-lived radioisotopes in the waste, exposure in a neutron flux to transmute the radioisotopes to stable nuclides, and packaging of radionuclides that cannot be transmuted easily for storage or geologic disposal. 76 refs., 32 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. Adhesive Properties of Cured Phenylethynyl Containing Imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Chang, Alice C.

    1997-01-01

    Considerable attention has been directed towards acetylene terminated oligomers over the last 20 years' and recent work has focused on phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) oligomers. These reactive oligomers possess several features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives. The phenylethynyl group can be readily incorporated into many different functionalized oligomers. The reactive oligomers possess relatively low melt viscosities and thermally cure without the evolution of volatile by-products. Once cured, they typically display high glass transition temperatures (Tgs), excellent solvent resistance and high mechanical properties. new modified phenylethynyl-terminated imide (LaRC MPEI) oligomers were synthesized at various molecular weights utilizing a small amount of trifunctional amine. As long as the amount of triamine is relatively small, this approach produces a mixture of linear, star-shaped and branched polymer chains that has lower melt and solution viscosity than an equivalent molecular weight linear phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers. The work reported herein involves the synthesis and characterization of a copolymer using this approach and the preparation of blends utilizing a phenylethynyl containing reactive plasticizer of lower molecular weight called LaRC LV-121. The chemistry and properties of this new MPEI as well as some blends of MPEI with LV-121, are presented and compared to the linear version, LARC-PETI-5.

  12. Dr. Hall and the work cure.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2005-01-01

    Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy. PMID:23927746

  13. Radiation curing of carbon fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.; Dispenza, C.; Sabatino, M. A.; Pitarresi, G.; Tumino, D.; Przbytniak, G.

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy/carbon fibre reinforced composites were produced by means of e-beam irradiation through a pulsed 10 MeV electron beam accelerator. The matrix consisted of a difunctional epoxy monomer (DGEBA) and an initiator of cationic polymerisation, while the reinforcement was a unidirectional high modulus carbon fibre fabric. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was carried out in order to determine the cross-linking degree. The analysis pointed out a nonuniformity in the cross-linking degree of the e-beam cured panels, with the formation of clusters at low Tg (glass transition temperature) and clusters at high Tg. An out-of-mould post irradiation thermal treatment on e-beam cured samples provides a higher uniformity in the network although some slight degradation effects. Mode I delamination fracture toughness and Interlaminar Shear Strength (ISS) were also investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and Short Beam Shear tests, respectively. Results from this mechanical characterisation allowed to correlate fracture toughness of the bulk matrix resin, cross-linking density and fibre/matrix interaction to the delamination fracture behaviour of the fibre reinforced material.

  14. Progress Towards an HIV Cure: Update from the 2014 International AIDS Society Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jenny Louise; Fromentin, Rémi; Corbelli, Giulio Maria; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Biomedical research has led to profound advances in the treatment of HIV infection. Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) now provides the means to readily control viral infection, and people living with HIV who receive timely and effective ART can expect to benefit from a life expectancy comparable to uninfected individuals. Nevertheless, despite effective treatment, ART does not fully restore the immune system and importantly HIV persists indefinitely in latent reservoirs, resulting in the need for life-long treatment. The challenges and limits of life-long treatment have spurred significant scientific interest and global investment into research towards an HIV cure. The International AIDS Society (IAS) 2014 Towards an HIV cure symposium brought together researchers and community to discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of latency and HIV reservoirs, and the clinical approaches towards an HIV cure under current investigation. This report summarizes and reviews some of the major findings discussed during the symposium. PMID:25257573

  15. Radiation curing of polyester resin modified with acrylic acid and its salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalińska, H.; Pietrzak, M.; Janowska, G.

    Polyester resin containing acrylic acid or its salts was cured with γ 60Co radiation. The course of curing was examined, the gel content and polymerization shrinkage were measured and also thermographic and IR absorption analyses were carried out. It was found that manganese, iron and copper acrylates inhibited the curing of resin while the remaining additives showed a slightly stimulating action. All the additives decreased the polymerization shrinkage by a factor of 2-3 and iron acrylate by as much as 8 times (up to 1%). They also increased the activation energy of the thermal decomposition of resin, and calcium, barium and copper acrylates increased the thermal stability of resin by 20 K. IR absorption spectra showed that acrylic acid and its salts reacted mainly with the monomeric component of the resin (styrene) whereas iron and copper acrylates first attacked the unsaturated bonds of the oligoester.

  16. Towards Multidisciplinary HIV-Cure Research: Integrating Social Science with Biomedical Research.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Cynthia I; Ross, Anna Laura; Auerbach, Judith D; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Dubé, Karine; Tucker, Joseph D; Noseda, Veronica; Possas, Cristina; Rausch, Dianne M

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a cure for HIV remains a timely and key challenge for the HIV research community. Despite significant scientific advances, current HIV therapy regimens do not completely eliminate the negative impact of HIV on the immune system; and the economic impact of treating all people infected with HIV globally, for the duration of their lifetimes, presents significant challenges. This article discusses, from a multidisciplinary approach, critical social, behavioral, ethical, and economic issues permeating the HIV-cure research agenda. As part of a search for an HIV cure, both the perspective of patients/participants and clinical researchers should be taken into account. In addition, continued efforts should be made to involve and educate the broader community. PMID:26642901

  17. Process Formulations And Curing Conditions That Affect Saltstone Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Pickenheim, B. R.; Daniel, W. E.

    2012-09-28

    The first objective of this study was to analyze saltstone fresh properties to determine the feasibility of reducing the formulation water to premix (w/p) ratio while varying the amount of extra water and admixtures used during processing at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The second part of this study was to provide information for understanding the impact of curing conditions (cure temperature, relative humidity (RH)) and processing formulation on the performance properties of cured saltstone.

  18. Applications of mass spectrometry techniques to autoclave curing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Mass spectrometer analysis of gases evolved from polymer materials during a cure cycle can provide a wealth of information useful for studying cure properties and procedures. In this paper data is presented for two materials to support the feasibility of using mass spectrometer gas analysis techniques to enhance the knowledge of autoclave curing of composite materials and provide additional information for process control evaluation. It is expected that this technique will also be useful in working out the details involved in determining the proper cure cycle for new or experimental materials.

  19. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one's life that one spends to "hit the nail on the head" in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are "sine quibus non" for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed. PMID:25674150

  20. Bending strength and depth of cure of light-cured composite resins irradiated using filters that simulate enamel.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, H; Kanie, T; Fujii, K; Shinohara, N

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluates the light-attenuating effects of enamel on the properties of light-cured restorative resins using simple experimental filters. Three filters were designed to replicate the light transmittance characteristics of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm thick human enamel. The bending strength, depth of cure, and levels of residual monomer for 12 shades of three commercial light-cured composite resins were examined. These resins were cured either using direct irradiation from a light source or irradiation through one of the filters. For all materials, the bending strength and depth of cure of specimens irradiated through a filter were lower and the levels of residual monomer were higher than those found in specimens irradiated directly. The results indicate that the light-attenuating effect of enamel reduces the polymerization efficiency, resulting in poorer mechanical properties of light-cured composite resins. PMID:15125601

  1. Dangerous medicines: Unproven AIDS cures and counterfeit antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Background Increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a critical goal endorsed by the United Nations and all of its member states. At the same time, anecdotal accounts suggest that the promotion of unproven AIDS 'cures' and remedies are widespread, and in the case of The Gambia, Iran and South Africa, have been promoted by governments directly. Although a range of legislative and regulatory measures have been adopted by some governments, and technical assistance has been provided by international agencies to address counterfeit medicines generally, the threat of counterfeit antiretroviral drugs is not being addressed. Discussion Countries, charged with fulfilling the right to health and committed to expanding access to ART must explicitly recognize their obligation to combat unproven AIDS treatments and ensure the availability of a safe and efficacious drugs supply. International donors must help support and coordinate these efforts. PMID:18304316

  2. Physicochemical Characteristics of Beef Jerky Cured with Salted-fermented Anchovy and Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gap-Don; Go, Gwang-woong; Lim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Eun-Young; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Joo, Seon-Tea; Yang, Han-Sul

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the availability of salted and fermented fish (SFF) including salted and fermented anchovy (SFA) and shrimp (SFS) as a marinade of beef jerky. In curing solutions, half (SFA 1 and SFS 1) or whole (SFA 2 and SFS 2) salt-water was replaced with SFF juices. Higher water activity (aw) was found in the beef jerky cured with SFFs than the control (C) (p< 0.05). The SFFs had the effect of causing a decrease in hardness and an increase in cohesiveness (p<0.05). Among the treatment samples, springiness was the highest in SFA2 and SFS2 (p<0.05) and the lowest values of Warner-Bratzler shear force were found in SFA1 and SFA2 (p<0.05). The SFFs also had the effect of increasing the flavor of the sensory properties; however, color measurements from both the instrumental surface color (L*, a*, b*, chroma, and hue angle) and color of sensory evaluation were decreased by addition of SFFs (p<0.05). Therefore, we conclude the SFFs can improve the texture and sensory properties of the beef jerky. In particular, the SFS is a good ingredient for the curing solution. However, studies are still needed on improving the aw, pH, and surface color of the beef jerky to apply the SFFs for making beef jerky. PMID:26760751

  3. An infiltration/cure model for manufacture of fabric composites by the resin infusion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weideman, Mark H.; Loos, Alfred C.; Dexter, H. Benson; Hasko, Gregory H.

    1992-01-01

    A 1-D infiltration/cure model was developed to simulate fabrication of advanced textile composites by the resin film infusion process. The simulation model relates the applied temperature and pressure processing cycles, along with the experimentally measured compaction and permeability characteristics of the fabric preforms, to the temperature distribution, the resin degree of cure and viscosity, and the infiltration flow front position as a function of time. The model also predicts the final panel thickness, fiber volume fraction, and resin mass for full saturation as a function of compaction pressure. Composite panels were fabricated using the RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) film infusion technique from knitted, knitted/stitched, and 2-D woven carbon preforms and Hercules 3501-6 resin. Fabric composites were fabricated at different compaction pressures and temperature cycles to determine the effects of the processing on the properties. The composites were C-scanned and micrographed to determine the quality of each panel. Advanced cure cycles, developed from the RTM simulation model, were used to reduce the total cure cycle times by a factor of 3 and the total infiltration times by a factor of 2.

  4. Dentin bond strength of light-cured glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Hinoura, K; Miyazaki, M; Onose, H

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of surface treatments and irradiation conditions on the bond strength of light-cured glass-ionomer cements to dentin. The light-cured glass-ionomer cements used in this study were Vitrabond, XR Ionomer, and Fuji Lining LC. Three experiments were designed to study the influence of the following factors on bond strength to dentin: (1) effect of the surface treatment of the dentin, (2) effect of the irradiation time, (3) effect of an increase in the interval between mixing of the cement and irradiation. Samples were stored in water for 24 hours, after which shear bond testing was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. For Vitrabond, the Scotchprep and Gluma 2 treatments gave the greatest shear bond strengths. For XR Ionomer and Fuji Lining LC, the Scotchprep treatment gave the greatest shear bond strengths. The bond strengths for all cements increased with prolonged irradiation time. Bond strengths decreased with a longer elapsed time between mixing and light-curing. This means that light-curing should be done soon after the cement is placed. The failure mode was found to be cohesive in the ionomer. PMID:1774385

  5. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  6. Effectiveness of composite cure with pulse activation and soft-start polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U J; Soh, M S; Siow, K S

    2002-01-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of composite cure with pulse activation and soft-start polymerization. A light-cure unit (BISCO VIP, BISCO Dental Products, Schaumburg, IL 60193, USA) that allowed for independent command over time and intensity was used. The six light-curing modes examined were: Control (C)-400 mW/cm2 [40 seconds]; Pulse Delay I (PDI) -100 mW/cm2 [3 seconds] --> delay [3 minutes] --> 500 mW/cm2 [30 seconds]; Pulse Delay II (PDII) - 200 mW/cm2 [20 seconds] --> delay [3 minutes] --> 500 mW/cm2 [30 seconds]; Soft-start (SS) - 200 mW/cm2 [10 seconds] --> 600 mW/cm2 [30 seconds]; Pulse Cure I (PCI) - 400 mW/cm2 [10 seconds] --> delay [10 seconds] --> 400 mW/cm2 [10 seconds] --> delay [10 seconds] --> 400 mW/cm2 [20 seconds]; and Pulse Cure II (PCII) - 400 mW/cm2 [20 seconds] --> delay [20 seconds] --> 400 mW/cm2 [20 seconds]. Effectiveness of cure with the different modes was determined by measuring the top and bottom surface hardness of 2 mm thick composite (Z100) specimens using a digital microhardness tester (load=500 gf; dwell time=15 seconds). The effectiveness of cure of the bottom surface of the composite was also established by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using the KBr technique. Data obtained was analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc test (p<0.05). No significant difference in top Knoops Hardness Number KHN wa s observed except for PDIand PDII. At the bottom surfaces, KHN obtained with the control was significantly greater than with PDII, SS and PCII. FTIR results ranked well with the hardness of the bottom surfaces. The absorbance ratio of carbon double bonds to aromatic ring obtained with the control group was significantly greater than with PDII and PCII. Effectiveness of the cure at the bottom surfaces of composites may be reduced by some pulse activation and soft-start polymerization regimens. PMID:11822365

  7. Effect of curing mode on the hardness of dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials.

    PubMed

    Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Kasaz, Aline de Cerqueira; Albino, Luís Gustavo Barrote; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Reis, Andre Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop Hardness (KHN) values of two dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials and one resin cement exposed to different curing conditions. Two dual-cured core build-up composite resins (LuxaCore-Dual, DMG; and FluoroCore2, Dentsply Caulk), and one dual-cured resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE) were used in the present study. The composite materials were placed into a cylindrical matrix (2 mm in height and 3 mm in diameter), and the specimens thus produced were either light-activated for 40 s (Optilux 501, Demetron Kerr) or were allowed to self-cure for 10 min in the dark (n = 5). All specimens were then stored in humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 h in the dark and were subjected to KHN analysis. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test at a pre-set alpha of 5%. All the light-activated groups exhibited higher KHN values than the self-cured ones (p = 0.00001), regardless of product. Among the self-cured groups, both composite resin core build-up materials showed higher KHN values than the dual-cured resin cement (p = 0.00001). LuxaCore-Dual exhibited higher KHN values than FluoroCore2 (p = 0.00001) when they were allowed to self-cure, while no significant differences in KHN values were observed among the light-activated products. The results suggest that dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials may be more reliable than dual-cured resin cements when curing light is not available. PMID:20658046

  8. Patienthood in medieval Tuscany: beliefs and cures.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on intersections of holy and sick bodies in the Tuscan Middle Ages to examine how the faithful accessed miraculous cures from contact with, or belief in, the relics of the saints. Rather than examine the relationship between the long dead martyrs (whose relics were abundant), however, it will look at the relationship between relatively recent saints and their devotees. The miracles discussed are traditional-that is, they are found in the lives of many saints and are not exceptional. It is hoped, however, that by concentrating on Tuscany, some insights can be secured on the relationship between Tuscan individuals of the late middle ages and those of their community who were recognised, either officially or through vox populi, as saints. PMID:27174846

  9. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  10. Using a centrifuge for quality control of pre-wetted lightweight aggregate in internally cured concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Albert E.

    Early age shrinkage of cementitious systems can result in an increased potential for cracking which can lead to a reduction in service life. Early age shrinkage cracking can be particularly problematic for high strength concretes, which are often specified due to their high strength and low permeability. However, these high strength concretes frequently exhibit a reduction in the internal relative humidity (RH) due to the hydration reaction (chemical shrinkage) and self-desiccation which results in a bulk shrinkage, termed autogenous shrinkage, which is substantial at early ages. Due to the low permeability of these concretes, standard external curing is not always efficient in addressing this reduction in internal RH since the penetration of water can be limited. Internal curing has been developed to reduce autogenous shrinkage. Internally cured mixtures use internal reservoirs filled with fluid (generally water) that release this fluid at appropriate times to counteract the effects of self-desiccation thereby maintaining a high internal RH. Internally cured concrete is frequently produced in North America using pre-wetted lightweight aggregate. One important aspect associated with preparing quality internally cured concrete is being able to determine the absorbed moisture and surface moisture associated with the lightweight aggregate which enables aggregate moisture corrections to be made for the concrete mixture. This thesis represents work performed to develop a test method using a centrifuge to determine the moisture state of pre-wetted fine lightweight aggregate. The results of the test method are then used in a series of worksheets that were developed to assist field technicians when performing the tests and applying the results to a mixture design. Additionally, research was performed on superabsorbent polymers to assess their ability to be used as an internal curing reservoir.

  11. Colour Stability of Heat and Cold Cure Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P R; Reddy, Madan Mohan; Ebenezar, A.V. Rajesh; Sivakumar, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the colour stability of heat and cold cure acrylic resins under simulated oral conditions with different colorants. Materials and Methods: Three different brands of heat cure acrylic resin and two rapid cure auto polymerizing acrylic resin of commercial products such as Trevelon Heat Cure (THC), DPI Heat cure (DHC), Pyrax Heat Cure (PHC), DPI Cold cure (DCC) and Acralyn-R-Cold cure (ACC) have been evaluated for discoloration and colour variation on subjecting it to three different, commonly employed food colorants such as Erythrosine, Tartarizine and Sunset yellow. In order to simulate the oral condition the food colorants were diluted with artificial saliva to the samples taken up for the study. These were further kept in an incubator at 37°C ± 1°C. The UV-visible spectrophotometer has been utilized to evaluate the study on the basis of CIE L* a* b* system. The prepared samples for standard evaluation have been grouped as control group, which has been tested with a white as standard, which is applicable for testing the colour variants. Results: The least colour changes was found to be with Sunset Yellow showing AE* value of 3.55 with heat cure acrylic resin branded as PHC material and the highest colour absorption with Tartarizine showing AE* value of 12.43 in rapid cure autopolymerzing acrylic resin material branded as ACC material. Conclusion: ACC which is a self cure acrylic resin shows a higher colour variation to the tartarizine food coloration. There were not much of discoloration values shown on the denture base resins as the food colorants are of organic azodyes. PMID:25738078

  12. Quantitative genetics of taura syndrome resistance in pacific white shrimp (penaeus vannamei): a cure model approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In aquaculture breeding, resistance against infectious diseases is commonly assessed as time until death under exposure to a pathogen. For some diseases, a fraction of the individuals may appear as "cured" (non-susceptible), and the resulting survival time may thus be a result of two confounded underlying traits, i.e., endurance (individual hazard) and susceptibility (whether at risk or not), which may be accounted for by fitting a cure survival model. We applied a cure model to survival data of Pacific white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) challenged with the Taura syndrome virus, which is one of the major pathogens of Panaeid shrimp species. Methods In total, 15,261 individuals of 513 full-sib families from three generations were challenge-tested in 21 separate tests (tanks). All challenge-tests were run until mortality naturally ceased. Time-until-event data were analyzed with a mixed cure survival model using Gibbs sampling, treating susceptibility and endurance as separate genetic traits. Results Overall mortality at the end of test was 28%, while 38% of the population was considered susceptible to the disease. The estimated underlying heritability was high for susceptibility (0.41 ± 0.07), but low for endurance (0.07 ± 0.03). Furthermore, endurance and susceptibility were distinct genetic traits (rg = 0.22 ± 0.25). Estimated breeding values for endurance and susceptibility were only moderately correlated (0.50), while estimated breeding values from classical models for analysis of challenge-test survival (ignoring the cured fraction) were closely correlated with estimated breeding values for susceptibility, but less correlated with estimated breeding values for endurance. Conclusions For Taura syndrome resistance, endurance and susceptibility are apparently distinct genetic traits. However, genetic evaluation of susceptibility based on the cure model showed clear associations with standard genetic evaluations that ignore the cure fraction for these

  13. A sixth-century Irish headache cure and its use in a south German monastery.

    PubMed

    Isler, H; Hasenfratz, H; O'Neill, T

    1996-12-01

    Medieval headache treatment is largely unknown. Medieval incantations against headache enumerate bodily organs to be protected. One 8th-century Latin hymn from Lake Constance using this device is addressed to St. Aid "mechprech", who has been identified as Aed Mac Bricc, Bishop of Killare, 6th century. This Irish Saint inspired unusual legends by some rather unorthodox activities: He abducted a young girl as hostage while his inheritance was withheld, but at the same time was seen surrounded by angels. He prayed for a nun who was pregnant and made the pregnancy vanish by a miracle, and he replaced the severed heads of maids, men and horses, creating a new spring as a by-product of this operation. Already at his birth his head had hit a stone, leaving a hole in the stone which collected rainwater that cured all ailments. In our own time, such "bullaun stones" are still believed to cure headache in Ireland. According to the legends collected by Plummer and Colgan, St. Aed Mac Bricc was well known for his power to cure headaches. He relieved St. Brigid's headache when she was suffering many miles away, but his most impressive cure was in convincing a headache sufferer that the patient's headache could actually be transferred own head. The headache hymn or incantation is intended to repeat Aed's unique miracle. PMID:8980854

  14. Resin polymerization problems--are they caused by resin curing lights, resin formulations, or both?

    PubMed

    Christensen, R P; Palmer, T M; Ploeger, B J; Yost, M P

    1999-01-01

    Negative effects of rapid, high-intensity resin curing have been predicted for both argon lasers and plasma-arc curing lights. To address these questions, six different resin restorative materials were cured with 14 different resin curing lights representing differences in intensities ranging from 400 mW/cm2 to 1,900 mW/cm2; delivery modes using constant, ramped, and stepped methods; cure times ranging from 1 second to 40 seconds; and spot sizes of 6.7 mm to 10.9 mm. Two lasers, five plasma-arc lights, and seven halogen lights were used. Shrinkage, modulus, heat generation, strain, and physical changes on the teeth and resins during strain testing were documented. Results showed effects associated with lights were not statistically significant, but resin formulation was highly significant. Microfill resins had the least shrinkage and the lowest modulus. An autocure resin had shrinkage and modulus as high as or higher than the light-cured hybrid resins. Lasers and plasma-arc lights produced the highest heat increases on the surface (up to 21 degrees C) and within the resin restorations (up to 14 degrees C), and the halogen lights produced the most heat within the pulp chamber (up to 2 degrees C). Strain within the tooth was least with Heliomolar and greatest with Z100 Restorative and BISFIL II autocure resin. Clinical effects of strain relief were evident as white lines at the tooth-resin interface and cracks in enamel adjacent to the margins. This work implicates resin formulation, rather than light type or curing mode, as the important factor in polymerization problems. Lower light intensity and use of ramped and stepped curing modes did not provide significant lowering of shrinkage, modulus, or strain, and did not prevent enamel cracking adjacent to margins and formation of "white line" defects at the margins. Until materials with lower shrinkage and modulus are available, use of low-viscosity surface sealants as a final step in resin placement is suggested to

  15. Mental Retardation: The Search for Cures. Research Monograph Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menolascino, Frank J.; Neman, Ronald

    The booklet describes the Association for Retarded Citizens' (ARC's) goal of coordinating efforts to seek a cure for mental retardation. Cures are defined as any intervention that would significantly increase intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior beyond the upper level of retardation. It is explained that because of the variety of causes…

  16. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  17. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  18. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  19. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  20. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  1. Improved method facilitates debulking and curing of phenolic impregnated asbestos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, P.

    1966-01-01

    Workpieces covered with phenolic impregnated asbestos tape and then wrapped with a specified thickness of nylon yarn under pressure, are debulked and cured in a standard oven. This method of debulking and curing is used in the fabrication of ablative chambers for the Gemini and Apollo attitude control engines.

  2. Effects of conventional and alternative curing methods on processed turkey quality traits.

    PubMed

    Redfield, A L; Sullivan, G A

    2015-12-01

    Deli-style turkey breast cured with pre-converted celery juice powder (CP) or sodium nitrite (SN) was manufactured with ingoing SN concentrations or equivalent of 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 ppm. Cured and total meat pigment, salt, and water activity were measured on d 0; color, pH, and residual nitrite were measured on d 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42. Untrained panelists evaluated sensory traits of 50, 100, 150, and 200 ppm products. The interaction of nitrite concentration and source affected (P≤0.05) b*, pH, and residual nitrite values. Less ingoing nitrite and increased storage resulted in less (P≤0.05) residual nitrite in products. Sensory results suggested products made with 200 ppm nitrite from CP were less acceptable. Overall, CP and SN products were similar for several traits, but this study suggests that the inclusion of ingoing nitrite from CP may be limited to 100 ppm nitrite (0.46% addition) for acceptable deli-style turkey breast. PMID:26467014

  3. Changes on physico-chemical properties, lipid oxidation and volatile compounds during the manufacture of celta dry-cured loin.

    PubMed

    Pateiro, M; Franco, D; Carril, J A; Lorenzo, J M

    2015-08-01

    The present study deals with the changes on the main technological characteristics and volatile compounds profile of a traditional Spanish dry-ripened loin from Celta pig breed. The evolution of physicochemical properties, colour, texture, free fatty acid profile and volatile compounds were assessed throughout the process seasoning, post-seasoning and after 30 and 60 days of dry-ripening. As it was expected, pH, moisture and activity water were significantly (P < 0.001) influenced by ripening time. Statistical analysis also displayed that colour parameters (lightness, L*; redness, a*; yellowness, b*) decreased significantly (P < 0.001) during the manufacturing process. On the other hand, lipid oxidation reached the highest levels at the end of process with mean values of 0.34 mg MDA/kg. Regarding total FFA, a significant (P < 0.001) increase was observed during the manufacturing process, being MUFA the most abundant at the end of process. Finally, sixty seven volatile compounds were identified during the manufacture of Celta dry-cured loin. At the end of process, volatile compounds from microbial activity were the most abundant followed by volatile compounds from lipid oxidation. PMID:26243901

  4. Cord blood transplantation for cure of HIV infections.

    PubMed

    Petz, Lawrence

    2013-09-01

    HIV infection has not been cured by antiretroviral drugs or gene therapy, but it has been cured by a hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) that was performed for a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and HIV infection using peripheral blood stem cells from an adult donor homozygous for CCR5-Δ32 (CCR5-Δ32/Δ32). HIV has remained undetectable more than 6 years after discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy. However, this approach cannot be readily generalized because of the low prevalence of the CCR5-Δ32 allele and the need for a very close human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match between adult donors and recipients, as when bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplants are performed. In contrast, cord blood (CB) transplants require less stringent HLA matching. CB units are being screened to develop an inventory of cryopreserved homozygous CCR5-Δ32 units available for HCT. One hundred eighty homozygous CCR5-Δ32 units have been identified, and 300 units are projected to provide for white pediatric patients a 73.6% probability of finding an adequately HLA-matched unit with a minimal cell dose of ≥2.5 × 10(7) total nucleated cells (TNC) per kilogram and for white adults a 27.9% probability. With a minimal cell dose requirement of ≥1 × 10(7) TNC per kilogram, the corresponding projected probabilities are 85.6% and 82.1%. CB transplantation does not require as stringent an HLA match between donor and recipient as bone marrow or peripheral blood HCTs, and HCT using cord bloods from donors homozygous for CCR5-Δ32 is, at the present time, the only feasible means of treatment of reasonable numbers of patients who are infected with HIV. PMID:23884642

  5. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W.; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-01-01

    with a maximum 1.2 mm of porcelain veneer restoration, the increase of curing time or light intensity is clinically needed for DC resin cements at the thickness of more than 0.9 mm. PMID:26162252

  6. Progress toward curing HIV infections with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Stephen T; Singh, Anjali; Read, Sarah W; Sharma, Opendra K; Finzi, Diana; Lane, Clifford; Rice, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy can suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but cannot completely eradicate the virus. A major obstacle in the quest for a cure is the difficulty in targeting and measuring latently infected cells. To date, a single person seems to have been cured of HIV. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) preceded this cancer patient's long-term sustained HIV remission, but researchers have been unable to replicate this cure, and the mechanisms that led to HIV remission remain to be established. In February 2014, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored a workshop that provided a venue for in-depth discussion of whether HSCT could be exploited to cure HIV in cancer patients requiring such procedures. Participants also discussed how HSCT might be applied to a broader community of HIV-infected persons in whom the risks of HSCT currently outweigh the likelihood and benefits of HIV cure. PMID:25273081

  7. Use of light-curing units in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Amit; Hurkadle, Jyothikiran; Magegowda, Shivalinga; Bhatia, Pankaj

    2013-08-01

    Because of their wide field of applications, light-curing units are now indispensable for orthodontists and general dentists; thus, it is important to be familiar with the various types of light-curing units, their history, specifications, advantages, and disadvantages. For this review, a search of the PubMed database (from 1966 to March 2010) was conducted using the search term "curing lights orthodontics". Eligibility of the selected studies was determined by reading the abstracts of articles identified by the search. All the articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected, and the articles collected. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were also hand searched for any applicable studies that might have been missed in the database searches. When selecting curing lights for an office, many variables need to be considered. Armed with knowledge about each curing-light category, orthodontists can evaluate their unique practice style and select the appropriate light/lights. PMID:23371892

  8. Curing system for high voltage cross linked cables

    DOEpatents

    Bahder, George; Katz, Carlos; Bopp, Louis A.

    1978-01-01

    This invention makes extruded, vulcanized, high voltage cables insulated with thermosetting compounds at much higher rates of production and with superior insulation of reduced thickness and with reduced cavities or voids in the insulation. As the cable comes from an extruder, it passes into a curing chamber with a heat booster that quickly raises the insulation to a temperature at which it is cured much more quickly than with steam heating of the prior art. A high temperature liquid in contact with the insulation maintains the high temperature; and because of the greater curing heat, the cable can travel through the curing chamber at a faster rate and into a cooling tube where it contacts with a cooling liquid under high pressure. The insulation compound is treated to reduce the size of cavities; and the high pressure maintained by the curing and cooling mediums prevent expansion of cavities before the insulation is set.

  9. Bacillus vanillea sp. nov., Isolated from the Cured Vanilla Bean.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-gan; Gu, Feng-lin; Li, Ji-hua; Xu, Fei; He, Shu-zhen; Fang, Yi-ming

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, designated strain XY18(T), was isolated from a cured vanilla bean in Hainan province, China. Cells were rod-shaped, endospore producing, and peritrichous flagella. Strain XY18(T) grew at salinities of 0-8 % (w/v) NaCl (optimally 1-4 %), pH 4.0-8.0 (optimally 5.0-7.0 %) and temperature range 20-45 °C (optimally 28-35 °C). The predominant menaquinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0, and iso-C17:0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain XY18(T) was a member of the genus Bacillus, and closely related to B. amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535(T) and B. siamensis PD-A10(T), with 99.1 and 99.2 % sequence similarity, respectively. However, the DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain XY18(T) and B. amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535(T) was 35.7 %. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain XY18(T) was 46.4 mol%, significantly differed from B. siamensis PD-A10(T) (41.4 %), which was higher than the range of 4 % indicative of species. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic study, including phenotypic features, chemotaxonomy, and phylogenetic analyses, strain XY18(T) represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus vanillea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XY18(T) (=CGMCC 8629 = NCCB 100507). PMID:25292250

  10. 7 CFR 30.38 - Class 3; air-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... produced principally in the Green River section of Kentucky. (g) Type 37. That type of air-cured or sun-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Sun-cured, Virginia Sun and Air-cured, or Dark Air-cured...

  11. 7 CFR 30.38 - Class 3; air-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... produced principally in the Green River section of Kentucky. (g) Type 37. That type of air-cured or sun-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Sun-cured, Virginia Sun and Air-cured, or Dark Air-cured...

  12. 7 CFR 30.38 - Class 3; air-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... produced principally in the Green River section of Kentucky. (g) Type 37. That type of air-cured or sun-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Sun-cured, Virginia Sun and Air-cured, or Dark Air-cured...

  13. 7 CFR 30.38 - Class 3; air-cured types and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... produced principally in the Green River section of Kentucky. (g) Type 37. That type of air-cured or sun-cured tobacco commonly known as Virginia Sun-cured, Virginia Sun and Air-cured, or Dark Air-cured...

  14. Stress evolution in a conductive adhesive during curing and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuhai

    2000-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using conductive adhesives, which are composites of polymers and conductive fillers, as replacements for solder in different types of microelectronic assemblies. However, conductive adhesives still suffer from several deficiencies, such as unstable electrical conductivity and inadequate adhesion. The reliability of the conductive adhesive joints is always one of the major considerations during their design and operation, and the curing and thermal stresses generated in polymers and composites during curing, cooling and thermal cycling play a very important role in determining reliability. Because of the mismatch in the mechanical properties between the conductive adhesive and the substrate, appreciable curing and thermal stress is generated during manufacturing, which may be detrimental to the reliability of conductive adhesive joints. In this dissertation, an interactive linear viscoelastic model which considers interaction between the initial gel network and the other networks that form during curing is proposed to simulate stress and volume shrinkage during the thermoset curing process, and an effective method for measuring volume shrinkage during the thermoset cure is developed. A systematic experimental study of the material properties of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix during the curing and cooling processes has been conducted. Based on these experimental data, stresses generated during several spatially homogeneous curing and cooling processes of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix are also calculated. It is found that the conductive adhesive possesses mechanical properties which are substantially different from those of the constituents, and that the conductive adhesive has a relaxation process which is similar to its matrix and generates appreciable curing and thermal stresses during curing and cooling. Finally, a processing procedure designed to provide desired residual stresses is discussed.

  15. Determination of the viability of Toxoplasma gondii in cured ham using bioassay: influence of technological processing and food safety implications.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, Susana; Gracia, María J; Lázaro, Regina; Pe Rez-Arquillué, Consuelo; Barberán, Montserrat; Herrera, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii and distributed worldwide. Ingestion of viable cysts from infected raw or undercooked meat is an important route of horizontal transmission of the parasite to humans. Little information is available concerning the effect of commercial curing on cysts of T. gondii. This study is the first in which the influence of processing of cured ham on the viability of T. gondii has been evaluated, using bioassay to assess the risk of infection from eating this meat product. Naturally infected pigs were selected for the study, and a mouse concentration bioassay technique was used to demonstrate viable bradyzoites of T. gondii in porcine tissues and hams. No viable parasites were found in the final product (14 months of curing) based on results of the indirect immunofluorescence assay and histological and PCR analyses. Our results indicate that the consumption of hams cured as described here poses an insignificant risk of acquiring toxoplasmosis. However, additional studies are required to evaluate the safety of ham products cured under different conditions of curing time, salt, and nitrite concentration. PMID:21219742

  16. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  17. pH of organ-culture-stored corneas.

    PubMed

    Lass, J H; Greiner, J V; Meneses, P; Morgan, D C; Medcalf, S K; Collie, D M; Skelnik, D L; Glonek, T

    1988-10-01

    Changes in intracorneal and storage-medium pH values of organ-culture-stored cat corneas were monitored over a 4-week period. The intracorneal pH was determined using the phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) chemical shift of inorganic orthophosphate in conjunction with a standard pH titration curve. We incubated 32 adult cat corneas using two similar standard organ-culture methods, one with chondroitin sulfate (method 1) and the other without (method 2). Time-course data at 0, 1, 3 and 4 weeks of storage were used to calculate the rate of pH change. The intracorneal pH was not changed significantly for either organ-culture method; however, the storage-medium pH rate of change declined significantly for both methods (method 1, 0.15 pH units/week; method 2, 0.12 pH units/week). The difference between intracorneal and storage-medium pH values over time increased at a rate of 0.12 and 0.11 pH units/week for method 1 and method 2, respectively. The declining storage-medium pH in conjunction with the maintenance of intracorneal pH contributes to an increased metabolic demand on the cornea. PMID:3218477

  18. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  19. All-fiber optoelectronic sensor with Bragg gratings for in-situ cure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusano, Andrea; Breglio, Giovanni; Cutolo, Antonello; Calabro, Antonio M.; Giordano, Michele; Nicolais, Luigi, II

    2000-08-01

    Real-time, in situ monitoring for quality control of the polymer cure process is of high interest, since thermoset polymer-matrix composite are widely used in large industrial areas: aeronautical, aerospace, automotive and civil due to their low cost/low weight features. However, their final properties are strongly dependence on the processing parameters, such as temperature and pressure sequence. The key-point for advanced composite materials is the possibility to have distributed and simultaneous monitoring of chemoreological and physical properties during the cure process. To this aim, we have developed and tested an optoelectronic fiber optic sensor based on the Fresnel principle able to monitor the variations of the refractive index due to the cure process of an epoxy based resin. Experimental results have been obtained on sensor capability to monitor the cure kinetics by assuming the refractive index as reaction co-ordinate. The integration with in-fiber Bragg grating in order to measure the local temperature has been discussed and tested.

  20. The weight change of various light-cured restorative materials stored in water.

    PubMed

    Keyf, Filiz; Yalçin, Filiz

    2005-05-15

    This study investigated weight changes of seven different light-cured composite restorative materials, one polyacid glass ionomer compomer, and one light-cured glass-ionomer cement following short-term and long-term storage in water. Two packable composites, three universal (hybrid) composites, one microglass composite, one polyacid glass ionomer resin composite (compomer), one microhybrid low-viscosity (flowable) composite, and one light cured glass ionomer composite cement were evaluated in this study. The weight changes of these specimens were measured daily (short-term storage), and they were measured after six weeks (long-term storage) using an electronic analytical balance. A significant difference was found in Ionoliner, Dyract AP, Opticor flow, Charisma, and Solitare 2, but no significant difference was found in the others (Filtek Z 250, Filtek P60, TPH Spectrum, and Valux Plus). Weight change showed a tendency to increase with the time of water storage. The greatest weight change occurred in light-cured glass ionomer composite cement (Ionoliner), which is followed in order by the weight changes in Dyract AP, Opticor Flow, Charisma, Solitare 2, Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, TPH Spectrum; Valux Plus had the least amount of change. PMID:15915206

  1. Effect of Dietary Processed Sulfur Supplementation on Texture Quality, Color and Mineral Status of Dry-cured Ham

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the chemical composition, mineral status, oxidative stability, and texture attributes of dry-cured ham from pigs fed processed sulfur (S, 1 g/kg feed), and from those fed a basal diet (CON), during the period from weaning to slaughter (174 d). Total collagen content and soluble collagen of the S group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p<0.05). The pH of the S group was significantly higher than that of the control group, whereas the S group had a lower expressible drip compared to the control group. The S group also showed the lower lightness compared to the control group (p<0.05). In regard to the mineral status, the S group had significantly lower Fe2+ and Ca2+ content than the control group (p<0.05), whereas the proteolysis index of the S group was significantly increased compared to the control group (p<0.05). The feeding of processed sulfur to pigs led to increased oxidative stability, related to lipids and pigments, in the dry-cured ham (p<0.05). Compared to the dry-cured ham from the control group, that from the S group exhibited lower springiness and gumminess; these results suggest that feeding processed sulfur to pigs can improve the quality of the texture and enhance the oxidative stability of dry-cured ham. PMID:26761895

  2. Optimization of water curing for the preservation of chestnuts (Castanea sativa Mill.) and evaluation of microbial dynamics during process.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Di Capua, Marika; Romano, Annalisa; Coppola, Raffaele; Aponte, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Chestnuts are very perishable fruits, whose quality may be compromised during postharvest handling. Damage can be caused both by insects and fungi. Water curing, a commonly used postharvest method, is based on soaking fruits in water typically for about one week. Factors that affect effectiveness of water curing have only been explained partially. A decrease in pH, likely imputable to a light fermentation caused by lactic acid bacteria, may inhibit the growth of moulds. In this study a Lactobacillus pentosus strain was selected for its ability to inhibit fungi, and used as a starter culture during water curing. As second goal, a reduction of the environmental impact of the process was evaluated by using water that had been re-cycled from a previous curing treatment. Experiments were performed on pilot as well as on farm scale. In all trials, microbial dynamics were evaluated by means of a polyphasic approach including conventional and molecular-based analyses. According to results, the employment of an adjunct culture appears as a very promising opportunity. Even if no reduction in the duration of the process was achieved, waters exhibited a minor microbial complexity and fruits did not lose the natural lustre after the process. PMID:24929716

  3. Fiber-Optic pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, A. Balaji; Radhakrishnan, T. K.

    The new enhancement in the determination of pH using optical fiber system is described here. This work uses the membrane made of cellulose acetate membrane for reagent immobilization and congo red (pKa 3.7) and neutral red (pKa 7.2) as pH indicators. An effective covalent chemical binding procedure is used to immobilize the indicatorsE The response time, reversibility, linear range, reproducibility, and long-term stability of fiber optic sensor with congo red as well as neutral red have been determined. The linear range measured for the sensor based on the congo red and neutral red is 4.2-6.3 and 4.1-9.0, respectively. The response time of sensor membrane is measured by varying the substance pH values between 11.0 and 2.0.

  4. Myristoylated and non-myristoylated forms of the pH sensor protein hisactophilin II: intracellular shuttling to plasma membrane and nucleus monitored in real time by a fusion with green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hanakam, F; Albrecht, R; Eckerskorn, C; Matzner, M; Gerisch, G

    1996-01-01

    Hisactophilins are myristoylated proteins that are rich in histidine residues and known to exist in Dictyostelium cells in a plasma membrane-bound and a soluble cytoplasmic state. Intracellular translocation of these proteins in response to pH changes was monitored using hisactophilin fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both the normal and a mutated non-myristoylated fusion protein shuffled within the cells in a pH-dependent manner. After lowering the pH, these proteins translocated within minutes between the cytoplasm, the plasma membrane and the nucleus. The role of histidine clusters on the surface of hisactophilin molecules in binding of the proteins to the plasma membrane and in their transfer to the nucleus is discussed on the basis of a pH switch mechanism. Images PMID:8670794

  5. Remnant percolative disorder in highly-cured networks

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Hance, B.; Martin, J.E. )

    1993-05-24

    The authors have previously reported viscoelastic measurements demonstrating that fully-cured networks and critical gels exhibit similar relaxation spectra, implying that fully-cured networks are somewhat ill- connected. Here, they present restricted valence percolation simulations of networks well beyond the percolation transition that explicitly display remnant disorder over length scales less than the correlation length of the network. They conclude that the topology of highly-cured networks is not well described by a regular three- dimensional tennis net but is ill-connected over length scales that correspond to relaxation modes of practical interest.

  6. Hydrosoluble, UV-crosslinkable and injectable chitosan for patterned cell-laden microgel and rapid transdermal curing hydrogel in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Lei; Xu, Feng; Gang, Xiaomin; Demirci, Utkan; Wei, Daqing; Li, Ying; Feng, Yujie; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Natural and biodegradable chitosan with unique amino groups has found widespread applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery. However, its applications have been limited by the poor solubility of native chitosan in neutral pH solution, which subsequently fails to achieve cell-laden hydrogel at physiological pH. To address this, we incorporated UV crosslinking ability in chitosan, allowing fabrication of patterned cell-laden and rapid transdermal curing hydrogel in vivo. The hydrosoluble, UV crosslinkable and injectable N-methacryloyl chitosan (N-MAC) was synthesized via single-step chemoselective N-acylation reaction, which simultaneously endowed chitosan with well solubility in neutral pH solution, UV crosslinkable ability and injectability. The solubility of N-MAC in neutral pH solution increased 2.21-fold with substitution degree increasing from 10.9% to 28.4%. The N-MAC allowed fabrication of cell-laden microgels with on-demand patterns via photolithography, and the cell viability in N-MAC hydrogel maintained 96.3 ± 1.3% N-MAC allowed rapid transdermal curing hydrogel in vivo within 60s through minimally invasive clinical surgery. Histological analysis revealed that low-dose UV irradiation hardly induced skin injury and acute inflammatory response disappeared after 7 days. N-MAC would allow rapid, robust and cost-effective fabrication of patterned cell-laden polysaccharide microgels with unique amino groups serving as building blocks for tissue engineering and rapid transdermal curing hydrogel in vivo for localized and sustained protein delivery. PMID:25917845

  7. Argon laser curing of fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant: in vitro caries development.

    PubMed

    Westerman, G; Hicks, J; Flaitz, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of argon laser polymerization of a visible-light-cured, fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant on caries development in vitro. A total of twelve caries-free premolar and molar teeth was selected, and underwent a fluoride-free prophylaxis and soft tissue debridement. Cavity preparations were placed in buccal and lingual surfaces. Lingual cavity preparations were filled with the fluoride-releasing sealant (UltraSealXTplus, Ultradent) and visible light cured per the manufacturer's recommendation. Buccal preparations were filled with the fluoride-releasing sealant and argon laser cured (231 mW, 12 J/cm2 for 10 seconds). Following sealant placement, the teeth were sectioned into buccal and lingual halves. An acid-resistant varnish was placed leaving a 1 mm rim of exposed surface enamel adjacent to the sealant. The specimens were then thermocycled in synthetic saliva (500 cycles, 5 to 50 degrees C). In vitro caries lesions were formed (2.2 mM Ca, 2.2 mM PO4, 50 mM acetic acid, 5 ppm fluoride, pH 3.95). Longitudinal sections (five sections per tooth half) were obtained and evaluated by polarized light microscopy for mean outer surface lesion depths and frequency of wall lesions. Mean primary surface (outer) lesion depth was significantly decreased (ANOVA, DMR, P < .05) for the fluoride-releasing sealant with argon laser polymerization (152 +/- 16 um) when compared with visible light curing (211 +/- 23 um). Likewise, wall lesion frequency was substantially reduced for the argon laser polymerized sealants (17 percent) when compared with that for the visible light polymerized sealants (24 percent, ANOVA, DMR, P < .05). Argon laser polymerization of a fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant improved caries resistance markedly in the surface enamel adjacent to the sealant material. Argon laser curing enhanced the caries protective ability of the sealant along the enamel-resin cavosurface, as noted by a decrease in wall

  8. Measuring Vapors To Monitor the State of Cure of a Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, Elliott; Perey, Daniel F.; Yost, William T.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed noninvasive method of monitoring the cure path and the state of cure of an epoxy or other resin involves measurement of the concentration( s) of one or more compound(s) in the vaporous effluent emitted during the curing process. The method is based on the following general ideas: (1) The concentrations of the effluent compounds in the vicinity of the curing resin are approximately proportional to the instantaneous rate of curing. (2) As curing proceeds at a given temperature, subsequent decreases in the concentrations are indicative of approaching completion of cure; that is, the lower are the concentrations, the more nearly complete is the cure.

  9. Cure shrinkage in epoxy grouts for grouted repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsuddoha, Md.; Islam, Md. Mainul; Aravinthan, Thiru; Manalo, Allan; Lau, Kin-tak

    2013-08-01

    Structures can go through harsh environmental adversity and can experience material loss and cracks during their service lives. Infill material is used to ensure a supporting bed for a grouted repair. Epoxy grouts are used for repairing and rehabilitating structures, such as foundations, bridges, piers, transportation pipelines, etc., because they are resistant to typical chemicals and possess superior mechanical properties than other grouts. The resin based infill used inside the void or cracked space of the repair is vulnerable to shrinkage. When these filled grouts have high resin content, cracks can develop from residual stresses, which can affect the load transfer performance. It follows that interlayer separation and cracking of infill layer can occur in a grouted repair. In this study, volumetric shrinkage of two epoxy grouts was measured over 28 days using a Pycnometer. The highest volumetric shrinkage measured after 7 days was found to be 2.72%. The results suggest that the volumetric shrinkage can be reduced to 1.1% after 7 days, through the introduction of a coarse aggregate filler; a 2.5 times reduction in shrinkage. About 98% and 92% of the total shrinkage over the 28 day period, of the unfilled and filled grouts respectively, was found to occur within 7 days of mixing. The gel-time shrinkages were also calculated, to determine the "postgel" part of the curing contraction which subsequently produces residual stresses in the hardened grout systems.

  10. Maleate/vinyl ether UV-cured coatings: Effects of composition on curing and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Noren, G.K.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of the composition of the maleate polyester and the vinyl ether terminated compound on their UV-curing and properties has been investigated. Linear unsaturated polyester resins based on maleic anhydride and 1,5-pentane diol were synthesized. The molecular weight of the unsaturated polyesters was varied by changing the ratio of maleic anhydride to 1,5-pentane diol and the double bond equivalent weight was varied by replacing maleic anhydride with succinic anhydride. Coating formulations containing these unsaturated polyesters, triethylene glycol divinyl ether and a free radical photoinitiator were crosslinked in the presence of UV light. The coatings were very brittle, exhibiting tensile strengths in the range of 1.5-4.0 MPa and elongations of only 3-7%. Diethyl maleate and isobutyl vinyl ether were effective diluents for reducing viscosity but reduced the cure speed. A vinyl ether urethane oligomer was synthesized and enhanced the flexibility and toughness of the coatings when substituted for triethylene glycol divinyl ether.

  11. Study of Rb-vapor coated cells — Atomic diffusion and cell curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutov, S. N.; Benimetskiy, F. A.; Plekhanov, A. I.; Sorokin, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of a study on an optical-resonant cell filled by a vapor of the Rb atoms and coated with a non-stick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. We show that it is possible to define correctly the diffusion coefficient of the atoms in the coating using the geometric parameters of the cell and the vapor density in the cell volume only. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the cell curing time is presented. It is shown that the mysterious cell curing process can be explained in terms of the polymerization of the polymer coating by alkali atoms. The anomalous long dwell time of the Rb atoms on the PDMS coating is discussed as well.

  12. The Effects of Long Term Cure on Offgassed Products of Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, Ginger; Whitfield, Steve

    1997-01-01

    The Environmental Chemistry and Compatability Team at The Marshall Space Flight Center conducts toxic offgassing analysis on materials and flight hardware for use in habitable environments aboard the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. As part of Research and Development, the Toxic Offgassing Laboratory conducted a long term cure study on four polyurethane coatings which are slated for potential use on Space Station. This study demonstrates the effects of cure time and temperature on the total tox value (sum T) and the maximum usage weight for each coating. All analysis was conducted according to test procedures outlined specifically for Space Station environments. Therefore, the ratings and weight limits generated for these materials are most applicable to space environments. However, this test does give some indication of time frames for solvent removal and is therefore of interest to, the environmental community as a whole.

  13. Determination of 5-log reduction times for Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, or Listeria monocytogenes in acidified foods with pH 3.5 or 3.8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A critical factor in ensuring the safety of acidified foods is the establishment of a thermal process that assures the destruction of acid-resistant vegetative pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. For acidified foods such as dressings and mayonnaises with pH values of 3.5 or higher, the high water phas...

  14. 52. photographer unknown 9 October 1935 CURING CONCRETE BLOCKS FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. photographer unknown 9 October 1935 CURING CONCRETE BLOCKS FOR BASE OF SOUTH HALF OF SPILLWAY DAM. INSPECTION TUNNEL FORM IN BACKGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  15. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  16. Investigation on the electron-beam curing of vinylester resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiancong, Huang; Meiwu, Shi; Guotai, Zhou; Hong, Zhou; Xiaopeng, Hao; Chunlan, Zhou

    2008-05-01

    A typical vinylester resin, Derakane 411-350, was electron-beam (EB) cured without initiators. The curing process was investigated by gel-fraction testing, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies. Both dynamic numerical analysis and positron annihilation life spectroscopy were utilized to analyze the microstructure of resin samples irradiated with different doses and dose rates. Resin irradiated with the same dose at a low dose rate achieved a higher degree of cure than those samples irradiated with a high dose rate. Resin irradiated with low dose rates had a lower free-volume fraction with smaller interstices and a more uniform microstructure. The glass-transition temperature of the resin increased with increasing irradiation dose. The mechanical properties of the EB-cured resin confirmed the analysis of changes in microstructure arising from irradiation.

  17. GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL CORPORATION; CURE ELECTROCOAGULATION TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CURE electrocoagulation technology was demonstrated under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), where water from the solar evaporation ponds (SEPs) was contaminat...

  18. Desorption and use of saturated lightweight aggregate in internal curing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briatka, P.; Makýš, P.

    2011-09-01

    Roughly 20 years ago there was a brand new concrete-curing concept presented in the U.S. based on providing "extra curing" water from inside the concrete. The extra water shoul be added to concrete during mixing, but is bound to some kind of carrier, so it does not alter the water-cement ratio. This technique, known as Internal Curing (IC) keeps the cement paste moist from the first moment when it normally would start to desiccate and is not mature enough to apply conventional means of curing. The durability and effectiveness of IC depend on the boundary conditions at the site as well as the properties of the carrier - in this case, Lightweight Aggregate (LWA), which, after the water soaking, replaces some part of the Normalweight Aggregate (NWA). This work deals with LWA (available on the European market) in the context of its properties affecting the efficiency of IC.

  19. Global strategies are required to cure and eliminate HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Revill, Peter; Testoni, Barbara; Locarnini, Stephen; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Chronic HBV infection results in >1 million deaths per year from cirrhosis and liver cancer. No known cure for chronic HBV exists, due in part to the continued presence of transcriptionally active DNA in the nucleus that is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A coordinated approach is urgently needed to advance an HBV cure worldwide, such as those established in the HIV field. We propose the establishment of an International Coalition to Eliminate Hepatitis B Virus (ICE-HBV) to facilitate the formation of international working groups on HBV virology, immunology, innovative tools and clinical trials: to promote awareness and education as well as to drive changes in government policy and ensure funds are channelled to HBV cure research and drug development. With the ICE-HBV in place, it should be possible to enable a HBV cure within the next decade. PMID:26907881

  20. Method for curing polymers using variable-frequency microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1998-02-24

    A method for curing polymers incorporating a variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity is disclosed. By varying the frequency of the microwave signal, non-uniformities within the cavity are minimized, thereby achieving a more uniform cure throughout the workpiece. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. The furnace cavity may be adapted to be used to cure materials defining a continuous sheet or which require compressive forces during curing. 15 figs.

  1. Method for curing polymers using variable-frequency microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Bible, Don W.; Paulauskas, Felix L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for curing polymers (11) incorporating a variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34). By varying the frequency of the microwave signal, non-uniformities within the cavity (34) are minimized, thereby achieving a more uniform cure throughout the workpiece (36). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. The furnace cavity (34) may be adapted to be used to cure materials defining a continuous sheet or which require compressive forces during curing.

  2. Light-curing polymers for laser plasma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E. Y.; Protasov, Y. S.; Protasov, Y. Y.; Telekh, V. D.

    2015-07-01

    Solid rather than liquid media are used in pulsed laser plasma generators despite sophisticated transportation and dosing system need for a long-term operation. Liquid media could be more preferable due to transfer and dosing (down to 10-14 L) being well developed, but plasma generation of those results in intense droplet formation and kinetic energy losses. Combination of liquids transportation advantages and solids plasma generation efficiency might resolve this trade-off. Liquid-to-solid transition can be induced by cooling down to sublimation temperature, thermo-, photo- or electron induced polymerization (curing). Light cured polymers seem to be very useful as active media for plasma generators, since they can be solidified very fast (ca. 30 ms) just before impact. We considered experimentally several UV- curing polymer and mixtures ablation regimes and supply schemes for laser plasma generation. The best results were obtained for liquid polymer at high-power pulsed irradiation matching curing optimum wavelength.

  3. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    DOEpatents

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  4. Investigation of Adhesive Bond Cure Conditions using Nonlinear Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Tobias P.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to investigate various cure conditions of adhesive bonds using nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling. Several samples were used to obtain normal incidence, oblique incidence, and wave mixing.

  5. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  6. Feasibility study for the development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of a new approach for the development of stable, easily handled, room temperature (293 K - 311 K) curing adhesives was studied and demonstrated. The work concentrated on a family of unsaturated amide/ester resins. Twelve candidate resins were synthesized and tested for completeness of cure at room temperature, adhesion to aluminum and titanium, shear strength, moisture resistance and heat stability. The three most promising candidate resins were selected and recommended for further development.

  7. Influence of curing agent on fibrosis around silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Josna; Mohanty, Mira

    2013-01-01

    Severe capsular contracture around silicone expander breast implants leading to pain and failure is a major clinical problem. Even though earlier studies have implicated the immunogenicity of silicone, the role of physical and chemical properties of the silicone material in excessive collagen deposition and fibrosis has been less addressed. The present study investigates whether there is any correlation between the type of curing systems i.e. addition and free radical curing and the fibrosis around silicone elastomer. The experiment carried out uses commercially available silicone ventriculo-peritoneal shunt material elastomer cured by platinum and the results are compared with results obtained in a similar study carried out by the authors using commercially available silicone tissue expander material cured by peroxide. Ultra-high molecular weight poly-ethylene (UHMWPE), the standard reference for biocompatibility evaluation, was used as the control material. The materials were implanted in rat skeletal muscle for 30 and 90 days. Inflammatory cells, myofibroblasts, cytokines, and collagen deposition at the material-tissue interface were identified by haematoxylin-eosin and Masson's Trichrome stains and semi-quantitated based on immunohistochemical studies. Results indicate that even though the cellular response in the initial phase of wound healing was similar in both platinum and peroxide-cured materials, the collagen deposition in the proliferative phase was more around peroxide-cured material in comparison to the platinum-cured silicone elastomer. There is a need to look into the molecular mechanisms of this interaction and the possibility of using curing systems other than free radical peroxide in the manufacture of silicone elastomer expanders for breast prosthesis. PMID:23683043

  8. A novel injectable borate bioactive glass cement for local delivery of vancomycin to cure osteomyelitis and regenerate bone.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xu; Zhao, Cunju; Gu, Yifei; Li, Le; Wang, Hui; Huang, Wenhai; Zhou, Nai; Wang, Deping; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Jun; Luo, Shihua; Zhang, Changqing; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2014-03-01

    Osteomyelitis (bone infection) is often difficult to cure. The commonly-used treatment of surgical debridement to remove the infected bone combined with prolonged systemic and local antibiotic treatment has limitations. In the present study, an injectable borate bioactive glass cement was developed as a carrier for the antibiotic vancomycin, characterized in vitro, and evaluated for its capacity to cure osteomyelitis in a rabbit tibial model. The cement (initial setting time = 5.8 ± 0.6 min; compressive strength = 25.6 ± 0.3 MPa) released vancomycin over ~25 days in phosphate-buffered saline, during which time the borate glass converted to hydroxyapatite (HA). When implanted in rabbit tibial defects infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-induced osteomyelitis, the vancomycin-loaded cement converted to HA and supported new bone formation in the defects within 8 weeks. Osteomyelitis was cured in 87 % of the defects implanted with the vancomycin-loaded borate glass cement, compared to 71 % for the defects implanted with vancomycin-loaded calcium sulfate cement. The injectable borate bioactive glass cement developed in this study is a promising treatment for curing osteomyelitis and for regenerating bone in the defects following cure of the infection. PMID:24477872

  9. Characterization of dental composite curing kinetics using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells-Gray, Elaine M.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Sakaguchi, Ron L.

    2009-02-01

    Polymer resin composites are a class of widely used restorative dental materials that undergo a complex polymerization curing process that has been the subject of substantial research. This study uses speckle correlation methods based on dynamic light scattering as a tool to monitor the rate and extent of dental composite polymerization during and after photo-curing. Thin disc-shaped samples (<2mm) were constructed using composite consisting of 50:50 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin, quartz silica filler particles, and camphorquinone as photo-initiator. A 633 nm HeNe laser beam was used to probe the top surface of the sample via a backscattered speckle pattern, while the bottom surface was illuminated with a halogen curing lamp (peak wavelength=470nm) to initiate the polymerization reaction. The speckle patterns were recorded with a CCD camera, and stored as a 'speckle cube' for post processing. Correlation values of the intensity fluctuation were calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis for pairs of subsequent speckle images and then ensemble averaged. Results show a sharp decrease in correlation at the onset of curing, indicating a large amount of double bond conversion and movement within the composite. Correlation values then quickly increase, eventually reaching a plateau near unity, indicating cessation of molecular rearrangement. The kinetic behavior demonstrated by our correlation curves are in good agreement with curing data found in the literature, and demonstrate the usefulness of this technique for monitoring dental composite curing.

  10. Vacuum Ultraviolet Curing of Low-k Organosilicate Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huifeng

    The goal of this project is to optimize the vacuum-ultraviolet spectrum to identify those wavelengths that will have the most beneficial effect on improving dielectric properties and minimizing damage. To do this, the effects of vacuum-ultraviolet radiation (VUV) on organosilicate glass (SiCOH) will be examined. Changes to the electrical, chemical and mechanical properties of low-k organosilicate dielectrics induced by vacuum-ultraviolet radiation are investigated. VUV-generated changes to the permittivity and dielectric thickness are measured with both capacitance-voltage characteristics and a reflectometer. FTIR measurements are utilized to find the effect of VUV irradiation on chemical properties of SiCOH and XPS with nanoindentation measurements are used to investigate changes in mechanical properties. Measurements of the band gap and defect-state concentrations of SiCOH are made with VUV spectroscopy. These investigations are used to optimize VUV or UV/VUVexposure conditions to determine the wavelengths and intensities that can mitigate processing-induced damage. Thus, a "UV/VUV curing" process can be established and comparisons between UV/VUV curing and conventional industrial UV curing will be made. Investigations have shown that a combined UV/VUV curing could overcome some drawbacks of industrially UV curing and improve properties of dielectrics more efficiently than UV curing.

  11. Modeling of novel hybrid photonic crystal structures involving cured hydrogen silsesquioxane pillars for improving the light extraction in light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadiyala, Anand; Dawson, Jeremy M.

    2016-03-01

    The Solid-State Lighting (SSL) industry utilizes semiconductor based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as core elements of light sources. LED lighting has several advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs; however, device-level issues such as material quality, low quantum efficiencies, and low light extraction efficiencies still exist. Many techniques have been explored to provide improvement in the area of LED light extraction. Improvement in light extraction efficiency, through the use of integrated optical components such as photonic crystals, is critical for the improvement in the overall efficiency of the device. Fabrication and integration of PhCs into LEDs with little or no degradation in device's electrical characteristics is an important accomplishment to be considered. Use of electron beam lithography and novel electron beam resists like hydrogen silsesquioxane will allow advancements toward achieving this goal. The unique chemical properties of HSQ allows transformation of the patterned resist into silicon dioxide. This leads to hybrid PhC structures that contain the cured form of HSQ and other materials of interest in an LED. In this work, novel hybrid PhC structures in square and triangular lattice configurations will be modeled to improve light extraction in blue InGaN/GaN based LEDs (λ=465 nm) and attain an optimal structure. Feature sizes from 100 nm to 465 nm will be modeled and the effect of the patterned structure (band gap and/or diffraction) on the light extraction will be studied and analyzed. Simulation data from frequency domain and time domain engines in MPB and OptiFDTD respectively will be analyzed and presented.

  12. Development of the Resin Infusion between Double Flexible Tooling process : assessment of the viability of in-mold coating and implementation of UV curing.

    SciTech Connect

    Okoli, Okenwa I.

    2004-12-01

    As composites gain wider acceptance in all sectors of the economy, new methodologies must be developed to increase their cost effectiveness in manufacturing. The neoteric Resin Infusion between Double Flexible Tooling (RIDFT) process is undergoing modifications to improve its cost-effectiveness by developing methodologies for in-mold coating and the incorporation of UV curing. In-mold coating is desired by the composites industry since it eliminates the current paint process, which is not only laborious and time consuming, but expensive, and presents safety issues. Two methodologies (paint films and coinfusion) for implementing in-mold coating were investigated. It was demonstrated that thermoformable paint films could be used to produce coated RIDFTed components. Coinfusion was also successfully implemented. This work also investigated the feasibility of designing and incorporating a Cure on Demand system into the RIDFT process, using ultraviolet (UV) light for the curing of composite laminates. The objective was to develop a process for the RIDFT that would eliminate or reduce the inflexibility in the current production process, resulting in shortened production cycle times. UV-cured laminates were produced at a fraction of the time required to produce catalyst-cured laminates. Mechanical and material characterization tests were performed on each of the UV-cured laminates produced. The results were referenced against those obtained for laminates produced using a catalyst curing system to determine their overall quality. The UV-cured laminates, after undergoing tensile and rheological thermal tests, were found to have mechanical and material properties comparable, or in a few instances slightly better, than that of thermally cured laminates.

  13. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  14. Designing ultraviolet curing of multifunctional (meth)acrylate hard coats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Mei

    Ultraviolet (UV) curing rapidly converts multifunctional (meth)acrylate liquid monomers into highly cross-linked, impervious, hard polymeric coatings at ambient temperature. This solidification process occurs by free-radical cross-linking polymerization. To achieve a better design of this process, it is desirable to have high conversion of functional groups, low stress, adequate mechanical properties, and low costs. To approach this design goal, the following modeling and experimental work was carried out. Firstly, a kinetic model was developed to simulate radical trapping. This model predicts a peak in the concentration of active radicals and a monotonic rise of the concentration of trapped radicals during polymerization. It also predicts a decrease in the fraction of trapped radicals at a given conversion as the UV light intensity is raised. Secondly, a kinetic gelation model, in which reaction occurs locally on a lattice, was developed. Unlike previous such models, this model accounts for free radical reaction time more accurately. It was found that a more uniform distribution of reacted sites leads to a favored propagation at a given conversion. Moreover, radical trapping and termination were found to shorten the kinetic chain length and to lower the asymptotic conversion reached when initiators are exhausted. Thirdly, elastic modulus evolution was simulated with a rigidity percolation model, in which bonds created by free-radical polymerization are represented as rigidly jointed beams. Simulations show that modulus of a network depends on the connectivity between monomer units as well as bonding structure. Finally, experimental determination of volume shrinkage of a sandwiched film was measured with a dynamic mechanical analyzer probe. A faster reaction causes more severely delayed volume shrinkage from the thermodynamic equilibrium volume required by the reaction. Nevertheless, volume shrinks more when the shrinkage of the thermodynamic volume rises. In

  15. ISOPAR L RELEASE FROM SALTSTONE CURED AT 55 C

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A; Cora Berry, C; Michael Bronikowski, M; Russell Eibling, R; Jack Zamecnik, J

    2006-05-16

    The decontaminated salt solution waste stream from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Salt Waste Processing Facility is anticipated to contain entrained extraction solvent. The decontaminated salt solution is scheduled to be processed through Tank 50 into the Saltstone Production Facility. This study, among others, has been undertaken because the solvent concentration in the decontaminated salt solution may cause flammability issues within the Saltstone Disposal Facility that may need to be addressed prior to operation. Previous work at the Savannah River National Laboratory determined the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 {micro}g/g in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the Isopar{reg_sign} L release data can be treated as a percentage of initial concentration in the concentration range studied. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release is larger than at lower temperatures. In this study, saltstone was prepared using a simulated decontaminated salt solution containing Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations of 50 {micro}L/L (30 {micro}g/g) and 100 {micro}L/L (61 {micro}g/g) and cured at 55 C. The headspace of each sample was purged and the Isopar{reg_sign} L was trapped on a coconut shell carbon tube. The amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L captured was determined using NIOSH Method 1501. The percentage of Isopar{reg_sign} L released after 20 days was 1.4 - 3.7% for saltstone containing 50 {micro}L/L concentration and 2.1 - 4.3% for saltstone containing 100 {micro}L/L concentration. Given the measurement uncertainties in this work there is no

  16. EB curing and cure grafting of novel CT monomer complexes: comparison with UV process and extension of the technique to thiol-ene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Gary R.; Garnett, John L.; Zilic, Elvis

    2004-09-01

    EB curing and cure grafting of charge transfer (CT) monomer complexes is discussed. The complexes studied involve representative donors (D) such as vinyl ethers and typical acceptors (A) including maleates, maleimides and acrylates also oligomers. The EB results are compared with UV curing and cure grafting of the same complexes. The work has been extended to include EB/UV curing and cure grafting of thiol-ene systems. The significance of these results in the potential commercial application of these complexes is discussed.

  17. Effect of Curing Temperature and Composition on the Performance Properties of Saltstone - 12473

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, Marissa M.; Harbour, John R.; Edwards, Tommy B.

    2012-07-01

    When freshly mixed Saltstone is placed into a vault at the Savannah River Site, the heat of hydration produced during curing causes the temperature of the grout to increase. It is not uncommon for the temperature of the grout to increase by 30 to 50 deg. C above the starting temperature depending on the vault size and location, environmental conditions and pour schedule. For example, temperatures measured by thermocouples in one cell have exceeded 70 deg. C. The elevated temperatures, once reached, can extend for weeks or even months. Recent studies at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have shown that curing simulated Saltstone mixes at elevated temperatures can lead to reduced compressive strength and dynamic Young's modulus as well as increased total porosity when compared to the same grout mixes cured at 20 deg. C. Samples cured at 60 deg. C can have hydraulic conductivities approximately 600 times greater than samples cured at 20 deg. C. Previous studies have shown that the 60 deg. C cured mix had a dynamic Young's modulus that was half that of the mix cured at 20 deg. C. However, high temperature curing may not always have negative effects on the performance properties of the grout. These results indicate that higher curing temperatures can significantly alter the performance properties that are inputs for the Saltstone Performance Assessment. The Saltstone formulation (mix design) must produce a grout waste form that meets both placement and performance properties. A statistically designed set of mixes was developed to determine key process and compositional factors that affect the performance properties of Saltstone grout. A total of 27 mixes were batched and tested. There are eight baseline mixes that contain high and low values of aluminate concentration, varying w/p ratio, and varying fly ash content in the premix. Each of the eight mixes was cured at 22, 40 and 60 deg. C. The three additional reference mixes batched at the beginning, middle and

  18. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  19. [ESR study on self-curing resin for rebasing during polymerization].

    PubMed

    Andoh, M

    1989-12-01

    The effects of temperature, concentrations of activator (N, N-dimethyl-p-toluidine) and inhibitor (hydroquinone), atmosphere, liquid powder ratio and mixing time on polymerization process of self-curing resin for rebasing were studied by electron spin resonance. When powder and liquid were mixed at a ratio commercially recommended at a physiologic temperature of 37 degrees C, the propagating radical was first detected 5.5 minutes later, of which time interval corresponds to induction time for polymerization. After the induction time, the concentration of propagating radicals increased rapidly with time and reached the maximum level at 27 minutes. The radicals thus formed remained stable for more than 2.5 days when stored in air at 37 degrees C, though their concentration diminished gradually. With increasing temperature for curing, the maximum level of the radical concentration decreased and the propagating radicals disappeared more rapidly, indicating recombination reactions to be perferentially occurring at higher temperatures. Increase in the amount of activator of N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine resulted in increase in the radical concentration. When powder was mixed with a liquid containing less inhibitor of hydroquinone, the radicals were found to remain stable longer. In air, propagating radical was detected faster and free radical was concentrated more rapidly than in the water and nitrogen gas. The fluidity of self-cured resin for rebasing as measured by use of spin probe TEMPO disappeared rapidly with increasing temperature for curing, decreasing the amount of liquid and shortening the mixing time. When curing temperature was raised to 37 degrees C from 22 degrees C at minutes after mixing, the fluidity disappeared 2.5 minutes later, i.e., at 5.5 minutes after mixing. To investigate the effects of the MMA-derivative radicals on growth of HeLa cells, HeLa cells were cultured on resins containing MMA-derivative radicals. The number of HeLa cells on resins

  20. Fast optical pH manipulation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Filevich, Oscar; Carrone, Guillermo; Pavlovsky, Victoria Andino; Etchenique, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    We describe a complete system for optical pH manipulation and imaging. The system consists of a photoactive Ruthenium complex capable of inducing a change of more than 5 pH units at the nanosecond time scale. A compatible imaging system acquires microscopic pH images at 1200 fps using a nonexpensive commercial digital camera and an LED illumination system. We use the system as a superb tool to investigate flow in Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) models. PMID:22703044