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Sample records for pharmacology lxxiii nomenclature

  1. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    PubMed Central

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  2. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXVII. Kisspeptin Receptor Nomenclature, Distribution, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Helen R.; Maguire, Janet J.; Colledge, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Kisspeptins are members of the Arg-Phe amide family of peptides, which have been identified as endogenous ligands for a G-protein-coupled receptor encoded by a gene originally called GPR54 (also known as AXOR12 or hOT7T175). After this pairing, the gene has been renamed KISS1R. The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification recommends that the official name for the receptor is the kisspeptin receptor to follow the convention of naming the receptor protein after the endogenous ligand. The endogenous ligand was initially called metastin, after its role as a metastasis suppressor, and is now referred to as kisspeptin-54 (KP-54), a C-terminally amidated 54-amino acid peptide cleaved from the 145-amino acid gene product. Shorter C-terminal cleavage fragments [KP-14, KP-13 and KP-10 (the smallest active fragment)] are also biologically active. Both receptor and peptide are widely expressed in human, rat, and mouse; the receptor sequence shares more than 80% homology in these species. Activation of the kisspeptin receptor by kisspeptin is via coupling to Gq/11 and the phospholipase C pathway, causing Ca2+ mobilization. Mutations in the KISS1R gene result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadotropism, and targeted disruption of Kiss1r in mice reproduces this phenotype, which led to the discovery of the remarkable ability of the kisspeptin receptor to act as a molecular switch for puberty. In addition to regulating the reproductive axis, the kisspeptin receptor is also implicated in cancer, placentation, diabetes, and the cardiovascular system. PMID:21079036

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXV. Nomenclature, Classification, and Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Melatonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delagrange, Philippe; Krause, Diana N.; Sugden, David; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Olcese, James

    2010-01-01

    The hormone melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine) is synthesized primarily in the pineal gland and retina, and in several peripheral tissues and organs. In the circulation, the concentration of melatonin follows a circadian rhythm, with high levels at night providing timing cues to target tissues endowed with melatonin receptors. Melatonin receptors receive and translate melatonin's message to influence daily and seasonal rhythms of physiology and behavior. The melatonin message is translated through activation of two G protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, that are potential therapeutic targets in disorders ranging from insomnia and circadian sleep disorders to depression, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. This review summarizes the steps taken since melatonin's discovery by Aaron Lerner in 1958 to functionally characterize, clone, and localize receptors in mammalian tissues. The pharmacological and molecular properties of the receptors are described as well as current efforts to discover and develop ligands for treatment of a number of illnesses, including sleep disorders, depression, and cancer. PMID:20605968

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXI. Nomenclature and Classification of Adenosine Receptors—An Update

    PubMed Central

    IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Linden, Joel; Müller, Christa E.

    2011-01-01

    In the 10 years since our previous International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology report on the nomenclature and classification of adenosine receptors, no developments have led to major changes in the recommendations. However, there have been so many other developments that an update is needed. The fact that the structure of one of the adenosine receptors has recently been solved has already led to new ways of in silico screening of ligands. The evidence that adenosine receptors can form homo- and heteromultimers has accumulated, but the functional significance of such complexes remains unclear. The availability of mice with genetic modification of all the adenosine receptors has led to a clarification of the functional roles of adenosine, and to excellent means to study the specificity of drugs. There are also interesting associations between disease and structural variants in one or more of the adenosine receptors. Several new selective agonists and antagonists have become available. They provide improved possibilities for receptor classification. There are also developments hinting at the usefulness of allosteric modulators. Many drugs targeting adenosine receptors are in clinical trials, but the established therapeutic use is still very limited. PMID:21303899

  5. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  6. [Newly developed nomenclature (Neuroscience-based Nomenclature)].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2016-06-01

    The current nomenclature is based on clinical indications; for example, drugs used for mania and psychosis are classified as "mood stabilizers" and "antipsychotic drugs", respectively. This discrepancy between their names and indications often confuses patients and their caregivers and sometimes leads to a misunderstanding of the effects of prescribed medications. In addition, up-to-date scientific knowledge on these drugs has not been reflected in the current nomenclature. To overcome these limitations of the current nomenclature, following an initiative of the European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP), a taskforce for psychotropic nomenclature was established with representatives from 5 international organizations, including the Asian College of Neuropsychopharmacology (AsCNP). The mission of this taskforce is to provide a pharmacologically-driven (rather than indication-based) nomenclature, which is now referred to as Neuroscience-based Nomenclature (NbN). The NbN project has just started. Since it always takes time to change the culture, we understand the transition will likely involve some expected and unexpected responses from the field. However, we believe that such responses and feedback will surely improve the quality of the NbN, which in turn will be beneficial for clinicians, researchers, and patients as well as their caregivers. PMID:27506083

  7. Allergen nomenclature*

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The revised nomenclature for allergens is presented together with proposed nomenclatures for (a) allergen genes, mRNAs and cDNAs, and (b) recombinant and synthetic peptides of allergenic interest. PMID:7955031

  8. Allergen nomenclature.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, D. G.; Goodfriend, L.; King, T. P.; Lowenstein, H.; Platts-Mills, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    This article presents a nomenclature system for allergens which has been officially recommended by the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). The nomenclature is based on proposals of the IUIS Sub-Committee for Allergen Nomenclature and is applicable to highly purified, well-characterized allergens and to non-purified or partially purified allergenic extracts. PMID:3492310

  9. A review of the current nomenclature for psychotropic agents and an introduction to the Neuroscience-based Nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Joseph; Stahl, Stephen; Moller, Hans-Jurgen; Blier, Pierre; Kupfer, David; Yamawaki, Shigeto; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Spedding, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M; Nutt, David

    2015-12-01

    Neuroscience based Nomenclature (NbN) is a new system of classifying psychotropic drugs by their pharmacological profile. The NbN was developed to replace the current indication-based nomenclature and to provide an up-to-date and more useful framework to better inform pharmacological decisions. NbN provides updated relevant and specific scientific, regulatory and clinical information, aiming to support rational and lucid prescribing. This pharmacologically driven nomenclature, which highlights pharmacological domains and modes of action, may also increase drug adherence as it clarifies the rationale for selecting a specific psychotropic agent. PMID:26527055

  10. Planetary nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobell, M. E.; Masursky, Harold

    1987-01-01

    In fiscal 1986, names were chosen for prominent features on the five previously known Uranian satellites and for features on the largest of the 10 satellites discovered by Voyager 2. The names of the five large satellites are taken mostly from Shakespeare, and most are spirits; therefore, Shakespearean and spirit themes were used to choose names for topographic features on the satellites. Crater names and most other feature names on Miranda, Oberon, and Titania are from Shakespeare; features on Ariel are named for bright spirits and those on Umbriel for dark, all taken from universal mythology. Preliminary coordinates for these features are derived from shaded relief maps of the satellites to be published in 1987. Orbital elements have been established for the 10 new satellites, and a paper describing this work is in progress; satellite positions are under review by Commission 16 of the IAU. The moon 1985 U1 is informally designated Puck. The nine small satellites discovered in 1986 are to be named for Shakespearean heroines; these names are to be listed in the 1987 edition of the Annual Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature.

  11. Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Durham, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Headache treatment has been based primarily on experiences with non-specific drugs such as analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or drugs that were originally developed to treat other diseases, such as beta-blockers and anticonvulsant medications. A better understanding of the basic pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine and other types of headache has led to the development over the past two decades of more target-specific drugs. Since activation of the trigeminovascular system and neurogenic inflammation are thought to play important roles in migraine pathophysiology, experimental studies modeling those events successfully predicted targets for selective development of pharmacological agents to treat migraine. Basically, there are two fundamental strategies for the treatment of migraine, abortive or preventive, based to a large degree on the frequency of attacks. The triptans, which exhibit potency towards selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors expressed on trigeminal nerves, remain the most effective drugs for the abortive treatment of migraine. However, numerous preventive medications are currently available that modulate the excitability of the nervous system, particularly the cerebral cortex. In this chapter, the pharmacology of commercially available medications as well as drugs in development that prevent or abort headache attacks will be discussed. PMID:20816410

  12. [Pharmacology].

    PubMed

    González, José; Orero, Ana; Olmo, Vicente; Martínez, David; Prieto, José; Bahlsen, Jose Antonio; Zaragozá, Francisco; Honorato, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Two of the main characteristics of western societies in the last fifty years have been the medicalization of the human life and the environmental degradation. The first one has forced human being to consider medicines use related to what would be rational, reasonable and well-reasoned. The second one brought us to a new ecologist conscience. In relation to the "human social system", the effects of medication can be considered very positive as a whole, particularly those related to the amazing increase of expectative and quality of life. But, along with those unquestionable beneficial effects, medicines have also caused some negative effects for other biotic and abiotic systems, such as microbian alterations and their undesirable consequences which have involved the massive use of antibiotics in medicine and veterinary, the uncontrolled elimination of millions of doses of all kind of drugs, additives and excipients, etc., as well as atmospheric contamination and degradation of forests and deep oceans which can have been caused by investigation and production of determinated drugs. In this context Pharmacology appears as a scientific discipline that studies the research (R), development (D), production (P), and utilization (U) of drugs and medical substances in relation to the environment. From a farmaecologic perspective the drugs utilization has its development in three main contexts, all of them closely related: prescription quality, farmaceutical care, and patient's active participation in his own disease and treatment. PMID:21666997

  13. A proposal for an updated neuropsychopharmacological nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Joseph; Nutt, David J; Kupfer, David J; Moller, Hans-Jurgen; Yamawaki, Shigeto; Spedding, Michael; Stahl, Stephen M

    2014-07-01

    Current psychopharmacological nomenclature remains wedded in an earlier period of scientific understanding, failing to reflect contemporary developments and knowledge, does not aid clinicians in selecting the best medication for a given patient, and tends to confuse patients by prescribing a drug that does not reflect their identified diagnosis (e.g. prescribe "antipsychotics" to depression). Four major colleges of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP, ACNP, Asian CNP, and CINP) proposed a new template comprising a multi-axial pharmacologically-driven nomenclature tested by four surveys. The template has five axes: 1-class (primary pharmacological target and relevant mechanism); 2-family (reflecting the relevant neurotransmitter and mechanism); 3-neurobiological activities; 4-efficacy and major side effects; and 5-approved indications. The results of the surveys suggest that the clinicians found the available indication-based nomenclature system dissatisfactory, non-intuitive, confusing, and doubt-inducing for them and the patients. The proposed five-axis template seeks to upend current usage by placing pharmacology rather than indication as the primary axes, with the proposed nomenclature relating primarily to Axis 1-the class, and usage of the other axes would largely depend upon the extent to which the clinician seeks to deepen the scientific and clinical base of his involvement. A significant proportion of the participants in the four surveys were in favour of the proposed system, a similar number wanted to consider the idea further, and only a small proportion (8.6%) were against it. The proposed five-axis pharmacology based nomenclature template is a system which might refresh and reflect the current scientific concepts of neuropsychopharmacology. PMID:24630385

  14. A simplified laminin nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Monique; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Carter, William G; Deutzmann, Rainer; Edgar, David; Ekblom, Peter; Engel, Jürgen; Engvall, Eva; Hohenester, Erhard; Jones, Jonathan C R; Kleinman, Hynda K; Marinkovich, M Peter; Martin, George R; Mayer, Ulrike; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Miner, Jeffrey H; Miyazaki, Kaoru; Patarroyo, Manuel; Paulsson, Mats; Quaranta, Vito; Sanes, Joshua R; Sasaki, Takako; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Sorokin, Lydia M; Talts, Jan F; Tryggvason, Karl; Uitto, Jouni; Virtanen, Ismo; von der Mark, Klaus; Wewer, Ulla M; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2005-08-01

    A simplification of the laminin nomenclature is presented. Laminins are multidomain heterotrimers composed of alpha, beta and gamma chains. Previously, laminin trimers were numbered with Arabic numerals in the order discovered, that is laminins-1 to -5. We introduce a new identification system for a trimer using three Arabic numerals, based on the alpha, beta and gamma chain numbers. For example, the laminin with the chain composition alpha5beta1gamma1 is termed laminin-511, and not laminin-10. The current practice is also to mix two overlapping domain and module nomenclatures. Instead of the older Roman numeral nomenclature and mixed nomenclature, all modules are now called domains. Some domains are renamed or renumbered. Laminin epidermal growth factor-like (LE) domains are renumbered starting at the N-termini, to be consistent with general protein nomenclature. Domain IVb of alpha chains is named laminin 4a (L4a), domain IVa of alpha chains is named L4b, domain IV of gamma chains is named L4, and domain IV of beta chains is named laminin four (LF). The two coiled-coil domains I and II are now considered one laminin coiled-coil domain (LCC). The interruption in the coiled-coil of beta chains is named laminin beta-knob (Lbeta) domain. The chain origin of a domain is specified by the chain nomenclature, such as alpha1L4a. The abbreviation LM is suggested for laminin. Otherwise, the nomenclature remains unaltered. PMID:15979864

  15. Mammalian Septins Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Macara, Ian G.; Baldarelli, Richard; Field, Christine M.; Glotzer, Michael; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Kennedy, Mary B.; Kinoshita, Makoto; Longtine, Mark; Low, Claudia; Maltais, Lois J.; McKenzie, Louise; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Nishikawa, Toru; Noda, Makoto; Petty, Elizabeth M.; Peifer, Mark; Pringle, John R.; Robinson, Phillip J.; Roth, Dagmar; Russell, S.E. Hilary; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Tanaka, Manami; Tanaka, Tomoo; Trimble, William S.; Ware, Jerry; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Zieger, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    There are 10 known mammalian septin genes, some of which produce multiple splice variants. The current nomenclature for the genes and gene products is very confusing, with several different names having been given to the same gene product and distinct names given to splice variants of the same gene. Moreover, some names are based on those of yeast or Drosophila septins that are not the closest homologues. Therefore, we suggest that the mammalian septin field adopt a common nomenclature system, based on that adopted by the Mouse Genomic Nomenclature Committee and accepted by the Human Genome Organization Gene Nomenclature Committee. The human and mouse septin genes will be named SEPT1–SEPT10 and Sept1–Sept10, respectively. Splice variants will be designated by an underscore followed by a lowercase “v” and a number, e.g., SEPT4_v1. PMID:12475938

  16. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.

  17. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author)

  18. A standardized kinesin nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Dawe, R. Kelly; Christie, Karen R.; Cleveland, Don W.; Dawson, Scott C.; Endow, Sharyn A.; Goldstein, Lawrence S.B.; Goodson, Holly V.; Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Howard, Jonathon; Malmberg, Russell L.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Miki, Harukata; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Okada, Yasushi; Reddy, Anireddy S.N.; Saxton, William M.; Schliwa, Manfred; Scholey, Jonathan M.; Vale, Ronald D.; Walczak, Claire E.; Wordeman, Linda

    2004-01-01

    In recent years the kinesin superfamily has become so large that several different naming schemes have emerged, leading to confusion and miscommunication. Here, we set forth a standardized kinesin nomenclature based on 14 family designations. The scheme unifies all previous phylogenies and nomenclature proposals, while allowing individual sequence names to remain the same, and for expansion to occur as new sequences are discovered. PMID:15479732

  19. Standardizing Scavenger Receptor Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    PrabhuDas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K.; Moestrup, Soren K.; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community. PMID:24563502

  20. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.

    1998-01-01

    The Principal Investigator's responsibilities on this grant fell into two categories according to his participation. In the nomenclature work of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Owen is chair of the Task Group for the Outer Solar System. He is also a member of the IAU's Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) which is composed of the chairs of the several Task Groups plus the presidents of two IAU Commissions and several outside consultants. The WGPSN is presided over by its President, Professor Kaare Aksnes from the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway.

  1. Nomenclature for aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report defines the principal terms which have come into use in the development of aeronautics. It was prepared in cooperation with a committee engaged upon a similar undertaking in Great Britain. As a result this nomenclature is in substantial agreement with the one which has been adopted by the aeronautical authorities of Great Britain.

  2. Notes On Nomenclature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, M. Guy

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the need for nomenclature improvements in the field of analytical chemistry by presenting examples of inconsistent uses of terms and names. Indicates that the development of a list of process and operational terms may serve as a way to obtain a clear designation of different kinds of separation and measurement. (CC)

  3. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1927-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a Special Conference on Aeronautical Nomenclature by the executive committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held on August 19, 1924, at which meeting Dr. Joseph S. Ames was appointed chairman of the conference. The conference was composed of representatives of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and specially appointed representatives officially designated by the Army Air Service, the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department, the Bureau of Standards, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications

  4. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant has supported work by T. Owen and B. A. Smith on planetary and satellite nomenclature, carried out under the general auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The IAU maintains a Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) whose current chair is Prof.Kaare Aksnes of the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway. Both Owen and Smith are members of the WGPSN; Owen as chair of the Outer Solar System Task Group, and Smith as chair of the Mars Task Group. The major activity during the last grant period (2002) was the approval of several new names for features on Mars by Smith's group and features on Jovian satellites plus new names for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus by Owen's group. Much of this work was accomplished by e-mail exchanges, but the new nomenclature was formally discussed and approved at a meeting of the WGPSN held in conjunction with the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Birmingham, Alabama in October 2002.

  5. Proposed nomenclature for microhaplotypes.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Kenneth K

    2016-01-01

    Microhaplotypes are a new type of genetic marker in forensics and population genetics. A standardized nomenclature is desirable. A simple approach that does not require a central authority for approval is proposed. The nomenclature proposed follows the recommendation of the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee ( http://www.genenames.org ): "We strongly encourage naming families and groups of genes related by sequence and/or function using a "root" symbol. This is an efficient and informative way to name related genes, and already works well for a number of established gene families…" The proposal involves a simple root consisting of "mh" followed by the two-digit chromosome number and unique characters established by the authors in the initial publication. We suggest the unique symbol be an indication of the laboratory followed by characters unique to the chromosome and laboratory. For instance, the microhaplotype symbol mh01KK-001 refers to a locus on chromosome 1 published by the Kidd Lab (KK-) as their #001. Publication defines mh01KK-001 as comprised of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4648344, rs6663840, rs58111155, and rs6688969. PMID:27316555

  6. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    The nomenclature for aeronautics presented in this Report No. 474 is a revision of the last previous report on this subject (i.e., Report no. 240.) This report is published for the purpose of encouraging greater uniformity and precision in the use of terms relating to aeronautics, both in official documents of the Government and in commercial publications. Terms in general use in other branches of engineering have been included only where they have some special significance in aeronautics, or form an integral part of its terminology.

  7. Nomenclature and classification, principles of

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nomenclature is critical for precise communications. Scientific names must be unique and attached to defined concepts. Classifications provide a means of encoding information into scientific nomenclature, so the use of scientific names provides the effective and efficient means for communicating abo...

  8. Lunar nomenclature: A dissenting note

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, D.W.G.

    1976-01-01

    This note reviews the nature of the traditional (Ma??dler) lunar nomenclature and the recent developments based on the use of more than 2000 named provinces. It appears that the new nomenclature is less efficient than the old in many cases and may lead to an impossible publication situation. The unnecessary break with the past is especially critized. ?? 1976.

  9. Solar flare nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    1995-03-01

    The evolution of solar flare nomenclature is reviewed in the context of the paradigm shift, in progress, from flares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar-terrestrial physics. Emphasis is placed on: the distinction between eruptive (Class II) flares and confined (Class I) flares; and the underlying similarity of eruptive flares inside (two-ribbon flares) and outside (flare-like brightenings accompanying disappearing filaments) of active regions. A list of reserach questions/ problems raised, or brought into focus, by the new paradigm is suggested; in general, these questions bear on the inter- relationships and associations of the two classes (or phases) or flares. Terms such as 'eruptive flare' and 'eruption' (defined to encompass both the CME and its associated eruptive flare) may be useful as nominal links between opposing viewpoints in the 'flares vs CMEs' controversy.

  10. Lysophospholipid receptor nomenclature review: IUPHAR Review 8

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids encompass a diverse range of small, membrane-derived phospholipids that act as extracellular signals. The signalling properties are mediated by 7-transmembrane GPCRs, constituent members of which have continued to be identified after their initial discovery in the mid-1990s. Here we briefly review this class of receptors, with a particular emphasis on their protein and gene nomenclatures that reflect their cognate ligands. There are six lysophospholipid receptors that interact with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA): protein names LPA1 – LPA6 and italicized gene names LPAR1-LPAR6 (human) and Lpar1-Lpar6 (non-human). There are five sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors: protein names S1P1-S1P5 and italicized gene names S1PR1-S1PR5 (human) and S1pr1-S1pr5 (non-human). Recent additions to the lysophospholipid receptor family have resulted in the proposed names for a lysophosphatidyl inositol (LPI) receptor – protein name LPI1 and gene name LPIR1 (human) and Lpir1 (non-human) – and three lysophosphatidyl serine receptors – protein names LyPS1, LyPS2, LyPS3 and gene names LYPSR1-LYPSR3 (human) and Lypsr1-Lypsr3 (non-human) along with a variant form that does not appear to exist in humans that is provisionally named LyPS2L. This nomenclature incorporates previous recommendations from the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, the Human Genome Organization, the Gene Nomenclature Committee, and the Mouse Genome Informatix. PMID:24602016

  11. Proposed systematic nomenclature for orbitides.

    PubMed

    Shim, Youn Young; Young, Lester W; Arnison, Paul G; Gilding, Edward; Reaney, Martin J T

    2015-04-24

    Orbitides are short (5-11 amino acid residue), ribosomally synthesized homodetic plant cyclic peptides characterized by N-to-C amide bonds rather than disulfide bonds. Orbitides can be discovered using mass spectrometry of plant extracts or by identifying DNA sequences coding for the precursor protein. The number of orbitides that have been characterized to date, by a number of different research groups, is modest. The nomenclatural system currently used for the Type VI cyclic peptides has been developed in an ad hoc fashion and is somewhat arbitrary. We propose a systematic naming system specifically for the Type VI cyclic peptides that reflects the taxonomic name of the species producing the orbitides and a numbering system that enables systematic representation of amino acid residues and modifications. The proposed naming system emulates the IUPAC Nomenclature for Natural Products and UniProt, both of which use abbreviations of taxonomic names for the compounds in question. Nomenclature for post-translational modifications also follows the IUPAC precedent, as well as the cyclic peptide literature. Furthermore, the proposed system aims to maintain agreement with the precedents set by the pre-existing literature. An example of the proposed nomenclature is provided using the methionine-containing homodetic peptides of Linum usitatissimum (flaxseed). PMID:25785712

  12. Nomenclature and placental mammal phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An issue arising from recent progress in establishing the placental mammal Tree of Life concerns the nomenclature of high-level clades. Fortunately, there are now several well-supported clades among extant mammals that require unambiguous, stable names. Although the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature does not apply above the Linnean rank of family, and while consensus on the adoption of competing systems of nomenclature does not yet exist, there is a clear, historical basis upon which to arbitrate among competing names for high-level mammalian clades. Here, we recommend application of the principles of priority and stability, as laid down by G.G. Simpson in 1945, to discriminate among proposed names for high-level taxa. We apply these principles to specific cases among placental mammals with broad relevance for taxonomy, and close with particular emphasis on the Afrotherian family Tenrecidae. We conclude that no matter how reconstructions of the Tree of Life change in years to come, systematists should apply new names reluctantly, deferring to those already published and maximizing consistency with existing nomenclature. PMID:20406454

  13. NASA catalogue of lunar nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, L. A.; Whitaker, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Lunar nomenclature is cataloged. It includes letter designations for subsidiary craters, and uses a more familiar spelling from eight names. The listed features are divided into three main groups for cataloging purposes, namely: (1) craters, (2) noncrater features; and (3) minor and miscellaneous features.

  14. Casein nomenclature, structure and association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter of the Encyclopedia of Dairy Science deals with the recent developments in the nomenclature, classification, structures, and associations of the major milk proteins: the caseins. Identification of the caseins continues to be based upon their primary structures. Significant findings re...

  15. The origin of electrochemical nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Giddens, W R

    2001-09-01

    This article is about the origin and development of certain words that are important in the vocabulary of all physicians and scientists. The words that make up the electrochemical nomenclature were created in 1833 by Michael Faraday and several of his friends. Terms such as electrolyte, ion, and electrode were invented in a fashion that ignored theory but fitted the experimental facts of the laboratory. This nomenclature, derived from Greek, was so accurate and functional that is has been completely incorporated into modern chemistry, a fact that seems remarkable since the structure of the atom was completely unknown at the time. To fully develop the etymology of these words, the life of Faraday is summarized and the deliberations of the men involved are reviewed. PMID:11686262

  16. Demystifying the Nomenclature of Bacterial Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A unified approach to bacterial names ensures accurate communication among scientists, regulators and the public. Rules for nomenclature ensure that changes to names of taxa follow a logical progression that maintains the integrity of the previous nomenclature while replacing it with new proposals b...

  17. Nomenclature for topographic features on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. A.

    The background behind the creation of a nomenclature for the topographic features of Mercury is examined, with particular attention given to developments associated with recent probe studies. The nomenclature is presented in Russian and Latin transcriptions, and problems in the transcription of Mercury topographic names into Russian are considered.

  18. Zoological nomenclature in the digital era

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Creation and use of the scientific names of animals are ruled by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. Until recently, publication of new names in a work produced with ink on paper was required for their availability. A long awaited amendment to the Code issued in September 2012 by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature now allows publication of new names in online-only works, provided that the latter are registered with ZooBank, the Official Register of Animal Names. With this amendment, the rules of zoological nomenclature have been aligned with the opportunities (and needs) of our digital era. However, possible causes for nomenclatural instability remain. These could be completely removed if the Code-compliant publication of new names will be identified with their online registration, under suitable technological and formal (legal) conditions. Future developments of the ZooBank may provide the tool required to make this definitive leap ahead in zoological nomenclature. PMID:23375141

  19. Convention on nomenclature for DNA cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hiddemann, W.; Schumann, J.; Andreeff, M.; Barlogie, B.; Herman, C.J.; Leif, R.C.; Mayall, B.H.; Murphy, R.F.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Committee on Nomenclature of the Society for Analytical Cytology presents guidelines for the analysis of DNA content by cytometry. These guidelines cover: staining of DNA; cytogenetic and cytometric terminology; DNA index; resolution of measurements; and cytometric standards.

  20. A systematic nomenclature for the insect brain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kei; Shinomiya, Kazunori; Ito, Masayoshi; Armstrong, J Douglas; Boyan, George; Hartenstein, Volker; Harzsch, Steffen; Heisenberg, Martin; Homberg, Uwe; Jenett, Arnim; Keshishian, Haig; Restifo, Linda L; Rössler, Wolfgang; Simpson, Julie H; Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Strauss, Roland; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2014-02-19

    Despite the importance of the insect nervous system for functional and developmental neuroscience, descriptions of insect brains have suffered from a lack of uniform nomenclature. Ambiguous definitions of brain regions and fiber bundles have contributed to the variation of names used to describe the same structure. The lack of clearly determined neuropil boundaries has made it difficult to document precise locations of neuronal projections for connectomics study. To address such issues, a consortium of neurobiologists studying arthropod brains, the Insect Brain Name Working Group, has established the present hierarchical nomenclature system, using the brain of Drosophila melanogaster as the reference framework, while taking the brains of other taxa into careful consideration for maximum consistency and expandability. The following summarizes the consortium's nomenclature system and highlights examples of existing ambiguities and remedies for them. This nomenclature is intended to serve as a standard of reference for the study of the brain of Drosophila and other insects. PMID:24559671

  1. New consensus nomenclature for mammalian keratins

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Jürgen; Bowden, Paul E.; Coulombe, Pierre A.; Langbein, Lutz; Lane, E. Birgitte; Magin, Thomas M.; Maltais, Lois; Omary, M. Bishr; Parry, David A.D.; Rogers, Michael A.; Wright, Mathew W.

    2006-01-01

    Keratins are intermediate filament–forming proteins that provide mechanical support and fulfill a variety of additional functions in epithelial cells. In 1982, a nomenclature was devised to name the keratin proteins that were known at that point. The systematic sequencing of the human genome in recent years uncovered the existence of several novel keratin genes and their encoded proteins. Their naming could not be adequately handled in the context of the original system. We propose a new consensus nomenclature for keratin genes and proteins that relies upon and extends the 1982 system and adheres to the guidelines issued by the Human and Mouse Genome Nomenclature Committees. This revised nomenclature accommodates functional genes and pseudogenes, and although designed specifically for the full complement of human keratins, it offers the flexibility needed to incorporate additional keratins from other mammalian species. PMID:16831889

  2. Nomenclature for human complement component C2*

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    This note describes the designations for variants of the human complement component C2, which were approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). PMID:1394787

  3. Pancreatic cytology: standardised terminology and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Perez-Machado, M A

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cytology can make a real difference to the management of patients. However it is a challenge in those cases where a definitive diagnosis of malignancy cannot be made with confidence. This creates the need for a unified terminology and nomenclature system that provides intra- and interdepartmental guidance for diagnosis. The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC) has published new guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology, addressing indications, techniques, terminology and nomenclature, ancillary studies, and postprocedure management. PMID:27221751

  4. The IAU Meteor Shower Nomenclature Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  5. Vasculitides: Proposal for an integrated nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Prete, Marcella; Indiveri, Francesco; Perosa, Federico

    2016-02-01

    The vasculitides form a heterogeneous group of systemic diseases that differ in etiology, histological patterns, and, consequently, clinical significance and prognosis but are traceable to the same pathological event, namely, vessel wall inflammation. The clinical heterogeneity among these diseases, together with yet unknown pathogenetic mechanisms for many of them, creates difficulties in the early diagnosis and correct management of affected patients. Therefore, several groups of investigators have elaborated nomenclatures to set some order in the definition and grouping of the vasculitides. The two main naming systems used for decades, i.e., the Fauci nomenclature and the 1994 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature, were recently superseded by a revised CHCC nomenclature published in 2012. The aim of that revision was to update the names and definitions of the vasculitides and to include novel forms, considering the advances in knowledge made since the first consensus conference was held. Here, we critically discuss the 2012 CHCC nomenclature in light of the earlier naming systems and raise some concerns in how several vasculitides were grouped. On the basis of this analysis, we propose an integrated nomenclature that we believe will have a more direct impact in the clinic, perfectly aware that any redefinition may present contradictions. PMID:26546717

  6. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs. PMID:16399376

  7. Acute pancreatitis: international classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bollen, T L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing and it is associated with a major healthcare concern. New insights in the pathophysiology, better imaging techniques, and novel treatment options for complicated AP prompted the update of the 1992 Atlanta Classification. Updated nomenclature for pancreatic collections based on imaging criteria is proposed. Adoption of the newly Revised Classification of Acute Pancreatitis 2012 by radiologists should help standardise reports and facilitate accurate conveyance of relevant findings to referring physicians involved in the care of patients with AP. This review will clarify the nomenclature of pancreatic collections in the setting of AP. PMID:26602933

  8. Working group for planetary system nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Most of the activity of the Working Group and Task Group of the IAU during these three years has been centered on the nomenclature of Neptune's satellites and rings as revealed by the Voyager spacecraft. The emphasis is now shifting to Venus, in preparation for the detailed radar mapping of that planet begun by the Magellan spacecraft in August 1990. Approval has been asked for nomenclature of the Earth's moon, Venus, Mars, and Triton features as well as 4 other Neptune satellites and three Neptune rings.

  9. Revised Nomenclature for Transposable Genetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Adam P.; Chandler, Michael; Courvalin, Patrice; Guédon, Gérard; Mullany, Peter; Pembroke, Tony; Rood, Julian I.; Smith, C. Jeffery; Summers, Anne O.; Tsuda, Masataka; Berg, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Transposable DNA elements occur naturally in the genomes of nearly all species of prokaryotes. A proposal for a uniform transposable element nomenclature was published prominently in the 1970s but is not, at present, available online even in abstract form, and many of the newly discovered elements have been named without reference to it. We propose here an updated version of the original nomenclature system for all of the various types of prokaryotic, autonomous, transposable elements excluding insertion sequences, for which a nomenclature system already exists. The use of this inclusive and sequential Tn numbering system for transposable elements described here recognizes the ease of interspecies spread of individual elements, and allows for the naming of mosaic elements containing segments from two or more previously described types of transposons or plasmids. It will guard against a future necessity to rename elements following changes in bacterial nomenclature which occurs constantly with our increased understanding of bacterial phylogenies and taxonomic groupings. It also takes into account the increasing importance of metagenomic sequencing projects and the continued identification of new mobile elements from unknown hosts. PMID:18778731

  10. Definition, classification and nomenclature of the yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This submission includes sections for the Preface, Use of this Book, Table of Contents and a chapter entitled Definition, classification and nomenclature of the yeasts, which are to be published in The Yeasts, A Taxonomic Study, 5th edition. This book has been prepared by a team of international ex...

  11. Broca's Area: Nomenclature, Anatomy, Typology and Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Simon S.; Crow, Timothy; Foundas, Anne; Amunts, Katrin; Roberts, Neil

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we (i) describe the nomenclature of Broca's area and show how the circumscribed definition of Broca's area is disassociated from Broca's aphasia, (ii) describe in detail how the gross anatomy of Broca's area varies between people, and how the definitions vary between studies, (iii) attempt to reconcile the findings of structural…

  12. The Amsterdam declaration on fungal nomenclature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was developed at a international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the curren...

  13. History of the enzyme nomenclature system.

    PubMed

    Tipton, K; Boyce, S

    2000-01-01

    Naming things is essential for people to understand one another, no matter what language or field of interest is involved. This is as true for enzymes, genes and chemicals as it is for birds, food, flowers, etc. Effective communication requires a lack of ambiguity, but, in practice, ambiguities abound even between people who use the same language in different parts of the world, or even within the same country. Whereas ambiguities in the words used for common objects or actions have been the basis for many, more-or-less memorable jokes, they can also cause a great deal of confusion. Such linguistic chaos is welcomed by many as being a part of a diverse heritage that should be preserved at all costs to prevent us from descending into Orwellian 'newspeak'. However, in the sciences, there are distinct advantages in others being able to understand what one is doing. Many groups have stressed the need for standardized, universally accepted systems of nomenclature in chemistry, genetics, enzymology, etc. However, it is the universal acceptance that usually causes the problem. It is rare to find people who will admit that they find nomenclature to be an interesting subject, but many who profess contempt for it will get very excited if it is suggested that their pet nomenclature should be changed in the interest of clarity or uniformity. This account will consider the development of the enzyme nomenclature system, its benefits, shortcomings and future prospects. PMID:10812475

  14. Symétries et nomenclature des baryons: Proposition d'une nouvelle nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Gaëtan

    Baryons, such as protons and neutrons, are matter particles made of three quarks. Their current nomenclature is based on the concept of isospin, introduced by Werner Heisenberg in 1932 to explain the similarity between the masses of protons and neutrons, as well as the similarity of their behaviour under the strong interaction. It is a refinement of a nomenclature designed in 1964, before the acceptance of the quark model, for light baryons. A historical review of baryon physics before the advent of the quark model is given to understand the motivations behind the light baryon nomenclature. Then, an overview of the quark model is given to understand the extensions done to this nomenclature in 1986, as well as to understand the physics of baryons and of properties such as isospin and flavour quantum numbers. Since baryon properties are in general explained by the quark model, a nomenclature based on isospin leads to several issues of physics and of clarity. To resolve these issues, the concepts of isospin and mass groups are generalized to all flavours of quarks, the Gell-Mann--Okubo formalism is extended to generalized mass groups, and a baryon nomenclature based on the quark model, reflecting modern knowledge, is proposed.

  15. Techniques of laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Nomenclature and selection.

    PubMed

    Haribhakti, Sanjiv P; Mistry, Jitendra H

    2015-01-01

    There are more than 50 different techniques of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) available in literature mainly due to modifications by surgeons in aim to improve postoperative outcome and cosmesis. These modifications include reduction in port size and/or number than what is used in standard LC. There is no uniform nomenclature to describe these different techniques so that it is not possible to compare the outcomes of different techniques. We brief the advantages and disadvantages of each of these techniques and suggest the situation where particular technique would be useful. We also propose a nomenclature which is easy to remember and apply, so that any future comparison will be possible between the techniques. PMID:25883450

  16. Techniques of laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Nomenclature and selection

    PubMed Central

    Haribhakti, Sanjiv P.; Mistry, Jitendra H.

    2015-01-01

    There are more than 50 different techniques of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) available in literature mainly due to modifications by surgeons in aim to improve postoperative outcome and cosmesis. These modifications include reduction in port size and/or number than what is used in standard LC. There is no uniform nomenclature to describe these different techniques so that it is not possible to compare the outcomes of different techniques. We brief the advantages and disadvantages of each of these techniques and suggest the situation where particular technique would be useful. We also propose a nomenclature which is easy to remember and apply, so that any future comparison will be possible between the techniques. PMID:25883450

  17. [Common German language nomenclature for systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Müller-Ladner, U; Burkhardt, H; Distler, J H W; Distler, O; Graninger, W B; Günther, C; Hunzelmann, N; Kiener, H; Sticherling, M; Sunderkötter, C; Walker, U A; Riemekasten, G

    2015-03-01

    Large data bases and the projects arising from them have led to a much improved understanding of systemic sclerosis over the last decade. Serology has developed further so that more autoantibodies are available for routine testing. Capillary microscopy has become standard and relevant progress has also been made in therapy. Many diagnostic terms found in medical documentation do not adequately reflect this progress. The nomenclature is inconsistent and, therefore, confusing. The international classification of diseases (ICD) nomenclature is, from our point of view, also in need of improvement. This article aims to reestablish a common German language standard for systemic sclerosis, which reflects current knowledge and is suitable for implementation in the clinical routine. PMID:25805510

  18. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  19. Guidelines for the nomenclature of the human heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; Kubota, Hiroshi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Chen, Bin; Hightower, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    The expanding number of members in the various human heat shock protein (HSP) families and the inconsistencies in their nomenclature have often led to confusion. Here, we propose new guidelines for the nomenclature of the human HSP families, HSPH (HSP110), HSPC (HSP90), HSPA (HSP70), DNAJ (HSP40), and HSPB (small HSP) as well as for the human chaperonin families HSPD/E (HSP60/HSP10) and CCT (TRiC). The nomenclature is based largely on the more consistent nomenclature assigned by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee and used in the National Center of Biotechnology Information Entrez Gene database for the heat shock genes. In addition to this nomenclature, we provide a list of the human Entrez Gene IDs and the corresponding Entrez Gene IDs for the mouse orthologs. PMID:18663603

  20. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  1. The amsterdam declaration on fungal nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, David L; Crous, Pedro W; Redhead, Scott A; Reynolds, Don R; Samson, Robert A; Seifert, Keith A; Taylor, John W; Wingfield, Michael J; Abaci, Ozlem; Aime, Catherine; Asan, Ahmet; Bai, Feng-Yan; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Begerow, Dominik; Berikten, Derya; Boekhout, Teun; Buchanan, Peter K; Burgess, Treena; Buzina, Walter; Cai, Lei; Cannon, Paul F; Crane, J Leland; Damm, Ulrike; Daniel, Heide-Marie; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Druzhinina, Irina; Dyer, Paul S; Eberhardt, Ursula; Fell, Jack W; Frisvad, Jens C; Geiser, David M; Geml, József; Glienke, Chirlei; Gräfenhan, Tom; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Groenewald, Marizeth; de Gruyter, Johannes; Guého-Kellermann, Eveline; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hibbett, David S; Hong, Seung-Beom; de Hoog, G Sybren; Houbraken, Jos; Huhndorf, Sabine M; Hyde, Kevin D; Ismail, Ahmed; Johnston, Peter R; Kadaifciler, Duygu G; Kirk, Paul M; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Lagneau, Paul-Emile; Lévesque, C André; Liu, Xingzhong; Lombard, Lorenzo; Meyer, Wieland; Miller, Andrew; Minter, David W; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Norvell, Lorelei; Ozerskaya, Svetlana M; Oziç, Rasime; Pennycook, Shaun R; Peterson, Stephen W; Pettersson, Olga V; Quaedvlieg, William; Robert, Vincent A; Ruibal, Constantino; Schnürer, Johan; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Shivas, Roger; Slippers, Bernard; Spierenburg, Henk; Takashima, Masako; Taşkın, Evrim; Thines, Marco; Thrane, Ulf; Uztan, Alev Haliki; van Raak, Marcel; Varga, János; Vasco, Aida; Verkley, Gerard; Videira, Sandra I R; de Vries, Ronald P; Weir, Bevan S; Yilmaz, Neriman; Yurkov, Andrey; Zhang, Ning

    2011-06-01

    The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was agreed at an international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the current system of naming pleomorphic fungi should be maintained or changed now that molecular data are routinely available. The issue is urgent as mycologists currently follow different practices, and no consensus was achieved by a Special Committee appointed in 2005 by the International Botanical Congress to advise on the problem. The Declaration recognizes the need for an orderly transitition to a single-name nomenclatural system for all fungi, and to provide mechanisms to protect names that otherwise then become endangered. That is, meaning that priority should be given to the first described name, except where that is a younger name in general use when the first author to select a name of a pleomorphic monophyletic genus is to be followed, and suggests controversial cases are referred to a body, such as the ICTF, which will report to the Committee for Fungi. If appropriate, the ICTF could be mandated to promote the implementation of the Declaration. In addition, but not forming part of the Declaration, are reports of discussions held during the symposium on the governance of the nomenclature of fungi, and the naming of fungi known only from an environmental nucleic acid sequence in particular. Possible amendments to the Draft BioCode (2011) to allow for the needs of mycologists are suggested for further consideration, and a possible example of how a fungus only known from the environment might be described is presented. PMID:22679594

  2. Nomenclature101.com: A Free, Student-Driven Organic Chemistry Nomenclature Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.; Caron, Jeanette; Laroche, Jamey; Daviau-Duguay, Melissa; Marcoux, Caroline; Richard, Gise`le

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental to a student's understanding of organic chemistry is the ability to interpret and use its language, including molecules' names and other key terms. A learning gap exists in that students often struggle with organic nomenclature. Although many resources describe the rules for naming molecules, there is a paucity of resources…

  3. Proposal for a unified CCN nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Brigstock, D R; Goldschmeding, R; Katsube, K-i; Lam, S C-T; Lau, L F; Lyons, K; Naus, C; Perbal, B; Riser, B; Takigawa, M; Yeger, H

    2003-04-01

    A proposal is put forth to unify the nomenclature of the CCN family of secreted, cysteine rich regulatory proteins. In the order of their description in the literature, CCN1 (CYR61), CCN2 (CTGF), CCN3 (NOV), CCN4 (WISP-1), CCN5 (WISP-2), and CCN6 (WISP-3) constitute a family of matricellular proteins that regulate cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, survival, and differentiation, at least in part through integrin mediated mechanisms. This proposal is endorsed by the International CCN Society and will serve to eliminate confusion from the multiple names that have been given to these molecules. PMID:12665631

  4. The P450 gene superfamily: recommended nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Adesnik, M; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F; Kemper, B; Levin, W

    1987-02-01

    A nomenclature for the P450 gene superfamily is proposed based on evolution. Recommendations include Roman numerals for distinct gene families, capital letters for subfamilies, and Arabic numerals for individual genes. An updating of this list, which presently includes 65 entries, will be required every 1-2 years. Assignment of orthologous genes is presently uncertain in some cases--between widely diverged species and especially in the P450II family due to the large number of genes. As more is known, it might become necessary to change some gene assignments that are based on our present knowledge. PMID:3829886

  5. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 5. Rhodamines.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, C J

    2016-01-01

    Rhodamines were first produced in the late 19(th) century, when they constituted a new class of synthetic dyes. These compounds since have been used to color many things including cosmetics, inks, textiles, and in some countries, food products. Certain rhodamine dyes also have been used to stain biological specimens and currently are widely used as fluorescent probes for mitochondria in living cells. The early history and current biological applications are sketched briefly and an account of the ambiguities, complications and confusions concerning dye identification and nomenclature are discussed. PMID:26529223

  6. Amyloid fibril protein nomenclature: 2012 recommendations from the Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Sipe, Jean D; Benson, Merrill D; Buxbaum, Joel N; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Merlini, Giampaolo; Saraiva, Maria J M; Westermark, Per

    2012-12-01

    The Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis (ISA) met during the XIIIth International Symposium, May 6-10, 2012, Groningen, The Netherlands, to formulate recommendations on amyloid fibril protein nomenclature and to consider newly identified candidate amyloid fibril proteins for inclusion in the ISA Amyloid Fibril Protein Nomenclature List. The need to promote utilization of consistent and up to date terminology for both fibril chemistry and clinical classification of the resultant disease syndrome was emphasized. Amyloid fibril nomenclature is based on the chemical identity of the amyloid fibril forming protein; clinical classification of the amyloidosis should be as well. Although the importance of fibril chemistry to the disease process has been recognized for more than 40 years, to this day the literature contains clinical and histochemical designations that were used when the chemical diversity of amyloid diseases was poorly understood. Thus, the continued use of disease classifications such as familial amyloid neuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy generates confusion. An amyloid fibril protein is defined as follows: the protein must occur in body tissue deposits and exhibit both affinity for Congo red and green birefringence when Congo red stained deposits are viewed by polarization microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical identity of the protein must have been unambiguously characterized by protein sequence analysis when so is practically possible. Thus, in nearly all cases, it is insufficient to demonstrate mutation in the gene of a candidate amyloid protein; the protein itself must be identified as an amyloid fibril protein. Current ISA Amyloid Fibril Protein Nomenclature Lists of 30 human and 10 animal fibril proteins are provided together with a list of inclusion bodies that, although intracellular, exhibit some or all of the properties of the mainly extracellular amyloid fibrils. PMID:23113696

  7. Conotoxins: Structure, Therapeutic Potential and Pharmacological Applications.

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Karim, Sajjad; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Wilson, Cornelia M; Mirza, Zeenat

    2016-01-01

    Cone snails, also known as marine gastropods, from Conus genus produce in their venom a diverse range of small pharmacologically active structured peptides called conotoxins. The cone snail venoms are widely unexplored arsenal of toxins with therapeutic and pharmacological potential, making them a treasure trove of ligands and peptidic drug leads. Conotoxins are small disulfide bonded peptides, which act as remarkable selective inhibitors and modulators of ion channels (calcium, sodium, potassium), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, noradrenaline transporters, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and neurotensin receptors. They are highly potent and specific against several neuronal targets making them valuable as research tools, drug leads and even therapeutics. In this review, we discuss their gene superfamily classification, nomenclature, post-translational modification, structural framework, pharmacology and medical applications of the active conopeptides. We aim to give an overview of their structure and therapeutic potential. Understanding these aspects of conopeptides will help in designing more specific peptidic analogues. PMID:26601961

  8. Dermatoses of pregnancy: Nomenclature, misnomers, and myths.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Melissa; Pomeranz, Miriam Keltz; McMeniman, Erin; Murase, Jenny E

    2016-01-01

    The most recent reclassification of dermatoses of pregnancy includes polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, atopic eruption of pregnancy, and pemphigoid gestationis; intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, strictly not a dermatosis, was included in specific dermatoses of pregnancy for working purposes. Another dermatosis, pustular psoriasis of pregnancy, could be included for similar reasons. The nomenclature of these pregnancy-specific eruptions has been revised several times, generating potential confusion among practitioners. Clouding the picture further are misnomers that have been used to describe dermatoses of pregnancy. In addition, several cutaneous conditions that are associated with, but not specific to, pregnancy, have been misunderstood, which has resulted in certain myths among patients and physicians. In this contribution, we describe how the nomenclature of each dermatosis of pregnancy has evolved to fit the current classification scheme. We then identify several misnomers that have generated confusion within the scheme. Finally, we debunk several myths that have developed around cutaneous conditions outside of this scheme, in both mother and newborn. PMID:27265068

  9. Nomenclatural Benchmarking: The roles of digital typification and telemicroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of nomenclatural benchmarking is the examination of type specimens of all available names to ascertain which currently accepted species the specimen bearing the name falls within. We propose a strategy for addressing four challenges for nomenclatural benchmarking. First, there is the mat...

  10. Nomenclatural realignment of Neotyphodium species with genus Epichloe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nomenclatural rule changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants made at the 18th International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in 2011 require that a single name is used for all fungi. Since the anamorphic stages of Epichloë species have been classified i...

  11. Beyond the Tower of Babel: A Nomenclature for Suicidology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Carroll, Patrick W.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a nomenclature for suicide-related behavior in the hope of improving the clarity and precision of communications, advancing suicidological research and knowledge, and improving the efficacy of clinical interventions. Provides a background of the ambiguity surrounding suicide terminology, contrasts nomenclature with classification, and…

  12. Chemical Alias: An Engaging Way to Examine Nomenclature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurushkin, Mikhail; Mikhaylenko, Maria

    2015-01-01

    An educational card game, "Chemical Alias," has been developed as an alternative method of reviewing students' knowledge of nomenclature. In contrast to conventional tests, this highly competitive activity is a fun and effective way to examine and reinforce nomenclature. The students play in pairs, using Clark's famous spiral arrangement…

  13. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate application of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.

  14. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate applicationmore » of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.« less

  15. Some corrections of coccidian (Apicomplexa: Protozoa) nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Levine, N D

    1980-10-01

    The following nomenclatural corrections and changes are introduced for the coccidia. NEW SPECIES: Cryptosporidium rhesi from the rhesus monkey Macaca mulatta; Cryptosporidium serpentis from the snakes Elaphe guttata, Elapha subocularis, Crotalus horridus, and Sanzinia madagascarensis; Eimeria perazae from the lizard Cnemidophorus l. lemniscatus; and Eimeria tarichae from the salamander Taricha toirosa. NEW COMBINATIONS: Orcheobius carinii for Cariniella carinii from the frog Leptodactylus ocellatus; Schellackia iguanae for Lainsonia iguanae from the iguana Iguana iguana; Schellackia weinbergi for Haemogregarina weinbergi from the lizard Tupinambis nigropunctatus; Dorisa harpia for Dorisiella harpia from the bat Harpiocephalus harpia lasyurus; Barrouxia labbei for Echinospora labbei from the centipedes Lithobius mutabilis and L. pyrenaicus; and Barrouxia ventricosa for Echinospora ventricosa from the centipede Lithobius hexodus. The generic names Lainsonia and Gordonella are synonymized with Schellackia; Echinospora with Barrouxia; and Cariniella with Orcheobius. PMID:7463253

  16. Cardiac amyloidosis: pathology, nomenclature, and typing.

    PubMed

    Maleszewski, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is an increasingly recognized cause of heart disease, caused by the deposition of misfolded protein within the heart. These proteins may deposit systemically and include the heart or deposit only within the heart muscle itself. In either case, cardiac symptoms may be the primary manifestation. The diagnosis is usually made by the pathologist identifying amyloid within a tissue sample. The diagnosis, however, does not end with such visual recognition of the presence of amyloid. Newer generation pharmacotherapeutic agents that are protein specific necessitate a closer evaluation to determine the type of protein being deposited and accurately conveying this to the treating clinician. Herein, the gross and histopathologic features of cardiac amyloidosis are reviewed along with a review of amyloid typing strategies (both direct and indirect) that may be employed in the diagnostic workup as well as the nomenclature standards for reporting. PMID:26361138

  17. Identification and nomenclature of the genus Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Visagie, C M; Houbraken, J; Frisvad, J C; Hong, S-B; Klaassen, C H W; Perrone, G; Seifert, K A; Varga, J; Yaguchi, T; Samson, R A

    2014-06-01

    Penicillium is a diverse genus occurring worldwide and its species play important roles as decomposers of organic materials and cause destructive rots in the food industry where they produce a wide range of mycotoxins. Other species are considered enzyme factories or are common indoor air allergens. Although DNA sequences are essential for robust identification of Penicillium species, there is currently no comprehensive, verified reference database for the genus. To coincide with the move to one fungus one name in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, the generic concept of Penicillium was re-defined to accommodate species from other genera, such as Chromocleista, Eladia, Eupenicillium, Torulomyces and Thysanophora, which together comprise a large monophyletic clade. As a result of this, and the many new species described in recent years, it was necessary to update the list of accepted species in Penicillium. The genus currently contains 354 accepted species, including new combinations for Aspergillus crystallinus, A. malodoratus and A. paradoxus, which belong to Penicillium section Paradoxa. To add to the taxonomic value of the list, we also provide information on each accepted species MycoBank number, living ex-type strains and provide GenBank accession numbers to ITS, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RPB2 sequences, thereby supplying a verified set of sequences for each species of the genus. In addition to the nomenclatural list, we recommend a standard working method for species descriptions and identifications to be adopted by laboratories working on this genus. PMID:25505353

  18. Identification and nomenclature of the genus Penicillium

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Hong, S.-B.; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Perrone, G.; Seifert, K.A.; Varga, J.; Yaguchi, T.; Samson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Penicillium is a diverse genus occurring worldwide and its species play important roles as decomposers of organic materials and cause destructive rots in the food industry where they produce a wide range of mycotoxins. Other species are considered enzyme factories or are common indoor air allergens. Although DNA sequences are essential for robust identification of Penicillium species, there is currently no comprehensive, verified reference database for the genus. To coincide with the move to one fungus one name in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, the generic concept of Penicillium was re-defined to accommodate species from other genera, such as Chromocleista, Eladia, Eupenicillium, Torulomyces and Thysanophora, which together comprise a large monophyletic clade. As a result of this, and the many new species described in recent years, it was necessary to update the list of accepted species in Penicillium. The genus currently contains 354 accepted species, including new combinations for Aspergillus crystallinus, A. malodoratus and A. paradoxus, which belong to Penicillium section Paradoxa. To add to the taxonomic value of the list, we also provide information on each accepted species MycoBank number, living ex-type strains and provide GenBank accession numbers to ITS, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RPB2 sequences, thereby supplying a verified set of sequences for each species of the genus. In addition to the nomenclatural list, we recommend a standard working method for species descriptions and identifications to be adopted by laboratories working on this genus. PMID:25505353

  19. Mouse Genetic Nomenclature: Standardization of Strain, Gene, and Protein Symbols

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Schofield, Paul N

    2011-01-01

    The use of standard nomenclatures for describing the strains, genes, and proteins of species is vital for the interpretation, archiving, analysis, and recovery of experimental data on the laboratory mouse. At a time when sharing of data and meta- analysis of experimental results is becoming a dominant mode of scientific investigation, failure to respect formal nomenclatures can cause confusion, errors, and in some cases contribute to poor science. Here we present the basic nomenclature rules for laboratory mice and explain how these rules should be applied to complex genetic manipulations and crosses. PMID:20685919

  20. Pharmacologic vitreolysis.

    PubMed

    Rhéaume, Marc-André; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    It is now well recognized that vitreous plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various retinal disorders. In many instances it can be addressed with pars plana vitrectomy, although this approach, like any surgery, has its limitations. The search for alternatives or adjunct to surgery has led to the development of pharmacologic vitreolysis. The use of intravitreal agents to alter the vitreous in order to reduce or eliminate its role in disease seems promising. The purpose of this article is to summarize the present knowledge on pharmacologic vitreolysis. A review of the different agents used and of ongoing trials will be presented. Also, current understanding of vitreous structure and its interaction with the retina will be discussed. PMID:21091015

  1. Changes in IUPAC Nomenclature Rules for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klesney, Stanley P.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in the 1971 edition of the IUPAC book, Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry," from the previous editions (Sections A and B, 1966, and Section C, 1965) are listed with details of the changes. (Author)

  2. Pharmacogenetic allele nomenclature: International workgroup recommendations for test result reporting.

    PubMed

    Kalman, L V; Agúndez, Jag; Appell, M Lindqvist; Black, J L; Bell, G C; Boukouvala, S; Bruckner, C; Bruford, E; Caudle, K; Coulthard, S A; Daly, A K; Tredici, Al Del; den Dunnen, J T; Drozda, K; Everts, R E; Flockhart, D; Freimuth, R R; Gaedigk, A; Hachad, H; Hartshorne, T; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Klein, T E; Lauschke, V M; Maglott, D R; McLeod, H L; McMillin, G A; Meyer, U A; Müller, D J; Nickerson, D A; Oetting, W S; Pacanowski, M; Pratt, V M; Relling, M V; Roberts, A; Rubinstein, W S; Sangkuhl, K; Schwab, M; Scott, S A; Sim, S C; Thirumaran, R K; Toji, L H; Tyndale, R F; van Schaik, Rhn; Whirl-Carrillo, M; Yeo, Ktj; Zanger, U M

    2016-02-01

    This article provides nomenclature recommendations developed by an international workgroup to increase transparency and standardization of pharmacogenetic (PGx) result reporting. Presently, sequence variants identified by PGx tests are described using different nomenclature systems. In addition, PGx analysis may detect different sets of variants for each gene, which can affect interpretation of results. This practice has caused confusion and may thereby impede the adoption of clinical PGx testing. Standardization is critical to move PGx forward. PMID:26479518

  3. The I.A.U. meteor shower nomenclature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  4. The mystifying nomenclature of cardiac troponin immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    The laboratory assessment of cardiospecific troponins(s) represents the cornerstone for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although troponin immunoassays are classified according to either analytical imprecision or percentage of measurable values in a presumably healthy population, it is rather clear that the nomenclature of commercial methods according to these systems of classification carries several drawbacks. The leading problems in classification according to imprecision are represented by the arbitrarity of optimal imprecision threshold, the uncertain correspondence between analytical performance and clinical outcomes and the improper use of terms, which has also been magnified by the lack of specific focus on this topic by regulating bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Union. Additional issues emerging from classification according to percentage of measurable values include the characterization of healthy population, the variation of values according to age, gender and race, as well as the influence of comorbidities. Considering that what really matters from a clinical standpoint is the clinical performance of the assay rather than the claimed analytical characteristics, it seems reasonable at this point in time to introduce a paradigm shift and gradually abandon the former analytical classification in favour of a different approach, preferable based on clinical outcomes. PMID:24588414

  5. Broca's area: nomenclature, anatomy, typology and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Keller, Simon S; Crow, Timothy; Foundas, Anne; Amunts, Katrin; Roberts, Neil

    2009-04-01

    In this review, we (i) describe the nomenclature of Broca's area and show how the circumscribed definition of Broca's area is disassociated from Broca's aphasia, (ii) describe in detail how the gross anatomy of Broca's area varies between people, and how the definitions vary between studies, (iii) attempt to reconcile the findings of structural asymmetry of Broca's area with the differences in methodological approaches, (iv) consider the functional significance of cytoarchitectonic definitions of Broca's area, and (v) critically elucidate the significance of circumscribed regions of cortex for language lateralisation and language development. Contrary to what has previously been reported in the literature, asymmetry of Broca's area has not been reproducibly demonstrated, particularly on a gross morphological level. This may be due to major inconsistencies in methodology (including different anatomical boundaries, measurement techniques and samples studied) or that the sulcal contours defining Broca's area are so naturally variable between people making a standard definition difficult. Cytoarchitectonic analyses more often than not report leftward asymmetry of some component of area 44 and/or area 45. If a structural asymmetry of Broca's area does exist, it is variable, which differs from that of the functional asymmetry of language, which is more consistent. One reason for this might be that the link between cellular architecture, connectivity and language function still remains to be elucidated. There is currently no convincing explanation to associate asymmetry of Broca's area with the lateralisation of language. PMID:19155059

  6. Sequence Variant Descriptions: HGVS Nomenclature and Mutalyzer.

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, Johan T

    2016-01-01

    Consistent and unambiguous description of sequence variants is essential to report and exchange information on the analysis of a genome, in particular in DNA diagnostics. The HGVS nomenclature-recommendations for the description of sequence variants as originally proposed by the Human Genome Variation Society-has gradually been accepted as the international standard for variant description. In this unit, we describe the current recommendations (HGVS version 15.11) regarding how to describe variants at the DNA, RNA, and protein level. We explain the rationale and give example descriptions for all variant types: substitution, deletion, duplication, insertion, inversion, conversion, and complex, as well as special types occurring only on the RNA (splicing) or protein level (nonsense, frame shift, extension). Finally, we point users to available support tools and give examples for the use of the freely available Mutalyzer suite. An extensive version of the HGVS recommendations is available online at http://varnomen.hgvs.org/. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367167

  7. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Catalytic receptors.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Fabbro, Doriano; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13353/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650444

  8. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Overview.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Buneman, O Peter; Catterall, William A; Cidlowski, John A; Davenport, Anthony P; Fabbro, Doriano; Fan, Grace; McGrath, John C; Spedding, Michael; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13347/full. This compilation of the major pharmacological targets is divided into eight areas of focus: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650438

  9. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; McGrath, John C; Catterall, William A; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties from the IUPHAR database. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. This compilation of the major pharmacological targets is divided into seven areas of focus: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors & Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528237

  10. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Transporters are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528242

  11. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14: overview.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen P H; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; McGrath, John C; Catterall, William A; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J; Abul-Hasn, N; Anderson, C M; Anderson, C M H; Araiksinen, M S; Arita, M; Arthofer, E; Barker, E L; Barratt, C; Barnes, N M; Bathgate, R; Beart, P M; Belelli, D; Bennett, A J; Birdsall, N J M; Boison, D; Bonner, T I; Brailsford, L; Bröer, S; Brown, P; Calo, G; Carter, W G; Catterall, W A; Chan, S L F; Chao, M V; Chiang, N; Christopoulos, A; Chun, J J; Cidlowski, J; Clapham, D E; Cockcroft, S; Connor, M A; Cox, H M; Cuthbert, A; Dautzenberg, F M; Davenport, A P; Dawson, P A; Dent, G; Dijksterhuis, J P; Dollery, C T; Dolphin, A C; Donowitz, M; Dubocovich, M L; Eiden, L; Eidne, K; Evans, B A; Fabbro, D; Fahlke, C; Farndale, R; Fitzgerald, G A; Fong, T M; Fowler, C J; Fry, J R; Funk, C D; Futerman, A H; Ganapathy, V; Gaisnier, B; Gershengorn, M A; Goldin, A; Goldman, I D; Gundlach, A L; Hagenbuch, B; Hales, T G; Hammond, J R; Hamon, M; Hancox, J C; Hauger, R L; Hay, D L; Hobbs, A J; Hollenberg, M D; Holliday, N D; Hoyer, D; Hynes, N A; Inui, K-I; Ishii, S; Jacobson, K A; Jarvis, G E; Jarvis, M F; Jensen, R; Jones, C E; Jones, R L; Kaibuchi, K; Kanai, Y; Kennedy, C; Kerr, I D; Khan, A A; Klienz, M J; Kukkonen, J P; Lapoint, J Y; Leurs, R; Lingueglia, E; Lippiat, J; Lolait, S J; Lummis, S C R; Lynch, J W; MacEwan, D; Maguire, J J; Marshall, I L; May, J M; McArdle, C A; McGrath, J C; Michel, M C; Millar, N S; Miller, L J; Mitolo, V; Monk, P N; Moore, P K; Moorhouse, A J; Mouillac, B; Murphy, P M; Neubig, R R; Neumaier, J; Niesler, B; Obaidat, A; Offermanns, S; Ohlstein, E; Panaro, M A; Parsons, S; Pwrtwee, R G; Petersen, J; Pin, J-P; Poyner, D R; Prigent, S; Prossnitz, E R; Pyne, N J; Pyne, S; Quigley, J G; Ramachandran, R; Richelson, E L; Roberts, R E; Roskoski, R; Ross, R A; Roth, M; Rudnick, G; Ryan, R M; Said, S I; Schild, L; Sanger, G J; Scholich, K; Schousboe, A; Schulte, G; Schulz, S; Serhan, C N; Sexton, P M; Sibley, D R; Siegel, J M; Singh, G; Sitsapesan, R; Smart, T G; Smith, D M; Soga, T; Stahl, A; Stewart, G; Stoddart, L A; Summers, R J; Thorens, B; Thwaites, D T; Toll, L; Traynor, J R; Usdin, T B; Vandenberg, R J; Villalon, C; Vore, M; Waldman, S A; Ward, D T; Willars, G B; Wonnacott, S J; Wright, E; Ye, R D; Yonezawa, A; Zimmermann, M

    2013-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties from the IUPHAR database. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. This compilation of the major pharmacological targets is divided into seven areas of focus: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors & Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528237

  12. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Catterall, William A; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Ion channels are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528239

  13. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Catalytic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Catalytic receptors are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528241

  14. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Enzymes are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528243

  15. Nomenclature of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in man*

    PubMed Central

    1967-01-01

    The World Health Organization convened in Geneva from 5 to 10 December 1966 a Scientific Group on Standardization of Procedures for the Study of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase1 (EC 1.1.1.49; D-glucose-6-phosphate: NAPD oxidoreductase; G6PD). Variants of this enzyme have attracted international attention both as causes of various haemolytic disorders and as useful genetic markers in man. In the course of the meeting the variants of this enzyme thus far described were extensively reviewed. There was unanimous agreement that a consistent system of nomenclature would be desirable, and that as G6PD variants were only one example of similar polymorphisms in man, a nomenclature should be devised which might conceivably be applied to other enzymes. The Group included the following recommendations on nomenclature in its report, which will be published in full in World Health Organization: Technical Report Series, 1967, 366. PMID:5299754

  16. Anatomical terminology and nomenclature: past, present and highlights.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav; Bozdechova, Ivana; Cech, Pavel; Musil, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    The anatomical terminology is a base for medical communication. It is elaborated into a nomenclature in Latin. Its history goes back to 1895, when the first Latin anatomical nomenclature was published as Basiliensia Nomina Anatomica. It was followed by seven revisions (Jenaiensia Nomina Anatomica 1935, Parisiensia Nomina Anatomica 1955, Nomina Anatomica 2nd to 6th edition 1960-1989). The last revision, Terminologia Anatomica, (TA) created by the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology and approved by the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists, was published in 1998. Apart from the official Latin anatomical terminology, it includes a list of recommended English equivalents. In this article, major changes and pitfalls of the nomenclature are discussed, as well as the clinical anatomy terms. The last revision (TA) is highly recommended to the attention of not only teachers, students and researchers, but also to clinicians, doctors, translators, editors and publishers to be followed in their activities. PMID:18488135

  17. Ocular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Novack, Gary D; Robin, Alan L

    2016-05-01

    Ophthalmic diseases include both those analogous to systemic diseases (eg, inflammation, infection, neuronal degeneration) and not analogous (eg, cataract, myopia). Many anterior segment diseases are treated pharmacologically through eye drops, which have an implied therapeutic index of local therapy. Unlike oral dosage forms administered for systemic diseases, eyedrops require patients not only to adhere to treatment, but to be able to accurately perform-ie, instill drops correctly. Anatomical and physiological barriers make topical delivery to the anterior chamber challenging-in some cases more challenging than absorption through the skin, nasal passages, or gut. Treatment of the posterior segment (eg, vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic nerve) is more challenging due to additional barriers. Recently, intravitreal injections have become a standard of care with biologics for the treatment of macular degeneration and other diseases. Although the eye has esterases, hydroxylases, and transporters, it has relatively little CYP450 enzymes. Because it is challenging to obtain drug concentrations at the target site, ocular clinical pharmacokinetics, and thus pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic interactions, are rarely available. Ophthalmic pharmaceuticals require consideration of solubility, physiological pH, and osmolarity, as well as sterility and stability, which in turn requires optimal pharmaceutics. Although applied locally, ocular medications may be absorbed systemically, which results in morbidity and mortality (eg, systemic hypotension, bronchospasm, and bradycardia). PMID:26360129

  18. Nomenclature of African species of the genus Stenodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae).

    PubMed

    Metallinou, Margarita; Crochet, Pierre-André

    2013-01-01

    The statuses of proposed nomina of the North African species of the genus Stenodactylus have been revised based on the study of their original descriptions and the examination of their name-bearing types. Important nomenclatural actions proposed include the designation of a lectotype for the nomen Stenodactylus guttatus ensuring continuity of the prevailing usage of S. petrii, and the proposal of maintaining prevailing usage of Stenodactylus sthenodactylus by applying to the International Commission of Zoological Nomenclature to set aside the existing name-bearing type and replace it with a neotype corresponding with that usage. PMID:26167591

  19. International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Science requires a precise, stable, and simple system of nomenclature used by scientists in all countries of the world, dealing on the one hand with the terms that denote the ranks of taxonomic groups, and on the other with the scientific names that are applied to the individual taxonomic units of a...

  20. Space telescope coordinate systems, symbols, and nomenclature definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    The major coordinate systems as well as the transformations and transformation angles between them, for the Space Telescope are defined. The coordinate systems were primarily developed for use in pointing and control system analysis and simulation. Additional useful information (on nomenclature, symbols, quaternion operations, etc.) is also contained.

  1. Chemical Nomenclature, Symbols and Terminology for Use in School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. G.; And Others

    This report contains recommendations on chemical nomenclature, guidance on symbols, and terminology and units for physiochemical quantities. This report, intended to provide guidance to science teachers, consists of eleven sections: (1) general introduction; (2) introduction to symbols, terminology, and units for physiochemical quantities; (3)…

  2. Sex Therapy: Advances in Paradigms, Nomenclature, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althof, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author reviews the historical paradigms that have influenced the treatment of sexual problems, changes in the diagnostic nomenclature, and recent innovations in sex therapy. Methods: The author reviews the literature and provides expert opinion. Results: The author gives a historical overview of how theoretical models of…

  3. On the nomenclature of coelom-derived body cavities.

    PubMed

    Knospe, C

    2008-06-01

    A rationalization of terms about the body cavities is urgently needed. Students and practitioners have difficulty in understanding the contradictory terms prevalent at present. For many years, the International Committee on Veterinary Gross Anatomical Nomenclature has failed to bring it off; therefore some proposals for the anatomical instruction until the next edition of the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria are made. PMID:18479312

  4. NOMENCLATURE FOR FACTORS OF THE SLA SYSTEM, UPDATE 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report summarizes the new swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) allele sequences and haplotypes designated by the SLA Nomenclature Committee of the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG). There have been 74 new SLA alleles, including 18 SLA-1 alleles, 11 SLA-2 alleles, six SLA-3 alleles, two ...

  5. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci. PMID:21542922

  6. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Transporters.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13355/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650446

  7. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Fabbro, Doriano; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13354/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650445

  8. PALM-COEIN Nomenclature for Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Deneris, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 30% of women will experience abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) during their life time. Previous terms defining AUB have been confusing and imprecisely applied. As a consequence, both clinical management and research on this common problem have been negatively impacted. In 2011, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Menstrual Disorders Group (FMDG) published PALM-COEIN, a new classification system for abnormal bleeding in the reproductive years. Terms such as menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, metrorrhagia, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, polymenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and uterine hemorrhage are no longer recommended. The PALM-COEIN system was developed to standardize nomenclature to describe the etiology and severity of AUB. A brief description of the PALM-COEIN nomenclature is presented as well as treatment options for each etiology. Clinicians will frequently encounter women with AUB and should report findings utilizing the PALM-COEIN system. PMID:26969858

  9. Nomenclature proposal to describe vocal fold motion impairment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Clark A; Mau, Ted; Remacle, Marc; Hess, Markus; Eckel, Hans E; Young, VyVy N; Hantzakos, Anastasios; Yung, Katherine C; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-08-01

    The terms used to describe vocal fold motion impairment are confusing and not standardized. This results in a failure to communicate accurately and to major limitations of interpreting research studies involving vocal fold impairment. We propose standard nomenclature for reporting vocal fold impairment. Overarching terms of vocal fold immobility and hypomobility are rigorously defined. This includes assessment techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria for determining vocal fold immobility and hypomobility. In addition, criteria for use of the following terms have been outlined in detail: vocal fold paralysis, vocal fold paresis, vocal fold immobility/hypomobility associated with mechanical impairment of the crico-arytenoid joint and vocal fold immobility/hypomobility related to laryngeal malignant disease. This represents the first rigorously defined vocal fold motion impairment nomenclature system. This provides detailed definitions to the terms vocal fold paralysis and vocal fold paresis. PMID:26036851

  10. Proteoglycan form and function: A comprehensive nomenclature of proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive classification of the proteoglycan gene families and respective protein cores. This updated nomenclature is based on three criteria: Cellular and subcellular location, overall gene/protein homology, and the utilization of specific protein modules within their respective protein cores. These three signatures were utilized to design four major classes of proteoglycans with distinct forms and functions: the intracellular, cell-surface, pericellular and extracellular proteoglycans. The proposed nomenclature encompasses forty-three distinct proteoglycan-encoding genes and many alternatively-spliced variants. The biological functions of these four proteoglycan families are critically assessed in development, cancer and angiogenesis, and in various acquired and genetic diseases where their expression is aberrant. PMID:25701227

  11. States of confusion: Jurisdictional variation in Australian medicines nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Hope, Denise; King, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    In December 2000, the Galbally Review recommended Australia achieve national uniformity in drugs and poisons legislation. While the Commonwealth Poisons Standard classifies and schedules medicines and poisons, the Australian States and Territories are responsible for regulating the supply of medicines and poisons through individual medicines legislation. In December 2013, this legislation was examined to identify the nomenclature used to describe medicines. The research found considerable variation across jurisdictions in terms of the nomenclature used, in particular the terms used for Schedules in the State and Territory legislation were often inconsistent with each other and the terms used in the Poisons Standard. Of most concern is that the same term may be used to describe different medicines in different jurisdictions, leading to possible confusion for health practitioners working across jurisdictions as is now possible under national registration. It is therefore imperative that national uniformity of drugs and poisons legislation is achieved to facilitate a common practice reference. PMID:26349380

  12. The Naming of Names: Guidelines for Gene Nomenclature in Marchantia.

    PubMed

    Bowman, John L; Araki, Takashi; Arteaga-Vazquez, Mario A; Berger, Frederic; Dolan, Liam; Haseloff, Jim; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kyozuka, Junko; Lin, Shih-Shun; Nagasaki, Hideki; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Keiji; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Sawa, Shinichiro; Shimamura, Masaki; Solano, Roberto; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Ueda, Takashi; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Zachgo, Sabine; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    While Marchantia polymorpha has been utilized as a model system to investigate fundamental biological questions for over almost two centuries, there is renewed interest in M. polymorpha as a model genetic organism in the genomics era. Here we outline community guidelines for M. polymorpha gene and transgene nomenclature, and we anticipate that these guidelines will promote consistency and reduce both redundancy and confusion in the scientific literature. PMID:26644462

  13. The Naming of Names: Guidelines for Gene Nomenclature in Marchantia

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, John L.; Araki, Takashi; Arteaga-Vazquez, Mario A.; Berger, Frederic; Dolan, Liam; Haseloff, Jim; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kyozuka, Junko; Lin, Shih-Shun; Nagasaki, Hideki; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Keiji; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Sawa, Shinichiro; Shimamura, Masaki; Solano, Roberto; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Ueda, Takashi; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Yamato, Katsuyuki T.; Zachgo, Sabine; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    While Marchantia polymorpha has been utilized as a model system to investigate fundamental biological questions for over almost two centuries, there is renewed interest in M. polymorpha as a model genetic organism in the genomics era. Here we outline community guidelines for M. polymorpha gene and transgene nomenclature, and we anticipate that these guidelines will promote consistency and reduce both redundancy and confusion in the scientific literature. PMID:26644462

  14. Standardizing the nomenclature of Martian impact crater ejecta morphologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Boyce, Joseph M.; Costard, Francois M.; Craddock, Robert A.; Garvin, James B.; Sakimoto, Susan E.H.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Roddy, David J.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Crater Morphology Consortium recommends the use of a standardized nomenclature system when discussing Martian impact crater ejecta morphologies. The system utilizes nongenetic descriptors to identify the various ejecta morphologies seen on Mars. This system is designed to facilitate communication and collaboration between researchers. Crater morphology databases will be archived through the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, where a comprehensive catalog of Martian crater morphologic information will be maintained.

  15. On the Prepuna biogeographic province: A nomenclatural clarification.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Juan J; Ezcurra, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The nomenclatural status of the Prepuna province sensu Cabrera (1951) and sensu Morrone (1999) is clarified. The Prepuna province sensu Cabrera (1951) is demoted to a district of the Monte province, stat. nov. The valid name of the Prepuna province sensu Morrone (1999) is Cuyan High Andean province Cabrera, 1971, stat. nov. Diagnoses of these areas are provided and their endemic taxa are listed. PMID:27395671

  16. Development of lunar nomenclature. [conference of international scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzel, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    A system of unification and standardization for lunar nomenclature was developed. The following recommendations were made for use in future lunar cartography: (1) satellite craters, previously designated by letters will be named; (2) names will no longer be restricted to scientists, but will also include great contributors to human knowledge and human culture; and (3) a system of grids for dividing the moon into 144 regions and subdividing these regions into 2304 provinces will be used.

  17. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  18. The Melbourne Code Appendices: announcing a new approach for tracking nomenclatural decisions and a analysis of the history of nomenclatural proposals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly expanded digital resource exists for tracking decisions on all nomenclature proposals potentially contributing to Appendices II-VIII of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants. This resource originated with the Smithsonian Institution's Proposals and Disposals web...

  19. Toward a consensus nomenclature for insect neuropeptides and peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Coast, Geoffrey M; Schooley, David A

    2011-03-01

    The nomenclature currently in use for insect neuropeptide and peptide hormone families is reviewed and suggestions are made as to how it can be rationalized. Based upon this review, a number of conventions are advanced as a guide to a more rationale nomenclature. The scheme that is put forward builds upon the binomial nomenclature scheme proposed by Raina and Gäde in 1988, when just over 20 insect neuropeptides had been identified. Known neuropeptides and peptide hormones are assigned to 32 structurally distinct families, frequently with overlapping functions. The names given to these families are those that are currently in use, and describe a biological function, homology to known invertebrate/vertebrate peptides, or a conserved structural motif. Interspecific isoforms are identified using a five-letter code to indicate genus and species names, and intraspecific isoforms are identified by Roman or Arabic numerals, with the latter used to signify the order in which sequences are encoded on a prepropeptide. The proposed scheme is sufficiently flexible to allow the incorporation of novel peptides, and could be extended to other arthropods and non-arthropod invertebrates. PMID:21093513

  20. “Pseudo” Nomenclature in Dermatology: What's in a Name?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In the bewildering array of scientific nomenclature in the medical field, it is important to use correct terminology, know their aberrations and the reason behind a specific terminology. This paper is an attempt towards compiling all the pseudo-nomenclatures coined in dermatology, in order to make it easier to retain and recollect these pseudo names, signs, morphology, diseases, and conditions. It is also imperative to know the true entities that these pseudo names masquerade as, so as to understand the explanation for assigning the term ‘pseudo’ to these conditions. A total of 52 pseudo-terms have been compiled here in reference to dermatology. Most of these pseudo-nomenclatures were coined due to some clinical or histopathological resemblance to the true conditions, while some were premature conclusions drawn from a flawed understanding of the basic nature of the condition. Clear understanding of each of these terms and the explanation behind them being pseudo will enable a dermatologist to avoid misdiagnosis and needless confusion. PMID:24082182

  1. A standardized nomenclature for craniofacial and facial anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Caple, Jodi; Stephan, Carl N

    2016-05-01

    Standardized terms and methods have long been recognized as crucial to reduce measurement error and increase reliability in anthropometry. The successful prior use of craniometric landmarks makes extrapolation of these landmarks to the soft tissue context, as analogs, intuitive for forensic craniofacial analyses and facial photogrammetry. However, this extrapolation has not, so far, been systematic. Instead, varied nomenclature and definitions exist for facial landmarks, and photographic analyses are complicated by the generalization of 3D craniometric landmarks to the 2D face space where analogy is subsequently often lost, complicating anatomical assessments. For example, landmarks requiring palpation of the skull or the examination of the 3D surface typology are impossible to legitimately position; similar applies to median landmarks not visible in lateral photographs. To redress these issues without disposing of the craniometric framework that underpins many facial landmarks, we provide an updated and transparent nomenclature for facial description. This nomenclature maintains the original craniometric intent (and base abbreviations) but provides clear distinction of ill-defined (quasi) landmarks in photographic contexts, as produced when anatomical points are subjectively inferred from shape-from-shading information alone. PMID:26662189

  2. Developing a community-based genetic nomenclature for anole lizards

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Comparative studies of amniotes have been hindered by a dearth of reptilian molecular sequences. With the genomic assembly of the green anole, Anolis carolinensis available, non-avian reptilian genes can now be compared to mammalian, avian, and amphibian homologs. Furthermore, with more than 350 extant species in the genus Anolis, anoles are an unparalleled example of tetrapod genetic diversity and divergence. As an important ecological, genetic and now genomic reference, it is imperative to develop a standardized Anolis gene nomenclature alongside associated vocabularies and other useful metrics. Results Here we report the formation of the Anolis Gene Nomenclature Committee (AGNC) and propose a standardized evolutionary characterization code that will help researchers to define gene orthology and paralogy with tetrapod homologs, provide a system for naming novel genes in Anolis and other reptiles, furnish abbreviations to facilitate comparative studies among the Anolis species and related iguanid squamates, and classify the geographical origins of Anolis subpopulations. Conclusions This report has been generated in close consultation with members of the Anolis and genomic research communities, and using public database resources including NCBI and Ensembl. Updates will continue to be regularly posted to new research community websites such as lizardbase. We anticipate that this standardized gene nomenclature will facilitate the accessibility of reptilian sequences for comparative studies among tetrapods and will further serve as a template for other communities in their sequencing and annotation initiatives. PMID:22077994

  3. A reassessment of the nomenclature of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Maervoet, Johan; Covaci, Adrian; Schepens, Paul; Sandau, Courtney D; Letcher, Robert J

    2004-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a widespread class of persistent organic chemicals that accumulate in the environment and humans and are associated with a broad spectrum of health effects. PCB biotransformation has been shown to lead to two classes of PCB metabolites that are present as contaminant residues in the tissues of selected biota: hydroxylated (HO) and methyl sulfone (MeSO2) PCBs. Although these two types of metabolites are related structures, different rules for abbreviation of both classes have emerged. It is important that a standardized nomenclature for the notation of PCB metabolites be universally agreed upon. We suggest that the full chemical name of the PCB metabolite and a shorthand notation should be adopted using the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's chemical name/original Ballschmiter and Zell number of the parent congener, followed by the assignment of the phenyl ring position number of the MeSO2- or HO-substituent. This nomenclature provides a clear, unequivocal set of rules in naming and abbreviating the PCB metabolite structure. Furthermore, this unified PCB metabolite nomenclature approach can be extended to the naming and abbreviation of potential metabolites of structurally analogous contaminants such as HO-polybrominated biphenyls and HO-polybrominated diphenyl ethers. PMID:14998742

  4. Patient Safety in Medication Nomenclature: Orthographic and Semantic Properties of International Nonproprietary Names

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Rachel; Aronson, Jeffrey K.; ten Hacken, Pius; Williams, Alison; Jordan, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Background Confusion between look-alike and sound-alike (LASA) medication names (such as mercaptamine and mercaptopurine) accounts for up to one in four medication errors, threatening patient safety. Error reduction strategies include computerized physician order entry interventions, and ‘Tall Man’ lettering. The purpose of this study is to explore the medication name designation process, to elucidate properties that may prime the risk of confusion. Methods and Findings We analysed the formal and semantic properties of 7,987 International Non-proprietary Names (INNs), in relation to naming guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO) INN programme, and have identified potential for errors. We explored: their linguistic properties, the underlying taxonomy of stems to indicate pharmacological interrelationships, and similarities between INNs. We used Microsoft Excel for analysis, including calculation of Levenshtein edit distance (LED). Compliance with WHO naming guidelines was inconsistent. Since the 1970s there has been a trend towards compliance in formal properties, such as word length, but longer names published in the 1950s and 1960s are still in use. The stems used to show pharmacological interrelationships are not spelled consistently and the guidelines do not impose an unequivocal order on them, making the meanings of INNs difficult to understand. Pairs of INNs sharing a stem (appropriately or not) often have high levels of similarity (<5 LED), and thus have greater potential for confusion. Conclusions We have revealed a tension between WHO guidelines stipulating use of stems to denote meaning, and the aim of reducing similarities in nomenclature. To mitigate this tension and reduce the risk of confusion, the stem system should be made clear and well ordered, so as to avoid compounding the risk of confusion at the clinical level. The interplay between the different WHO INN naming principles should be further examined, to better understand their

  5. The nomenclature of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids and derivatives: evolution of the code system.

    PubMed

    Drabowicz, Józef; Jakubowski, Hieronim; Kudzin, Marcin H; Kudzin, Zbigniew H

    2015-01-01

    The approach for the unification of published proposals for the nomenclature and abbreviations of aminoalkylphosphonic acids and their derivatives is presented. Their modification was made on the basis of the IUPAC-IUB rules concerning the nomenclature and code system of proteinogenic amino acids. Our present proposal formulates the supplementary code and nomenclature system allowing unambiguous description of phosphonic analogs of proteinogenic amino acids, their analogs, homologs, metabolites, and derivatives including phosphonopeptides. PMID:25730210

  6. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Davenport, Anthony P; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13348/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650439

  7. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Cidlowski, John A; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13352/full. Nuclear hormone receptors are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650443

  8. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Catterall, William A; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13350/full. Voltage-gated ion channels are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650441

  9. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Other ion channels.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13351/full. Other ion channels are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650442

  10. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Ligand-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Peters, John A; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13349/full. Ligand-gated ion channels are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650440

  11. Recommended nomenclature for the vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase gene family.

    PubMed

    Duester, G; Farrés, J; Felder, M R; Holmes, R S; Höög, J O; Parés, X; Plapp, B V; Yin, S J; Jörnvall, H

    1999-08-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family encodes enzymes that metabolize a wide variety of substrates, including ethanol, retinol, other aliphatic alcohols, hydroxysteroids, and lipid peroxidation products. Studies on 19 vertebrate animals have identified ADH orthologs across several species, and this has now led to questions of how best to name ADH proteins and genes. Seven distinct classes of vertebrate ADH encoded by non-orthologous genes have been defined based upon sequence homology as well as unique catalytic properties or gene expression patterns. Each class of vertebrate ADH shares <70% sequence identity with other classes of ADH in the same species. Classes may be further divided into multiple closely related isoenzymes sharing >80% sequence identity such as the case for class I ADH where humans have three class I ADH genes, horses have two, and mice have only one. Presented here is a nomenclature that uses the widely accepted vertebrate ADH class system as its basis. It follows the guidelines of human and mouse gene nomenclature committees, which recommend coordinating names across species boundaries and eliminating Roman numerals and Greek symbols. We recommend that enzyme subunits be referred to by the symbol "ADH" (alcohol dehydrogenase) followed by an Arabic number denoting the class; i.e. ADH1 for class I ADH. For genes we recommend the italicized root symbol "ADH" for human and "Adh" for mouse, followed by the appropriate Arabic number for the class; i.e. ADH1 or Adh1 for class I ADH genes. For organisms where multiple species-specific isoenzymes exist within a class, we recommend adding a capital letter after the Arabic number; i.e. ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C for human alpha, beta, and gamma class I ADHs, respectively. This nomenclature will accommodate newly discovered members of the vertebrate ADH family, and will facilitate functional and evolutionary studies. PMID:10424757

  12. Nomenclature for alleles of the thiopurine methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Appell, Malin L; Berg, Jonathan; Duley, John; Evans, William E; Kennedy, Martin A; Lennard, Lynne; Marinaki, Tony; McLeod, Howard L; Relling, Mary V; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Weinshilboum, Richard; Yeoh, Allen E J; McDonagh, Ellen M; Hebert, Joan M; Klein, Teri E; Coulthard, Sally A

    2013-04-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) has become one of the best examples of pharmacogenomics to be translated into routine clinical practice. TPMT metabolizes the thiopurines 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, and azathioprine, drugs that are widely used for treatment of acute leukemias, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other disorders of immune regulation. Since the discovery of genetic polymorphisms in the TPMT gene, many sequence variants that cause a decreased enzyme activity have been identified and characterized. Increasingly, to optimize dose, pretreatment determination of TPMT status before commencing thiopurine therapy is now routine in many countries. Novel TPMT sequence variants are currently numbered sequentially using PubMed as a source of information; however, this has caused some problems as exemplified by two instances in which authors' articles appeared on PubMed at the same time, resulting in the same allele numbers given to different polymorphisms. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish an order and consensus to the numbering of known and novel TPMT sequence variants. To address this problem, a TPMT nomenclature committee was formed in 2010, to define the nomenclature and numbering of novel variants for the TPMT gene. A website (http://www.imh.liu.se/tpmtalleles) serves as a platform for this work. Researchers are encouraged to submit novel TPMT alleles to the committee for designation and reservation of unique allele numbers. The committee has decided to renumber two alleles: nucleotide position 106 (G>A) from TPMT*24 to TPMT*30 and position 611 (T>C, rs79901429) from TPMT*28 to TPMT*31. Nomenclature for all other known alleles remains unchanged. PMID:23407052

  13. Clarification and changes in Permian stratigraphic nomenclature in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawin, R.S.; Franseen, E.K.; West, R.R.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Watney, W.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines Permian nomenclature changes to Zeller (1968) that have been adopted by the Kansas Geological Survey. The Permian System/ Period, Cisuralian Series/Epoch, and Asselian Stage/Age are established at the base of the Bennett Shale Member of the Red Eagle Limestone. Series/epoch names Wolfcampian, Leonardian, and Guadalupian are retained and usage of Gearyan, Cimarronian, and Custerian is abandoned. The repositioned Carboniferous-Permian boundary divides the Council Grove Group into Carboniferous (Upper Pennsylvanian Series/Epoch; Virgilian Stage/Age) and Permian (Wolfcampian Series Epoch) segments.

  14. Basics of compounding sterile preparations: nomenclature and considerations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on sterile dosage forms and serves as a review for those trained in compounding sterile preparations, as well as to educate those that have not received any formal training on the topics of nomenclature and composition. The use of proper terminology is important for proper/accurate communications among healthcare practitioners. Proper terminology also has potential legal/liability implications. In addition to terminology considerations, it is important to be aware of the different routes of administration of sterile formulations and their different compositions and uses. PMID:25474860

  15. The new Martian nomenclature of the international Astronomical Union

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de, Vaucouleur G.; Blunck, J.; Davies, M.; Dollfus, A.; Koval, I.K.; Kuiper, G.P.; Masursky, H.; Miyamoto, S.; Moroz, V.I.; Sagan, C.; Smith, B.

    1975-01-01

    A new nomenclature for Martian regions and topographic features uncovered by Mariner 9, as officially adopted by the International Astronomical Union, is described. About 180 craters, generally of diameters >100 km, have been named, as well as 13 classes of topographic features designated catena, chasma, dorsum, fossa, labyrinthus, mensa, mons, patera, planitia, planum, tholus, vallis, and vastitas. In addition seven craters and the Kepler Dorsum are named on Phobos, and two craters on Deimos. Coordinates and maps of each named features are displayed. ?? 1975.

  16. Nomenclatural benchmarking: the roles of digital typification and telemicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Quentin; Bourgoin, Thierry; Coddington, Jonathan; Gostony, Timothy; Hamilton, Andrew; Larimer, Roy; Polaszek, Andrew; Schauff, Michael; Solis, M. Alma

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nomenclatural benchmarking is the periodic realignment of species names with species theories and is necessary for the accurate and uniform use of Linnaean binominals in the face of changing species limits. Gaining access to types, often for little more than a cursory examination by an expert, is a major bottleneck in the advance and availability of biodiversity informatics. For the nearly two million described species it has been estimated that five to six million name-bearing type specimens exist, including those for synonymized binominals. Recognizing that examination of types in person will remain necessary in special cases, we propose a four-part strategy for opening access to types that relies heavily on digitization and that would eliminate much of the bottleneck: (1) modify codes of nomenclature to create registries of nomenclatural acts, such as the proposed ZooBank, that include a requirement for digital representations (e-types) for all newly described species to avoid adding to backlog; (2) an “r” strategy that would engineer and deploy a network of automated instruments capable of rapidly creating 3-D images of type specimens not requiring participation of taxon experts; (3) a “K” strategy using remotely operable microscopes to engage taxon experts in targeting and annotating informative characters of types to supplement and extend information content of rapidly acquired e-types, a process that can be done on an as-needed basis as in the normal course of revisionary taxonomy; and (4) creation of a global e-type archive associated with the commissions on nomenclature and species registries providing one-stop-shopping for e-types. We describe a first generation implementation of the “K” strategy that adapts current technology to create a network of Remotely Operable Benchmarkers Of Types (ROBOT) specifically engineered to handle the largest backlog of types, pinned insect specimens. The three initial instruments will be in the

  17. Principles of Safety Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, M K; Authier, S; Curtis, M J

    2008-01-01

    Safety Pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline that uses the basic principles of pharmacology in a regulatory-driven process to generate data to inform risk/benefit assessment. The aim of Safety Pharmacology is to characterize the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) relationship of a drug's adverse effects using continuously evolving methodology. Unlike toxicology, Safety Pharmacology includes within its remit a regulatory requirement to predict the risk of rare lethal events. This gives Safety Pharmacology its unique character. The key issues for Safety Pharmacology are detection of an adverse effect liability, projection of the data into safety margin calculation and finally clinical safety monitoring. This article sets out to explain the drivers for Safety Pharmacology so that the wider pharmacology community is better placed to understand the discipline. It concludes with a summary of principles that may help inform future resolution of unmet needs (especially establishing model validation for accurate risk assessment). Subsequent articles in this issue of the journal address specific aspects of Safety Pharmacology to explore the issues of model choice, the burden of proof and to highlight areas of intensive activity (such as testing for drug-induced rare event liability, and the challenge of testing the safety of so-called biologics (antibodies, gene therapy and so on.). PMID:18604233

  18. Studies in neuroendocrine pharmacology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maickel, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The expertise and facilities available within the Medical Sciences Program section on Pharmacology were used along with informational input from various NASA sources to study areas relevant to the manned space effort. Topics discussed include effects of drugs on deprivation-induced fluid consumption, brain biogenic amines, biochemical responses to stressful stimuli, biochemical and behavioral pharmacology of amphetamines, biochemical and pharmacological studies of analogues to biologically active indole compounds, chemical pharmacology: drug metabolism and disposition, toxicology, and chemical methodology. Appendices include a bibliography, and papers submitted for publication or already published.

  19. Online registry for mutations in hereditary amyloidosis including nomenclature recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rowczenio, Dorota M; Noor, Islam; Gillmore, Julian D; Lachmann, Helen J; Whelan, Carol; Hawkins, Philip N; Obici, Laura; Westermark, Per; Grateau, Gilles; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D

    2014-09-01

    Hereditary systemic amyloidosis comprises a group of rare monogenic diseases inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. It is associated with mutations in genes encoding eight different proteins, including transthyretin, apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein AII, lysozyme, fibrinogen A α-chain, cystatin C, gelsolin and beta-2-microglobulin. With support from the EU FP6 EURAMY project we have designed an online registry of genes and mutations in hereditary amyloidosis including their associated clinical phenotypes, with a view to having a single free online portal for the collection and distribution of this information. Users can search the registry by either mutation, phenotype or authors who have published or submitted mutations. It provides a submission form for reporting newly identified mutations. We also wanted to introduce nomenclature which complies with recommendations set out by Human Genome Variation Society and HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for description of new and known genetic variants. We hope this registry would be a useful and convenient tool for the medical and scientific community. PMID:25044787

  20. Appropriate stratigraphic nomenclature for coal reservoirs in Piceance basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.

    1985-05-01

    Coal-bearing intervals occurring within the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Piceance basin have been described by various authors. The most current and widely accepted work has the Sego, Corcoran, Cozzette, and Rollins Sandstone Members comprising the Iles Formation. The overlying Williams Fork Formation is divided into the basal Bowie Shale Member and Paonia Shale Member, with the upper remaining section undifferentiated. Coal seams associated with the Iles Formation belong to the Black Diamond coal group. The Fairfield coal group and the South Canon coal group are part of the Bowie Shale Member. These two coal groups, continuous throughout the basin, are also called the Sommerset coals in the Sommerset coal field and the Cameo coal measures in the Grand Mesa coal field. Although priority of nomenclature dictates otherwise, established usage of the Cameo coals for coal seams in the Bowie Shale Member should be continued as the most appropriate nomenclature. The basal coal seam of the proposed Cameo coal group is laterally continuous throughout the Piceance basin. A second coal seam 40-120 ft (12-37 m) above the basal coal also has large areal extent. Both coal seams, as existing and potential future pay zones, are of significant economic importance and should, in ascending order, be classified as the Cameo coal A and D seams. The coal seams in the Paonia Shale Member, extremely variable in thickness, continuity, and quality, have been established as the Coal Ridge coal group.

  1. A Need for Logical and Consistent Anatomical Nomenclature for Cutaneous Nerves of the Limbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gest, Thomas R.; Burkel, William E.; Cortright, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    The system of anatomical nomenclature needs to be logical and consistent. However, variations in translation to English of the Latin and Greek terminology used in Nomina Anatomica and Terminologia Anatomica have led to some inconsistency in the nomenclature of cutaneous nerves in the limbs. An historical review of cutaneous nerve nomenclature…

  2. The foundation of the Melbourne Code Appendices: Announcing a new paradigm for tracking nomenclatural decisions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new expanded digital resource exists for tracking decisions on all nomenclature proposals potentially contributing to Appendices II-VIII of the International Code of Nomenclature. This system owes its origins to the Smithsonian Institution's Proposals and Disposals website created by Dan Nicolson ...

  3. 26 CFR 1.338-2 - Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. 1.338-2 Section 1.338-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. (a) Scope. This section prescribes...

  4. 26 CFR 1.338-2 - Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. 1.338-2 Section 1.338-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. (a) Scope. This section prescribes...

  5. 26 CFR 1.338-2 - Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. 1.338-2 Section 1.338-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. (a) Scope. This section prescribes...

  6. Curriculum Guidelines for Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacology embraces the physical and chemical properties of drugs; the preparation of pharmaceutical agents; the absorption, fate, and excretion of drugs; and the effects of drugs on living systems. These guidelines represent a consensus on what would constitute a minimally acceptable pharmacology course for predoctoral dental students. (MLW)

  7. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  8. Pharmacology for the Psychotherapist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Myron Michael

    This book covers those areas of pharmacology that are of importance and interest to the psychotherapist. The 1st chapter introduces the various types of drugs. The 2nd chapter presents an overview of pharmacology and its principles. The 3rd chapter reviews aspects of the human body of importance to understanding the workings of psychotropic drugs.…

  9. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  10. Integrating pharmacology and clinical pharmacology in universities.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Julia C

    2012-06-01

    Continuing development of safe and effective new medicines is critically important for global health, social prosperity and the economy. The drug discovery-development pipeline depends critically on close partnerships between scientists and clinicians and on educational programmes that ensure that the pharmacological workforce, in its broadest sense, is fit for purpose. Here I consider factors that have influenced the development of basic and clinical pharmacology in UK universities over the past 40 years and discuss ways in which basic pharmacologists, clinical pharmacologists and scientists from different disciplines can work together effectively, while retaining their professional identities and fostering developments in their disciplines. Specifically, I propose the establishment of Institutes of Drug Discovery and Development, whose activities could include development and implementation of a translational pharmacology research strategy, drawing on the collective expertise of the membership and the university as whole; provision of a forum for regular seminars and symposia to promote the discipline, encourage collaboration and develop a cohesive community; provision of a research advisory service, covering, for example, data management, applications for ethics permission, clinical trials design, statistics and regulatory affairs; liaison with potential funders and leadership of major funding bids, including funding for doctoral training; provision of advice on intellectual property protection and the commercialization of research; liaison with corporate partners to facilitate collaboration, knowledge transfer and effective translation; and leadership of undergraduate and postgraduate education in basic and clinical pharmacology and related sciences for medical and science students, including continuing professional development and transferable skills. PMID:22360628

  11. Integrating pharmacology and clinical pharmacology in universities

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Julia C

    2012-01-01

    Continuing development of safe and effective new medicines is critically important for global health, social prosperity and the economy. The drug discovery–development pipeline depends critically on close partnerships between scientists and clinicians and on educational programmes that ensure that the pharmacological workforce, in its broadest sense, is fit for purpose. Here I consider factors that have influenced the development of basic and clinical pharmacology in UK universities over the past 40 years and discuss ways in which basic pharmacologists, clinical pharmacologists and scientists from different disciplines can work together effectively, while retaining their professional identities and fostering developments in their disciplines. Specifically, I propose the establishment of Institutes of Drug Discovery and Development, whose activities could include development and implementation of a translational pharmacology research strategy, drawing on the collective expertise of the membership and the university as whole; provision of a forum for regular seminars and symposia to promote the discipline, encourage collaboration and develop a cohesive community; provision of a research advisory service, covering, for example, data management, applications for ethics permission, clinical trials design, statistics and regulatory affairs; liaison with potential funders and leadership of major funding bids, including funding for doctoral training; provision of advice on intellectual property protection and the commercialization of research; liaison with corporate partners to facilitate collaboration, knowledge transfer and effective translation; and leadership of undergraduate and postgraduate education in basic and clinical pharmacology and related sciences for medical and science students, including continuing professional development and transferable skills. PMID:22360628

  12. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24517644

  13. Disharmony of the spheres: Recent trends in planetary surface nomenclature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Inadvisable departures from tradition in naming newly mapped features on Mars, Mercury, and the Moon have been implemented and proposed since 1970. Functional need for place names also has become confused with cartographic convenience. Much of the resulting new nomenclature is neither unique, efficient, nor imaginative. The longstanding classical orientation in Solar System geography needs to be firmly reasserted. The Ma??dler scheme for designating smaller craters on the Moon should be retained and extended to the farside. Names of surface features on other bodies might best reflect the traditional connotations of planet and satellite names: for example, most crates on Mars would be named for mythical heroes and military personalities in ancient history, craters on Mercury might commemorate explorers or commercial luminaries, and features on Venus would bear the names of famous women. ?? 1976.

  14. Allergic reactions following contrast material administration: nomenclature, classification, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Comment, Lionel; Mangin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    In forensic pathology routine, fatal cases of contrast agent exposure can be occasionally encountered. In such situations, beyond the difficulties inherent in establishing the cause of death due to nonspecific or absent autopsy and histology findings as well as limited laboratory investigations, pathologists may face other problems in formulating exhaustive, complete reports, and conclusions that are scientifically accurate. Indeed, terminology concerning adverse drug reactions and allergy nomenclature is confusing. Some terms, still utilized in forensic and radiological reports, are outdated and should be avoided. Additionally, not all forensic pathologists master contrast material classification and pathogenesis of contrast agent reactions. We present a review of the literature covering allergic reactions to contrast material exposure in order to update used terminology, explain the pathophysiology, and list currently available laboratory investigations for diagnosis in the forensic setting. PMID:24061700

  15. Disharmony of the spheres - Recent trends in planetary surface nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Inadvisable departures from tradition in naming newly mapped features on Mars, Mercury, and the moon have been implemented and proposed since 1970. Functional need for place names also has become confused with cartographic convenience. Much of the resulting new nomenclature is neither unique, efficient, nor imaginative. The long-standing classical orientation in Solar System geography needs to be firmly reasserted. The Maedler scheme for designating smaller craters on the moon should be retained and extended to the farside. Names of surface features on other bodies might best reflect the traditional connotations of planet and satellite names: for example, most craters on Mars would be named for mythical heroes and military personalities in ancient history, craters on Mercury might commemorate explorers or commercial luminaries, and features on Venus would bear the names of famous women.

  16. Indices of Regional Brain Atrophy: Formulae and Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of brain atrophy helps to discriminate normal age-related changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Albeit indices of regional brain atrophy have proven to be a parameter useful in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of some neurodegenerative diseases, indices of absolute regional atrophy still have some important limitations. We propose using indices of relative atrophy for representing how the volume of a given region of interest (ROI) changes over time in comparison to changes in global brain measures over the same time. A second problem in morphometric studies is terminology. There is a lack of systematization naming indices and the same measure can be named with different terms by different research groups or imaging softwares. This limits the understanding and discussion of studies. In this technological report, we provide a general description on how to compute indices of absolute and relative regional brain atrophy and propose a standardized nomenclature. PMID:26261753

  17. Macrophage activation and polarization: nomenclature and experimental guidelines.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J; Allen, Judith E; Biswas, Subhra K; Fisher, Edward A; Gilroy, Derek W; Goerdt, Sergij; Gordon, Siamon; Hamilton, John A; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Lawrence, Toby; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Martinez, Fernando O; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mosser, David M; Natoli, Gioacchino; Saeij, Jeroen P; Schultze, Joachim L; Shirey, Kari Ann; Sica, Antonio; Suttles, Jill; Udalova, Irina; van Ginderachter, Jo A; Vogel, Stefanie N; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-07-17

    Description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing. Like the biblical Tower of Babel, macrophage activation encompasses a panoply of descriptors used in different ways. The lack of consensus on how to define macrophage activation in experiments in vitro and in vivo impedes progress in multiple ways, including the fact that many researchers still consider there to be only two types of activated macrophages, often termed M1 and M2. Here, we describe a set of standards encompassing three principles-the source of macrophages, definition of the activators, and a consensus collection of markers to describe macrophage activation-with the goal of unifying experimental standards for diverse experimental scenarios. Collectively, we propose a common framework for macrophage-activation nomenclature. PMID:25035950

  18. Foreign Language Translation of Chemical Nomenclature by Computer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chemical compound names remain the primary method for conveying molecular structures between chemists and researchers. In research articles, patents, chemical catalogues, government legislation, and textbooks, the use of IUPAC and traditional compound names is universal, despite efforts to introduce more machine-friendly representations such as identifiers and line notations. Fortunately, advances in computing power now allow chemical names to be parsed and generated (read and written) with almost the same ease as conventional connection tables. A significant complication, however, is that although the vast majority of chemistry uses English nomenclature, a significant fraction is in other languages. This complicates the task of filing and analyzing chemical patents, purchasing from compound vendors, and text mining research articles or Web pages. We describe some issues with manipulating chemical names in various languages, including British, American, German, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, and Hungarian, and describe the current state-of-the-art in software tools to simplify the process. PMID:19239237

  19. Geometric nomenclature and classification of RNA base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Leontis, N B; Westhof, E

    2001-01-01

    Non-Watson-Crick base pairs mediate specific interactions responsible for RNA-RNA self-assembly and RNA-protein recognition. An unambiguous and descriptive nomenclature with well-defined and nonoverlapping parameters is needed to communicate concisely structural information about RNA base pairs. The definitions should reflect underlying molecular structures and interactions and, thus, facilitate automated annotation, classification, and comparison of new RNA structures. We propose a classification based on the observation that the planar edge-to-edge, hydrogen-bonding interactions between RNA bases involve one of three distinct edges: the Watson-Crick edge, the Hoogsteen edge, and the Sugar edge (which includes the 2'-OH and which has also been referred to as the Shallow-groove edge). Bases can interact in either of two orientations with respect to the glycosidic bonds, cis or trans relative to the hydrogen bonds. This gives rise to 12 basic geometric types with at least two H bonds connecting the bases. For each geometric type, the relative orientations of the strands can be easily deduced. High-resolution examples of 11 of the 12 geometries are presently available. Bifurcated pairs, in which a single exocyclic carbonyl or amino group of one base directly contacts the edge of a second base, and water-inserted pairs, in which single functional groups on each base interact directly, are intermediate between two of the standard geometries. The nomenclature facilitates the recognition of isosteric relationships among base pairs within each geometry, and thus facilitates the recognition of recurrent three-dimensional motifs from comparison of homologous sequences. Graphical conventions are proposed for displaying non-Watson-Crick interactions on a secondary structure diagram. The utility of the classification in homology modeling of RNA tertiary motifs is illustrated. PMID:11345429

  20. Clinical pharmacology of bimatoprost.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Louis B

    2005-06-01

    Bimatoprost (Lumigan), Allergan) is a highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent that provides good diurnal control of intraocular pressure in glaucoma and ocular hypertensive patients. Bimatoprost is a synthetic molecule that is structurally and pharmacologically similar to prostamide F(2), and appears to mimic the activity of the prostamides. Consistent with prostamide-mimetic activity, bimatoprost has potent inherent pharmacological activity in prostamide-sensitive preparations and essentially remains intact in the living primate eye. This is sufficient to explain its potent and efficacious ocular hypotensive activity, and suggests that bimatoprost is a pharmacologically unique compound. PMID:16922657

  1. How to use the IUPHAR receptor database to navigate pharmacological data.

    PubMed

    Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P; Sharman, Joanna L; Harmar, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    Today's data-intensive, interdisciplinary research challenges scientists to keep up to date with key experimental techniques and tools reported in the literature. The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Database (IUPHAR-DB) goes some way to addressing this need by providing expert-curated information sourced from primary literature and displayed in a user-friendly manner online. The database provides a channel for the IUPHAR Nomenclature Committee (NC-IUPHAR) to provide recommendations on the nomenclature of receptors and ion channels, to document their properties and the ligands that are useful for receptor characterization. Here we describe IUPHAR-DB's main features and provide examples of techniques for navigating and exploring the information. The database is freely available online at http://www.iuphar-db.org/. PMID:22674159

  2. Community intelligence in knowledge curation: an application to managing scientific nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lin; Xu, Chao; Tian, Ming; Sang, Jian; Zou, Dong; Li, Ang; Liu, Guocheng; Chen, Fei; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Wang, Xumin; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing community intelligence in knowledge curation bears significant promise in dealing with communication and education in the flood of scientific knowledge. As knowledge is accumulated at ever-faster rates, scientific nomenclature, a particular kind of knowledge, is concurrently generated in all kinds of fields. Since nomenclature is a system of terms used to name things in a particular discipline, accurate translation of scientific nomenclature in different languages is of critical importance, not only for communications and collaborations with English-speaking people, but also for knowledge dissemination among people in the non-English-speaking world, particularly young students and researchers. However, it lacks of accuracy and standardization when translating scientific nomenclature from English to other languages, especially for those languages that do not belong to the same language family as English. To address this issue, here we propose for the first time the application of community intelligence in scientific nomenclature management, namely, harnessing collective intelligence for translation of scientific nomenclature from English to other languages. As community intelligence applied to knowledge curation is primarily aided by wiki and Chinese is the native language for about one-fifth of the world's population, we put the proposed application into practice, by developing a wiki-based English-to-Chinese Scientific Nomenclature Dictionary (ESND; http://esnd.big.ac.cn). ESND is a wiki-based, publicly editable and open-content platform, exploiting the whole power of the scientific community in collectively and collaboratively managing scientific nomenclature. Based on community curation, ESND is capable of achieving accurate, standard, and comprehensive scientific nomenclature, demonstrating a valuable application of community intelligence in knowledge curation. PMID:23451119

  3. Community Intelligence in Knowledge Curation: An Application to Managing Scientific Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dong; Li, Ang; Liu, Guocheng; Chen, Fei; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Wang, Xumin; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing community intelligence in knowledge curation bears significant promise in dealing with communication and education in the flood of scientific knowledge. As knowledge is accumulated at ever-faster rates, scientific nomenclature, a particular kind of knowledge, is concurrently generated in all kinds of fields. Since nomenclature is a system of terms used to name things in a particular discipline, accurate translation of scientific nomenclature in different languages is of critical importance, not only for communications and collaborations with English-speaking people, but also for knowledge dissemination among people in the non-English-speaking world, particularly young students and researchers. However, it lacks of accuracy and standardization when translating scientific nomenclature from English to other languages, especially for those languages that do not belong to the same language family as English. To address this issue, here we propose for the first time the application of community intelligence in scientific nomenclature management, namely, harnessing collective intelligence for translation of scientific nomenclature from English to other languages. As community intelligence applied to knowledge curation is primarily aided by wiki and Chinese is the native language for about one-fifth of the world’s population, we put the proposed application into practice, by developing a wiki-based English-to-Chinese Scientific Nomenclature Dictionary (ESND; http://esnd.big.ac.cn). ESND is a wiki-based, publicly editable and open-content platform, exploiting the whole power of the scientific community in collectively and collaboratively managing scientific nomenclature. Based on community curation, ESND is capable of achieving accurate, standard, and comprehensive scientific nomenclature, demonstrating a valuable application of community intelligence in knowledge curation. PMID:23451119

  4. Stability or stasis in the names of organisms: the evolving codes of nomenclature.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Sandra; Lamas, Gerardo; Lughadha, Eimear Nic; Novarino, Gianfranco

    2004-01-01

    Nomenclature, far from being a dry dusty subject, is today more relevant than ever before. Researchers into genomics are discovering again the need for systems of nomenclature-names are what we use to communicate about organisms, and by extension the rest of their biology. Here, we briefly outline the history of the published international codes of nomenclature, tracing them from the time of Linnaeus in the eighteenth century to the present day. We then outline some of what we feel are the major challenges that face the codes in the twenty-first century; focusing primarily on publication, priority, typification and the role of science in the naming of organisms. We conclude that the codes are essential for taxonomists in the pursuance of their science, and that the democratic nature of decision-making in the regulation of the rules of nomenclature, though sometimes perceived as a potential weakness, is in fact one of its great strengths. PMID:15253348

  5. On the nomenclature of celestial objects - not to build the Tower of Babel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, S.

    In order to accumulate and retrieve data relating to celestial objects, it is essential to designate names of objects correctly. The recommendation by the IAU Working Group on the Nomenclature is described.

  6. Standardized nomenclatures: keys to continuity of care, nursing accountability and nursing effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Keenan, G; Aquilino, M L

    1998-01-01

    Standardized nursing nomenclatures must be included in clinical documentation systems to generate data that more accurately represent nursing practice than outcomes-related measures currently used to support important policy decisions. NANDA, NIC, and NOC--comprehensive nomenclatures for the needed variables of nursing diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes--are described. Added benefits of using NANDA, NIC, and NOC in everyday practice are outlined, including facilitation of the continuity of care of patients in integrated health systems. PMID:9582821

  7. North American Commission on Stratigraphic Nomenclature Note 66: records of Stratigraphic Commission, 2003-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Easton, Robert M.; Catuneanu, Octavian; Donovan, Art D.; Fluegeman, Richard H.; Hamblin, A.P.; Harper, Howard; Lasca, Norman P.; Morrow, Jared R.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Sadler, Peter; Scott, Robert W.; Tew, Berry H.

    2014-01-01

    Note 66 summarizes activities of the North American Commission on Stratigraphic Nomenclature (NACSN) from November 2003 to October 2013 and is condensed from the minutes of the NACSN’s 58th to 68th annual meetings1. The purposes of the Commission are to develop statements of stratigraphic principles,recommend procedures applicable to the classification and nomenclature of stratigraphic and related units, review problems in classifying and naming stratigraphic and related units, and formulate expressions of judgment on these matters.

  8. Describing Sequencing Results of Structural Chromosome Rearrangements with a Suggested Next-Generation Cytogenetic Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Ordulu, Zehra; Wong, Kristen E.; Currall, Benjamin B.; Ivanov, Andrew R.; Pereira, Shahrin; Althari, Sara; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    With recent rapid advances in genomic technologies, precise delineation of structural chromosome rearrangements at the nucleotide level is becoming increasingly feasible. In this era of “next-generation cytogenetics” (i.e., an integration of traditional cytogenetic techniques and next-generation sequencing), a consensus nomenclature is essential for accurate communication and data sharing. Currently, nomenclature for describing the sequencing data of these aberrations is lacking. Herein, we present a system called Next-Gen Cytogenetic Nomenclature, which is concordant with the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (2013). This system starts with the alignment of rearrangement sequences by BLAT or BLAST (alignment tools) and arrives at a concise and detailed description of chromosomal changes. To facilitate usage and implementation of this nomenclature, we are developing a program designated BLA(S)T Output Sequence Tool of Nomenclature (BOSToN), a demonstrative version of which is accessible online. A standardized characterization of structural chromosomal rearrangements is essential both for research analyses and for application in the clinical setting. PMID:24746958

  9. The Pharmacology of Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To provide students with a comprehensive, integrated presentation on the pharmacology of immuosuppression. Design Course content on the pharmacology of immunosuppression relating to organ transplantation and treatment of autoimmune disorders was presented in integrated sequence modules that included content from pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, and therapeutics. Weekly recitation sessions and active-learning exercises were incorporated to allow students to apply the information they learned to integrated patient cases and stimulate involvement and critical thinking. Fundamental material related to the components and functions of the immune system was presented to students early in curriculum with courses such as biochemistry, pathophysiology, and immunology/microbiology. Assessment Comprehensive examinations, in-class quizzes, written case submissions, case discussions, review exercises, and group exercises were used to assess student learning. Conclusion Students at South University received a comprehensive and detailed understanding of all aspects relating to immunosuppressive therapy. This was accomplished by integrating instruction on immunosuppressive therapy from various disciplines. PMID:20221337

  10. Phylogeny, identification and nomenclature of the genus Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Samson, R A; Visagie, C M; Houbraken, J; Hong, S-B; Hubka, V; Klaassen, C H W; Perrone, G; Seifert, K A; Susca, A; Tanney, J B; Varga, J; Kocsubé, S; Szigeti, G; Yaguchi, T; Frisvad, J C

    2014-06-01

    Aspergillus comprises a diverse group of species based on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic characters, which significantly impact biotechnology, food production, indoor environments and human health. Aspergillus was traditionally associated with nine teleomorph genera, but phylogenetic data suggest that together with genera such as Polypaecilum, Phialosimplex, Dichotomomyces and Cristaspora, Aspergillus forms a monophyletic clade closely related to Penicillium. Changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants resulted in the move to one name per species, meaning that a decision had to be made whether to keep Aspergillus as one big genus or to split it into several smaller genera. The International Commission of Penicillium and Aspergillus decided to keep Aspergillus instead of using smaller genera. In this paper, we present the arguments for this decision. We introduce new combinations for accepted species presently lacking an Aspergillus name and provide an updated accepted species list for the genus, now containing 339 species. To add to the scientific value of the list, we include information about living ex-type culture collection numbers and GenBank accession numbers for available representative ITS, calmodulin, β-tubulin and RPB2 sequences. In addition, we recommend a standard working technique for Aspergillus and propose calmodulin as a secondary identification marker. PMID:25492982

  11. Structural recognition and nomenclature standardization in forensic knot analysis.

    PubMed

    Chisnall, Robert Charles

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of knots during civil and criminal investigations is characterized by two fundamental challenges: the precise recognition of all structural nuances and the application of accurate, universally recognized terms. These challenges are exacerbated by inconsistencies, contradictions and regional terminology, which occur in common practice and in mainstream books as well as within forensic science. Some knots bear multiple or value-laden names, even misnomers, and some terms have manifold applications. This can lead to ambiguity and confusion. Additionally, many topological concepts and terms are applicable to practical knot-tying, despite the differences between real-world and theoretical knots, but the esoterica of topology are inaccessible to anyone unfamiliar with that branch of mathematics. To highlight these challenges some examples of knots encountered in case work are presented. Significantly, an overview of a few previously ignored issues is examined and several new concepts are introduced. An emphasis is placed on identifying structural variations, standardized nomenclature is outlined, and recommended terminology is derived from fields such as forensic science, chemistry, archaeology, topology and the textile industry. Greater precision in knot identifications, characterizations and descriptions can assist investigators in linking specific tying practises to potential suspects, analysing the manner in which knotted evidence was tied, and understanding how knots and ligatures perform in given scenarios. PMID:27320402

  12. Guidelines to classification and nomenclature of Arabian felsic plutonic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsay, C.R.; Stoeser, D.B.; Drysdall, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Well-defined procedures for classifying the felsic plutonic rocks of the Arabian Shield on the basis of petrographic, chemical and lithostratigraphic criteria and mineral-resource potential have been adopted and developed in the Saudi Arabian Deputy Ministry for Mineral Resources over the past decade. A number of problems with conventional classification schemes have been identified and resolved; others, notably those arising from difficulties in identifying precise mineral compositions, continue to present difficulties. The petrographic nomenclature used is essentially that recommended by the International Union of Geological Sciences. Problems that have arisen include the definition of: (1) rocks with sodic, zoned or perthitic feldspar, (2) trondhjemites, and (3) alkali granites. Chemical classification has been largely based on relative molar amounts of alumina, lime and alkalis, and the use of conventional variation diagrams, but pilot studies utilizing univariate and multivariate statistical techniques have been made. The classification used in Saudi Arabia for stratigraphic purposes is a hierarchy of formation-rank units, suites and super-suites as defined in the Saudi Arabian stratigraphic code. For genetic and petrological studies, a grouping as 'associations' of similar and genetically related lithologies is commonly used. In order to indicate mineral-resource potential, the felsic plutons are classed as common, precursor, specialized or mineralized, in order of increasing exploration significance. ?? 1986.

  13. Challenges for opioid receptor nomenclature: IUPHAR Review 9

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian M; Christie, Macdonald J; Devi, Lakshmi; Toll, Lawrence; Traynor, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of the structure and function of opioid receptors raise significant challenges for the definition of individual receptor types and the development of a nomenclature that precisely describes isoforms that may subserve different functions in vivo. Presentations at the 2013 meeting of the International Narcotics Research Conference in Cairns, Australia, considered some of the new discoveries that are now unravelling the complexities of opioid receptor signalling. Variable processing of opioid receptor messenger RNAs may lead to the presence of several isoforms of the μ receptor. Each opioid receptor type can function either as a monomer or as part of a homo- or heterodimer or higher multimer. Additionally, recent evidence points to the existence of agonist bias in the signal transduction pathways activated through μ receptors, and to the presence of regulatory allosteric sites on the receptors. This brief review summarizes the recent discoveries that raise challenges for receptor definition and the characterization of signal transduction pathways activated by specific receptor forms. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24528283

  14. Phylogeny, identification and nomenclature of the genus Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    Samson, R.A.; Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.; Hong, S.-B.; Hubka, V.; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Perrone, G.; Seifert, K.A.; Susca, A.; Tanney, J.B.; Varga, J.; Kocsubé, S.; Szigeti, G.; Yaguchi, T.; Frisvad, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus comprises a diverse group of species based on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic characters, which significantly impact biotechnology, food production, indoor environments and human health. Aspergillus was traditionally associated with nine teleomorph genera, but phylogenetic data suggest that together with genera such as Polypaecilum, Phialosimplex, Dichotomomyces and Cristaspora, Aspergillus forms a monophyletic clade closely related to Penicillium. Changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants resulted in the move to one name per species, meaning that a decision had to be made whether to keep Aspergillus as one big genus or to split it into several smaller genera. The International Commission of Penicillium and Aspergillus decided to keep Aspergillus instead of using smaller genera. In this paper, we present the arguments for this decision. We introduce new combinations for accepted species presently lacking an Aspergillus name and provide an updated accepted species list for the genus, now containing 339 species. To add to the scientific value of the list, we include information about living ex-type culture collection numbers and GenBank accession numbers for available representative ITS, calmodulin, β-tubulin and RPB2 sequences. In addition, we recommend a standard working technique for Aspergillus and propose calmodulin as a secondary identification marker. PMID:25492982

  15. Nature, nomenclature and taxonomy of obligate methanol utilizing strains.

    PubMed

    Cercel, M

    1999-01-01

    In a screening program, a number of different bacterial strains with the ability to utilize methanol as a sole carbon and energy source were isolated and described. They are well known methanol utilizing genera Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Micrococcus, Methylomonas or, on the contrary, the new, unknown genera and species of methylotrophic bacteria. In the last category, Acinetobacter and Alcaligenes are the new reported genera of organisms able to use methanol as a sole carbon and energy source. The present paper reports the very complex physiological and biochemical modifications when very versatile bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus are cultured on methanol and when the obligate methylotrophic state is compared with the facultative methylotrophic state of the same bacterial strain. Based on experiments and comparisons with literature data, it seems that Methylomonas methanica is the obligate methylotrophic state of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and that Acinetobacter calcoaceticus is the facultative methylotrophic state of Methylococcus capsulatus, an obligate methylotroph. The relationship of the obligate to the facultative and of the facultative to the obligate methylotrophy were established. These new methylotrophic genera and species, the profound physiological and biochemical modifications as well as the new data concerning nature, nomenclature and taxonomy of methanol utilizing bateria were reported for the first time in 1983. PMID:11845445

  16. Words matter: Recommendations for clarifying coral disease nomenclature and terminology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Coral diseases have caused significant losses on Caribbean reefs and are becoming a greater concern in the Pacific. Progress in coral disease research requires collaboration and communication among experts from many different disciplines. The lack of consistency in the use of terms and names in the recent scientific literature reflects the absence of an authority for naming coral diseases, a lack of consensus on the meaning of even some of the most basic terms as they apply to corals, and imprecision in the use of descriptive words. The lack of consensus partly reflects the complexity of this newly emerging field of research. Establishment of a nomenclature committee under the Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) could lead to more standardized definitions and could promote use of appropriate medical terminology for describing and communicating disease conditions in corals. This committee could also help to define disease terminology unique to corals where existing medical terminology is not applicable. These efforts will help scientists communicate with one another and with the general public more effectively. Scientists can immediately begin to reduce some of the confusion simply by explicitly defining the words they are using. In addition, digital photographs can be posted on the CDHC website and included in publications to document the macroscopic (gross) signs of the conditions observed on coral colonies along with precisely written characterizations and descriptions.

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta: Clinical diagnosis, nomenclature and severity assessment

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, FS; Sillence, DO

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the genetic heterogeneity in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), proposed in 1979 by Sillence et al., has been confirmed with molecular genetic studies. At present, 17 genetic causes of OI and closely related disorders have been identified and it is expected that more will follow. Unlike most reviews that have been published in the last decade on the genetic causes and biochemical processes leading to OI, this review focuses on the clinical classification of OI and elaborates on the newly proposed OI classification from 2010, which returned to a descriptive and numerical grouping of five OI syndromic groups. The new OI nomenclature and the pre-and postnatal severity assessment introduced in this review, emphasize the importance of phenotyping in order to diagnose, classify, and assess severity of OI. This will provide patients and their families with insight into the probable course of the disorder and it will allow physicians to evaluate the effect of therapy. A careful clinical description in combination with knowledge of the specific molecular genetic cause is the starting point for development and assessment of therapy in patients with heritable disorders including OI. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution–NonCommercial–NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:24715559

  18. Towards standardization of the nomenclature of resistance training exercises.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew C; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Judelson, Daniel A; Cullen-Carroll, Nick

    2013-05-01

    There is a disagreement surrounding the names of resistance training exercises. The purpose of this study was to survey different professionals regarding the nomenclature of resistance training exercises. Two hundred five participants volunteered for the study, of which, 64.9 % were male. Participants self-identified as either certified athletic trainer (22.4%), academic (18.5%), strength and conditioning coach (25.9%), personal trainer (15.6%), or clinician (17.6%). Participants were asked to name 10 resistance training exercises as depicted by pictures. A χ2 for exercise name by current profession analysis was used to analyze frequency differences. All exercises in the survey yielded inconsistent terminology primarily related to the responders' profession and 3 items in their naming patterns as follows: specification, equipment, and exercise. These results reveal a need to establish consistent naming pattern guidelines for resistance training exercises. The use of a consistent naming pattern may provide direction and clarity when working with athletes and clients in a strength training environment. We suggest a "specification, equipment, exercise" (e.g., 1 arm dumbbell row) naming pattern be used when naming resistance training exercises. PMID:23439332

  19. Pharmacologic Therapies in Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Lima; Wipf, Joyce E

    2016-07-01

    Anticoagulants are beneficial for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The development of target-specific oral anticoagulants is changing the landscape of anticoagulation therapy and created growing interest on this subject. Understanding the pharmacology of different anticoagulants is the first step to adequately treat patients with best available therapy while avoiding serious bleeding complications. This article reviews the pharmacology of the main anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, direct oral anticoagulants, and heparins) and their clinical indications based on evidence-based data currently available in the literature. PMID:27235611

  20. Pharmacology. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials required to teach a competency-based course in pharmacology for practical nursing. The following are covered in the five instructional units: calculating medication dosages, documenting medications, identifying classification and effects of medications, administering medications, and assisting with…

  1. Social pharmacology: expanding horizons.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of "social pharmacology" is not covered by the so-called "Phase IV" alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the "life cycle" of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  2. Pharmacological management of sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Systemic sepsis continues to be the most-difficult management problem in caring for the combat casualty. The complications of sepsis pervade all areas of injury to soldiers in the field, whether it is mechanical (missiles), thermal (burns), chemical, biological, or radiation injury. With the advent of tactical nuclear weapons, the problem of sepsis will be much higher in future wars than has previously been experienced through the world. The purpose of this chapter is a) to review the data suggesting pharmacological agents that may benefit the septic patient, and b) to emphasize the adjunctive therapies that should be explored in clinical trials. The pharmacological management of sepsis remains controversial. Most of the drugs utilized clinically treat the symptoms of the disease and are not necessarily directed at fundamental mechanisms that are known to be present in sepsis. A broad data base is emerging, indicating that NSAID should be used in human clinical trials. Prostaglandins are sensitive indicators of cellular injury and may be mediators for a number of vasoactive chemicals. Opiate antagonists and calcium channel blockers require more in-depth data; however, recent studies generate excitement for their potential use in the critically ill patient. Pharmacological effects of antibiotics, in concert with other drugs, suggest an entirely new approach to pharmacological treatment in sepsis. There is no doubt that new treatment modalities or adjunctive therapies must be utilized to alter the poor prognosis of severe sepsis that we have observed in the past 4 decades.

  3. Neisseria Adhesin A Variation and Revised Nomenclature Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Bambini, Stefania; De Chiara, Matteo; Muzzi, Alessandro; Mora, Marirosa; Lucidarme, Jay; Brehony, Carina; Borrow, Ray; Masignani, Vega; Comanducci, Maurizio; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Jolley, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), involved in the adhesion and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis into host tissues, is one of the major components of Bexsero, a novel multicomponent vaccine licensed for protection against meningococcal serogroup B in Europe, Australia, and Canada. NadA has been identified in approximately 30% of clinical isolates and in a much lower proportion of carrier isolates. Three protein variants were originally identified in invasive meningococci and named NadA-1, NadA-2, and NadA-3, whereas most carrier isolates either lacked the gene or harbored a different variant, NadA-4. Further analysis of isolates belonging to the sequence type 213 (ST-213) clonal complex identified NadA-5, which was structurally similar to NadA-4, but more distantly related to NadA-1, -2, and -3. At the time of this writing, more than 89 distinct nadA allele sequences and 43 distinct peptides have been described. Here, we present a revised nomenclature system, taking into account the complete data set, which is compatible with previous classification schemes and is expandable. The main features of this new scheme include (i) the grouping of the previously named NadA-2 and NadA-3 variants into a single NadA-2/3 variant, (ii) the grouping of the previously assigned NadA-4 and NadA-5 variants into a single NadA-4/5 variant, (iii) the introduction of an additional variant (NadA-6), and (iv) the classification of the variants into two main groups, named groups I and II. To facilitate querying of the sequences and submission of new allele sequences, the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are available at http://pubmlst.org/neisseria/NadA/. PMID:24807056

  4. A general definition and nomenclature for alternative splicing events.

    PubMed

    Sammeth, Michael; Foissac, Sylvain; Guigó, Roderic

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of the transcriptome present in eukaryotic cells is one of the most challenging tasks in the postgenomic era. In this regard, alternative splicing (AS) is a key phenomenon contributing to the production of different mature transcripts from the same primary RNA sequence. As a plethora of different transcript forms is available in databases, a first step to uncover the biology that drives AS is to identify the different types of reflected splicing variation. In this work, we present a general definition of the AS event along with a notation system that involves the relative positions of the splice sites. This nomenclature univocally and dynamically assigns a specific "AS code" to every possible pattern of splicing variation. On the basis of this definition and the corresponding codes, we have developed a computational tool (AStalavista) that automatically characterizes the complete landscape of AS events in a given transcript annotation of a genome, thus providing a platform to investigate the transcriptome diversity across genes, chromosomes, and species. Our analysis reveals that a substantial part--in human more than a quarter-of the observed splicing variations are ignored in common classification pipelines. We have used AStalavista to investigate and to compare the AS landscape of different reference annotation sets in human and in other metazoan species and found that proportions of AS events change substantially depending on the annotation protocol, species-specific attributes, and coding constraints acting on the transcripts. The AStalavista system therefore provides a general framework to conduct specific studies investigating the occurrence, impact, and regulation of AS. PMID:18688268

  5. Revised Nomenclature for Avian Telencephalon and Some Related Brainstem Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    REINER, ANTON; PERKEL, DAVID J.; BRUCE, LAURA L.; BUTLER, ANN B.; CSILLAG, ANDRÁS; KUENZEL, WAYNE; MEDINA, LORETA; PAXINOS, GEORGE; SHIMIZU, TORU; STRIEDTER, GEORG; WILD, MARTIN; BALL, GREGORY F.; DURAND, SARAH; GÜTÜRKÜN, ONUR; LEE, DIANE W.; MELLO, CLAUDIO V.; POWERS, ALICE; WHITE, STEPHANIE A.; HOUGH, GERALD; KUBIKOVA, LUBICA; SMULDERS, TOM V.; WADA, KAZUHIRO; DUGAS-FORD, JENNIFER; HUSBAND, SCOTT; YAMAMOTO, KEIKO; YU, JING; SIANG, CONNIE; JARVIS, ERICH D.

    2008-01-01

    The standard nomenclature that has been used for many telencephalic and related brainstem structures in birds is based on flawed assumptions of homology to mammals. In particular, the outdated terminology implies that most of the avian telencephalon is a hypertrophied basal ganglia, when it is now clear that most of the avian telencephalon is neurochemically, hodologically, and functionally comparable to the mammalian neocortex, claustrum, and pallial amygdala (all of which derive from the pallial sector of the developing telencephalon). Recognizing that this promotes misunderstanding of the functional organization of avian brains and their evolutionary relationship to mammalian brains, avian brain specialists began discussions to rectify this problem, culminating in the Avian Brain Nomenclature Forum held at Duke University in July 2002, which approved a new terminology for avian telencephalon and some allied brainstem cell groups. Details of this new terminology are presented here, as is a rationale for each name change and evidence for any homologies implied by the new names. Revisions for the brainstem focused on vocal control, catecholaminergic, cholinergic, and basal ganglia-related nuclei. For example, the Forum recognized that the hypoglossal nucleus had been incorrectly identified as the nucleus intermedius in the Karten and Hodos (1967) pigeon brain atlas, and what was identified as the hypoglossal nucleus in that atlas should instead be called the supraspinal nucleus. The locus ceruleus of this and other avian atlases was noted to consist of a caudal noradrenergic part homologous to the mammalian locus coeruleus and a rostral region corresponding to the mammalian A8 dopaminergic cell group. The midbrain dopaminergic cell group in birds known as the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontinus pars compacta was recognized as homologous to the mammalian substantia nigra pars compacta and was renamed accordingly; a group of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons at

  6. Revision of the nomenclature for the Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal crystal proteins.

    PubMed

    Crickmore, N; Zeigler, D R; Feitelson, J; Schnepf, E; Van Rie, J; Lereclus, D; Baum, J; Dean, D H

    1998-09-01

    The crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis have been extensively studied because of their pesticidal properties and their high natural levels of production. The increasingly rapid characterization of new crystal protein genes, triggered by an effort to discover proteins with new pesticidal properties, has resulted in a variety of sequences and activities that no longer fit the original nomenclature system proposed in 1989. Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal crystal protein (Cry and Cyt) nomenclature was initially based on insecticidal activity for the primary ranking criterion. Many exceptions to this systematic arrangement have become apparent, however, making the nomenclature system inconsistent. Additionally, the original nomenclature, with four activity-based primary ranks for 13 genes, did not anticipate the current 73 holotype sequences that form many more than the original four subgroups. A new nomenclature, based on hierarchical clustering using amino acid sequence identity, is proposed. Roman numerals have been exchanged for Arabic numerals in the primary rank (e.g., Cry1Aa) to better accommodate the large number of expected new sequences. In this proposal, 133 crystal proteins comprising 24 primary ranks are systematically arranged. PMID:9729610

  7. A need for logical and consistent anatomical nomenclature for cutaneous nerves of the limbs.

    PubMed

    Gest, Thomas R; Burkel, William E; Cortright, Gerald W

    2009-01-01

    The system of anatomical nomenclature needs to be logical and consistent. However, variations in translation to English of the Latin and Greek terminology used in Nomina Anatomica and Terminologia Anatomica have led to some inconsistency in the nomenclature of cutaneous nerves in the limbs. An historical review of cutaneous nerve nomenclature reveals that there are two general naming conventions: one primarily American and one primarily British. The American convention presents cutaneous nerves of the limbs in the format "medial brachial cutaneous nerve," while the British convention presents the same nerve as "medial cutaneous nerve of the arm," thereby translating "brachii" to "of the arm." If logically and consistently applied throughout the body, the British convention would rename the sural nerve to the "nerve of the calf," the brachial artery would become the "artery of the arm," the femoral nerve would be "nerve of the thigh," and femur would be "bone of the thigh" or "thigh bone." The British convention leads to many other nomenclatural inconsistencies, which would seem to make learning anatomy more difficult for the beginning student. In this era of contracting anatomy curricula, every effort should be made to keep anatomical nomenclature simple, logical, and consistent. PMID:19496151

  8. Development of a rational nomenclature for naming peptide and protein toxins from sea anemones.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joacir Stolarz; Fuentes-Silva, Deyanira; King, Glenn F

    2012-09-15

    Sea anemone toxins are predominantly peptide and proteins that act mainly on sodium and potassium channels, as well as in a variety of target cells causing lysis. Over recent years, the number of sea anemone peptide toxins as well as cytolytic pore-forming proteins and phospholipase A(2) sequences submitted to databases has been rapidly increasing due to the developments in DNA sequencing technology and proteomic approaches. However, the lack of a systematic nomenclature has resulted in multiple names being assigned to the same toxins, toxins from unrelated species being designated by the same name, and ambiguous name designations. Therefore, in this work we propose a systematic nomenclature in which we adopted specific criteria, based on order of discovery and phylogenetic analysis, in order to avoid redundant sea anemone toxin names. Implementation of the nomenclature proposed here not only allowed us to rename the already published 191 anemone toxins without ambiguities, but it can be used to unambiguously name newly discovered toxins whether or not they are related to previously published sea anemone sequences. In the new nomenclature each toxin name contains information about the toxin's biological activity, origin and relationship to known isoforms. Ongoing increases in the speed of DNA sequencing will raise significantly the number of sea anemone toxin sequences in the literature. This will represent a constant challenge in their clear identification and logical classification, which could be solved using the proposed nomenclature. PMID:22683676

  9. Pharmacological strategies for detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Diaper, Alison M; Law, Fergus D; Melichar, Jan K

    2014-01-01

    Detoxification refers to the safe discontinuation from a substance of dependence and is distinct from relapse prevention. Detoxification usually takes between a few days and a few weeks to complete, depending on the substance being misused, the severity of dependence and the support available to the user. Psychosocial therapies alongside pharmacological treatments are essential to improve outcome. The dependencies considered in this overview are detoxification from opioids (with methadone, buprenorphine, α2-adrenoceptor agonists and adjunct medications), alcohol (with benzodiazepines, anti-glutamatergics and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic drugs), stimulants and cannabis (with no clear recommended pharmacological treatments), benzodiazepines (with dose tapering) and nicotine (with nicotine replacement therapy, antidepressants and partial agonists). Evidence is limited by a lack of controlled trials robust enough for review bodies, and more research is required into optimal treatment doses and regimes, alone and in combination. PMID:24118014

  10. Similitude in modern pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M Z

    1999-07-01

    The principle of the similitude, the basis of homeopathy, has correspondences in the clinical studies of secondary effects of many modern pharmaceutical agents through the observation of the rebound effects of these drugs. Through clinical pharmacology, I proposed a model on which to base the scientificism of the homeopathic model. We have studied the effects of the drugs in the human body using pharmacological compendia and recent scientific works, confirming the mechanism of the homeopathic medicines' action through the verification of the primary action of the drugs and the consequent secondary reaction of the organism in hundreds of pharmaceutical agents. Treatment exploiting the "rebound" effect (curative vital reaction) may also be observed. This work suggests a research methodology to scientifically base the therapeutic principle of similitude. PMID:10449051

  11. [Pharmacological biomodulation in cancer].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, F; Merentes, E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the P-glycoprotein as a mediator of multidrug resistance (MDR) represents one of the most important research accomplishments in antineoplastic pharmacology during the last decade. Demonstration of Pgp in epithelial tissues, untreated and chemotherapeutically pretreated human malignancies, and identification of various agents capable of reversing in vitro resistance has generated enthusiasm for clinical studies throughout the world. This review discusses recent developments of experimental and clinical investigations of MDR reversing agents in cancer. PMID:11510431

  12. Social Pharmacology: Expanding horizons

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of “social pharmacology” is not covered by the so-called “Phase IV” alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the “life cycle” of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  13. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  14. Overview of safety pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Goineau, Sonia; Lemaire, Martine; Froget, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Safety pharmacology entails the assessment of the potential risks of novel pharmaceuticals for human use. As detailed in the ICH S7A guidelines, safety pharmacology for drug discovery involves a core battery of studies on three vital systems: central nervous (CNS), cardiovascular (CV), and respiratory. Primary CNS studies are aimed at defining compound effects on general behavior, locomotion, neuromuscular coordination, seizure threshold, and vigilance. The primary CV test battery includes an evaluation of proarrhythmic risk using in vitro tests (hERG channel and Purkinje fiber assays) and in vivo measurements in conscious animals via telemetry. Comprehensive cardiac risk assessment also includes full hemodynamic evaluation in a large, anesthetized animal. Basic respiratory function can be examined in conscious animals using whole-body plethysmography. This allows for an assessment of whether the sensitivity to respiratory-depressant effects can be enhanced by exposure to increased CO2 . Other safety pharmacology topics detailed in this unit are the timing of such studies, ethical and animal welfare issues, and statistical evaluation. PMID:24510755

  15. New unified nomenclature for genes involved in the oxidation of methanol in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lidstrom, M E; Anthony, C; Biville, F; Gasser, F; Goodwin, P; Hanson, R S; Harms, N

    1994-03-15

    The system involving the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in Gram-negative methylotrophic bacteria is complex. A total of 32 genes have been reported, termed mox, for methanol oxidation, and it is possible that more will be identified. Some mox genes carrying out completely different functions have been given the same designations by different laboratories and others have been given separate designations that were later discovered to be the same. It is now important to change the mox nomenclature to remedy this confusing situation. This communication proposes a new nomenclature for genes involved in methanol oxidation based on currently known linkage groups. PMID:8181704

  16. The Rise of "Professional Staff" and Demise of the "Non-Academic": A Study of University Staffing Nomenclature Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebalj, Darlene; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2012-01-01

    Concerns regarding the nomenclature of university administration in Australia and the UK have featured in the higher education literature for over a decade. In response, a significant nomenclature shift is occurring, with Australian universities replacing the term "General Staff" to describe all administrative and technical staff, in favour of…

  17. Clinical pharmacology and malaria.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, A M; Winstanley, P A

    1997-10-01

    The role of clinical pharmacology in improving the prevention and treatment of malaria is reviewed. A series of general and specific issues is discussed, concentrating on risk-benefit and cost-effectiveness. The techniques of clinical pharmacokinetics play an important role in the optimal use of drugs and this is illustrated by studies on quinine and proguanil. In discussing amodiaquine toxicity, the role of the pharmacologist and the chemist in designing out drug toxicity lends hope for producing a new generation of antimalarial drugs. PMID:9625927

  18. Pharmacologic agents targeting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Xia, Hong-guang; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular catabolic mechanism critically involved in regulating tissue homeostasis. The implication of autophagy in human diseases and the need to understand its regulatory mechanisms in mammalian cells have stimulated research efforts that led to the development of high-throughput screening protocols and small-molecule modulators that can activate or inhibit autophagy. Herein we review the current landscape in the development of screening technology as well as the molecules and pharmacologic agents targeting the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy. We also evaluate the potential therapeutic application of these compounds in different human pathologies. PMID:25654545

  19. Neuroimmune pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter; Hassan, Ahmed; Jain, Piyush; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is a major health problem which impairs the quality of life, impacts mental health and is exacerbated by stress and psychiatric disturbances which, in turn, can affect disease prognosis and response to treatment. Accumulating evidence indicates that the immune system is an important interface between intestinal inflammation and the enteric, sensory, central and autonomic nervous systems. In addition, the neuroimmune interactions originating from the gastrointestinal tract are orchestrated by the gut microbiota. This article reviews some major insights into this complex homeostatic network that have been achieved during the past two years and attempts to put these advances into perspective with novel opportunities of pharmacological intervention. PMID:26426677

  20. Pharmacologic treatment of paraphilias.

    PubMed

    Assumpção, Alessandra Almeida; Garcia, Frederico Duarte; Garcia, Heloise Delavenne; Bradford, John M W; Thibaut, Florence

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of paraphilias remains a challenge in the mental health field. Combined pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment is associated with better efficacy. The gold standard treatment of severe paraphilias in adult males is antiandrogen treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been used in mild types of paraphilia and in cases of sexual compulsions and juvenile paraphilias. Antiandrogen treatments seem to be effective in severe paraphilic subjects committing sexual offenses. In particular, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs have shown high efficacy working in a similar way to physical castration but being reversible at any time. Treatment recommendations, side effects, and contraindications are discussed. PMID:24877704

  1. Allele Name Translation Tool and Update NomenCLature: software tools for the automated translation of HLA allele names between successive nomenclatures.

    PubMed

    Mack, S J; Hollenbach, J A

    2010-05-01

    In this brief communication, we describe the Allele Name Translation Tool (antt) and Update NomenCLature (uncl), free programs developed to facilitate the translation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele names recorded using the December 2002 version of the HLA allele nomenclature (e.g. A*01010101) to those recorded using the colon-delimited version of the HLA allele nomenclature (e.g. A*01:01:01:01) that was adopted in April 2010. In addition, the antt and uncl translate specific HLA allele-name changes (e.g. DPB1*0502 is translated to DPB1*104:01), as well as changes to the locus prefix for HLA-C (i.e. Cw* is translated to C*). The antt and uncl will also translate allele names that have been truncated to two, four, or six digits, as well as ambiguous allele strings. The antt is a locally installed and run application, while uncl is a web-based tool that requires only an Internet connection and a modern browser. The antt accepts a variety of HLA data-presentation and allele-name formats. In addition, the antt can translate using user-defined conversion settings (e.g. the names of alleles that encode identical peptide binding domains can be translated to a common 'P-code'), and can serve as a preliminary data-sanity tool. The antt is available for download, and uncl for use, at www.igdawg.org/software. PMID:20412076

  2. Nomenclatural and taxonomic problems related to the electronic publication of new nomina and nomenclatural acts in zoology, with brief comments on optical discs and on the situation in botany.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Alain; Crochet, Pierre-André; Dickinson, Edward C; Nemésio, André; Aescht, Erna; Bauer, Aaron M; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Bour, Roger; De Carvalho, Marcelo R; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Frétey, Thierry; Jäger, Peter; Koyamba, Victoire; Lavilla, Esteban O; Löbl, Ivan; Louchart, Antoine; Malécot, Valéry; Schatz, Heinrich; Ohler, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    In zoological nomenclature, to be potentially valid, nomenclatural novelties (i.e., new nomina and nomenclatural acts) need first to be made available, that is, published in works qualifying as publications as defined by the International Code of zoological Nomenclature ("the Code"). In September 2012, the Code was amended in order to allow the recognition of works electronically published online after 2011 as publications available for the purpose of zoological nomenclature, provided they meet several conditions, notably a preregistration of the work in ZooBank. Despite these new Rules, several of the long-discussed problems concerning the electronic publication of new nomina and nomenclatural acts have not been resolved. The publication of this amendment provides an opportunity to discuss some of these in detail. It is important to note that: (1) all works published only online before 2012 are nomenclaturally unavailable; (2) printed copies of the PDFs of works which do not have their own ISSN or ISBN, and which are not obtainable free of charge or by purchase, do not qualify as publications but must be seen as facsimiles of unavailable works and are unable to provide nomenclatural availability to any nomenclatural novelties they may contain; (3) prepublications online of later released online publications are unavailable, i.e., they do not advance the date of publication; (4) the publication dates of works for which online prepublications had been released are not those of these prepublications and it is critical that the real release date of such works appear on the actual final electronic publication, but this is not currently the case in electronic periodicals that distribute such online prepublications and which still indicate on their websites and PDFs the date of release of prepublication as that of publication of the work; (5) supplementary online materials and subsequent formal corrections of either paper or electronic publications distributed only

  3. Epigenetics and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Stefanska, Barbara; MacEwan, David J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of gene regulation have shown there to be much more regulation of the genome than first thought, through epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic mechanisms are systems that have evolved to either switch off gene activity altogether, or fine-tune any existing genetic activation. Such systems are present in all genes and include chromatin modifications and remodelling, DNA methylation (such as CpG island methylation rates) and histone covalent modifications (e.g. acetylation, methylation), RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These systems regulate genomic activity ‘beyond’ simple transcriptional factor inducer or repressor function of genes to generate mRNA. Epigenetic regulation of gene activity has been shown to be important in maintaining normal phenotypic activity of cells, as well as having a role in development and diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's. Newer classes of drugs regulate epigenetic mechanisms to counteract disease states in humans. The reports in this issue describe some advances in epigenetic understanding that relate to human disease, and our ability to control these mechanisms by pharmacological means. Increasingly the importance of epigenetics is being uncovered – it is pharmacology that will have to keep pace. PMID:25966315

  4. Rebuilding the Tower of Babel: A Revised Nomenclature for the Study of Suicide and Suicidal Behaviors. Part 1: Background, Rationale, and Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Morton M.; Berman, Alan L.; Sanddal, Nels D.; O'Carroll, Patrick W.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Since the publication of the O'Carroll et al. (1996) nomenclature for suicidology, there have been a number of published letters and articles, as well as an active e-mail dialogue, in response to, and elaborating upon, this effort to establish a standard nomenclature for suicidology. This new nomenclature has been presented on a number of…

  5. International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants (Melbourne Code): Appendices II-VIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Science requires a precise, stable, and simple system of nomenclature used by scientists in all countries of the world, dealing on the one hand with the terms that denote the ranks of taxonomic groups, and on the other with the scientific names that are applied to the individual taxonomic units of a...

  6. 78 FR 15956 - Guidance for Industry on Tablet Scoring: Nomenclature, Labeling, and Data for Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Tablet Scoring: Nomenclature, Labeling, and Data for Evaluation; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for...

  7. What Did They Just Say? A Performance Improvement Journey through Nomenclature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Alicia R.

    2012-01-01

    A domestic credit union engages in a systematic performance improvement plan to better leverage a technical application within its organization. By engaging stakeholders early in the process, standardizing the organization's nomenclature, and building strategic partnerships, the credit union was able to achieve both quantitative and qualitative…

  8. International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (Vienna Code) Journal or equivalent: Book

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botany requires a precise and simple system of nomenclature used by botanists in all countries, dealing on the one hand with the terms that denote the ranks of taxonomic groups or units, and on the other hand with the scientific names that are applied to the individual taxonomic groups of plants. Th...

  9. Standard descriptive nomenclature of constituents of aggregates for radiation-shielding concrete. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1992-05-01

    This nomenclature is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.41 on Concrete for Radiation Shielding. Current edition approved Mar. 15, 1992 and published May 1992. Originally published as C 638-73. Last previous edition was C 638-84(1990). It was reapproved 1997.

  10. 75 FR 9343 - Nomenclature Change Relating to the Network Distribution Center Transition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... 111 and 121 Nomenclature Change Relating to the Network Distribution Center Transition AGENCY: Postal... to the ongoing transition of USPS bulk mail centers (BMC) to network distribution centers (NDC), by... Gambhir at 202-268-6256. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background: The BMC network was established in...

  11. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Boumsell, Laurence; Balderas, Robert; Bensussan, Armand; Gattei, Valter; Horejsi, Vaclav; Jin, Bo-Quan; Malavasi, Fabio; Mortari, Frank; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Stockinger, Hannes; van Zelm, Menno C; Zola, Heddy; Clark, Georgina

    2015-11-15

    CD (cluster of differentiation) Ags are cell surface molecules expressed on leukocytes and other cells relevant for the immune system. CD nomenclature has been universally adopted by the scientific community and is officially approved by the International Union of Immunological Societies and sanctioned by the World Health Organization. It provides a unified designation system for mAbs, as well as for the cell surface molecules that they recognize. This nomenclature was established by the Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops. In addition to defining the CD nomenclature, these workshops have been instrumental in identifying and determining the expression and function of cell surface molecules. Over the past 30 y, the data generated by the 10 Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops have led to the characterization and formal designation of more than 400 molecules. CD molecules are commonly used as cell markers, allowing the identification and isolation of leukocyte populations, subsets, and differentiation stages. mAbs against these molecules have proven to be essential for biomedical research and diagnosis, as well as in biotechnology. More recently, they have been recognized as invaluable tools for the treatment of several malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this article, we describe how the CD nomenclature was established, present the official updated list of CD molecules, and provide a rationale for their usefulness in the 21st century. PMID:26546687

  12. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, Raoul J P; Rossi, Riccardo L; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-07-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org. PMID:25897123

  13. A Case Study of Implications and Applications of Standardized Nomenclature for Asset Management in Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFrancesco, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare organizations strive to adapt to the continuous change in what has become a fast-paced, high technology environment. Many organizations are charged to find efficiencies to better manage medical device assets. Increasingly, healthcare leaders opt to adopt a standardized medical device nomenclature under the purview of a set of national…

  14. Comparison of mitotyper rules and phylogenetic-based mtDNA nomenclature systems.

    PubMed

    Polanskey, Deborah; Den Hartog, Bobi K; Elling, John W; Fisher, Constance L; Kepler, Russell B; Budowle, Bruce

    2010-09-01

    A consistent nomenclature scheme is necessary to characterize a forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype. A standard nomenclature, called the Mitotyper Rules™, has been developed that applies typing rules in a hierarchical manner reflecting the forensic practitioner's nomenclature preferences. In this work, an empirical comparison between the revised hierarchical nomenclature rules and the phylogenetic approach to mtDNA type description has been conducted on 5173 samples from the phylogenetically typed European Mitochondrial DNA Population database (EMPOP) to identify the degree and significance of any differences. The comparison of the original EMPOP types and the results of retyping these sequences using the Mitotyper Rules demonstrates a high degree of concordance between the two alignment schemes. Differences in types resulted mainly because the Mitotyper Rules selected an alignment with the fewest number of differences compared with the rCRS. In addition, several identical regions were described in more than one way in the EMPOP dataset, demonstrating a limitation of a solely phylogenetic approach in that it may not consistently type nonhaplogroup-specific sites. Using a rule-based approach, commonly occurring as well as private variants are subjected to the same rules for naming, which is particularly advantageous when typing partial sequence data. PMID:20666918

  15. Nomenclature of Toso, Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 3, and IgM FcR.

    PubMed

    Kubagawa, Hiromi; Carroll, Michael C; Jacob, Chaim O; Lang, Karl S; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Mak, Tak; McAndrews, Monica; Morse, Herbert C; Nolan, Garry P; Ohno, Hiroshi; Richter, Günther H; Seal, Ruth; Wang, Ji-Yang; Wiestner, Adrian; Coligan, John E

    2015-05-01

    Hiromi Kubagawa and John E. Coligan coordinated an online meeting to define an appropriate nomenclature for the cell surface glycoprotein presently designated by different names: Toso, Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 3 (FAIM3), and IgM FcR (FcμR). FAIM3 and Faim3 are the currently approved symbols for the human and mouse genes, respectively, in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ensembl, and other databases. However, recent functional results reported by several groups of investigators strongly support a recommendation for renaming FAIM3/Faim3 as FCMR/Fcmr, a name better reflecting its physiological function as the FcR for IgM. Participants included 12 investigators involved in studying Toso/FAIM3(Faim3)/FμR, representatives from the Human Genome Nomenclature Committee (Ruth Seal) and the Mouse Genome Nomenclature Committee (Monica McAndrews), and an observer from the IgM research field (Michael Carroll). In this article, we provide a brief background of the key research on the Toso/FAIM3(Faim3)/FcμR proteins, focusing on the ligand specificity and functional activity, followed by a brief summary of discussion about adopting a single name for this molecule and its gene and a resulting recommendation for genome nomenclature committees. PMID:25888699

  16. Rhizobium selenireducens sp. nov. Validation and inclusion onto the list of organisms with standing in nomenclature.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature. The list of valid microbial names is maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology and we are proposing that Rhizobium selenireducens sp. nov. be added to the list as a valid spec...

  17. Developments in Pedagogic Nomenclature in Australian Vocational Education: Evolution of Revolution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Over recent decades the nomenclature of "innovative" pedagogic approaches in vocational education and training (VET) has undergone a number of changes. In almost all cases "traditional face-to-face" teaching is set as the comparative benchmark and painted in pejorative terms. Using aspects of Basil Bernstein's theoretical framework and definitions…

  18. Current status and perspectives of unificiation of Glu-3 nomenclature systems in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (LMW-GS) composition in common wheat is one of the critical determinants of gluten properties. However, the nomenclature of Glu-3 encoding LMW-GSs has not been consistent among laboratories, due to the complexity of the LMW-GSs and the distinct separation metho...

  19. The contribution of O.S. Vialov to the development of ichnological classification and nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palii, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    This work highlights the role of O.S. Vialov, an outstanding Soviet geologist and paleontologist, and Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR, in the creation and development of classification and nomenclature of fossil traces left by organisms.

  20. 26 CFR 1.338-2 - Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. 1.338-2 Section 1.338-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. (a) Scope. This section prescribes rules relating...

  1. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org. PMID:25897123

  2. 26 CFR 1.338-2 - Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nomenclature and definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. 1.338-2 Section 1.338-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... definitions; mechanics of the section 338 election. (a) Scope. This section prescribes rules relating...

  3. A computer-Based System for Handling Chemical Nomenclature and Structural Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlett, Russell J.; Tate, Fred A.

    1972-01-01

    Among other improvements in chemical nomenclature used in the Chemical Registry System, Chemical Abstracts Service intends to standardize the fundamental principles for naming cyclic structures so that procedures for the derivation of ring names can become more amenable to computer generation and translation. (Author/NH)

  4. Nomenclature and databases - the past, the present, and the future : a primer for the congenital heart surgeon.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Mavroudis, Constantine; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois G; Clarke, David Robinson; Gaynor, J William; Spray, Thomas L; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Stellin, Giovanni; Ebels, Tjark; Bacha, Emile A; Walters, Henry L; Elliott, Martin J

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses the historical aspects, current state of the art, and potential future advances in the areas of nomenclature and databases for congenital heart disease. Five areas will be reviewed: (1) common language = nomenclature, (2) mechanism of data collection (database or registry) with an established uniform core data set, (3) mechanism of evaluating case complexity, (4) mechanism to ensure and verify data completeness and accuracy, and (5) collaboration between medical subspecialties. During the 1990s, both the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and the European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery (EACTS) created congenital heart surgery outcomes databases. Beginning in 1998, the EACTS and STS collaborated in the work of the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project. By 2000, a common congenital heart surgery nomenclature, along with a common core minimal data set, were adopted by the EACTS and the STS and published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. In 2000, the International Nomenclature Committee for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease was established; this committee eventually evolved into the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease (ISNPCHD). The working component of ISNPCHD is the International Working Group for Mapping and Coding of Nomenclatures for Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease, also known as the Nomenclature Working Group (NWG). By 2005, the NWG cross-mapped the EACTS-STS nomenclature with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code of the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology and created the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC) ( http://www.IPCCC.NET ). This common nomenclature (IPCCC), and the common minimum database data set created by the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project, are now utilized by both EACTS and STS; since 1998, this nomenclature and database have been used by both the STS

  5. Impacts of phylogenetic nomenclature on the efficacy of the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Matthew S

    2015-02-01

    Cataloging biodiversity is critical to conservation efforts because accurate taxonomy is often a precondition for protection under laws designed for species conservation, such as the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Traditional nomenclatural codes governing the taxonomic process have recently come under scrutiny because taxon names are more closely linked to hierarchical ranks than to the taxa themselves. A new approach to naming biological groups, called phylogenetic nomenclature (PN), explicitly names taxa by defining their names in terms of ancestry and descent. PN has the potential to increase nomenclatural stability and decrease confusion induced by the rank-based codes. But proponents of PN have struggled with whether species and infraspecific taxa should be governed by the same rules as other taxa or should have special rules. Some proponents advocate the wholesale abandonment of rank labels (including species); this could have consequences for the implementation of taxon-based conservation legislation. I examined the principles of PN as embodied in the PhyloCode (an alternative to traditional rank-based nomenclature that names biological groups based on the results of phylogenetic analyses and does not associate taxa with ranks) and assessed how this novel approach to naming taxa might affect the implementation of species-based legislation by providing a case study of the ESA. The latest version of the PhyloCode relies on the traditional rank-based codes to name species and infraspecific taxa; thus, little will change regarding the main targets of the ESA because they will retain rank labels. For this reason, and because knowledge of evolutionary relationships is of greater importance than nomenclatural procedures for initial protection of endangered taxa under the ESA, I conclude that PN under the PhyloCode will have little impact on implementation of the ESA. PMID:25155291

  6. SU-E-P-22: AAPM Task Group 263 Tackling Standardization of Nomenclature for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszak, M; Feng, M; Moran, J; Xiao, Y; Mayo, C; Miller, R; Bosch, W; Popple, R; Marks, L; Wu, Q; Molineu, A; Martel, M; Yock, T; McNutt, T; Brown, N; Purdie, T; Yorke, E; Santanam, L; Gabriel, P; Michalski, J; and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is growing recognition of need for increased clarity and consistency in the nomenclatures used for body and organ structures, DVH metrics, toxicity, dose and volume units, etc. Standardization has multiple benefits; e.g. facilitating data collection for clinical trials, enabling the pooling of data between institutions, making transfers (i.e. hand-offs) between centers safer, and enabling vendors to define “default” settings. Towards this goal, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a task group (TG263) in July of 2014, operating under the Work Group on Clinical Trials to develop consensus statements. Guiding principles derived from the investigation and example nomenclatures will be presented for public feedback. Methods: We formed a multi-institutional and multi-vendor collaborative group of 39 physicists, physicians and others involved in clinical use and electronic transfer of information. Members include individuals from IROC, NRG, IHE-RO, DICOM WG-7, ASTRO and EORTC groups with overlapping interests to maximize the quality of the consensus and increase the likelihood of adoption. Surveys of group and NRG members were used to define current nomenclatures and requirements. Technical requirements of vendor systems and the proposed DICOM standards were examined. Results: There is a marked degree of inter and intra institutional variation in current approaches, resulting from inter-vendor differences in capabilities, clinic specific conceptualizations and inconsistencies. Using a consensus approach, the group defined optimal formats for the naming of targets and normal structures. A formal objective assessment of 13 existing clinically-used software packages show that all had capabilities to accommodate these recommended nomenclatures. Conclusions: A multi-stakeholder effort is making significant steps forward in developing a standard nomenclature that will work across platforms. Our current working list includes > 550

  7. Pharmacology of Quercus infectoria.

    PubMed

    Dar, M S; Ikram, M; Fakouhi, T

    1976-12-01

    The galls of Quercus infectoria (Fagaceae), a commonly available plant in Iran, were studied pharmacologically. Two fractions were employed, a dried acetone-treated methanol extract dissolved in water (Fraction A) and a subfraction prepared by chloroform-methanol extraction (Fraction B). Fraction A was active as an analgesic in rats and significantly reduced blood sugar levels in rabbits. Fraction B had CNS depressant activity. Data obtained with a treadmill indicated a decreased activity ratio by Fraction B, suggesting a possible interference in motor coordination. It potentiated the barbiturate sleeping time significantly without changing the onset time or the loss of the righting reflex. In addition, Fraction B exhibited a moderate antitremorine activity by causing a delay in the onset and a decrease in the severity of tremorine-induced tremors. The local anesthetic action of Fraction B was evident due to the complete blockade of the isolated frog sciatic nerve conduction. PMID:1032663

  8. Pharmacology of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Pepper, G A

    1999-01-01

    The wide variety of first-line agents available for managing high blood pressure include diuretics, beta adrenergic receptor blockers, alpha adrenergic receptor blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and calcium channel blockers. Supplemental agents used for second-line therapy and special indications, such as pregnancy and hypertensive emergencies, include angiotensin receptor blockers, central-acting agents, direct vasodilators, and adrenergic neuron inhibitors. Selection of agents for particular patients requires consideration of research-based evidence for positive long-term outcomes and of the unique patient profile of age, race, co-morbidities, and lifestyle. A thorough understanding of the pharmacology (mechanism, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and drug interactions, clinical use) of antihypertensive agents is an essential foundation for nursing practice in women's health. PMID:10584919

  9. Conus venom peptide pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien; Vetter, Irina; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-04-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse group of recently evolved venom peptides used for prey capture and/or defense. Each species of cone snails produces in excess of 1000 conopeptides, with those pharmacologically characterized (≈ 0.1%) targeting a diverse range of membrane proteins typically with high potency and specificity. The majority of conopeptides inhibit voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, providing valuable research tools for the dissection of the role played by specific ion channels in excitable cells. It is noteworthy that many of these targets are found to be expressed in pain pathways, with several conopeptides having entered the clinic as potential treatments for pain [e.g., pyroglutamate1-MrIA (Xen2174)] and one now marketed for intrathecal treatment of severe pain [ziconotide (Prialt)]. This review discusses the diversity, pharmacology, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic potential of cone snail venom peptide families acting at voltage-gated ion channels (ω-, μ-, μO-, δ-, ι-, and κ-conotoxins), ligand-gated ion channels (α-conotoxins, σ-conotoxin, ikot-ikot, and conantokins), G-protein-coupled receptors (ρ-conopeptides, conopressins, and contulakins), and neurotransmitter transporters (χ-conopeptides), with expanded discussion on the clinical potential of sodium and calcium channel inhibitors and α-conotoxins. Expanding the discovery of new bioactives using proteomic/transcriptomic approaches combined with high-throughput platforms and better defining conopeptide structure-activity relationships using relevant membrane protein crystal structures are expected to grow the already significant impact conopeptides have had as both research probes and leads to new therapies. PMID:22407615

  10. Pharmacology of GABA.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B

    1982-01-01

    GABA-ergic systems are involved in all the main functions of the brain. In most brain regions impairment of this system produces epileptic activity. GABA-mediated inhibitory function can be enhanced by drugs of at least seven different types. They act on the metabolism or synaptic release of GABA, or its reuptake into neurones of glia, or on various components of the GABA receptor complex (GABA recognition site, "benzodiazepine" receptor or chloride ionophore). Among such compounds, those which act most specifically and potently on GABA receptors remain primarily research tools. Among compounds in clinical use, valproate, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsant barbiturates al enhance GABA-mediated inhibition. In the future, new inhibitors of GABA uptake, new GABA agonists and potent inhibitors of GABA-transaminase are likely to become available. Trials of drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function have been made in a wide variety of neurological disorders. In most forms of epilepsy a therapeutic effect is evident. Real benefit from GABA therapies has not been demonstrated in the principal disorders of movement (Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease, dystonias), except in so far as they have a myoclonic or paroxysmal component. Among psychiatric disorders the acute symptoms of schizophrenia are exacerbated by enhanced GABA-ergic function. Abstinence syndromes (alcohol, barbiturate or narcotic withdrawal) are ameliorated by drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function, and there is some evidence for a beneficial action in anxiety states and mania. Attempts to relate the molecular neurobiology of GABA with clinical pharmacology are of very recent origin. Improved understanding of the variety of GABA receptor mechanisms will provide the key to the more selective pharmacological manipulations that are required for therapeutic success. PMID:6214305

  11. Pharmacological aspects of (-)-deprenyl.

    PubMed

    Magyar, K; Pálfi, M; Tábi, T; Kalász, H; Szende, B; Szöko, E

    2004-08-01

    Deprenyl, the selective irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), has been synthesised as a potential antidepressant, however, due to its dopamine potentiating capacity, became a registered drug in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Deprenyl possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities; some of them are not related to its MAO-B inhibitory potency. Beside its dopamine potentiating effect, it renders protection against a number of dopaminergic, cholinergic and noradrenergic neurotoxins with a complex mechanism of action. By inducing antioxidant enzymes and decreasing the formation of reactive oxygen species, deprenyl is able to combat an oxidative challenge implicated as a common causative factor in neurodegenerative diseases. In a dose substantially lower than required for MAO-B inhibition (10(-9)-10(-13) M), deprenyl interferes with early apoptotic signalling events induced by various kinds of insults in cell cultures of neuroectodermal origin, thus protecting cells from apoptotic death. Deprenyl requires metabolic conversion to a hitherto unidentified metabolite to exert its antiapoptotic effect, which serves to protect the integrity of the mitochondrion by inducing transcriptional and translational changes. Pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies have revealed that deprenyl undergoes intensive first pass metabolism, and its major metabolites also possess pharmacological activities. The ratio of the parent compound and its metabolites reaching the systemic circulation and the brain are highly dependent on the routes of administration. Therefore, in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, reconsideration of the dosing schedule, by lowering the dose of deprenyl and choosing the most appropriate route of administration, would diminish undesired adverse effects, with unaltered neuroprotective potency. PMID:15279565

  12. Systematic nomenclature for the PLUNC/PSP/BSP30/SMGB proteins as a subfamily of the BPI fold-containing superfamily.

    PubMed

    Bingle, Colin D; Seal, Ruth L; Craven, C Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    We present the BPIFAn/BPIFBn systematic nomenclature for the PLUNC (palate lung and nasal epithelium clone)/PSP (parotid secretory protein)/BSP30 (bovine salivary protein 30)/SMGB (submandibular gland protein B) family of proteins, based on an adaptation of the SPLUNCn (short PLUNCn)/LPLUNCn (large PLUNCn) nomenclature. The nomenclature is applied to a set of 102 sequences which we believe represent the current reliable data for BPIFA/BPIFB proteins across all species, including marsupials and birds. The nomenclature will be implemented by the HGNC (HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee). PMID:21787333

  13. Pharmacological treatment of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Hain, Timothy C; Uddin, Mohammed

    2003-01-01

    This review discusses the physiology and pharmacological treatment of vertigo and related disorders. Classes of medications useful in the treatment of vertigo include anticholinergics, antihistamines, benzodiazepines, calcium channel antagonists and dopamine receptor antagonists. These medications often have multiple actions. They may modify the intensity of symptoms (e.g. vestibular suppressants) or they may affect the underlying disease process (e.g. calcium channel antagonists in the case of vestibular migraine). Most of these agents, particularly those that are sedating, also have a potential to modulate the rate of compensation for vestibular damage. This consideration has become more relevant in recent years, as vestibular rehabilitation physical therapy is now often recommended in an attempt to promote compensation. Accordingly, therapy of vertigo is optimised when the prescriber has detailed knowledge of the pharmacology of medications being administered as well as the precise actions being sought. There are four broad causes of vertigo, for which specific regimens of drug therapy can be tailored. Otological vertigo includes disorders of the inner ear such as Ménière's disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and bilateral vestibular paresis. In both Ménière's disease and vestibular neuritis, vestibular suppressants such as anticholinergics and benzodiazepines are used. In Ménière's disease, salt restriction and diuretics are used in an attempt to prevent flare-ups. In vestibular neuritis, only brief use of vestibular suppressants is now recommended. Drug treatments are not presently recommended for BPPV and bilateral vestibular paresis, but physical therapy treatment can be very useful in both. Central vertigo includes entities such as vertigo associated with migraine and certain strokes. Prophylactic agents (L-channel calcium channel antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, beta-blockers) are the mainstay of treatment

  14. Pharmacology of cortical inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Krnjević, K.; Randić, Mirjana; Straughan, D. W.

    1966-01-01

    1. We have studied the effects of various pharmacological agents on the cortical inhibitory process described in the previous two papers (Krnjević, Randić & Straughan, 1966a, b); the drugs were mostly administered directly by iontophoresis from micropipettes and by systemic injection (I.V.). 2. Strychnine given by iontophoresis or by the application of a strong solution to the cortical surface potentiated excitatory effects, but very large iontophoretic doses also depressed neuronal firing. Subconvulsive and even convulsive systemic doses had little or no effect at the cortical level. There was no evidence, with any method of application, that strychnine directly interferes with the inhibitory process. 3. Tetanus toxin, obtained from two different sources and injected into the cortex 12-48 hr previously, also failed to block cortical inhibition selectively. As with strychnine, there was some evidence of increased responses to excitatory inputs. 4. Other convulsant drugs which failed to block cortical inhibition included picrotoxin, pentamethylene tetrazole, thiosemicarbazide, longchain ω-amino acids and morphine. 5. The inhibition was not obviously affected by cholinomimetic agents or by antagonists of ACh. 6. α- and β-antagonists of adrenergic transmission were also ineffective. 7. Cortical inhibition was fully developed in the presence of several general anaesthetics, including ether, Dial, pentobarbitone, Mg and chloralose. A temporary reduction in inhibition which is sometimes observed after systemic doses of pentobarbitone, is probably secondary to a fall in blood pressure. 8. Several central excitants such as amphetamine, caffeine and lobeline also failed to show any specific antagonistic action on cortical inhibition. 9. In view of the possibility that GABA is the chemical agent mediating cortical inhibition, an attempt was made to find a selective antagonist of its depressant action on cortical neurones. None of the agents listed above, nor any other

  15. Pharmacological approaches to migraine.

    PubMed

    Diener, H Ch

    2003-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal disorder with attacks of headache, nausea, vomiting, photo- and phonophobia and malaise. This review summarises new treatment options both for the therapy of the acute attack as well as for migraine prophylaxis. Analgesics like aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in treating migraine attacks. Few controlled trials were performed for the use of ergotamine or dihydroergotamine. These trials indicate inferior efficacy compared to serotonin (5-HT)1B/D-agonists (further on called "triptans"). The triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan and zolmitriptan) are highly effective. They improve headache as well as nausea, photo- and phonophobia. The different triptans have minor differences in efficacy, headache recurrence and adverse effects. The knowledge of their different pharmacological profile allows a more specific treatment of the individual migraine characteristics. Migraine prophylaxis is recommended, when more than 3 attacks occur per month, if attacks do not respond to acute treatment or if side effects of acute treatment are severe. Substances with proven efficacy include the beta-blockers metoprolol and propranolol, the calcium channel blocker flunarizine, several 5-HT antagonists and amitriptyline. Recently antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, gabapentin, topiramate) were evaluated for the prophylaxis of migraine. The use of botulinum-toxin is under investigation. PMID:12830928

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of FTO.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Fiona; Demetriades, Marina; Aik, WeiShen; Merkestein, Myrte; Kramer, Holger; Andrew, Daniel S; Scudamore, Cheryl L; Hough, Tertius A; Wells, Sara; Ashcroft, Frances M; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J; Cox, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, a genome wide association study identified a SNP in intron one of the gene encoding human FTO that was associated with increased body mass index. Homozygous risk allele carriers are on average three kg heavier than those homozygous for the protective allele. FTO is a DNA/RNA demethylase, however, how this function affects body weight, if at all, is unknown. Here we aimed to pharmacologically inhibit FTO to examine the effect of its demethylase function in vitro and in vivo as a first step in evaluating the therapeutic potential of FTO. We showed that IOX3, a known inhibitor of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases, decreased protein expression of FTO (in C2C12 cells) and reduced maximal respiration rate in vitro. However, FTO protein levels were not significantly altered by treatment of mice with IOX3 at 60 mg/kg every two days. This treatment did not affect body weight, or RER, but did significantly reduce bone mineral density and content and alter adipose tissue distribution. Future compounds designed to selectively inhibit FTO's demethylase activity could be therapeutically useful for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25830347

  17. Pharmacological Inhibition of FTO

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Fiona; Demetriades, Marina; Aik, WeiShen; Merkestein, Myrte; Kramer, Holger; Andrew, Daniel S.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Hough, Tertius A.; Wells, Sara; Ashcroft, Frances M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, a genome wide association study identified a SNP in intron one of the gene encoding human FTO that was associated with increased body mass index. Homozygous risk allele carriers are on average three kg heavier than those homozygous for the protective allele. FTO is a DNA/RNA demethylase, however, how this function affects body weight, if at all, is unknown. Here we aimed to pharmacologically inhibit FTO to examine the effect of its demethylase function in vitro and in vivo as a first step in evaluating the therapeutic potential of FTO. We showed that IOX3, a known inhibitor of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases, decreased protein expression of FTO (in C2C12 cells) and reduced maximal respiration rate in vitro. However, FTO protein levels were not significantly altered by treatment of mice with IOX3 at 60 mg/kg every two days. This treatment did not affect body weight, or RER, but did significantly reduce bone mineral density and content and alter adipose tissue distribution. Future compounds designed to selectively inhibit FTO’s demethylase activity could be therapeutically useful for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25830347

  18. Pharmacology of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2004-01-01

    Dronabinol (Delta 9-tetrahydocannabinol, THC), the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the use of cannabis, is an agonist to both the CB1 and the CB2 subtype of cannabinoid receptors. It is available on prescription in several countries. The non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), some analogues of natural cannabinoids and their metabolites, antagonists at the cannabinoid receptors and modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues including spleen, leukocytes; reproductive, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts; endocrine glands, arteries and heart. Five endogenous cannabinoids have been detected so far, of whom anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol are best characterized. There is evidence that besides the two cannabinoid receptor subtypes cloned so far additional cannabinoid receptor subtypes and vanilloid receptors are involved in the complex physiological functions of the cannabinoid system that include motor coordination, memory procession, control of appetite, pain modulation and neuroprotection. Strategies to modulate their activity include inhibition of re-uptake into cells and inhibition of their degradation to increase concentration and duration of action. Properties of cannabinoids that might be of therapeutic use include analgesia, muscle relaxation, immunosuppression, anti-inflammation, anti-allergic effects, sedation, improvement of mood, stimulation of appetite, anti-emesis, lowering of intraocular pressure, bronchodilation, neuroprotection and antineoplastic effects. PMID:15159677

  19. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  20. Taxonomy of fungi causing mucormycosis and entomophthoramycosis (zygomycosis) and nomenclature of the disease: molecular mycologic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2012-02-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis confirmed the phylum Zygomycota to be polyphyletic, and the taxa conventionally classified in Zygomycota are now distributed among the new phylum Glomeromycota and 4 subphyla incertae sedis (uncertain placement). Because the nomenclature of the disease zygomycosis was based on the phylum Zygomycota (Zygomycetes) in which the etiologic agents had been classified, the new classification profoundly affects the name of the disease. Zygomycosis was originally described as a convenient and inclusive name for 2 clinicopathologically different diseases, mucormycosis caused by members of Mucorales and entomophthoramycosis caused by species in the order Entomophthorales of Zygomycota. Without revision of original definition, the name "zygomycosis," however, has more often been used as a synonym only for mucormycosis. This article reviews the progress and changes in taxonomy and nomenclature of Zygomycota and the disease zygomycosis. The article also reiterates the reasons why the classic names "mucormycosis" and "entomophthoramycosis" are more appropriate than "zygomycosis." PMID:22247451

  1. New world monkey nightmares: science, art, use, and abuse (?) in platyrrhine taxonomic nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Alfred L

    2012-08-01

    The taxonomy and nomenclature of New World monkeys is becoming precariously unstable and impractical, plagued by revisions aimed at conforming to approaches that reject the Biological Species Concept for narrowly construed reasons and resulting in a hyperinflated taxonomy at species (often) and genus (sometimes) levels. This undermines a major goal of classification at the most basic taxonomic levels to ease communication and facilitate research. Since it is difficult to justify extensive changes in terminology without a deeply justified theoretical purpose or without showing what scientific benefits these alterations can bring, working primatologists need not accept this doctrinaire trend. Knowing as little as we do about what a species actually is, does not justify contorting the value of a species nomenclature so that it reflects nothing more than coat color, a node, or endpoint of a dendrogram. PMID:22605529

  2. The Working Group on Meteor Showers Nomenclature: a History, Current Status and a Call for Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jopek, T. J.; Jenniskens, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    During the IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro in 2009, the members of Commission 22 established the Working Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature, from what was formerly the Task Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature. The Task Group had completed its mission to propose a first list of established meteor showers that could receive officially names. At the business meeting of Commission 22 the list of 64 established showers was approved and consequently officially accepted by the IAU. A two-step process is adopted for showers to receive an official name from the IAU: i) before publication, all new showers discussed in the literature are first added to the Working List of Meteor Showers, thereby receiving a unique name, IAU number and three-letter code; ii) all showers which come up to the verification criterion are selected for inclusion in the List of Established Meteor Showers, before being officially named at the next IAU General Assembly.

  3. What's in a Name? Exploring the Nomenclature of Science Communication in the UK.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Sam; Redfern, James; Millington, Steve; Gray, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This study, via a consideration of the literature, and a limited survey of active science communicators, presents concise and workable definitions for science outreach, public engagement, widening participation, and knowledge exchange, in a UK context.  Sixty-six per cent of participants agreed that their definitions of outreach, public engagement, and widening participation aligned with those of their colleagues, whilst 64% felt that their personal definitions matched those of their institute. However, closer inspection of the open-ended questions found the respondents often differed in the use of the nomenclature. In particular, the respondents found it difficult to define knowledge exchange in this context. It is hoped that this initial study will form the foundation of future work in this area, and that it will help to further develop the debate regarding the need for a consistent nomenclature across science communication. PMID:26448860

  4. What’s in a Name? Exploring the Nomenclature of Science Communication in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, Sam; Redfern, James; Millington, Steve; Gray, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This study, via a consideration of the literature, and a limited survey of active science communicators, presents concise and workable definitions for science outreach, public engagement, widening participation, and knowledge exchange, in a UK context.  Sixty-six per cent of participants agreed that their definitions of outreach, public engagement, and widening participation aligned with those of their colleagues, whilst 64% felt that their personal definitions matched those of their institute. However, closer inspection of the open-ended questions found the respondents often differed in the use of the nomenclature. In particular, the respondents found it difficult to define knowledge exchange in this context. It is hoped that this initial study will form the foundation of future work in this area, and that it will help to further develop the debate regarding the need for a consistent nomenclature across science communication. PMID:26448860

  5. International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) progress to date and future plans.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Charlotte M; Baker, Julia F; Bradley, Alys E; Goodman, Dawn G; Harada, Takanori; Herbert, Ronald; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Kellner, Rupert; Mahler, Beth; Meseck, Emily; Nolte, Thomas; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Vahle, John; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The INHAND Proposal (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) has been operational since 2005. A Global Editorial Steering Committee (GESC) manages the overall objectives of the project and the development of harmonized terminology for each organ system is the responsibility of the Organ Working Groups (OWG), drawing upon experts from North America, Europe and Japan.Great progress has been made with 9 systems published to date - Respiratory, Hepatobiliary, Urinary, Central/Peripheral Nervous Systems, Male Reproductive and Mammary, Zymbals, Clitoral and Preputial Glands in Toxicologic Pathology and the Integument and Soft Tissue and Female Reproductive System in the Journal of Toxicologic Pathology as supplements and on a web site - www.goreni.org. INHAND nomenclature guides offer diagnostic criteria and guidelines for recording lesions observed in rodent toxicity and carcinogenicity studies. The guides provide representative photo-micrographs of morphologic changes, information regarding pathogenesis, and key references. During 2012, INHAND GESC representatives attended meetings with representatives of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to begin incorporation of INHAND terminology as preferred terminology for SEND (Standard for Exchange of Nonclinical Data) submissions to the FDA. The interest in utilizing the INHAND nomenclature, based on input from industry and government toxicologists as well as information technology specialists, suggests that there will be wide acceptance of this nomenclature. The purpose of this publication is to provide an update on the progress of INHAND. PMID:26023262

  6. International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) progress to date and future plans

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Charlotte M.; Baker, Julia F.; Bradley, Alys E.; Goodman, Dawn G.; Harada, Takanori; Herbert, Ronald; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Kellner, Rupert; Mahler, Beth; Meseck, Emily; Nolte, Thomas; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Vahle, John; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The INHAND Proposal (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) has been operational since 2005. A Global Editorial Steering Committee (GESC) manages the overall objectives of the project and the development of harmonized terminology for each organ system is the responsibility of the Organ Working Groups (OWG), drawing upon experts from North America, Europe and Japan.Great progress has been made with 9 systems published to date – Respiratory, Hepatobiliary, Urinary, Central/Peripheral Nervous Systems, Male Reproductive and Mammary, Zymbals, Clitoral and Preputial Glands in Toxicologic Pathology and the Integument and Soft Tissue and Female Reproductive System in the Journal of Toxicologic Pathology as supplements and on a web site – www.goreni.org. INHAND nomenclature guides offer diagnostic criteria and guidelines for recording lesions observed in rodent toxicity and carcinogenicity studies. The guides provide representative photo-micrographs of morphologic changes, information regarding pathogenesis, and key references. During 2012, INHAND GESC representatives attended meetings with representatives of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to begin incorporation of INHAND terminology as preferred terminology for SEND (Standard for Exchange of Nonclinical Data) submissions to the FDA. The interest in utilizing the INHAND nomenclature, based on input from industry and government toxicologists as well as information technology specialists, suggests that there will be wide acceptance of this nomenclature. The purpose of this publication is to provide an update on the progress of INHAND. PMID:26023262

  7. A new standard nomenclature for proteins related to Apx and Shroom

    PubMed Central

    Hagens, Olivier; Ballabio, Andrea; Kalscheuer, Vera; Kraehenbuhl, Jean-Pierre; Schiaffino, M Vittoria; Smith, Peter; Staub, Olivier; Hildebrand, Jeff; Wallingford, John B

    2006-01-01

    Shroom is a recently-described regulator of cell shape changes in the developing nervous system. This protein is a member of a small family of related proteins that are defined by sequence similarity and in most cases by some link to the actin cytoskeleton. At present these proteins are named Shroom, APX, APXL, and KIAA1202. In light of the growing interest in this family of proteins, we propose here a new standard nomenclature. PMID:16615870

  8. NASA 2010 Pharmacology Evidence Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Institute of Medicine reviewed NASA's Human Research Program Evidence in assessing the Pharmacology risk identified in NASA's Human Research Program Requirements Document (PRD). Since this review there was a major reorganization of the Pharmacology discipline within the HRP, as well as a re-evaluation of the Pharmacology evidence. This panel is being asked to review the latest version of the Pharmacology Evidence Report. Specifically, this panel will: (1) Appraise the descriptions of the human health-related risk in the HRP PRD. (2) Assess the relevance and comprehensiveness of the evidence in identifying potential threats to long-term space missions. (3) Assess the associated gaps in knowledge and identify additional areas for research as necessary.

  9. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  10. The Avian Brain Nomenclature Forum: Terminology for a New Century in Comparative Neuroanatomy

    PubMed Central

    REINER, ANTON; PERKEL, DAVID J.; BRUCE, LAURA L.; BUTLER, ANN B.; CSILLAG, ANDRÁS; KUENZEL, WAYNE; MEDINA, LORETA; PAXINOS, GEORGE; SHIMIZU, TORU; STRIEDTER, GEORG; WILD, MARTIN; BALL, GREGORY F.; DURAND, SARAH; GÜTÜRKÜN, ONUR; LEE, DIANE W.; MELLO, CLAUDIO V.; POWERS, ALICE; WHITE, STEPHANIE A.; HOUGH, GERALD; KUBIKOVA, LUBICA; SMULDERS, TOM V.; WADA, KAZUHIRO; DUGAS-FORD, JENNIFER; HUSBAND, SCOTT; YAMAMOTO, KEIKO; YU, JING; SIANG, CONNIE; JARVIS, ERICH D.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the assumptions of homology on which the standard nomenclature for the cell groups and fiber tracts of avian brains have been based are in error, and as a result that terminology promotes misunderstanding of the functional organization of avian brains and their evolutionary relationship to mammalian brains. Recognizing this problem, a number of avian brain researchers began an effort to revise the terminology, which culminated in the Avian Brain Nomenclature Forum, held at Duke University from July 18 to 20, 2002. In the new terminology approved at this Forum, the flawed conception that the telencephalon of birds consists nearly entirely of a hypertrophied basal ganglia has been purged from the telencephalic terminology, and the actual parts of the basal ganglia and its brainstem afferent cell groups have been given names reflecting their now evident homologies. The telencephalic regions that were erroneously named to reflect presumed homology to mammalian basal ganglia were renamed as parts of the pallium, using prefixes that retained most established abbreviations (to maintain continuity with the replaced nomenclature). Details of this meeting and its major conclusions are presented in this paper, and the details of the new terminology and its basis are presented in a longer companion paper. We urge all to use this new terminology, because we believe it will promote better communication among neuroscientists. PMID:19626136

  11. Nomenclatural instability in the venomous snakes of the Bothrops complex: Implications in toxinology and public health.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Paola Andrea; Venegas, Pablo Javier; Chaparro, Juan Carlos; Scrocchi, Gustavo José

    2016-09-01

    Since nomenclature is intended to reflect the evolutionary history of organisms, advances in our understanding of historical relationships may lead to changes in classification, and thus potentially in taxonomic instability. An unstable nomenclature for medically important animals like venomous snakes is of concern, and its implications in venom/antivenom research and snakebite treatment have been extensively discussed since the 90´s. The taxonomy of the pitvipers of the Bothrops complex has been historically problematic and different genus-level rearrangements were proposed to rectify the long-standing paraphyly of the group. Here we review the toxinological literature on the Bothrops complex to estimate the impact of recent proposals of classification in non-systematic research. This assessment revealed moderate levels of nomenclatural instability in the last five years, and the recurrence of some practices discussed in previous studies regarding the use of classifications and the information provided about the origin of venom samples. We briefly comment on a few examples and the implications of different proposals of classifications for the Bothrops complex. The aim of this review is to contribute to the reduction of adverse effects of current taxonomic instability in a group of medical importance in the Americas. PMID:27242040

  12. The P450 superfamily: update on new sequences, gene mapping, and recommended nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Nelson, D R; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Feyereisen, R; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F

    1991-01-01

    We provide here a list of 154 P450 genes and seven putative pseudogenes that have been characterized as of October 20, 1990. These genes have been described in a total of 23 eukaryotes (including nine mammalian and one plant species) and six prokaryotes. Of 27 gene families so far described, 10 exist in all mammals. These 10 families comprise 18 subfamilies, of which 16 and 14 have been mapped in the human and mouse genomes, respectively; to date, each subfamily appears to represent a cluster of tightly linked genes. We propose here a modest revision of the initially proposed (Nebert et al., DNA 6, 1-11, 1987) and updated (Nebert et al., DNA 8, 1-13, 1989) nomenclature system based on evolution of the superfamily. For the gene we recommend that the italicized root symbol CYP for human (Cyp for mouse), representing cytochrome P450, be followed by an Arabic number denoting the family, a letter designating the subfamily (when two or more exist), and an Arabic numeral representing the individual gene within the subfamily. A hyphen should precede the final number in mouse genes. We suggest that the human nomenclature system be used for other species. This system is consistent with our earlier proposed nomenclature for P450 of all eukaryotes and prokaryotes, except that we are discouraging the future use of cumbersome Roman numerals. PMID:1991046

  13. Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Gondwanan homoxylous woods: a nomenclatural revision of the genera with taxonomic notes.

    PubMed

    Bamford, M K.; Philippe, M

    2001-04-01

    The homoxylous fossil woods occurring in the Gondwanan continents of South America, Australia, Africa, India and Antarctica during the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous period are considered here. Original descriptions of the genera and wherever possible, the type material, have been consulted. Applying the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the generic names of the homoxylous woods have been revised from a nomenclatural point of view. According to this review, out of 31 generic names used for woods from the given time interval and area, 6 are illegitimate later nomenclatural synonyms, 1 is a later homonym, and 5 can be considered as taxonomical synonyms. Moreover, 9 genera have been used erroneously. We propose one new generic name (Protaxodioxylon n. gen.) and elsewhere we will propose for conservation, with a conserved type one of the illegitimate names and one of the taxonomic synonyms. As a result, we consider that there are only eighteen generic names correctly quoted for the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of Gondwana, and we provide a taxonomic key for the corresponding genera. This revision is the first step in systematically comparing northern and southern hemisphere woods. PMID:11179718

  14. A unified nomenclature for quantification and description of water conducting properties of sapwood xylem based on Darcy's law.

    PubMed

    Reid, Douglas E B; Silins, Uldis; Mendoza, Carl; Lieffers, Victor J

    2005-08-01

    The literature dealing with the water conducting properties of sapwood xylem in trees is inconsistent in terminology, symbols and units. This has resulted from confusion in the use of either an analogy to Ohm's law or Darcy's law as the basis for nomenclature. Ohm's law describes movement of electricity through a conductor, whereas Darcy's law describes movement of a fluid (liquid or gas) through a porous medium. However, it is generally not realized that, in their full notation, these laws are mathematically equivalent. Despite this, plant physiologists have failed to agree on a convention for nomenclature. As a result, the study of water movement through sapwood xylem is confusing, especially for scientists entering the field. To improve clarity, we suggest the adoption of a single nomenclature that can be used by all plant physiologists when describing water movement in xylem. Darcy's law is an explicit hydraulic relationship and the basis for established theories that describe three-dimensional saturated and unsaturated flow in porous media. We suggest, therefore, that Darcy's law is the more appropriate theoretical framework on which to base nomenclature describing sapwood hydraulics. Our proposed nomenclature is summarized in a table that describes conventional terms, with their formulae, dimensions, units and symbols; the table also lists the many synonyms found in recent literature that describe the same concepts. Adoption of this proposal will require some changes in the use of terminology, but a common rigorous nomenclature is needed for efficient and clear communication among scientists. PMID:15929930

  15. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  16. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pawson, Adam J.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P.H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS ‘Guide to Receptors and Channels’ (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques. PMID:24234439

  17. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS 'Guide to Receptors and Channels' (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques. PMID:24234439

  18. Network analyses in systems pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Seth I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Systems pharmacology is an emerging area of pharmacology which utilizes network analysis of drug action as one of its approaches. By considering drug actions and side effects in the context of the regulatory networks within which the drug targets and disease gene products function, network analysis promises to greatly increase our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the multiple actions of drugs. Systems pharmacology can provide new approaches for drug discovery for complex diseases. The integrated approach used in systems pharmacology can allow for drug action to be considered in the context of the whole genome. Network-based studies are becoming an increasingly important tool in understanding the relationships between drug action and disease susceptibility genes. This review discusses how analysis of biological networks has contributed to the genesis of systems pharmacology and how these studies have improved global understanding of drug targets, suggested new targets and approaches for therapeutics, and provided a deeper understanding of the effects of drugs. Taken together, these types of analyses can lead to new therapeutic options while improving the safety and efficacy of existing medications. Contact: ravi.iyengar@mssm.edu PMID:19648136

  19. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B.; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A.; Harty, Breanne L.; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C.; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W.; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A.; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W.; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  20. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  1. The Pharmacology of Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin M.; Furth, Mark E.; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase “regenerative pharmacology” to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is “the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues.” As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all. PMID:23818131

  2. Pharmacological effects of rosa damascena.

    PubMed

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Saberi, Zahra; Amini, Somayeh

    2011-07-01

    Rosa damascena mill L., known as Gole Mohammadi in is one of the most important species of Rosaceae family flowers. R. damascena is an ornamental plant and beside perfuming effect, several pharmacological properties including anti-HIV, antibacterial, antioxidant, antitussive, hypnotic, antidiabetic, and relaxant effect on tracheal chains have been reported for this plant. This article is a comprehensive review on pharmacological effects of R. damascena. Online literature searches were performed using Medline, medex, Scopus, and Google Scholar websites backed to 1972 to identify researches about R. damascena. Searches also were done by going through the author's files and the bibliographies of all located papers. PMID:23493250

  3. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  4. PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF PROTOCATECHUIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Rashid, Rehana; Fatima, Nighat; Mahmood, Sadaf; Mir, Sadullah; Khan, Sara; Jabeen, Nyla; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, PCA) is a simple phenolic acid. It is found in a large variety of edible plants and possesses various pharmacological activities. This article aims to review the modern trends in phytochemical isolation and extraction of PCA from plants and other natural resources. Moreover, this article also encompasses pharmacological and biological activities of PCA. It is well known to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hyperglycemia, antibacterial, anticancer, anti-ageing, anti-athro- genic, anti-tumoral, anti-asthma, antiulcer, antispasmodic and neurological properties. PMID:26647619

  5. Pharmacological Effects of Rosa Damascena

    PubMed Central

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Saberi, Zahra; Amini, Somayeh

    2011-01-01

    Rosa damascena mill L., known as Gole Mohammadi in is one of the most important species of Rosaceae family flowers. R. damascena is an ornamental plant and beside perfuming effect, several pharmacological properties including anti-HIV, antibacterial, antioxidant, antitussive, hypnotic, antidiabetic, and relaxant effect on tracheal chains have been reported for this plant. This article is a comprehensive review on pharmacological effects of R. damascena. Online literature searches were performed using Medline, medex, Scopus, and Google Scholar websites backed to 1972 to identify researches about R. damascena. Searches also were done by going through the author's files and the bibliographies of all located papers. PMID:23493250

  6. Pharmacological management of acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Melvin; Mullett, Charles J; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge base related to the pharmacological treatments for acute bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory illness affecting infants worldwide. The mainstays of therapy include airway support, supplemental oxygen, and support of fluids and nutrition. Frequently tried pharmacological interventions, such as ribavirin, nebulized bronchodilators, and systemic corticosteroids, have not been proven to benefit patients with bronchiolitis. Antibiotics do not improve the clinical course of patients with bronchiolitis, and should be used only in those patients with proven concurrent bacterial infection. Exogenous surfactant and heliox therapy also cannot be recommended for routine use, but surfactant replacement holds promise and should be further studied. PMID:19209271

  7. "Just as the Structural Formula Does": Names, Diagrams, and the Structure of Organic Chemistry at the 1892 Geneva Nomenclature Congress.

    PubMed

    Hepler-Smith, Evan

    2015-02-01

    At the Geneva Nomenclature Congress of 1892, some of the foremost organic chemists of the late nineteenth century crafted a novel relationship between chemical substances, chemical diagrams, and chemical names that has shaped practices of chemical representation ever since. During the 1880s, the French chemist Charles Friedel organised the nomenclature reform effort that culminated in the Geneva Congress; in the disorderly nomenclature of German synthetic chemistry, Friedel saw an opportunity to advance French national interests and his own pedagogical goals. Friedel and a group of close colleagues reconceived nomenclature as a unified field, in which all chemical names ought to relate clearly to one another and to the structure of the compounds they represented. The German chemist Adolf von Baeyer went a step farther, arguing for names that precisely and uniquely corresponded to the structural formula of each compound, tailored for use in chemical dictionaries and handbooks. Baeyer's vision prevailed at the Geneva Congress, which consequently codified rules for rigorously mapping structural formulas into names, resulting in names that faithfully represented the features of these diagrams but not always the chemical behaviour of the compounds themselves. This approach ultimately limited both the number of chemical compounds that the Geneva rules were able to encompass and the breadth of their application. However, the relationship between diagram and name established at the Geneva Congress became the foundation not only of subsequent systems of chemical nomenclature but of methods of organising information that have supported the modern chemical sciences. PMID:26173340

  8. The Miocene Topanga Group of Southern California - A 100-Year History of Changes in Stratigraphic Nomenclature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Russell H.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Vedder, John G.

    2007-01-01

    A review of selected literature summarizes the origin and chronology of changes in usage of 'Topanga' in the Miocene stratigraphic nomenclature of the Los Angeles Basin and adjacent areas in southern California. The review was done to summarize and reconcile some differences in Miocene stratigraphic nomenclature as applied to geologic map compilations of the Santa Ana (Morton, 2004), San Bernardino (Morton and Miller, 2003), Long Beach (Saucedo and others, 2003) and Los Angeles (Yerkes and Campbell, 2005) 30' x 60' quadrangles, all of which are products of the cooperative (California Geological Survey-U.S. Geological Survey) Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP). The deposition of the Topanga Group spans about 6 my (from as old as about 18 ma to as young as about 12 ma), and the sequence of included strata records changes in provenance and depositional environments that are contemporaneous with part of a major Miocene tectonic episode in southern California -- the 'basin-inception phase' in the evolution of the Neogene Los Angeles basin (Yerkes and others, 1965). The area of Topanga deposition extends to the southern, eastern, northern, and northwestern sides of the Los Angeles basin, as well as the southern part of the eastern Ventura Basin. Topanga beds are inferred to underlie the thick upper Miocene and Pliocene deposits of the central Los Angeles Basin and the southern part of the eastern Ventura Basin; however, they have been reached by drilling only in marginal areas, where the overlying deposits are relatively thin. Post-Topanga strata were deposited in more-restricted areas of rapid subsidence. Selected papers are summarized as they relate to the Topanga nomenclature, and are presented in chronological order.

  9. Human Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Alternatively-Spliced Transcriptional Variants and Their Suggested Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Black, William J.; Stagos, Dimitrios; Marchitti, Satori A.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Tipton, Keith F.; Bairoch, Amos; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily consists of 19 genes encoding enzymes critical for NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes, including drugs and environmental toxicants. Mutations in ALDH genes are the molecular basis of several disease states (e.g. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, pyridoxine-dependent seizures, and type II hyperprolinemia) and may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this nomenclature update was to identify splice transcriptional variants principally for the human ALDH genes. METHODS Data-mining methods were used to retrieve all human ALDH sequences. Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants were determined based upon: a) criteria for sequence integrity and genomic alignment; b) evidence of multiple independent cDNA sequences corresponding to a variant sequence; and c) if available, empirical evidence of variants from the literature. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants and their encoded proteins exist for most of the human ALDH genes; however, their function and significance remain to be established. When compared with the human genome, rat and mouse include an additional gene, Aldh1a7, in the ALDH1A subfamily. In order to avoid confusion when identifying splice variants in various genomes, nomenclature guidelines for the naming of such alternative transcriptional variants and proteins are recommended herein. In addition, a web database (www.aldh.org) has been developed to provide up-to-date information and nomenclature guidelines for the ALDH superfamily. PMID:19823103

  10. Anomalous pulmonary venous connections and related anomalies: nomenclature, embryology, anatomy, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael J; Ungerleider, Ross M; Aiello, Vera D; Spicer, Diane; Giroud, Jorge M

    2013-01-01

    This article combines material from three complementary overviews presented in the Symposium on Pulmonary Venous Anomalies during the Joint Meeting of the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery and Sociedad Latina de Cardiologia y Cirugia Cardiovascular Pediátrica in Lima, Peru. We discuss the embryologic basis for nomenclature, the hierarchical diagnostic categories, and the important anatomic and morphologic characteristics of anomalous pulmonary venous connections. The anatomic descriptions help to guide an understandable and sensible approach to the diagnosis and surgical management of these various disorders. PMID:23799752

  11. WHO and the development of acupuncture nomenclature: overcoming a Tower of Babel.

    PubMed

    Akerele, O

    1991-01-01

    At present, WHO does not have an official policy on acupuncture. The Organization's policies are usually developed after a debate has taken place on a particular health issue. There has not yet been a debate on acupuncture. This paper reviews WHO's efforts to produce a standard acupuncture nomenclature as a first step towards ensuring that a debate on acupuncture takes place in an atmosphere of greater understanding of the contribution that acupuncture can make in the delivery of health care. Activities that the programme for traditional medicine hopes to implement in the coming years are outlined. PMID:1897496

  12. Dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages: a unified nomenclature based on ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Guilliams, Martin; Ginhoux, Florent; Jakubzick, Claudia; Naik, Shalin H.; Onai, Nobuyuki; Schraml, Barbara U.; Segura, Elodie; Tussiwand, Roxane; Yona, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) has historically been categorized into monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages on the basis of functional and phenotypical characteristics. However, considering that these characteristics are often overlapping, the distinction between and classification of these cell types has been challenging. In this Opinion article, we propose a unified nomenclature for the MPS. We suggest that these cells can be classified primarily by their ontogeny and secondarily by their location, function and phenotype. We believe that this system permits a more robust classification during both steady-state and inflammatory conditions, with the benefit of spanning different tissues and across species. PMID:25033907

  13. International Union of Pharmacology. LXX. Subtypes of γ-Aminobutyric AcidA Receptors: Classification on the Basis of Subunit Composition, Pharmacology, and Function. Update

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Richard W.; Sieghart, Werner

    2010-01-01

    In this review we attempt to summarize experimental evidence on the existence of defined native GABAA receptor subtypes and to produce a list of receptors that actually seem to exist according to current knowledge. This will serve to update the most recent classification of GABAA receptors (Pharmacol Rev 50:291–313, 1998) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology. GABAA receptors are chloride channels that mediate the major form of fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. They are members of the Cys-loop pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (LGIC) superfamily and share structural and functional homology with other members of that family. GABAA receptors are assembled from a family of 19 homologous subunit gene products and form numerous, mostly hetero-oligomeric, pentamers. Such receptor subtypes with properties that depend on subunit composition vary in topography and ontogeny, in cellular and subcellular localization, in their role in brain circuits and behaviors, in their mechanisms of regulation, and in their pharmacology. We propose several criteria, which can be applied to all the members of the LGIC superfamily, for including a receptor subtype on a list of native hetero-oligomeric subtypes. With these criteria, we develop a working GABAA receptor list, which currently includes 26 members, but will undoubtedly be modified and grow as information expands. The list is divided into three categories of native receptor subtypes: “identified,” “existence with high probability,” and “tentative.” PMID:18790874

  14. Pharmacologic Treatment for Temporomandibular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dym, Harry; Bowler, Dustin; Zeidan, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacologic agents play an integral role in the overall management of temporomandibular joint disorder. The general dentist should be familiar with the different classes of drugs currently in use for dealing with this often complex medical/dental problem. PMID:27040290

  15. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  16. Pharmacology Experiments on the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    A computer program that replaces a set of pharmacology and physiology laboratory experiments on live animals or isolated organs is described and illustrated. Five experiments are simulated: dose-effect relationships on smooth muscle, blood pressure and catecholamines, neuromuscular signal transmission, acetylcholine and the circulation, and…

  17. Pharmacology of Marihuana (Cannabis sativa)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maickel, Roger P.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed discussion of marihuana (Cannabis sativa) providing the modes of use, history, chemistry, and physiologic properties of the drug. Cites research results relating to the pharmacologic effects of marihuana. These effects are categorized into five areas: behavioral, cardiovascular-respiratory, central nervous system, toxicity-toxicology,…

  18. The Pharmacological Potential of Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This review describes pharmacologically active compounds from mushrooms. Compounds and complex substances with antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antiallergic, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory, antiatherogenic, hypoglycemic, hepatoprotective and central activities are covered, focusing on the review of recent literature. The production of mushrooms or mushroom compounds is discussed briefly. PMID:16136207

  19. The pharmacological activities of (-)-anonaine.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsing-Tan; Wu, Hui-Ming; Chen, Hsin-Liang; Liu, Chi-Ming; Chen, Chung-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Magnoliaceae and Annonaceae are used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. (-)-Anonaine, isolated from several species of Magnoliaceae and Annonaceae, presents antiplasmodial, antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidation, anticancer, antidepression, and vasorelaxant activity. This article provides an overview of the pharmacological functions of (-)-anonaine. PMID:23857128

  20. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  1. Clinical pharmacology and vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Silvestrelli, G; Corea, F; Micheli, S; Lanari, A

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment and several drugs of abuse have been associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). However, there is a paucity of data on the independent risk of vascular disease (VD) associated with pharmacological treatment and no controlled trials demonstrating a reduction in risk with abstinence. Information about IHD and CVD-related drug abuse is mainly limited to epidemiological studies focused on urban populations. The potential link between some pharmacological treatments (estrogen, some oncologic drugs and some atypical antipsychotics) and cerebrovascular adverse events was analyzed, but disagreement about an association persists. Drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamines and heroin, have been associated with an increased vascular risk. These drugs can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure, vasculitic-type changes, lead to embolization caused by infective endocarditis, and hemostatic and hematologic abnormalities that can result in increased blood viscosity and platelet aggregation. Long-term treatment strategies based on medication, psychological support, and outreach programs play an important role in treatment of drug dependency. In these last years public interest in risk factors for VD has been constantly increasing and the successful identification and management of pharmacological treatment and drug abuse can be challenging. One of the major public health issues for the future will be to focus more on new vascular risk factor recognition and management. The objective of this chapter is to review the relevance of IHD and CVD associated with various pharmacological treatments and drug abuse with focusing on ischemic disease. This chapter reports the clinical evidence of this association and analyzes the experimental role of new drugs as a growing risk factor of VD with the hypothetical new association. In conclusion, in this chapter great attention is paid to evaluating the scientific and real

  2. Proposals to clarify and enhance the naming of fungi under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, David L

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three proposals to modify the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants adopted in 2011 with respect to the provisions for fungi are made, in accordance with the wishes of mycologists expressed at the 10(th) International Mycological Congress in Bangkok in 2014, and with the support of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF), the votes of which are presented here. The proposals relate to: conditions for epitypification, registration of later typifications, protected lists of names, removal of exemptions for lichen-forming fungi, provision of a diagnosis when describing a new taxon, citation of sanctioned names, avoiding homonyms in other kingdoms, ending preference for sexually typified names, and treatment of conspecific names with the same epithet. These proposals are also being published in Taxon, will be considered by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi and General Committee on Nomenclature, and voted on at the 19(th) International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China, in 2017. PMID:26203423

  3. Clarification of the nomenclature for MSC: The International Society for Cellular Therapy position statement.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, E M; Le Blanc, K; Dominici, M; Mueller, I; Slaper-Cortenbach, I; Marini, F C; Deans, R J; Krause, D S; Keating, A

    2005-01-01

    The plastic-adherent cells isolated from BM and other sources have come to be widely known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the recognized biologic properties of the unfractionated population of cells do not seem to meet generally accepted criteria for stem cell activity, rendering the name scientifically inaccurate and potentially misleading to the lay public. Nonetheless, a bona fide MSC most certainly exists. To address this inconsistency between nomenclature and biologic properties, and to clarify the terminology, we suggest that the fibroblast-like plastic-adherent cells, regardless of the tissue from which they are isolated, be termed multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, while the term mesenchymal stem cells is used only for cells that meet specified stem cell criteria. The widely recognized acronym, MSC, may be used for both cell populations, as is the current practice; thus, investigators must clearly define the more scientifically correct designation in their reports. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) encourages the scientific community to adopt this uniform nomenclature in all written and oral communications. PMID:16236628

  4. Development of the Spanish version of the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine: methodology and main issues.

    PubMed Central

    Reynoso, G. A.; March, A. D.; Berra, C. M.; Strobietto, R. P.; Barani, M.; Iubatti, M.; Chiaradio, M. P.; Serebrisky, D.; Kahn, A.; Vaccarezza, O. A.; Leguiza, J. L.; Ceitlin, M.; Luna, D. A.; Bernaldo de Quirós, F. G.; Otegui, M. I.; Puga, M. C.; Vallejos, M.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation features linguistic and terminology management issues related to the development of the Spanish version of the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED). It aims at describing the aspects of translating and the difficulties encountered in delivering a natural and consistent medical nomenclature. Bunge's three-layered model is referenced to analyze the sequence of symbolic concept representations. It further explains how a communicative translation based on a concept-to-concept approach was used to achieve the highest level of flawlessness and naturalness for the Spanish rendition of SNOMED. Translation procedures and techniques are described and exemplified. Both the computer-aided and human translation methods are portrayed. The scientific and translation team tasks are detailed, with focus on Newmark's four-level principle for the translation process, extended with a fifth further level relevant to the ontology to control the consistency of the typology of concepts. Finally the convenience for a common methodology to develop non-English versions of SNOMED is suggested. PMID:11079973

  5. International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND): Progress to Date and Future Plans.

    PubMed

    Keenan, C M; Baker, J; Bradley, A; Goodman, D G; Harada, T; Herbert, R; Kaufmann, W; Kellner, R; Mahler, B; Meseck, E; Nolte, T; Rittinghausen, S; Vahle, J; Yoshizawa, K

    2015-07-01

    The International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice proposal (INHAND) has been operational since 2005. A Global Editorial Steering Committee manages the overall objectives of the project, and the development of harmonized terminology for each organ system is the responsibility of the Organ Working Groups, drawing upon experts from North America, Europe, and Japan. Great progress has been made with 9 systems published to date--respiratory, hepatobiliary, urinary, central/peripheral nervous systems, male reproductive and mammary, zymbals, clitoral, and preputial glands in Toxicologic Pathology and the integument and soft tissue and female reproductive in the Journal of Toxicologic Pathology as supplements and on a Web site--www.goReni.org. INHAND nomenclature guides offer diagnostic criteria and guidelines for recording lesions observed in rodent toxicity and carcinogenicity studies. The guides provide representative photomicrographs of morphologic changes, information regarding pathogenesis, and key references. The purpose of this brief communication is to provide an update on the progress of INHAND. PMID:25530274

  6. Identification, Nomenclature, and Evolutionary Relationships of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P.; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S.; Reese, R. Neil; Benson, Benjamin V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution. PMID:24137047

  7. A proposal to rationalize within-species plant virus nomenclature: benefits and implications of inaction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Roger A C; Kehoe, Monica A

    2016-07-01

    Current approaches used to name within-species, plant virus phylogenetic groups are often misleading and illogical. They involve names based on biological properties, sequence differences and geographical, country or place-association designations, or any combination of these. This type of nomenclature is becoming increasingly unsustainable as numbers of sequences of the same virus from new host species and different parts of the world increase. Moreover, this increase is accelerating as world trade and agriculture expand, and climate change progresses. Serious consequences for virus research and disease management might arise from incorrect assumptions made when current within-species phylogenetic group names incorrectly identify properties of group members. This could result in development of molecular tools that incorrectly target dangerous virus strains, potentially leading to unjustified impediments to international trade or failure to prevent such strains being introduced to countries, regions or continents formerly free of them. Dangerous strains might be missed or misdiagnosed by diagnostic laboratories and monitoring programs, and new cultivars with incorrect strain-specific resistances released. Incorrect deductions are possible during phylogenetic analysis of plant virus sequences and errors from strain misidentification during molecular and biological virus research activities. A nomenclature system for within-species plant virus phylogenetic group names is needed which avoids such problems. We suggest replacing all other naming approaches with Latinized numerals, restricting biologically based names only to biological strains and removing geographically based names altogether. Our recommendations have implications for biosecurity authorities, diagnostic laboratories, disease-management programs, plant breeders and researchers. PMID:27101071

  8. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup phylogeny of the dog: Proposal for a cladistic nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Fregel, Rosa; Suárez, Nicolás M; Betancor, Eva; González, Ana M; Cabrera, Vicente M; Pestano, José

    2015-05-01

    Canis lupus familiaris mitochondrial DNA analysis has increased in recent years, not only for the purpose of deciphering dog domestication but also for forensic genetic studies or breed characterization. The resultant accumulation of data has increased the need for a normalized and phylogenetic-based nomenclature like those provided for human maternal lineages. Although a standardized classification has been proposed, haplotype names within clades have been assigned gradually without considering the evolutionary history of dog mtDNA. Moreover, this classification is based only on the D-loop region, proven to be insufficient for phylogenetic purposes due to its high number of recurrent mutations and the lack of relevant information present in the coding region. In this study, we design 1) a refined mtDNA cladistic nomenclature from a phylogenetic tree based on complete sequences, classifying dog maternal lineages into haplogroups defined by specific diagnostic mutations, and 2) a coding region SNP analysis that allows a more accurate classification into haplogroups when combined with D-loop sequencing, thus improving the phylogenetic information obtained in dog mitochondrial DNA studies. PMID:25869968

  9. Proposed nomenclature for salt intake and for reductions in dietary salt.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norm R C; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Webster, Jacqui; Lackland, Daniel T; Neal, Bruce; MacGregor, Graham A

    2015-04-01

    There is considerable confusion about what ranges of dietary salt(a) could be considered low, normal, or high and also what ranges of reduction in dietary salt are small or large. The World Hypertension League with other organizations involved in dietary salt reduction have proposed a standardized nomenclature based on normal ancestral levels of salt intake and also on ranges of reduction in salt intake in clinical and population interventions. Low daily salt (sodium) intake where harm due to deficiency would be expected to occur is recommended to remain undefined because of inadequate research but likely <0.25 g (100 mg), normal (physiological) intake <2.5 g (1000 mg), recommended intake <5.0 g (2000 mg), high ≥5.0 g (2000 mg), very high >10 to 15 g (4000-6000 mg), and extremely high >15 g (6000 mg). Reductions in daily salt (sodium) intake are recommended to be called small if <2.5 g (1000 mg), moderate if 2.5 to 5.0 g (1000-2000 mg) and large if >5.0 g (2000 mg). Use of this nomenclature is likely to result in less confusion about salt intake and interventions to reduce dietary sodium. PMID:25413335

  10. A world checklist of Onychophora (velvet worms), with notes on nomenclature and status of names.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ivo de Sena; Read, V Morley St J; Mayer, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the number of valid species of Onychophora is uncertain. To facilitate taxonomic work on this understudied animal group, we present an updated checklist for the two extant onychophoran subgroups, Peripatidae and Peripatopsidae, along with an assessment of the status of each species. According to our study, 82 species of Peripatidae and 115 species of Peripatopsidae have been described thus far. However, among these 197 species, 20 are nomina dubia due to major taxonomic inconsistencies. Apart from nomina dubia, many of the valid species also require revision, in particular representatives of Paraperipatus within the Peripatopsidae, and nearly all species of Peripatidae. In addition to extant representatives, the record of unambiguous fossils includes three species with uncertain relationship to the extant taxa. For all species, we provide a list of synonyms, information on types and type localities, as well as remarks on taxonomic and nomenclatural problems and misspellings. According to recent evidence of high endemism and cryptic speciation among the Peripatidae and Peripatopsidae, previous synonyms are revised. Putative mutations, subspecies and variations are either raised to the species status or synonymised with corresponding taxa. In our revised checklist, we follow the rules and recommendations of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature to clarify previous inconsistencies. PMID:22930648

  11. Clarifying the nomenclature of intervertebral disc degeneration and displacement: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Qiang; Samartzis, Dino

    2014-01-01

    As a significant determinant of low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) has attracted more and more attention of both investigators and physicians. Disc herniation, termed as intervertebral disc displacement, is amongst the most prevalent spinal diseases closely linked with IDD. Due to the same origins and similar pathophysiology, the ambiguity regarding the similarity and difference of IDD and intervertebral disc displacement thus remains. The aim of this study was to clarify the nomenclature of IDD and disc herniation in terms of molecular etiology, pathophysiology, nature history and clinical outcomes. Collectively, IDD is a type of multifaceted, progressive spinal disease with or without clinical symptoms as back pain, characterized by extracellular matrix and the integrity of NP and AF lost, fissures formation. Disc herniation (termed as intervertebral disc displacement) is a type of spinal disease based on IDD or not, with local pain and/or sciatica due to mechanical compression and autoimmune cascades upon the corresponding nerve roots. Clarifying the nomenclature of intervertebral disc degeneration and displacement has important implications both for investigators and for physicians. PMID:24817926

  12. A world checklist of Onychophora (velvet worms), with notes on nomenclature and status of names

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ivo de Sena; Read, V. Morley St. J.; Mayer, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the number of valid species of Onychophora is uncertain. To facilitate taxonomic work on this understudied animal group, we present an updated checklist for the two extant onychophoran subgroups, Peripatidae and Peripatopsidae, along with an assessment of the status of each species. According to our study, 82 species of Peripatidae and 115 species of Peripatopsidae have been described thus far. However, among these 197 species, 20 are nomina dubia due to major taxonomic inconsistencies. Apart from nomina dubia, many of the valid species also require revision, in particular representatives of Paraperipatus within the Peripatopsidae, and nearly all species of Peripatidae. In addition to extant representatives, the record of unambiguous fossils includes three species with uncertain relationship to the extant taxa. For all species, we provide a list of synonyms, information on types and type localities, as well as remarks on taxonomic and nomenclatural problems and misspellings. According to recent evidence of high endemism and cryptic speciation among the Peripatidae and Peripatopsidae, previous synonyms are revised. Putative mutations, subspecies and variations are either raised to the species status or synonymised with corresponding taxa. In our revised checklist, we follow the rules and recommendations of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature to clarify previous inconsistencies. PMID:22930648

  13. MEGA ♪ --Empirical Support for Nomenclature on the Anomalies: Sexually Violent and Predatory Youth.

    PubMed

    Miccio-Fonseca, L C; Rasmussen, Lucinda A Lee

    2015-10-01

    Applied are empirical findings supporting the authors' previously presented nomenclature identifying two subsets of sexually abusive youth overlooked by most contemporary risk assessment tools: sexually violent and predatory sexually violent youth. The cross-validation findings on an ecologically framed risk assessment tool, MEGA (♪) (Multiplex Empirically Guided Inventory of Ecological Aggregates for Assessing Sexually Abusive Children and Adolescents [Ages 19 and Under]) (N = 1,056 male and female sexually abusive youth, ages 4-19, including youth with low intellectual functioning), from the United States, Canada, England, and Scotland, were utilized. Findings provided normative data, with cutoff scores according to age and gender. Most contemporary risk assessment tools have three levels (low, moderate, and high), which may in fact be limited in assessing the range of risk level. The MEGA (♪) cross-validation established a new range of risk level, with the fourth level (very high) definitively identifying the most dangerous youth, thus empirically supporting the nomenclature of sexually violent and predatory sexually violent youth. PMID:24793314

  14. Pharmacometabolomics: implications for clinical pharmacology and systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Weinshilboum, R M

    2014-02-01

    Metabolomics, the study of metabolism at an "omic" level, has the potential to transform our understanding of mechanisms of drug action and the molecular basis for variation in drug response. It is now possible to define metabolic signatures of drug exposure that can identify pathways involved in both drug efficacy and adverse drug reactions. In addition, the "metabotype," the metabolic "signature" of a patient, is a unique identity that contains information about drug response and disease heterogeneity. The application of metabolomics for the study of drug effects and variation in drug response is creating "pharmacometabolomics," a discipline that will contribute to personalized drug therapy and will complement pharmacogenomics by capturing environmental and microbiome-level influences on response to drug therapy. This field has the potential to transform pharmacology and clinical pharmacology in significant ways and will contribute to efforts for personalized therapy. This overview highlights developments in the new discipline of pharmacometabolomics. PMID:24193171

  15. Paradoxical pharmacology: turning our pharmacological models upside down.

    PubMed

    Page, Clive

    2011-04-01

    Paradoxical pharmacology is a term first suggested by Richard Bond to refer to intriguing observations that chronic use of some drug types can have the opposite biological effect(s) to those seen following acute administration of the same drug. A good example of 'paradoxical pharmacology' is the research Richard has pioneered showing that whereas acute administration of β-blockers is contraindicated in the treatment of asthma, chronic use of certain β-blockers can have therapeutic benefit. It would appear that those β-blockers that can act as inverse agonists at the β2 receptor particularly show this paradoxical effect and the findings of Richard's research not only challenge the dogma of the treatment of asthma but also challenge many of the pharmacological principles of ligand/receptor interactions established by Sir James Black and others. In this paper, I discuss Richard's efforts to evaluate the chronic effects of β-blockers in the airways and how this research caught the imagination of Sir James Black. PMID:21458081

  16. Rebuilding the Tower of Babel: A Revised Nomenclature for the Study of Suicide and Suicidal Behaviors. Part 2: Suicide-Related Ideations, Communications, and Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Morton M.; Berman, Alan L.; Sanddal, Nels D.; O'Carroll, Patrick W.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Although a number of investigators have adopted the O'Carroll et al. (1996) nomenclature and applied it in their studies, and others have acknowledged its role in highlighting the need for clarification of terms, the nomenclature has not been widely used in the research and clinical communities. The rationale behind the rebuilding of the O'Carroll…

  17. Nanoparticles: pharmacological and toxicological significance

    PubMed Central

    Medina, C; Santos-Martinez, M J; Radomski, A; Corrigan, O I; Radomski, M W

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles are tiny materials (<1000 nm in size) that have specific physicochemical properties different to bulk materials of the same composition and such properties make them very attractive for commercial and medical development. However, nanoparticles can act on living cells at the nanolevel resulting not only in biologically desirable, but also in undesirable effects. In contrast to many efforts aimed at exploiting desirable properties of nanoparticles for medicine, there are limited attempts to evaluate potentially undesirable effects of these particles when administered intentionally for medical purposes. Therefore, there is a pressing need for careful consideration of benefits and side effects of the use of nanoparticles in medicine. This review article aims at providing a balanced update of these exciting pharmacological and potentially toxicological developments. The classes of nanoparticles, the current status of nanoparticle use in pharmacology and therapeutics, the demonstrated and potential toxicity of nanoparticles will be discussed. PMID:17245366

  18. Pharmacologic treatment of pediatric insomnia.

    PubMed

    Owens, Judith A; Moturi, Sricharan

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric insomnia is common in children and adolescents, particularly in children who have comorbid medical, psychiatric, and neurodevelopmental disorders, and may be associated with cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial impairments that often result in significant caregiver burden. Although several behavioral interventions for pediatric insomnia are effective, there is a relative paucity of empiric evidence supporting the use of pharmacologic treatment. Sedative/hypnotic drugs are frequently used in clinical practice to treat pediatric insomnia, and guidelines for the use of these medications in general as well as for specific medications have been developed. This review presents expert consensus guidelines for the use of these medications in clinical practice, with a focus on the different classes of pharmacologic agents that are most commonly prescribed. PMID:19836701

  19. Pharmacological effects of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Aparna; Singh, D K

    2012-01-01

    Sapindus mukorossi is an extremely valuable medicinal plant, distributed in tropical and sub-tropical regions of Asia. The aim of present review is to form a short compilation of the phytochemical composition and pharmacological properties of this multipurpose tree. The main phytoconstituents isolated and identified from different parts of this plant are triterpenoidal saponins of oleanane, dammarane and tirucullane type. The structure and chemical names of all the types of triterpenoidal saponins reported in Sapindus mukorossi are included in this review. Many research studies have been conducted to prove the plant's potential as being spermicidal, contraceptive, hepatoprotective, emetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-protozoal. The present review highlights some of the salient pharmacological uses of Sapindus mukorossi. PMID:22983291

  20. Pharmacological potential of cerium oxidenanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celardo, Ivana; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in pharmacology to improve or create ex novo therapies. Cerium oxidenanoparticles (nanoceria), well-known as catalysts, possess an astonishing pharmacological potential due to their antioxidant properties, deriving from a fraction of Ce3+ ions present in CeO2. These defects, compensated by oxygen vacancies, are enriched at the surface and therefore in nanosized particles. Reactions involving redox cycles between the Ce3+ and Ce4+oxidation states allow nanoceria to react catalytically with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, mimicking the behavior of two key antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, potentially abating all noxious intracellularreactive oxygen species (ROS) via a self-regenerating mechanism. Hence nanoceria, apparently well tolerated by the organism, might fight chronic inflammation and the pathologies associated with oxidative stress, which include cancer and neurodegeneration. Here we review the biological effects of nanoceria as they emerge from in vitro and in vivo studies, considering biocompatibility and the peculiar antioxidant mechanisms.

  1. Pharmacologic management of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Price, W A

    1988-05-01

    Treatment of eating disorders is difficult regardless of the methods employed. Pharmacologic management in anorexia nervosa and in bulimia nervosa is especially helpful when it is part of a multimodal treatment approach that includes individual, family and behavioral therapy. Care must be taken to guard against side effects, abuse and noncompliance in a group of patients that tends to be prone to all three. PMID:3284300

  2. A Pharmacologic View of Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Lamola, Angelo A

    2016-06-01

    A pharmacologic view of phototherapy for neonatal jaundice is presented. By considering the photons of therapy light as molecules of a drug, this view connects therapeutic efficacy with photon wavelength, photon dose, dose rate and regimen, efficiency of photon absorption by bilirubin, quantum yields of photoproducts, and their metabolic courses. Based on this view, recommendations to ultimately improve efficacy and safety are presented. Special attention is given to phototherapy regimens for low gestational age, low birthweight infants. PMID:27235206

  3. Pharmacological disruption of maladaptive memory.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane R; Torregrossa, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by intrusive, distracting, and disturbing memories that either perpetuate the illness or hinder successful treatment. For example, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves such strong reemergence of memories associated with a traumatic event that the individual feels like the event is happening again. Furthermore, drug addiction is characterized by compulsive use and repeated relapse that is often driven by internal memories of drug use and/or by exposure to external stimuli that were associated with drug use. Therefore, identifying pharmacological methods to weaken the strength of maladaptive memories is a major goal of research efforts aimed at finding new treatments for these disorders. The primary mechanism by which memories could be pharmacologically disrupted or altered is through manipulation of memory reconsolidation. Reconsolidation occurs when an established memory is remembered or reactivated, reentering a labile state before again being consolidated into long-term memory storage. Memories are subject to disruption during this labile state. In this chapter we will discuss the preclinical and clinical studies identifying potential pharmacological methods for disrupting the integrity of maladaptive memory to treat mental illness. PMID:25977090

  4. The pharmacology of bimatoprost (Lumigan).

    PubMed

    Woodward, D F; Krauss, A H; Chen, J; Lai, R K; Spada, C S; Burk, R M; Andrews, S W; Shi, L; Liang, Y; Kedzie, K M; Chen, R; Gil, D W; Kharlamb, A; Archeampong, A; Ling, J; Madhu, C; Ni, J; Rix, P; Usansky, J; Usansky, H; Weber, A; Welty, D; Yang, W; Tang-Liu, D D; Garst, M E; Brar, B; Wheeler, L A; Kaplan, L J

    2001-05-01

    Bimatoprost (Lumigan) is a pharmacologically unique and highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent. It appears to mimic the activity of a newly discovered family of fatty acid amides, termed prostamides. One biosynthetic route to the prostamides involves anandamide as the precursor. Bimatoprost pharmacology has been extensively characterized by binding and functional studies at more than 100 drug targets, which comprise a diverse variety of receptors, ion channels, and transporters. Bimatoprost exhibited no meaningful activity at receptors known to include antiglaucoma drug targets as follows: adenosine (A(1-3)), adrenergic (alpha(1), alpha(2), beta(1), beta(2)), cannabinoid (CB(1), CB(2)), dopamine (D(1-5)), muscarinic (M(1-5)), prostanoid (DP, EP(1-4), FP, IP, TP), and serotonin (5HT(1-7)). Bimatoprost does, however, exhibit potent inherent pharmacological activity in the feline iris sphincter preparation, which is prostamide-sensitive. Bimatoprost also resembles the prostamides in that it is a potent and highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent. A single dose of bimatoprost markedly reduces intraocular pressure in dogs and laser-induced ocular hypertensive monkeys. Decreases in intraocular pressure are well maintained for at least 24 hr post-dose. Human studies have demonstrated that systemic exposure to bimatoprost is low and that accumulation does not occur. The sclera is the preferred route of accession to the eye. The high scleral permeability coefficient Papp is a likely contributing factor to the rapid onset and long-acting ocular hypotensive profile of bimatoprost. PMID:11434936

  5. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  6. [Pharmacological preconditioning in carotid endarterectomy].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Karalkin, A V; Fedin, A I; Virganskii, A O; Kunitsyn, N V; Kholopova, E A; Yumin, S M

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at examining efficacy of preoperative preparation (pharmacological preconditioning) for carotid endarterectomy in patients with chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency. For this purpose, we analysed the outcomes of surgical treatment in a total of 80 patients presenting with haemodynamically significant unilateral and bilateral lesions of carotid arteries. Of these, 40 patients were operated on immediately and a further 40 patients underwent surgery after pharmacological preconditioning with Actovegin taken at a daily dose of 1,200 mg for 1.5 months. It was demonstrated that preoperative preparation prior to surgery increases cerebral perfusion which is determined by means of single-photon emission computed tomography, thus substantially improving the outcomes of surgical treatment. Statistically significant differences in cognitive function of these groups of patients were revealed 7 days and 6 months after the operation. Improvement of cognitive functions was associated with fewer symptom-free postoperative cerebral ischaemic foci in various regions of the brain. A conclusion was made on a positive role of pharmacological preconditioning with Actovegin in surgical management of cerebrovascular insufficiency, first of all in relation to more complete restoration of cognitive functions. PMID:26355920

  7. Enzymatic Vitrectomy and Pharmacologic Vitreodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankoor R; Trese, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    The field of vitreoretinal surgery has evolved substantially over the last several decades. Scientific advances have improved our understanding of disease pathophysiology, and new surgical adjuncts and techniques have decreased surgical time and improved patient outcomes. Pharmacologic agents have recently been developed for intraocular use in order to enhance vitreous removal and even as a nonsurgical treatment for pathology due to an abnormal vitreoretinal interface. Plasmin can successfully cause vitreous liquefaction and induce a posterior vitreous detachment. Additionally, ocriplasmin has been approved for symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion and others appear to be promising for pharmacologic manipulation of the vitreous. The ability to induce vitreous liquefaction and a complete posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) with a single intravitreal injection has potential implications for the management of multiple vitreoretinopathies. Enzymatic vitrectomy may help to reduce vitreous viscosity, thereby facilitating removal during vitrectomy and reducing surgical time, especially when using smaller-gauge vitrectomy instruments. The induction of a PVD also has the potential to reduce intraoperative complications. As we improve our understanding of the molecular flux in the vitreous cavity, pharmacologic vitreodynamics will likely become more important as it may allow for improved manipulation of intravitreal molecules. PMID:26501959

  8. Nomenclature, categorization and usage of formulae to adjust QT interval for heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, Simon W; Cheng, Xin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the QT interval on a standard 12 lead electrocardiogram is of value in the recognition of a number of conditions. A critical part of its use is the adjustment for the effect of heart rate on QT interval. A systematic search was conducted to identify studies that proposed formulae to standardize the QT interval by heart rate. A nomenclature was developed for current and subsequent equations based on whether they are corrective (QTc) or predictive (QTp). QTc formulae attempt to separate the dependence of the length of the QT interval from the length of the RR interval. QTp formulae utilize heart rate and the output QTp is compared to the uncorrected QT interval. The nomenclature consists of the first letter of the first author’s name followed by the next two consonance (whenever possible) in capital letters; with subscripts in lower case alphabetical letter if the first author develops more than one equation. The single exception was the Framingham equation, because this cohort has developed its own “name” amongst cardiovascular studies. Equations were further categorized according to whether they were linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic, or power based. Data show that a person’s QT interval adjusted for heart rate can vary dramatically with the different QTc and QTp formulae depending on the person’s heart rate and QT interval. The differences in the QT interval adjustment equations encompasses values that are considered normal or significant prolonged. To further compare the equations, we considered that the slope of QTc versus heart rate should be zero if there was no correlation between QT and heart rate. Reviewing a sample of 107 patient ECGs from a hospital setting, the rank order of the slope - from best (closest to zero) to worst was QTcDMT, QTcRTHa, QTcHDG, QTcGOT, QTcFRM, QTcFRD, QTcBZT and QTcMYD. For two recent formulae based on large data sets specifically QTcDMT and QTcRTHa, there was no significant deviation of the slope

  9. Nomenclature, categorization and usage of formulae to adjust QT interval for heart rate.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Simon W; Cheng, Xin Bo

    2015-06-26

    Assessment of the QT interval on a standard 12 lead electrocardiogram is of value in the recognition of a number of conditions. A critical part of its use is the adjustment for the effect of heart rate on QT interval. A systematic search was conducted to identify studies that proposed formulae to standardize the QT interval by heart rate. A nomenclature was developed for current and subsequent equations based on whether they are corrective (QTc) or predictive (QTp). QTc formulae attempt to separate the dependence of the length of the QT interval from the length of the RR interval. QTp formulae utilize heart rate and the output QTp is compared to the uncorrected QT interval. The nomenclature consists of the first letter of the first author's name followed by the next two consonance (whenever possible) in capital letters; with subscripts in lower case alphabetical letter if the first author develops more than one equation. The single exception was the Framingham equation, because this cohort has developed its own "name" amongst cardiovascular studies. Equations were further categorized according to whether they were linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic, or power based. Data show that a person's QT interval adjusted for heart rate can vary dramatically with the different QTc and QTp formulae depending on the person's heart rate and QT interval. The differences in the QT interval adjustment equations encompasses values that are considered normal or significant prolonged. To further compare the equations, we considered that the slope of QTc versus heart rate should be zero if there was no correlation between QT and heart rate. Reviewing a sample of 107 patient ECGs from a hospital setting, the rank order of the slope - from best (closest to zero) to worst was QTcDMT, QTcRTHa, QTcHDG, QTcGOT, QTcFRM, QTcFRD, QTcBZT and QTcMYD. For two recent formulae based on large data sets specifically QTcDMT and QTcRTHa, there was no significant deviation of the slope from zero

  10. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions. PMID:14976618

  11. Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K P; Stanley, G D

    1999-01-01

    When performing IVCS, one must never forget the primary goal of providing patient comfort without compromising cardiopulmonary function or the patient's ability to react purposely to verbal commands and physical stimuli. When it is anticipated that required sedation will lead to loss of protective airway reflexes, such patients require a greater level of care than exists with IVCS. Deep sedation is a complication of IVCS and must be avoided. In deep sedation, one creates a state of depressed consciousness from which the patient is not easily aroused, accompanied by a partial or complete loss of protective reflexes, including the ability to maintain a patent airway independently and respond purposely to physical stimuli or verbal commands. In keeping this goal in mind, understanding those situations in which patients are at increased risk should be emphasized. In general, the elderly show increased sensitivity to the drugs used for IVCS, so the dose and frequency of administration should be reduced. In addition, patients with COPD appear to be more sensitive to the respiratory depressant effects of narcotics and benzodiazepines, especially when used in combination. Patients with low serum albumin concentrations show increased sensitivity to drugs that are highly protein bound such as thiopental because more free drug is available for therapeutic effect. To avoid hypotention, caution should be exercised in patients with poor left ventricular function or borderline volume status before the administration of IVCS. Understanding the metabolism and excretion of the agents used for IVCS is critical to avoid oversedation. Drugs such as diazepam, morphine, meperidine, and fentanyl have active metabolites, so the potential for drug accumulation and prolonged effect certainly exists. Patients with renal disease are particularly susceptible to CNS toxicity from normeperidine because of the accumulation of the active metabolite. Drugs like fentanyl, although short acting, have prolonged activity as a result of seepage of stored drug back into the systemic circulation. In contrast, thiopental is metabolized to water-soluble inactive metabolites. Careful titration to effect with dosage adjustments will avoid unnecessary oversedation with resultant respiratory and cardiovascular complications. Time should elapse between repeat doses to allow peak effects to occur. In addition, potential drug interactions that can prolong the effects should be recognized. Examples of the latter are the interaction between cimetidine and diazepam or the protease inhibitors and the benzodiazepines, in which the potential exists for excessive and prolonged sedation. The use of the narcotic antagonist naloxone and the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil should be scrutinized because they should be reserved for the unusual situation in which excessive cardiopulmonary depression occurs. Maintenance of a patent airway and stable cardiovascular function in a patient who can respond to verbal commands and physical stimuli is the primary goal of IVCS. With the agents discussed in this chapter, this goal is easily obtained, keeping the principles just mentioned in mind with all the appropriate monitoring guidelines discussed elsewhere in this text. PMID:10614019

  12. Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide natural products: overview and recommendations for a universal nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Arnison, Paul G.; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Bowers, Albert A.; Bugni, Tim S.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Camarero, Julio A.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Challis, Gregory L.; Clardy, Jon; Cotter, Paul D.; Craik, David J.; Dawson, Michael; Dittmann, Elke; Donadio, Stefano; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Fischbach, Michael A.; Garavelli, John S.; Göransson, Ulf; Gruber, Christian W.; Haft, Daniel H.; Hemscheidt, Thomas K.; Hertweck, Christian; Hill, Colin; Horswill, Alexander R.; Jaspars, Marcel; Kelly, Wendy L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Link, A. James; Liu, Wen; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Moll, Gert N.; Moore, Bradley S.; Müller, Rolf; Nair, Satish K.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Norris, Gillian E.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Onaka, Hiroyasu; Patchett, Mark L.; Piel, Joern; Reaney, Martin J. T.; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Ross, R. Paul; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schmidt, Eric W.; Selsted, Michael E.; Severinov, Konstantin; Shen, Ben; Sivonen, Kaarina; Smith, Leif; Stein, Torsten; Süssmuth, Roderich D.; Tagg, John R.; Tang, Gong-Li; Truman, Andrew W.; Vederas, John C.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Wenzel, Silke C.; Willey, Joanne M.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2014-01-01

    This review presents recommended nomenclature for the biosynthesis of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), a rapidly growing class of natural products. The current knowledge regarding the biosynthesis of the >20 distinct compound classes is also reviewed, and commonalities are discussed. PMID:23165928

  13. Naming pleomorphic fungi – the debate on how to deal with Article 59 of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi are the only living organisms that are legitimately permitted by any Code of Nomenclature to bear multiple Latin scientific binomial names. This convention is rooted in the historical treatment of fungal names before their life-cycles were fully understood. It has been allowed to continue bec...

  14. Pharmacological Chaperoning: A Primer on Mechanism and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Katelyn G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately forty percent of diseases are attributable to protein misfolding, including those for which genetic mutation produces misfolding mutants. Intriguingly, many of these mutants are not terminally misfolded since native-like folding, and subsequent trafficking to functional locations, can be induced by target-specific, small molecules variably termed pharmacological chaperones, pharmacoperones, or pharmacochaperones (PCs). PC targets include enzymes, receptors, transporters, and ion channels, revealing the breadth of proteins that can be engaged by ligand-assisted folding. The purpose of this review is to provide an integrated primer of the diverse mechanisms and pharmacology of PCs. In this regard, we examine the structural mechanisms that underlie PC rescue of misfolding mutants, including the ability of PCs to act as surrogates for defective intramolecular interactions and, at the intermolecular level, overcome oligomerization deficiencies and dominant negative effects, as well as influence the subunit stoichiometry of heteropentameric receptors. Not surprisingly, PC-mediated structural correction of misfolding mutants normalizes interactions with molecular chaperones that participate in protein quality control and forward-trafficking. A variety of small molecules have proven to be efficacious PCs and the advantages and disadvantages of employing orthostatic antagonists, active-site inhibitors, orthostatic agonists, and allosteric modulator PCs is considered. Also examined is the possibility that several therapeutic agents may have unrecognized activity as PCs, and this chaperoning activity may mediate/contribute to therapeutic action and/or account for adverse effects. Lastly, we explore evidence that pharmacological chaperoning exploits intrinsic ligand-assisted folding mechanisms. Given the widespread applicability of PC rescue of mutants associated with protein folding disorders, both in vitro and in vivo, the therapeutic potential of PCs is vast

  15. AnnoTALE: bioinformatics tools for identification, annotation, and nomenclature of TALEs from Xanthomonas genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Jan; Reschke, Maik; Erkes, Annett; Streubel, Jana; Morgan, Richard D.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Koebnik, Ralf; Boch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are virulence factors, produced by the bacterial plant-pathogen Xanthomonas, that function as gene activators inside plant cells. Although the contribution of individual TALEs to infectivity has been shown, the specific roles of most TALEs, and the overall TALE diversity in Xanthomonas spp. is not known. TALEs possess a highly repetitive DNA-binding domain, which is notoriously difficult to sequence. Here, we describe an improved method for characterizing TALE genes by the use of PacBio sequencing. We present ‘AnnoTALE’, a suite of applications for the analysis and annotation of TALE genes from Xanthomonas genomes, and for grouping similar TALEs into classes. Based on these classes, we propose a unified nomenclature for Xanthomonas TALEs that reveals similarities pointing to related functionalities. This new classification enables us to compare related TALEs and to identify base substitutions responsible for the evolution of TALE specificities. PMID:26876161

  16. New insights into the classification and nomenclature of cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe, Javier; López-Cruz, Pedro L.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Anderson, Stewart; Burkhalter, Andreas; Cauli, Bruno; Fairén, Alfonso; Feldmeyer, Dirk; Fishell, Gord; Fitzpatrick, David; Freund, Tamás F.; González-Burgos, Guillermo; Hestrin, Shaul; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Huang, Josh; Jones, Edward G.; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kisvárday, Zoltán; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Lewis, David A.; Marín, Oscar; Markram, Henry; McBain, Chris J.; Meyer, Hanno S.; Monyer, Hannah; Nelson, Sacha B.; Rockland, Kathleen; Rossier, Jean; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Rudy, Bernardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Staiger, Jochen F.; Tamás, Gábor; Thomson, Alex; Wang, Yun; Yuste, Rafael; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic classification and accepted nomenclature of neuron types is much needed but is currently lacking. This article describes a possible taxonomical solution for classifying GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex based on a novel, web-based interactive system that allows experts to classify neurons with pre-determined criteria. Using Bayesian analysis and clustering algorithms on the resulting data, we investigated the suitability of several anatomical terms and neuron names for cortical GABAergic interneurons. Moreover, we show that supervised classification models could automatically categorize interneurons in agreement with experts’ assignments. These results demonstrate a practical and objective approach to the naming, characterization and classification of neurons based on community consensus. PMID:23385869

  17. Standardised nomenclature for glucocorticoid dosages and glucocorticoid treatment regimens: current questions and tentative answers in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Buttgereit, F; da Silva, J A P; Boers, M; Burmester, G-R; Cutolo, M; Jacobs, J; Kirwan, J; Köhler, L; Van Riel, P; Vischer, T; Bijlsma, J W J

    2002-08-01

    In rheumatology and other medical specialties there is a discrepancy between the widespread use and the imprecise designation of glucocorticoid treatment regimens. Verbal descriptions of glucocorticoid treatment regimens used in various phases of diseases vary between countries and institutions. Given this background, a workshop under the auspices of the EULAR Standing Committee on International Clinical Studies including Therapeutic Trials was held to discuss this issue and to seek a consensus on nomenclature for glucocorticoid treatment. This report summarises the panel's discussion and recognises that answers derived from consensus conferences are not definitive. Nevertheless, recommendations on glucocorticoid treatment are presented that (1) reflect current and best knowledge available and (2) take into account current clinical practice. A question-answer rationale presentation style has been chosen to convey the messages, to summarise the meeting in a readable format, and to avoid dogmatism. PMID:12117678

  18. Nomenclatural corrections, neotype designation and new subspecies description in the genus Suiriri (Aves: Passeriformes: Tyrannidae).

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Guy M; Steinheimer, Frank D; Raposo, Marcos A; Zimmer, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Zimmer et al. (2001) documented two morphological and vocal forms within what was then known as Suiriri suiriri affinis, and described the short-billed form as Suiriri islerorum. However, studies of the Burmeister type material held at the Natural History Collections of the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, revealed the types of Suiriri s. affinis (Burmeister, 1856) to be the same taxon as Suiriri islerorum, which name therefore becomes a junior synonym. No published name is available for the long-billed form. A new name is therefore introduced by an original description in accordance with the International code on zoological nomenclature. The original type material of S. s. bahiae (Berlepsch, 1893) is confirmed to be lost; a neotype is designated. PMID:24872051

  19. A Brief Review of Recent Controversies in the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Sambucus nigra sensu lato

    PubMed Central

    Applequist, W.L.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Sambucus is widespread and morphologically difficult, and as a result, no taxonomic treatment to date has been entirely satisfactory. The only modern revision, by Bolli, reduced the number of recognized species worldwide from over 30 to nine. In Bolli’s treatment, five taxa formerly considered to be distinct species, including S. canadensis, S. cerulea, S. peruviana, and the endemic island taxa S. maderensis and S. palmensis, were placed within S. nigra as subspecies. Available data relating to these taxa are briefly reviewed. It is suggested that, while the recognition of the American elder as S. nigra subsp. canadensis is reasonable, S. cerulea and possibly S. peruviana would be better treated as distinct species; the best classification of the other two taxa remains uncertain. The preferred family assignment for Sambucus is Adoxaceae, though the name of this family may change in future depending upon the ultimate disposition of published nomenclatural proposals now in process. PMID:27158181

  20. Women, anxiety and mood: a review of nomenclature, comorbidity and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeanne Leventhal; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Kotz, Krista; Richardson, Gregg

    2007-11-01

    Women experience a high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders, and comorbidity of mood and anxiety disorders is highly prevalent. Both mood and anxiety disorders disturb sleep, attention and, thereby, cognitive function. They result in a variety of somatic complaints. The mood disorder continuum includes minor depression, dysthymia, major depression and bipolar disorder. Chronobiological disorders, such as seasonal affective disorder as well as premenstrual dysphoric disorder, occur in some women, with comorbid seasonal affective disorder and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in just under half of these individuals [1] . Early life experience, heritability, gender, other psychiatric illness, stress and trauma all interact dynamically in the development of mood and anxiety disorders. The epidemiology, nomenclature and clinical diagnostic issues of these illnesses in midlife woman are reviewed. PMID:18039068

  1. Recent developments in the nomenclature, presence, isolation, detection and clinical impact of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, E; Böing, A N; Gool, E L; Nieuwland, R

    2016-01-01

    The research field of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as microparticles and exosomes, is growing exponentially. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of recent developments relevant to the readers of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. We will discuss nomenclature, the presence of EVs in fluids, methods of isolation and detection, and emerging clinical implications. Although research on EVs has been performed within the ISTH for over a decade, most of the recent research on EVs has been brought together by the International Society on Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV). To achieve an overview of recent developments, the information provided in this review comes not only from publications, but also from latest meetings of the ISEV (April 2015, Washington, DC, USA), the International Society on Advancement of Cytometry (June 2015, Glasgow, UK), and the ISTH (June 2015, Toronto, Canada). PMID:26564379

  2. Suggested nomenclature change and new reference locality for Dequeen Formation, Pike County, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, T.L.; Landry, R.J.

    1983-09-01

    The DeQueen Formation of the Trinity Group, Comanchean Cretaceous, crops out in southwestern Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma. The outcrop, located in the Highland gypsum quarry of Pike County, southwestern Arkansas, is described in detail in this paper and presented as a reference locality. Data from the locality provide the basis for a nomenclature change from the DeQueen Limestone Member to the DeQueen Formation. The formation consists of 64.23% clastic sediments, 24.72% gypsum, and 11.05% limestone. Hopper salt casts, ripple marks, scattered pyrite and marcasite nodules, celestite, and chickenwire gypsum can also be found. The DeQueen Formation is underlain by clays and the Ultima Thule Gravel lentil, while the top is unconformably overlain by Upper Cretaceous Tokio gravels. The general paleoenvironment represents a normally low-energy subtidal environment ranging from brackish to normal to hypersaline waters in a lagoonal setting that shallows upward.

  3. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  4. RNA backbone: consensus all-angle conformers and modular string nomenclature (an RNA Ontology Consortium contribution).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jane S; Schneider, Bohdan; Murray, Laura W; Kapral, Gary J; Immormino, Robert M; Headd, Jeffrey J; Richardson, David C; Ham, Daniela; Hershkovits, Eli; Williams, Loren Dean; Keating, Kevin S; Pyle, Anna Marie; Micallef, David; Westbrook, John; Berman, Helen M

    2008-03-01

    A consensus classification and nomenclature are defined for RNA backbone structure using all of the backbone torsion angles. By a consensus of several independent analysis methods, 46 discrete conformers are identified as suitably clustered in a quality-filtered, multidimensional dihedral angle distribution. Most of these conformers represent identifiable features or roles within RNA structures. The conformers are given two-character names that reflect the seven-angle delta epsilon zeta alpha beta gamma delta combinations empirically found favorable for the sugar-to-sugar "suite" unit within which the angle correlations are strongest (e.g., 1a for A-form, 5z for the start of S-motifs). Since the half-nucleotides are specified by a number for delta epsilon zeta and a lowercase letter for alpha beta gamma delta, this modular system can also be parsed to describe traditional nucleotide units (e.g., a1) or the dinucleotides (e.g., a1a1) that are especially useful at the level of crystallographic map fitting. This nomenclature can also be written as a string with two-character suite names between the uppercase letters of the base sequence (N1aG1gN1aR1aA1cN1a for a GNRA tetraloop), facilitating bioinformatic comparisons. Cluster means, standard deviations, coordinates, and examples are made available, as well as the Suitename software that assigns suite conformer names and conformer match quality (suiteness) from atomic coordinates. The RNA Ontology Consortium will combine this new backbone system with others that define base pairs, base-stacking, and hydrogen-bond relationships to provide a full description of RNA structural motifs. PMID:18192612

  5. The Jaw Adductor Muscle Complex in Teleostean Fishes: Evolution, Homologies and Revised Nomenclature (Osteichthyes: Actinopterygii)

    PubMed Central

    Datovo, Aléssio; Vari, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The infraclass Teleostei is a highly diversified group of bony fishes that encompasses 96% of all species of living fishes and almost half of extant vertebrates. Evolution of various morphological complexes in teleosts, particularly those involving soft anatomy, remains poorly understood. Notable among these problematic complexes is the adductor mandibulae, the muscle that provides the primary force for jaw adduction and mouth closure and whose architecture varies from a simple arrangement of two segments to an intricate complex of up to ten discrete subdivisions. The present study analyzed multiple morphological attributes of the adductor mandibulae in representatives of 53 of the 55 extant teleostean orders, as well as significant information from the literature in order to elucidate the homologies of the main subdivisions of this muscle. The traditional alphanumeric terminology applied to the four main divisions of the adductor mandibulae – A1, A2, A3, and Aω – patently fails to reflect homologous components of that muscle across the expanse of the Teleostei. Some features traditionally used as landmarks for identification of some divisions of the adductor mandibulae proved highly variable across the Teleostei; notably the insertion on the maxilla and the position of muscle components relative to the path of the ramus mandibularis trigeminus nerve. The evolutionary model of gain and loss of sections of the adductor mandibulae most commonly adopted under the alphanumeric system additionally proved ontogenetically incongruent and less parsimonious than a model of subdivision and coalescence of facial muscle sections. Results of the analysis demonstrate the impossibility of adapting the alphanumeric terminology so as to reflect homologous entities across the spectrum of teleosts. A new nomenclatural scheme is proposed in order to achieve congruence between homology and nomenclature of the adductor mandibulae components across the entire Teleostei. PMID

  6. The jaw adductor muscle complex in teleostean fishes: evolution, homologies and revised nomenclature (osteichthyes: actinopterygii).

    PubMed

    Datovo, Aléssio; Vari, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    The infraclass Teleostei is a highly diversified group of bony fishes that encompasses 96% of all species of living fishes and almost half of extant vertebrates. Evolution of various morphological complexes in teleosts, particularly those involving soft anatomy, remains poorly understood. Notable among these problematic complexes is the adductor mandibulae, the muscle that provides the primary force for jaw adduction and mouth closure and whose architecture varies from a simple arrangement of two segments to an intricate complex of up to ten discrete subdivisions. The present study analyzed multiple morphological attributes of the adductor mandibulae in representatives of 53 of the 55 extant teleostean orders, as well as significant information from the literature in order to elucidate the homologies of the main subdivisions of this muscle. The traditional alphanumeric terminology applied to the four main divisions of the adductor mandibulae - A1, A2, A3, and Aω - patently fails to reflect homologous components of that muscle across the expanse of the Teleostei. Some features traditionally used as landmarks for identification of some divisions of the adductor mandibulae proved highly variable across the Teleostei; notably the insertion on the maxilla and the position of muscle components relative to the path of the ramus mandibularis trigeminus nerve. The evolutionary model of gain and loss of sections of the adductor mandibulae most commonly adopted under the alphanumeric system additionally proved ontogenetically incongruent and less parsimonious than a model of subdivision and coalescence of facial muscle sections. Results of the analysis demonstrate the impossibility of adapting the alphanumeric terminology so as to reflect homologous entities across the spectrum of teleosts. A new nomenclatural scheme is proposed in order to achieve congruence between homology and nomenclature of the adductor mandibulae components across the entire Teleostei. PMID:23565279

  7. Progression or Regression? – Strengths and Weaknesses of the New Munich Nomenclature III for Cervix Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Hilal, Z.; Tempfer, C.; Schiermeier, S.; Reinecke, J.; Ruppenkamp, C.; Hilal, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since 01. 01. 2015 the new Munich nomenclature III for gynaecological diagnostics of the cervix has been in force. The changes have led to controversial scientific discussions. This study reports for the first time on the consequences. Materials and Methods: The present data are based on smear screening results for the year 2014. The data of 63 134 patients were evaluated. Results: 2.27 % of all smears were remarkable. Group IIa was assigned to 0.91 %. Group II-p was somewhat more frequently recorded than group IIID1 (0.59 vs. 0.53 %). Groups IIID1 and IIID2 were found in 0.53 and 0.61 %, respectively, of the cases. Agreement with histology was found in 36.84 and 44.68 %, respectively. Glandular lesions represented the most frequent changes in group III. Histological clarification was obtained for 0.18 % of all remarkable findings. The relative incidence of high-grade precancerous conditions (CIN III) and invasive tumours amounted to 0.1 %. Conclusion: A close communication between gynaecologists and cytologists is mandatory for the correct usage of the new nomenclature. The future annual statistics of the health insurances can now be analysed in more detail. A statistical classification of glandular epithelial changes is now also possible for the first time. The heterogeneous group IIa constitutes an unnecessary uncertainty for patients and physicians. The splitting of the group IIID does not appear to have any advantage for the further clinical management. Further studies are needed to show whether or not the classification can stand up to international comparisons. PMID:26556907

  8. Leptin: pharmacological aspects in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sorace, M; Tripodi, L; Tripodi, A; Groppetti, D; Cremonesi, F

    2006-01-01

    Hematic levels of leptin vary in relation to numerous metabolic factors and are able to interact in perfect synchrony with the hormones involved in the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian axis during the various phases of the reproductive cycle. In general it is maintained that the complex and multiple action mechanisms of leptin need to be clarified by further in-depth research studies. It is likely that valid pharmacological applications of leptin will be found for human use although it is too premature to talk about concrete pharmacological answers and to formulate the relative complete technical protocols. In medicine the therapeutic use of leptin for humans has been reported in only a few cases. In fact human recombinant leptin has already been administered in gynecology for hypothalamic amenorrhea with precise protocols. In addition, very recent studies have provided the basis for new strategies to be developed concerning the use of leptin to fight multiple sclerosis. At present there are considerable technical and economic problems in the production of leptin on a large scale. Most likely these problems will be overcome in the foreseeable future, and will involve new techniques related to genetics, cellular reprograming, and stem cells. In fact, new pharmacogenetic research has provided encouraging results for the production in industrial quantities of a more effective and fail-proof leptin. Even considering that norms have not yet been proposed for pharmacological interventions with leptin for use directly on humans, in our work we have studied by immunohistochemistry methods the distribution of leptin and its receptor (Ob-R) in the ovaries of the female dog as a biological model, in the pre- and postpubertal phases and in other phases of the ovarian cycle. Given the hypothesis that the information obtained from immunohistochemical localization of the hormone and its receptor in various ovarian structures is transferable to humans, it could be useful to define

  9. Pharmacologic considerations for Shuttle astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.; Bungo, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Medication usage by crewmembers in the preflight and inflight mission periods is common in the Shuttle Program. The most common medical reports for which medication is used are: space motion sickness (SMS), sleeplessness, headache, and backache. A number of medications are available in the Shuttle Medical Kit to treat these problems. Currently, astronauts test all frequently used medications before mission assignment to identify potential side-effects, problems related to performance, personal likes/dislikes, and individual therapeutic effect. However, microgravity-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics, in combination with multiple operational factors, may significantly alter crewmember responses inflight. This article discusses those factors that may impact pharmacologic efficacy during Shuttle missions.

  10. Histamine pharmacology: four years on

    PubMed Central

    Chazot, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    The histamine field has moved on rapidly in the last four years, with expansion in roles and clinical development, particularly in the newest two of four histamine receptors. This themed volume is a testament to this expansion with 16 original and review articles spanning a wide spectrum of histamine-related topics, with therapeutic translational relevance to addiction, dementias, anxiety disorders, cancers, vestibular disorders, migraine and autoimmune disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23944741

  11. Pain pharmacology: focus on opioids

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Summary The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20–25% worldwide. Although major improvements in pain control have been obtained, more than 50% of the patients reports inadequate relief. It is accepted that chronic pain, if not adequately and rapidly treated, can become a disease in itself, often intractable and maybe irreversible. This is mainly due to neuroplasticity of pain pathways. In the present review I will discuss about pain depicting the rational for the principal pharmacological interventions and finally focusing on opioids, that represent a primary class of drug to treat pain. PMID:25568646

  12. Pharmacologic Therapies in Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Loveless, Melinda S; Fry, Adrielle L

    2016-07-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are common, and there are many options for pharmacologic therapy. Unfortunately, there is not strong evidence for the use of many of these medications. Acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are generally first-line medications for most musculoskeletal pain, but there is more evidence these medications are not as safe as once thought. Other analgesic and antispasmodic medications can be effective for acute pain but generally are not as effective for chronic pain. Antidepressants and anticonvulsants can be more effective for chronic or neuropathic pain. Topical formulations of NSAIDs can be effective for pain with fewer side effects. PMID:27235619

  13. Gaultheria: Phytochemical and pharmacological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Rui; Qiao, Wen-Lin; Liu, Zi-Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Rui; Li, Shu-Yi; Shi, Ren-Bing; She, Gai-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The genus Gaultheria, comprised of approximately 134 species, is mostly used in ethnic drugs to cure rheumatism and relieve pain. Phytochemical investigations of the genus Gaultheria have revealed the presence of methyl salicylate derivatives, C₆-C₃ constituents, organic acids, terpenoids, steroids, and other compounds. Methyl salicylate glycoside is considered as a characteristic ingredient in this genus, whose anti-rheumatic effects may have a new mechanism of action. In this review, comprehensive information on the phytochemistry, volatile components and the pharmacology of the genus Gaultheria is provided to explore its potential and advance research. PMID:24084015

  14. [SQUALENE: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES].

    PubMed

    Muzalevskaya, E N; Miroshnichenko, L A; Nikolaevskii, V A; Ushakov, I B; Chernov, Yu N; Alabovskii, V V; Batishcheva, G A; Buzlama, A V

    2015-01-01

    The review of literature demonstrates that squalene, known to most experts as an intermediate product in the synthesis of cholesterol, has several pharmacological properties including hypolipidemic, hepatoprotective, cardioprotective, antioxidant, and antitoxicant activity. Squalene is effective in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 and can potentiate the activity of some antitumor (antiblastoma) preparations and reduce their undesired side effects. This bioactive substance has low toxicity and, in therapeutic doses, does not produce any damaging action on the human organism. A promising source of raw material for the commercial production of squalene is offered by amaranth seed oil. PMID:26292512

  15. Pharmacologic interventions in aging hair

    PubMed Central

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people’s overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today’s increasing life-expectations, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and is delivering active products directed towards meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft, decrease of melanocyte function, and decrease in hair production. The scalp is subject to intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation: prototypes are familial premature graying, and androgenetic alopecia. Currently available pharmacologic treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil and oral finasteride. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and air pollution. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress also plays a role in hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds include photoprotectors and antioxidants. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants remain the mainstay of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are currently under investigation. PMID:18044109

  16. Post-mortem clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ferner, R E

    2008-01-01

    Clinical pharmacology assumes that deductions can be made about the concentrations of drugs from a knowledge of the pharmacokinetic parameters in an individual; and that the effects are related to the measured concentration. Post-mortem changes render the assumptions of clinical pharmacology largely invalid, and make the interpretation of concentrations measured in post-mortem samples difficult or impossible. Qualitative tests can show the presence of substances that were not present in life, and can fail to detect substances that led to death. Quantitative analysis is subject to error in itself, and because post-mortem concentrations vary in largely unpredictable ways with the site and time of sampling, as a result of the phenomenon of post-mortem redistribution. Consequently, compilations of ‘lethal concentrations’ are misleading. There is a lack of adequate studies of the true relationship between fatal events and the concentrations that can be measured subsequently, but without such studies, clinical pharmacologists and others should be wary of interpreting post-mortem measurements. PMID:18637886

  17. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  18. The behavioral pharmacology of hallucinogens

    PubMed Central

    Fantegrossi, William E.; Murnane, Aeneas C.; Reissig, Chad J.

    2008-01-01

    Until very recently, comparatively few scientists were studying hallucinogenic drugs. Nevertheless, selective antagonists are available for relevant serotonergic receptors, the majority of which have now been cloned, allowing for reasonably thorough pharmacological investigation. Animal models sensitive to the behavioral effects of the hallucinogens have been established and exploited. Sophisticated genetic techniques have enabled the development of mutant mice, which have proven useful in the study of hallucinogens. The capacity to study post-receptor signaling events has lead to the proposal of a plausible mechanism of action for these compounds. The tools currently available to study the hallucinogens are thus more plentiful and scientifically advanced than were those accessible to earlier researchers studying the opioids, benzodiazepines, cholinergics, or other centrally active compounds. The behavioral pharmacology of phenethylamine, tryptamine, and ergoline hallucinogens are described in this review, paying particular attention to important structure activity relationships which have emerged, receptors involved in their various actions, effects on conditioned and unconditioned behaviors, and in some cases, human psychopharmacology. As clinical interest in the therapeutic potential of these compounds is once again beginning to emerge, it is important to recognize the wealth of data derived from controlled preclinical studies on these compounds. PMID:17977517

  19. Pharmacologic interventions in aging hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people's overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today's increasing life-expectations, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and is delivering active products directed towards meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft, decrease of melanocyte function, and decrease in hair production. The scalp is subject to intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation: prototypes are familial premature graying, and androgenetic alopecia. Currently available pharmacologic treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil and oral finasteride. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and air pollution. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress also plays a role in hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds include photoprotectors and antioxidants. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants remain the mainstay of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are currently under investigation. PMID:18044109

  20. Molecular Pharmacology of Chemokine Receptors.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Raymond H; de Munnik, Sabrina M; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F; Smit, Martine J

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are involved in various pathologies such as inflammatory diseases, cancer, and HIV infection. Small molecule and antibody-based antagonists have been developed to inhibit chemokine-induced receptor activity. Currently two small molecule inhibitors targeting CXCR4 and CCR5 are on the market for stem cell mobilization and the treatment of HIV infection, respectively. Antibody fragments (e.g., nanobodies) targeting chemokine receptors are primarily orthosteric ligands, competing for the chemokine binding site. This is opposed by most small molecules, which act as allosteric modulators and bind to the receptor at a topographically distinct site as compared to chemokines. Allosteric modulators can be distinguished from orthosteric ligands by unique features, such as a saturable effect and probe dependency. For successful drug development, it is essential to determine pharmacological parameters (i.e., affinity, potency, and efficacy) and the mode of action of potential drugs during early stages of research in order to predict the biological effect of chemokine receptor targeting drugs in the clinic. This chapter explains how the pharmacological profile of chemokine receptor targeting ligands can be determined and quantified using binding and functional experiments. PMID:26921959

  1. Nomenclature for the Nameless: A Proposal for an Integrative Molecular Taxonomy of Cryptic Diversity Exemplified by Planktonic Foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Morard, Raphaël; Escarguel, Gilles; Weiner, Agnes K M; André, Aurore; Douady, Christophe J; Wade, Christopher M; Darling, Kate F; Ujiié, Yurika; Seears, Heidi A; Quillévéré, Frédéric; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; de Vargas, Colomban; Kucera, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Investigations of biodiversity, biogeography, and ecological processes rely on the identification of "species" as biologically significant, natural units of evolution. In this context, morphotaxonomy only provides an adequate level of resolution if reproductive isolation matches morphological divergence. In many groups of organisms, morphologically defined species often disguise considerable genetic diversity, which may be indicative of the existence of cryptic species. The diversity hidden by morphological species can be disentangled through genetic surveys, which also provide access to data on the ecological distribution of genetically circumscribed units. These units can be identified by unique DNA sequence motifs and allow studies of evolutionary and ecological processes at different levels of divergence. However, the nomenclature of genetically circumscribed units within morphological species is not regulated and lacks stability. This represents a major obstacle to efforts to synthesize and communicate data on genetic diversity for multiple stakeholders. We have been confronted with such an obstacle in our work on planktonic foraminifera, where the stakeholder community is particularly diverse, involving geochemists, paleoceanographers, paleontologists, and biologists, and the lack of stable nomenclature beyond the level of formal morphospecies prevents effective transfer of knowledge. To circumvent this problem, we have designed a stable, reproducible, and flexible nomenclature system for genetically circumscribed units, analogous to the principles of a formal nomenclature system. Our system is based on the definition of unique DNA sequence motifs collocated within an individual, their typification (in analogy with holotypes), utilization of their hierarchical phylogenetic structure to define levels of divergence below that of the morphospecies, and a set of nomenclature rules assuring stability. The resulting molecular operational taxonomic units remain

  2. New proposals for naming lower-ranked taxa within the frame of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Alain

    2006-10-01

    The recent multiplication of cladistic hypotheses for many zoological groups poses a challenge to zoological nomenclature following the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature: in order to account for these hypotheses, we will need many more ranks than currently allowed in this system, especially in lower taxonomy (around the ranks genus and species). The current Code allows the use of as many ranks as necessary in the family-series of nomina (except above superfamily), but forbids the use of more than a few ranks in the genus and species-series. It is here argued that this limitation has no theoretical background, does not respect the freedom of taxonomic thoughts or actions, and is harmful to zoological taxonomy in two respects at least: (1) it does not allow to express in detail hypothesized cladistic relationships among taxa at lower taxonomic levels (genus and species); (2) it does not allow to point taxonomically to low-level differentiation between populations of the same species, although this would be useful in some cases for conservation biology purposes. It is here proposed to modify the rules of the Code in order to allow use by taxonomists of an indeterminate number of ranks in all nominal-series. Such an 'expanded nomenclatural system' would be highly flexible and likely to be easily adapted to any new finding or hypothesis regarding cladistic relationships between taxa, at genus and species level and below. This system could be useful for phylogeographic analysis and in conservation biology. In zoological nomenclature, whereas robustness of nomina is necessary, the same does not hold for nomenclatural ranks, as the latter are arbitrary and carry no special biological, evolutionary or other information, except concerning the mutual relationships between taxa in the taxonomic hierarchy. Compared to the Phylocode project, the new system is equally unambiguous within the frame of a given taxonomic frame, but it provides more explicit and

  3. The Chemical Basis of Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Molecular biology now dominates pharmacology so thoroughly that it is difficult to recall that only a generation ago the field was very different. To understand drug action today, we characterize the targets through which they act and new drug leads are discovered on the basis of target structure and function. Until the mid-1980s the information often flowed in reverse: investigators began with organic molecules and sought targets, relating receptors not by sequence or structure but by their ligands. Recently, investigators have returned to this chemical view of biology, bringing to it systematic and quantitative methods of relating targets by their ligands. This has allowed the discovery of new targets for established drugs, suggested the bases for their side effects, and predicted the molecular targets underlying phenotypic screens. The bases for these new methods, some of their successes and liabilities, and new opportunities for their use are described. PMID:21058655

  4. Psychostimulants: Basic and Clinical Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    McCreary, Andrew C; Müller, Christian P; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Substance use disorder, and particularly psychostimulant use disorder, has considerable socioeconomic burden globally. The psychostimulants include several chemical classes, being derivatives of benzoylecgonine, phenethylamine, phenylpropanolamine, or aminoaryloxazoline. Psychostimulant drugs activate the brain reward pathways of the mesoaccumbal system, and continued use leads to persistent neuroplastic and dysfunctional changes of a variety of structures involved in learning and memory, habit-forming learning, salience attribution, and inhibitory control. There are a variety of neurochemical and neurobehavioral changes in psychostimulant addiction, for example, dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic (5-HT-ergic), and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) changes have all noted. In this chapter, we will review pharmacological changes associated with psychostimulant use and abuse in humans and animals, and on the basis of the best characterized and most widely abused psychostimulants (amphetamines, cocaine) discuss why use transitions into abuse and review basic science and clinical strategies that might assist in treating psychostimulant abuse. PMID:26070753

  5. Pharmacological treatment of epilepsy today.

    PubMed

    Benna, P; Bergamasco, B

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of epilepsy has not gone through remarkable changes in recent years. Treatment is based on few first choice drugs, the mechanism of action of which we do not yet know exactly. These include: phenobarbital, primidone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproic acid, ethosuximide, clonazepam. Choice of drug is determined by the kind of seizures presented by the patient, while successful treatment is determined by the kind of epilepsy. The present trend is the use of first line drugs in monotherapy, fixing individually the dosage according to the plasma levels. The results obtained with the GABA-agonists (progabide, gamma-vinyl GABA) and with some of the calcium-antagonists (flunarizine) seem promising. PMID:2886407

  6. Pharmacological Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, RM; Vieira, CS; Ferriani, RA; Candido-dos-Reis, FJ; Brito, LGO

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are common, benign gynecologic tumors, affecting one in three to four women, with estimates of up to 80%, depending on the population studied. Their etiology is not well established, but it is under the influence of several risk factors, such as early menarche, nulliparity and family history. More than 50% of affected women are asymptomatic, but the lesions may be related to bothersome symptoms, such as abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and bloating or urinary symptoms. The treatment of UF is classically surgical; however, various medical options are available, providing symptom control while minimizing risks and complications. A large number of clinical trials have evaluated commonly used medical treatments and potentially effective new ones. Through a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus and Google Scholar databases, through which we included 41 studies out of 7658 results, we thoroughly explored the different pharmacological options available for management of UF, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25364587

  7. Nomenclatural issues in ornithology: the incredible controversy on the identity of a long overlooked Brazilian bird.

    PubMed

    Nemésio, André; Rasmussen, Claus; Aguiar, Alexandre P; Pombal, José P; Dubois, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The identity of Scytalopus speluncae (Ménétriés, 1835) (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae), a tapaculo from southeastern Brazil, has been the matter of debate during the last eight years. A group of ornithologists considers that the nomen Scytalopus speluncae should be attributed to a species endemic to coastal mountains of southeastern Brazil, whereas another group considers it a species from the drier environments of another mountain belt in Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil. Both research groups disagree on the identity of the still extant but damaged alleged holotype, deposited at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, on the identity of the holotype specimen illustration from a plate accompanying the species description, and even on the type locality. To further complicate this matter of identity, members of each research group, based on their own interpretations of the identity of Scytalopus speluncae, described and named again the two species with different nomina, erecting at least one unnecessary nomen. After almost ten years of a debate, there is still no consensus on the identity of the species, and there are now at least three available nomina for apparently only two distinct biological species. As taxonomists belonging to fields of zoology other than ornithology, and realizing the above situation is mainly a nomenclatural one, we herein present a summary of the contentious issue, try to distinguish what seems to be facts and speculation and based on these we consider the rules of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (the Code) whenever appropriate, in the hope of bringing some objectivity to the debate. We conclude that no unequivocal evidence was presented to decide to which species the type specimen belongs solely based on its morphological characters, since the holotype presents considerable damage. On the other hand, the original designation of the type locality by Ménétriés (1835) as S

  8. Uniformity of rotavirus strain nomenclature proposed by the Rotavirus Classification Working Group (RCWG).

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ciarlet, Max; McDonald, Sarah M; Attoui, Houssam; Bányai, Krisztián; Brister, J Rodney; Buesa, Javier; Esona, Mathew D; Estes, Mary K; Gentsch, Jon R; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Johne, Reimar; Kirkwood, Carl D; Martella, Vito; Mertens, Peter P C; Nakagomi, Osamu; Parreño, Viviana; Rahman, Mustafizur; Ruggeri, Franco M; Saif, Linda J; Santos, Norma; Steyer, Andrej; Taniguchi, Koki; Patton, John T; Desselberger, Ulrich; Van Ranst, Marc

    2011-08-01

    In April 2008, a nucleotide-sequence-based, complete genome classification system was developed for group A rotaviruses (RVs). This system assigns a specific genotype to each of the 11 genome segments of a particular RV strain according to established nucleotide percent cutoff values. Using this approach, the genome of individual RV strains are given the complete descriptor of Gx-P[x]-Ix-Rx-Cx-Mx-Ax-Nx-Tx-Ex-Hx. The Rotavirus Classification Working Group (RCWG) was formed by scientists in the field to maintain, evaluate and develop the RV genotype classification system, in particular to aid in the designation of new genotypes. Since its conception, the group has ratified 51 new genotypes: as of April 2011, new genotypes for VP7 (G20-G27), VP4 (P[28]-P[35]), VP6 (I12-I16), VP1 (R5-R9), VP2 (C6-C9), VP3 (M7-M8), NSP1 (A15-A16), NSP2 (N6-N9), NSP3 (T8-T12), NSP4 (E12-E14) and NSP5/6 (H7-H11) have been defined for RV strains recovered from humans, cows, pigs, horses, mice, South American camelids (guanaco), chickens, turkeys, pheasants, bats and a sugar glider. With increasing numbers of complete RV genome sequences becoming available, a standardized RV strain nomenclature system is needed, and the RCWG proposes that individual RV strains are named as follows: RV group/species of origin/country of identification/common name/year of identification/G- and P-type. In collaboration with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the RCWG is also working on developing a RV-specific resource for the deposition of nucleotide sequences. This resource will provide useful information regarding RV strains, including, but not limited to, the individual gene genotypes and epidemiological and clinical information. Together, the proposed nomenclature system and the NCBI RV resource will offer highly useful tools for investigators to search for, retrieve, and analyze the ever-growing volume of RV genomic data. PMID:21597953

  9. A single nomenclature and associated database for alleles at the MHC class II DRB1 locus of sheep: IPD-MHC-OLA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of standardised nomenclatures with associated databases containing reference sequences for alleles at polymorphic loci within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) has been facilitated by the development of the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD-MHC). Recently, included within I...

  10. Reinforcing the foundations of ornithological nomenclature: Filling the gaps in Sherborn's and Richmond's historical legacy of bibliographic exploration.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Due to its public popularity, ornithology has a huge corpus of scientific publication for a relatively small number of species. Although there are global checklists of currently recognised taxa, there has been only limited, mainly individual, effort to build a nomenclatural database that the science of ornithology deserves. This is especially true in relation to concise synonymies. With the arrival of ZooBank and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, the time has come to develop synonymies and to add fuller bibliographic detail to databases. The preparation for both began at the start of the 20(th) century with extensive work by Sherborn and Richmond. I discuss their legacy, offer notes on significant work since then, and provide suggestions for what remains to be done. To make solid the foundations for ornithological nomenclature and taxonomy, especially for synonymies, ornithologists will need to collaborate much more and contribute to the digital infrastructure. PMID:26877655

  11. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology. PMID:20620917

  12. Terminology and nomenclature in colonic surgery: universal application of a rule-based approach derived from updates on mesenteric anatomy.

    PubMed

    Coffey, J C; Sehgal, R; Culligan, K; Dunne, C; McGrath, D; Lawes, N; Walsh, D

    2014-09-01

    Recent developments in colonic surgery generate exciting opportunities for surgeons and trainees. In the first instance, the anatomy of the entire mesenteric organ has been clarified and greatly simplified. No longer is it regarded as fragmented and complex. Rather it is continuous from duodenojejunal flexure to mesorectum, spanning the gastrointestinal tract between. Recent histologic findings have demonstrated that although apposed to the retroperitoneum, the mesenteric organ is separated from this via Toldt's fascia. These fundamentally important observations underpin the principles of complete mesocolic excision, where the mesocolic package is maintained intact, following extensive mesenterectomy. More importantly, they provide the first opportunity to apply a canonical approach to the development of nomenclature in resectional colonic surgery. In this review, we demonstrate how the resultant nomenclature is entirely anatomic based, and for illustrative purposes, we apply it to the procedure conventionally referred to as right hemicolectomy, or ileocolic resection. PMID:24968936

  13. First Employment of British Pharmacology Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Michael; Markham, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted in UK Universities to identify the employment of pharmacology graduates (BSc, MSc and PhD) 6 months after graduation in 2003. The aim was to provide data for the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) so they could offer advice to interested bodies and to University staff for careers information. 85% of 52 Universities…

  14. Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Joeri

    2016-02-01

    'Type' in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93-119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. 'Type' was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber's analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important dimension of early nineteenth century 'type talk.' Farber's taxonomy of type concepts passes over the fact that certain uses of 'type' began to take on a new meaning in this period. At the closing of the eighteenth century, terms like 'type specimen,' 'type species,' and 'type genus' were universally recognized as referring to typical, model members of their encompassing taxa. But in the course of the nineteenth century, the same terms were co-opted for a different purpose. As part of an effort to drive out nomenclatural synonymy - the confusing state of a taxon being known to different people by different names - these terms started to signify the fixed and potentially atypical name-bearing elements of taxa. A new type concept was born: the nomenclatural type. In this article, I retrace this perplexing nineteenth century shift in meaning of 'type.' I uncover the nomenclatural disorder that the new nomenclatural type concept dissolved, and expose the conceptual confusion it left in its tracks. What emerges is an account of how synonymy was suppressed through the coinage of a homonym. PMID:26126490

  15. Plant cyclins: a unified nomenclature for plant A-, B- and D-type cyclins based on sequence organization.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, J P; Doonan, J H; Freeman, D; Hashimoto, J; Hirt, H; Inzé, D; Jacobs, T; Kouchi, H; Rouzé, P; Sauter, M; Savouré, A; Sorrell, D A; Sundaresan, V; Murray, J A

    1996-12-01

    The comparative analysis of a large number of plant cyclins of the A/B family has recently revealed that plants possess two distinct B-type groups and three distinct A-type groups of cyclins. Despite earlier uncertainties, this large-scale comparative analysis has allowed an unequivocal definition of plant cyclins into either A or B classes. We present here the most important results obtained in this study, and extend them to the case of plant D-type cyclins, in which three groups are identified. For each of the plant cyclin groups, consensus sequences have been established and a new, rational, plant-wide naming system is proposed in accordance with the guidelines of the Commission on Plant Gene Nomenclature. This nomenclature is based on the animal system indicating cyclin classes by an upper-case roman letter, and distinct groups within these classes by an arabic numeral suffix. The naming of plant cyclin classes is chosen to indicate homology to their closest animal class. The revised nomenclature of all described plant cyclins is presented, with their classification into groups CycA1, CycA2, CycA3, CycB1, CycB2, CycD1, CycD2 and CycD3. PMID:9002599

  16. Report of the First International Consensus on Standardized Nomenclature of Antinuclear Antibody HEp-2 Cell Patterns 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edward K. L.; Damoiseaux, Jan; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; Conrad, Karsten; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; von Mühlen, Carlos A.; Andrade, Luis E. C.

    2015-01-01

    During the 12th International Workshop on Autoantibodies and Autoimmunity held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 28, 2014, a full day session was devoted to establishing a consensus on the nomenclature of staining patterns observed in the antinuclear antibody (ANA) indirect immunofluorescence test on HEp-2 cells. The current report summarizes the collective agreements with input from the host Brazilian and international communities that represented research, clinical, and diagnostic service laboratories. Patterns are categorized in three major groups (nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitotic patterns) and each pattern has been defined and described in detail. The consensus nomenclature and representative patterns are made available online at the international consensus on antinuclear antibody pattern (ICAP) website (www.ANApatterns.org). To facilitate continuous improvement and input, specific comments on ICAP are encouraged and these will be discussed in subsequent ICAP meetings. The ultimate goal with the establishment of the ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody test nomenclature, as well as interpretation guidelines for ANA testing, thereby optimizing usage in patient care. PMID:26347739

  17. Report of the First International Consensus on Standardized Nomenclature of Antinuclear Antibody HEp-2 Cell Patterns 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward K L; Damoiseaux, Jan; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; Conrad, Karsten; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Andrade, Luis E C

    2015-01-01

    During the 12th International Workshop on Autoantibodies and Autoimmunity held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 28, 2014, a full day session was devoted to establishing a consensus on the nomenclature of staining patterns observed in the antinuclear antibody (ANA) indirect immunofluorescence test on HEp-2 cells. The current report summarizes the collective agreements with input from the host Brazilian and international communities that represented research, clinical, and diagnostic service laboratories. Patterns are categorized in three major groups (nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitotic patterns) and each pattern has been defined and described in detail. The consensus nomenclature and representative patterns are made available online at the international consensus on antinuclear antibody pattern (ICAP) website (www.ANApatterns.org). To facilitate continuous improvement and input, specific comments on ICAP are encouraged and these will be discussed in subsequent ICAP meetings. The ultimate goal with the establishment of the ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody test nomenclature, as well as interpretation guidelines for ANA testing, thereby optimizing usage in patient care. PMID:26347739

  18. Should there be a separate code of nomenclature for the protists?

    PubMed

    Corliss, J O

    1992-01-01

    The present Botanical and Zoological Codes of Nomenclature are often inadequate for resolution of all the peculiar problems caused by the very nature of the numerous and diverse groups of the so-called 'lower' eukaryotic organisms known as protists. Whether or not a separate code should therefore be created for these species--many but not all of which are unicellular in structure and microscopic in size--is complicated by several factors. The principal one is related to the wide dispersal of protists throughout many taxonomic classes and phyla/divisions; sometimes even multiple kingdoms are involved. If recognition of a single kingdom Protista is no longer tenable, then even the concept of one code per kingdom is not applicable. Other difficulties arise primarily from long-standing differences in major provisions of present Botanical and Zoological Codes. Numerous 'ambiregnal' forms exist, species currently under dual code jurisdiction. The matter of names for suprafamilial taxa of protists, irrespective of their ultimate kingdom assignment, poses another set of concerns not yet resolved. A plea is made to recognize the legitimacy of having distinct high-level ranks for protist species that seem to be widely separated phylogenetically from fellow protists or from other eukaryotic assemblages. PMID:1292654

  19. Classification and nomenclature of the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs).

    PubMed

    Persson, Bengt; Kallberg, Yvonne

    2013-02-25

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies known today. The members are distantly related with typically 20-30% residue identity in pair-wise comparisons. Still, all hitherto structurally known SDRs present a common three-dimensional structure consisting of a Rossmann fold with a parallel beta sheet flanked by three helices on each side. Using hidden Markov models (HMMs), we have developed a semi-automated subclassification system for this huge family. Currently, 75% of all SDR forms have been assigned to one of the 464 families totalling 122,940 proteins. There are 47 human SDR families, corresponding to 75 genes. Most human SDR families (35 families) have only one gene, while 12 have between 2 and 8 genes. For more than half of the human SDR families, the three-dimensional fold is known. The number of SDR members increases considerably every year, but the number of SDR families now starts to converge. The classification method has paved the ground for a sustainable and expandable nomenclature system. Information on the SDR superfamily is continuously updated at http://sdr-enzymes.org/. PMID:23200746

  20. Casimer Funk, nonconformist nomenclature, and networks surrounding the discovery of vitamins.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Alesia

    2013-07-01

    In the 2 decades between when the existence of vitamins was first postulated and when they were isolated, scientists and research physicians could produce no conclusive evidence for their existence from the laboratory or clinic. By the time the first vitamin was chemically isolated, vitamins were already widely accepted by scientists, clinicians, the public, and government agencies. In the period between when vitamins were postulated and the Nobel Prize was awarded for their discovery, a debate over nomenclature served as a substitute for a priority dispute. The most popular term "vitamine" was introduced by Casimer Funk in 1912 and was changed to "vitamin" by Cecil Drummond in 1920. Initial conditions surrounding the discovery of vitamins, including World War I, necessitated the creation of unusual networks for the dissemination of scientific information about vitamins. In Great Britain, research institutes, government agencies, and individual researchers were instrumental in creating a set of national and international networks for the dissemination of information from research laboratories to hospitals, physicians, pharmaceutical houses, and the public. These networks of dissemination still exert an influence on how scientific information about vitamins is communicated to the public today. PMID:23719227

  1. Inflammatory collateral cyst associated with a palatoradicular groove: report of a case and discussion of nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Tormena, Mariana; Veltrini, Vanessa Cristina; Farah, Gustavo Jacobucci; Damante, José Humberto

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this article are to present a case demonstrating the connection between palatoradicular grooves and inflammatory collateral cysts and to discuss the related nomenclature. Radiographs in a 21-year-old man revealed a radiolucent, unilocular, well-defined area near the vital maxillary right lateral incisor and canine. Palatal swelling was present, and a 6-mm-deep periodontal pocket was found at the palatal surface of the right lateral incisor. The differential diagnoses were keratocystic odontogenic tumor, developmental lateral periodontal cyst, and inflammatory lateral periodontal cyst. The area was explored surgically, and the lesion was excised. Surgical exploration revealed a palatoradicular groove, which was scaled and planed with the aid of manual curettes with the intention of creating a flat surface to promote insertion of the periodontal fibers. Histopathologic analysis revealed that the lesion was an inflammatory cyst. The presence of a palatoradicular groove can put the periodontium at risk because a resulting lack of fiber insertion makes oral hygiene difficult. This established inflammatory process can initiate development of an inflammatory collateral cyst that may be misdiagnosed, hindering successful management. In this case, bone grafting and placement of a resorbable membrane were used to promote bone formation and subsequent sealing of the periodontal space. PMID:27148666

  2. Taxonomic and nomenclatural aspects of Hypoxylon taxa from southern South America proposed by Spegazzini.

    PubMed

    Hladki, Adriana I; Romero, Andrea I

    2009-01-01

    The holotypes and isotypes of 20 Hypoxylon taxa described by Spegazzini have been examined and their taxonomic positions and nomenclatural problems are discussed. Two new combinations, Annulohypoxylon apiahynum comb. nov. and A. subeffusum comb. nov., are proposed. H. goliath is considered a synonym of Rosellinia bunodes. H. albostigmatosum and H. guarapiense are synonyms of H. anthochroum, H. anthracoderma of H. monticulosum, H. mbaiense of H. notatum, H. paulistanum of H. diatrypeoides, H. plumbeum and H. rubiginosum var. microcarpum of H. perforatum. H. porteri and H. intermedium belong in Biscogniauxia capnodes, H. puiggarii in Annulophypoxylon subeffusum, H. subvinosum. in H. lenormandii, H. turbinatum var. guaraniticum in Phylacia turbinata and H. valsarioides in Creosphaeria sassafras. H. leptascum is transferred to A. leptascum, H. circostomum to Nemania circostoma and H. latissimum to N. latissima. The holotype of H. albostigmatosum has been recovered, thus the lectotypification by Shear no longer is needed. H. subnigricans and H. umbilicatum are confirmed as good taxa. H. anthochroum and H. lenormandii are reported as first records from Argentina (Tucumán). PMID:19750953

  3. Nomenclature of genetic movement disorders: Recommendations of the international Parkinson and movement disorder society task force.

    PubMed

    Marras, Connie; Lang, Anthony; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Sue, Carolyn M; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Bertram, Lars; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Warner, Thomas T; Durr, Alexandra; Assmann, Birgit; Lohmann, Katja; Kostic, Vladimir; Klein, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The system of assigning locus symbols to specify chromosomal regions that are associated with a familial disorder has a number of problems when used as a reference list of genetically determined disorders,including (I) erroneously assigned loci, (II) duplicated loci, (III) missing symbols or loci, (IV) unconfirmed loci and genes, (V) a combination of causative genes and risk factor genes in the same list, and (VI) discordance between phenotype and list assignment. In this article, we report on the recommendations of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Task Force for Nomenclature of Genetic Movement Disorders and present a system for naming genetically determined movement disorders that addresses these problems. We demonstrate how the system would be applied to currently known genetically determined parkinsonism, dystonia, dominantly inherited ataxia, spastic paraparesis, chorea, paroxysmal movement disorders, neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, and primary familial brain calcifications. This system provides a resource for clinicians and researchers that, unlike the previous system, can be considered an accurate and criterion-based list of confirmed genetically determined movement disorders at the time it was last updated. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27079681

  4. Marine medaka ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and new insight into teleost Abch nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Hye-Min; Choi, Ik-Young; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The ABC gene family is recognized as one of the largest gene families in all kingdoms of life. Although many genes involved in the ABC superfamily have been annotated from several fish species, information on large sets of the ABC superfamily and their evolutionary characterization are still unclear. In the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma, 50 ABC transporters were identified with bioinformatics-aided in silico analyses, and their full-length cDNA sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into the eight subfamilies (A–H) that include all members of all ABC subfamilies. Interestingly, several teleosts’ Abcg members were closely clustered with Abch members in a distinctive clade. The abch gene was also observed in the coelacanth and the spotted gar, suggesting that this gene was retained from a bilaterian ancestor and that a gene loss event recently occurred in the tetrapod lineage. In teleosts, the nomenclature of previously annotated abcg genes should be considered carefully, as they form a distinctive clade with the marine medaka abch subfamily and other teleost abch genes, but not with the members of the Abcg subfamily. PMID:26472499

  5. Phylogenetic nomenclature and evolution of mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of the mannose-binding lectin gene (MBL2) affect the concentration and functional efficiency of the protein. We recently used haplotype-specific sequencing to identify 23 MBL2 haplotypes, associated with enhanced susceptibility to several diseases. Results In this work, we applied the same method in 288 and 470 chromosomes from Gabonese and European adults, respectively, and found three new haplotypes in the last group. We propose a phylogenetic nomenclature to standardize MBL2 studies and found two major phylogenetic branches due to six strongly linked polymorphisms associated with high MBL production. They presented high Fst values and were imbedded in regions with high nucleotide diversity and significant Tajima's D values. Compared to others using small sample sizes and unphased genotypic data, we found differences in haplotyping, frequency estimation, Fu and Li's D* and Fst results. Conclusion Using extensive testing for selective neutrality, we confirmed that stochastic evolutionary factors have had a major role in shaping this polymorphic gene worldwide. PMID:20465856

  6. Rufus of Ephesus and his contribution to the development of anatomical nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bujalkova, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Rufus of Ephesus, a famous ancient physician, lived about the years 80 - 150 CE. His theories stressed the importance of anatomy and he preferred pragmatic approach to diagnosis and treatment. In his work "On the Names of the Parts of the Human Body", he put in pragmatic effort to make a lexicon of anatomy for his pupils. In the introduction, he described it as a manual for the students of medical art which relied on demonstration in teaching; visible (outer) parts of the body were shown on a demonstrator and invisible (inner) parts were shown on a dissected monkey. The brief explanation of the anatomical terms includes position, shape, and functions of organs, and this is what makes his work a pioneering effort to explain the anatomy clearly, systematically, and using consistent terminology. Rufus stressed the importance of exact nomenclature to prevent misunderstandings in medical practice. This anatomy manual had a major influence on the development of anatomical terminology. It is an important contribution to the history of teaching. The other essential contribution of Rufus' lexicon (also known for its briefer title Onomastikon) is that the author recognised and critically reviewed the knowledge and views of his predecessors, physicians of the pre-Galenic period. No less important was his teaching to anatomists and physicians who followed, as they often cited or paraphrased Rufus in their own works (Galen, Oribasius). Many fragments of Rufus' work have been preserved by medieval Arabic medical writers, especially by Rhazes. PMID:22047484

  7. An update to polyketide synthase and non-ribosomal synthetase genes and nomenclature in Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Frederik T; Gardiner, Donald M; Lysøe, Erik; Fuertes, Patricia Romans; Tudzynski, Bettina; Wiemann, Philipp; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Giese, Henriette; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-02-01

    Members of the genus Fusarium produce a plethora of bioactive secondary metabolites, which can be harmful to humans and animals or have potential in drug development. In this study we have performed comparative analyses of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) from ten different Fusarium species including F. graminearum (two strains), F. verticillioides, F. solani, F. culmorum, F. pseudograminearum, F. fujikuroi, F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, F. equiseti, and F. oxysporum (12 strains). This led to identification of 52 NRPS and 52 PKSs orthology groups, respectively, and although not all PKSs and NRPSs are assumed to be intact or functional, the analyses illustrate the huge secondary metabolite potential in Fusarium. In our analyses we identified a core collection of eight NRPSs (NRPS2-4, 6, 10-13) and two PKSs (PKS3 and PKS7) that are conserved in all strains analyzed in this study. The identified PKSs and NRPSs were named based on a previously developed classification system (www.FusariumNRPSPKS.dk). We suggest this system be used when PKSs and NRPSs have to be classified in future sequenced Fusarium strains. This system will facilitate identification of orthologous and non-orthologous NRPSs and PKSs from newly sequenced Fusarium genomes and will aid the scientific community by providing a common nomenclature for these two groups of genes/enzymes. PMID:25543026

  8. Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype nomenclature based on the internal transcribed spacer sequence: a consensus.

    PubMed

    Santín, Mónica; Fayer, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    The standard method for determining the genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi is based on the DNA sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA gene. There are 81 genotypes with 111 genotype names: 26 genotypes have been identified exclusively in humans, eight have been identified in humans and in other hosts, 27 have been identified exclusively in cattle and pigs, six have been identified exclusively in cats and dogs, and 14 have been identified in miscellaneous hosts. Because none of these genotypes has taxonomic status and therefore do not adhere to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature regarding naming, some genotypes have received multiple names, each different and in separate publications by different authors. Because of the proliferation of genotypes with overlapping names and multiple hosts the scientific literature has become confusing and difficult to efficiently utilize. To reduce confusion and provide guidance for future publications we tabulated all names, GenBank accession numbers, and author citations and propose that the first published name has precedence and should become the primary name used in all subsequent publications in which genotyping is based on ITS sequencing. In those publications the names and GenBank numbers that were submitted at later dates should also be provided by the authors as synonyms to aid readers and reviewers. PMID:19335772

  9. The everyday used nomenclature of the aortic root components: the tower of Babel?

    PubMed

    Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Moritz, Anton; Moosdorf, Rainer; Lichtenberg, Artur; Misfeld, Martin; Charitos, Efstratios I

    2012-03-01

    Modern analyses of data for scientific reporting and healthcare management purposes require standardized and consistent definitions, something which also holds true for aortic root surgery, as part of the cardiovascular surgery spectrum. The aim of the present study was to investigate the currently employed nomenclature of the aortic root components. A questionnaire was constructed on the terminology of aortic root components, providing a list of common definitions including anatomical descriptions, as well as fields for custom responses. Responses were received from 534 cardiothoracic surgeons registered at www.ctsnet.org. Remarkable variations in definitions were detected. The most unanimously accepted terms were: 'aortic leaflets', the freely moving parts (52.6% of responses); 'commissures', the distal part of the leaflet attachments plus the peripheral area of the free edges of the leaflets (52.2%); 'semi-lunar leaflet attachment', the anatomic site of leaflet attachment (58%); 'annulus', the circular line defined by the nadirs of the leaflets (38%); 'interleaflet triangle', the tissue between two leaflets and annulus (23%); 'aortic valve', the three leaflets only (55%); 'aortic root' as composed of sinuses, tissue between the leaflets, sinutubular junction, leaflets and their wall attachment (63%). The remarkable variability on the everyday-used definitions of the aortic root components can potentially lead to misinterpretation of data. More stringent adoption of consistent, standardized definitions of aortic root components is necessary in the modern era of data collection and management. PMID:22345173

  10. Taxonomic and nomenclatural notes on the genera Themus Motschulsky and Lycocerus Gorham (Coleoptera, Cantharidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuxia; Kopetz, Andreas; Yang, Xingke

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The following taxonomic or nomenclatural changes are proposed: Themus (s.str.) regalis (Gorham, 1889), nom. rest.; Themus (s.str.) scutulatus Wittmer, 1983 = Themus (s.str.) hmong Kazantsev, 2007, syn. n.; Themus (Telephorops) coelestis (Gorham, 1889) = Themus violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992, syn. n.; Themus (Telephorops) uniformis Wittmer, 1983, stat. n. = Themus (Telephorops) cribripennis Wittmer, 1983, syn. n.; Themus (Haplothemus) licenti Pic, 1938, stat. rev., resurrected from synonymy with Themus coriaceipennis (Fairmaire, 1889); Lycocerus aenescens (Fairmaire, 1889) = Lycocerus tcheonanus (Pic, 1922), syn. n.; Lycocerus asperipennis (Fairmaire, 1891) = Lycocerus wangi (Švihla, 2004), syn. n.; Lycocerus borneoensis nom. n. for Athemellus atricolor (Wittmer, 1972); Lycocerus bilineatus (Wittmer, 1995) = Lycocerus amplus (Wittmer, 1995), syn. n.; Lycocerus fairmairei nom. n. et stat. rev. for Athemus dimidiaticrus (Fairmaire, 1889), originally in Telephorus, resurrected from synonymy with Lycocerus orientalis (Gorham, 1889); Lycocerus confossicollis (Fairmaire, 1891), comb. n. hereby transferred from Cantharis = Lycocerus multiimpressus (Wittmer, 1997), syn. n.; Lycocerus inopaciceps (Pic, 1926) = Athemus (Athemellus) bimaculicollis (Švihla, 2005), syn. n.; Lycocerus nigratus nom. n. for Lycocerus nigricolor (Wittmer, 1972), originally in Podabrinus; Lycocerus plebejus (Kiesenwetter, 1874) = Lycocerus brunneonotaticeps (Pic, 1922), syn. n. = Cantharis rufonotaticeps Pic, 1921 syn. n.; Lycocerus swampingatus (Pic, 1916), comb. n., hereby transferred from Cantharis. The neotypes of Themus violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992 and Athemus (s.str.) maculithorax Wang & Yang, 1992 are designated respectively. PMID:24146589

  11. Phylogenetic-based nomenclatural proposals for Ophiocordycipitaceae (Hypocreales) with new combinations in Tolypocladium.

    PubMed

    Quandt, C Alisha; Kepler, Ryan M; Gams, Walter; Araújo, João P M; Ban, Sayaka; Evans, Harry C; Hughes, David; Humber, Richard; Hywel-Jones, Nigel; Li, Zengzhi; Luangsa-Ard, J Jennifer; Rehner, Stephen A; Sanjuan, Tatiana; Sato, Hiroki; Shrestha, Bhushan; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yao, Yi-Jian; Zare, Rasoul; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2014-06-01

    Ophiocordycipitaceae is a diverse family comprising ecologically, economically, medicinally, and culturally important fungi. The family was recognized due to the polyphyly of the genus Cordyceps and the broad diversity of the mostly arthropod-pathogenic lineages of Hypocreales. The other two cordyceps-like families, Cordycipitaceae and Clavicipitaceae, will be revised taxonomically elsewhere. Historically, many species were placed in Cordyceps, but other genera have been described in this family as well, including several based on anamorphic features. Currently there are 24 generic names in use across both asexual and sexual life stages for species of Ophiocordycipitaceae. To reflect changes in Art. 59 in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN), we propose to protect and to suppress names within Ophiocordycipitaceae, and to present taxonomic revisions in the genus Tolypocladium, based on rigorous and extensively sampled molecular phylogenetic analyses. When approaching this task, we considered the principles of priority, monophyly, minimizing taxonomic revisions, and the practical utility of these fungi within the wider biological research community. PMID:25083412

  12. Automatic parcellation of human cortical gyri and sulci using standard anatomical nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    DESTRIEUX, Christophe; FISCHL, Bruce; DALE, Anders; HALGREN, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Precise localization of sulco-gyral structures of the human cerebral cortex is important for the interpretation of morpho-functional data, but requires anatomical expertise and is time consuming because of the brain s geometric complexity. Software developed to automatically identify sulco-gyral structures has improved substantially as a result of techniques providing topologically-correct reconstructions permitting inflated views of the human brain. Here we describe a complete parcellation of the cortical surface using standard internationally-accepted nomenclature and criteria. This parcellation is available in the FreeSurfer package. First, a computer-assisted hand parcellation classified each vertex as sulcal or gyral, and these were then subparcellated into 74 labels per hemisphere. Twelve datasets were used to develop rules and algorithms (reported here) that produced labels consistent with anatomical rules as well as automated computational parcellation. The final parcellation was used to build an atlas for automatically labeling the whole cerebral cortex. This atlas was used to label an additional 12 datasets, which were found to have good concordance with manual labels. This paper presents a precisely-defined method for automatically labeling the cortical surface in standard terminology. PMID:20547229

  13. Automatic parcellation of human cortical gyri and sulci using standard anatomical nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Destrieux, Christophe; Fischl, Bruce; Dale, Anders; Halgren, Eric

    2010-10-15

    Precise localization of sulco-gyral structures of the human cerebral cortex is important for the interpretation of morpho-functional data, but requires anatomical expertise and is time consuming because of the brain's geometric complexity. Software developed to automatically identify sulco-gyral structures has improved substantially as a result of techniques providing topologically correct reconstructions permitting inflated views of the human brain. Here we describe a complete parcellation of the cortical surface using standard internationally accepted nomenclature and criteria. This parcellation is available in the FreeSurfer package. First, a computer-assisted hand parcellation classified each vertex as sulcal or gyral, and these were then subparcellated into 74 labels per hemisphere. Twelve datasets were used to develop rules and algorithms (reported here) that produced labels consistent with anatomical rules as well as automated computational parcellation. The final parcellation was used to build an atlas for automatically labeling the whole cerebral cortex. This atlas was used to label an additional 12 datasets, which were found to have good concordance with manual labels. This paper presents a precisely defined method for automatically labeling the cortical surface in standard terminology. PMID:20547229

  14. Pharmacology of sexually compulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Codispoti, Victoria L

    2008-12-01

    In a meta-analysis on controlled outcomes evaluations of 22,000 sex offenders, Losel and Schmucker found 80 comparisons between treatment and control groups. The recidivism rate averaged 19% in treated groups, and 27% in controls. Most other reviews reported a lower rate of sexual recidivism in treated sexual offenders. Of 2039 citations in this study (including literature in five languages), 60 studies held independent comparisons. Problematic issues included the control groups; various hormonal, surgical, cognitive behavioral, and psychotherapeutic treatments; and sample sizes. In the 80 studies compared after the year 2000, 32% were reported after 2000, 45% originated in the United States, 45% were reported in journals, and 36% were unpublished. Treatment characteristics showed a significant lack of pharmacologic treatment (7.5%), whereas use cognitive and classical behavioral therapy was 64%. In 68% of the studies, no information was available on the integrity of the treatment implementation; 36% of the treatment settings were outpatient only, 31% were prison settings, and 12% were mixed settings (prison, hospital, and outpatient). Integrating research interpretations is complicated by the heterogeneity of sex offenders, with only 56% being adult men and 17.5% adolescents. Offense types reported included 74% child molestation, 48% incest, and 30% exhibitionism. Pedophilia was not singled out. Follow-up periods varied from 12 months to greater than 84 months. The definition of recidivism ran the gamut from arrest (24%), conviction (30%), charges (19%), and no indication (16%). Results were difficult to interpret because of the methodological problems with this type of study. Overall, a positive outcome was noted with sex offender treatment. Cognitive-behavioral and hormonal treatment were the most promising. Voluntary treatment led to a slightly better outcome than mandatory participation. When accounting for a low base rate of sexual recidivism, the reduction

  15. Designer psychostimulants: pharmacology and differences.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Leslie; White, Michael; Treble, Ric

    2014-12-01

    More than 200 novel psychoactive drugs have been reported in Europe, with 73 added in 2012 and additional compounds encountered every week in 2013. Many of these are "designer psychostimulants" which aim to mimic the subjective effects of amphetamines, cocaine or 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy"). Several drugs are based on the beta-ketoamphetamine cathinone chemical structure, others include aminoindanes, aminotetralins, piperazines, amphetamine analogues and pipradrol derivatives. Although a detailed analysis of the pharmacology of these novel drugs is largely lacking, a number of scientific studies have been reported in 2011-2013 and these are reviewed. All of the novel psychostimulants activate monoamine systems in the brain - with differing dopamine (DA) v serotonin (5-HT) preferences. Those activating principally DA systems are amphetamine-like stimulants, such as naphyrone, desoxypipradrol, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and benzylpiperazine while those preferentially activating 5-HT mechanisms are MDMA-like or cocaine-like stimulants, such as mephedrone, methylone and other substituted cathinones, aminoindanes, aminotetralins and piperazines. The ability of mephedrone and other novel psychostimulants to substitute for methylamphetamine or cocaine in drug discrimination tests in rats, and the ability of mephedrone to induce conditioned place preference and to sustain self-administration behaviour suggests that this and other cocaine/methylamphetamine-like drugs have dependence liability. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:24456744

  16. Cardiovascular Safety Pharmacology of Sibutramine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaesuk; Chung, Eunyong; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Dae Hyun; Song, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyoung Moon; Cha, Hey Jin; Shin, Ji Soon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sibutramine is an anorectic that has been banned since 2010 due to cardiovascular safety issues. However, counterfeit drugs or slimming products that include sibutramine are still available in the market. It has been reported that illegal sibutramine-contained pharmaceutical products induce cardiovascular crisis. However, the mechanism underlying sibutramine-induced cardiovascular adverse effect has not been fully evaluated yet. In this study, we performed cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies of sibutramine systemically using by hERG channel inhibition, action potential duration, and telemetry assays. Sibutramine inhibited hERG channel current of HEK293 cells with an IC50 of 3.92 μM in patch clamp assay and increased the heart rate and blood pressure (76 Δbpm in heart rate and 51 ΔmmHg in blood pressure) in beagle dogs at a dose of 30 mg/kg (per oral), while it shortened action potential duration (at 10 μM and 30 μM, resulted in 15% and 29% decreases in APD50, and 9% and 17% decreases in APD90, respectively) in the Purkinje fibers of rabbits and had no effects on the QTc interval in beagle dogs. These results suggest that sibutramine has a considerable adverse effect on the cardiovascular system and may contribute to accurate drug safety regulation. PMID:26157557

  17. Biochemistry and pharmacology of endovanilloids.

    PubMed

    Starowicz, Katarzyna; Nigam, Santosh; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2007-04-01

    Endovanilloids are defined as endogenous ligands and activators of transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels. The first endovanilloid to be identified was anandamide (AEA), previously discovered as an endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors. In fact, there are several similarities, in terms of opposing actions on the same intracellular signals, role in the same pathological conditions, and shared ligands and tissue distribution, between TRPV1 and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. After AEA and some of its congeners (the unsaturated long chain N-acylethanolamines), at least 2 other families of endogenous lipids have been suggested to act as endovanilloids: (i) unsaturated long chain N-acyldopamines and (ii) some lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA). Here we discuss the mechanisms for the regulation of the levels of the proposed endovanilloids, as well as their TRPV1-mediated pharmacological actions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we outline the possible pathological conditions in which endovanilloids, acting at sometimes aberrantly expressed TRPV1 receptors, might play a role. PMID:17349697

  18. Histamine receptors and cancer pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Vanina A; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected indicating that histamine can modulate proliferation of different normal and malignant cells. High histamine biosynthesis and content together with histamine receptors have been reported in different human neoplasias including melanoma, colon and breast cancer, as well as in experimental tumours in which histamine has been postulated to behave as an important paracrine and autocrine regulator of proliferation. The discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor in different tissues has contributed to our understanding of histamine role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions revealing novel functions for histamine and opening new perspectives in histamine pharmacology research. In the present review we aimed to briefly summarize current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor involvement in cancer before focusing on some recent evidence supporting the novel role of histamine H4 receptor in cancer progression representing a promising molecular target and avenue for cancer drug development. LINKED ARTICLES BJP has previously published a Histamine themed issue (2009). To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2009.157.issue-1 PMID:20636392

  19. Pharmacology of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J D; Francis, S H

    2002-01-01

    The clinical properties (efficacy and safety profile) of a medicine are related not only to its mode of action, but also to its selectivity for its target (usually a receptor or enzyme) and are also influenced by its pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination). The growing number of phosphodiesterase inhibitors that are selective for phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) represent a promising new class of compounds that are useful for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and perhaps other disorders. Some of the basic pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters that describe drug action are discussed with regard to the new PDE5 inhibitors. Central topics reviewed are the concentration that produces a given in vitro response, or potency (IC50), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (Tmax), half-life (t 1/2), area under the curve (AUC), bioavailability, onset and duration of action, and the balance to achieve optimum safety and efficacy. To illustrate these concepts, a group of inhibitors with varying selectivities and potencies for PDE5 (theophylline, IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil) are discussed. Each drug has its own set of unique pharmacological characteristics based on its specific molecular structure, enzyme inhibition profile and pharmacokinetic properties. Each PDE5 inhibitor has a distinct selectivity that contributes to its safety profile. As with all new drugs, and especially those in a new class, careful evaluation will be necessary to ensure the optimal use of the PDE5 inhibitors. PMID:12166544

  20. Safety Pharmacology Evaluation of Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Engwall, Michael J; Vargas, Hugo M

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals or biopharmaceuticals (BPs) are molecules such as monoclonal antibodies, soluble/decoy receptors, hormones, enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors that are produced in various biological expression systems and are used to diagnose, treat, or prevent various diseases. Safety pharmacology (SP) assessment of BPs has evolved since the approval of the first BP (recombinant human insulin) in 1982. This evolution is ongoing and is informed by various international harmonization guidelines. Based on these guidelines, the potential undesirable effect of every drug candidate (small molecule or BP) on the cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems, referred to as the "core battery," should be assessed prior to first-in-human administration. However, SP assessment of BPs poses unique challenges such as choice of test species and integration of SP parameters into repeat-dose toxicity studies. This chapter reviews the evolution of SP assessment of BPs using the approval packages of marketed BPs and discusses the past, current, and new and upcoming approach and methods that can be used to generate high-quality data for the assessment of SP of BPs. PMID:26091648

  1. Prostaglandins: pharmacology and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Karim, S M; Hillier, K

    1974-01-01

    Prostaglandin research has been 1 of the most stimulating features of biomedical investigation in the past decade. Interest developed at a time of expanding knowledge of hormonal and neurohormonal behavior and research work received a tremendous impetus in the early 1960s with the elucidation in Sweden of the chemical structures of prostaglandins, followed by the discovery of their biosynthetic pathways. The original findings of large amounts of prostaglandin in the male accessory genital glands and their secretions, and subsequent discovery in the menstrual and amniotic fluids linked these substances with human production. As a result of further investigation, clinical applications of prostaglandins for the induction of labor and termination of early unwanted pregnancies have been developed. Apart from the functions of the prostaglandins in the reproductive area, they have been shown to have a widespread distribution in the body and produce many different pharmacological effects. Prostaglandins are thought to be involved in the regulation of blood pressure and through their vascular effects have therapeutic potential in the treatment of hypertension and peripheral vascular disease. Through their bronchodilator effect, some prostaglandins may become useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:4611742

  2. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  3. Cardiovascular Safety Pharmacology of Sibutramine.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jaesuk; Chung, Eunyong; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Dae Hyun; Song, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyoung Moon; Cha, Hey Jin; Shin, Ji Soon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2015-07-01

    Sibutramine is an anorectic that has been banned since 2010 due to cardiovascular safety issues. However, counterfeit drugs or slimming products that include sibutramine are still available in the market. It has been reported that illegal sibutramine-contained pharmaceutical products induce cardiovascular crisis. However, the mechanism underlying sibutramine-induced cardiovascular adverse effect has not been fully evaluated yet. In this study, we performed cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies of sibutramine systemically using by hERG channel inhibition, action potential duration, and telemetry assays. Sibutramine inhibited hERG channel current of HEK293 cells with an IC50 of 3.92 μM in patch clamp assay and increased the heart rate and blood pressure (76 Δbpm in heart rate and 51 ΔmmHg in blood pressure) in beagle dogs at a dose of 30 mg/kg (per oral), while it shortened action potential duration (at 10 μM and 30 μM, resulted in 15% and 29% decreases in APD50, and 9% and 17% decreases in APD90, respectively) in the Purkinje fibers of rabbits and had no effects on the QTc interval in beagle dogs. These results suggest that sibutramine has a considerable adverse effect on the cardiovascular system and may contribute to accurate drug safety regulation. PMID:26157557

  4. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  5. Pharmacology of some acetylcholine homologues

    PubMed Central

    Barrass, B. C.; Brimblecombe, R. W.; Rich, P.; Taylor, Joan V.

    1970-01-01

    1. The acetates of several long chain (3 to 12 methylene groups) analogues of choline have been prepared and their pharmacological properties studied. 2. None of the compounds had a high level of activity at the post-ganglionic parasympathetic acetylcholine receptors. The lower members of the series showed weak agonist activity and the homologues with 8 to 10 methylene groups had very weak anticholinergic activity. 3. All the compounds had a depolarizing action at the acetylcholine receptors of the neuromuscular junction and of sympathetic ganglia. At the neuromuscular junction there were two peaks of stimulant activity, one with the hexamethylene and one with the dodecamethylene homologue, whereas at the ganglion there was only one peak, with the hexamethylene homologue. 4. The ganglion-stimulant activity of the higher members of the series was blocked by pretreatment with the anticholinesterase drug dyflos, whereas the activity of lower members was either unaffected by such treatment or slightly potentiated. 5. The results are discussed in terms of possible spatial arrangements of acetylcholine receptor units in the neuromuscular junction and the ganglion. PMID:5420144

  6. Bromodomains and their pharmacological inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gallenkamp, Daniel; Gelato, Kathy A; Haendler, Bernard; Weinmann, Hilmar

    2014-03-01

    Over 60 bromodomains belonging to proteins with very different functions have been identified in humans. Several of them interact with acetylated lysine residues, leading to the recruitment and stabilization of protein complexes. The bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) proteins contain tandem bromodomains which bind to acetylated histones and are thereby implicated in a number of DNA-centered processes, including the regulation of gene expression. The recent identification of inhibitors of BET and non-BET bromodomains is one of the few examples in which effective blockade of a protein-protein interaction can be achieved with a small molecule. This has led to major strides in the understanding of the function of bromodomain-containing proteins and their involvement in diseases such as cancer and inflammation. Indeed, BET bromodomain inhibitors are now being clinically evaluated for the treatment of hematological tumors and have also been tested in clinical trials for the relatively rare BRD-NUT midline carcinoma. This review gives an overview of the newest developments in the field, with a focus on the biology of selected bromodomain proteins on the one hand, and on reported pharmacological inhibitors on the other, including recent examples from the patent literature. PMID:24497428

  7. Phylogeny and nomenclature of the genus Talaromyces and taxa accommodated in Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium

    PubMed Central

    Samson, R.A.; Yilmaz, N.; Houbraken, J.; Spierenburg, H.; Seifert, K.A.; Peterson, S.W.; Varga, J.; Frisvad, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The taxonomic history of anamorphic species attributed to Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium is reviewed, along with evidence supporting their relationship with teleomorphic species classified in Talaromyces. To supplement previous conclusions based on ITS, SSU and/or LSU sequencing that Talaromyces and subgenus Biverticillium comprise a monophyletic group that is distinct from Penicillium at the generic level, the phylogenetic relationships of these two groups with other genera of Trichocomaceae was further studied by sequencing a part of the RPB1 (RNA polymerase II largest subunit) gene. Talaromyces species and most species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium sensu Pitt reside in a monophyletic clade distant from species of other subgenera of Penicillium. For detailed phylogenetic analysis of species relationships, the ITS region (incl. 5.8S nrDNA) was sequenced for the available type strains and/or representative isolates of Talaromyces and related biverticillate anamorphic species. Extrolite profiles were compiled for all type strains and many supplementary cultures. All evidence supports our conclusions that Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium is distinct from other subgenera in Penicillium and should be taxonomically unified with the Talaromyces species that reside in the same clade. Following the concepts of nomenclatural priority and single name nomenclature, we transfer all accepted species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium to Talaromyces. A holomorphic generic diagnosis for the expanded concept of Talaromyces, including teleomorph and anamorph characters, is provided. A list of accepted Talaromyces names and newly combined Penicillium names is given. Species of biotechnological and medical importance, such as P. funiculosum and P. marneffei, are now combined in Talaromyces. Excluded species and taxa that need further taxonomic study are discussed. An appendix lists other generic names, usually considered synonyms of Penicillium sensu lato that

  8. Some taxonomic and nomenclatural changes in American Mantodea (Insecta, Dictyoptera)--Part I.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Antonio A; Rivera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Multiple nomenclatural problems persist in mantodean taxonomy. This constitutes an important challenge for praying mantis systematics, its forthcoming development and future consolidation. In this first contribution, we attempt solving a number of issues involving mostly Neotropical praying mantis species described by Brazilian entomologists Paulo S. Terra, Cândido F. de Mello-Leitão, Salvador de Toledo Piza Junior and Lauro J. Jantsch. We provide evidence to justify the following nomenclatural changes. In Acanthopidae, Acontiothespis travassosi Jantsch, 1986 is a new synonym of Raptrix perspicua (F. 1787). Changes in Thespidae are: Emboicy Terra, 1982 is a new synonym of Chloromiopteryx Giglio-Tos, 1915, E. mirim Terra, 1982 is transferred to Chloromiopteryx as C. mirim (Terra, 1982) (new combination); Musoniola plurilobata Mello-Leitão, 1937 is transferred to Chloromiopteryx as C. plurilobata (Mello-Leitão, 1937) (new combination); Metathespis modesta Piza, 1968 is removed from synonymy with Chloromiopteryx thalassina (Burmeister, 1838) and considered valid as C. modesta (Piza, 1968) (new combination and status revalidated); Metathespis precaria Piza, 1968 is removed from synonymy with Chloromiopteryx thalassina (Burmeister, 1838) and considered a new synonym of Miobantia rustica (Fabricius, 1781); Eumiopteryx magna Jantsch, 1991 is transferred to Anamiopteryx as A. magna (Jantsch, 1991) (new combination). For Mantidae/Amelinae, Tithrone corseuli Jantsch, 1986 and T. clauseni Jantsch, 1995 are new synonyms of Litaneutria minor (Scudder, 1872); in Mantidae/Photininae Coptopteryx gigliotosi Piza, 1960 (non Werner, 1925), its replacement name Coptopteryx ermannoi Jantsch & Corseuil, 1988 and Paraphotina precaria Piza, 1966 (the latter currently placed within Coptopteryx) are all new synonyms of Coptopteryx argentina (Burmeister, 1838), whereas Brachypteromantis bonariensis Piza 1960 (currently placed among Coptopteryx) is a new synonym of Coptopteryx gayi

  9. The descriptive nomenclature and classification of growth fabrics in fossil scleractinian reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insalaco, Enzo

    1998-06-01

    genesis is discussed. A review of the classification of reef fabrics suggests that there is currently no adequate system to describe fossil scleractinian growth fabrics. The most commonly used classification of reefal fabrics is that of Embry and Klovan (1971). [Embry, A.F., Klovan, J.E., 1971. A Late Devonian reef tract on northeastern Banks Island, Northwest Territories. Bull. Can. Pet. Geol. 33, 730-781.] There are a number of shortcomings in this scheme which may be grouped into three categories: (1) the interpretative nature of the classification; (2) problems in interpreting biological effect from form; and (3) insufficient categories to adequately describe Mesozoic and Cenozoic growth fabrics. Moreover, there appears to be a lack of a standardised nomenclature for growth fabrics which has hindered meaningful comparisons of scleractinian growth fabrics through time and space. A descriptive system based on a modification and expansion of the Embry and Klovan system (1971) is proposed and a revised nomenclature for growth fabrics presented. The system is designed to be flexible in its application — it can be used simply to describe a growth fabric, or, through the use of genetic and non-genetic modifiers, to imply types of reef-building processes and growth fabric heterogeneity. Although the concepts and terminology discussed in this paper relate to scleractinian growth fabric, they are equally applicable to fabrics comprising other organisms.

  10. Lectotype designations and nomenclatural changes in Xylographus Mellié (Coleoptera, Ciidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Gómez, Vivian Eliana; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Lawrence, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We designate lectotypes and propose nomenclatural changes in Xylographus Mellié (Coleoptera, Ciidae) based on type specimens deposited in the Museum of Comparative Zoology (USA), Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (Germany), the Natural History Museum (UK), Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de la Ville de Genève (Switzerland), Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle (France), Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet (Sweden) and Naturhistorisches Museum Wien (Austria). We designate lectotypes for the following species: Cis fultoni Broun, 1886, Xylographus anthracinus Mellié, 1849, X. bicolor Pic, 1916, X. brasiliensis Pic, 1916, X. ceylonicus Ancey, 1876, X. contractus Mellié, 1849, X. corpulentus Mellié, 1849, X. dentatus Pic, 1922, X. gibbus Mellié, 1849, X. hypocritus Mellié, 1849, X. javanus Pic, 1937, X. lemoulti Pic, 1916, X. longicollis Pic, 1922, X. madagascariensis Mellié, 1849, X. nitidissimus Pic, 1916, X. perforatus Gerstaecker, 1871, X. porcus Gorham, 1886, X. punctatus Mellié, 1849, X. ritsemai Pic, 1921, X. rufescens Pic, 1921, X. rufipennis Pic, 1934, X. rufipes Pic, 1930, X. seychellensis Scott, 1926, X. subopacus Pic, 1929, X. subsinuatus Pic, 1916, X. suillus Gorham, 1886, X. testaceitarsis Pic, 1916 and X. tomicoides Reitter, 1902. We propose the following syn. n. (senior synonym listed first): X. anthracinus = X. testaceitarsis, X. brasiliensis = X. lucasi Lopes-Andrade & Zacaro, X. corpulentus = X. lemoulti and X. richardi Mellié, X. madagascariensis = X. eichelbaumi Reitter, X. rufipennis, X. seychellensis Scott and X. tarsalis Fåhraeus, X. nitidissimus = X. longicollis, X. subsinuatus = X. rufescens. We exclude three species from Xylographus: Cis renominatus, nom. n. (for X. dentatus Pic, 1922, not C. dentatus Mellié, 1849), Paratrichapus fultoni (Broun, 1886), comb. n. and P. javanus (Pic, 1937), comb. n. PMID:24493963

  11. Regulatory RNAs in the Less Studied Streptococcal Species: From Nomenclature to Identification.

    PubMed

    Zorgani, Mohamed A; Quentin, Roland; Lartigue, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal species are Gram-positive bacteria involved in severe and invasive diseases in humans and animals. Although, this group includes different pathogenic species involved in life-threatening infections for humans, it also includes beneficial species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, which is used in yogurt production. In bacteria virulence factors are controlled by various regulatory networks including regulatory RNAs. For clearness and to develop logical thinking, we start this review with a revision of regulatory RNAs nomenclature. Previous reviews are mostly dealing with Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae regulatory RNAs. We especially focused our analysis on regulatory RNAs in Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus thermophilus and other less studied Streptococcus species. Although, S. agalactiae RNome remains largely unknown, sRNAs (small RNAs) are supposed to mediate regulation during environmental adaptation and host infection. In the case of S. mutans, sRNAs are suggested to be involved in competence regulation, carbohydrate metabolism, and Toxin-Antitoxin systems. A new category of miRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) was also identified for the first time in this species. The analysis of S. thermophilus sRNome shows that many sRNAs are associated to the bacterial immune system known as CRISPR-Cas system. Only few of the other different Streptococcus species have been the subject of studies pointed toward the characterization of regulatory RNAs. Finally, understanding bacterial sRNome can constitute one step forward to the elaboration of new strategies in therapy such as substitution of antibiotics in the management of S. agalactiae neonatal infections, prevention of S. mutans dental caries or use of S. thermophilus CRISPR-Cas system in genome editing applications. PMID:27507970

  12. Regulatory RNAs in the Less Studied Streptococcal Species: From Nomenclature to Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zorgani, Mohamed A.; Quentin, Roland; Lartigue, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal species are Gram-positive bacteria involved in severe and invasive diseases in humans and animals. Although, this group includes different pathogenic species involved in life-threatening infections for humans, it also includes beneficial species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, which is used in yogurt production. In bacteria virulence factors are controlled by various regulatory networks including regulatory RNAs. For clearness and to develop logical thinking, we start this review with a revision of regulatory RNAs nomenclature. Previous reviews are mostly dealing with Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae regulatory RNAs. We especially focused our analysis on regulatory RNAs in Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus thermophilus and other less studied Streptococcus species. Although, S. agalactiae RNome remains largely unknown, sRNAs (small RNAs) are supposed to mediate regulation during environmental adaptation and host infection. In the case of S. mutans, sRNAs are suggested to be involved in competence regulation, carbohydrate metabolism, and Toxin–Antitoxin systems. A new category of miRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) was also identified for the first time in this species. The analysis of S. thermophilus sRNome shows that many sRNAs are associated to the bacterial immune system known as CRISPR-Cas system. Only few of the other different Streptococcus species have been the subject of studies pointed toward the characterization of regulatory RNAs. Finally, understanding bacterial sRNome can constitute one step forward to the elaboration of new strategies in therapy such as substitution of antibiotics in the management of S. agalactiae neonatal infections, prevention of S. mutans dental caries or use of S. thermophilus CRISPR-Cas system in genome editing applications. PMID:27507970

  13. Revisiting nomenclature for the description of prostate cancer androgen-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Heemers, Hannelore V; Mohler, James L

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the Noble prize-winning findings of Huggins and Hodges, the androgen receptor (AR) has been the main target for treatment of advanced prostate cancer (CaP). Today, second- and even third-line androgen deprivation strategies, which have been designed rationally to interfere with the AR signaling that re-emerges under conditions of androgen deprivation and is at least in part responsible for disease recurrence, are effective in impeding progression of advanced CaP. The therapeutic success of these novel agents in CaP that has failed initial androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and subsequent chemotherapy is prompting studies to explore their use earlier in the course of CaP progression. Repositioning of these drugs, along with alterations in the timing, sequencing and/or combination of traditional or novel ADTs, either alone or in combination with radiation or chemo- or immuno-therapies are expected to broaden significantly the scope of treatment options for CaP. Despite the rapidly changing and continuously innovating landscape of CaP therapies that target AR activity, the terminology that is used to describe CaP androgen status has not evolved. Currently available nomenclature falls short in capturing the sustained androgen-responsiveness of mostCaPs after ADT, does not distinguish readily between CaP’s responsiveness to androgens and other steroid hormones, and does not specify the treatment condition(s) under which CaP recurs. A novel vocabulary is introduced to solve these limitations and to facilitate optimal communication among physicians, scientists and CaP patients. PMID:25374913

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Wood, Andrew J; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried out genome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species-including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  15. The extracellular matrix of Volvox: a comparative study and proposed system of nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Kirk, D L; Birchem, R; King, N

    1986-02-01

    The structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of representatives of all four sections of the genus Volvox was examined by a combination of light- and electron-microscopic methods. On the basis of these observations, plus published descriptions of aspects of ECM organization in other members of the order Volvocales, a system of nomenclature is proposed, to facilitate discussion of comparative morphology and phylogeny of the ECM in the order. In this system the ECM is divided into four main zones: the flagellar zone (FZ), which consists of attachments to and specializations of the ECM around the flagella; the boundary zone (BZ), which consists of portions of the ECM that (except in periflagellar regions) are continuous over the surface of the organism and are not structurally continuous with deeper layers; the cellular zone (CZ), which consists of specializations, other than those of the FZ, around individual cells; and the deep zone (DZ), which consists of components that fill the central region of the organism, internal to CZ. An empirically based set of hierarchical subdivisions of these zones is then proposed that permits specific identification of most morphologically distinct ECM components. The fact that not all zones and subzones are present in all members of the order means that this system permits identification of those ECM structures that have been gained or lost during Volvocalean evolution. Species-specific differences in the structure of virtually all aspects of the ECM were seen among the Volvox species examined in this study. However, the fact that such differences cannot always be used as diagnostic characters for the four divisions of the genus was demonstrated by the observation that in certain ECM features two members of the same division (V. carteri f. nagariensis and V. carteri f. weismannia) differ markedly in structure from one another, with one member of the pair resembling a member of another division. Thus many details of ECM

  16. Nomenclature and classification of vasculitis: lessons learned from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis)

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, J C

    2011-01-01

    Names influence how something is perceived. Diagnostic terms (diagnoses) are the names of diseases that are usually derived either from some distinctive characteristic of the disease or include an eponym recognizing someone who elucidated the disease. No matter how logical and appropriate a name may be, if it is not usable and used it is of no lasting value. This brief commentary focuses on the nomenclature of systemic vasculitides, and uses as a prime example Wegener's granulomatosis, which has been renamed recently ‘granulomatosis with polyangiitis’, in part because of concerns about the suitability of Friedrich Wegener as the source of an eponym. The most distinctive pathological feature of Wegener's granulomatosis is multi-focal necrotizing inflammation that has long been called granulomatosis. The systemic variant of Wegener's granulomatosis also is characterized by inflammation in many different vessels or different types, i.e. polyangiitis. Thus, granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a very appropriate alternative term for Wegener's granulomatosis. This term also is in accord with the name for a closely related vasculitis, i.e. microscopic polyangiitis. Terms that indicate aetiology and pathogenesis, when known, are useful to include in names for diseases (diagnoses). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA) or proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) are implicated in the cause of granulomatosis with polyangiitis and thus also should be specified in the diagnosis (e.g. PR3-ANCA-positive granulomatosis with polyangiitis or MPO-ANCA-positive microscopic polyangiitis). As our understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and aetiology of vasculitides change over time, the names and approaches for diagnosing these diseases will change accordingly. PMID:21447122

  17. Quantitative pharmacologic MRI in mice.

    PubMed

    Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora-Adriana; Procissi, Daniel; Demyanenko, Andrey V; Jacobs, Russell E

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacologic MRI (phMRI) uses functional MRI techniques to provide a noninvasive in vivo measurement of the hemodynamic effects of drugs. The cerebral blood volume change (ΔCBV) serves as a surrogate for neuronal activity via neurovascular coupling mechanisms. By assessing the location and time course of brain activity in mouse mutant studies, phMRI can provide valuable insights into how different behavioral phenotypes are expressed in deferring brain activity response to drug challenge. In this report, we evaluate the utility of three different intravascular ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agents for phMRI using a gradient-echo technique, with temporal resolution of one min at high magnetic field. The tissue half-life of the USPIOs was studied using a nonlinear detrending model. The three USPIOs are candidates for CBV weighted phMRI experiments, with r(2)/r(1) ratios ≥ 20 and apparent half-lives ≥ 1.5 h at the described doses. An echo-time of about 10 ms or longer results in a functional contrast to noise ratio (fCNR) > 75 after USPIO injection, with negligible decrease between 1.5-2 h. phMRI experiments were conducted at 7 T using cocaine as a psychotropic substance and acetazolamide, a global vasodilator, as a positive control. Cocaine acts as a dopamine-serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, increasing extracellular concentrations of these neurotransmitters, and thus increasing dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. phMRI results showed that CBV was reduced in the normal mouse brain after cocaine challenge, with the largest effects in the nucleus accumbens, whereas after acetazolamide, blood volume was increased in both cerebral and extracerebral tissue. PMID:21793079

  18. The pharmacology of nomegestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiangyan; Seeger, Harald; Mueck, Alfred O

    2012-04-01

    Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) is a 19-norprogesterone derivative with high biological activity at the progesterone receptor, a weak anti-androgenic effect, but with no binding to estrogen, glucocorticoid or mineralocorticoid receptors. At dosages of 1.5mg/day or more, NOMAC effectively suppresses gonadotropic activity and ovulation in women of reproductive age. Hemostasis, lipids and carbohydrate metabolism remain largely unchanged. In normal and cancerous human breast cells, NOMAC has shown favorable effects on estrogen metabolism. Like natural progesterone (but in contrast to some other synthetic progestogens), it does not appear stimulate the proliferation of cancerous breast cells. While there has been some experience of the use of NOMAC in combination with estrogens as a hormone replacement therapy, most of the data on the compound are reported in the context of its inclusion as a component of a new contraceptive pill comprising 2.5mg NOMAC combined with 1.5mg estradiol. Because of its strong endometrial efficacy, and due to its high antigonadotropic activity and long elimination half-life (about 50h), the contraceptive efficacy of the new pill is maintained even when dosages are missed. Furthermore, for the first time with a monophasic 24/4 regimen containing estradiol, cyclical stability can be achieved comparable with that obtained using pills containing ethinyl estradiol and progestogens like levonorgestrel or drospirenone. The addition of NOMAC to estradiol means that the beneficial effects of estrogen are not lost, which is of especial importance in relation to the cardiovascular system. On the basis both of its pharmacology and of studies performed during the development of the NOMAC/estradiol pill, involving some 4000 women in total, good long-term tolerability can be expected for NOMAC, although its safety profile is still to be fully ascertained, as the clinical endpoint studies are yet to be completed. PMID:22364709

  19. Integrating Behavioral and Pharmacological Therapeutic Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Samuel F.

    1986-01-01

    Fear of dental procedures and associated anxiety are widely accepted as important deterents to optimal oral health. Such health care-related fears and anxieties are also common in many areas of medicine. For both medical and dental care a large body of psychologically derived therapeutic modalities have evolved. These methods have been shown to interact positively with pharmacological therapies also designed to help patients better tolerate medical and dental treatment. Despite these findings, behavioral interventions have not found widespread acceptance in medical and dental practice. A multidimensional model which emphasizes the simultaneous consideration of pharmacologic, psychologic, and clinical dental factors is suggested in order to arrive at therapeutic decisions. Further research could address more powerful behavioral modalities, safer pharmacologic methods, and behavioral and pharmacologic combinations which interact optimally for particular clinical conditions. PMID:3458386

  20. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY MODELS FOR PULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies Dosimetry Models for Pulmonary Pharmacology

    Ted B. Martonen, Jeffry D. Schroeter, and John S. Fleming

    Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  1. Using pharmacological chaperones to restore proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Di, Xiao-Jing; Mu, Ting-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Normal organismal physiology depends on the maintenance of proteostasis in each cellular compartment to achieve a delicate balance between protein synthesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation while minimizing misfolding and aggregation. Defective proteostasis leads to numerous protein misfolding diseases. Pharmacological chaperones are cell-permeant small molecules that promote the proper folding and trafficking of a protein via direct binding to that protein. They stabilize their target protein in a protein-pharmacological chaperone state, increasing the natively-folded protein population that can effectively engage trafficking machinery for transport to the final destination for function. Here, as regards the application of pharmacological chaperones, we focus on their capability to promote the folding and trafficking of lysosomal enzymes, G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and ion channels, each of which is presently an important drug target. Pharmacological chaperones hold great promise as potential therapeutics to ameliorate a variety of protein misfolding diseases. PMID:24747662

  2. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer with Pharmacological Ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, John A.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains dismal, with less than 3% survival at 5 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-dose, intravenous pharmacological ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress selectively in pancreatic cancer cells vs. normal cells, suggesting a promising new role of ascorbate as a therapeutic agent. At physiologic concentrations, ascorbate functions as a reducing agent and antioxidant. However, when pharmacological ascorbate is given intravenously, it is possible to achieve millimolar plasma concentration. At these pharmacological levels, and in the presence of catalytic metal ions, ascorbate can induce oxidative stress through the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated ascorbate oxidation occurs extracellularly, generating H2O2 flux into cells resulting in oxidative stress. Pharmacologic ascorbate also inhibits the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts and displays synergistic cytotoxic effects when combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Phase I trials of pharmacological ascorbate in pancreatic cancer patients have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity, examine the use of pharmacological ascorbate in treatment and assess the current data supporting its potential as an adjuvant in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26201606

  3. Methodological innovations expand the safety pharmacology horizon.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, M K; Curtis, M J

    2012-09-01

    Almost uniquely in pharmacology, drug safety assessment is driven by the need for elaboration and validation of methods for detecting drug actions. This is the 9th consecutive year that the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM) has published themed issues arising from the annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS). The SPS is now past its 10th year as a distinct (from pharmacology to toxicology) discipline that integrates safety pharmacologists from industry with those in academia and the various global regulatory authorities. The themes of the 2011 meeting were (i) the bridging of safety assessment of a new chemical entity (NCE) between all the parties involved, (ii) applied technologies and (iii) translation. This issue of JPTM reflects these themes. The content is informed by the regulatory guidance documents (S7A and S7B) that apply prior to first in human (FIH) studies, which emphasize the importance of seeking model validation. The manuscripts encompass a broad spectrum of safety pharmacology topics including application of state-of-the-art techniques for study conduct and data processing and evaluation. This includes some exciting novel integrated core battery study designs, refinements in hemodynamic assessment, arrhythmia analysis algorithms, and additionally an overview of safety immunopharmacology, and a brief survey discussing similarities and differences in business models that pharmaceutical companies employ in safety pharmacology, together with SPS recommendations on 'best practice' for the conduct of a non-clinical cardiovascular assessment of a NCE. PMID:22617368

  4. What's in a Name? A Coordinated Approach toward the Correct Use of a Uniform Nomenclature to Improve Patient Reports and Databases.

    PubMed

    Tack, Véronique; Deans, Zandra C; Wolstenholme, Nicola; Patton, Simon; Dequeker, Elisabeth M C

    2016-06-01

    The Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) recommendations provide standardized nomenclature for reporting variants. This should be encouraged in molecular pathology-both for issuing diagnostic reports and for correct data recording in electronic databases. Many providers of external quality assessment (EQA) promote the correct use of HGVS nomenclature by scoring variant descriptions used in EQA reports. This study focuses on the type and impact of variant nomenclature errors. An assessment was made of EGFR gene variant nomenclature by four EQA providers (European Society of Pathology [ESP], European Molecular Genetics Quality Network [EMQN], United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Service for Molecular Genetics, and the French national Gen&Tiss EQA scheme) for two EQA distributions. Laboratories testing for oncology biomarkers make different errors when describing EGFR gene variants. Significant differences were observed regarding inclusion of the correct reference sequence: EMQN participants made fewer errors compared to ESP EQA participants (P-value = 0.015). The analysis of ESP EQA participants showed significant improvement over 2 years (P-value = 0.016). Results demonstrate the need for improvement of variant reporting according to HGVS guidelines. Consequences of using incorrect mutation nomenclature are currently perceived as low by many laboratories, but the impact will rise with an increased reliance on databases to assist in result analysis. PMID:26920083

  5. Annotated checklist of the recent and extinct pythons (Serpentes, Pythonidae), with notes on nomenclature, taxonomy, and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Schleip, Wulf D.; O’Shea, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Abstract McDiarmid et al. (1999) published the first part of their planned taxonomic catalog of the snakes of the world. Since then, several new python taxa have been described in both the scientific literature and non-peer-reviewed publications. This checklist evaluates the nomenclatural status of the names and discusses the taxonomic status of the new taxa, and aims to continue the work of McDiarmid et al. (1999) for the family Pythonidae, covering the period 1999 to 2010. Numerous new taxa are listed, and where appropriate recent synonymies are included and annotations are made. A checklist and a taxonomic identification key of valid taxa are provided. PMID:21594030

  6. The identity of Tachina westermanni Wiedemann, 1819 (Diptera: Calliphoridae or Tachinidae) with a solution to a nomenclatural problem.

    PubMed

    Rognes, Knut; O'Hara, James E; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2015-01-01

    Tachina westermanni Wiedemann, 1819 was based on four syntypes, two conspecific calliphorids and two conspecific tachinids. Two existing but contradictory lectotype fixations have resulted in confusion as to the correct application of the specific name westermanni Wiedemann. Evidence is presented showing that the lectotype fixation of Townsend in 1931 is valid and assigns westermanni Wiedemann to the Calliphoridae, with Pericallimyia westermanni as the valid binomen. The valid name for the tachinid taxon becomes Brachelia westermanni Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 and a neotype is designated for it in the interests of nomenclatural stability. PMID:26249089

  7. Revised stratigraphic nomenclature for the Wasatch and Green River formations of Eocene age, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    In this book the nomenclature of the Eocene Wasatch and Green River formations is revised to establish a stratigraphic framework that can be used for the accurate basinwide correlations of lithologic and chronologic units. To implement these revisions, the names Alkali Creek Tongue of the Wasatch Formation, and Farson Sandstone Member of the Green River Formation, Scheggs and Rife beds of the Tipton Shale Member of the Green River Formation are introduced. The continued use of the names New Fork Tongue, Desertion Point Tongue, and upper tongue of the Wasatch Formation, and the Fontenelle Tongue, upper Tipton Shale Member, middle tongue, and upper tongue of the Green River Formation is discouraged.

  8. Drug reformulations and repositioning in pharmaceutical industry and its impact on market access: reassessment of nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Murteira, Susana; Ghezaiel, Zied; Karray, Slim; Lamure, Michel

    2013-01-01

    classifications in the literature, a harmonized nomenclature for drug repositioning, reformulation, and combination cases will allow for a robust analysis of the added value and market access conditions attributed for each strategy and case type as assessed by regulators and payors in Europe and the United States. After evaluation of the existing terminologies and given the absence of clear and consistent definitions for drug reformulation and repositioning in the literature, we propose a global terminology and taxonomy in order to cover all of the previously unclear definitions and classifications for repositioned and reformulated products. PMID:27226826

  9. New species of Trimma (Actinopterygii, Gobiidae) from Indonesia, with comments on head papillae nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Winterbottom, Richard; Erdmann, Mark V

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of the gobiid Trimma are described from Indonesian waters, and a partially reformulated nomenclature for the cephalic sensory papillae of members of this genus is provided. Trimma aturirii possesses two dark oblique stripes on either side of the pupil (blue, edged with red in life, dark brown in preservative), the lower of which continues posteriorly across the dorsal margin of the opercle, with the dorsal half of the body red and the ventral half abruptly white in life. The species has a narrow bony interorbital (≤50% pupil width), a moderate interorbital trench with a slight groove posterodorsal to the eye, no scales on the cheek, opercle or in the predorsal midline, no elongate spines in the first dorsal fin, 9-10 dorsal and 9 anal fin rays, 17-18 (7-11 branched) pectoral fin rays and an unbranched fifth pelvic fin ray. Trimma kardium has a pair of tapering oval red spots which join anteriorly over the anterior region of the hyoid arches, forming an approximate heart-shaped marking on the ventral surface of the head. It has a narrow bony interorbital (≤40% pupil width), a moderate interorbital trench with a slight groove posterodorsal to the eye, 17-18 unbranched pectoral fin rays, 1-5 cycloid scales in the predorsal midline confined to about the middle third of the nape, and a single row of 1-3 cycloid scales along the upper border of the opercle. Trimma trioculatum has a large (slightly greater than pupil diameter in width) round, black, ocellated spot in the first dorsal fin between spines 1 and 5, a second, much smaller black or dark red spot just posterior to the spine of the second dorsal fin and above the basal stripe, a yellow body with a dark purplish or gray head with two distinct red bars across the cheek, no round spots of any colour on the nape, opercle or cheek, a small dark (preserved) or white (alive) spot on the upper pectoral fin base, a narrow bony interorbital (<70% pupil diameter), no elongate spines in the first dorsal

  10. Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers – Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kuldip; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in thinking, knowing, remembering, judging, and problem solving. Cognitive dysfunctions are an integral part of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in healthy ageing. Cognitive Enhancers are molecules that help improve aspects of cognition like memory, intelligence, motivation, attention and concentration. Recently, Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers have gained popularity as effective and safe alternative to various established drugs. Many of these Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers seem to be more efficacious compared to currently available Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers. This review describes and summarizes evidence on various Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers such as physical exercise, sleep, meditation and yoga, spirituality, nutrients, computer training, brain stimulation, and music. We also discuss their role in ageing and different neuro-psychiatric disorders, and current status of Cochrane database recommendations. We searched the Pubmed database for the articles and reviews having the terms ‘non pharmacological and cognitive’ in the title, published from 2000 till 2014. A total of 11 results displayed, out of which 10 were relevant to the review. These were selected and reviewed. Appropriate cross-references within the articles along with Cochrane reviews were also considered and studied. PMID:26393186

  11. Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers - Current Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Kumar, Kuldip; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2015-07-01

    Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in thinking, knowing, remembering, judging, and problem solving. Cognitive dysfunctions are an integral part of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in healthy ageing. Cognitive Enhancers are molecules that help improve aspects of cognition like memory, intelligence, motivation, attention and concentration. Recently, Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers have gained popularity as effective and safe alternative to various established drugs. Many of these Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers seem to be more efficacious compared to currently available Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers. This review describes and summarizes evidence on various Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers such as physical exercise, sleep, meditation and yoga, spirituality, nutrients, computer training, brain stimulation, and music. We also discuss their role in ageing and different neuro-psychiatric disorders, and current status of Cochrane database recommendations. We searched the Pubmed database for the articles and reviews having the terms 'non pharmacological and cognitive' in the title, published from 2000 till 2014. A total of 11 results displayed, out of which 10 were relevant to the review. These were selected and reviewed. Appropriate cross-references within the articles along with Cochrane reviews were also considered and studied. PMID:26393186

  12. Open partial horizontal laryngectomies: a proposal for classification by the working committee on nomenclature of the European Laryngological Society.

    PubMed

    Succo, G; Peretti, G; Piazza, C; Remacle, M; Eckel, H E; Chevalier, D; Simo, R; Hantzakos, A G; Rizzotto, G; Lucioni, M; Crosetti, E; Antonelli, A R

    2014-09-01

    We present herein the proposal of the European Laryngological Society working committee on nomenclature for a systematic classification of open partial horizontal laryngectomies (OPHL). This is based on the cranio-caudal extent of laryngeal structures resected, instead of a number of different and heterogeneous variables present in existing nomenclatures, usually referring to eponyms, types of pexy, or inferior limit of resection. According to the proposed classification system, we have defined three types of OPHLs: Type I (formerly defined horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy), Type II (previously called supracricoid laryngectomy), and Type III (also named supratracheal laryngectomy). Use of suffixes "a" and "b" in Type II and III OPHLs reflects sparing or not of the suprahyoid epiglottis. Various extensions to one arytenoid, base of tongue, piriform sinus, and crico-arytenoid unit are indicated by abbreviations (ARY, BOT, PIR, and CAU, respectively). Our proposal is not intended to give a comprehensive algorithm of application of different OPHLs to specific clinical situations, but to serve as the basis for obtaining a common language among the head and neck surgical community. We therefore intend to present this classification system as a simple and intuitive teaching instrument, and a tool to be able to compare surgical series with each other and with non-surgical data. PMID:24691854

  13. Current state of medical device nomenclature and taxonomy systems in the UK: spotlight on GMDN and SNOMED CT

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Carolan-Rees, Grace

    2013-01-01

    A standardised terminology for describing medical devices can enable safe and unambiguous exchange of information. Proposed changes to EU-wide medical devices regulations mandate the use of such a system. This article reviews two important classification systems for medical devices in the UK. The Global Medical Device Nomenclature (GMDN) provides a classification system specifically for medical devices and diagnostics, and facilitates data exchange between manufacturers and regulators. SNOMED CT is the terminology of choice in the NHS for communicating, sharing and storing information about patients’ healthcare episodes. Harmonisation of GMDN and SNOMED CT will encourage use of single terminology throughout the lifetime of a device; from regulatory approval through clinical use and post-marketing surveillance. Manufacturers will be required to register medical devices with a European device database (Eudamed) and to fit certain devices with a Unique Device Identifier; both are efforts to improve transparency and traceability of medical devices. Successful implementation of these elements depends on having a consistent nomenclature for medical devices. PMID:23885299

  14. Application of a revised hydrostratigraphical classification and nomenclature to the Mesozoic and Cenozoic succession of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bassam, Abdulaziz M.; Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed E.; Hussein, Mohammed Tahir

    2000-05-01

    At the dawn of the 21st century many parts of the world are suffering a shortage of water resources. Arid and semi-arid areas in particular are facing challenges and increasing pressure is being put on their groundwater management plans. Such a situation created an urgent need to put forward a design for classification and nomenclature that can help to differentiate highly productive zones from small locally exploited productive zones. A previously proposed hydrostratigraphical classification and nomenclature scheme is revised, modified, and applied to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary succession of Saudi Arabia. The scheme utilised in the present paper is modified to include, in addition, productivity, water quality criteria, usability, and recharge as criteria reflecting the hydrogeological importance of the productive zones. The Triassic Sudair Mega-aquitard forms the lower hydrostratigraphic boundary for the Ad-Dahna'a Aquasystem. The Ad-Dahna'a Aquasystem comprises two aquagroups: the Riyadh and Rub'Al-Khali Aquagroups. Each aquagroup is in turn subdivided into superaquifers, aquifers and possibly subaquifers, separated by aquitards of different ranks. The physical and hydrogeological characteristics of each unit are also discussed.

  15. Proposed stratigraphic nomenclature and macroscopic identification of lithostratigraphic units of the Paintbrush Group exposed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.; Spengler, R.W.; Moyer, T.C.; Geslin, J.K.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes the formations of the Paintbrush Group exposed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, presents a detailed stratigraphic nomenclature for the Tiva Canyon and Topopah spring Tuffs, and discusses the criteria that define lithostratigraphic units. The Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs are divided into zones, subzones, and intervals on the basis of macroscopic features observed in surface exposures and borehole samples. Primary divisions reflect depositional and compositional zoning that is expressed by variations in crystal content, phenocryst assemblage, pumice content and composition, and lithic content. Secondary divisions define welding and crystlalization zones, depositional features, or fracture characteristics. Both formations are divided into crystal-rich and crystal-poor members that have an identical sequency of zones, although subzone designations vary slightly between the two units. The identified lithostratigraphic divisions can be used to approximate thermal-mechanical and hydrogeologic boundaries in the field. Linking these three systems of nomenclature provides a framework within which to correlate these properties through regions of sparse data.

  16. Systematic Nomenclature for GGDEF and EAL Domain-Containing Cyclic Di-GMP Turnover Proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Galperin, Michael Y; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Gomelsky, Mark; Green, Jeffrey; Hughes, Kelly T; Jenal, Urs; Landini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Escherichia coli has served as one of a few model bacterial species for studying cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. The widely used E. coli K-12 laboratory strains possess 29 genes encoding proteins with GGDEF and/or EAL domains, which include 12 diguanylate cyclases (DGC), 13 c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE), and 4 "degenerate" enzymatically inactive proteins. In addition, six new GGDEF and EAL (GGDEF/EAL) domain-encoding genes, which encode two DGCs and four PDEs, have recently been found in genomic analyses of commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. As a group of researchers who have been studying the molecular mechanisms and the genomic basis of c-di-GMP signaling in E. coli, we now propose a general and systematic dgc and pde nomenclature for the enzymatically active GGDEF/EAL domain-encoding genes of this model species. This nomenclature is intuitive and easy to memorize, and it can also be applied to additional genes and proteins that might be discovered in various strains of E. coli in future studies. PMID:26148715

  17. Toward a More Precise and Informative Nomenclature Describing Fetal and Neonatal Male Germ Cells in Rodents1

    PubMed Central

    McCarrey, John R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The germ cell lineages are among the best characterized of all cell lineages in mammals. This characterization includes precise nomenclature that distinguishes among numerous, often subtle, changes in function or morphology as development and differentiation of germ cells proceed to form the gametes. In male rodents, there are at least 41 distinct cell types that occur during progression through the male germ cell lineage that gives rise to spermatozoa. However, there is one period during male germ cell development—that which occurs immediately following the primordial germ cell stage and prior to the spermatogonial stage—for which the system of precise and informative cell type terminology is not adequate. Often, male germ cells during this period are referred to simply as “gonocytes.” However, this term is inadequate for multiple reasons, and it is suggested here that nomenclature originally proposed in the 1970s by Hilscher et al., which employs the terms M-, T1-, and T2-prospermatogonia, is preferable. In this Minireview, the history, proper utilization, and advantages of this terminology relative to that of the term gonocytes are described. PMID:23843236

  18. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Ligands: Beyond CB1 and CB2

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, A. C.; Abood, M. E.; Alexander, S. P. H.; Di Marzo, V.; Elphick, M. R.; Greasley, P. J.; Hansen, H. S.; Kunos, G.; Mackie, K.; Mechoulam, R.; Ross, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB1, non-CB2 established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel “CB3” cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB1, non-CB2 pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB3 receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB1 receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB1/CB2 receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB1, non-CB2 cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature. PMID:21079038

  19. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  20. Towards a genealogy of pharmacological practice.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Ricardo; Ried, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Following Foucault's work on disciplinary power and biopolitics, this article maps an initial cartography of the research areas to be traced by a genealogy of pharmacological practice. Pharmacology, as a practical activity, refers to the creation, production and sale of drugs/medication. This work identifies five lines of research that, although often disconnected from each other, may be observed in the specialized literature: (1) pharmaceuticalization; (2) regulation of the pharmaceutical industry; (3) the political-economic structure of the pharmaceutical industry; (4) consumption/consumerism of medications; (5) and bio-knowledge. The article suggests that a systematic analysis of these areas leads one to consider pharmacological practice a sui generis apparatus of power, which reaches beyond the purely disciplinary and biopolitical levels to encompass molecular configurations, thereby giving rise not only to new types of government over life, but also to new struggles for life, extending from molecular to population-wide levels. PMID:25956710

  1. Puerarin: a review of pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Xi; Zhang, Hong; Peng, Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Puerarin is the major bioactive ingredient isolated from the root of the Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi, which is well known as Gegen (Chinese name) in traditional Chinese medicine. As the most abundant secondary metabolite, puerarin was isolated from Gegen in the late 1950s. Since then, its pharmacological properties have been extensively investigated. It is available in common foods and is used in alternative medicine. It has been widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes and diabetic complications, osteonecrosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, endometriosis, and cancer. The beneficial effects of puerarin on the various medicinal purposes may be due to its wide spectrum of pharmacological properties such as vasodilation, cardioprotection, neuroprotection, antioxidant, anticancer, antiinflammation, alleviating pain, promoting bone formation, inhibiting alcohol intake, and attenuating insulin resistance. However, the direct molecular mechanisms and targets remain unclear. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the pharmacological effects of puerarin. PMID:24339367

  2. Investigational pharmacology for low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Avinash K; Chimes, Gary P; Malanga, Gerard A

    2010-01-01

    Study design: Review and reinterpretation of existing literature. Objective: This review article summarizes the anatomy and pathogenesis of disease processes that contribute to low back pain, and discusses key issues in existing therapies for chronic low back pain. The article also explains the scientific rationale for investigational pharmacology and highlights emerging compounds in late development. Results/conclusion: While the diverse and complex nature of chronic low back pain continues to challenge clinicians, a growing understanding of chronic low back pain on a cellular level has refined our approach to managing chronic low back pain with pharmacology. Many emerging therapies with improved safety profiles are currently in the research pipeline and will contribute to a multimodal therapeutic algorithm in the near future. With the heterogeneity of the patient population suffering from chronic low back pain, the clinical challenge will be accurately stratifying the optimal pharmacologic approach for each patient. PMID:21197321

  3. Eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes: human polymorphisms, and recommended nomenclature based on divergent evolution and chromosomal mapping.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, V; Bairoch, A; Tipton, K F; Nebert, D W

    1999-08-01

    As currently being performed with an increasing number of superfamilies, a standardized gene nomenclature system is proposed here, based on divergent evolution, using multiple alignment analysis of all 86 eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) amino-acid sequences known at this time. The ALDHs represent a superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes having similar primary structures that oxidize a wide spectrum of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. To date, a total of 54 animal, 15 plant, 14 yeast, and three fungal ALDH genes or cDNAs have been sequenced. These ALDHs can be divided into a total of 18 families (comprising 37 subfamilies), and all nonhuman ALDH genes are named here after the established human ALDH genes, when possible. An ALDH protein from one gene family is defined as having approximately < or = 40% amino-acid identity to that from another family. Two members of the same subfamily exhibit approximately > or = 60% amino-acid identity and are expected to be located at the same subchromosomal site. For naming each gene, it is proposed that the root symbol 'ALDH' denoting 'aldehyde dehydrogenase' be followed by an Arabic number representing the family and, when needed, a letter designating the subfamily and an Arabic number denoting the individual gene within the subfamily; all letters are capitalized in all mammals except mouse and fruit fly, e.g. 'human ALDH3A1 (mouse, Drosophila Aldh3a1).' It is suggested that the Human Gene Nomenclature Guidelines (http://++www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature/guidelines.h tml) be used for all species other than mouse and Drosophila. Following these guidelines, the gene is italicized, whereas the corresponding cDNA, mRNA, protein or enzyme activity is written with upper-case letters and without italics, e.g. 'human, mouse or Drosophila ALDH3A1 cDNA, mRNA, or activity'. If an orthologous gene between species cannot be identified with certainty, sequential naming of these genes will be carried out

  4. Pharmacological and Chemical Effects of Cigarette Additives

    PubMed Central

    Rabinoff, Michael; Caskey, Nicholas; Rissling, Anthony; Park, Candice

    2007-01-01

    We investigated tobacco industry documents and other sources for evidence of possible pharmacological and chemical effects of tobacco additives. Our findings indicated that more than 100 of 599 documented cigarette additives have pharmacological actions that camouflage the odor of environmental tobacco smoke emitted from cigarettes, enhance or maintain nicotine delivery, could increase the addictiveness of cigarettes, and mask symptoms and illnesses associated with smoking behaviors. Whether such uses were specifically intended for these agents is unknown. Our results provide a clear rationale for regulatory control of tobacco additives. PMID:17666709

  5. Novel pharmacological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed. PMID:26907518

  6. Rhein: A Review of Pharmacological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Xi; Xia, Wei; Yue, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Rhein (4, 5-dihydroxyanthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid) is a lipophilic anthraquinone extensively found in medicinal herbs, such as Rheum palmatum L., Cassia tora L., Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., and Aloe barbadensis Miller, which have been used medicinally in China for more than 1,000 years. Its biological activities related to human health are being explored actively. Emerging evidence suggests that rhein has many pharmacological effects, including hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and antimicrobial activities. The present review provides a comprehensive summary and analysis of the pharmacological properties of rhein, supporting the potential uses of rhein as a medicinal agent. PMID:26185519

  7. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pulse contour analysis, ultrasound and bio-impedance are reviewed. PMID:21284692

  8. Molecular pharmacology of the CFTR Cl- channel.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T C; Sheppard, D N

    1999-11-01

    Dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel is associated with a wide spectrum of disease. In the search for modulators of CFTR, pharmacological agents that interact directly with the CFTR Cl- channel have been identified. Some agents stimulate CFTR by interacting with the nucleotide-binding domains that control channel gating, whereas others inhibit CFTR by binding within the channel pore and preventing Cl- permeation. Knowledge of the molecular pharmacology of CFTR might lead to new treatments for diseases caused by the dysfunction of CFTR. PMID:10542444

  9. Salbutamol in paediatrics: pharmacology, prescribing and controversies.

    PubMed

    Andrzejowski, Paul; Carroll, Will

    2016-08-01

    Salbutamol has become a key drug in respiratory medicine since it was first developed by Sir David Jack et al in 1968, 5000 years after the β agonist ephedrine was first used in its raw form, as the Ma Huang herb in Chinese medicine to treat asthma. It is one of the most commonly encountered medicines in paediatric practice and the authors have found that an understanding of its pharmacology in clinical practice is incredibly helpful. In this article, we discuss its pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, practical prescribing points and some unresolved issues surrounding its use, which should serve to provide an essential working knowledge for the busy paediatrician. PMID:27059284

  10. Strychnos potatorum: Phytochemical and pharmacological review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Kavita N.; Kadam, Prasad V.; Patel, Jigna A.; Patil, Manohar J.

    2014-01-01

    In traditional system of medicine, the seeds of Strychnos potatorum Linn. (family: Loganiaceae) are used in the treatment of gonorrhea, leukorrhea leukeorrhea, gastropathy, bronchitis, chronic diarrhea, dysentery, renal and vesicle calculi, diabetes, conjunctivitis, scleritis, ulcers and other eye disease. An attempt has been made to highlight this medicinal seeds through phytochemical and pharmacological study. The present review deals with the phytochemical and pharmacological screening of therapeutic importance from Strychnos potatorum L., an important medicinal plant. This study includes the collective information of different medicinal uses of Strychnos potatorum. The generated data has provided the basis for its wide use as the therapeutant both in the traditional and folk medicines. PMID:24600197

  11. Cannabinoid pharmacology: the first 66 years

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2006-01-01

    Research into the pharmacology of individual cannabinoids that began in the 1940s, several decades after the presence of a cannabinoid was first detected in cannabis, is concisely reviewed. Also described is how this pharmacological research led to the discovery of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and of endogenous ligands for these receptors, to the development of CB1- and CB2-selective agonists and antagonists and to the realization that the endogenous cannabinoid system has significant roles in both health and disease, and that drugs which mimic, augment or block the actions of endogenously released cannabinoids must have important therapeutic applications. Some goals for future research are identified. PMID:16402100

  12. [Pharmacological action of cultured calculus bovis].

    PubMed

    Yuan, H

    1991-02-01

    By means of comparative pharmacological study, the main pharmacodynamics and toxicity of cultured calculus bovis and natural calculus bovis were compared under the same conditions. The results show that both drugs possess sedative, antispasmodic, antipyretic, antiinflammatory, cardiotonic and hypotensive effects, the strength of effect and toxicity being similar. PMID:1872960

  13. Non-pharmacological treatments for COPD.

    PubMed

    Mulhall, Patrick; Criner, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects roughly 10% of the global population and is growing in prevalence annually. COPD is characterized by progressive non-reversible narrowing of airways mainly due to cigarette smoking. Therapeutic interventions aimed at altering this progressive disease course can largely be grouped into pharmacological or non-pharmacological therapies. The focus of this paper is on the non-pharmacological aspects of COPD management, reviewing the current literature to provide an evidence-based management approach. Non-pharmacological therapies reviewed in this article include the implementation of comprehensive care models utilizing a coordinated multidisciplinary team, tele-monitoring and patient-centred approach to optimize COPD care and improve compliance. Preventing progression of COPD via smoking cessation remains of paramount importance, and newer therapeutic options including electronic cigarettes show promise in small studies as cessation aids. COPD has systemic manifestations that can be ameliorated with the enrollment in pulmonary rehabilitation programmes, which focus on exercise endurance to improve dyspnoea and quality of life. Advanced therapeutics for COPD includes lung volume reduction surgery for a pre-specified cohort and minimally invasive bronchoscopic valves that in recent reviews show promise. Lastly, patients on maximal COPD therapy with progressive disease can be referred for lung transplantation; however, this often requires a highly selected and motivated patient and care team. Survival rates for lung transplantation are improving; thus, this procedure remains a viable option as more expertise and experience are gained. PMID:27099216

  14. Disrupting Reconsolidation: Pharmacological and Behavioral Manipulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soeter, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that disrupting reconsolidation by pharmacological manipulations "deleted" the emotional expression of a fear memory in humans. If we are to target reconsolidation in patients with anxiety disorders, the disruption of reconsolidation should produce content-limited modifications. At the same time, the fear-erasing effects…

  15. Pharmacological Treatment Effects on Eye Movement Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to…

  16. Origins, practices and future of safety pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Bass, Alan; Kinter, Lewis; Williams, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The origins of safety pharmacology are grounded upon observations that organ functions (like organ structures) can be toxicological targets in humans exposed to novel therapeutic agents, and that drug effects on organ functions (unlike organ structures) are not readily detected by standard toxicological testing. Safety pharmacology is " em leader those studies that investigate the potential undesirable pharmacodynamic effects of a substance on physiological functions in relationship to exposure in the therapeutic range and above em leader " [International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) S7A guidelines; Safety Pharmacology Studies for Human Pharmaceuticals]. This publication provides a comprehensive review of the history of safety pharmacology, international regulatory guidelines that govern the practices of this important field, and the scientific challenges that are being faced by its rapid emergence in pharmaceutical development. The criticality of identifying undesired adverse effects of new drugs in nonclinical models, which reflect the overall human condition, is reflected in the importance of generating an integrated and accurate assessment of possible human risk. The conundrum posed by the challenge of formulating a reliable risk assessment is the importance of improving and enhancing the safe progression of new drugs to the marketplace, while preventing unnecessary delays (or discontinuances), based on nonclinical findings that are not relevant or interpretable in terms of clinical response or human risk. PMID:15172010

  17. Pharmacological Interventions for Students with ADD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Vance L.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the research on pharmacological interventions for students with attention deficit disorder finds that psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) are effective in improving focus and impulse control, but should be used in conjunction with psychosocial and behavioral interventions. Comprehensive medical screenings and guidelines…

  18. The parallel evolution of immunology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Conti, A A

    2010-01-01

    Immunology is the systematic evaluation of the means through which human beings protect themselves and respond to the attack of internal and external agents, and Edward Jenner (1749-1823) and Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) are considered pioneers of this field. Jenner observed the protective effect of cowpox against smallpox and inoculated the cowpox in human beings to protect them from the often lethal smallpox. Pasteur developed in his laboratory a vaccine against rabies and elaborated methods for attenuating the virulence of pathogenic microorganisms while maintaining their immunogenicity. Pharmacology is the area of medical science dealing with drugs and their uses, and it was during the nineteenth century that it assumed its status of scientific specialty, mainly in German-speaking Europe, through the establishment of pharmacological institutes and dedicated laboratories. The discovery and the synthesis of drugs and the systematic evaluation of their activity have constituted through time a scientific field in which immunology and pharmacology have met and given origin to notable progress in the history of science. The development of chemotherapy, as well as of organ and tissue transplantation, in the twentieth century has been decisively promoted by both immunology and pharmacology. In the last three decades the relationship between these two scientific branches has become increasingly closer in basic research, clinical science, medical education and also editorial scientific activity, as documented by the Journal hosting this paper. PMID:20646363

  19. Protein Kinase C Pharmacology: Refining the Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Zhang, Alyssa X.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Protein kinase C (PKC) has been in the limelight since the discovery three decades ago that it acts as a major receptor for the tumor-promoting phorbol esters. Phorbol esters, with their potent ability to activate two of the three classes of PKC isozymes, have remained the best pharmacological tool for directly modulating PKC activity. However, with the discovery of other phorbol ester-responsive proteins, the advent of various small-molecule and peptide modulators, and the need to distinguish isozyme-specific activity, the pharmacology of PKC has become increasingly complex. Not surprisingly, many of the compounds originally touted as direct modulators of PKC have subsequently been shown to hit many other cellular targets and, in some cases, not even directly modulate PKC. The complexities and reversals in PKC pharmacology have led to widespread confusion about the current status of the pharmacological tools available to control PKC activity. Here, we aim to clarify the cacophony in the literature regarding the current state of bona fide and discredited cellular PKC modulators, including activators, small-molecule inhibitors, and peptides, and also address the use of genetically-encoded reporters and of PKC mutants to measure the effects of these drugs on the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling by specific isozymes. PMID:23662807

  20. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level. PMID:26901192

  1. Multidimensional Screening as a Pharmacology Laboratory Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Marvin H.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A multidimensional pharmacodynamic screening experiment that addresses drug interaction is included in the pharmacology-toxicology laboratory experience of pharmacy students at the University of the Pacific. The student handout with directions for the procedure is reproduced, drug compounds tested are listed, and laboratory evaluation results are…

  2. New approaches to pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis has been recognized as a major public health problem for less than two decades. The increasing incidence of fragility fractures, such as vertebral, hip, and wrist fractures, first became apparent from epidemiological studies in the early and mid-1980s, when effective treatment was virtually unavailable. Pharmacological therapies that effectively reduce the number of fractures by improving bone mass are now available widely in countries around the world. Most current agents inhibit bone loss by reducing bone resorption, but emerging therapies may increase bone mass by directly promoting bone formation--as is the case with parathyroid hormone. Current treatment alternatives include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and selective estrogen receptor modulators, but sufficient calcium and vitamin D are a prerequisite. The availability of evidence-based data that show reductions in the incidence of fractures of 30-50% during treatment has been a major step forward in the pharmacological prevention of fractures. With all agents, fracture reduction is most pronounced for vertebral fracture in high-risk individuals; alendronate and risedronate also may protect against hip fracture in the elderly. New approaches to pharmacological treatment will include further development of existing drugs, especially with regard to tolerance and frequency of dosing. New avenues for targeting the condition will emerge as our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of bone remodelling increases, although issues of tissue specificity may be difficult to solve. In the long term, information gained through knowledge of bone genetics may be used to adapt pharmacological treatments more precisely to each individual. PMID:14710507

  3. Rapid analysis of pharmacology for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Andrew L; Bickerton, G Richard; Carruthers, Ian M; Boyer, Stephen K; Rubin, Harvey; Overington, John P

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic, epidemic and endemic infectious diseases are united by a common problem: how do we rapidly and cost-effectively identify potential pharmacological interventions to treat infections? Given the large number of emerging and neglected infectious diseases and the fact that they disproportionately afflict the poorest members of the global society, new ways of thinking are required to developed high productivity discovery systems that can be applied to a larger number of pathogens. The growing availability of parasite genome data provides the basis for developing methods to prioritize, a priori, the potential drug target and pharmacological landscape of an infectious disease. Thus the overall objective of infectious disease informatics is to enable the rapid generation of plausible, novel medical hypotheses of testable pharmacological experiments, by uncovering undiscovered relationships in the wealth of biomedical literature and databases that were collected for other purposes. In particular our goal is to identify potential drug targets present in a pathogen genome and prioritize which pharmacological experiments are most likely to discover drug-like lead compounds rapidly against a pathogen (i.e. which specific compounds and drug targets should be screened, in which assays and where they can be sourced). An integral part of the challenge is the development and integration of methods to predict druggability, essentiality, synthetic lethality and polypharmacology in pathogen genomes, while simultaneously integrating the inevitable issues of chemical tractability and the potential for acquired drug resistance from the start. PMID:21401504

  4. Clinical pharmacology of old age syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, C; Wilson, K C M; Kinirons, M T; Wagg, A; Dhesi, J K

    2003-01-01

    Several syndromes occur in old age. They are often associated with increased mortality and in all there is a paucity of basic and clinical research. The recent developments in the clinical pharmacology of three common syndromes of old age (delirium, urinary incontinence, and falls) are discussed along with directions for future research. PMID:12919174

  5. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level. PMID:26901192

  6. Pharmacological profile of novel psychoactive benzofurans

    PubMed Central

    Rickli, Anna; Kopf, Simone; Hoener, Marius C; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Benzofurans are newly used psychoactive substances, but their pharmacology is unknown. The aim of the present study was to pharmacologically characterize benzofurans in vitro. Experimental Approach We assessed the effects of the benzofurans 5-APB, 5-APDB, 6-APB, 6-APDB, 4-APB, 7-APB, 5-EAPB and 5-MAPDB and benzodifuran 2C-B-FLY on the human noradrenaline (NA), dopamine and 5-HT uptake transporters using HEK 293 cells that express the respective transporters. We also investigated the release of NA, dopamine and 5-HT from monoamine-preloaded cells, monoamine receptor-binding affinity and 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptor activation. Key Results All of the benzofurans inhibited NA and 5-HT uptake more than dopamine uptake, similar to methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and unlike methamphetamine. All of the benzofurans also released monoamines and interacted with trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TA1 receptor), similar to classic amphetamines. Most benzofurans were partial 5-HT2A receptor agonists similar to MDMA, but also 5-HT2B receptor agonists, unlike MDMA and methamphetamine. The benzodifuran 2C-B-FLY very potently interacted with 5-HT2 receptors and also bound to TA1 receptors. Conclusions and Implications Despite very similar structures, differences were found in the pharmacological profiles of different benzofurans and compared with their amphetamine analogues. Benzofurans acted as indirect monoamine agonists that interact with transporters similarly to MDMA. The benzofurans also interacted with 5-HT receptors. This pharmacological profile probably results in MDMA-like entactogenic psychoactive properties. However, benzofurans induce 5-HT2B receptor activation associated with heart valve fibrosis. The pharmacology of 2C-B-FLY indicates predominant hallucinogenic properties and a risk for vasoconstriction. PMID:25765500

  7. Impacts of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code) on the scientific names of plant pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent changes in the new International Code of Nomenclature (ICN) for algae, fungi and plants require that only one name be used for pleomorphic fungi many of which have two or more scientific names at present. It is necessary to decide which of two competing scientific names will be applied to one...

  8. Elucidating Article 45.6 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature: A dichotomous key for the determination of subspecific or infrasubspecific rank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present an overview of the difficulties sometimes encountered when determining whether a published name following a binomen is available or infrasubspecific and unavailable, following Article 45.6 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN, 1999). We propose a dichotomous key that...

  9. NOMENCLATURAL NOTES ON THE EURYTOMIDS (CHALCIDOIDEA: EURYTOMIDAE) DESCRIBED BY JEAN BRÈTHES HOUSED IN MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES “BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA”

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine species parasitic eurytomid wasps described by Jean Brèthes and deposited in the National Insect Collection of Argentina, Buenos Aires are treated and their nomenclature stabilized. The condition of the type material is described. Lectotypes are designated for Prodecatoma parodii, Eudecatoma o...

  10. Amendment of Articles 8, 9, 10, 21 and 78 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature to expand and refine methods of publication.

    PubMed

    International Commission On Zoological Nomenclature

    2012-01-01

    The International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature has voted in favour of a revised version of the amendment to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature that was proposed in 2008. The purpose of the amendment is to expand and refine the methods of publication allowed by the Code, particularly in relation to electronic publication. The amendment establishes an Official Register of Zoological Nomenclature (with ZooBank as its online version), allows electronic publication after 2011 under certain conditions, and disallows publication on optical discs after 2012. The requirements for electronic publications are that the work be registered in ZooBank before it is published, that the work itself state the date of publication and contain evidence that registration has occurred, and that the ZooBank registration state both the name of an electronic archive intended to preserve the work and the ISSN or ISBN associated with the work. Registration of new scientific names and nomenclatural acts is not required. The Commission has confirmed that ZooBank is ready to handle the requirements of the amendment. PMID:22977348

  11. Publication trends in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology: focus on pharmacology in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Michel, Martin C

    2013-11-01

    In a previous analysis of the country of origin of papers published in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, a major shift toward contributions from emerging market countries, was noticed in comparison of 2010 to 2001 publications. Repeating such analysis for 2012 publications in the journal confirmed this trend. An interesting new trend was the emerging presence of papers from a variety of Islamic countries including Egypt. Based on this trend, we shortly review the history and current structure of pharmacology in Egypt. It appears that the presence of Egyptian pharmacology in international journals including pharmacology journals has sharply been increasing over the last two decades. Challenges for a continuation of this encouraging trend are being discussed. PMID:24037453

  12. Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Arthur C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assesses overall effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments, relative effectiveness of specific treatments, and moderators of treatment effectiveness for nocturnal enuretic children via quantitative integration of research. Findings confirm that more children benefit from psychological than from pharmacological interventions and…

  13. Johann Flögel (1834-1918) and the birth of comparative insect neuroanatomy and brain nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Seyfarth, Ernst-August

    2008-09-01

    Johann H.L. Flögel (1834-1918) was an amateur scientist and self-taught microscopist in Germany who 130years ago pioneered comparative arthropod neuroanatomy. He was fascinated by innovations in optical instrumentation, and his meticulous studies of the insect supraoesophageal ganglia were the first to use serial sections and photomicrographs to characterize the architecture of circumscribed regions of brain tissue. Flögel recognized the interpretative power resulting from observations across various species, and his comparative study of 1878, in particular, provided a baseline for subsequent workers to evolve a secure nomenclature of insect brain structures. His contributions stand out from contemporary accounts by virtue of their disciplined descriptions and emphasis on identifying comparable elements in different taxa. Here we give a biographical sketch of his life and summarize his remarkable achievements. PMID:18541456

  14. Standardized nursing language in the systematized nomenclature of medicine clinical terms: A cross-mapping validation method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Der-Fa F; Eichmann, David; Konicek, Debra; Park, Hyun Tae; Ucharattana, Prangtip; Delaney, Connie

    2006-01-01

    Many standardized healthcare languages have been mapped to the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms known as SNOMED CT, which was developed by the College of American Pathologists. This study describes a methodology for detecting misassigned concepts from source systems to SNOMED CT and presents the results of applying this methodology to a subset of concepts from two standardized nursing languages, the Nursing Interventions Classification and the Nursing Outcomes Classification. The methodology is based on comparing the knowledge representations of a set of nursing concepts between source systems (nursing languages) and SNOMED CT. If any nursing concept differs in knowledge representation in the target system compared with the source system, editorial misassignment of the concept was declared and recommendations for target system developers were made. In a total of 75 nursing concepts used to test this method, five misassigned concepts(6.6%) were found in SNOMED CT. This method can be used to validate other healthcare languages. PMID:16980782

  15. Novel riboflavin transporter family RFVT/SLC52: identification, nomenclature, functional characterization and genetic diseases of RFVT/SLC52.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Atsushi; Inui, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Riboflavin, a water-soluble vitamin also known as vitamin B2, is essential for normal cellular functions. Riboflavin transporters play important roles in its homeostasis. Recently, three novel riboflavin transporters were identified, and designated as RFT1, RFT2 and RFT3. Because the RFTs did not show similarity to other SLC transporters, and RFT1 and RFT3 are similar in sequence and function, they were assigned into a new SLC family, SLC52. Subsequently, RFT1/GPR172B, RFT3/GPR172A and RFT2/C20orf54 were renamed as RFVT1/SLC52A1, RFVT2/SLC52A2 and RFVT3/SLC52A3, respectively. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the cloning, nomenclature, functional characterization and genetic diseases of RFVT1/SLC52A1, RFVT2/SLC52A2 and RFVT3/SLC52A3. PMID:23506902

  16. What we call what we do affects how we do it: a new nomenclature for simulation research in medical education.

    PubMed

    Haji, Faizal A; Hoppe, Daniel J; Morin, Marie-Paule; Giannoulakis, Konstantine; Koh, Jansen; Rojas, David; Cheung, Jeffrey J H

    2014-05-01

    Rapid technological advances and concern for patient safety have increased the focus on simulation as a pedagogical tool for educating health care providers. To date, simulation research scholarship has focused on two areas; evaluating instructional designs of simulation programs, and the integration of simulation into a broader educational context. However, these two categories of research currently exist under a single label-Simulation-Based Medical Education. In this paper we argue that introducing a more refined nomenclature within which to frame simulation research is necessary for researchers, to appropriately design research studies and describe their findings, and for end-point users (such as program directors and educators), to more appropriately understand and utilize this evidence. PMID:23559018

  17. The type specimens, type localities and nomenclature of Sarcoramphus vultures (Aves: Cathartidae), with a note on their speciation.

    PubMed

    Mlíkovský, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    A nomenclatural review of Sarcoramphus vultures resulted in the following: The genus Sarcoramphus was described by Duméril in 1805 rather than 1806. Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758, is the type of Sarcoramphus by subsequent monotypy (Froriep in Duméril 1806), not by Vigors's (1825) designation. The type of the genus Gypagus Vieillot, 1816, is, by monotypy, Vultur gryphus Linnaeus, 1758, not Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758. Due to this, Gypagus is a junior objective synonym of Vultur Linnaeus, 1758. Gyparchus was created by Gloger (1841) as a new genus for Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758, not as an emendation of Gypagus Vieillot, 1816. Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758 was found to be possibly based on syntypes from two different taxa and a lectotype is here designated. The author of Vultur sacer is Zimmermann (in Bartram 1793), not Cassin (1853). Possible speciation events in the genus Sarcoramphus are also discussed. PMID:25781112

  18. Replacement names and nomenclatural comments for problematic species-group names in Europe's Neogene freshwater Gastropoda. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Thomas A; Harzhauser, Mathias; Kroh, Andreas; Elisavet, Georgopoulou; Mandic, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    In the course of a new database project on Miocene to Recent freshwater gastropods of Europe, a great many of primary and secondary homonyms were revealed. Such nomenclatural issues need clarification in order to avoid misunderstandings and wrong statements about geographical distributions and temporal ranges. The following 16 new names are introduced to replace existing homonyms: Theodoxus militaris jurisicpolsakae nom. n., Viviparus stevanovici nom. n., Melanopsis haueri ripanjensis nom. n., Melanopsis wolfgangfischeri nom. n., Micromelania ramacanensis nom. n., Pseudamnicola welterschultesi nom. n., Muellerpalia haszprunari nom. n., Muellerpalia pseudovalvatoides nom. n., Lithoglyphus gozhiki nom. n., Valvata heidemariae willmanni nom. n., Radix macaleti nom. n., Gyraulus okrugljakensis nom. n., Gyraulus rasseri nom. n., Gyraulus vrapceanus nom. n., Planorbarius halavatsi nom. n., and Segmentina mosbachensis nom. n. Additionally, six cases of homonyms are discussed that are not replaced by new names, because they are considered junior synonyms. PMID:25147468

  19. Anatomy and nomenclature of murine lymph nodes: Descriptive study and nomenclatory standardization in BALB/cAnNCrl mice.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Wim; Derore, Annie; Simoens, Paul

    2006-05-30

    Murine lymph nodes are intensively studied but often assigned incorrectly in scientific papers. In BALB/cAnNCrl mice, we characterized a total of 22 different lymph nodes. Peripheral nodes were situated in the head and neck region (mandibular, accessory mandibular, superficial parotid, cranial deep cervical nodes), and at the forelimb (proper axillary, accessory axillary nodes) and hindlimb (subiliac, sciatic, popliteal nodes). Intrathoracic lymph nodes included the cranial mediastinal, tracheobronchal and caudal mediastinal nodes. Abdominal lymph nodes were associated with the gastrointestinal tract (gastric, pancreaticoduodenal, jejunal, colic, caudal mesenteric nodes) or were located along the major intra-abdominal blood vessels (renal, lumbar aortic, lateral iliac, medial iliac and external iliac nodes). Comparative and nomenclative aspects of murine lymph nodes are discussed. The position of the lymph nodes of BALB/cAnNCrl mice is summarized and illustrated in an anatomical chart containing proposals for both an official nomenclature according to the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria and English terms. PMID:16624319

  20. Generation and structural validation of a library of diverse xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides, including an update on xyloglucan nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Tuomivaara, Sami T; Yaoi, Katsuro; O'Neill, Malcolm A; York, William S

    2015-01-30

    Xyloglucans are structurally complex plant cell wall polysaccharides that are involved in cell growth and expansion, energy metabolism, and signaling. Determining the structure-function relationships of xyloglucans would benefit from the availability of a comprehensive and structurally diverse collection of rigorously characterized xyloglucan oligosaccharides. Here, we present a workflow for the semi-preparative scale generation and purification of neutral and acidic xyloglucan oligosaccharides using a combination of enzymatic and chemical treatments and size-exclusion chromatography. Twenty-six of these oligosaccharides were purified to near homogeneity and their structures validated using a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, high-performance anion exchange chromatography, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mass spectrometry and analytical chromatography were compared as methods for xyloglucan oligosaccharide quantification. 1H chemical shifts were assigned using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy. A comprehensive update of the nomenclature describing xyloglucan side-chain structures is provided for reference. PMID:25497333

  1. A methane-dependent coccus, with notes on classification and nomenclature of obligate, methane-utilizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Foster, J W; Davis, R H

    1966-05-01

    Foster, J. W. (The University of Texas, Austin), and Richard H. Davis. A methane-dependent coccus, with notes on classification and nomenclature of obligate, methane-utilizing bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 91:1924-1931. 1966.-A new coccus-shaped bacterium capable of aerobic growth at the expense of methane or methanol in a mineral salts medium is described. The organism did not grow at the expense of any of the conventional substrates or homologous hydrocarbons tested. It is gram-negative, nonmotile, and thermotolerant. It grows well at 50 C, optimally at 37 C, but does not grow at 55 C. The cells are encapsulated and have a characteristic diplococcoid arrangement. Washed, "resting-cell" suspensions oxidized certain primary alcohols and short-chain alkanes, an example of "nongrowth oxidation." Of the methane-C utilized, 86% was "fixed" in organic form; the remainder was oxidized to CO(2). The guanine-cytosine content of the extracted deoxyribonucleic acid was 62.5%. Obligate methane-utilizing bacteria are considered as "one-carbon" organisms rather than hydrocarbon utilizers. The assimilation pathway in the obligate methane-methanol bacteria is different from that in the facultative methanol utilizers. Nomenclatural problems arising from the use of the prefix "Methano-" to denote both bacteria that oxidize methane and bacteria that produce methane are discussed. The obligate, one-carbon, methane-methanol bacteria are considered as "methyl" utilizers, and the prefix "Methylo-" is suggested as a solution to the problem of generic cognomens. "Methylococcus capsulatus" gen. n., sp. n. is the name proposed for the new methane coccus. PMID:5937247

  2. Nomenclature and databases for the surgical treatment of congenital cardiac disease--an updated primer and an analysis of opportunities for improvement.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl Lewis; Lacour-Gayet, Francois G; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Franklin, Rodney C G; Béland, Marie J; Jenkins, Kathy J; Walters, Hal; Bacha, Emile A; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Clarke, David Robinson; Gaynor, J William; Spray, Thomas L; Stellin, Giovanni; Ebels, Tjark; Krogmann, Otto N; Aiello, Vera D; Colan, Steven D; Weinberg, Paul; Giroud, Jorge M; Everett, Allen; Wernovsky, Gil; Elliott, Martin J; Edwards, Fred H

    2008-12-01

    This review discusses the historical aspects, current state of the art, and potential future advances in the areas of nomenclature and databases for the analysis of outcomes of treatments for patients with congenitally malformed hearts. We will consider the current state of analysis of outcomes, lay out some principles which might make it possible to achieve life-long monitoring and follow-up using our databases, and describe the next steps those involved in the care of these patients need to take in order to achieve these objectives. In order to perform meaningful multi-institutional analyses, we suggest that any database must incorporate the following six essential elements: use of a common language and nomenclature, use of an established uniform core dataset for collection of information, incorporation of a mechanism of evaluating case complexity, availability of a mechanism to assure and verify the completeness and accuracy of the data collected, collaboration between medical and surgical subspecialties, and standardised protocols for life-long follow-up. During the 1990s, both The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons created databases to assess the outcomes of congenital cardiac surgery. Beginning in 1998, these two organizations collaborated to create the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project. By 2000, a common nomenclature, along with a common core minimal dataset, were adopted by The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. In 2000, The International Nomenclature Committee for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease was established. This committee eventually evolved into the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease. The working component of this international nomenclature society has been The International Working Group for Mapping and Coding

  3. Advances in Pediatric Pharmacology, Therapeutics, and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Paul, Ian M.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Significant advancements have been made in pediatric therapeutics and pharmacology over the last two years. In the United States, passage of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act has made the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and Pediatric Research Equity Act permanent, and ensured that studies will be conducted in neonates. In Europe, the Pediatric Regulation, which went into effect in early 2007, has also provided a framework encouraging an expansion of pediatric research. Because of such regulatory involvement, a greater number of studies are being performed, and more pediatric dosing, efficacy, and safety information is being incorporated into product labels. The goal of this publication is to highlight important advancements made in the field of pediatric pharmacology, toxicology, and therapeutics from January 2012 to December 2013. PMID:25037123

  4. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  5. Marihuana vs. alcohol: a pharmacologic comparison.

    PubMed

    Truitt, E B

    1975-01-01

    A review of the pharmacology, behavior, toxicity and therapeutic actions of alcohol and marihuana shows many similarities between the two drugs and few striking differences. Both drugs have fundamental non-specific actions on the neural membrane in common with the sedative-hypnotic-anesthetic group of drugs. They differ mainly in the quantitative aspects of their action owing to variation in 1) the ratio of stimulant to depressant effects, 2) their distribution in the body because of the greater lipid solubility of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9THC), 3) the route of intake and 4) in their metabolic transformation. Despite marked contrasts in potency, toxicity and therapeutic potential as a result of these differences it is proposed that the proper pharmacologic classification of both drugs is in the sedative group based on their activity at non-toxic levels rather than regarding marihuana as a primary hallucinogen as presently done in many texts. PMID:1096554

  6. Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Carthamus tinctorius L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le-Le; Tian, Ke; Tang, Zheng-Hai; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Wang, Yi-Tao; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Carthamus tinctorius L. is a multifunctional cash crop. Its flowers and seeds are extensively used in traditional herbal medicine in China, Korea, Japan, and other Asian countries, for treating various ailments such as gynecological, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular diseases as well as blood stasis and osteoporosis. More than 100 compounds have been isolated and identified from C. tinctorius. Flavonoids and alkaloids, especially the quinochalcone c-glycoside hydroxysafflor yellow A, N-(p-Coumaroyl)serotonin, and N-feruloylserotonin, are responsible for most of the pharmacological activities of C. tinctorius. In this paper, comprehensive and up-to-date information on the phytochemistry and pharmacology of C. tinctorius is presented. This information will be helpful for further explorations of the therapeutic potential of C. tinctorius and may provide future research opportunities. PMID:27080938

  7. Ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Tephrosia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Palbag, Satadru; Dey, Bijay Kr; Singh, Narendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Tephrosia purpurea (L.) Pers. is popularly known as 'Sarapunkha' in classical Ayurvedic texts. It is a perennial plant belonging to the family Fabaceae, and occurs throughout the Indian subcontinent. T. purpurea is traditionally used to treat splenomegaly, cirrhosis, cough and cold, abdominal swelling and as an antidote in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Phytochemical investigations indicate the presence of semiglabrin, pongamole, lanceolatins A and B, rutin, lupeol, and β-sitosterol. Flavonoids including (+)-tephrorin A and B, (+)-tephrosone, an isoflavone, 7, 4'-dihydroxy-3', 5'-dimethoxyisoflavone and a chalcone, (+)-tephropurpurin were isolated from the whole plant. Pharmacological activities of different parts of the plant reported include anti-inflammatory, antiulcer, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiallergic, antidiabetic, hepatoprotective, antitumor and insect repellent activity. In the present review, the literature on the phytochemical and pharmacological investigations of Tephrosia purpurea (L.) Pers. are summarized to August, 2012. PMID:24484589

  8. Aripiprazole: from pharmacological profile to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Di Sciascio, Guido; Riva, Marco Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Clinical experience with aripiprazole has confirmed the effectiveness and the safety of this novel antipsychotic drug in patients with schizophrenia as well as for the treatment of mania in type I bipolar disorder. However the generalization of the results from clinical trials requires further effort in order to address some issues and to overcome incorrect and partial interpretation of the clinical evidence. This article provides some straightforward guidance that may help clinical psychiatrists to translate the mechanism of action of aripiprazole into clinical setting, thus improving the appropriate use of the drug through rational application of its pharmacological profile. Examples of paradigmatic clinical situations are presented and discussed, suggesting possible intervention strategies, which may contribute to achieving the most appropriate use of the pharmacological properties of aripiprazole in real life settings. PMID:26508859

  9. Chemical and pharmacological profiles of Echinacea complex.

    PubMed

    Capek, Peter; Šutovská, Martina; Kocmálová, Michaela; Fraňová, Soňa; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Gancarz, Roman

    2015-08-01

    Echinacea purpurea has a long history in traditional medicine. To verify the pharmacological efficacy of active principles, a polysaccharide-phenolic-protein complex has been isolated from flowering parts of herb by alkaline extraction. It showed on GPC and HPLC one peak of molecular mass around 10 kDa. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses revealed carbohydrate, phenolic and protein contents in Echinacea complex. Pharmacological tests have shown its marked cough suppressing and bronchodilatory effects. The antitussive effect of Echinacea was similar to the narcotic drug codeine and the bronchodilatory effect was more significant than salbutamol, the antiasthmatic drug used in a clinical practice. Pharmacodynamic study shows the beneficial effects of Echinacea complex on the respiratory system and highlights the great potential for development of antitussive and bronchodilatory drugs from natural sources. PMID:25999016

  10. Spectroscopic properties of pharmacologically active phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Polozov, G. I.; Sorokin, V. L.; Ksendzova, G. A.

    2012-05-01

    The IR Fourier-transform spectra of pharmacologically active phenol molecules in solutions in CCl4 and in the crystalline state have been studied. Phenol derivatives with different directivities and different levels of pharmacological efficiency have been examined. Based on analysis of the IR spectra of screened phenols, the antimicrobial activity of phenols with free hydroxyl groups has been shown to be highest. The high antimicrobial activity of aminophenols is related to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. For aminophenols that are active against herpesviruses, O-H...N hydrogen bonds are formed in molecules. The main characteristic of the high antiviral activity against A-type influenza is predominance of intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the O-H...O=C type in molecules. Sulfur-containing aminophenols, which manifest activity against HIV infection, are characterized by the occurrence of hydrogen bonds that involve the participation of the OH, NH, and SO2 groups.

  11. Pharmacological caspase inhibitors: research towards therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kudelova, J; Fleischmannova, J; Adamova, E; Matalova, E

    2015-08-01

    Caspases are key molecules of apoptosis and the inflammatory response. Up-regulation of the caspase cascade contributes to human pathologies such as neurodegenerative and immune disorders. Thus, blocking the excessive apoptosis by pharmacological inhibitors seems promising for therapeutic interventions in such diseases. Caspase inhibitors, both natural and artificial, have been used as research tools and have helped to define the role of the individual caspases in apoptosis and in non-apoptotic processes. Moreover, some caspase inhibitors have demonstrated their therapeutic efficiency in the reduction of cell death and inflammation in animal models of human diseases. However, no drug based on caspase inhibition has been approved on the market until now. Thus, the development of therapeutic approaches that specifically target caspases remains a great challenge and is now the focus of intense biological and clinical interest. Here, we provide a brief review of recent knowledge about pharmacological caspase inhibitors with special focus on their proposed clinical applications. PMID:26348072

  12. Pharmacological Therapy of Tachyarrhythmias During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yaksh, Ameeta; van der Does, Lisette JME; Lanters, Eva AH; de Groot, Natasja MS

    2016-01-01

    Tachyarrhythmias are the most frequently observed cardiac complications during pregnancy. The majority of these maternal and foetal arrhythmias are supraventricular tachyarrhythmias; ventricular tachyarrhythmias are rare. The use of anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) during pregnancy is challenging due to potential foetal teratogenic effects. Maintaining stable and effective therapeutic maternal drug levels is difficult due to haemodynamic and metabolic alterations. Pharmacological treatment of tachyarrhythmias is indicated in case of maternal haemodynamic instability or hydrops fetalis. Evidenc e regarding the efficacy and safety of AAD therapy during pregnancy is scarce and the choice of AAD should be based on individual risk assessments for both mother and foetus. This review outlines the current knowledge on the development of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy, the indications for and considerations of pharmacological treatment and its potential side-effects. PMID:27408722

  13. Systems pharmacology augments drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, T; Nasir, M; Keiser, M J; Vilar, S; Hripcsak, G; Tatonetti, N P

    2015-02-01

    Small molecule drugs are the foundation of modern medical practice, yet their use is limited by the onset of unexpected and severe adverse events (AEs). Regulatory agencies rely on postmarketing surveillance to monitor safety once drugs are approved for clinical use. Despite advances in pharmacovigilance methods that address issues of confounding bias, clinical data of AEs are inherently noisy. Systems pharmacology-the integration of systems biology and chemical genomics-can illuminate drug mechanisms of action. We hypothesize that these data can improve drug safety surveillance by highlighting drugs with a mechanistic connection to the target phenotype (enriching true positives) and filtering those that do not (depleting false positives). We present an algorithm, the modular assembly of drug safety subnetworks (MADSS), to combine systems pharmacology and pharmacovigilance data and significantly improve drug safety monitoring for four clinically relevant adverse drug reactions. PMID:25670520

  14. Clinical Pharmacology in the Adolescent Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Gareth J.; Hartford, Christine M.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented that adolescents and young adults (AYAs) experience a significant cancer burden as well as significant cancer mortality compared with other age groups. The reasons for the disparate outcomes of AYAs and other age groups are not completely understood and are likely to be multifactorial, including a range of sociodemographic issues unique to these individuals as well as differences between adolescents, younger pediatric patients, and adults in the pharmacology of anticancer agents. Because adolescence is a period of transition from childhood to early adulthood, numerous physical, physiologic, cognitive, and behavioral changes occur during this time. In this review, we provide an overview of the unique developmental physiology of the adolescent and explain how these factors and the behavioral characteristics of adolescents may affect the pharmacology of anticancer agents in this patient population. Finally, we describe examples of studies that have assessed the relation between drug disposition and age, focusing on the AYA age group. PMID:20439647

  15. Effective non-pharmacological birth interventions.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jude

    2015-02-01

    Midwifery expertise is in 'normal' birth. What constitutes 'normal' is debatable, but well embedded within 'normal' are the birth plans of women who aspire to give birth without using drugs. To give birth without drugs for many may seem undesirable or intolerable, especially to those whose cultural references to birth have been overwhelmingly negative, fearful or risk-obsessed. However, significant numbers of women have confidence in their innate ability to birth their babies and are rightfully concerned about the undesirable side effects of pharmacological interventions. As well as providing wider choice for women, looking for alternative ways of addressing pain and progress in labour enhances birth attendants' knowledge and becomes a delightful journey of discovering the ancient and modern arts of midwifery. Shared here are a collection of ideas to contribute to the toolkit of knowledge about non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:26333246

  16. Pharmacological Therapy of Tachyarrhythmias During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yaksh, Ameeta; van der Does, Lisette Jme; Lanters, Eva Ah; de Groot, Natasja Ms

    2016-05-01

    Tachyarrhythmias are the most frequently observed cardiac complications during pregnancy. The majority of these maternal and foetal arrhythmias are supraventricular tachyarrhythmias; ventricular tachyarrhythmias are rare. The use of anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) during pregnancy is challenging due to potential foetal teratogenic effects. Maintaining stable and effective therapeutic maternal drug levels is difficult due to haemodynamic and metabolic alterations. Pharmacological treatment of tachyarrhythmias is indicated in case of maternal haemodynamic instability or hydrops fetalis. Evidenc e regarding the efficacy and safety of AAD therapy during pregnancy is scarce and the choice of AAD should be based on individual risk assessments for both mother and foetus. This review outlines the current knowledge on the development of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy, the indications for and considerations of pharmacological treatment and its potential side-effects. PMID:27408722

  17. Pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Marie; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent

    2002-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate the cell division cycle, apoptosis, transcription and differentiation in addition to functions in the nervous system. Deregulation of CDKs in various diseases has stimulated an intensive search for selective pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases. More than 50 inhibitors have been identified, among which >20 have been co-crystallized with CDK2. These inhibitors all target the ATP-binding pocket of the catalytic site of the kinase. The actual selectivity of most known CDK inhibitors, and thus the underlying mechanism of their cellular effects, is poorly known. Pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs are currently being evaluated for therapeutic use against cancer, alopecia, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke), cardiovascular disorders (e.g. atherosclerosis and restenosis), glomerulonephritis, viral infections (e.g. HCMV, HIV and HSV) and parasitic protozoa (Plasmodium sp. and Leishmania sp.). PMID:12237154

  18. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  19. Angioedema: Clinical Presentations and Pharmacological Management.

    PubMed

    Collins-Yoder, Angela Smith

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema (AE) is a unique clinical presentation of an unchecked release of bradykinin. The origin of this clinical presentation can be either genetic or acquired. The outcome within the patient is subcutaneous swelling of the lower layers of the epidermis. Symptoms are most often localized to the upper airway or the gastrointestinal tract. A typical course resolves in 5 to 7 days, but in some patients, the clinical manifestations exist up to 6 weeks. Hereditary AE is rare and genetically linked, and typically, the patient has episodes for many years before diagnosis. Episodes of acquired AE may be drug induced, triggered by a specific allergen, or idiopathic. Angioedema can elicit the need for critical care interventions, for advanced airway management, or unnecessary abdominal surgery. The treatment for these patients is evolving as new pharmacological agents are developed. This article addresses subtypes of AE, triggers, pharmacology, and information for interdisciplinary team planning of individualized case management. PMID:27258954

  20. Task-specific writing tremor: clinical phenotypes, progression, treatment outcomes, and proposed nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Ondo, William G; Satija, Pankaj

    2012-02-01

    Task-specific tremor diagnoses remain controversial. We evaluated 56 subjects seen with writing tremor. The diagnosis was made if there was a clear history of exclusive tremor while writing for at least 3 years before noticing tremor in any other scenario and the continued presence of writing tremor as the most prominent aspect of their tremor disorder on examination. The age of tremor onset was 47.2 ± 18.0 years (73.2% male). Ethnic backgrounds were Caucasian (68.4%), African (23.2%), Hispanic (5.2%), and Asian/Indian (3.3%), and 44% reported any tremor in a first degree relative. Writing tremor often progressed to other task-specific tremors or rest tremor but not to immediate postural tremor, as usually seen in essential tremor. The other tremor provoking scenarios were eating/drinking (14), brushing teeth/shaving/make-up (5), typing (2), suture removal (1), and drafting (1) and occurred a mean of 7.5 years after the onset of writing tremor. Fourteen developed a "rest" (true rest or crescendo) tremor but only 2 of these met clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease. Pharmacologic treatments of writing tremor, including with ethanol, were generally poor, whereas deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermediate (VIM) thalamus was successful. Compared with patients with "classic" essential tremor in our clinic, writing tremor patients were more likely African, more likely male, had an older age of onset, a lower likelihood of familial tremor, and were more refractory to tremor medications and ethanol. This supports segregation between task-specific tremor and essential tremor but does not support the specific diagnosis of "writing tremor" because many patients progress to tremor with other tasks. PMID:21985650

  1. Mitochondrial pharmacology: its future is now.

    PubMed

    Szeto, H H; James, L P; Atkinson, A J

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial medicine is an evolving discipline whose importance derives from the central function of mitochondria in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, generation of reactive oxygen species, and cell death by necrosis or apoptosis. Consequently, mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the progression of aging and the pathophysiology of many common diseases and off-target drug effects. This provides an impetus for the development of mitochondrial pharmacology, and some promising therapeutic targets for mitochondrial protective therapy have been identified. PMID:25399706

  2. Phytochemical and pharmacological profile of Ipomoea aquatica.

    PubMed

    Manvar, Mital N; Desai, T R

    2013-01-01

    Ipomoea aquatica (I. aquatica) (Convolvulaceae) is commonly grown green leafy vegetable found throughout India, Ceylon, Tropical Asia, Africa, and Australia. Traditionally, I. aquatica used as carminative agent and lessens inflammation, and is useful in fever, jaundice, biliousness, bronchitis, liver complaints, etc., I. aquatica is a rich source of vitamins, minerals, proteins, fibers, carotenes, and flavanoids with many health benefits. The objective of this review is to highlight the pharmacognostical, phytochemical, and pharmacological information of this plant. PMID:24231393

  3. Pharmacological correction of misfolding of ABC proteins.

    PubMed

    Rudashevskaya, Elena L; Stockner, Thomas; Trauner, Michael; Freissmuth, Michael; Chiba, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system distinguishes between correctly and incorrectly folded proteins to prevent processing of aberrantly folded conformations along the secretory pathway. Non-synonymous mutations can lead to misfolding of ABC proteins and associated disease phenotypes. Specific phenotypes may at least partially be corrected by small molecules, so-called pharmacological chaperones. Screening for folding correctors is expected to open an avenue for treatment of diseases such as cystic fibrosis and intrahepatic cholestasis. PMID:25027379

  4. Pharmacological correction of misfolding of ABC proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Rudashevskaya, Elena L.; Stockner, Thomas; Trauner, Michael; Freissmuth, Michael; Chiba, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system distinguishes between correctly and incorrectly folded proteins to prevent processing of aberrantly folded conformations along the secretory pathway. Non-synonymous mutations can lead to misfolding of ABC proteins and associated disease phenotypes. Specific phenotypes may at least partially be corrected by small molecules, so-called pharmacological chaperones. Screening for folding correctors is expected to open an avenue for treatment of diseases such as cystic fibrosis and intrahepatic cholestasis. PMID:25027379

  5. An Overview of Clinical Pharmacology of Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen

    2010-01-01

    Ibuprofen was the first member of Propionic acid derivatives introduced in 1969. It is a popular domestic and over the counter analgesic and antipyretic for adults and children. Ibuprofen has been rated as the safest conventional NSAID by spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting systems in the UK. This article summarizes the main pharmacological effects, therapeutical applications and adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions and food drug interactions of ibuprofen that have been reported especially during the last 10 years. PMID:22043330

  6. Pharmacological Management of Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Easterling, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy remains a significant public health problem. Pharmacological management of blood pressure in pregnancy is impacted by changes in maternal drug disposition and by the pharmacodynamic effects of specific agents. This paper will review the impact of pregnancy on pathways of drug elimination and the associated clinical implications, the pharmacodynamic effects of specific drugs and classes of drugs in pregnancy, and the data to date on the impact of antihypertensive therapy on mothers and their fetuses. PMID:25311173

  7. Phage Therapy: Eco-Physiological Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial virus use as antibacterial agents, in the guise of what is commonly known as phage therapy, is an inherently physiological, ecological, and also pharmacological process. Physiologically we can consider metabolic properties of phage infections of bacteria and variation in those properties as a function of preexisting bacterial states. In addition, there are patient responses to pathogenesis, patient responses to phage infections of pathogens, and also patient responses to phage virions alone. Ecologically, we can consider phage propagation, densities, distribution (within bodies), impact on body-associated microbiota (as ecological communities), and modification of the functioning of body “ecosystems” more generally. These ecological and physiological components in many ways represent different perspectives on otherwise equivalent phenomena. Comparable to drugs, one also can view phages during phage therapy in pharmacological terms. The relatively unique status of phages within the context of phage therapy as essentially replicating antimicrobials can therefore result in a confluence of perspectives, many of which can be useful towards gaining a better mechanistic appreciation of phage therapy, as I consider here. Pharmacology more generally may be viewed as a discipline that lies at an interface between organism-associated phenomena, as considered by physiology, and environmental interactions as considered by ecology. PMID:25031881

  8. Plasma Membrane Transporters in Modern Liver Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Jose J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The liver plays a crucial role in the detoxification of drugs used in the treatment of many diseases. The liver itself is the target for drugs aimed to modify its function or to treat infections and tumours affecting this organ. Both detoxification and pharmacological processes occurring in the liver require the uptake of the drug by hepatic cells and, in some cases, the elimination into bile. These steps have been classified as detoxification phase 0 and phase III, respectively. Since most drugs cannot cross the plasma membrane by simple diffusion, the involvement of transporters is mandatory. Several members of the superfamilies of solute carriers (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, with a minor participation of other families of transporters, account for the uptake and efflux, respectively, of endobiotic and xenobiotic compounds across the basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. These transporters are also involved in the sensitivity and refractoriness to the pharmacological treatment of liver tumours. An additional interesting aspect of the role of plasma membrane transporters in liver pharmacology regards the promiscuity of many of these carriers, which accounts for a variety of drug-drug, endogenous substances-drug and food components-drug interactions with clinical relevance. PMID:24278693

  9. Molecular Pharmacology of δ-Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Louis; Cahill, Catherine M; von Zastrow, Mark; Schiller, Peter W; Pineyro, Graciela

    2016-07-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics available and are the first choice in the treatment of acute severe pain. However, partial efficacy, a tendency to produce tolerance, and a host of ill-tolerated side effects make clinically available opioids less effective in the management of chronic pain syndromes. Given that most therapeutic opioids produce their actions via µ-opioid receptors (MOPrs), other targets are constantly being explored, among which δ-opioid receptors (DOPrs) are being increasingly considered as promising alternatives. This review addresses DOPrs from the perspective of cellular and molecular determinants of their pharmacological diversity. Thus, DOPr ligands are examined in terms of structural and functional variety, DOPrs' capacity to engage a multiplicity of canonical and noncanonical G protein-dependent responses is surveyed, and evidence supporting ligand-specific signaling and regulation is analyzed. Pharmacological DOPr subtypes are examined in light of the ability of DOPr to organize into multimeric arrays and to adopt multiple active conformations as well as differences in ligand kinetics. Current knowledge on DOPr targeting to the membrane is examined as a means of understanding how these receptors are especially active in chronic pain management. Insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms of pharmacological diversity should guide the rational design of more effective, longer-lasting, and better-tolerated opioid analgesics for chronic pain management. PMID:27343248

  10. [PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOMATERIALS].

    PubMed

    Chekman, I S

    2015-01-01

    Literature data and results of our department studies on theoretical and practical basics of nanoscience were summarized in the article. Much attention is paid to research in the field of physical, chemical, biological, medical, physiological, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of nanomaterials with the aim of their wider implementation into practice lately. The discovery of new quantum/wave properties of nanoparticles is of particular importance. The author of the article advances an idea: wave properties of nanomaterials play greater role with a decrease in particle size. The preponderance of wave properties compared with corpuscular ones in nanostructures determines a great change in their physical. chemical properties and an increase in physical, mechanical biological, physiological, pharmacological, and toxicologica activity. The idea advanced in the article hasn't been verified by theoretical or experimental studies for now. Joined efforts of scientists of different scientific fields are needed. A confirmation of hypothesis by specific findings will be of great importance for physiology, medicine, pharmacology and promote an implementation of new efficacious preparations into clinical practice. New fundamental discoveries could be made only by multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27025054

  11. Ethics of pharmacological research involving adolescents.

    PubMed

    Welisch, Eva; Altamirano-Diaz, Luis A

    2015-02-01

    Pharmacological research in the adolescent population is not meeting adolescents' needs. Medication is still frequently prescribed off label, and studies especially in sensitive areas of adolescent health care are underrepresented. Adolescents did not benefit from the new knowledge gained in cancer research, and their outcome has essentially not improved during the last two decades in comparison to younger children and adults. There are many obstacles that make it challenging to enroll adolescents in pharmacological research. Access can be difficult. Confidentiality plays an essential role for minors and may be a hindrance, notably to studying sexual and mental health matters. Pharmaceutical companies may exclude the adolescent patient because of a lack of profit and in fear of a complex study design. Research concepts should be explained to the adolescent in a comprehensive manner, and assent and consent forms should be clear and understandable. New laws and incentives have been developed to encourage pharmaceutical companies to engage adolescents in their research projects. Centralization and collaboration of all parties involved may make the whole approach to adolescent research more efficient and uniform. The mature minor doctrine has facilitated the enrollment process. Parental consent may be waived for low-risk medical trials to promote recruitment. Ethics committees therefore play a major role in protecting the adolescent from harm from participating in research. In conclusion, pharmacological research in adolescents has to be encouraged. This will increase the safety of current medical treatment regimens and will allow this population to benefit from therapeutic advancements. PMID:25523399

  12. Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Yasir Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction. PMID:23738071

  13. Teaching the Pharmacology of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Launa M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To provide doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students with highly integrated, comprehensive and up-to-date instruction related to the pharmacology of antiarrhythmic drugs. Design. Students were taught the medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics of antiarrhythmic agents in the cardiology module presented in quarter 7 of the PharmD curriculum. Important foundational information for this topic was presented to students in prerequisite physiology courses and pathophysiology courses offered earlier in the curriculum. Emphasis was placed on student critical thinking and active involvement. Weekly recitation sessions afforded students the opportunity to apply the information they learned regarding arrhythmia pharmacotherapy to comprehensive patient cases. Assessment. Student comprehension was measured using class exercises, short quizzes, case write-ups, comprehensive examinations, group exercises, and classroom discussion. Students were afforded the opportunity to evaluate the course, and the instructors as well as rate the degree to which the course achieved its educational outcomes. Conclusion. Students learned about cardiac arrhythmias through a high-quality, interdisciplinary series of classes presented by faculty members with extensive experience related to the pharmacology and pharmacotherapy of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21969725

  14. Progestogens Used in Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: Differences in Their Pharmacological Properties, Intracellular Actions, and Clinical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hapgood, Janet P.; Winer, Sharon; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The safety of progestogens as a class has come under increased scrutiny after the publication of data from the Women's Health Initiative trial, particularly with respect to breast cancer and cardiovascular disease risk, despite the fact that only one progestogen, medroxyprogesterone acetate, was used in this study. Inconsistency in nomenclature has also caused confusion between synthetic progestogens, defined here by the term progestin, and natural progesterone. Although all progestogens by definition have progestational activity, they also have a divergent range of other properties that can translate to very different clinical effects. Endometrial protection is the primary reason for prescribing a progestogen concomitantly with postmenopausal estrogen therapy in women with a uterus, but several progestogens are known to have a range of other potentially beneficial effects, for example on the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Because women remain suspicious of the progestogen component of postmenopausal hormone therapy in the light of the Women's Health Initiative trial, practitioners should not ignore the potential benefits to their patients of some progestogens by considering them to be a single pharmacological class. There is a lack of understanding of the differences between progestins and progesterone and between individual progestins differing in their effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems, the breast, and bone. This review elucidates the differences between the substantial number of individual progestogens employed in postmenopausal hormone therapy, including both progestins and progesterone. We conclude that these differences in chemical structure, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, affinity, potency, and efficacy via steroid receptors, intracellular action, and biological and clinical effects confirm the absence of a class effect of progestogens. PMID:23238854

  15. New pharmacological treatment strategies for relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer; Vengeliene, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Here we discuss treatment strategies that are based on pharmacological interventions to reduce craving and relapse in alcohol-dependent patients. We will first provide a historical overview about relapse prevention strategies. We will then review the development of disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate, and nalmefene and discuss their neurobiological modes of action. Then the concept of convergent genomic analysis will be introduced for the discovery of new molecular treatment targets. Finally, we will provide convincing evidence for the use of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blockers as substitution drugs. Important conclusions of this review are: (i) learning from other addictive substances is very helpful-e.g., substitution therapies as applied to opiate addiction for decades could also be translated to alcoholics, (ii) the glutamate theory of alcohol addiction provides a convincing framework for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists as substitution drugs for alcohol-dependent patients, (iii) a combination of behavioral and pharmacological therapies may be the optimal approach for future treatment strategies-one promising example concerns the pharmacological disruption of reconsolidation processes of alcohol cue memories, (iv) given that many neurotransmitter systems are affected by chronic alcohol consumption, numerous druggable targets have been identified; consequently, a "cocktail" of different compounds will further improve the treatment situation, (v) in silico psychopharmacology, such as drug repurposing will yield new medications, and finally, (vi) the whole organism has to be taken into consideration to provide the best therapy for our patients. In summary, there is no other field in psychiatric research that has, in recent years, yielded so many novel, druggable targets and innovative treatment strategies than for alcohol addiction. However, it will still be several years before the majority of the "treatment-seeking population" will benefit

  16. Pharmacological foundations of cardio-oncology.

    PubMed

    Minotti, Giorgio; Salvatorelli, Emanuela; Menna, Pierantonio

    2010-07-01

    Anthracyclines and many other antitumor drugs induce cardiotoxicity that occurs "on treatment" or long after completing chemotherapy. Dose reductions limit the incidence of early cardiac events but not that of delayed sequelae, possibly indicating that any dose level of antitumor drugs would prime the heart to damage from sequential stressors. Drugs targeted at tumor-specific moieties raised hope for improving the cardiovascular safety of antitumor therapies; unfortunately, however, many such drugs proved unable to spare the heart, aggravated cardiotoxicity induced by anthracyclines, or were safe in selected patients of clinical trials but not in the general population. Cardio-oncology is the discipline aimed at monitoring the cardiovascular safety of antitumor therapies. Although popularly perceived as a clinical discipline that brings oncologists and cardiologists working together, cardio-oncology is in fact a pharmacology-oriented translational discipline. The cardiovascular performance of survivors of cancer will only improve if clinicians joined pharmacologists in the search for new predictive models of cardiotoxicity or mechanistic approaches to explain how a given drug might switch from causing systolic failure to inducing ischemia. The lifetime risk of cardiotoxicity from antitumor drugs needs to be reconciled with the identification of long-lasting pharmacological signatures that overlap with comorbidities. Research on targeted drugs should be reshaped to appreciate that the terminal ballistics of new "magic bullets" might involve cardiomyocytes as innocent bystanders. Finally, the concepts of prevention and treatment need to be tailored to the notion that late-onset cardiotoxicity builds on early asymptomatic cardiotoxicity. The heart of cardio-oncology rests with such pharmacological foundations. PMID:20335321

  17. Reinforcing the foundations of ornithological nomenclature: Filling the gaps in Sherborn’s and Richmond’s historical legacy of bibliographic exploration

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Due to its public popularity, ornithology has a huge corpus of scientific publication for a relatively small number of species. Although there are global checklists of currently recognised taxa, there has been only limited, mainly individual, effort to build a nomenclatural database that the science of ornithology deserves. This is especially true in relation to concise synonymies. With the arrival of ZooBank and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, the time has come to develop synonymies and to add fuller bibliographic detail to databases. The preparation for both began at the start of the 20th century with extensive work by Sherborn and Richmond. I discuss their legacy, offer notes on significant work since then, and provide suggestions for what remains to be done. To make solid the foundations for ornithological nomenclature and taxonomy, especially for synonymies, ornithologists will need to collaborate much more and contribute to the digital infrastructure. PMID:26877655

  18. [Pharmacological aspects of pain research in Germany].

    PubMed

    Niederberger, E; Kuner, R; Geißlinger, G

    2015-10-01

    In spite of several approved analgesics, the therapy of pain still constitutes a challenge due to the fact that the drugs do not exert sufficient efficacy or are associated with severe side effects. Therefore, the development of new and improved painkillers is still of great importance. A number of highly qualified scientists in Germany are investigating signal transduction pathways in pain, effectivity of new drugs and the so far incompletely investigated mechanisms of well-known analgesics in preclinical and clinical studies. The highlights of pharmacological pain research in Germany are summarized in this article. PMID:26294077

  19. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis. PMID:22640851

  20. Preliminary Pharmacological Evaluation of Enantiomeric Morphinans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of levo- and dextromorphinan pairs have been synthesized and evaluated for their affinities to the mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors, the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) channel, and sigma 1 and 2 receptors. It was found that levo isomers tended to have higher affinities at the opioid receptors and moderate to high affinities to the NMDA and sigma receptors, while dextro isomers tended to have lower affinities to the opioid receptors but comparatively higher affinities to the NMDA and sigma receptors. This series of compounds have interesting and complex pharmacological profiles, and merit further investigation as potential therapies for drug abuse treatment. PMID:24393077