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Sample records for pharyngeal aerobic microflora

  1. Changes in pharyngeal aerobic microflora in oral breathers after palatal rapid expansion

    PubMed Central

    Cazzolla, Angela Pia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Lacaita, Grazia Maria; Cuccia, Marco Antonino; Ripa, Antonio; Testa, Nunzio Francesco; Ciavarella, Domenico; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate in oral breathing children the qualitative and quantitative effects on aerobic and facultatively anaerobic oropharyngeal microflora of respiratory function improved by rapid palatal expansion (RPE). Methods In an open clinical trial, we studied 50 oral breathers, aged 8 to 14 years and suffering from both maxillary constriction and posterior cross-bite. At baseline, patients were examined by a single otorhinolaryngologist (ENT), confirming nasal obstruction in all subjects by posterior rhino-manometric test. Patients were evaluated three times by oropharyngeal swabs:1) at baseline (T = 0); 2) after palatal spreading out (T = 1); and 3) at the end of RPE treatment (T = 2). With regard to the microbiological aspect, the most common and potentially pathogenic oral microrganisms (i.e. Streptococcus pyogenes, Diplococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus spp, Branhamella catarrhalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans) were specifically detected in proper culture plates, isolated colonies were identified by means of biochemical tests and counted by calibrated loop. The data were analyzed by means of the following tests: Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon's test. Results After the use of RME there was a statistically significant decrease of Staphylococcus aureus stock at CFU/mLat T1(P = 0.0005; Z = -3,455 by Wilcoxon Rank test) and T2 (P < 0.0001; Z = -4,512 by Wilcoxon Rank test) vs T0. No significant changes were found for the other examined microrganisms. Conclusion Our data suggest that RPE therapy in oral breathers may strongly reduce the pathogenic aerobic and facultatively anaerobic microflora in the oral pharynx after a normalization of the upper airways function, and may reduce the risk of respiratory infections. PMID:16426457

  2. [Microflora of pharyngeal mucosa in children with solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, V B; Baturo, A P; Romanenko, E E; Kostinov, M P; Zaeva, G E; Mikhaĭlova, S N; Leonova, A Iu; Moiseenko, E I

    2008-01-01

    Microbiological study of pharyngeal mucosa in 43 children with solid tumors revealed that 77.2% of isolated microorganisms belonged to Gram-positive flora. It was shown that streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus were the main species. Species composition of streptococci included both pyogenic (S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, S. equi) andviridans species (S. acidominimus, S. oralis and "S. milleri" group). Nocardioform actinomycetes, corynebacteria and other staphylococci were referred to additional microflora. Accidental microflora was represented by Neisseria spp., non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria, enterobacteria and yeast-like fungi. Microbiologic study of pharyngeal mucosa biocenosis showed that monoculture was present only in 2.3% of cases; in other cases microorganisms formed both intra-genus and inter-species associations. 2-6-component associations were revealed with predominance of 3-4-component associations (37.2% and 32.6% respectively). Relationship of distribution of microorganisms belonging to main and additional microflora was revealed. PMID:19186552

  3. [Immunity and normal pharyngeal microflora in persons living in a technogenically exposed area].

    PubMed

    Kolenchukova, O A; Savchenko, A A

    2006-01-01

    The impact of industrial emissions of an aluminum plant of immunity and pharyngeal mucosal biocenosis were studied in healthy individuals living in the Sovetsky district. The effect of sodium fluoride in various concentrations on the activity of metabolic enzymes in the bacterial Staphylococcus epidermis cells isolated from the pharyngeal mucosa of the healthy individuals was also studied. The persons living in the Sovetsky district were found to have higher values of cellular immunity, an increase in the quantitative composition of the oral microflora being observed when its qualitative composition was worse. Various concentrations of sodium fluoride were ascertained to have a heterodirectional impact on microbial metabolism. PMID:17190044

  4. Examination of the Aerobic Microflora of Swine Feces and Stored Swine Manure.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Terence R; Cotta, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Understanding antibiotic resistance in agricultural ecosystems is critical for determining the effects of subtherapeutic and therapeutic uses of antibiotics for domestic animals. This study was conducted to ascertain the relative levels of antibiotic resistance in the aerobic bacterial population to tetracycline, tylosin, and erythromycin. Swine feces and manure samples were plated onto various agar media with and without antibiotics and incubated at 37°C. Colonies were counted daily. Randomly selected colonies were isolated and characterized by 16S rRNA sequence analyses and additional antibiotic resistance and biochemical analyses. Colonies were recovered at levels of 10 to 10 CFU mL for swine slurry and 10 to 10 CFU g swine feces, approximately 100-fold lower than numbers obtained under anaerobic conditions. Addition of antibiotics to the media resulted in counts that were 60 to 80% of those in control media without added antibiotics. Polymerase chain reaction analyses for antibiotic resistance genes demonstrated the presence of a number of different resistance genes from the isolates. The recoverable aerobic microflora of swine feces and manure contain high percentages of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which include both known and novel genera and species, and a variety of antibiotic resistance genes. Further analyses of these and additional isolates should provide additional information on these organisms as potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes in these ecosystems. PMID:27065407

  5. [Monitoring of microflora localized at the pharyngeal tonsil surface in the children residing in the city of Chelyabinsk and presenting with chronic adenoiditis].

    PubMed

    Gizinger, O A; Shchetinin, S A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present retrospective study based on the analysis of 791 medical cards was to investigate microflora localized at the pharyngeal tonsil surface in the children living in the city of Chelyabinsk and presenting with exacerbation of chronic adenoiditis. 66% of the patients with this condition were 4-6 year old children. The most commonly documented were the associations composed of resident species S. alpha-haemoliticus and S. epidermidis together with pathobiontic S. aureus. S. beta-haemoliticus and S. pneumoniae occurred most frequently whereas H. influenza and some representatives of the genus Enterobacteriaceae were less numerous. Fungi of the genus Candida were identified in 25.4% of the samples at a titer above 10^4. In 23.7% of the cases, these fungi were found in the associations with S. aureus which resulted in mutual potentiation of the pathogenicity factor. PMID:26977565

  6. Pharyngitis - viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001392.htm Pharyngitis - viral To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pharyngitis , or sore throat, is swelling, discomfort, pain, or ...

  7. Aerobic bacterial microflora of Broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris) oral cavity and cloaca, originating from parque Zoológico Arruda Câmara, Paraíba, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, J S A; Mota, R A; Pinheiro Júnior, J W; Almeida, M C S; Silva, D R; Ferreira, D R A; Azevedo, J C N

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate and identify the aerobic bacterial microflora from the oral cavity mucosa and cloaca's samples, collected from Broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris), born and bred in captivity at Parque Zoológico Arruda Câmara, João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. The most common bacteria were Staphylococcus sp. (14.74%), Corynebacterium sp. (13.68%), Escherichia coli (13.68%) and Shigella sp.(11.58%), and the less common were Citrobacter sp. (1.05%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (1.05%) and Salmonella sp. (1.05%).This emphasizes the importance of these microorganisms' participation in infectious processes (sepsis) and injuries caused by crocodilians. PMID:24031343

  8. Vertical and Horizontal Variations in the Physiological Diversity of the Aerobic Chemoheterotrophic Bacterial Microflora in Deep Southeast Coastal Plain Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, D. L.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Thomas, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic chemoheterotrophic bacteria were isolated from surface soils and coastal plain subsurface (including deep aquifer) sediments (depths to 265 m) at a study site near Aiken, S.C., by plating on concentrated and dilute media. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. These isolates were quite diverse; 626 physiologically distinct types (i.e., types with a unique pattern of responses to the 21 tests) were detected among the 1,112 isolates obtained. Physiologically distinct types were isolated on concentrated and dilute media (only 11% overlap between the groups); isolates from surface soils and subsurface sediments were also quite different (only 3% overlap). The surface soil isolates more readily utilized all but 1 of 12 carbon sources offered, and a significantly larger proportion of them hydrolyzed esculin and gelatin. Only 4% of the subsurface isolates fermented glucose, even though 82% of them could use it aerobically. l-Malate and d-gluconate were utilized by at least 75% of the subsurface isolates, and seven other carbon sources were used by at least 40% of them. Subsurface isolates from different geological formations (depths) and, to a lesser extent, from the same geological formation at different boreholes differed distinctly in their group responses to certain physiological tests. Moreover, sediments from different depths and boreholes contained physiologically distinct types of bacteria. Thus, considerable bacterial diversity was observed in coastal plain subsurface sediments, even within defined geological formations. PMID:16347902

  9. [Pharyngeal tuberculosis: Case report].

    PubMed

    Spini, Roxana Gabriela; Bordino, Lucas; Cohen, Daniela; Martins, Andrea; Ramírez, Zaida; González, Norma E

    2015-08-01

    Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation. In Argentina, the number of cases of tuberculosis reported in children under 19 years in 2012 was 1752. Only 12.15% had extrapulmonary manifestation. A case of a 17 year old girl with pharyngeal tuberculosis is reported. The patient presented intermittent fever and swallowing pain for 6 months, without response to conventional antibiotic treatment. Chest X-ray showedbilateral micronodular infiltrate, so hospitalization was decided to study and treat. The sputum examination for acid-fast resistant bacilli was positive and treatment with four antituberculous drugs was started, with good evolution and disappearance of symptoms. Diagnostic confirmation with the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum culture was obtained. The main symptoms of pharyngeal tuberculosis are sore throat and difficulty in swallowing of long evolution. It is important to consider tuberculosis as differential diagnosis in patients with chronic pharyngitis unresponsive to conventional treatment. PMID:26172025

  10. Pharyngitis - sore throat

    MedlinePlus

    Pharyngitis - bacterial; Sore throat ... caused by swelling in the back of the throat (pharynx) between the tonsils and the voice box (larynx). Most sore throats are caused by colds, the flu, coxsackie virus ...

  11. Pharyngitis - sore throat

    MedlinePlus

    Flores AR, Caserta MT. Pharyngitis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  12. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  13. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  14. Effect of perorally administered pivmecillinam on the normal oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, A; Edlund, C; Svenungsson, B; Emtestam, L; Nord, C E

    2001-06-01

    To study the ecological effects of pivmecillinam on the human oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora, 15 healthy volunteers were given pivmecillinam tablets 400 mg twice daily for 7 days. Saliva, stool and skin specimens were taken before (days -3 and 0) and on the 2nd, 4th and 7th days during the administration period and 14 and 21 days after the start of administration. Mecillinam caused no major changes in the aerobic or anaerobic oropharyngeal microflora. In the aerobic intestinal microflora there was a decrease in the numbers of Escherichia coli while no changes occurred in the anaerobic microflora. In the skin microflora there was a transient decrease in the numbers of Propionibacterium spp. underneath the wing of the nose. The major effect of pivmecillinam was seen on E. coli and to some extent on Propionibacterium spp. No further ecological disturbances were noticed in the oropharyngeal, intestinal or skin microflora. PMID:11450889

  15. Yeast microflora of nectarines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resident fruit microflora has been the source of biocontrol agents for control of postharvest decays of fruits, and the active ingredient in commercialized biocontrol products. Except grapes and apples, information on the resident microflora of other fruits is only fragmentary, but greater knowledge...

  16. Pharyngeal pouch carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saunders, M W; Murty, G E; Bradely, P J

    1993-02-01

    Malignant change occurs in 0.3-10% of pharyngeal pouches, with longstanding pouches most at risk. Contrast radiology and endoscopy can detect large and medium sized tumors but are inadequate for small lesions and carcinoma in situ. Expectant treatment and conservative surgery fail to provide an excised pouch for histological analysis and small lesions may be missed. Consequently, careful consideration must be given to radical excision, particularly if the pouch has been longstanding. The role of radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery remains unproven. PMID:8482256

  17. Characterization of the microflora of the human axilla.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D; Daulby, A; Grimshaw, S; James, G; Mercer, J; Vaziri, S

    2003-06-01

    It is widely accepted that axillary malodour is attributable to the microbial biotransformation of odourless, natural secretions into volatile odorous products. Consequently, there is a need to understand the microbial ecology of the axilla in order that deodorant products, which control microbial action in this region, can be developed in the appropriate manner. A detailed characterization of the axillary microflora of a group of human volunteers has been performed. The axillary microflora is composed of four principal groups of bacteria (staphylococci, aerobic coryneforms, micrococci and propionibacteria), and the yeast genus Malassezia. Results indicated that the axillary microflora was dominated by either staphylococcal or aerobic coryneform species. Comparisons between axillary bacterial numbers and levels of axillary odour demonstrated the greatest association between odour levels and the presence of aerobic coryneforms in the under-arm. As the taxonomy of cutaneous aerobic coryneforms is poorly understood, a further study was conducted to characterize selected axillary aerobic coryneform isolates. Using the molecular technique of 16S rDNA sequencing, selected genomic sequences of a number of axillary aerobic coryneform isolates were obtained. Comparisons with sequence databases indicated the likely presence of a range of Corynebacterium species on axillary skin, although the majority of isolates were most similar to either Corynebacterium G-2 CDC G5840 or C. mucifaciens DMMZ 2278. Although for a panel of individuals differences in the carriage of Corynebacterium species were noted, similar species were carried by a number of panellists. All isolates examined in this limited evaluation failed to demonstrate the capability to metabolize long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) to shorter chain, more volatile products. The application of this modern molecular phylogenetic technique has increased understanding of the diversity of aerobic coryneform carriage in the axilla

  18. Common Questions About Streptococcal Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Monica G; Higgins, Kim E; Perez, Evan D

    2016-07-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection causes 15% to 30% of sore throats in children and 5% to 15% in adults, and is more common in the late winter and early spring. The strongest independent predictors of GABHS pharyngitis are patient age of five to 15 years, absence of cough, tender anterior cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudates, and fever. To diagnose GABHS pharyngitis, a rapid antigen detection test should be ordered in patients with a modified Centor or FeverPAIN score of 2 or 3. First-line treatment for GABHS pharyngitis includes a 10-day course of penicillin or amoxicillin. Patients allergic to penicillin can be treated with firstgeneration cephalosporins, clindamycin, or macrolide antibiotics. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are more effective than acetaminophen and placebo for treatment of fever and pain associated with GABHS pharyngitis; medicated throat lozenges used every two hours are also effective. Corticosteroids provide only a small reduction in the duration of symptoms and should not be used routinely. PMID:27386721

  19. Lateral pharyngeal fat pad pressure during breathing.

    PubMed

    Winter, W C; Gampper, T; Gay, S B; Suratt, P M

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether pressure in tissue lateral to the upper airway, the lateral pharyngeal fat pad, differs from atmospheric and pharyngeal pressure and whether it changes with breathing. We studied five male pigs by inserting a transducer-tipped catheter into their fat pad space using computed tomography (CT) scan guidance. We measured airflow with a pneumotachograph attached to a face mask and pharyngeal pressure with a balloon catheter. Fat pad pressure correlated positively with airflow and with pharyngeal pressure, decreasing during inspiration and increasing during expiration. Pressure in the fat pad differed from atmospheric pressure, generally exceeding it, and from pharyngeal pressure. We conclude that lateral pharyngeal fat pad pressure differs from atmospheric and pharyngeal pressure and that it changes with breathing. PMID:9085504

  20. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  1. Synergistic effect of ionizing radiation on chemical disinfectant treatments for reduction of natural microflora on seafood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Jo, Cheorun; Ha, Sang-Do

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on seafood products such as mussel and squid compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of chlorine and ionizing radiation on the natural microflora of mussel and squid. Total aerobic bacteria initially ranged from 102 to 104 Log CFU/g. More than 100 ppm of chlorine and irradiation at 1 kGy were sufficient to reduce the total aerobic bacteria on mussel and squid to a level lower than detection limit (10 CFU/g). Synergistic effects against natural microflora were observed for all combined treatment. These results suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combine chlorine-ionizing radiation treatment against natural microflora on mussel and squid.

  2. Effects of dietary antibiotics on intestinal microflora in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ohya, T; Sato, S

    1983-01-01

    Changes were examined in the intestinal microflora in broiler chickens fed a diet containing antibiotics to obtain fundamental information on the mechanisms of beneficial effect of the antibiotics upon livestock production. Three antibiotics (colistin, bacitracin, and enramycin) were employed as feed additives. Experiments were conducted with broiler chickens in two ways. In one way dietary antibiotics were fed continually at levels approved for use as feed additives for a long term. In the other they were fed the same antibiotics for a short term. Significant changes in microflora were observed mainly in such bacterial groups as aerobic bacteria and Lactobacillus. In the long term administration, three possible modes of variance in the bacterial flora were postulated: Changes directly related to the antibacterial spectrum of antibiotics. Antagonistic changes related to an ecological balance in the bacterial flora. Changes in quantitative balance of bacteria constituting each bacterial group. The change in the intestinal microflora during administration of the antibiotic diet was expressed as a complex form of these transition modes. In the short term administration, it was demonstrated that the effect of the antibiotic diet lingered even 7 days after administration. This suggests that antibiotics used as feed additives may possibly affect the stability of the intestinal microflora. PMID:6680771

  3. The IPA Categories "Pharyngeal" and "Epiglottal": Laryngoscopic Observations of Pharyngeal Articulations and Larynx Height.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esling, John H.

    1999-01-01

    Reexamines the sounds produced at the pharyngeal place of articulation to review the linguistic phonetic realizations of sounds that have been labeled "pharyngeal" and those that have been labeled "epiglottal," and to investigate the production of a series of pharyngeal sounds under conditions of larynx raising and larynx lowering. (Author/VWL)

  4. Transformation of mercuric chloride and methylmercury by the rumen microflora.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S; Forsberg, C W

    1979-01-01

    The microflora in strained rumen fluid did not methylate or volatilize 203Hg2+ at detectable rates. However, there was an exponential decay in the concentration of added CH3Hg+, which was attributed to demethylation. The major product of demethylation was metallic mercury (Hg0), and it was released as a volatile product from the reaction mixture. Demethylation occurred under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The rate of demethylation was proportional to the concentration of added CH3Hg+-Hg from 0.02 to 100 microgram of Hg per ml. The presence of HgCl2 had almost no inhibitory effect on the rate of cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond of CH2HgCl, but it completely inhibited volatilization of the Hg formed, when the concentration of HgCl2-Hg reached 100 micrograms/ml. Three of 11 species of anaerobic rumen bacteria catalyzed demethylation. These were Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Megasphaera elsdenii. None of the 11 species caused detectable methylation, and only two caused limited volatilization of Hg2+. Three species of bacteria out of 90 fresh aerobic isolates from rumen contents were demethylators: two were identified as Pseudomonas sp., and the third was a Micrococcus sp. Demethylation by the rumen microflora appeared to be carried out by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and, on the basis of Hg2+ sensitivity, probably resulted from the activity of two enzymes, a CH3-Hg+ hydrolase and a Hg2+ reductase. PMID:539820

  5. Management of streptococcal pharyngitis reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Gerber, M A; Markowitz, M

    1985-01-01

    Adequate treatment of GABHS pharyngitis with penicillin shortens the course of illness, reduces the spread of streptococci and prevents suppurative complications. It has also been a major factor in the markedly accelerated decline in the incidence of acute rheumatic fever in this country. Difficulties in the clinical diagnosis of GABHS pharyngitis make bacteriologic confirmation highly desirable. Currently a properly performed throat culture is the best way to obtain this bacteriologic confirmation. However, it is possible that rapid antigen detection tests will replace the throat culture in the future. These diagnostic tools should be used more selectively and only in conjunction with clinical and epidemiologic data. Greater selectivity will help control costs and will increase the chances of identifying patients who are truly infected and are not merely streptococcal carriers. Penicillin is still the drug of choice and an oral preparation given twice daily is as effective as more frequent doses. Patients at risk for noncompliance should be treated with a single injection of benzathine penicillin combined with procaine penicillin to lessen the local discomfort. Routine follow-up cultures of asymptomatic patients should be abandoned. Persistence of GABHS following a course of treatment may no longer be an important risk factor for the development of rheumatic fever. However, there are exceptional cases, as noted in the text, in which eradication of GABHS carriage with a short course of rifampicin may be desirable. PMID:3931060

  6. Effect on the human normal microflora of oral antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Edlund; Nord

    2000-08-01

    Oral administration of antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) can cause ecological disturbances in the normal intestinal microflora. Poorly absorbed drugs can reach the colon in active form, suppress susceptible microorganisms and disturb the ecological balance. Suppression of the normal microflora may lead to reduced colonization resistance with subsequent overgrowth of pre-existing, naturally resistant microorganisms, such as yeasts and Clostridium difficile. New colonization by resistant potential pathogens may also occur and may spread within the body or to other patients and cause severe infections. It is therefore important to learn more about the ecological effects of antibacterial agents on the human microflora. The impact on intestinal microorganisms of oral antibiotics used for the treatment of UTIs is reviewed here. Ampicillin, amoxycillin and co-amoxiclav suppress both the aerobic and anaerobic intestinal microflora with overgrowth of ampicillin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Pivmecillinam also affects the intestinal microflora, suppressing Escherichia coli, but does not have a major effect on the anaerobic microflora. Several orally administered cephalosporins, such as cefixime, cefpodoxime, cefprozil and ceftibuten, reduce the number of Enterobacteriaceae and increase the number of enterococci. Colonization with C. difficile has also been observed. Fluoroquinolones eliminate or strongly suppress intestinal Enterobacteriaceae, but affect enterococci and anaerobic bacteria only slightly. When antimicrobial agents are prescribed for the treatment of UTIs, not only the antimicrobial spectrum of the agent but also the potential ecological disturbances, including the risk of emergence of resistant strains, should be considered. PMID:10969051

  7. Effect on the human normal microflora of oral antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Edlund, C; Nord, C E

    2000-09-01

    Oral administration of antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) can cause ecological disturbances in the normal intestinal microflora. Poorly absorbed drugs can reach the colon in active form, suppress susceptible microorganisms and disturb the ecological balance. Suppression of the normal microflora may lead to reduced colonization resistance with subsequent overgrowth of pre-existing, naturally resistant microorganisms, such as yeasts and Clostridium difficile. New colonization by resistant potential pathogens may also occur and may spread within the body or to other patients and cause severe infections. It is therefore important to learn more about the ecological effects of antibacterial agents on the human microflora. The impact on intestinal microorganisms of oral antibiotics used for the treatment of UTIs is reviewed here. Ampicillin, amoxycillin and co-amoxiclav suppress both the aerobic and anaerobic intestinal microflora with overgrowth of ampicillin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Pivmecillinam also affects the intestinal microflora, suppressing Escherichia coli, but does not have a major effect on the anaerobic microflora. Several orally administered cephalosporins, such as cefixime, cefpodoxime, cefprozil and ceftibuten, reduce the number of Enterobacteriaceae and increase the number of enterococci. Colonization with C. difficile has also been observed. Fluoroquinolones eliminate or strongly suppress intestinal Enterobacteriaceae, but affect enterococci and anaerobic bacteria only slightly. When antimicrobial agents are prescribed for the treatment of UTIs, not only the antimicrobial spectrum of the agent but also the potential ecological disturbances, including the risk of emergence of resistant strains, should be considered. PMID:11051623

  8. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction: Evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Separation of the nasal and oral cavities by dynamic closure of the velo-pharyngeal port is necessary for normal speech and swallowing. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) may either follow repair of a cleft palate or be independent of clefting. While the diagnosis of VPD is made by audiologic perceptual evaluation of speech, identification of the mechanism of the dysfunction requires instrumental visualization of the velo-pharyngeal port during specific speech tasks. Matching the specific intervention for management of VPD with the type of dysfunction, i.e. differential management for differential diagnosis, maximizes the result while minimizing the morbidity of the intervention. PMID:19884668

  9. Pharyngeal Packing during Rhinoplasty: Advantages and Disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Majid; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Behdani, Reza; Khadivi, Ehsan; Bakhshaee, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Controversy remains as to the advantages and disadvantages of pharyngeal packing during septorhinoplasty. Our study investigated the effect of pharyngeal packing on postoperative nausea and vomiting and sore throat following this type of surgery or septorhinoplasty. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I or II patients who were candidates for septorhinoplasty. They were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in the study group had received pharyngeal packing while those in the control group had not. The incidence of nausea and vomiting and sore throat based on the visual analog scale (VAS) was evaluated postoperatively in the recovery room as well as at 2, 6 and 24 hours. Results: The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) was 12.3%, with no significant difference between the study and control groups. Sore throat was reported in 50.5% of cases overall (56.8% on pack group and 44.4% on control). Although the severity of pain was higher in the study group at all times, the incidence in the two groups did not differ significantly. Conclusion: The use of pharyngeal packing has no effect in reducing the incidence of nausea and vomiting and sore throat after surgery. Given that induced hypotension is used as the routine method of anesthesia in septorhinoplasty surgery, with a low incidence of hemorrhage and a high risk of unintended retention of pharyngeal packing, its routine use is not recommended for this procedure. PMID:26788486

  10. Microflora of the penile skin-lined neovagina of transsexual women

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    -lined neovagina of transsexual women. It reveals a mixed microflora of aerobe and anaerobe species usually found either on the skin, in the intestinal microflora or in a BV microflora. PMID:19457233

  11. Isolation and characterization of the microflora of nixtamalized corn masa.

    PubMed

    Adolphson, Stephen J; Dunn, Michael L; Jefferies, Laura K; Steele, Frost M

    2013-08-01

    Corn tortillas are a staple in the diet among the Mexican population, and are traditionally produced through a process known as nixtamalization. This traditional process involves steeping whole-kernel corn in an alkaline solution overnight and then grinding the corn into dough (masa), which is then baked. While the masa is held before baking, significant microbial change can occur which leads to fermentation and spoilage. The objective of this research was to characterize and identify the microflora of nixtamalized corn masa from six different commercial tortilla mills throughout Guadalajara, Mexico. The identification of samples was conducted using the microbial identification system (MIS), which analyzes cellular fatty acids via gas chromatography to identify bacterial species. Lactic acid bacteria and aerobic mesophiles were the predominant organisms, with both groups having counts ranging from 10(4) to 10(7)cfu/g across all mills. Coliform populations were observed at counts of 10(2) to 10(3)cfu/g, while yeast and mold counts were typically less than 10(1)cfu/g. Some mills showed no presence of coliforms or yeast or mold. Streptococcus bovis and Lactobacillus oris were isolated from all mills, and were the most prevalent organisms representing 43% and 17% of all lactic acid bacteria isolated, respectively. S. bovis was also isolated on the aerobic tryptic soy plates and was the most prevalent species representing 19% of the total organisms from these aerobic plates. PMID:23803568

  12. How the pharyngeal resonator is controlled articulatorily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esling, John H.

    2005-04-01

    Indigenous languages of North America, especially west coast Vancouver Island Nuuchahnulth and Interior BC Salish, illustrate an extensive range of use of the pharyngeal resonator. The pharynx is classified as part of the laryngeal articulator (rather than lingual) because the laryngeal constrictor mechanism (controlling changes from the glottis to the aryepiglottic folds) is the principal articulator whose movements determine the shape of the pharynx. The Nuuchahnulth (Nootka) dialects (e.g., Ahousaht) and Thompson, Moses-Columbia, and Spokane/Kalispel Salish varieties all close the larynx completely for the speech sound epiglottal stop. With the airway optimally shut, the pharynx is small; the aryepiglottic folds are pressed against the epiglottic tubercle, the tongue is retracted, and the larynx is raised. There are good indications that the thyroarytenoid, aryepiglottic, thyroepiglottic, hyoglossus and hyothyroid muscles participate in this buckling maneuvre. These languages also contain either a pharyngeal fricative or approximant (at the same place of articulation but with less stricture) and, in Thompson, also pharyngealized uvulars (with even less stricture). Pharyngeal resonance in all of these cases is dependent initially on the shortening of the supraglottic tube and subsequently on the combined effect of tongue retraction and larynx raising reducing the volume immediately above the supraglottic tube.

  13. Altered Pharyngeal Muscles in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H.; Shill, Holly A.; Caviness, John N.; Samanta, Johan E.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia (impaired swallowing) is common in Parkinson disease (PD) patients and is related to aspiration pneumonia, the primary cause of death in PD. Therapies that ameliorate the limb motor symptoms of PD are ineffective for dysphagia. This suggests that the pathophysiology of PD dysphagia may differ from that affecting limb muscles but little is known about potential neuromuscular abnormalities in the swallowing muscles in PD. This study examined the fiber histochemistry of pharyngeal constrictor (PC) and cricopharyngeal (CP) sphincter muscles in postmortem specimens from 8 PD and 4 age-matched control patients. Pharyngeal muscles in PD patients exhibited many atrophic fibers, fiber type grouping, and fast-to-slow myosin heavy chain transformation. These alterations indicate that the pharyngeal muscles experienced neural degeneration and regeneration over the course of PD. Notably, the PD patients with dysphagia had a higher percentage of atrophic myofibers vs. with those without dysphagia and controls. The fast-to-slow fiber type transition is consistent with abnormalities in swallowing, slow movement of food and increased tone in the CP sphincter in PD patients. The alterations in the pharyngeal muscles may play a pathogenic role in the development of dysphagia in PD patients. PMID:22588389

  14. Meningococcal colonisation misdiagnosed as gonococcal pharyngeal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, R C; Cooper, R M

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of pharyngeal gonorrhoea were misdiagnosed in patients harbouring meningococci which failed to utilise maltose in CTA medium. The microbiological identity of the isolates was established by other means. Although meningococci giving atypical reactions to carbohydrate utilisation tests occur only rarely, the possibility of a misdiagnosis of gonorrhea, and its social and legal repercussions, should be considered. PMID:116706

  15. [Hydrological indications in the therapy of pharyngitis].

    PubMed

    Olina, Massimo; Aluffi Valletti, Paolo; Pia, Francesco; Toso, Andrea; Borello, Giovanni; Policarpo, Mario; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2008-06-01

    Pharyngitis is an inflammatory disease of the mucosal and submucosal structures of the throat. Infection may or may not be a component of the disease. Pharyngitis is one of the common illness for which patients visit primary care physicians. Most of them are diagnosed by clinical evaluation and usually respond to treatment with antibiotics, but exceptions occur when pharyngitis is caused by non bacterial inflammatory processes like virus, mycoses, reflux of gastric juices, tobacco or alcohol abuse. In these cases, as alternative and preventive, could be indicated the thermal therapy. For many centuries thermal waters have been used in the treatment of chronic inflammations of the upper respiratory airway, such as pharyngitis, with good results. Different thermal waters are currently used, in particular sulfur or sulfur- salty- bromine-, iodine- or sulfur-sulfate-bicarbonate-carbonate alkaline or sulfur-arsenical-ferruginous, normally utilized by inhalation or irrigation or aerosol-therapy. The principal pharmacological activity of these waters is connected to the concentrations of H2S, halogens (Iodine e Bromine), sulfates, arsenic and the level of radioactivity, concerning their antimicrobial power and the mucolytic effect of sulphur. PMID:18710064

  16. [Clinical diagnosis and treatment of allergic pharyngitis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Yan, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Mingxia

    2015-08-01

    Although the concept of united airway disease has been widely accepted, most scholars emphasize only the effect of rhino-sinusitis while ignoring the pharyngeal factors to the lower airway, especially to the allergic pharyngitis (AP), which still lacks enough awareness. First of all, absence of unified diagnostic standard leads to the lack of epidemiological data, which, results in doctors' personal experience but no guideline in treatments. In addition, it is still not clear that the role of AP in the allergic airway diseases and its relationship with asthma. However, the number of patients with AP has been increasing obviously in daily clinic practice. Combined with the previous observation, this paper does a systematic review about the clinical problems of AP, expecting to give a hand to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of AP. PMID:26685417

  17. Pharyngeal fat in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Shelton, K E; Woodson, H; Gay, S; Suratt, P M

    1993-08-01

    Although most patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are obese, it is not known how obesity contributes to airway collapse during sleep. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the volume of adipose tissue adjacent to the pharyngeal airway in humans is related to the degree of OSA. We studied 30 subjects, nine without OSA and 21 with OSA; two subjects were studied before and after weight loss. Adipose tissue was detected with magnetic resonance imaging using T1-weighted spin echo sequences. The volume of adipose tissue adjacent to the upper airway was determined by measuring the volume of all pixels in the intensity range of adipose tissue within the region bounded by the ramus of the mandible, the spine, the anterior border of the soft palate, and the hard palate. Polysomnography was performed with conventional techniques. All subjects had a collection of adipose tissue adjacent to the upper airway; the volume of this adipose tissue correlated with the number of apneas plus hypopneas per hour of sleep (r = 0.59, p < 0.001). Both patients who lost weight and had fewer apneas and hypopneas had a marked decrease in the pharyngeal adipose tissue volume. We conclude that adipose tissue is deposited adjacent to the pharyngeal airway in patients with OSA and that the volume of this tissue is related to the presence and degree of OSA. PMID:8342912

  18. Pulmonary Renal Syndrome After Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Mara-Koosham, Gopi; Stoltze, Karl; Aday, Jeffrey; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary renal syndrome is a class of small vessel vasculitides that are characterized by the dual presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and glomerulonephritis. Pulmonary renal syndrome has multiple etiologies, but its development has been rarely reported following infection with group A streptococcus. We present the case of a 36-year-old Native American male who was transferred to our facility due to refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis 2 weeks prior to admission. Given the presence of hemoptysis, bronchoscopy was performed and was consistent with DAH. Urinalysis demonstrated hematuria and proteinuria, in the setting of elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Additionally, antistreptolysin O titer was positive. Given the constellation of laboratory findings and history of streptococcal pharyngitis, the patient was diagnosed with PRS secondary to streptococcal infection. High-dose methylprednisolone was initiated with concomitant plasmapheresis. He was extubated successfully after his respiratory status improved and was eventually discharged home after making a full recovery within 2 weeks after admission. This case illustrates the importance of clinically relevant sequelae of streptococcal infection as well as the appropriate treatment of PRS secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis with plasmapheresis and intravenous corticosteroids. PMID:27231692

  19. Pharyngeal pumping continues after laser killing of the pharyngeal nervous system of C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.; Horvitz, H.R. )

    1989-10-01

    Using a laser microbeam to kill specific subsets of the pharyngeal nervous system of C. elegans, we found that feeding was accomplished by two separately controlled muscle motions, isthmus peristalsis and pumping. The single neuron M4 was necessary and sufficient for isthmus peristalsis. The MC neurons were necessary for normal stimulation of pumping in response to food, but pumping continued and was functional in MC- worms. The remaining 12 neuron types were also unnecessary for functional pumping. No operation we did, including destruction of the entire pharyngeal nervous system, abolished pumping altogether. When we killed all pharyngeal neurons except M4, the worms were viable and fertile, although retarded and starved. Since feeding is one of the few known essential actions controlled by the nervous system, we suggest that most of the C. elegans nervous system is dispensable in hermaphrodites under laboratory conditions. This may explain the ease with which nervous system mutants are isolated and handled in C. elegans.

  20. Unusual compositions of microflora of vacuum-packaged beef primal cuts of very long storage life.

    PubMed

    Youssef, M K; Gill, C O; Tran, F; Yang, X

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum-packaged top butt cuts from a beef packing plant that does not use any carcass decontaminating interventions were assessed for their organoleptic and microbiological properties during storage at 2 or -1.5°C. Cuts stored at 2°C were acceptable after storage for 140 days but were unacceptable after 160 days because of persistent sour, acid odors. Odors of cuts stored at -1.5°C for 160 days were acceptable. The numbers of aerobes on cuts increased from <1 log CFU/cm(2) to 7 or 6 log CFU/cm(2) for cuts stored at 2 or -1.5°C, respectively. The numbers of Enterobacteriaceae increased from <-1 log CFU/cm(2) to 5 or 3 log CFU/cm(2) for cuts stored at 2 or -1.5°C, respectively. Bacteria recovered from initial microflora were, mainly, strictly aerobic organisms. Bacteria recovered from cuts stored for 160 days were mainly Carnobacterium spp. that grew on an acetate-containing agar generally selective for lactic acid bacteria other than Carnobacterium. C. divergens and C. maltaromaticum were recovered from cuts stored at 2°C, but C. maltaromaticum was the only species of Carnobacterium recovered from cuts stored at -1.5°C. No lactic acid bacteria of genera that usually predominate in the spoilage microflora of vacuum-packaged beef at late storage times were recovered from the spoilage microflora. The findings indicate that carnobacteria, initially present at very small numbers, grew exponentially to persistently dominate the spoilage microflora of vacuum-packaged beef cuts of unusually long storage life. PMID:25474067

  1. [Characteristics of associated microflora of ejaculate from males with gonococcal infections].

    PubMed

    Voronina, L G; Mikhaĭlova, E A; Perunova, N B; Kuznetsova, E K

    2006-01-01

    Species composition and biological properties of aerobic and anaerobic microflora from an ejaculate from males with acute and chronic gonococcal infection and from healthy men were studied. Patients with gonococcal infection were shown to present quantitative and qualitative changes in microbiocenosis of the reproductive tract. Patients with acute gonorrhea displayed decreased species diversity in contrast to healthy persons, while different species of associated with gonococci microbes with high persistent potential, were cultured in patients suffering from a chronic form of infection. The role of revealed pathological biocenosis patterns in developing chronic infection as well as postgonorrheal gonococci-free urethritis is discussed. PMID:16941881

  2. Similarity and Enhancement: Nasality from Moroccan Arabic Pharyngeals and Nasals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellou, Georgia Eve

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies of the articulation, acoustics, and perception of nasal and pharyngeal consonants and adjacent vowels were conducted to investigate nasality in Moroccan Arabic (MA). The status of nasality in MA is described as coarticulatorily complex, where two phoneme types (pharyngeal segments and nasal segments) yield similar…

  3. Pharyngeal Fricatives, and Pike's "Fricative" and "Frictional" Categories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprigg, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of pharyngeal fricatives in Arabic looks at voiced and voiceless varieties within the context of K. L. Pike's classifications. Pike treated pharyngeal fricatives as standing apart from others, including a number of oral fricatives and one glottal fricative in a category he called "frictionals." Later, however, he distinguished the…

  4. Foodborne streptococcal pharyngitis after a party.

    PubMed Central

    Berkley, S F; Rigau-Pérez, J G; Facklam, R; Broome, C V

    1986-01-01

    Following a private party in Río Piedras, PR, 23 (56 percent) of those who attended developed an illness characterized by pharyngitis, myalgia, fatigue, headache, and fever. Consumption of carrucho (conch) salad was significantly associated with illness (P = 0.013, Fisher's exact test). Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (M nontypable T12, serum opacity factor positive) were isolated both from throat cultures in 11 of 47 persons who attended the party and from the implicated food. The original source of contamination of the conch salad was not identified. Because complications may still occur from such infections and only a small percentage of persons with sore throats seek medical attention and ultimately receive treatment for their illnesses, it is important to recognize these outbreaks. PMID:3083478

  5. The inhibitory effect of natural microflora of food on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Al-Zeyara, Shaikha A; Jarvis, Basil; Mackey, Bernard M

    2011-01-31

    The aims of this study were to (i) compare the inhibitory effects of the natural microflora of different foods on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes during enrichment in selective and non-selective broths; (ii) to isolate and identify components of the microflora of the most inhibitory food; and (iii) to determine which of these components was most inhibitory to growth of L. monocytogenes in co-culture studies. Growth of an antibiotic-resistant marker strain of L. monocytogenes was examined during enrichment of a range of different foods in Tryptone Soya Broth (TSB), Half Fraser Broth (HFB) and Oxoid Novel Enrichment (ONE) Broth. Inhibition of L. monocytogenes was greatest in the presence of minced beef, salami and soft cheese and least with prepared fresh salad and chicken pâté. For any particular food the numbers of L. monocytogenes present after 24h enrichment in different broths increased in the order: TSB, HFB and ONE Broth. Numbers of L. monocytogenes recovered after enrichment in TSB were inversely related to the initial aerobic plate count (APC) in the food but with only a moderate coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.51 implying that microbial numbers and the composition of the microflora both influenced the degree of inhibition of L. monocytogenes. In HFB and ONE Broth the relationship between APC and final L. monocytogenes counts was weaker. The microflora of TSB after 24h enrichment of minced beef consisted of lactic acid bacteria, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and enterococci. In co-culture studies of L. monocytogenes with different components of the microflora in TSB, the lactic acid bacteria were the most inhibitory followed by the Enterobacteriaceae. The least inhibitory organisms were Pseudomonas sp., enterococci and B. thermosphacta. In HFB and ONE Broth the growth of Gram-negative organisms was inhibited but lactic acid bacteria still reached high numbers after 24h. A more detailed study of the growth of

  6. Pharyngeal sense organs drive robust sugar consumption in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    LeDue, Emily E; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Jung, Aera Y; Dahanukar, Anupama; Gordon, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    The fly pharyngeal sense organs lie at the transition between external and internal nutrient sensing mechanisms. Here, we investigate the function of pharyngeal sweet gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs), demonstrating that they express a subset of the nine previously identified sweet receptors and respond to stimulation with a panel of sweet compounds. We show that pox-neuro (poxn) mutants lacking taste function in the legs and labial palps have intact pharyngeal sweet taste, which is both necessary and sufficient to drive preferred consumption of sweet compounds by prolonging ingestion. Moreover, flies putatively lacking all sweet taste show little preference for nutritive or non-nutritive sugars in a short-term feeding assay. Together, our data demonstrate that pharyngeal sense organs play an important role in directing sustained consumption of sweet compounds, and suggest that post-ingestive sugar sensing does not effectively drive food choice in a simple short-term feeding paradigm. PMID:25807033

  7. Mechanical parameters determining pharyngeal collapsibility in patients with sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Oliven, Arie; Kaufman, Eran; Kaynan, Rotem; Oliven, Ron; Steinfeld, Uri; Tov, Nave; Odeh, Majed; Gaitini, Luis; Schwartz, Alan R; Kimmel, Eitan

    2010-10-01

    The relative impact of mechanical factors on pharyngeal patency in patients with obstructive sleep apnea is poorly understood. The present study was designed to evaluate parameters of the "tube law" on pharyngeal pressure-flow relationships and collapsibility in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. We developed a mathematical model that considered the collapsible segment of the pharynx to represent an orifice of varying diameter. The model enabled us to assess the effects of pharyngeal compliance (C), neutral cross-sectional area (A(o)), external peripharyngeal pressure (P(ex)), and the resistance proximal to the site of collapse on flow mechanics and pharyngeal collapsibility [critical pressure (P(crit))]. All parameters were measured in 15 patients with obstructive sleep apnea under propofol anesthesia, both at rest and during mandibular advancement and electrical stimulation of the genioglossus. The data was used both to confirm the validity of the model and to compare expected and actual relationships between the tube-law parameters and the pharyngeal pressure-flow relationship and collapsibility. We found a close correlation between predicted and measured P(crit) (R = 0.98), including changes observed during pharyngeal manipulations. C and A(o) were closely and directly interrelated (R = 0.93) and did not correlate with P(crit). A significant correlation was found between P(ex) and P(crit) (R = 0.77; P < 0.01). We conclude that the pharynx of patients with obstructive sleep apnea can be modeled as an orifice with varying diameter. Pharyngeal compliance and A(o) are closely interrelated. Pharyngeal collapsibility depends primarily on the surrounding pressure. PMID:20576847

  8. Variability of the Pharyngeal Phase of Swallow in the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Daniel G.; Poliacek, Ivan; Rose, Melanie J.; Bolser, Donald C.; Pitts, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Objective The pharyngeal phase of swallow has been thought to be a stereotypical motor behavior. Study Design This is a prospective, preclinical, hypothesis driven, one group by three-task design. Methods We sought to compare the effects of pharyngeal swabbing, water only, and water plus punctate mechanical stimulation on the spatiotemporal features of the pharyngeal phase of swallow in the cat. Swallow was elicited under these three conditions in six anaesthetized cats. Electromyographic activity was recorded from seven muscles used to evaluate swallow: mylohyoid, geniohyoid, thyrohyoid, thyroarytenoid, thyropharyngeus, cricopharyngeus, and parasternal. Results Pharyngeal swabbing in comparison to the other stimulus conditions, results in decreases in post-swallow cricopharyngeus activity (upper esophageal sphincter); a significant increase in parasternal (schluckatmung; swallow breath) activity; and increases in thyrohyoid (laryngeal elevator), thyroarytenoid (laryngeal adductor) and parasternal muscles burst duration. Pearson correlations were found of moderate strength between 19% of burst duration comparisons and weak to moderate relationships between 29% of burst amplitude comparisons. However, there were no positive significant relationships between phase durations and electromyogram amplitudes between any of the muscles studied during swallow. Conclusions The results support the concept that a stereotypical behavior, such as pharyngeal swallowing in animal models, can be modified by sensory feedback from pharyngeal mucosal mechanoreceptors. Furthermore, differences in swallow phase durations and amplitudes provide evidence that separate regulatory mechanisms exist which regulate spatial and temporal aspects of the behavior. PMID:25171095

  9. Lateral pharyngeal fat pad pressure during breathing in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Winter, W C; Gampper, T; Gay, S B; Suratt, P M

    1997-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that the pressure in tissues surrounding the upper airway is one of the determinants of the size and shape of the upper airway. To our knowledge, this pressure has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to test whether the pressure in a tissue lateral to the upper airway, the lateral pharyngeal fat pad pressure (Pfp), differs from atmospheric and pharyngeal pressures and whether it changes with breathing. We studied six male lightly sedated pigs by inserting a transducer tipped catheter into their fat pad space by using computerized tomographic scan guidance. We measured airflow with a pneumotachograph attached to a face mask and pharyngeal pressure with a balloon catheter. Pfp differed from atmospheric pressure, generally exceeding it, and from pharyngeal pressure. Pfp correlated positively with airflow and with pharyngeal pressure, decreasing during inspiration and increasing during expiration. Changes in Pfp with ventilation were eliminated by oropharyngeal intubation. We conclude that Pfp differs from atmospheric and pharyngeal pressures and that it changes with breathing. PMID:9292450

  10. Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas of the cavernous sinus through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery

    PubMed Central

    Pero, Guglielmo; Quilici, Luca; Piano, Mariangela; Valvassori, Luca; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    We report three cases of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the cavernous sinus treated by Onyx injection through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. The treatment of choice of DAVFs of the cavernous sinus is endovascular, and it is preferentially done via transvenous occlusion of the cavernous sinus. The cavernous sinus can be reached through either the inferior petrosal sinus or the superior ophthalmic vein. When these venous routes are occluded, the first attempt is to pass through the occluded inferior petrosal sinus, but sometimes this attempt can fail. In some cases there are small transosseous feeders to the fistula arising from the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. When all of the more conventional approaches are unattainable, this route can be attempted. In our experience, it allowed safe and rapid occlusion of the fistula. PMID:24759156

  11. Grave Complication of Pharyngitis: Lemierre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit Kumar B.; Patel, Kimmyben; Doshi, Raj Kumar P.; Patel, Narottam A.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is the causative agent in the pharyngitis. After invasion of the oropharyngeal mucosa by the organism leads to the development of the grave complications like superficial thrombophlebitis of internal jugular vein, septic emboli in the lung and coagulopathy. A 23-year-old male presented with chief complaints of sore throat, headache and high grade fever with past history of upper respiratory tract infection one month ago. On examination, he had high grade fever, tachycardia, hypotension and tender cervical lymph nodes. Oropharyngeal mucosa appeared ooedematous and congested. Leucocytosis with raised ESR was present. Blood culture positive for Fusobacterium necrophorum. Dilated right IJV with the hypoechoic thrombosis seen on Ultrasonography & Doppler. Patient was diagnosed as a case of Lemierre syndrome secondary to oropharyngeal infection was made. He was treated with intravenous imipenem and metronidazole, and then shifted to oral amoxicillin. After completion of full course of the therapy of 6 weeks, patient was improved clinically and all routine blood investigations were normalized. Blood culture was negative for Fusobacterium necrophorum. No evidence of thrombosis within the right internal jugular vein on Doppler. PMID:26266187

  12. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  13. Effect of inhaled steroids on laryngeal microflora.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mahfuz; Ekin, Selami; Ucler, Rıfkı; Arısoy, Ahmet; Bayram, Yasemin; Yalınkılıç, Abdulaziz; Bozan, Nazım; Garca, Mehmet Fatih; Çankaya, Hakan

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions As is known, this study is the first study to evaluate the effect of inhaled steroids on laryngeal microflora. The data support that ICS usage causes changes in the larynx microflora. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the alteration in larynx microbial flora of the patients treated with ICS comparing the culture results of a control group. In addition, laryngeal microflora was compared to the smears obtained from the vallecula and pharynx. Materials and methods The study included 39 patients (mean age = 45.56 ± 12.76 years) who had been using a corticosteroid inhaler and control group consisting of 27 persons (mean age = 43.07 ± 13.23 years). Culture samples were obtained from the pharynx, larynx, and vallecula in the patient and control groups, and they were evaluated in the microbiology laboratory. Obtained culture results were named by the same microbiologist according to the basic microorganism classification method. Results Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Streptococcus viridians (VGS) and candida albicans were detected to grow significantly more in the patient group in all three anatomic localizations compared to the control group. Neisseria spp, basillus spp, and Non-viridans alpha-hemolytic streptococcus were detected to grow significantly more in the control group in all three anatomic localizations compared to the patient group. PMID:26901427

  14. The development and evolution of the pharyngeal arches

    PubMed Central

    GRAHAM, ANTHONY

    2001-01-01

    A muscularised pharynx, with skeletal support, serving the dual functions of feeding and respiration, is a fundamental vertebrate characteristic. Embryologically, the pharyngeal apparatus has its origin in a series of bulges that form on the lateral surface of the embryonic head, the pharyngeal arches, whose development is complex. These structures are composed of a number of disparate embryonic cell types: ectoderm, endoderm, neural crest and mesoderm, whose development must be coordinated to generate the functional adult apparatus. In the past, most studies have emphasised the role played by the neural crest, which generates the skeletal elements of the arches, in directing pharyngeal arch development, but it has also become apparent that the endoderm plays a prominent role in directing arch development. Neural crest cells are not required for arch formation, their regionalisation nor to some extent their sense of identity. Furthermore, the endoderm is the major site of expression of a number of important signalling molecules, and this tissue has been shown to be responsible for promoting the formation of particular components of the arches. Thus vertebrate pharyngeal morphogenesis can now be seen to be a more complex process than was previously believed, and must result from an integration of both neural crest and endodermal patterning mechanisms. Interestingly, this also mirrors the fact that the evolutionary origin of pharyngeal segmentation predates that of the neural crest, which is an exclusively vertebrate characteristic. As such, the evolution of the vertebrate pharynx is also likely to have resulted from an integration between these 2 patterning systems. Alterations in the interplay between neural crest and endodermal patterning are also likely to be responsible for the evolutionary that occurred to the pharyngeal region during subsequent vertebrate evolution. PMID:11523815

  15. Novel diagnostic device for oral and pharyngeal examinations of children: folding-scope for the oral and pharyngeal cavities.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Koichi; Sekimoto, Sotaro; Tsunoda, Atsunobu

    2010-01-01

    Although children may dislike and/or resist oral and pharyngeal examination with a tongue depressor, they enjoy lollipops on sticks, eating with spoons, forks, and chopsticks, and brushing their teeth. Many reports have noted this apparent contradiction, since paediatric patients are often treated after toothbrushes or chopsticks penetrate the pharyngeal wall. We therefore developed a novel device to observe the inside of the mouth without using a flashlight, tongue depressor or head mirror. We previously developed the AWS for tracheal intubation through the mouth for anaesthesia and emergency situations, along with a new device to observe the inside of the oral cavity simultaneously. We have developed a new attachment to the AWS for observations inside the oral cavity and pharynx. Our newly developed oral and pharyngeal examination system is a useful tool for diagnostic examinations and may also enable treatment without causing discomfort or distress to patients and their families. PMID:22767566

  16. The Cutaneous Bacterial Microflora of the Bodybuilders Using Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Taheri, Mohammad; Ghanbari Asad, Ali; Khani, Soghra; Ahrari, Iman; Pakshir, Keyvan; Khashei, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse by the athletes has dramatically increased during the recent decades. These substances might increase the skin lipids and enhance the cutaneous microbial proliferation. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the potential side effects of AAS on the bacterial microflora colonization of the bodybuilders` skin. Patients and Methods: The skin samples of 94 male bodybuilders (71 AAS users, 23 non-AAS users) and 46 subjects of the control group, with similar gender and age, were cultured and incubated in both aerobic condition to isolate Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic condition for Propionibacterium acnes. The isolated bacteria were identified by standard microbiological techniques. Results: The skin lesions were more frequent in the body builders than the controls. Moreover, statistically significant differences were also observed in skin lesions among the AAS users and the non-AAS user athletes. The prevalence of S. aureus and P. acnes in the athletes was higher than that of the control group. In addition, there was a significant difference in distribution of P. acnes between the bodybuilders who used AAS and those who did not. Conclusions: A higher number of bacterial flora was found in the bodybuilders particularly those using AAS in comparison to the controls, which might be due to the influence of these AAS on the skin microflora and transmission of the bacteria through the direct contact of the naked skin with the exercise instruments. PMID:25789120

  17. Application of Classification Models to Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielens, Jason D.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present 3 methods of performing pattern recognition on spatiotemporal plots produced by pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Method: Classification models, including the artificial neural networks (ANNs) multilayer perceptron (MLP) and learning vector quantization (LVQ), as well as support vector machines (SVM), were…

  18. Oral Bacteria as Potential Probiotics for the Pharyngeal Mucosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Taverniti, Valentina; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; Stuknyte, Milda; Karp, Matti; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The research described here was aimed at the selection of oral bacteria that displayed properties compatible with their potential use as probiotics for the pharyngeal mucosa. We included in the study 56 bacteria newly isolated from the pharynges of healthy donors, which were identified at the intraspecies level and characterized in vitro for their probiotic potential. The experiments led us to select two potential probiotic bacterial strains (Streptococcus salivarius RS1 and ST3) and to compare them with the prototype oral probiotic S. salivarius strain K12. All three strains efficiently bound to FaDu human epithelial pharyngeal cells and thereby antagonized Streptococcus pyogenes adhesion and growth. All were sensitive to a variety of antibiotics routinely used for the control of upper respiratory tract infections. Immunological in vitro testing on a FaDu layer revealed different responses to RS1, ST3, and K12. RS1 and ST3 modulated NF-κB activation and biased proinflammatory cytokines at baseline and after interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induction. In conclusion, we suggest that the selected commensal streptococci represent potential pharyngeal probiotic candidates. They could display a good degree of adaptation to the host and possess potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:20418429

  19. Radial and longitudinal asymmetry of human pharyngeal pressures during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Sears, V W; Castell, J A; Castell, D O

    1991-12-01

    Radial asymmetry of upper esophageal sphincter resting pressure has been previously described; however, neither radial nor longitudinal asymmetry of pharyngeal pressures has been demonstrated. The authors used a specially designed intraluminal transducer catheter (Konigsberg; Konigsberg Instruments, Pasadena, CA) with four solid-state transducers separated by 3 cm and oriented circumferentially at 90 degrees intervals to measure pharyngeal pressures. Two wet swallows at each 1-cm interval along the length of the pharynx were measured in 12 normal volunteers (10 male, 2 female; mean age, 38 years). Pressure data were collected on-line by an Apple IIe microcomputer (Apple Computer Inc., Cupertino, CA) at 100 Hz and analyzed for both radial and longitudinal asymmetry. Significant (P less than 0.05) longitudinal asymmetry was shown in all positions except right lateral. Radial asymmetry was present for the first 4 cm only, with anterior and posterior pressures significantly (P less than 0.05) higher than lateral pressures. It was concluded that pharyngeal pressure responses show both axial and longitudinal asymmetry in the distal pharynx. Awareness of transducer position and orientation is essential in the evaluation of pharyngeal pressures. PMID:1955121

  20. Icariin Metabolism by Human Intestinal Microflora.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hailong; Kim, Mihyang; Han, Jaehong

    2016-01-01

    Icariin is a major bioactive compound of Epimedii Herba, a traditional oriental medicine exhibiting anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-osteoporosis activities. Recently, the estrogenic activities of icariin drew significant attention, but the published scientific data seemed not to be so consistent. To provide fundamental information for the study of the icaritin metabolism, the biotransformation of icariin by the human intestinal bacteria is reported for the first time. Together with human intestinal microflora, the three bacteria Streptococcus sp. MRG-ICA-B, Enterococcus sp. MRG-ICA-E, and Blautia sp. MRG-PMF-1 isolated from human intestine were reacted with icariin under anaerobic conditions. The metabolites including icariside II, icaritin, and desmethylicaritin, but not icariside I, were produced. The MRG-ICA-B and E strains hydrolyzed only the glucose moiety of icariin, and icariside II was the only metabolite. However, the MRG-PMF-1 strain metabolized icariin further to desmethylicaritin via icariside II and icaritin. From the results, along with the icariin metabolism by human microflora, it was evident that most icariin is quickly transformed to icariside II before absorption in the human intestine. We propose the pharmacokinetics of icariin should focus on metabolites such as icariside II, icaritin and desmethylicaritin to explain the discrepancy between the in vitro bioassay and pharmacological effects. PMID:27589718

  1. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. PMID:21051843

  2. Mathematical modeling of normal pharyngeal bolus transport: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Chang, M W; Rosendall, B; Finlayson, B A

    1998-07-01

    Dysphagia (difficulty in swallowing) is a common clinical symptom associated with many diseases, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, neuromuscular diseases, and cancer. Its complications include choking, aspiration, malnutrition, cachexia, and dehydration. The goal in dysphagia management is to provide adequate nutrition and hydration while minimizing the risk of choking and aspiration. It is important to advance the individual toward oral feeding in a timely manner to enhance the recovery of swallowing function and preserve the quality of life. Current clinical assessments of dysphagia are limited in providing adequate guidelines for oral feeding. Mathematical modeling of the fluid dynamics of pharyngeal bolus transport provides a unique opportunity for studying the physiology and pathophysiology of swallowing. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a special case of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In CFD, the flow of a fluid in a space is modeled by covering the space with a grid and predicting how the fluid moves from grid point to grid point. FEA is capable of solving problems with complex geometries and free surfaces. A preliminary pharyngeal model has been constructed using FEA. This model incorporates literature-reported, normal, anatomical data with time-dependent pharyngeal/upper esophageal sphincter (UES) wall motion obtained from videofluorography (VFG). This time-dependent wall motion can be implemented as a moving boundary condition in the model. Clinical kinematic data can be digitized from VFG studies to construct and test the mathematical model. The preliminary model demonstrates the feasibility of modeling pharyngeal bolus transport, which, to our knowledge, has not been attempted before. This model also addresses the need and the potential for CFD in understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. Improvements of the model are underway. Combining the model with individualized clinical data should potentially

  3. Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on production performance, immune characteristics, antioxidant status, and intestinal microflora of bursin-immunized broilers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xuejiao; Yi, Dan; Ni, Xueqin; Zeng, Dong; Jing, Bo; Lei, Mingxia; Bian, Zhengrong; Zeng, Yan; Li, Tao; Xin, Jinge

    2014-04-01

    Examples of probiotics that can promote host health by improving its intestinal microbial balance and intestinal immunity belong to the genus Lactobacillus. Bursin (BS) is a peptide isolated from the bursa of Fabricius for use as an adjuvant for a variety of immunogens. To investigate the synergistic effects of Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) dietary supplementation and BS immunization on production performance, immune characteristics, antioxidant status, and intestinal microflora in broilers, we randomly allocated 200 1-day-old broilers of mixed sex into 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement (LP-/BS-, LP-/BS+, LP+/BS-, LP+/BS+) for 42 days. BS immunization enhanced immune response by increasing serum total immunoglobulin G concentration and interleukin-6 concentration, promoted antioxidant capacity by increasing catalase activities in serum and liver and by decreasing serum malondialdehyde (MDA) content at 42 days of age (DOA), and enriched intestinal microflora diversity. LP supplementation enhanced immune response by increasing interleukin-2 concentration at 42 DOA; promoted antioxidant capacity by increasing liver catalase activities, increasing glutathione peroxidase activities in serum and liver at 21 DOA, and decreasing serum MDA content at 42 DOA; promoted intestinal microflora composition by decreasing total aerobes and Escherichia coli counts at 21 DOA, by increasing total anaerobes count at 21 DOA, and by increasing Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. counts at both 21 and 42 DOA. The interactions between BS and LP had a significant effect on daily body mass gain and feed conversion ratio in the starter period (1-21 DOA); on interleukin-2 concentration and liver MDA content at 21 DOA; and on thymus index, peripheral lymphocyte proliferation, and E. coli counts at 42 DOA. Overall, these data suggest that the combination of LP dietary supplementation and BS immunization promoted the production performance, immune characteristics, antioxidant

  4. Function of a key morphological innovation: fusion of the cichlid pharyngeal jaw

    PubMed Central

    Darrin Hulsey, C

    2005-01-01

    The pharyngeal jaw of cichlids may represent a key innovation that facilitated their unparalleled trophic divergence. In cichlids, ‘fusion’ of the lower pharyngeal jaw (LPJ) results from suturing between the two lower ceratobranchials. To examine, what novel abilities a more extensively fused pharyngeal jaw may confer, the function of LPJ suturing was examined in Heroine cichlids. Greater LPJ suturing, pharyngeal jaw splitting under compression and the forces used to crush molluscs in the wild suggest increased LPJ fusion in the trophically polymorphic Herichthys minckleyi operates to strengthen the pharyngeal jaw. Among Heroine cichlid species, the presence of an external LPJ suture and feeding specialization on molluscs was evolutionarily quite variable, but greater LPJ fusion estimated from the amount of external suturing was highly correlated with molluscivory. Throughout cichlid diversification, increased pharyngeal jaw fusion via suturing has likely helped to reinforce the LPJ during pharyngeal processing thereby facilitating the ability of cichlids to exploit durable prey. PMID:16608685

  5. Microflora in soils of desert regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    Desert soil samples, collected using aseptic techniques, are low in organic matter and cation exchange capacity. Aerobic and microaerophilic bacteria are most abundant, next are algae and molds. Chemical and physical properties are determined by standard procedures, including the Kjeldahl method and the use of Munsell soil color charts.

  6. moz regulates Hox expression and pharyngeal segmental identity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig T; Maves, Lisa; Kimmel, Charles B

    2004-05-01

    In vertebrate embryos, streams of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells migrate to form segmental pharyngeal arches and differentiate into segment-specific parts of the facial skeleton. To identify genes involved in specifying segmental identity in the vertebrate head, we screened for mutations affecting cartilage patterning in the zebrafish larval pharynx. We present the positional cloning and initial phenotypic characterization of a homeotic locus discovered in this screen. We show that a zebrafish ortholog of the human oncogenic histone acetyltransferase MOZ (monocytic leukemia zinc finger) is required for specifying segmental identity in the second through fourth pharyngeal arches. In moz mutant zebrafish, the second pharyngeal arch is dramatically transformed into a mirror-image duplicated jaw. This phenotype resembles a similar but stronger transformation than that seen in hox2 morpholino oligo (hox2-MO) injected animals. In addition, mild anterior homeotic transformations are seen in the third and fourth pharyngeal arches of moz mutants. moz is required for maintenance of most hox1-4 expression domains and this requirement probably at least partially accounts for the moz mutant homeotic phenotypes. Homeosis and defective Hox gene expression in moz mutants is rescued by inhibiting histone deacetylase activity with Trichostatin A. Although we find early patterning of the moz mutant hindbrain to be normal, we find a late defect in facial motoneuron migration in moz mutants. Pharyngeal musculature is transformed late, but not early, in moz mutants. We detect relatively minor defects in arch epithelia of moz mutants. Vital labeling of arch development reveals no detectable changes in CNC generation in moz mutants, but later prechondrogenic condensations are mispositioned and misshapen. Mirror-image hox2-dependent gene expression changes in postmigratory CNC prefigure the homeotic phenotype in moz mutants. Early second arch ventral expression of goosecoid (gsc) in moz

  7. Teaching Aerobic Lifestyles: New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; Iammarino, Nicholas K.

    1982-01-01

    New approaches to teaching aerobic life-styles in secondary schools are suggested, focusing on three components: (1) the psychological benefits of aerobic activity; (2) alternative aerobic programs at nonschool locations; and (3) the development of an aerobics curriculum to help maintain an active life-style after graduation. (JN)

  8. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  9. [Microflora in patients with systemic connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Romanov, V A; Shilkina, N P; Gul'neva, M Iu; Ivanov, D V

    2008-01-01

    The study of microflora of skin, mucous tunic of nose and mouth, and the quantitative and qualitative structure of the intestinal and urinal microflora in cases of systemic connective tissues diseases, are reproduced. The decrease of the dominant state of typical representatives, and the increase of the role of pseudopathogenic bacteria in various biotypes, were observed. The frequency of S. aureus detection increased in skin, mucous tunic of nose and mouth. Pseudopathogenic microbes acquired greater significance in the forming of microbiocenosis of intestine, while the number of E. coli, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacterium decreased. The frequency of detection of microbes in urine decreased. The comparative analyses of the microflora in patients with systemic lupus erythromatosis and progressive systemic sclerosis demonstrated the common peculiarities for microflora character change. PMID:18488449

  10. [Research advances in aerobic denitrifiers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhong, Wen-hui; Wang, Guo-xiang

    2007-11-01

    This paper reviewed the varieties and characteristics of aerobic denitrifiers, their action mechanisms, and the factors affecting aerobic denitrification. Aerobic denitrifiers mainly include Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Paracoccus and Bacillus, which are either aerobic or facultative aerobic, and heterotrophic. They can denitrify under aerobic conditions, with the main product being N2O. They can also convert NH4+ -N to gas product. The nitrate reductase which catalyzes the denitrification is periplasmic nitrate reductase rather than membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Dissolved oxygen concentration and C/N ratio are the main factors affecting aerobic denitrification. The main methods for screening aerobic denitrifiers, such as intermittent aeration and selected culture, were also introduced. The research advances in the application of aerobic denitrifiers in aquaculture, waste water processing, and bio-degradation of organic pollutants, as well as the contributions of aerobic denitrifiers to soil nitrogen emission were summarized. PMID:18260473

  11. A Case of Persistent and Possibly Treatment Resistant Pharyngeal Gonorrhea.

    PubMed

    Levy, Vivian; Pandori, Mark; Berrada, Zenda L; Relucio, Karen I; Lopez, Teresa P; Samuel, Michael C; Park, Ina U

    2016-04-01

    An HIV-negative man with pharyngeal gonorrhea had a positive test-of-cure (nucleic acid amplification test) result 7 days after treatment with ceftriaxone/azithromycin. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Multi-Antigen Sequencing Type 1407 and mosaic pen A (XXXIV) gene were identified in the test-of-cure specimen, and culture was negative. Retreatment with ceftriaxone 500 mg intramuscularly plus azithromycin 2 g orally yielded a negative test-of-cure result. PMID:26967304

  12. Five-Day Cefdinir Treatment for Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Tack, Kenneth J.; Henry, Daniel C.; Gooch, W. Manford; Brink, Douglas N.; Keyserling, Constance H.; Group, The Cefdinir Pharyngitis Study

    1998-01-01

    A multicenter, randomized, controlled, investigator-blind study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of oral cefdinir versus oral penicillin V for the treatment of pharyngitis due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS). Patients 13 years of age and older were randomized to receive either oral cefdinir (300 mg twice a day) for 5 days followed by placebo for 5 days or oral penicillin V (250 mg four times a day) for 10 days. Throat cultures were obtained, and signs and symptoms of pharyngitis were recorded at study admission and follow-up visits on study days 11 to 15, 16 to 20, and 25 to 31. Patients kept a diary to record medication intake and their assessment of throat pain at admission and at each day of study treatment. Five hundred fifty-eight patients were enrolled, of whom 432 (77.4%) were clinically and microbiologically evaluable. The GABHS eradication rates 5 to 10 days after completion of therapy were 193 of 218 (88.5%) in the cefdinir group and 176 of 214 (82.2%) in the penicillin group (P = 0.053). Clinical cure rates were 89.0 and 84.6%, respectively (P = 0.80). By the time of the long-term follow-up visit, 2 to 3 weeks after completion of treatment, 156 of 191 (81.7%) of the assessable cefdinir patients and 152 of 195 (77.9%) of the penicillin patients remained free of GABHS. Both treatments were well tolerated, with adverse reaction rates of 18.3% in the cefdinir study arm and 15.0% in the penicillin study arm (P = 0.278). Five-day treatment with cefdinir is safe and effective therapy for GABHS pharyngitis. Based on its twice-a-day dosage and shorter course of therapy, leading to potentially greater patient compliance, cefdinir may be considered for use in the treatment of pharyngitis caused by GABHS. PMID:9593129

  13. Pharyngeal swallowing disorders: selection for and outcome after myotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, R J; Bremner, C G; DeMeester, T R; Crookes, P F; Peters, J H; Hagen, J A; DeMeester, S R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop selection criteria based on the mechanical properties of pharyngoesophageal swallowing that indicate when patients with pharyngeal dysphagia will benefit from a myotomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The pathophysiology of pharyngoesophageal swallowing disorders is complex. The disorder is of interest to several medical specialists (gastroenterologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general and thoracic surgeons), which contributes to confusion about the entity. The management is compounded because it is most frequently seen in the elderly, is often associated with generalized neuromuscular disease, and occurs with a high prevalence of concomitant disease. The selection of patients for myotomy is difficult and of major importance to the quality of life of the affected patients. METHOD: One hundred seven patients without a Zenker diverticulum but with pharyngeal dysphagia underwent a detailed manometric assessment of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Cricopharyngeal opening was identified by the presence of a subatmospheric pressure drop before bolus arrival. Impaired pharyngoesophageal segment compliance resulting in a resistance to pharyngoesophageal flow was determined by measuring the intrabolus pressure generated by a 5-ml liquid bolus. RESULTS: Thirty-one of 107 patients underwent a myotomy (29%). Both impaired sphincter opening and increased intrabolus pressure predicted a good outcome. CONCLUSION: Myotomy is beneficial in patients with pharyngeal swallowing disorders and manometric evidence of defective sphincter opening and increased intrabolus pressure. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9790349

  14. The treatment of nonstreptococcal pharyngitis with erythromycin: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Marlow, R A; Torrez, A J; Haxby, D

    1989-01-01

    This preliminary study evaluated the effectiveness of enteric-coated erythromycin in the treatment of adults with nonstreptococcal pharyngitis. Twenty-six patients, aged 12 or older, with nonstreptococcal pharyngitis were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive either enteric-coated erythromycin or placebo for 10 days. Each day the patients rated the soreness of their throats and how sick they felt. The use of erythromycin appeared to decrease the median number of days for the feeling of sickness to improve (two days versus four days, P less than .01) as well as to decrease the median number of days for the feeling of sickness to resolve (three-and-a-half days versus five days, P less than .05). This apparent improvement in sickness occurred even though there was no significant decrease in the soreness of the throat in patients treated with erythromycin compared to those patients treated with placebo. Treatment with enteric-coated erythromycin appeared to shorten the time until improvement in this group of adults with nonstreptococcal pharyngitis. PMID:2612797

  15. Pulmonary Renal Syndrome After Streptococcal Pharyngitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mara-Koosham, Gopi; Stoltze, Karl; Aday, Jeffrey; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary renal syndrome is a class of small vessel vasculitides that are characterized by the dual presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and glomerulonephritis. Pulmonary renal syndrome has multiple etiologies, but its development has been rarely reported following infection with group A streptococcus. We present the case of a 36-year-old Native American male who was transferred to our facility due to refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis 2 weeks prior to admission. Given the presence of hemoptysis, bronchoscopy was performed and was consistent with DAH. Urinalysis demonstrated hematuria and proteinuria, in the setting of elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Additionally, antistreptolysin O titer was positive. Given the constellation of laboratory findings and history of streptococcal pharyngitis, the patient was diagnosed with PRS secondary to streptococcal infection. High-dose methylprednisolone was initiated with concomitant plasmapheresis. He was extubated successfully after his respiratory status improved and was eventually discharged home after making a full recovery within 2 weeks after admission. This case illustrates the importance of clinically relevant sequelae of streptococcal infection as well as the appropriate treatment of PRS secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis with plasmapheresis and intravenous corticosteroids. PMID:27231692

  16. Dynamics of development of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria during aeration of an oil-bearing stratum to enhance oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, S.S.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution and activity of microorganisms in ground formations has been studied in order to assess their use and regulation during oil field exploitation. Experiments were performed on water-flooded oil fields of the Tatar ASSR and revealed some regularity in the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic microflora. Wells were opened after 3, 28 and 68 days after flooding with aerated water supplemented with nitrogen and phosphate salts. Activation of aerobes results in oxidation of residual oil (not released over 3 years of exploitation). The products (CO/sub 2/ fatty acids) of oxidation promote oil recovery. In the longer experiments anaerobic processes, especially methanogenesis from CO/sub 2/ were enhanced.

  17. Examination of the Aerobic Microflora of swine feces and stored swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial compounds are commonly used as feed additives for domestic animals to reduce infection and promote growth, but concerns have arisen that such feeding practices may result in increased microbial resistance to antibiotics used in human health. Our previous studies of the commensal anaer...

  18. Outcome after pharyngeal reconstruction using pectoralis major and radial forearm flap after resection of pharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Andreas; Mansour, Naglaa; Hofauer, Benedikt; Bier, Henning; Scherer, Elias Q

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the outcome after pharyngeal reconstruction using pectoralis major and radial forearm flaps in pharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas. 90 patients who underwent flap surgery due to oro/-hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas were compared with 404 patients without pharyngeal reconstruction. Differences between the groups were analyzed using the Chi-square, Fisher exact, and the unpaired student's t test. Survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier. Overall survival in oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer showed comparable results in patients with or without pharyngeal reconstruction (5-year: 53.4 vs. 64.2 %, p = 0.23; 5-year: 51.8 vs. 62.4 %, p = 0.94), while the survival time after flap surgery was significantly decreased (5-year: 44.8 vs. 62.4 %, p < 0.02; 5-year: 30.3 vs. 64.2 %, p = 0.07). Subgroup analysis attributed the worse survival after flap surgery to patients who underwent flap surgery due to functional deficits or recurrent disease (p = 0.002). In these patients, the median survival after flap surgery was 26 (hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer) or 13 months (oropharyngeal cancer) and associated with a significant increase in severe complications and hospitalization time (p < 0.0001). The hospitalization time correlated with the history of prior radiotherapy and the extent of surgery (r = 0.26; r = 0.3; p < 0.0001). Flap surgery in primary oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer showed an unaltered overall survival when compared with patients without reconstruction. Patients with recurrent disease or functional deficits demonstrated a significant decrease in survival combined with an increase of severe complications. PMID:26345240

  19. Innate immunity and the normal microflora.

    PubMed

    Boman, H G

    2000-02-01

    This paper discusses the following ten subtitles with the contents indicated. 1. To meet a microbe: discusses the four alternatives in host-microbe interactions. 2. Receptors and signal transduction giving gene activation: discusses the lipopolysaccharide receptor and the limitations of cell cultures versus use of live animals. 3. Effector molecules--antimicrobial peptides with and without cysteines. A data base exists with over 500 sequences. This paper gives a general overview of five classes of gene-encoded effector molecules, based on the absence or presence of cysteines. These molecules are peptide antibiotics with wide spectra against different microbes. They are synthesized as propeptides and post-translational modifications are common. 4. Effectors of innate immunity--lethal action without host damage: evaluates current opinions about the mode of action of peptide antibiotics and the fact that these effectors do not create host damage. 5. Genes, introns and movable elements. Two cecropin genes containing movable elements and the human cathelicidin gene for proFALL-39/hCAP18 are discussed. 6. The natural microflora. Hippos or frogs as model systems. This section includes the isolation of bacteria from the normal flora of frogs; Aeromonas hydrophila, the bacterium found on all five frog species studied; arguments and selected examples of frog-microbe interactions in vivo and in vitro; and the use of glucocorticoids as control for nuclear factor-kappa B/I kappa B alpha regulation of effector genes. 7. The use of germ-free mice--hard facts from hard work: summarizes new findings which indicate that germ-free mice are born with a set of antibacterial peptides in their small intestine. The intestine of germ-free mice monoinfected with A. hydrophila have peptide patterns that differ depending on a pretreatment with cortisone. 8. Looking back--an evolutionary perspective on innate immunity: arguments for an early evolutionary need for gene-encoded antibacterial

  20. Enlargement of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad space in pigs increases upper airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Winter, W C; Gampper, T; Gay, S B; Suratt, P M

    1995-09-01

    Because the upper airway is partially enclosed in a rigid boundary, enlargement of soft tissue structures within this boundary could narrow the airway. The purpose of this study was to determine whether enlargement of the soft tissue space in the region of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad would increase pharyngeal resistance and narrow the retropalateal upper airway. In five young male anesthetized pigs, we inserted balloon occlusion catheters in the lateral pharyngeal fat pad under computerized tomographic scan guidance. We measured pharyngeal resistance with a pharyngeal catheter and a tightly fitting face mask before and after inflation of the balloons. We also measured pharyngeal airway cross-sectional area before and after inflation of the balloons. In all pigs, balloon inflation significantly increased pharyngeal resistance and significantly decreased the area of the retropalateal airway. We conclude that enlargement of the soft tissue space in the region of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad increases pharyngeal resistance and narrows the retropalateal airway in anesthetized pigs. PMID:8567510

  1. Aerobic thermophilic treatment of sewage sludge at pilot plant scale. 1. Operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Ponti, C; Sonnleitner, B; Fiechter, A

    1995-01-15

    The aerobic thermophilic treatment process of sewage sludge was studied at different bioreactor scales in a pilot plant installation. Since, for a satisfactory sludge disinfection, the Swiss legislation requires minimal incubation times of all volume elements, the bioreactors were operated in repetitive batch mode (draw and fill). Different retention times and frequencies of the volume changes were applied in order to prove the capability of the particular operation modes in assuring high degradative potential. The main enzymatic activity involved during the aerobic treatment was proteolysis: the RQ values ranged between 0.8 and 0.9 depending on the applied operating conditions. Although not in a linear manner, the efficiency of the microflora decreased as the bioreactor scale increased, when this increase corresponded with a reduction of the specific power input. The sludge oxidation rates can be tuned by some process operating conditions such as the volume change frequency, the changed volume quantities and the retention times. It was possible to improve the microbial degradative efficiency by an increased frequency of the changes, while the mean retention time influenced in particular the ultimate product quality, described as residual organic matter content of the sludge. The microflora present was also satisfactorily active at mean hydraulic retention times of less than 10 h. The organic matter concentration of the inlet sewage sludge plays an important role: it influences the aerobic degradation process positively. PMID:7765808

  2. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  3. Motor unit regulation of mammalian pharyngeal dilator muscle activity.

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, E; Dick, T E

    1989-01-01

    The present study examined the cellular regulation of one of the pharyngeal dilator muscles, the geniohyoid, by assessing its motor unit (MU) behavior in anesthetized cats. During spontaneous breathing, MU that (a) were active during inspiration only (I-MU) and (b) were active during both inspiration and expiration (I/E-MU) were identified. I-MU had a later inspiratory onset time and a shorter duration of inspiratory firing than did I/E-MU (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.0001, respectively). I-MU were usually quiescent whereas I/E-MU were usually active during the last 20% of inspiration. I/E-MU fired more rapidly (P less than 0.00001) and for relatively longer periods of time (P less than 0.00001) during inspiration than during expiration. End-expiratory airway occlusion (preventing lung expansion during inspiration) augmented the inspiratory activity of both I-MU and I/E-MU. Conversely, end-expiratory airway occlusion reduced the absolute and relative firing durations (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.00002, respectively) and the firing frequency (P less than 0.001) of I/E-MU activity during expiration. These results indicate that (a) the complex pattern of pharyngeal dilator muscle activity is due to the integrated activity of a heterogeneous group of MU, (b) changes in the degree to which pharyngeal dilator muscles are active result from combinations of MU recruitment/decruitment and modulations of the frequency and duration of MU firing, and (c) gating of lung-volume afferent information occurs during the respiratory cycle. PMID:2760202

  4. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF PHARYNGEAL NEOPLASIA IN 25 DOGS.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, Gregorio; Zotti, Alessandro; Alberti, Monica; Rossi, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to investigate head tumors in dogs, however little information is available for lesions of the pharyngeal area. The purpose of this multicentric, retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe the CT findings in a sample of dogs with pathologically confirmed pharyngeal neoplasia and determine whether any CT features allowed differentiation of tumor type. Location of lesions, size and shape, margins, relationship with surrounding structures and vessels, attenuation characteristics and enhancement pattern, regional lymph node changes, and presence of metastasis were recorded by three observers (1 DECVDI). The effect of final diagnosis on each CT feature was tested. A total of 25 dogs were included: 15 with carcinomas, five sarcomas, four melanomas, and one lymphoma. The oropharynx and laryngopharynx were more frequently involved. Among tumor groups, lesions were of similar size, irregularly shaped, had ill-defined margins, and had moderate-to-marked heterogeneous contrast enhancement. Lysis of hyoid bones was recorded in two carcinomas and infiltration of the lingual artery occurred in one case. Marked medial retropharyngeal lymphoadenomegaly was recorded in 11 of 14 carcinomas, in all sarcomas and in two of four melanomas. The single lymphoma case showed ill-defined thickening of the oropharyngeal and laryngeal wall with retropharyngeal and mandibular lymphadenomegaly. Lung metastases were found in two of five sarcomas and two of four melanomas. Findings from the current study did not support the hypothesis that CT features could be used to predict pharyngeal tumor type in dogs. However, CT was helpful for determining mass extension, lymph node involvement, and distant metastatic spread. PMID:26173553

  5. Syndromes of the first and second pharyngeal arches: A review.

    PubMed

    Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Ornelas, Camila C; Fanganiello, Roberto D

    2009-08-01

    Our aim in this review is to discuss currently known mechanisms associated with three important syndromes of the first and second pharyngeal arches: Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), Oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome (AOVS) and Auriculo-Condylar syndrome (ACS) or question mark ear syndrome. TCS and ACS are autosomal dominant diseases, with nearly complete penetrance and wide spectrum of clinical variability. The phenotype of the latter has several overlapping features with OAVS, but OAVS may exist in both sporadic and autosomal dominant forms. Mutations in the TCOF1 gene are predicted to cause premature termination codons, leading to haploinsuficiency of the protein treacle and causing TCS. Low amount of treacle leads ultimately to a reduction in the number of cranial neural crest cells migrating to the first and second pharyngeal arches. Other than TCS, the genes associated with ACS and OAVS are still unknown. The first locus for ACS was mapped by our group to 1p21-23 but there is genetic heretogeneity. Genetic heterogeneity is also present in OAVS. Based on the molecular analysis of balanced translocation in an OAVS patient, it has been suggested that abnormal expression of BAPX1 possibly due to epigenetic disregulation might be involved with the etiology of OAVS. Involvement of environmental events has also been linked to the causation of OAVS. Identification of factors leading to these disorders are important for a comprehensive delineation of the molecular pathways underlying the craniofacial development from the first and the second pharyngeal arches, for genetic counseling and to open alternative strategies for patient treatment. PMID:19610085

  6. Design of sensors for microcirculation investigation in pharyngeal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareew, Gleb O.; Mareew, Oleg V.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-08-01

    Sensors designed for research of blood microcirculation in pharyngeal mucosa by a laser Doppler flowmetry, are described and considered in view of anatomic and physiological features of objects of research. Two designs of sensors for laser Doppler flowmetry are described - non-contact and contact. The results of and clinical testing at norm and different pathologies of pharynx of on calibration of sensors, and also their comparative technical characteristics and materials of clinical researches of microcirculation are resulted at norm and at a various pathology.

  7. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  8. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  9. Managing for Improved Aerobic Stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerobic deterioration or spoilage of silage is the result of aerobic microorganisms metabolizing components of the silage using oxygen. In the almost 40 years over which these silage conferences have been held, we have come to recognize the typical pattern of aerobic microbial development by which s...

  10. Dual embryonic origin and patterning of the pharyngeal skeleton in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Piekarski, Nadine; Hanken, James

    2015-01-01

    The impressive morphological diversification of vertebrates was achieved in part by innovation and modification of the pharyngeal skeleton. Extensive fate mapping in amniote models has revealed a primarily cranial neural crest derivation of the pharyngeal skeleton. Although comparable fate maps of amphibians produced over several decades have failed to document a neural crest derivation of ventromedial elements in these vertebrates, a recent report provides evidence of a mesodermal origin of one of these elements, basibranchial 2, in the axolotl. We used a transgenic labeling protocol and grafts of labeled cells between GFP+ and white embryos to derive a fate map that describes contributions of both cranial neural crest and mesoderm to the axolotl pharyngeal skeleton, and we conducted additional experiments that probe the mechanisms that underlie mesodermal patterning. Our fate map confirms a dual embryonic origin of the pharyngeal skeleton in urodeles, including derivation of basibranchial 2 from mesoderm closely associated with the second heart field. Additionally, heterotopic transplantation experiments reveal lineage restriction of mesodermal cells that contribute to pharyngeal cartilage. The mesoderm-derived component of the pharyngeal skeleton appears to be particularly sensitive to retinoic acid (RA): administration of exogenous RA leads to loss of the second basibranchial, but not the first. Neural crest was undoubtedly critical in the evolution of the vertebrate pharyngeal skeleton, but mesoderm may have played a central role in forming ventromedial elements, in particular. When and how many times during vertebrate phylogeny a mesodermal contribution to the pharyngeal skeleton evolved remain to be resolved. PMID:25963195

  11. [Potentialities of autofluorescent spectroscopy in diagnosis of laryngeal and pharyngeal tumors].

    PubMed

    Mareev, O V; Pravdin, A B; Afonina, O I; Filina, E V

    2008-01-01

    Laryngeal and pharyngeal mucosa of 50 patients with malignant (n=56%) and benign (n=44%) laryngeal and pharyngeal tumors was examined with autofluorescent spectroscopy using nitrogen laser LGI-505 (337,1 nm). It was found that autofluorescent spectrum of malignant tumors is significantly less intensive than relevant spectrum of healthy mucosa and benign tumors. PMID:18427510

  12. The role of the endoderm in the development and evolution of the pharyngeal arches

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Anthony; Okabe, Masataka; Quinlan, Robyn

    2005-01-01

    The oro-pharyngeal apparatus has its origin in a series of bulges found on the lateral surface of the embryonic head, the pharyngeal arches. Significantly, the development of these structures is extremely complex, involving interactions between a number of disparate embryonic cell types: ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm and neural crest, each of which generates particular components of the arches, and whose development must be co-ordinated to generate the functional adult oro-pharyngeal apparatus. In the past most studies have emphasized the role played by the neural crest, which generates the skeletal elements of the arches, in directing pharyngeal arch development. However, it is now apparent that the pharyngeal endoderm plays an important role in directing arch development. Here we discuss the role of the pharyngeal endoderm in organizing the development of the pharyngeal arches, and the mechanisms that act to pattern the endoderm itself and those which direct its morphogenesis. Finally, we discuss the importance of modification to the pharyngeal endoderm during vertebrate evolution. In particular, we focus on the emergence of the parathyroid gland, which we have recently shown to be the result of the internalization of the gills. PMID:16313389

  13. Cutting edge: the vaginal microflora and bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, H

    2008-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the vaginal primarily harbours lactobacilli which ideally confer in mutualism with the vaginal epithelium colonisation resistance to other micro-organisms, thereby preventing ascending or systemic infection. Albeit only a few Lactobacillus species constitute the vaginal microflora, huge species- and strain-specific differences occur however, and these differences account for a wide variability in the intrinsic capability of the Lactobacillus microflora to maintain the vaginal ecosystem. Hence, among a substantial proportion of women, the picture of lactobacilli-driven mutualism is actually less ideal than one may assume. As the vagina is incessantly subjected to cyclic changes as well as behavioural exposures that may challenge the perpetuation of the Lactobacillus microflora, the intrinsic stability of the resident microflora is paramount to women's health. Considering the close concordance between the rectal and vaginal lactobacilli, future research may benefit from the study of food, oral, and intestinal microbiology in relation to the vaginal Lactobacillus microbiota. Loss of the hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli accompanied by massive anaerobic overgrowth is observed with bacterial vaginosis. Molecular studies of the bacterial vaginosis microflora have recently revealed a tremendous species variability further documenting the complex polymicrobial nature of this condition. Emerging issues include the predominance of G. vaginalis, a normal microflora constituent possibly eliciting a host of virulence mechanisms at increasing concentrations through quorum sensing, the associated abundance of A. vaginae as a rather specific marker of therapy failure and disease persistence or recurrence, and the discovery of an adherent, metronidazole-resistant biofilm consisting of the latter two species. PMID:18669158

  14. Influence of a single gamma-irradiation on rat microflora.

    PubMed

    Benová, K; Falis, M; Toropila, M; Sehnalková, H; Pastvová, L

    2002-01-01

    Changes in leukocyte counts and in the gut microflora of laboratory rats irradiated with single whole-body dose of gamma rays (5.0 Gy) were determined. The number of leukocytes was lower especially 1 and 2 weeks after irradiation. A significant decrease in lymphocytes was observed 1 week and in monocytes 1 and 2 weeks after irradiation. In parallel with these changes, an increase in common microflora was observed; some microorganisms, which normally are not present in duodenum, liver and mouth cavity, were detected in these organs. PMID:12422530

  15. Hallucigenia's head and the pharyngeal armature of early ecdysozoans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Martin R; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2015-07-01

    The molecularly defined clade Ecdysozoa comprises the panarthropods (Euarthropoda, Onychophora and Tardigrada) and the cycloneuralian worms (Nematoda, Nematomorpha, Priapulida, Loricifera and Kinorhyncha). These disparate phyla are united by their means of moulting, but otherwise share few morphological characters--none of which has a meaningful fossilization potential. As such, the early evolutionary history of the group as a whole is largely uncharted. Here we redescribe the 508-million-year-old stem-group onychophoran Hallucigenia sparsa from the mid-Cambrian Burgess Shale. We document an elongate head with a pair of simple eyes, a terminal buccal chamber containing a radial array of sclerotized elements, and a differentiated foregut that is lined with acicular teeth. The radial elements and pharyngeal teeth resemble the sclerotized circumoral elements and pharyngeal teeth expressed in tardigrades, stem-group euarthropods and cycloneuralian worms. Phylogenetic results indicate that equivalent structures characterized the ancestral panarthropod and, seemingly, the ancestral ecdysozoan, demonstrating the deep homology of panarthropod and cycloneuralian mouthparts, and providing an anatomical synapomorphy for the ecdysozoan supergroup. PMID:26106857

  16. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nora S; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, the most common periodic disorder of childhood, presents with the cardinal symptoms of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis typically before age 5. This review presents the recent literature on PFAPA and summarizes key findings in the pathogenesis, evaluation, and treatment of the disease. Theories surrounding the pathogenesis of PFAPA include a faulty innate immunologic response in conjunction with dysregulated T-cell activation. A potential genetic link is also under consideration. Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene variants have been implicated and appear to modify disease severity. In individuals with the heterozygous variant, PFAPA episodes are milder and shorter in duration. Diagnostic criteria include the traditional clinical signs, in addition to the following biomarkers: elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of elevated procalcitonin, vitamin D, CD64, mean corpuscular volume, and other nonspecific inflammatory mediators in the absence of an infectious explanation for fever. Treatment of PFAPA includes tonsillectomy, a single dose of corticosteroids, and, most recently, interleukin 1 blockers such as anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab. Tonsillectomy remains the only permanent treatment modality. PMID:27343963

  17. Pharyngeal mesoderm regulatory network controls cardiac and head muscle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Itamar; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Avraham, Roi; Rinon, Ariel; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Cross, Joe W.; Leviatan, Noam; Hegesh, Julius; Roy, Achira; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Carvajal, Jaime; Tole, Shubha; Kioussi, Chrissa; Quaggin, Susan; Tzahor, Eldad

    2012-01-01

    The search for developmental mechanisms driving vertebrate organogenesis has paved the way toward a deeper understanding of birth defects. During embryogenesis, parts of the heart and craniofacial muscles arise from pharyngeal mesoderm (PM) progenitors. Here, we reveal a hierarchical regulatory network of a set of transcription factors expressed in the PM that initiates heart and craniofacial organogenesis. Genetic perturbation of this network in mice resulted in heart and craniofacial muscle defects, revealing robust cross-regulation between its members. We identified Lhx2 as a previously undescribed player during cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development. Lhx2 and Tcf21 genetically interact with Tbx1, the major determinant in the etiology of DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Furthermore, knockout of these genes in the mouse recapitulates specific cardiac features of this syndrome. We suggest that PM-derived cardiogenesis and myogenesis are network properties rather than properties specific to individual PM members. These findings shed new light on the developmental underpinnings of congenital defects. PMID:23112163

  18. Effects of Dry Chilling on the Microflora on Beef Carcasses at a Canadian Beef Packing Plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Youssef, M K; Yang, X

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the course of effects on the microflora on beef carcasses of a commercial dry chilling process in which carcasses were dry chilled for 3 days. Groups of 25 carcasses selected at random were sampled when the chilling process commenced and after the carcasses were chilled for 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 67 h for determination of the numbers of aerobes, coliforms, and Escherichia coli. The temperatures of the surfaces and the thickest part of the hip (deep leg) of carcasses, as well as the ambient air conditions, including air temperature, velocity, and relative humidity (RH), were monitored throughout the chilling process. The chiller was operated at 0°C with an off-coil RH of 88%. The air velocity was 1.65 m/s when the chiller was loaded. The initial RH levels of the air in the vicinity of carcasses varied with the locations of carcasses in the chiller and decreased rapidly during the first hour of chilling. The average times for shoulder surfaces, rump surfaces, and the deep leg of carcasses to reach 7°C were 13.6 ± 3.1, 16.0 ± 2.4 and 32.4 ± 3.2 h, respectively. The numbers of aerobes, coliforms, and E. coli on carcasses before chilling were 5.33 ± 0.42, 1.95 ± 0.77, 1.42 ± 0.78 log CFU/4,000 cm(2), respectively. The number of aerobes on carcasses was reduced by 1 log unit each in the first hour of chilling and in the subsequent 23 h of chilling. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the numbers of aerobes recovered from carcasses after 24 and 67 h of chilling. The total numbers (log CFU/100,000 cm(2)) on carcasses before chilling and after the first hour of chilling were 3.86 and 2.24 for coliforms and 3.30 and 2.04 for E. coli. The subsequent 23 h of chilling reduced the numbers of both groups of organisms by a further log unit. No coliforms or E. coli were recovered after 67 h of chilling. The findings show that the chilling regime investigated in this study resulted in significant reductions of all

  19. The vaginal microflora in relation to gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gingivitis has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcome (APO). Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been associated with APO. We assessed if bacterial counts in BV is associated with gingivitis suggesting a systemic infectious susceptibilty. Methods Vaginal samples were collected from 180 women (mean age 29.4 years, SD ± 6.8, range: 18 to 46), and at least six months after delivery, and assessed by semi-quantitative DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization assay (74 bacterial species). BV was defined by Gram stain (Nugent criteria). Gingivitis was defined as bleeding on probing at ≥ 20% of tooth sites. Results A Nugent score of 0–3 (normal vaginal microflora) was found in 83 women (46.1%), and a score of > 7 (BV) in 49 women (27.2%). Gingivitis was diagnosed in 114 women (63.3%). Women with a diagnosis of BV were more likely to have gingivitis (p = 0.01). Independent of gingival conditions, vaginal bacterial counts were higher (p < 0.001) for 38/74 species in BV+ in comparison to BV- women. Counts of four lactobacilli species were higher in BV- women (p < 0.001). Independent of BV diagnosis, women with gingivitis had higher counts of Prevotella bivia (p < 0.001), and Prevotella disiens (p < 0.001). P. bivia, P. disiens, M. curtisii and M. mulieris (all at the p < 0.01 level) were found at higher levels in the BV+/G+ group than in the BV+/G- group. The sum of bacterial load (74 species) was higher in the BV+/G+ group than in the BV+/G- group (p < 0.05). The highest odds ratio for the presence of bacteria in vaginal samples (> 1.0 × 104 cells) and a diagnosis of gingivitis was 3.9 for P. bivia (95% CI 1.5–5.7, p < 0.001) and 3.6 for P. disiens (95%CI: 1.8–7.5, p < 0.001), and a diagnosis of BV for P. bivia (odds ratio: 5.3, 95%CI: 2.6 to 10.4, p < 0.001) and P. disiens (odds ratio: 4.4, 95% CI: 2.2 to 8.8, p < 0.001). Conclusion Higher vaginal bacterial counts can be found in women with BV and gingivitis in comparison to women with BV but not gingivitis. P

  20. [The bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and factors determining its spectrum in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Guira, O; Tiéno, H; Traoré, S; Diallo, I; Ouangré, E; Sagna, Y; Zabsonré, J; Yanogo, D; Traoré, S S; Drabo, Y J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and to identify the factors which determine the bacterial spectrum in order to increase empiric antibiotic prescription in Ouagadougou. The study was a cross-sectional one, carried from July 1st, 2011 to June 30, 2012 in the departments of internal medicine and general and digestive surgery in Yalgado Ouédraogo teaching hospital. Samples for bacteriological tests consisted of aspiration of pus through the healthy skin, curettage and swab of the base of the ulceration or tissue biopsy from foot lesions. The bacteria's sensitivity to antibiotics has been tested by the qualitative method (Kirby-Bauer). The frequency of diabetic foot infection was 14.45% and the monthly incidence 5.33. The mean age of patients was 56 years and the sex ratio 1.37. Foot ulcerations were chronic in 33 (51.56%), necrotic in 51 (79.69%) and associated with osteitis in 40 (62.5%) patients. Infection was grade 3 in 70.3% cases. Thirty-nine patients had received antibiotics before hospital admission. Among the 71 samples, 62 (87.32%) cultures were positive: 53 (85.48%) monomicrobial and 9 (14.52%) bimicrobial. Aerobic Gram-positive cocci (76%) were the most frequent from ulcerations: Staphylococcus aureus (32.39%), Streptococcus sp (18.30%). Negative coagulase staphylococci have been found in 23.94% cases. Aerobic gram-negative bacilli have been isolated from 24% ulcerations. No factor was associated with the type of bacteria. Gram-positive pathogen cocci showed a high sensitivity to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and oxacillin. No methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or extended-spectrum beta lactamase Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) have been isolated. A better design is necessary to a clarification of bacterial flora in diabetic foot infections. Prevention of bacterial resistance is also needed. PMID:26187771

  1. Systemic response to host microflora in gnotobiotic pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of the development and maintenance of a healthy gut microflora from birth throughout life has become a major focus. To this end, our laboratory has developed a porcine-derived mixed bacterial culture (CF) isolated from the ceca of a healthy, pathogen-free pigs. The CF culture has be...

  2. Reiterative expression of pax1 directs pharyngeal pouch segmentation in medaka.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Inohaya, Keiji; Mise, Takeshi; Kudo, Akira; Takada, Shinji; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-05-15

    A striking characteristic of vertebrate development is the pharyngeal arches, which are a series of bulges on the lateral surface of the head of vertebrate embryos. Although each pharyngeal arch is segmented by the reiterative formation of endodermal outpocketings called pharyngeal pouches, the molecular network underlying the reiterative pattern remains unclear. Here, we show that pax1 plays crucial roles in pouch segmentation in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos. Importantly, pax1 expression in the endoderm prefigures the location of the next pouch before the cells bud from the epithelium. TALEN-generated pax1 mutants did not form pharyngeal pouches posterior to the second arch. Segmental expression of tbx1 and fgf3, which play essential roles in pouch development, was almost non-existent in the pharyngeal endoderm of pax1 mutants, with disturbance of the reiterative pattern of pax1 expression. These results suggest that pax1 plays a key role in generating the primary pattern for segmentation in the pharyngeal endoderm by regulating tbx1 and fgf3 expression. Our findings illustrate the crucial roles of pax1 in vertebrate pharyngeal segmentation and provide insights into the evolutionary origin of the deuterostome gill slit. PMID:27034424

  3. A Pair of Pharyngeal Gustatory Receptor Neurons Regulates Caffeine-Dependent Ingestion in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaekyun; van Giesen, Lena; Choi, Min Sung; Kang, KyeongJin; Sprecher, Simon G; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The sense of taste is an essential chemosensory modality that enables animals to identify appropriate food sources and control feeding behavior. In particular, the recognition of bitter taste prevents animals from feeding on harmful substances. Feeding is a complex behavior comprised of multiple steps, and food quality is continuously assessed. We here examined the role of pharyngeal gustatory organs in ingestion behavior. As a first step, we constructed a gustatory receptor-to-neuron map of the larval pharyngeal sense organs, and examined corresponding gustatory receptor neuron (GRN) projections in the larval brain. Out of 22 candidate bitter compounds, we found 14 bitter compounds that elicit inhibition of ingestion in a dose-dependent manner. We provide evidence that certain pharyngeal GRNs are necessary and sufficient for the ingestion response of larvae to caffeine. Additionally, we show that a specific pair of pharyngeal GRNs, DP1, responds to caffeine by calcium imaging. In this study we show that a specific pair of GRNs in the pharyngeal sense organs coordinates caffeine sensing with regulation of behavioral responses such as ingestion. Our results indicate that in Drosophila larvae, the pharyngeal GRNs have a major role in sensing food palatability to regulate ingestion behavior. The pharyngeal sense organs are prime candidates to influence ingestion due to their position in the pharynx, and they may act as first level sensors of ingested food. PMID:27486388

  4. Ageing and muscular dystrophy differentially affect murine pharyngeal muscles in a region-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E; Luo, Qingwei; Ho, Justin; Vest, Katherine E; Sokoloff, Alan J; Pavlath, Grace K

    2014-01-01

    The inability to swallow, or dysphagia, is a debilitating and life-threatening condition that arises with ageing or disease. Dysphagia results from neurological or muscular impairment of one or more pharyngeal muscles, which function together to ensure proper swallowing and prevent the aspiration of food or liquid into the lungs. Little is known about the effects of age or disease on pharyngeal muscles as a group. Here we show ageing affected pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy in wild-type mice depending on the particular muscle analysed. Furthermore, wild-type mice also developed dysphagia with ageing. Additionally, we studied pharyngeal muscles in a mouse model for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, a dysphagic disease caused by a polyalanine expansion in the RNA binding protein, PABPN1. We examined pharyngeal muscles of mice overexpressing either wild-type A10 or mutant A17 PABPN1. Overexpression of mutant A17 PABPN1 differentially affected growth of the palatopharyngeus muscle dependent on its location within the pharynx. Interestingly, overexpression of wild-type A10 PABPN1 was protective against age-related muscle atrophy in the laryngopharynx and prevented the development of age-related dysphagia. These results demonstrate that pharyngeal muscles are differentially affected by both ageing and muscular dystrophy in a region-dependent manner. These studies lay important groundwork for understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy, which may lead to novel therapies for individuals with dysphagia. PMID:25326455

  5. A Pair of Pharyngeal Gustatory Receptor Neurons Regulates Caffeine-Dependent Ingestion in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaekyun; van Giesen, Lena; Choi, Min Sung; Kang, KyeongJin; Sprecher, Simon G.; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The sense of taste is an essential chemosensory modality that enables animals to identify appropriate food sources and control feeding behavior. In particular, the recognition of bitter taste prevents animals from feeding on harmful substances. Feeding is a complex behavior comprised of multiple steps, and food quality is continuously assessed. We here examined the role of pharyngeal gustatory organs in ingestion behavior. As a first step, we constructed a gustatory receptor-to-neuron map of the larval pharyngeal sense organs, and examined corresponding gustatory receptor neuron (GRN) projections in the larval brain. Out of 22 candidate bitter compounds, we found 14 bitter compounds that elicit inhibition of ingestion in a dose-dependent manner. We provide evidence that certain pharyngeal GRNs are necessary and sufficient for the ingestion response of larvae to caffeine. Additionally, we show that a specific pair of pharyngeal GRNs, DP1, responds to caffeine by calcium imaging. In this study we show that a specific pair of GRNs in the pharyngeal sense organs coordinates caffeine sensing with regulation of behavioral responses such as ingestion. Our results indicate that in Drosophila larvae, the pharyngeal GRNs have a major role in sensing food palatability to regulate ingestion behavior. The pharyngeal sense organs are prime candidates to influence ingestion due to their position in the pharynx, and they may act as first level sensors of ingested food. PMID:27486388

  6. Correlation between nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometry in the diagnosis of hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Ritzel, Rodrigo Agne; Berwig, Luana Cristina; da Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues; Serpa, Eliane Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil is one of the main causes of mouth breathing, and accurate diagnosis of this alteration is important for proper therapeutic planning. Therefore, studies have been conducted in order to provide information regarding the procedures that can be used for the diagnosis of pharyngeal obstruction. Objective: To verify the correlation between nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometric examinations in the diagnosis of pharyngeal tonsil hyperplasia. Method: This was a cross-sectional, clinical, experimental, and quantitative study. Fifty-five children took part in this study, 30 girls and 25 boys, aged between 7 and 11 years. The children underwent nasofibropharyngoscopic and cephalometric evaluation to determine the grade of nasopharyngeal obstruction. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient at the 5% significance level was used to verify the correlation between these exams. Results: In the nasopharyngoscopy evaluation, most children showed grade 2 and 3 hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil, which was followed by grade 1. In the cephalometry assessment, most children showed grade 1 hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil, which was followed by grade 2. A statistically significant regular positive correlation was observed between the exams. Conclusion: It was concluded that the evaluation of the pharyngeal tonsil hyperplasia could be carried out by fiber optic nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometry, as these examinations were regularly correlated. However, it was found that cephalometry tended to underestimate the size of the pharyngeal tonsil relative to nasopharyngoscopy. PMID:25991937

  7. The innervation of the zebrafish pharyngeal jaws and teeth.

    PubMed

    Crucke, Jeroen; Van de Kelft, Annelore; Huysseune, Ann

    2015-07-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) teeth are increasingly used as a model to study odontogenesis in non-mammalians. Using serial semi-thin section histology and immunohistochemistry, the nerves innervating the pharyngeal jaws and teeth have been identified. The last pair of branchial arches, which are non-gill bearing but which carry the teeth, are innervated by an internal branch of a post-trematic ramus of the vagal nerve. Another, external, branch is probably responsible for the motor innervation of the branchiomeric musculature. Nerve fibres appear in the pulp cavity of the teeth only late during cytodifferentiation, and are therefore likely not involved in early steps of tooth formation. The precise role of the nervous system during continuous tooth replacement remains to be determined. Nonetheless, this study provides the necessary morphological background information to address this question. PMID:26018453

  8. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the pharyngeal region using anchored hemoclip with surgical thread: A novel method

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hitomi; Tabuchi, Maiko; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of the pharyngeal region has not been well accepted, although ESD of the gastrointestinal tract is a standard procedure for treating early cancers. However, early detection and treatment of pharyngeal cancers is highly beneficial because surgical resection can be highly invasive and cause serious cosmetic deformities, swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, and speech defects. On the other hand, application of an anchored clip with surgical thread during ESD of the gastrointestinal tract has been reported to be beneficial. This pilot case series reveals the usefulness and clinical feasibility of applying a clip with thread in ESD of the pharyngeal region. PMID:27540568

  9. Evaluation of the 3M™ Petrifilm™ Rapid Aerobic Count Plate for the Enumeration of Aerobic Bacteria: Collaborative Study, First Action 2015.13.

    PubMed

    Bird, Patrick; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Jechorek, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The 3M™ Petrifilm™ Rapid Aerobic Count (RAC) Plate is a sample-ready culture medium system containing dual-sensor indicator technology for the rapid quantification of aerobic bacteria in food products. The 3M Petrifilm RAC Plate was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA BAM) Chapter 3 (Aerobic Plate Count) for the enumeration of aerobic bacteria in raw easy-peel shrimp and the Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products (SMEDP) Chapter 6 (Standard Plate Count Method) for the enumeration of aerobic bacteria in pasteurized skim milk and instant nonfat dry milk (instant NFDM). The 3M Petrifilm RAC Plate was evaluated using a paired study design in a multilaboratory collaborative study following current AOAC validation guidelines. Three target contamination levels (low, 10-100 CFU/g; medium, 100-1000 CFU/g; and high 1000-10 000 CFU/g) were evaluated for naturally occurring aerobic microflora for each matrix. For raw easy-peel shrimp, duplicate 3M Petrifilm RAC Plates were enumerated after 24 ± 2 h incubation at both 32 and 35°C. Pasteurized skim milk 3M Petrifilm RAC Plates were enumerated after 24 ± 2 h incubation at 32°C, and instant NFDM 3M Petrifilm RAC Plates were enumerated after 48 ± 3 h incubation at 32°C. No statistical difference was observed between 3M Petrifilm RAC Plate and FDA BAM or SMEDP reference methods for each contamination level. PMID:27297837

  10. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  11. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  12. Fatal verminous pharyngitis and esophagitis caused by Streptocara incognita in mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    PubMed

    Alić, A; Prasović, S; Hodzić, A; Besirović, H; Residbegović, Emina; Omeragić, J

    2013-03-01

    Streptocara spp. infections are reported to cause gastritis, proventriculitis, esophagitis, and pharyngitis in various waterfowls, especially diving ducks. In the present paper, we describe severe fatal diphtheritic pharyngitis and esophagitis caused by Streptocara incognita in three female mute swans (Cygnus olor) in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Prior to death, the swans were showing signs of lethargy, anorexia, and reluctance to move. At necropsy, in all swans severe diphtheritic pharyngitis and esophagitis with deep, dark red hemorrhagic ulcerations were observed. Numerous thin, white, up to 1-cm-long nematodes, identified as S. incognita, were observed embedded in the pharyngeal and esophageal mucosa under the diphtheritic membranes. Histopathology revealed severe fibrinonecrotic inflammation with numerous cross-sections of the parasites. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of severe, fatal streptocariasis in mute swans. PMID:23678745

  13. Pharyngeal teeth of the freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) a predator of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P., III

    1997-01-01

    The morphology of pharyngeal teeth of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) was studied to determine changes that occur during growth of drum that may relate to consumption of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) by larger fish. Pharyngeal teeth were of three types. Cardiform teeth were replaced by villiform teeth, which were replaced by molariform teeth as the size class of drum increased. Molariform teeth comprised over 85% of total surface area of dentition in fish 265 mm long.

  14. Pharyngeal Residue Severity Rating Scales Based on Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Paul D; Hersey, Denise P; Leder, Steven B

    2016-06-01

    Identification of pharyngeal residue severity located in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses has always been a primary goal during fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Pharyngeal residue is a clinical sign of potential prandial aspiration making an accurate description of its severity an important but difficult challenge. A reliable, validated, and generalizable pharyngeal residue severity rating scale for FEES would be beneficial. A systematic review of the published English language literature since 1995 was conducted to determine the quality of existing pharyngeal residue severity rating scales based on FEES. Databases were searched using controlled vocabulary words and synonymous free text words for topics of interest (deglutition disorders, pharyngeal residue, endoscopy, videofluoroscopy, fiberoptic technology, aspiration, etc.) and outcomes of interest (scores, scales, grades, tests, FEES, etc.). Search strategies were adjusted for syntax appropriate for each database/platform. Data sources included MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946-April Week 3 2015), Embase (OvidSP 1974-2015 April 20), Scopus (Elsevier), and the unindexed material in PubMed (NLM/NIH) were searched for relevant articles. Supplementary efforts to identify studies included checking reference lists of articles retrieved. Scales were compared using qualitative properties (sample size, severity definitions, number of raters, and raters' experience and training) and psychometric analyses (randomization, intra- and inter-rater reliability, and construct validity). Seven articles describing pharyngeal residue severity rating scales met inclusion criteria. Six of seven scales had insufficient data to support their use as evidenced by methodological weaknesses with both qualitative properties and psychometric analyses. There is a need for qualitative and psychometrically reliable, validated, and generalizable pharyngeal residue severity rating scales that are anatomically specific, image

  15. Four-bar linkage modelling in teleost pharyngeal jaws: computer simulations of bite kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Grubich, Justin R; Westneat, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    The pharyngeal arches of the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) possess large toothplates and a complex musculoskeletal design for biting and crushing hard prey. The morphology of the pharyngeal apparatus is described from dissections of six specimens, with a focus on the geometric conformation of contractile and rotational elements. Four major muscles operate the rotational 4th epibranchial (EB4) and 3rd pharyngobranchial (PB3) elements to create pharyngeal bite force, including the levator posterior (LP), levator externus 3/4 (LE), obliquus posterior (OP) and 3rd obliquus dorsalis (OD). A biomechanical model of upper pharyngeal jaw biting is developed using lever mechanics and four-bar linkage theory from mechanical engineering. A pharyngeal four-bar linkage is proposed that involves the posterior skull as the fixed link, the LP muscle as input link, the epibranchial bone as coupler link and the toothed pharyngobranchial as output link. We used a computer model to simulate contraction of the four major muscles, with the LP as the dominant muscle, the length of which determined the position of the linkage. When modelling lever mechanics, we found that the effective mechanical advantages of the pharyngeal elements were low, resulting in little resultant bite force. By contrast, the force advantage of the four-bar linkage was relatively high, transmitting approximately 50% of the total muscle force to the bite between the toothplates. Pharyngeal linkage modelling enables quantitative functional morphometry of a key component of the fish feeding system, and the model is now available for ontogenetic and comparative analyses of fishes with pharyngeal linkage mechanisms. PMID:16822272

  16. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information on aerobic exercise (specifically running) and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtained by participating in fitness programs. Recommends collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers and gives a preliminary discussion of aerobic running and its…

  17. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1992-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information regarding aerobic exercise (specifically running), and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtain by participating in fitness programs. Presents methods of collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers. Offers preliminary discussion of aerobic running…

  18. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  19. Role of Intestinal Microflora in the Metabolism of Guanidinosuccinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Milstien, Sheldon; Goldman, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Among a variety of bacteria isolated from the gastrointestinal tracts of rats and humans, only streptococci of group N are capable of degrading guanidinosuccinic acid added to their culture medium. The urinary excretion of guanidinosuccinic acid by germfree rats is greater than that of conventional rats. The excretion of this compound by gnotobiotic rats correlates with the capacity of their intestinal microflora to degrade guanidinosuccinic acid in culture. Thus, guanidinosuccinic acid excretion is low in rats infected exclusively with Streptococcus faecalis, and the excretion is not altered when germfree rats are infected with an organism unable to degrade guanidinosuccinic acid (Lactobacillus). These findings suggest that the intestinal microflora, particularly Streptococcus, play a role in the metabolism of guanidinosuccinic acid by the host. PMID:4196249

  20. Activity of Microorganisms in Acid Mine Water I. Influence of Acid Water on Aerobic Heterotrophs of a Normal Stream

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Jon H.; Randles, C. I.; Dugan, P. R.

    1968-01-01

    Comparison of microbial content of acid-contaminated and nonacid-contaminated streams from the same geographical area indicated that nonacid streams contained relatively low numbers of acid-tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms. The acid-tolerant aerobes survived when acid entered the stream and actually increased in number to about 2 × 103 per ml until the pH approached 3.0. The organisms then represented the heterotrophic aerobic microflora of the streams comprised of a mixture of mine drainage and nonacid water. A stream which was entirely acid drainage did not have a similar microflora. Most gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria died out very rapidly in acidic water, and they comprised a very small percentage of the microbial population of the streams examined. Iron- and sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria were present wherever mine water entered a stream system. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria predominated over iron oxidizers. Ecological data from the field were verified by laboratory experiments designed to simulate stream conditions. PMID:5650063

  1. Effects of meteorologic factors and schooling on the seasonality of group A streptococcal pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Hervás, Daniel; Hervás-Masip, Juan; Ferrés, Laia; Ramírez, Antonio; Pérez, José L; Hervás, Juan A

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children attended at a hospital emergency department in the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic factors and schooling. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of children aged 1-15 years with a diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis between January 2006 and December 2011. The number of S. pyogenes pharyngitis was correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, solar radiation, and schooling, using regression and time series techniques. A total of 906 patients (median, 4 years old) with S. pyogenes pharyngitis, confirmed by throat culture, were attended during the study period. A seasonal pattern was observed with a peak activity in June and a minimum in September. Mean temperature, solar radiation, and school holidays were the best predicting variables (R(2) = 0.68; p < 0.001). S. pyogenes activity increased with the decrease of mean temperature (z = -2.4; p < 0.05), the increase of solar radiation (z = 4.2; p < 0.001), and/or the decrease in school holidays (z = -2.4; p < 0.05). In conclusion, S. pyogenes pharyngitis had a clear seasonality predominating in springtime, and an association with mean temperature, solar radiation, and schooling was observed. The resulting model predicted 68 % of S. pyogenes pharyngitis. PMID:26446674

  2. Effects of meteorologic factors and schooling on the seasonality of group A streptococcal pharyngitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervás, Daniel; Hervás-Masip, Juan; Ferrés, Laia; Ramírez, Antonio; Pérez, José L.; Hervás, Juan A.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children attended at a hospital emergency department in the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic factors and schooling. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of children aged 1-15 years with a diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis between January 2006 and December 2011. The number of S. pyogenes pharyngitis was correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, solar radiation, and schooling, using regression and time series techniques. A total of 906 patients (median, 4 years old) with S. pyogenes pharyngitis, confirmed by throat culture, were attended during the study period. A seasonal pattern was observed with a peak activity in June and a minimum in September. Mean temperature, solar radiation, and school holidays were the best predicting variables ( R 2 = 0.68; p < 0.001 ). S. pyogenes activity increased with the decrease of mean temperature ( z = -2.4; p < 0.05), the increase of solar radiation ( z = 4.2; p < 0.001), and/or the decrease in school holidays ( z = -2.4; p < 0.05). In conclusion, S. pyogenes pharyngitis had a clear seasonality predominating in springtime, and an association with mean temperature, solar radiation, and schooling was observed. The resulting model predicted 68 % of S. pyogenes pharyngitis.

  3. Evaluation of Pharyngeal Space in Different Combinations of Class II Skeletal Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Jay; Shyagali, Tarulatha R.; Bhayya, Deepak P.; Shah, Romil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study was aimed to evaluate the pharyngeal airway linear measurements of untreated skeletal class II subjects with normal facial vertical pattern in prognathic maxilla with orthognathic mandible and orthognathic maxilla with retrognathic mandible. Materials and method: the sample comprised of lateral Cephalograms of two groups (30 each) of class II malocclusion variants. Group 1 comprised of class II malocclusion with prognathic maxilla and orthognathic mandible, whereas group 2 comprised of class II malocclusion with orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible. Each group was traced for the linear measurements of the pharyngeal airway like the oropharynx, nasopharynx and soft palate. The obtained data was subjected to independent t test and the Mann Whitney test to check the difference between the two groups and within the groups respectively. Results: there was significant difference between all the linear measurements at the soft palate region and the distance between the tip of soft palate to its counter point on the pharyngeal wall in oropharynx region (p-ppm). Conclusion: the pharyngeal airway for class II malocclusion with various combination in an average growth pattern adult showed significant difference. The present results suggested, that the pharyngeal airway space might be the etiological factor for different sagittal growth pattern of the jaws and probable usage of different growth modification appliance can influence the pharyngeal airway. PMID:26635436

  4. Upper and lower pharyngeal airway space in West-Tamil Nadu population

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Prabhakaran; Muthukumar, Karthi; Krishnan, Prabhakar; Senthil Kumar, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the upper and lower pharyngeal airway (LPA) width in Class II malocclusion patients with low, average, and high vertical growth patterns. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Materials and Methods: Pretreatment lateral cephalometric films of 90 Class II subjects were used to measure the upper and LPAs. The inclusion criteria were subjects of West-Tamil Nadu, aged between 14 and 25 years, only skeletal Class II subjects of either gender and no pharyngeal pathology at initial visit. The sample comprised a total of 90 Class II subjects divided into three groups according to the vertical facial pattern: Normodivergent (n = 30), hypodivergent (n = 30), and hyperdivergent (n = 30). The assessment of upper and LPAs was done according to McNamara's airway analysis. Statistical Analysis: The intergroup comparison of the upper and LPAs was performed with one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test was used to compare among the various vertical patterns. Results: Skeletal Class II subjects with hyperdivergent facial pattern showed statistically significant narrow upper pharyngeal width when compared to normodivergent and hypodivergent facial patterns. No statistically significant difference was found in the lower pharyngeal width in all three vertical facial growth patterns. Conclusion: Subjects with Class II malocclusions and hyperdivergent growth pattern have significantly narrow upper pharyngeal airway space when compared to other two vertical patterns. Narrow pharyngeal airway space is one of the predisposing factors for mouth breathing and obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:26538913

  5. Dietary Yeasts Reduce Inflammation in Central Nerve System via Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kazushiro; Tomita, Takayuki; Okuno, Tatsusada; Kinoshita, Makoto; Koda, Toru; Honorat, Josephe A; Takei, Masaya; Hagihara, Kouichiro; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Mochizuki, Hideki; Sakoda, Saburo; Nakatsuji, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The intestinal microflora affects the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases by influencing immune system function. Some bacteria, such as lactic acid bacteria, have been reported to have beneficial effects on immune function. However, little is known about the effects of yeasts. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of various dietary yeasts contained in fermented foods on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods The effects of eight yeasts selected from 18 types of yeasts contained in fermented foods were examined using an EAE model. Of these, Candida kefyr was investigated by analyzing the intestinal microflora and its effects on intestinal and systemic immune states. Results Administration of C. kefyr ameliorated the severity of EAE. Reduced numbers of Th17 cells, suppressed interleukin (IL)-6 production by intestinal explants, and increased Tregs and CD103-positive regulatory dendritic cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were observed. Analysis of 16s-rDNA from feces of C. kefyr-treated mice demonstrated increased Lactobacillales and decreased Bacteroides compared to control flora. Transfer of intestinal microbiota also resulted in decreased Bacteroides and ameliorated symptoms of EAE. Thus, oral administration of C. kefyr ameliorated EAE by altering the microflora, accompanied by increased Tregs and CD103-positive regulatory dendritic cells in MLNs and decreased Th17 cells in the intestinal lamina propria. Interpretation Oral ingestion of C. kefyr may have beneficial effects on MS by modifying microflora. In addition, our findings also suggested the potential health benefits of dietary yeasts. PMID:25642435

  6. Microflora in inflammatory bowel diseases: a pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Eugenia; Canani, Roberto Berni; De Marco, Giulio; Guarino, Alfredo

    2004-07-01

    Several lines of evidence link inflammatory bowel diseases to modifications of intestinal microflora. Epidemiologic and clinical data suggest a triggering role for select agents in ulcerative colitis and in Crohn disease. Experimental evidence indicates that intestinal microorganisms are needed for developing intestinal inflammation in IL-10 knockout mice, and this is associated with an increased number of adherent clostridia and a decrease of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. It may be hypothesized that a host-agent-specific relationship leads to an abnormal immune response, which may be genetically driven in select inflammatory bowel diseases. However, different from adults, the pattern of intestinal microflora undergoes profound changes during the early stage of life, contributing to the development of the immune system. A close relationship exists between microbiologic and immunologic imprinting. The microbiologic imprinting in neonates may be modified using bacterial probiotics that colonize the intestine, modify the immune response, and decrease the risk for atopy. Probiotics may decrease the recurrences of inflammatory bowel diseases. Preliminary evidence of intestinal antiinflammatory effects has been detected in children with cystic fibrosis. Overall these data provide the rationale to investigate the interaction between intestinal microflora and the local and general immune response in children with, or at risk for, inflammatory bowel diseases. This approach may be a key for understanding the pathophysiology of intestinal inflammation and may disclose novel strategies to educate better the immune system, particularly during its developmental stage. PMID:15220668

  7. In vitro fermentation by human fecal microflora of wheat arabinoxylans.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S A; Shewry, P R; Li, L; Gibson, G R; Sanz, M L; Rastall, R A

    2007-05-30

    The fermentation of three arabinoxylan (AX) fractions from wheat by the human fecal microflora was investigated in vitro. Three AX fractions, with average molecular masses of 354, 278, and 66 kDa, were incorporated into miniature-scale batch cultures (with inulin as a positive prebiotic control) with feces from three healthy donors, aged 23-29. Microflora changes were monitored by the culture-independent technique, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) and lactic acid production were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Total cell numbers increased significantly in all treated cultures, and the fermentation of AX was associated with a proliferation of the bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, and eubacteria groups. Smaller but statistically significant increases in bacteroides and clostridia groups were also observed. All AX fractions had comparable bifidogenic impacts on the microflora at 5 and 12 h, but the 66 kDa AX was particularly selective for lactobacilli. Eubacteria increased significantly on all AX fractions, particularly on 66 kDa AX. As previously reported, inulin gave a selective increase in bifidobacteria. All supplemented cultures showed significant rises in total SCFA production, with a particularly high proportion of butyric acid being produced from AX fermentation. The prebiotic effect, that is, the selectivity of AX for bifidobacteria and lactobacilli groups, increased as the molecular mass of the AX decreased. This suggests that molecular mass may influence the fermentation of AX in the colon. PMID:17488118

  8. The relationship between nitro group reduction and the intestinal microflora.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, L A; Soderberg, F B; Goldman, P

    1975-07-01

    The capacity of rats to reduce a 25-mg dose of p-nitrobenzoic acid (PNBA) was measured by quantifying the amount of this compound recovered in the urine as p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and its conjugates. It was found that germfree rats converted approximately 1% of PNBA to PABA; in conventional rats the conversion was approximately 25%. Various bacteria isolated from the rat cecum were selectively associated with germfree rats and it was demonstrated that these bacteria colonized their gastrointestinal tracts. In assoication with Lactobacillus plantarum, the conversion of PNBA to PABA increased to 3.9%. When these rats were further associated with Clostridium sp. and Streptoccocus faecalis, the conversion increased to approximately 12%. A general correlation was found between the capacity of constituents of the microflora to reduce PNBA in vitro and when associated with the germfree rat. Cecectomy, which removes a substantial portion of the microflora of the rat, decreases the capacity of the conventional rat to reduce PNBA. Similar experiments with p-nitrobenzenesulfonamide indicate that this compound is also largely reduced by the flora. Evidence that the reduction of the nitro group in these compounds is carried out by the intestinal microflora explains previous observations in which the reduction of these compounds in rats did not correlate with the activity of liver enzymes putative for these reactions. PMID:1097637

  9. Surface Microflora of Four Smear-Ripened Cheeses

    PubMed Central

    Mounier, Jérôme; Gelsomino, Roberto; Goerges, Stefanie; Vancanneyt, Marc; Vandemeulebroecke, Katrien; Hoste, Bart; Scherer, Siegfried; Swings, Jean; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Cogan, Timothy M.

    2005-01-01

    The microbial composition of smear-ripened cheeses is not very clear. A total of 194 bacterial isolates and 187 yeast isolates from the surfaces of four Irish farmhouse smear-ripened cheeses were identified at the midpoint of ripening using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive sequence-based PCR, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing for identifying and typing the bacteria and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (mtDNA RFLP) analysis for identifying and typing the yeast. The yeast microflora was very uniform, and Debaryomyces hansenii was the dominant species in the four cheeses. Yarrowia lipolytica was also isolated in low numbers from one cheese. The bacteria were highly diverse, and 14 different species, Corynebacterium casei, Corynebacterium variabile, Arthrobacter arilaitensis, Arthrobacter sp., Microbacterium gubbeenense, Agrococcus sp. nov., Brevibacterium linens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus equorum, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Micrococcus luteus, Halomonas venusta, Vibrio sp., and Bacillus sp., were identified on the four cheeses. Each cheese had a more or less unique microflora with four to nine species on its surface. However, two bacteria, C. casei and A. arilaitensis, were found on each cheese. Diversity at the strain level was also observed, based on the different PFGE patterns and mtDNA RFLP profiles of the dominant bacterial and yeast species. None of the ripening cultures deliberately inoculated onto the surface were reisolated from the cheeses. This study confirms the importance of the adventitious, resident microflora in the ripening of smear cheeses. PMID:16269673

  10. Impact of salinomycin on the intestinal microflora of broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Charlotte H; Bjerrum, Lotte; Pedersen, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Background The ionophoric coccidiostat salinomycin is widely used in chicken feed. In the near future the use of ionophore coccidiostats may be banned as has been the case for other antimicrobial growth promoters. This study was conducted to examine the effect of salinomycin on Campylobacter jejuni infection and on the composition of the caecal microflora in broiler chickens. Methods An experimental infection study was carried out in isolators and the intestinal microflora was analyzed using quantitative cultivation, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), cloning and sequencing. Results We found no effect of salinomycin on C. jejuni but salinomycin significantly affected the composition of the microflora. In addition, salinomycin significantly reduced the prevalence of Clostridium perfringens and we observed a significant increase (62%) in the mean body weight of salinomycin treated chickens compared to un-treated controls. Conclusion Termination of the use of ionophore coccidiostats will not affect food safety related to campylobacter, but will increase the risk of necrotic enteritis in the broilers. PMID:17963485

  11. Evidence of a true pharyngeal tonsil in birds: a novel lymphoid organ in Dromaius novaehollandiae and Struthio camelus (Palaeognathae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tonsils are secondary lymphoid organs located in the naso- and oropharynx of most mammalian species. Most tonsils are characterised by crypts surrounded by dense lymphoid tissue. However, tonsils without crypts have also been recognised. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), although not well-organised and lacking tonsillar crypts, is abundant in the avian oropharynx and has been referred to as the “pharyngeal tonsil”. In this context the pharyngeal folds present in the oropharynx of ratites have erroneously been named the pharyngeal tonsils. This study distinguishes between the different types and arrangements of lymphoid tissue in the pharyngeal region of D. novaehollandiae and S. camelus and demonstrates that both species possess a true pharyngeal tonsil which fits the classical definition of tonsils in mammals. Results The pharyngeal tonsil (Tonsilla pharyngea) of D. novaehollandiae was located on the dorsal free surface of the pharyngeal folds and covered by a small caudo-lateral extension of the folds whereas in S. camelus the tonsil was similarly located on the dorsal surface of the pharyngeal folds but was positioned retropharyngeally and encapsulated by loose connective tissue. The pharyngeal tonsil in both species was composed of lymph nodules, inter-nodular lymphoid tissue, mucus glands, crypts and intervening connective tissue septa. In S. camelus a shallow tonsillar sinus was present. Aggregated lymph nodules and inter-nodular lymphoid tissue was associated with the mucus glands on the ventral surface of the pharyngeal folds in both species and represented the Lymphonoduli pharyngeales. Similar lymphoid tissue, but more densely packed and situated directly below the epithelium, was present on the dorsal, free surface of the pharyngeal folds and represented a small, non-follicular tonsil. Conclusions The follicular pharyngeal tonsils in D. novaehollandiae and S. camelus are distinct from the pharyngeal folds in these species and

  12. Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wakerley, Benjamin R; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    The pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome is defined by rapidly progressive oropharyngeal and cervicobrachial weakness associated with areflexia in the upper limbs. Serial nerve conduction studies suggest that PCB represents a localised subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome characterised by axonal rather than demyelinating neuropathy. Many neurologists are unfamiliar with PCB, which is often misdiagnosed as brainstem stroke, myasthenia gravis or botulism. The presence of additional ophthalmoplegia and ataxia indicates overlap with Fisher syndrome. Half of patients with PCB carry IgG anti-GT1a antibodies which often cross-react with GQ1b, whereas most patients with Fisher syndrome carry IgG anti-GQ1b antibodies which always cross-react with GT1a. Significant overlap between the clinical and serological profiles of these patients supports the view that PCB and Fisher syndrome form a continuous spectrum. In this review, we highlight the clinical features of PCB and outline new diagnostic criteria. PMID:23804237

  13. Coordination in oro-pharyngeal biomechanics during human swallowing.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Minagi, Yoshitomo; Hori, Kazuhiro; Kondoh, Jugo; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Tamine, Kenichi; Inoue, Makoto; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Chen, Yongjin; Ono, Takahiro

    2015-08-01

    In swallowing, the tongue contacts against the hard palate to generate pressure for propelling a bolus from the oral cavity into the pharynx. Meanwhile, the hyoid and larynx move upward and forward to facilitate the bolus from the pharynx into the esophagus. It has been well known that sequential coordination between those actions is critical for safety accomplishment of swallowing. However, the absence of noninvasive assessment for it limits the detection to the physiological symptom of dysphagia. We applied a sensor sheet on the hard palate to measure tongue contact pressure and a bend sensor on the frontal neck to monitor the laryngeal movement, which was synchronized with hyoid motion for assessing the coordination between both actions in 14 healthy male subjects when swallowing 5ml of water. The sequential order of tongue pressure and hyoid movement was successfully displayed. Tongue pressure was produced after slight movement of the hyoid and closely to the hyoid elevation, then reached a maximum when the hyoid stabilized in the most anterior-superior position, and ceased concurrently with the onset of hyoid descent. Additionally, the synchronized data from both sensors showed positive correlations between identified time points on the laryngeal signal waveform and onset, peak and offset of tongue pressure. Our sensing system successfully showed the coordination between tongue pressure production and hyoid motion, and could be a simple and noninvasive method for clinicians to evaluate the oral and pharyngeal stages of swallowing. PMID:25957912

  14. Effects of laryngeal restriction on pharyngeal peristalsis and biomechanics: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Reza; Sanvanson, Patrick; Balasubramanian, Gokulakrishnan; Kern, Mark; Wuerl, Ashley; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2016-06-01

    To date, rehabilitative exercises aimed at strengthening the pharyngeal muscles have not been developed due to the inability to successfully overload and fatigue these muscles during their contraction, a necessary requirement for strength training. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that applying resistance against anterosuperior movement of the hyolaryngeal complex will overload the pharyngeal muscles and by repetitive swallowing will result in their fatigue manifested by a reduction in pharyngeal peristaltic amplitude. Studies were done in two groups. In group 1 studies 15 healthy subjects (age: 42 ± 14 yr, 11 females) were studied to determine whether imposing resistance to swallowing using a handmade device can affect the swallow-induced hyolaryngeal excursion and related upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. In group 2, an additional 15 healthy subjects (age 56 ± 25 yr, 7 females) were studied to determine whether imposing resistance to the anterosuperior excursion of the hyolaryngeal complex induces fatigue manifested as reduction in pharyngeal contractile pressure during repeated swallowing. Analysis of the video recordings showed significant decrease in maximum deglutitive superior laryngeal excursion and UES opening diameter (P < 0.01) due to resistive load. Consecutive swallows against the resistive load showed significant decrease in pharyngeal contractile integral (PhCI) values (P < 0.01). Correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between PhCI and successive swallows, suggesting "fatigue" (P < 0.001). In conclusion, repeated swallows against a resistive load induced by restricting the anterosuperior excursion of the larynx safely induces fatigue in pharyngeal peristalsis and thus has the potential to strengthen the pharyngeal contractile function. PMID:27079611

  15. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K.; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. Methods— We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. Results— In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. Conclusions— In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. PMID:27165955

  16. Evolutionary Trends of the Pharyngeal Dentition in Cypriniformes (Actinopterygii: Ostariophysi)

    PubMed Central

    Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Charles, Cyril; Chevret, Pascale; Semon, Marie; Tafforeau, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background The fish order Cypriniformes is one of the most diverse ray-finned fish groups in the world with more than 3000 recognized species. Cypriniformes are characterized by a striking distribution of their dentition: namely the absence of oral teeth and presence of pharyngeal teeth on the last gill arch (fifth ceratobranchial). Despite this limited localisation, the diversity of tooth patterns in Cypriniformes is astonishing. Here we provide a further description of this diversity using X-ray microtomography and we map the resulting dental characters on a phylogenetic tree to explore evolutionary trends. Results We performed a pilot survey of dental formulae and individual tooth shapes in 34 adult species of Cypriniformes by X-ray microtomography (using either conventional X-ray machine, or synchrotron microtomography when necessary) or by dissecting. By mapping morphological results in a phylogenetic tree, it emerges that the two super-families Cobitoidea and Cyprinoidea have followed two distinct evolutionary pathways. Furthermore, our analysis supports the hypothesis of a three-row dentition as ancestral for Cyprinoidea and a general trend in tooth row reduction in most derived lineages. Yet, this general scheme must be considered with caution as several events of tooth row gain and loss have occurred during evolutionary history of Cyprinoidea. Significance Dentition diversity in Cypriniformes constitutes an excellent model to study the evolution of complex morphological structures. This morphological survey clearly advocates for extending the use of X-ray microtomography to study tooth morphology in Cypriniformes. Yet, our survey also underlines that improved knowledge of Cypriniformes life traits, such as feeding habits, is required as current knowledge is not sufficient to conclude on the link between diet and dental morphology. PMID:20585584

  17. Modulation of small intestinal homeostasis along with its microflora during acclimatization at simulated hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Adak, Atanu; Ghosh; Mondal, Keshab Chandra

    2014-11-01

    At high altitude (HA) hypobaric hypoxic environment manifested several pathophysiological consequences of which gastrointestinal (GI) disorder are very common phenomena. To explore the most possible clue behind this disorder intestinal flora, the major player of the GI functions, were subjected following simulated hypobaric hypoxic treatment in model animal. For this, male albino rats were exposed to 55 kPa (approximately 4872.9 m) air pressure consecutively for 30 days for 8 h/day and its small intestinal microflora, their secreted digestive enzymes and stress induced marker protein were investigated of the luminal epithelia. It was observed that population density of total aerobes significantly decreased, but the quantity of total anaerobes and Escherichia coli increased significantly after 30 days of hypoxic stress. The population density of strict anaerobes like Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroides sp. and Lactobacillus sp. and obligate anaerobes like Clostridium perfringens and Peptostreptococcus sp. were expanded along with their positive growth direction index (GDI). In relation to the huge multiplication of anaerobes the amount of gas formation as well as content of IgA and IgG increased in duration dependent manner. The activity of some luminal enzymes from microbial origin like a-amylase, gluco-amylase, proteinase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase were also elevated in hypoxic condition. Besides, hypoxia induced in formation of malondialdehyde along with significant attenuation of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activity and lowered GSH/GSSG pool in the intestinal epithelia. Histological study revealed disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier with higher infiltration of lymphocytes in lamina propia and atrophic structure. It can be concluded that hypoxia at HA modified GI microbial imprint and subsequently causes epithelial barrier dysfunction which may relate to the small intestinal dysfunction at HA. PMID:25434105

  18. Surgical management of velopharyngeal dysfunction: outcome analysis of autogenous posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation.

    PubMed

    Witt, P D; O'Daniel, T G; Marsh, J L; Grames, L M; Muntz, H R; Pilgram, T K

    1997-04-01

    Posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation has been advocated for patients having velopharyngeal dysfunction with a small coronal gap. Nonautogenous augmentation has not been accepted widely because of migration or extrusion of alloplastic implants and resorption of injected materials. Autogenous posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation has been performed for decades by Italian surgeons. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this procedure. Autogenous posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation, using a rolled superiorly based pharyngeal myomucosal flap, was performed on 14 patients, between November of 1989 and June of 1992, who fulfilled two criteria: velopharyngeal dysfunction unresponsive to speech therapy and a small (< 20 percent) coronal gap on velopharyngeal nasendoscopy. Of these, 3 patients had prior prosthetic velopharyngeal management, including 2 patients with Robin sequence. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively with recorded (audio-videotape) perceptual, nasendoscopic, and fluoroscopic standardized speech and airway evaluations. The tapes were used for construction of a randomized master tape that was presented in blinded fashion and random order to three skilled raters for independent assessment of numerous perceptual and instrumental parameters of speech. The raters were uninvolved in the care of the patients or this study, and their intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities were known. Preoperatively, the majority of patients had nasal turbulence. All patients had variable degrees of hypernasality ranging from intermittent to pervasive. Parameters rated included (1) resonance (hypernasality, hyponasality, mixed), (2) auditory nasal emission (including nasal turbulence), and (3) visual characteristics regarding velopharyngeal closure. The visual parameters consisted of questions about whether a pharyngeal bulge was present or absent, descriptions of posterior pharyngeal wall movements with speech

  19. Coffee, tea, and fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in a large prospective US cohort.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Janet S; Patel, Alpa V; McCullough, Marjorie L; Gaudet, Mia M; Chen, Amy Y; Hayes, Richard B; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer. The authors examined associations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea intake with fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a prospective US cohort study begun in 1982 by the American Cancer Society. Among 968,432 men and women who were cancer free at enrollment, 868 deaths due to oral/pharyngeal cancer occurred during 26 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted relative risk. Intake of >4 cups/day of caffeinated coffee was associated with a 49% lower risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer death relative to no/occasional coffee intake (relative risk = 0.51, 95% confidence interval: 0.40, 0.64) (1 cup/day = 237 ml). A dose-related decline in relative risk was observed with each single cup/day consumed (P(trend) < 0.001). The association was not modified by sex, smoking status, or alcohol use. An inverse association for >2 cups/day of decaffeinated coffee intake was suggested (relative risk = 0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.37, 1.01). No association was found for tea drinking. In this large prospective study, caffeinated coffee intake was inversely associated with oral/pharyngeal cancer mortality. Research is needed to elucidate biologic mechanisms whereby coffee might help to protect against these often fatal cancers. PMID:23230042

  20. Yeast microflora of nectarines and their potential for biocontrol of brown rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resident fruit microflora has been the source of biocontrol agents for the control of postharvest decays of fruits and the active ingredient in commercialized biocontrol products. With the exception of grapes and apples, information on the resident microflora of other fruits is only fragmentary; ho...

  1. Characterizing culturable microflora of nectarines: bacteria and their potential for biological control of postharvest fruit decay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microorganisms isolated from fruit surfaces have been used to control postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine fruit surfaces during fruit ...

  2. Impact of cefixime on the normal intestinal microflora.

    PubMed

    Nord, C E; Movin, G; Stålberg, D

    1988-01-01

    The ecological effects on the normal intestinal microflora after cefixime tablets in doses of 200 mg twice daily for 7 days were studied in 10 healthy volunteers. Stool specimens were collected before and 2, 4, 7, 14 and 21 days after start of treatment. Plasma samples were collected during 12 h after the first dose on day 1 and 1 sample was taken on day 7 for bioassay of cefixime concentration. Peak plasma concentration of cefixime occurred after about 4 h with a mean of 3.0 mg/l. The mean AUC0----oc after a single dose was estimated at 21.9 mg x h/l and the mean elimination half-life was 3.9 h. The mean plasma concentration of cefixime 3 h after the morning dose on day 7 was 2.0 mg/l. The concentrations of cefixime in faeces increased during treatment. One subject had detectable concentrations in faeces on day 2, three subjects on day 4 and 8 subjects on day 7 in the order of 237-912 mg/kg faeces. There was a marked decrease in the numbers of streptococci and Escherichia coli and an increase in the numbers of enterococci during the administration of cefixime. In the anaerobic microflora, the numbers of cocci, clostridia and bacteroides were suppressed while there were minor changes in the numbers of bifidobacteria. Clostridium difficile was isolated in 5 subjects on day 7 but cytotoxin was only detected in one subject. The intestinal microflora was normalized within 2 weeks after treatment had stopped. Slightly soft stools were reported by 7 subjects. One subject had abdominal pain and diarrhoea 1 week after treatment followed by anal irritation and itching.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3222669

  3. [PATHOGENIC MIKO,- AND MICROFLORA OF FRAXINUS EXCELSIOR IN PODOLYA UKRAINE].

    PubMed

    Kulbanska, I N; Goychuk, A F

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes our research results of pathogenic myco- and microflora, as well as harmful entomofauna on European Ash. It is shown that the most common and harmful diseaseis tuberculosis (its causal agent--bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv.savastanoi (Smith 1908), which affects trunks, branches, twigs and buds of European Ash. It describes a number of pathogens and representatives mikofitozov malicious entomofauna that by virtue of its activities significantly weaken the growth, development and underestimate the qualitative characteristics of wood European Ash. PMID:26638486

  4. Intestinal microflora as potential modifiers of sensitizer activity in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, P.W.; Clarke, C.; Dawson, K.B.; Simpson, W.; Simmons, D.J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Treatment of mice (some bearing Lewis lung tumors), with penicillin (PEN) at 500 mg/l drinking water for one week prior to treatment with misonidazole (MIS), resulted in: the elimination of their anaerobic cecal flora; a decrease in MIS-induced neurotoxicity; an increase in pharmacological exposure to MIS; a decrease in MIS chemopotentiation; a probable increase in MIS radiosensitization; an increase in MIS induced hypothermia. Assuming no chemical interaction between PEN and MIS, these observations indicate that the intestinal microflora can influence the activity of MIS in vivo. The observed reduction in the neurotoxic but not the radiosensitizing potential of MIS following PEN treatment indicates a therapeutic benefit.

  5. Ecological effects of perorally administered pivmecillinam on the normal vaginal microflora.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Asa; Fianu-Jonasson, Aino; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Nord, Carl Erik

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of the effects of antimicrobial agents on the normal vaginal microflora is limited. The objective of the present study was to study the ecological impact of pivmecillinam on the normal vaginal microflora. In 20 healthy women, the estimated day of ovulation was determined during three subsequent menstrual cycles. Microbiological and clinical examinations were performed on the estimated day of ovulation and on day 3 in all cycles and also on day 7 after ovulation in cycles 1 and 2. Anaerobic and facultative anaerobic gram-positive rods, mainly species of lactobacilli and actinomycetes, dominated the microflora. One woman was colonized on the third day of administration with a resistant Escherichia coli strain, and Candida albicans was detected in one woman on days 3 and 7 in cycle 2. No other major changes in the normal microflora occurred during the study. Administration of pivmecillinam had a minor ecological impact on the normal vaginal microflora. PMID:15616292

  6. Ecological Effects of Perorally Administered Pivmecillinam on the Normal Vaginal Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Åsa; Fianu-Jonasson, Aino; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Nord, Carl Erik

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of the effects of antimicrobial agents on the normal vaginal microflora is limited. The objective of the present study was to study the ecological impact of pivmecillinam on the normal vaginal microflora. In 20 healthy women, the estimated day of ovulation was determined during three subsequent menstrual cycles. Microbiological and clinical examinations were performed on the estimated day of ovulation and on day 3 in all cycles and also on day 7 after ovulation in cycles 1 and 2. Anaerobic and facultative anaerobic gram-positive rods, mainly species of lactobacilli and actinomycetes, dominated the microflora. One woman was colonized on the third day of administration with a resistant Escherichia coli strain, and Candida albicans was detected in one woman on days 3 and 7 in cycle 2. No other major changes in the normal microflora occurred during the study. Administration of pivmecillinam had a minor ecological impact on the normal vaginal microflora. PMID:15616292

  7. Effective observation of treatment of chronic pharyngitis with semiconductor laser irradiation at acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suxian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yanrong

    1993-03-01

    The treatment of this disease with laser such as He-Ne laser, Nd:YAG laser, and CO2 laser, etc., has been applied in our country, but application of the semiconductor laser therapy has received few reports. It has many advantages, such as ting volume, steady function, simple operation (the patient can operate it by himself), no side effects, remarkable results, and it is very convenient. So the semiconductor laser can be used to treat the chronic pharyngitis with irradiation on acupunctural points. One-hundred-twenty chronic pharyngitis patients were divided into 2 groups, a laser group and a medicine group, 60 cases for each. The effective rate is 91.6% and 66.6%, respectively. Obviously the treatment of chronic pharyngitis with semiconductor laser is valuable for widespread use. The principle of the laser therapy is discussed in the last part of this paper.

  8. Is screening for pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis warranted in high-risk groups?

    PubMed

    Tipple, C; Hill, S C; Smith, A

    2010-11-01

    A recent survey reported that 36% of UK genitourinary medicine clinics offer testing for pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Screening at this site is targeted at high-risk groups attending our centre, including female sex workers (FSWs) and male sex workers (MSWs). A total of 2406 patients were screened between November 2006 and October 2007. A retrospective case-note review was performed for positive cases. The prevalence of pharyngeal CT was 1.9% in both men and women. The mean number of sexual partners reported in the preceding three months was 168 and 56 for FSWs and MSWs, respectively. Lack of consistent condom use and high numbers of sexual partners identify this population as potential core transmitters of infection. While the British Association of Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) guidelines do not recommend routine screening for pharyngeal CT, there may be a role in selected high-risk populations. PMID:21187360

  9. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of selected azo dyes in wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; Bishop, P.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Agha, A.M. . Faculty of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Azo dyes represent the largest class of dyes in use today. Current environmental concern with these dyes revolves around the potential carcinogenic health risk presented by these dyes or their intermediate biodegradation products when exposed to microflora in the human digestive tract. These dyes may build up in the environment, since many wastewater treatment plants allow these dyes to pass through the system virtually untreated. The initial step in the degradation of these dyes is the cleavage of the Azo bond. This cleavage is often impossible under aerobic conditions, but has been readily demonstrated under anaerobic conditions. The focus of the study was to determine the feasibility of using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor to accomplish this cleavage. The effects of typical process variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent dye concentration levels, and degree of bed fluidization on removal efficiencies were also studied. The four dyes selected for this study were Acid-Orange 7, Acid-Orange 8, Acid-Orange 10, and Acid-Red 14. The effectiveness of using a bench-scale-activated sludge reactor as a sequenced second stage was also examined. Results indicate that nearly complete cleavage of the Azo bond is easily accomplished for each of the four dyes under hydraulic retention times of either 12 or 24 h. Initial results indicate, though, that aromatic amine by-products remain. The sequenced second stage was able to remove the remaining Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) load to acceptable levels. Work is presently underway to determine the face of the anaerobic by-products in the aerobic second stage.

  10. Prevalence of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Groups A, C, and G in Patients with Acute Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Trupti B; Nadagir, Shobha D; Biradar, Asmabegaum

    2016-01-01

    Context: Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) is the most frequently isolated pathogen in acute pharyngitis. However, the role of Group C (GCS) and Group G (GGS) streptococci in disease burden is under recognized. The present study is carried out to find out the prevalence of acute pharyngitis caused by the different serogroups of streptococci and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these streptococcal isolates. Study and Design: A cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: A total of 218 throat swabs from patients with acute pharyngitis and 82 from healthy controls were collected and processed as per standard protocol. Samples were inoculated on blood agar and Streptococcus selective agar. Isolates were identified by the conventional method and serogrouped by latex agglutination test using Remel Streptex kit. Results: Beta-hemolytic streptococci (BHS) were isolated from 34 (15.59%) of pharyngitis patients and 11 (13.41%) of the healthy carrier. Among pharyngitis, GAS was isolated from 20 (9.17%), GCS 7 (3.21%), and GGS 7 (3.21%) patients. Carriage rate of GAS was 6 (7.31%) and GCS, 5 (6.09%). Vancomycin (100%), amoxyclavulanic acid (90%), levofloxacin (85%), and cephotaxime (80%) were found to be most effective antibiotics. Comparatively, higher drug resistance was observed among GCS and GGS to all the drugs used in the study except for levofloxacin. Conclusions: Although rate of pharyngitis associated with GCS and GGS is marginally lower than GAS, their carriage rate among healthy and relative higher drug resistance emphasizes the need for periodic surveillance of infection by the different serogroups of BHS. PMID:27013813

  11. Postoperative evaluation of the folded pharyngeal flap operation for cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimasu, Hidemi; Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Negishi, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Velopharyngeal function is very important for patients with cleft palate to acquire good speech. For patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency, prosthetic speech appliances and speech therapy are applied first, and then pharyngeal flap surgery to improve velopharyngeal function is performed in our hospital. The folded pharyngeal flap operation was first reported by Isshiki and Morimoto in 1975. We usually use a modification of the original method. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to introduce our method of the folded pharyngeal flap operation and report the results. Materials and Methods: The folded pharyngeal flap operation was performed for 110 patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency from 1982 to 2010. Of these, the 97 whose postoperative speech function was evaluated are reported. The cases included 61 males and 36 females, ranging in age from 7 to 50 years. The time from surgery to speech assessment ranged from 5 months to 6 years. In order to evaluate preoperative velopharyngeal function, assessment of speech by a trained speech pathologist, nasopharyngoscopy, and cephalometric radiography with contrast media were performed before surgery, and then the appropriate surgery was selected and performed. Postoperative velopharyngeal function was assessed by a trained speech pathologist. Results: Of the 97 patients who underwent the folded pharyngeal flap operation, 85 (87.6%) showed velopharyngeal competence, 8 (8.2%) showed marginal velopharyngeal incompetence, and only 2 (2.1%) showed velopharyngeal incompetence; in 2 cases (2.1%), hyponasality was present. Approximately 95% of patients showed improved velopharyngeal function. Conclusions: The folded pharyngeal flap operation based on appropriate preoperative assessment has been shown to be an effective method for the treatment of cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency. PMID:26389036

  12. Profile of microflora of the posterior intestine of Chinook salmon before, during, and after administration of rations with and without erythromycin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, C.M.; Mobin, S.M.A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the resident heterotrophic aerobic microflora of the salmonid posterior intestine before, during, and after the administration of rations with erythromycin in a hatchery raceway environment. We compare the profiles of medicated Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha with those of control fish that were not fed erythromycin. The combined counts of bacteria and yeasts per gram of fish intestine originating from four upstream raceways ranged from 3.0 ?? 102 to 9.6 ?? 105 colony-forming units (CFU) over the study period. Yeasts were commonly identified in the gut, and abundances ranged from 0% to more than 80% of the CFU. Erythromycin therapy decreased the total microbial population and altered the bacterial diversity in the gut during treatment. The intestinal microbial populations in fish medicated with erythromycin increased rapidly after treatment ceased, and by 25 d after treatment the CFU were similar in samples from both medicated and control fish populations. Of 325 isolates from fish selected for biochemical profiles, we identified a total of eight gram-positive and eight gram-negative genera. Bacillus spp. were common throughout sampling and were identified in samples of fish feed. Erythromycin-resistant, gram-positive bacteria were observed throughout the sampling in medicated and control fish. We identified seven gram-positive and two gram-negative genera in 74 selected isolates from control and erythromycin feeds. Our studies suggest that the aerobic microflora of the posterior intestine varies over time, and it is likely that few resistant genera of concern to human health are present.

  13. Acquired Pharyngeal Diverticulum after Anterior Cervical Fusion Operation Misdiagnosed as Typical Zenker Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Chang Wan; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-08-01

    A pharyngeal diverticulum is a rare complication of an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We present a case of a pharyngeal diverticulum after an ACDF, which was misdiagnosed as a typical Zenker diverticulum. A 54-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and a sense of irritation in the neck following C5 through C7 cervical fusion 3 years prior. The patient underwent open surgery to resect the diverticulum with concurrent cricopharyngeal myotomy. An ACDF-related diverticulum is difficult to distinguish from a typical Zenker diverticulum. PMID:27525244

  14. Acquired Pharyngeal Diverticulum after Anterior Cervical Fusion Operation Misdiagnosed as Typical Zenker Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Chang Wan; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-01-01

    A pharyngeal diverticulum is a rare complication of an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We present a case of a pharyngeal diverticulum after an ACDF, which was misdiagnosed as a typical Zenker diverticulum. A 54-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and a sense of irritation in the neck following C5 through C7 cervical fusion 3 years prior. The patient underwent open surgery to resect the diverticulum with concurrent cricopharyngeal myotomy. An ACDF-related diverticulum is difficult to distinguish from a typical Zenker diverticulum. PMID:27525244

  15. Observations on the pathogenesis of chronic non-specific pharyngitis and laryngitis.

    PubMed

    Ward, P H; Berci, G

    1982-12-01

    Repeated analysis of cinephotographic and cinefluorographic studies, correlated with clinical observations, have provided insight into the physiopathology of many cases of chronic non-specific pharyngitis, laryngitis, contact ulcers, granulomas, and pachylaryngitis. Hiatal hernia and gastro-esophageal-pharyngeal reflux appear to be the cause of local irritation. Chronic coughing and habitual harsh throat clearing initiate the contact ulcers and granuloma formation. the successful treatment of this entire family of lesions is dependent upon elimination of vocal abuse and control of the factors that are responsible for the chronic irritations. PMID:7176789

  16. [Antibiotics to treat streptococcal pharyngitis in Swiss children: is it still useful?].

    PubMed

    Verolet, Charlotte M; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2016-02-17

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis is a common pediatric infectious disease in school-aged children. After the detection of the bacteria in the pharynx, treatment with 10 days of antibiotics is recommended in Switzerland. The rationale to treat is based on studies from the 1950s, when the epidemiology of GAS strain was very different and the incidence of acute rheumatic fever significantly higher than today in developed countries. This article explores the current national recommendations, as well as the benefits of antibiotic treatment in the management of this infection. A reevaluation, as in other countries, of the management and treatment of GAS pharyngitis in Switzerland is considered. PMID:27039456

  17. Lactic acid microflora of the gut of snail Cornu aspersum

    PubMed Central

    Koleva, Zdravka; Dedov, Ivaylo; Kizheva, Joana; Lipovanska, Roxana; Moncheva, Penka; Hristova, Petya

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal lactic acid microflora of the edible snail Cornu aspersum was studied by culture-based methods and was phenotypically and molecularly characterized. The antibacterial activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates was investigated. Snails in different stages of development were collected from farms located in several regions of Bulgaria. One hundred twenty-two isolates, belonging to the group of LAB, were characterized morphologically and were divided into four groups. Representative isolates from each morphological type were subjected to phenotypic characterization and molecular identification. The snail gut lactic acid microflora was composed by Enterococcus (17 isolates), Lactococcus (12 isolates), Leuconostoc (7 isolates), Lactobacillus (18 isolates) and Weissella (1 isolate). The species affiliation of Lactococcus lactis (12), Leuconostoc mesenteroides (4) and Lactobacillus plantarum (2) was confirmed by species-specific primers. The Lactobacillus isolates were identified by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA as Lactobacillus brevis (12), L. plantarum (2), Lactobacillus graminis (1) and Lactobacillus curvatus (3). The species L. brevis, L. graminis and L. curvatus were found in snails in a phase of hibernation, whereas L. plantarum was identified both in active and hibernation phases. Antibacterial activity (bacteriocine-like) was shown only by one strain of L. mesentereoides P4/8 against Propionibacterium acnes. The present study showed that the LAB are a component of the microbial communities in the snail digestive system. This is the first report on Lactobacillus strains detected in the gut of C. aspersum. PMID:26019550

  18. Orosensory contributions to dysphagia: a link between perception of sweet and sour taste and pharyngeal delay time.

    PubMed

    Pauloski, Barbara R; Nasir, Sazzad M

    2016-06-01

    Pharyngeal delay is a significant swallowing disorder often resulting in aspiration. It is suspected that pharyngeal delay originates from sensory impairment, but a direct demonstration of a link between oral sensation and pharyngeal delay is lacking. In this study involving six patients with complaints of dysphagia, taste sensation of the oral tongue was measured and subsequently related to swallowing kinematics. It was found that a response bias for sour taste was significantly correlated with pharyngeal delay time on paste, highlighting oral sensory contributions to swallow motor dysfunctions. Investigating the precise nature of such a link between oral sensation and dysphagia would constitute a basis for understanding the disorder. The results of this study highlight oral sensory contributions to pharyngeal swallow events and provide impetus to examine this link in larger samples of dysphagic patients. PMID:27302989

  19. Continuous negative pressure-flush through a dual tube for the treatment of a complicated pharyngeal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIANGMIN; LIU, FOLIN; LAN, XIAOLIN; LUO, KEQING; XIAO, FUFU; LI, SHAOJIN

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of pharyngeal fistulas is complicated. It is more difficult to deal with pharyngeal fistula following surgical treatment for hypopharynx carcinoma, particularly in cases of pectoralis major muscle flap repair. The present study describes the case of a 56-year-old man who presented with a highly-differentiated pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma located at the right side of the hypopharynx. The patient underwent a total laryngectomy and a right functional carotid dissection and tracheostomy; this was followed by post-operative radiotherapy. A pharyngeal fistula subsequently developed, but an attempt to repair this with a pectoralis major muscle flap failed. The complicated pharyngeal fistula was treated via continuous negative pressure-flush through a dual tube, without the requirement for incision, daily dressing or antibiotics. The favorable patient outcome represented a positive result, which was also able to reduce the psychological burden of the patient and improve their quality of life. PMID:26998082

  20. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  1. [THE EVALUATION OF MICROBIOLOGICAL DISORDERS OF MICROFLORA OF OROPHARYNX AND INTESTINE USING MATHEMATICAL MODELING TECHNIQUE].

    PubMed

    Zatevalov, A V; Elkova, E P; Afanasiev, S S; Aleshkin, A V; Mironov, A Yu; Gusarova, M P; Gudova, N V

    2016-02-01

    The analysis was applied to microflora of feces and oropharinx and concentration of volatile fatty acids in saliva from patients of consultative diagnostic center of G.N. Gabrichevskii Moscow research institute of epidemiology and microbiology. The computer classification program is developed on the basis of determining degree of microbiological disorders on the basis of received data and using artificial neural networks and discriminant analysis. The analysis established decreasing of probability of false classification in case of increasing of degree of microbiological disorders of microflora of intestine and absence of such a correlation for microbiological and metabolic disorders of microflora of intestine. PMID:27455568

  2. Effect of nasal noninvasive respiratory support methods on pharyngeal provocation-induced aerodigestive reflexes in infants.

    PubMed

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Hasenstab, Kathryn A; Sitaram, Swetha; Clouse, Brian J; Slaughter, Jonathan L; Shaker, Reza

    2016-06-01

    The pharynx is a locus of provocation among infants with aerodigestive morbidities manifesting as dysphagia, life-threatening events, aspiration-pneumonia, atelectasis, and reflux, and such infants often receive nasal respiratory support. We determined the impact of different oxygen delivery methods on pharyngeal stimulation-induced aerodigestive reflexes [room air (RA), nasal cannula (NC), and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP)] while hypothesizing that the sensory motor characteristics of putative reflexes are distinct. Thirty eight infants (28.0 ± 0.7 wk gestation) underwent pharyngoesophageal manometry and respiratory inductance plethysmography to determine the effects of graded pharyngeal stimuli (n = 271) on upper and lower esophageal sphincters (UES, LES), swallowing, and deglutition-apnea. Comparisons were made between NC (n = 19), nCPAP (n = 9), and RA (n = 10) groups. Importantly, NC or nCPAP (vs. RA) had: 1) delayed feeding milestones (P < 0.05), 2) increased pharyngeal waveform recruitment and duration, greater UES nadir pressure, decreased esophageal contraction duration, decreased distal esophageal contraction amplitude, and decreased completely propagated esophageal peristalsis (all P < 0.05), and 3) similarly developed UES contractile and LES relaxation reflexes (P > 0.05). We conclude that aerodigestive reflexes were similarly developed in infants using noninvasive respiratory support with adequate upper and lower aerodigestive protection. Increased concern for GERD is unfounded in this population. These infants may benefit from targeted oromotor feeding therapies and safe pharyngeal bolus transit to accelerate feeding milestones. PMID:27012774

  3. Pharyngeal Pressure Generation during Tongue-Hold Swallows across Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltgen, Sebastian H.; Macrae, Phoebe; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of the tongue-hold swallowing maneuver on pharyngeal pressure generation in healthy young and elderly research volunteers. Method: Sixty-eight healthy research volunteers (young, n = 34, mean age = 26.8 years, SD = 5.5; elderly, n = 34, mean age = 72.6 years, SD = 4.8; sex equally represented) performed 5…

  4. Pharyngeal abscess presenting with upper airway obstruction and atlanto-axial subluxation in a small infant.

    PubMed

    Brookes, A; Moriarty, A

    2000-05-01

    We describe an infant who presented with a combination of upper airway obstruction and atlanto-axial subluxation, secondary to a pharyngeal abscess resulting from cosmetic ear piercing. This combination posed a number of difficulties for the anasthetist and a detailed plan was formulated to prepare the child for anasthesia. PMID:10792140

  5. Streptococcal Pharyngitis in a Two-Month-Old Infant: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sajadian, Seyyed Mohammad Sajad; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus is the most common cause of bacterial pharyngitis among 5 - 15-year-old children, but it is uncommon in children less than three years old and rarely happens in infants less than one year old. Case Presentation The patient was a 62-day-old female infant who presented with fever and poor feeding since two days before admission. At the time of admission, the patient was febrile and ill. Upon examination, a rectal temperature of 38.5°C, multiple right-sided submandibular lymphadenopathies, pharyngeal erythema, and tonsillar exudates were detected. Twenty-four hours after the throat swab was collected and cultured, Streptococcus pyogenes grew on a sheep blood agar medium. The patient’s mother, who also experienced similar symptoms, had a positive throat swab culture for S. pyogenes. Conclusions Although Streptococcal pharyngitis is rare in children less than three years old and the necessity of treatment is not well clarified, in case of streptococcal infection in parents and the occurrence of similar signs and symptoms in their child, considering S. pharyngitis as a possible differential diagnosis seems rational.

  6. Developmental Sexual Dimorphism of the Oral and Pharyngeal Portions of the Vocal Tract: An Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorperian, Houri K.; Wang, Shubing; Schimek, E. Michael; Durtschi, Reid B.; Kent, Ray D.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Chung, Moo K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The anatomic origin for prepubertal vowel acoustic differences between male and female subjects remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine developmental sex differences in vocal tract (VT) length and its oral and pharyngeal portions. Method: Nine VT variables were measured from 605 imaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging…

  7. Formation of oral and pharyngeal dentition in teleosts depends on differential recruitment of retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Yann; Bernard, Laure; Debiais-Thibaud, Melanie; Bourrat, Franck; Joly, Jean-Stephane; Pottin, Karen; Meyer, Axel; Retaux, Sylvie; Stock, David W; Jackman, William R; Seritrakul, Pawat; Begemann, Gerrit; Laudet, Vincent

    2010-09-01

    One of the goals of evolutionary developmental biology is to link specific adaptations to changes in developmental pathways. The dentition of cypriniform fishes, which in contrast to many other teleost fish species possess pharyngeal teeth but lack oral teeth, provides a suitable model to study the development of feeding adaptations. Here, we have examined the involvement of retinoic acid (RA) in tooth development and show that RA is specifically required to induce the pharyngeal tooth developmental program in zebrafish. Perturbation of RA signaling at this stage abolished tooth induction without affecting the development of tooth-associated ceratobranchial bones. We show that this inductive event is dependent on RA synthesis from aldh1a2 in the ventral posterior pharynx. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling has been shown to be critical for tooth induction in zebrafish, and its loss has been associated with oral tooth loss in cypriniform fishes. Pharmacological treatments targeting the RA and FGF pathways revealed that both pathways act independently during tooth induction. In contrast, we find that in Mexican tetra and medaka, species that also possess oral teeth, both oral and pharyngeal teeth are induced independently of RA. Our analyses suggest an evolutionary scenario in which the gene network controlling tooth development obtained RA dependency in the lineage leading to the cypriniforms. The loss of pharyngeal teeth in this group was cancelled out through a shift in aldh1a2 expression, while oral teeth might have been lost ultimately due to deficient RA signaling in the oral cavity. PMID:20445074

  8. Pharyngeal pumping in Caenorhabditis elegans depends on tonic and phasic signaling from the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowski, Nicholas F.; Raizen, David M.; Fang-Yen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic movements are ubiquitous in animal locomotion, feeding, and circulatory systems. In some systems, the muscle itself generates rhythmic contractions. In others, rhythms are generated by the nervous system or by interactions between the nervous system and muscles. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, feeding occurs via rhythmic contractions (pumping) of the pharynx, a neuromuscular feeding organ. Here, we use pharmacology, optogenetics, genetics, and electrophysiology to investigate the roles of the nervous system and muscle in generating pharyngeal pumping. Hyperpolarization of the nervous system using a histamine-gated chloride channel abolishes pumping, and optogenetic stimulation of pharyngeal muscle in these animals causes abnormal contractions, demonstrating that normal pumping requires nervous system function. In mutants that pump slowly due to defective nervous system function, tonic muscle stimulation causes rapid pumping, suggesting tonic neurotransmitter release may regulate pumping. However, tonic cholinergic motor neuron stimulation, but not tonic muscle stimulation, triggers pumps that electrophysiologically resemble typical rapid pumps. This suggests that pharyngeal cholinergic motor neurons are normally rhythmically, and not tonically active. These results demonstrate that the pharynx generates a myogenic rhythm in the presence of tonically released acetylcholine, and suggest that the pharyngeal nervous system entrains contraction rate and timing through phasic neurotransmitter release. PMID:26976078

  9. Quantitative Lingual, Pharyngeal and Laryngeal Ultrasonography in Swallowing Research: A Technical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi-Fishman, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    Because of its distinct advantage in radiation-free soft tissue imaging, ultrasonography has been widely used to study lingual, pharyngeal, hyoid, laryngeal, and even esophageal action during swallowing in individuals of all ages. Qualitative ultrasonographic observations have made considerable contributions to our understanding of deglutition.…

  10. Delayed Initiation of the Pharyngeal Swallow: Normal Variability in Adult Swallows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Brodsky, Martin B.; Michel, Yvonne; Lee, Fu-Shing; Walters, Bobby

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine bolus head timing and location relations with the onset of hyoid movement at the initiation of the pharyngeal swallow and at the onset of swallow-related apnea. Method: Bolus head timing and location and the timing of swallow-related apnea were recorded from frame-by-frame analyses of…

  11. Nasal and pharyngeal eosinophil peroxidase levels in adults with poorly controlled asthma correlate with sputum eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Rank, M A; Ochkur, S I; Lewis, J C; Teaford, H G; Wesselius, L J; Helmers, R A; Lee, N A; Nair, P; Lee, J J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to compare nasal, pharyngeal, and sputum eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) levels with induced sputum eosinophil percentage in 10 adults with poorly controlled asthma and 10 normal controls. EPX was measured using an ELISA and normalized for grams of protein for nasal and pharynx specimens and for mL-gram of protein for sputum. Sputum EPX levels were statistically different between asthma and control subjects (P = 0.024). EPX levels measured in the nasal and pharyngeal swab samples derived from the same patients were also different between asthma and control subjects, each displaying a high degree of significance (P = 0.002). Spearman's correlation coefficients for nasal EPX and pharyngeal EPX levels compared to induced sputum eosinophil percentage were 0.81 (P = 0.0007) and 0.78 (P = 0.0017), respectively. Thus, there is a strong association in a given patient between both nasal and pharyngeal EPX levels and the eosinophil percentage of induced sputum. PMID:26645423

  12. The Reliability of Oral and Pharyngeal Dimensions Captured with Acoustic Pharyngometry.

    PubMed

    Molfenter, Sonja M

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic Pharyngometry (APh) is a method for quantifying oropharyngeal tract configuration using sound wave reflection and is commonly used in diagnostics and research of sleep apnea. The standard preset output of APh (minimal cross-sectional area) has been established as reliable. However, by conducting post-processing measures on specific breathing tasks, APh data can also reveal oral length, oral volume, pharyngeal length, and pharyngeal volume. Given that these measures may have utility in dysphagia research, the reliability of these measures is unknown and is the focus of the current study. Ten young healthy female volunteers completed two sessions of APh data collection to obtain measures of oral length, oral volume, pharyngeal length, and pharyngeal volume 1 week apart. Two-way mixed intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to establish intra-rater reliability, inter-rater reliability, and test-retest reliability. Results revealed excellent levels of agreement within and across raters for all oropharyngeal tract parameters. Levels of test-retest agreement for oral length and oral volume indicated these parameters are appropriate for monitoring change within an individual. All parameters were deemed to have acceptable test-retest values as outcome measures in group-level analysis. PMID:27262868

  13. Necrotic pharyngitis associated with Mycoplasma bovis infections in American bison (Bison bison)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison, generally presenting as severe, caseonecrotic pneumonia. Here we describe three diagnostic cases in which M. bovis is strongly implicated as a causative agent of necrotic pharyngitis. ...

  14. Pharyngeal collapsibility during sleep is elevated in insulin-resistant females with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Oscar L; Galiatsatos, Panagis; Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Patil, Susheel P; Smith, Philip L; Magnuson, Thomas; Schweitzer, Michael; Steele, Kimberley; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Schwartz, Alan R

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with sleep apnoea, leading us to hypothesise that it is also associated with elevations in pharyngeal collapsibility, even in the absence of sleep apnoea.90 bariatric patients were characterised for sleep apnoea, pharyngeal collapsibility and insulin resistance. Patients with a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) >10 events·h(-1), diabetes mellitus, tonsillar hypertrophy and pulmonary disease were excluded. The remaining 14 females underwent collapsibility measurements (passive critical pressure, Pcritp ) during non-rapid eye movement sleep. The homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, a measure of insulin resistance, was derived from measurements of fasting glucose and insulin levels, and compared to Pcritp Groups with high Pcritp compared to low Pcritp did not differ in age, body mass index or RDI. HOMA and insulin were elevated in the high Pcritp group compared to the low Pcritp group (p<0.02). Pcritp correlated with HOMA (Spearman's ρ=0.565, 95% CI 0.104-0.862; p=0.035) and insulin (Spearman's ρ=0.609 95% CI 0.196-0.835; p=0.021).Obese insulin-resistant subjects without frank diabetes or sleep apnoea demonstrate preclinical elevations in pharyngeal collapsibility, which may increase their susceptibility to sleep apnoea. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance could play a significant role in sleep apnoea pathogenesis by generating requisite elevations in pharyngeal collapsibility. PMID:27103392

  15. Lateral congenital anomalies of the pharyngeal apparatus: part I. Normal developmental anatomy (embryogenesis) for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the embryogenesis of the pharyngeal apparatus is the only means of understanding the "architecture" of the neck. The embryonic pharynx (which includes future oral and nasal cavities) is a much more extensive area than the adult pharynx. The main feature of the developing pharynx is a series of arches, internal pouches, and external clefts, which together comprise the pharyngeal apparatus. This structure is associated with other developing splanchna of the neck, e.g., the thyroid and parathyroid glands, tonsils, and thymus. Within each of the pharyngeal arches are the developing aortic arches and, specific for each arch, cranial nerves. The complex relations of the mesenchymal derivatives of arches (muscles, cartilage, bones) with the neurovascular bundles within each arch are presented and explained. The pharyngeal apparatus undergoes dramatic transformations: pouches and clefts disappear without interruption (interruption would produce gills and support the misnomer "branchial apparatus"). In addition, in the lateroventral neck, somites migrate to produce other muscles such as sternocleidomastoid and trapezius innervated by spinal nerves. Lateral congenital anomalies largely rely on persistence of a cleft/and or pouch or communication between the two. Their tracts have a "crooked" course among other entities generated by alterations that take place during embryogenesis. PMID:21944634

  16. Pharyngeal pH monitoring in gastrectomy patients – what do we really measure?

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Jell, Alissa; Feussner, Hubertus; Schmid, Roland M; Bajbouj, Monther

    2015-01-01

    Aim Diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) has dramatically increased over the last years. For diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux, a newly designed pharyngeal probe (Dx-pH) was recently introduced. It is also recommended to guide therapy decision in antireflux surgery. However, diagnostic results are questionable. Therefore, we establish a reliable reference group with asymptomatic patients after total gastrectomy and, thus, complete extinction of gastric acid production. Methods Pharyngeal pH monitoring was performed in 10 consecutive patients with history of total gastrectomy. All patients were off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and followed a non-acid diet during the complete measurement period. Results All procedures were performed without any complication. Six of the 10 asymptomatic gastrectomy patients (60%) had pathological results derived from the validated reference values (Ryan score) in pharyngeal pH monitoring. Conclusion Pathological pH values assessed by the Dx-pH device, usually interpreted as pathological aerosolized acidic gastroesophageal and/or laryngopharyngeal reflux, are obviously dissociated from gastric acid production. Further studies are required to determine diagnostic value of the new system. Therefore, the pharyngeal pH monitoring system seems currently not to be useful to guide any diagnostic or therapeutic decisions, in particular if surgical therapy is considered.

  17. Molecular analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from Chinese children with pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hesheng; Shen, Xuzhuang; Huang, Guoying; Fu, Zhou; Zheng, Yuejie; Wang, Libo; Li, Chengrong; Liu, Lan; Shen, Ying; Liu, Xiaorong; Yang, Yonghong

    2011-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important gram-positive bacterial pathogen that causes various human diseases, of which streptococcal pharyngitis is the most common. In this work, a total of 185 S. pyogenes isolated from Chinese children with pharyngitis was analyzed by superantigen (SAg) genes, emm genotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Fifty-eight (31.4%) isolates were also typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The results indicate that most of the emm1 isolates possessed speA (88.5%) and speJ (83.6%), and few isolates possessed speI gene (13.1%). In contrast, none of the emm12-type isolates possessed speJ; few isolates possessed speA (5.2%); and most of the isolates possessed speI (91.7%). PFGE analysis revealed 25 different clusters, and MLST was performed for 2 predominant emm-type isolates; emm12 isolates belonged to ST36 while emm1 isolates belonged to ST28. As far as this collection is concerned, emm1 and emm12 are the prevalent genotypes among S. pyogenes strains associated with children's pharyngitis in China. Most of the pharyngitis strains can be covered by a 26-valent vaccine. A strong correspondence is found only in the direction of emm type for both SAg profiles and PFGE types but not in the reverse direction. PMID:21251553

  18. Examination of the cultivatable, aerobic microflora of swine feces and stored swine manure on various media and antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial compounds have been commonly used as feed additives for domestic animals to reduce infection and promote growth. Recent concerns have suggested that such feeding practices may result in increased microbial resistance to antibiotics. Our laboratory has been studying the predominant comm...

  19. Transoral surgery for laryngo-pharyngeal cancer - The paradigm shift of the head and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Tateya, Ichiro; Shiotani, Akihiro; Satou, Yasuo; Tomifuji, Masayuki; Morita, Shuko; Muto, Manabu; Ito, Juichi

    2016-02-01

    Transoral surgery is a less invasive treatment that is becoming a major strategy in the treatment of laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. It is a minimally invasive approach that has no skin incision and limits the extent of tissue dissection, disruption of speech and swallowing muscles, blood loss, damage to major neurovascular structures, and injury to normal tissue. Transoral approaches to the laryngo-pharynx, except for early glottis cancer, had been limited traditionally to tumors that can be observed directly and manipulated with standard instrumentation and lighting. Since the 1990s, transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) has been used as an organ preservation strategy with good oncological control and good functional results, although it has not been widely used because of its technical difficulty. Recently, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is becoming popular as a new treatment modality for laryngo-pharyngeal cancer, and surgical robots are used widely in the world since United States FDA approval in 2009. In spite of the global spread of TORS, it has not been approved by the Japan FDA, which has led to the development of other low-cost transoral surgical techniques in Japan. Transoral videolaryngoscopic surgery (TOVS) was developed as a new transoral surgery system for laryngo-pharyngeal lesions to address the problems of TLM. In TOVS, a rigid endoscope is used to visualize the surgical field instead of a microscope and the advantages of TOVS include the wide operative field and working space achieved using the distending laryngoscope and videolaryngoscope. Also, with the spread of narrow band imaging (NBI), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), which are widely used for superficial cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, have been applied for the superficial laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Both EMR and ESD are performed mainly by gastroenterologists with a sharp dissector and magnifying endoscopy (ME)-NBI with minimal surgical margin

  20. "Aerobic" Writing: A Writing Practice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Sally Chandler

    "Aerobic writing" is a writing center strategy designed to keep students in writing "shape." Like aerobic exercise, aerobic writing is sustained for a certain length of time and done on a regular basis at prescribed time intervals. The program requires students to write at least two times a week for approximately an hour each time. Students write,…

  1. Arthritis and Aerobic Exercise: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Arthritic patients who regularly do aerobic exercise make significant gains in aerobic and functional status, and in subjective areas like pain tolerance and mood. Still, they are often advised to curtail physical activity. Guidelines are presented for physicians prescribing aerobic exercise. An exercise tolerance test is recommended. (SM)

  2. Formation of oral and pharyngeal dentition in teleosts depends on differential recruitment of retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, Yann; Bernard, Laure; Debiais-Thibaud, Melanie; Bourrat, Franck; Joly, Jean-Stephane; Pottin, Karen; Meyer, Axel; Retaux, Sylvie; Stock, David W.; Jackman, William R.; Seritrakul, Pawat; Begemann, Gerrit; Laudet, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of evolutionary developmental biology is to link specific adaptations to changes in developmental pathways. The dentition of cypriniform fishes, which in contrast to many other teleost fish species possess pharyngeal teeth but lack oral teeth, provides a suitable model to study the development of feeding adaptations. Here, we have examined the involvement of retinoic acid (RA) in tooth development and show that RA is specifically required to induce the pharyngeal tooth developmental program in zebrafish. Perturbation of RA signaling at this stage abolished tooth induction without affecting the development of tooth-associated ceratobranchial bones. We show that this inductive event is dependent on RA synthesis from aldh1a2 in the ventral posterior pharynx. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling has been shown to be critical for tooth induction in zebrafish, and its loss has been associated with oral tooth loss in cypriniform fishes. Pharmacological treatments targeting the RA and FGF pathways revealed that both pathways act independently during tooth induction. In contrast, we find that in Mexican tetra and medaka, species that also possess oral teeth, both oral and pharyngeal teeth are induced independently of RA. Our analyses suggest an evolutionary scenario in which the gene network controlling tooth development obtained RA dependency in the lineage leading to the cypriniforms. The loss of pharyngeal teeth in this group was cancelled out through a shift in aldh1a2 expression, while oral teeth might have been lost ultimately due to deficient RA signaling in the oral cavity.—Gibert, Y., Bernard, L., Debiais-Thibaud, M., Bourrat, F., Joly, J.-S., Pottin, K., Meyer, A., Retaux, S., Stock, D. W., Jackman, W. R., Seritrakul, P., Begemann, G., Laudet, V. Formation of oral and pharyngeal dentition in teleosts depends on differential recruitment of retinoic acid signaling. PMID:20445074

  3. Effects of birth asphyxia on the modulation of pharyngeal provocation-induced adaptive reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ish K; Shubert, Theresa R; Sitaram, Swetha; Wei, Lai; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2015-10-15

    Perinatal asphyxia and aerodigestive symptoms are troublesome. We tested the hypothesis that pharyngeal provocation alters proximal and distal aerodigestive reflex coordination and kinetics in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), compared with healthy controls. Specifically, we characterized the sensory-motor properties of pharyngeal provocation-induced effects on upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) reflexes. Ten orally fed controls (32.0 ± 1.5 wk gestation) and 25 infants with HIE (38.1 ± 0.4 wk gestation) were evaluated at 39.7 ± 0.9 and 41.9 ± 0.6 wk postmenstrual age respectively. Pharyngo-esophageal reflexes evoked upon graded water stimuli were tested using water-perfusion micromanometry methods. Analysis included sensory-motor characteristics of pharyngeal reflexive swallow (PRS), pharyngo-UES-contractile reflex (PUCR), esophageal body-waveform kinetics, and pharyngo-LES-relaxation reflex (PLESRR). For controls vs. infants with HIE, median appearance, pulse, grimace, activity, respiration (APGAR) scores were 6 vs. 1 at 1 min (P < 0.001) and 8 vs. 3 at 5 min (P < 0.001). Upon pharyngeal- stimulation, HIE infants (vs. controls) had frequent PUCR (P = 0.01); increased UES basal tone (P = 0.03); decreased LES basal tone (P = 0.002); increased pharyngeal-waveforms per stimulus (P = 0.03); decreased frequency of LES relaxation (P = 0.003); and decreased proximal esophageal contractile amplitude (P = 0.002), with prolonged proximal esophageal contractile duration (P = 0.008). Increased tonicity and reactivity of the UES and dysregulation of LES may provide the pathophysiological basis for pooling of secretions, improper bolus clearance, and aspiration risk. Deficits in function at the nuclear or supranuclear level involving glossopharyngeal and vagal neural networks and respiratory regulatory pathways involved with aerodigestive protection may be contributory. PMID:26272260

  4. Phasic respiratory modulation of pharyngeal collapsibility via neuromuscular mechanisms in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ying; McGuire, Michelle; Liu, Chun; Malhotra, Atul

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea patients experience recurrent upper airway (UA) collapse due to decreases in the UA dilator muscle activity during sleep. In contrast, activation of UA dilators reduces pharyngeal critical pressure (Pcrit, an index of pharyngeal collapsibility), suggesting an inverse relationship between pharyngeal collapsibility and dilator activity. Since most UA muscles display phasic respiratory activity, we hypothesized that pharyngeal collapsibility is modulated by respiratory drive via neuromuscular mechanisms. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, vagotomized, and ventilated (normocapnia). In one group, integrated genioglossal activity, Pcrit, and maximal airflow (Vmax) were measured at three expiration and five inspiration time points within the breathing cycle. Pcrit was closely and inversely related to phasic genioglossal activity, with the value measured at peak inspiration being the lowest. In other groups, the variables were measured during expiration and peak inspiration, before and after each of five manipulations. Pcrit was 26% more negative (−15.0 ± 1.0 cmH2O, −18.9 ± 1.2 cmH2O; n = 23), Vmax was 7% larger (31.0 ± 1.0 ml/s, 33.2 ± 1.1 ml/s), nasal resistance was 12% bigger [0.49 ± 0.05 cmH2O/(ml/s), 0.59 ± 0.05 cmH2O/(ml/s)], and latency to induced UA closure was 14% longer (55 ± 4 ms, 63 ± 5 ms) during peak inspiration vs. expiration (all P < 0.005). The expiration-inspiration difference in Pcrit was abolished with neuromuscular blockade, hypocapnic apnea, or death but was not reduced by the superior laryngeal nerve transection or altered by tracheal displacement. Collectively, these results suggest that pharyngeal collapsibility is moment-by-moment modulated by respiratory drive and this phasic modulation requires neuromuscular mechanisms, but not the UA negative pressure reflex or tracheal displacement by phasic lung inflation. PMID:22052868

  5. Submental negative pressure application decreases collapsibility of the passive pharyngeal airway in nonobese women.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinichiro; Isono, Shiroh; Amemiya, Megumi; Sato, Shin; Ikeda, Aya; Okazaki, Junko; Sato, Yumi; Ishikawa, Teruhiko

    2015-04-01

    The pharyngeal airway is surrounded by soft tissues that are also enclosed by bony structures such as the mandible, maxilla, and cervical spine. The passive pharyngeal airway is therefore structurally analogous to a collapsible tube within a rigid box. Cross-sectional area of the tube is determined by transmural pressure, the pressure difference between intraluminal and extraluminal pressures. Due to a lack of knowledge on the influence of extraluminal soft tissue pressure on the human pharyngeal airway patency, we hypothesized that application of negative external pressure to the submental region decreases collapsibility of the passive pharynx, and that obese individuals have less response to the intervention than nonobese individuals. Static mechanical properties of the passive pharynx were compared before and during application of submental negative pressure in 10 obese and 10 nonobese adult women under general anesthesia and paralysis. Negative pressure was applied through use of a silicone collar covering the entire submental region and a vacuum pump. In nonobese subjects, application of submental negative pressure (-25 and -50 cmH2O) significantly decreased closing pressures at the retropalatal airway by 2.3 ± 3.2 cmH2O and 2.0 ± 3.0 cmH2O, respectively, and at the retroglossal airway by 2.9 ± 2.7 cmH2O and 3.7 ± 2.6 cmH2O, respectively, and the intervention stiffened the retroglossal pharyngeal airway wall. No significant mechanical changes were observed during application of submental negative pressure in obese subjects. Conclusively, application of submental negative pressure was found to decreases collapsibility of the passive pharyngeal airway in nonobese Japanese women. PMID:25614595

  6. Notes from the Field: Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis Misdiagnoses at a Rural Urgent-Care Clinic--Wyoming, March 2015.

    PubMed

    Harrist, Alexia; Van Houten, Clayton; Shulman, Stanford T; Van Beneden, Chris; Murphy, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is the most common bacterial cause of pharyngitis, implicated in 20%-30% of pediatric and 5%-15% of adult health care visits for sore throat (1). Along with the sudden onset of throat pain, GAS pharyngitis symptoms include fever, headache, and bilateral tender cervical lymphadenopathy (1,2). Accurate diagnosis and management of GAS pharyngitis is critical for limiting antibiotic overuse and preventing rheumatic fever (2), but distinguishing between GAS and viral pharyngitis clinically is challenging (1). Guidelines for diagnosis and management of GAS pharyngitis have been published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)* (1). IDSA recommends that patients with sore throat be tested for GAS to distinguish between GAS and viral pharyngitis; however, IDSA emphasizes the use of selective testing based on clinical symptoms and signs to avoid identifying GAS carriers rather than acute GAS infections (1). Therefore, testing for GAS usually is not recommended for the following: patients with sore throat and accompanying symptoms (e.g., cough, rhinorrhea) that strongly suggest a viral etiology; children aged <3 years, because acute rheumatic fever is extremely rare in this age group; and asymptomatic household contacts of patients with GAS pharyngitis (1). IDSA recommends penicillin or amoxicillin as the treatment of choice based on effectiveness and narrow spectrum of activity. To date, penicillin-resistant GAS has never been documented (1). PMID:26719990

  7. Alpha-synuclein pathology and axonal degeneration of the peripheral motor nerves innervating pharyngeal muscles in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Beach, Thomas G

    2013-02-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cardinal motor manifestations and CNS pathology. Current drug therapies can often stabilize these cardinal motor symptoms, and attention has shifted to the other motor and nonmotor symptoms of PD that are resistant to drug therapy. Dysphagia in PD is perhaps the most important drug-resistant symptom because it leads to aspiration and pneumonia, the leading cause of death. Here, we present direct evidence for degeneration of the pharyngeal motor nerves in PD. We examined the cervical vagal nerve (cranial nerve X), pharyngeal branch of nerve X, and pharyngeal plexus innervating the pharyngeal muscles in 14 postmortem specimens, that is, from 10 patients with PD and 4 age-matched control subjects. Synucleinopathy in the pharyngeal nerves was detected using an immunohistochemical method for phosphorylated α-synuclein. Alpha-synuclein aggregates were revealed in nerve X and the pharyngeal branch of nerve X, and immunoreactive intramuscular nerve twigs and axon terminals within the neuromuscular junctions were identified in all of the PD patients but in none of the controls. These findings indicate that the motor nervous system of the pharynx is involved in the pathologic process of PD. Notably, PD patients who have had dysphagia had a higher density of α-synuclein aggregates in the pharyngeal nerves than those without dysphagia. These findings indicate that motor involvement of the pharynx in PD is one of the factors leading to oropharyngeal dysphagia commonly seen in PD patients. PMID:23334595

  8. Endoderm-specific deletion of Tbx1 reveals an FGF-independent role for Tbx1 in pharyngeal apparatus morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Abigail; Kasah, Sahrunizam; Mansour, Suzanne L.; Morrow, Bernice; Basson, M. Albert

    2015-01-01

    Background The T-box transcription factor Tbx1, is essential for the normal development of multiple organ systems in the embryo. One of the most striking phenotypes in Tbx1−/− embryos is the failure of the caudal pharyngeal pouches to evaginate from the foregut endoderm. Despite considerable interest in the role of Tbx1 in development, the mechanisms whereby Tbx1 controls caudal pouch formation have remained elusive. In particular, the question as to how Tbx1 expression in the pharyngeal endoderm regulates pharyngeal pouch morphogenesis in the mouse embryo is not known. Results To address this question, we produced mouse embryos in which Tbx1 was specifically deleted from the pharyngeal endoderm and as expected, embryos failed to form caudal pharyngeal pouches. To determine the molecular mechanism, we examined expression of Fgf3 and Fgf8 ligands and downstream effectors. Although Fgf8 expression is greatly reduced in Tbx1-deficient endoderm, FGF signaling levels are unaffected. Furthermore, pouch morphogenesis is only partially perturbed by the loss of both Fgf3 and Fgf8 from the endoderm, indicating that neither are required for pouch formation. Conclusions Tbx1 deletion from the pharyngeal endoderm is sufficient to cause caudal pharyngeal arch segmentation defects by FGF-independent effectors that remain to be identified. PMID:24812002

  9. Interaction of gut microflora with tannins in feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Gunjan; Puniya, A. K.; Aguilar, C. N.; Singh, Kishan

    2005-11-01

    Tannins (hydrolyzable and condensed) are water-soluble polyphenolic compounds that exert antinutritional effects on ruminants by forming complexes with dietary proteins. They limit nitrogen supply to animals, besides inhibiting the growth and activity of ruminal microflora. However, some gastrointestinal microbes are able to break tannin-protein complexes while preferentially degrading hydrolyzable tannins (HTs). Streptococcus gallolyticus, Lonepinella koalarum and Selenomonas ruminantium are the dominant bacterial species that have the ability to degrade HTs. These tanninolytic microorganisms possess tannin-degrading ability and have developed certain mechanisms to tolerate tannins in feeds. Hence, selection of efficient tanninolytic microbes and transinoculation among animals for long-term benefits become areas of intensive interest. Here, we review the effects of tannins on ruminants, the existence and significance of tannin-degrading microorganisms in diverse groups of animals and the mechanisms that tannin-degrading microorganisms have developed to counter the toxic effects of tannin.

  10. Microflora analysis of a child with severe combined immune deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Kropp, K. D.; Molina, T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a microflora analysis of a 5-year-old male child with severe combined immune deficiency who was delivered by Caesarean section and continuously maintained in an isolator. Despite precautions, it was found that the child had come in contact with at least 54 different microbial contaminants. While his skin autoflora was similar to that of a reference group of healthy male adults in numbers of different species and the number of viable cells present per square centimeter of surface area, the subject's autoflora differed from the reference group in that significantly fewer anaerobic species were recovered from the patient's mouth and feces. It is suggested that the child's remaining disease free shows that the reported bacteria are noninvasive or that the unaffected components of the child's immune defense mechanisms are important.

  11. Operative control of human microflora in confined habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Solovieva, Zoya; Panina, Jana

    The problem of operative control and transmission of information on microbial state of humans in artificial environment is much actual especially in conditions of long-term space missions and in perspective mission to Mars. There was revealed that in long-term missions there is a periodical accumulation of pathogenicity potential in the system "human-microbes" which lead to possible development of opportunistic infections of crew members in spaceflight. To investigate covering tissues microflora of volunteers participated in 14 and 105 days isolation in confined habitat the new non-culture method was elaborated, based on computer treatment of native swab, equally distributed on total surface of microscopy glass and Gram stained. It allows to obtain information on 3 basic indices -morphology, tinctorial and quantitative, thus it could detect increasing of total microbial amount, growth of staphylococci which is important for early diagnostics of microbial disbalance on covering tissues of volunteers. The analysis is performed with the aid of authomatized system of digital microscopy dedicated to recognition of microbial images on the preparate and for further transmission of these digital images via telecommunication network, thus making possibility of remote consultancies. The data of 14-day experiment reveals increasing of potential pathogens on 7th day of isolation with further decrease on 14th day, changes of microflora in 105-day isolation has the tendency of periodical accumulation. In general, the results were compatible with ones obtained by classical bacteriological studies. The results are significant under the microbial quantity of 104 CFU/swab and higher, which is important for analyzing of microbial groups if they grow in quantities, increasing normal values.

  12. Effects of a Skin Neuropeptide (Substance P) on Cutaneous Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Ramdani, Yasmina; Jaouen, Thomas; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Lati, Elian; Yvergnaux, Florent; Driouich, Azzedine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Farmer, Christine; Misery, Laurent; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin is the largest human neuroendocrine organ and hosts the second most numerous microbial population but the interaction of skin neuropeptides with the microflora has never been investigated. We studied the effect of Substance P (SP), a peptide released by nerve endings in the skin on bacterial virulence. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacillus cereus, a member of the skin transient microflora, was used as a model. Exposure to SP strongly stimulated the cytotoxicity of B. cereus (+553±3% with SP 10−6 M) and this effect was rapid (<5 min). Infection of keratinocytes with SP treated B. cereus led to a rise in caspase1 and morphological alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. Secretome analysis revealed that SP stimulated the release of collagenase and superoxide dismutase. Moreover, we also noted a shift in the surface polarity of the bacteria linked to a peel-off of the S-layer and the release of S-layer proteins. Meanwhile, the biofilm formation activity of B. cereus was increased. The Thermo unstable ribosomal Elongation factor (Ef-Tu) was identified as the SP binding site in B. cereus. Other Gram positive skin bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis also reacted to SP by an increase of virulence. Thermal water from Uriage-les-Bains and an artificial polysaccharide (Teflose®) were capable to antagonize the effect of SP on bacterial virulence. Conclusions/Significance SP is released in sweat during stress and is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of numerous skin diseases through neurogenic inflammation. Our study suggests that a direct effect of SP on the skin microbiote should be another mechanism. PMID:24250813

  13. The oral microflora in obesity and type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shillitoe, Edward; Weinstock, Ruth; Kim, Taewan; Simon, Howard; Planer, Jessica; Noonan, Susan; Cooney, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is prevalent in people with obesity. It has been proposed that these conditions are related to specific features of the microflora of the mouth and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Hyperglycemia often resolves quickly after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) but the role of the GI microflora cannot be examined easily because of reduced intestinal mobility. We propose that the study of microorganisms present in the mouth of patients undergoing RYGB will contribute to our understanding of the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Objective To conduct a feasibility study to examine differences in oral microbes in obese patients with and without T2DM and to determine whether it is feasible to measure changes after gastric bypass surgery. Methods Individuals with morbid obesity (n=29), of whom 13 had T2DM, were studied. Oral rinses, stool samples, and blood samples were obtained before RYGB, and oral rinses and blood samples were obtained at 2 and 12 weeks postsurgery. Results Prior to surgery, participants with T2DM had slightly higher total levels of oral bacteria than those without diabetes. Those with HbA1c > 6.5% had rather lower levels of Bifidobacteria in the mouth and stool. At 2 weeks post-RYGB, patients with T2DM were able to reduce or discontinue their hypoglycemic medications. Stool samples could not be obtained but oral rinses were readily available. The levels of oral Bifidobacteria had increased tenfold and levels of circulating endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha had decreased. Conclusions The study of oral bacteria before and after RYGB is feasible and should be tested in larger patient populations to increase our understanding of the role of microorganisms in the pathogenesis of obesity and T2DM. PMID:23119124

  14. Bengt E. Gustafsson memorial lecture. Function of the normal human microflora.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, S L

    1986-01-01

    The normal human microflora maintains a delicate balance between its constituent parts, numbering 10(11) bacteria per gram with over 400 different species. Certain metabolic functions and enzyme activities can be attributed to the microflora, and these play a role in metabolizing nutrients, vitamins, drugs, endogenous hormones and carcinogens. Our laboratory has studied estrogen and cholesterol metabolism and activation of colon carcinogens. Three techniques to change the flora and its enzymatic activities have been used. Switching the diet from an omnivore diet to a vegetarian diet decreases bacterial deconjugating enzymes in the intestine. Administering antibiotics also suppresses the metabolic activity of the microflora. Similar suppressive effects can be achieved by feeding a human strain of Lactobacillus that implants in the gastrointestinal tract. Manipulation of these various modalities can maximize the beneficial activities of the intestinal microflora. PMID:3103209

  15. Effect of disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora on the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Thornton, E A

    1993-04-01

    Oral pretreatment of mice with either a mixture of kanamycin and erythromycin or metronidazole to modify the gut microflora greatly enhanced the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A given by mouth. This lends support to the suggestion that disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora in animals such as cattle, which often carry the organism in the rumen, may lead to intestinal multiplication and faecal excretion, thereby providing a source of infection that may lead to necrobacillosis of the body surface. PMID:8472777

  16. Effects of treatment with antimicrobial agents on the human colonic microflora

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Fatemeh; Sutherland, John B; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are the most valuable means available for treating bacterial infections. However, the administration of therapeutic doses of antimicrobial agents to patients is a leading cause of disturbance of the normal gastrointestinal microflora. This disturbance results in diminishing the natural defense mechanisms provided by the colonic microbial ecosystem, making the host vulnerable to infection by commensal microorganisms or nosocomial pathogens. In this minireview, the impacts of antimicrobials, individually and in combinations, on the human colonic microflora are discussed. PMID:19337440

  17. Role of intestinal microflora in the degradation of DDT by rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1968-01-01

    Though liver homogenates show apparent microsomal enzyme DDT-dehydrochlorinase activity, in the intact fish the intestinal microflora play a major role in DDT detoxication. Since the presence of this microflora in fish depends on the recent intake of food (12), the rate of detoxication and hence the toxicity of ingested DDT to the rainbow trout will probably depend somewhat on the available food supply.

  18. 16S community profiling identifies proton pump inhibitor related differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rachel; Hu, Lan; Amirault, Janine; Khatwa, Umakanth; Ward, Doyle V.; Onderdonk, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that PPI use results in changes in gastric microflora which, through full column reflux, results in lung and oropharyngeal microflora changes. Study design We performed a prospective, cross sectional cohort study of 116 children (57 off and 59 on PPIs) undergoing simultaneous bronchoscopy and upper endoscopy for the evaluation of chronic cough. We performed 16S sequencing on gastric, bronchoalveolar lavage and oropharyngeal fluid. Fifty patients also underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) testing. Results Streptococcus was more abundant in the gastric fluid of patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and there was a significant correlation with PPI dose (mg/kg/day) and abundance of gastric Streptococcus (p=0.01). There was also a significant difference in the abundance of oropharyngeal Streptococcus in PPI treated patients. Eight unique bacterial genera were found in the gastric and lung fluid but not in the oropharyngeal suggesting exchange between the two sites and two of the seven (Lactococcus, Acinetobacter) were more abundant in patients with more full column reflux, suggesting direct aspiration. Principal component analysis revealed greater overlap between gastric and lung than oropharyngeal microflora. Conclusions PPI use was associated with differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora. Although microflora exchange can occur between all three sites, gastric and lung microflora are more closely related and the mechanism of exchange between sites may be aspiration of full column reflux. PMID:25661411

  19. Effect of chlorhexidine gluconate mouth wash on the plaque microflora in children using intra oral appliances.

    PubMed

    Amitha, H; Munshi, A K

    1995-01-01

    The effect of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth wash (Hexidine) on the plaque microflora was evaluated on children wearing intra oral removable appliances. Plaque samples were collected from the enamel sections, both primary and permanent, mounted on the removable appliances. These appliances were worn by 12 children for one week. Plaque was allowed to accumulate on the in situ test sites and on the adjacent natural dentition. At the end of the experimental period the plaque microflora associated with the enamel sections were compared with that obtained from lingual and interproximal areas of the lower molar teeth. It was also compared with a control group of 12 children without an appliance. In addition, the effect of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth wash on the plaque microflora for the next 14 days was also determined on both the groups. Although some quantitative difference was found between the proportion of isolates obtained from the different enamel surfaces, it was not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant increase in the isolates of plaque microflora after the insertion of removable appliance in children which decreased significantly with the use of 10 ml of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouth wash twice a day. The study indicates that the primary and permanent tooth specimens mounted on the intra-oral device collected plaque microflora similar to that present on the adjacent natural dentition and that chlorhexidine gluconate mouth wash therapy is effective in reducing plaque microflora in children with removable appliances. PMID:8634191

  20. Nitroreduction and formation of hemoglobin adducts in rats with a human intestinal microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Straetemans, M.M.E.; Koopman, J.P.; Bos, R.P.

    1994-10-01

    In the covalent binding of nitroarenes to macromolecules, nitroreduction is an important step. The intestinal microflora represents an enormous potential of bacterial nitroreductase activity. As a consequence, the in vivo nitroreduction of orally administerednitroarenes is primarily located in the intestine. In this study, we have investigated the nitroreduction of 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF) by a human microflora in female Wistar rats. Germ-free (FG) rats were equipped with a bacterial flora derived from human feces. Nontreated GF rats and GF animals equipped with a conventional rat flora were used as controls. The composition of the human and the conventional microflora isolated from the rats were consistent with the microflora of the administered feces. In the rats receiving only sunflower seed oil, no adducts were detected. The animals equipped with a human or rat microflora that received 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) formed 2-AF hemoglobin (Hb)-adducts at average levels mean {+-} 0.003 and 0.043 {+-} 0.010 {mu}mole/g Hb, respectively. In the FG rats, an adduct level of 0.57 {+-} 0.09 was determined after 2-AF administration and non adducts were detected after 2-NF administration. The results show that nitroreduction by an acquired human intestinal microflora and subsequent adduct formation can be studied in the rate in vivo. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Adaptive phenotypic plasticity in the Midas cichlid fish pharyngeal jaw and its relevance in adaptive radiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phenotypic evolution and its role in the diversification of organisms is a central topic in evolutionary biology. A neglected factor during the modern evolutionary synthesis, adaptive phenotypic plasticity, more recently attracted the attention of many evolutionary biologists and is now recognized as an important ingredient in both population persistence and diversification. The traits and directions in which an ancestral source population displays phenotypic plasticity might partly determine the trajectories in morphospace, which are accessible for an adaptive radiation, starting from the colonization of a novel environment. In the case of repeated colonizations of similar environments from the same source population this "flexible stem" hypothesis predicts similar phenotypes to arise in repeated subsequent radiations. The Midas Cichlid (Amphilophus spp.) in Nicaragua has radiated in parallel in several crater-lakes seeded by populations originating from the Nicaraguan Great Lakes. Here, we tested phenotypic plasticity in the pharyngeal jaw of Midas Cichlids. The pharyngeal jaw apparatus of cichlids, a second set of jaws functionally decoupled from the oral ones, is known to mediate ecological specialization and often differs strongly between sister-species. Results We performed a common garden experiment raising three groups of Midas cichlids on food differing in hardness and calcium content. Analyzing the lower pharyngeal jaw-bones we find significant differences between diet groups qualitatively resembling the differences found between specialized species. Observed differences in pharyngeal jaw expression between groups were attributable to the diet's mechanical resistance, whereas surplus calcium in the diet was not found to be of importance. Conclusions The pharyngeal jaw apparatus of Midas Cichlids can be expressed plastically if stimulated mechanically during feeding. Since this trait is commonly differentiated - among other traits - between

  2. Tube Law of the Pharyngeal Airway in Sleeping Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Genta, Pedro R.; Edwards, Bradley A.; Sands, Scott A.; Owens, Robert L.; Butler, James P.; Loring, Stephen H.; White, David P.; Wellman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive pharyngeal collapse during sleep. However, the dynamics of pharyngeal narrowing and re-expansion during flow-limited breathing are not well described. The static pharyngeal tube law (end-expiratory area versus luminal pressure) has demonstrated increasing pharyngeal compliance as luminal pressure decreases, indicating that the airway would be sucked closed with sufficient inspiratory effort. On the contrary, the airway is rarely sucked closed during inspiratory flow limitation, suggesting that the airway is getting stiffer. Therefore, we hypothesized that during inspiratory flow limitation, as opposed to static conditions, the pharynx becomes stiffer as luminal pressure decreases. Methods: Upper airway endoscopy and simultaneous measurements of airflow and epiglottic pressure were performed during natural nonrapid eye movement sleep. Continuous positive (or negative) airway pressure was used to induce flow limitation. Flow-limited breaths were selected for airway cross-sectional area measurements. Relative airway area was quantified as a percentage of end-expiratory area. Inspiratory airway radial compliance was calculated at each quintile of epiglottic pressure versus airway area plot (tube law). Results: Eighteen subjects (14 males) with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index = 57 ± 27 events/h), aged 49 ± 8 y, with a body mass index of 35 ± 6 kg/m2 were studied. A total of 163 flow limited breaths were analyzed (9 ± 3 breaths per subject). Compliances at the fourth (2.0 ± 4.7 % area/cmH2O) and fifth (0.0 ± 1.7 % area/cmH2O) quintiles were significantly lower than the first (12.2 ± 5.5 % area/cmH2O) pressure quintile (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The pharyngeal tube law is concave (airway gets stiffer as luminal pressure decreases) during respiratory cycles under inspiratory flow limitation. Citation: Genta PR, Edwards BA, Sands SA, Owens RL, Butler JP, Loring SH, White DP, Wellman A. Tube law of

  3. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  4. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis—a state known as “aerobic glycolysis.” Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state. PMID:27308416

  5. Pediatric Pharyngeal IgD-positive Monoclonal Plasmacytoid and Plasma Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanxiang; Long, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric neoplasm with monoclonal proliferation of lymphoplasmacytoid lymphocytes and plasma cells is exceedingly rare and has essentially never been reported in immunocompetent children. Here, we report a previously healthy 13-year-old girl with a pharyngeal mass and enlarged cervical lymph nodes. The pharyngeal mass was composed of CD138, CD79a, MUM-1, IgD, CD20, PAX-5, CD43, λ-restricted monoclonal plasmacytoid, and plasma cells. Scattered CD20, PAX-5 B cells were present in the background. The patient was treated as localized non-Hodgkin lymphoma (stage II) with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone and is in complete remission at 17 months from the last chemotherapy. PMID:25851555

  6. An 11-year-old boy with pharyngitis and cough: Lemierre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mação, Patricia; Cancelinha, Candida; Lopes, Paulo; Rodrigues, Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The authors present the case of an 11-year-old boy with pharyngitis, treated with amoxicillin, that worsened on day 7, with cough, high fever and refusal to eat. Lethargy and respiratory distress were noted. Based on radiographic findings of bilateral infiltrates he was diagnosed with pneumonia and started on intravenous ampicillin and erythromycin. Two days later he complained of right-sided neck pain and a palpable mass was identified. An ultrasound showed partial thrombosis of the right internal jugular vein and a lung CT scan revealed multiple septic embolic lesions. Lemierre syndrome was diagnosed, antibiotic treatment adjusted and anticoagulation started. A neck CT-scan showed a large parapharyngeal abscess. His clinical condition improved gradually and after 3 weeks of intravenous antibiotics he was discharged home on oral treatment. This case illustrates the importance of diagnosing Lemierre syndrome in the presence of pharyngitis with localised neck pain and respiratory distress, to prevent potentially fatal complications. PMID:23616317

  7. Exudative pharyngitis possibly due to Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum, a new challenge in the differential diagnosis of diphtheria.

    PubMed Central

    Izurieta, H. S.; Strebel, P. M.; Youngblood, T.; Hollis, D. G.; Popovic, T.

    1997-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum has rarely been reported to cause disease in humans, despite its common presence in the flora of the upper respiratory tract. We report here a case of exudative pharyngitis with pseudomembrane possibly caused by C. pseudodiphtheriticum in a 4-year-old girl. The case initially triggered clinical and laboratory suspicion of diphtheria. Because C. pseudodiphtheriticum can be easily confused with Corynebacterium diphtheriae in Gram stain, clarification of its role in the pathogenesis of exudative pharyngitis in otherwise healthy persons is of public health importance. Simple and rapid screening tests to differentiate C. pseudodiphtheriticum from C. diphtheriae should be performed to prevent unnecessary concern in the community and unnecessary outbreak control measures. PMID:9126447

  8. Calretinin-immunoreactivity in the oro-facial and pharyngeal regions of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; Jacobowitz, D M; Sugimoto, T

    1992-11-01

    Calretinin-immunoreactivity (CR-ir) was examined in the rat oro-facial and pharyngeal tissues using an immunofluorescence method. CR-ir was distributed in the entire size range of trigeminal ganglion neurons. CR-ir was also observed in nerve fibers surrounding neuronal cell bodies in autonomic ganglia, and in nerve endings in the lip, tongue, incisal papilla, soft palate, pharynx and epiglottis. CR-immunoreactive nerve endings were all in close proximity to the epithelium, and classified into 2 types; simple (free nerve ending) and taste-bud-related types. In the salivary gland, positive nerve fibers were seen around large excretory ducts. The present study indicates that viscerosensory (probably including gustatory) nerve fibers innervating the oral and pharyngeal tissues contain CR, while somotosensory nerve fibers innervating the facial skin are devoid of CR. PMID:1491782

  9. Fluoroscopic and computed tomographic features of the pharyngeal airway in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Suratt, P M; Dee, P; Atkinson, R L; Armstrong, P; Wilhoit, S C

    1983-04-01

    Because it has been suggested that patients with obstructive sleep apnea have a narrower pharyngeal airway than normal persons, we performed lateral fluoroscopy and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the pharynx in patients with this syndrome. Fluoroscopy in 6 sleeping patients showed that the obstruction always began during inspiration when the soft palate touched the tongue and posterior pharyngeal wall. The CT scans in 9 awake subjects demonstrated that the narrowest section of the airway in patients and in control subjects was the region posterior to the soft palate. The cross-sectional area of this region was significantly narrower in patients than it was in control subjects (p less than 0.001). Because a narrow airway would be more likely to collapse during inspiration than a normal one would (Bernoulli's Principle), we conclude that the narrow airways we observed in awake patients may be an important contributing factor in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:6838055

  10. Methods to determine aerobic endurance.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Laurent; Léger, Luc; Legros, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Physiological testing of elite athletes requires the correct identification and assessment of sports-specific underlying factors. It is now recognised that performance in long-distance events is determined by maximal oxygen uptake (V(2 max)), energy cost of exercise and the maximal fractional utilisation of V(2 max) in any realised performance or as a corollary a set percentage of V(2 max) that could be endured as long as possible. This later ability is defined as endurance, and more precisely aerobic endurance, since V(2 max) sets the upper limit of aerobic pathway. It should be distinguished from endurance ability or endurance performance, which are synonymous with performance in long-distance events. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess aerobic endurance. They are numerous and can be classified into two categories, namely direct and indirect methods. Direct methods bring together all indices that allow either a complete or a partial representation of the power-duration relationship, while indirect methods revolve around the determination of the so-called anaerobic threshold (AT). With regard to direct methods, performance in a series of tests provides a more complete and presumably more valid description of the power-duration relationship than performance in a single test, even if both approaches are well correlated with each other. However, the question remains open to determine which systems model should be employed among the several available in the literature, and how to use them in the prescription of training intensities. As for indirect methods, there is quantitative accumulation of data supporting the utilisation of the AT to assess aerobic endurance and to prescribe training intensities. However, it appears that: there is no unique intensity corresponding to the AT, since criteria available in the literature provide inconsistent results; and the non-invasive determination of the AT using ventilatory and heart rate

  11. In vivo polarization dependant Second and Third harmonic generation imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans pharyngeal muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidis, G.; Troulinaki, K.; Fotakis, C.; Tavernarakis, N.

    2009-07-01

    In this study Second and Third harmonic generation (SHG-THG) imaging measurements were performed to the pharyngeal muscles of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in vivo with linearly polarized laser beam. Complementary information about the anatomy of the pharynx and the morphology of the anterior part of the worm were extracted. THG signals proved to have no dependence on incident light polarization, while SHG images are highly sensitive to the changes of the incident linearly polarized light.

  12. Pharyngeal shape and dimensions in healthy subjects, snorers, and patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed Central

    Rodenstein, D O; Dooms, G; Thomas, Y; Liistro, G; Stanescu, D C; Culée, C; Aubert-Tulkens, G

    1990-01-01

    To characterise the relation between pharyngeal anatomy and sleep related disordered breathing, 17 men with complaints of snoring were studied by all night polysomnography. Ten of them had obstructive sleep apnoea (mean (SD) apnoea-hypopnoea index 56.3 (41.7), age 52 (10) years, body mass index 31.4 (5.3) kg/m2); whereas seven were simple snorers (apnoea-hypopnoea index 6.7 (4.6), age 40 (17) years, body mass index 25.9 (4.3) kg/m2). The pharynx was studied by magnetic resonance imaging in all patients and in a group of eight healthy subjects (age 27 (6) years, body mass index 21.8 (2.2) kg/m2, both significantly lower than in the patients; p less than 0.05). On the midsagittal section and six transverse sections equally spaced between the nasopharynx and the hypopharynx several anatomical measurements were performed. Results showed that there was no difference between groups in most magnetic resonance imaging measurements, but that on transverse sections the pharyngeal cross section had an elliptic shape with the long axis oriented in the coronal plane in normal subjects, whereas in apnoeic and snoring patients the pharynx was circular or had an elliptic shape but with the long axis oriented in the sagittal plane. It is suggested that the change in pharyngeal cross sectional shape, secondary to a reduction in pharyngeal transverse diameter, may be related to the risk of developing sleep related disordered breathing. Images PMID:2247861

  13. Group A Streptococci Bind to Mucin and Human Pharyngeal Cells through Sialic Acid-Containing Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Patricia A.; Pancholi, Vijaykumar; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in the colonization of group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes) is adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells. Prior to adherence to their target tissue, the first barrier that the streptococci encounter is the mucous layer of the respiratory tract. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interaction between mucin, the major glycoprotein component of mucus, and streptococci. We report here that S. pyogenes is able to bind to bovine submaxillary mucin in solid-phase microtiter plate assays. Western blots probed with 125I-labeled mucin and a panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that the streptococcal M protein is one of two cell wall-associated proteins responsible for this binding. The binding was further localized to the N-terminal portion of the M molecule. Further analysis revealed that the M protein binds to the sialic acid moieties on mucin, and this interaction seems to be based on M-protein conformation rather than specific amino acid sequences. We found that sialic acid also plays a critical role in the adherence of an M6 streptococcal strain to the Detroit 562 human pharyngeal cell line and have identified α2-6-linked sialic acid as an important sialylated linkage for M-protein recognition. Western blot analysis of extracted pharyngeal cell membrane proteins identified three potential sialic acid-containing receptors for the M protein. The results are the first to show that sialic acid not only is involved in the binding of the streptococci to mucin but also plays an important role in adherence of group A streptococci to the pharyngeal cell surface. PMID:11705914

  14. Outbreak of Group A beta hemolytic Streptococcus pharyngitis in a Peruvian military facility, April 2012.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Mariana; Valle, Ruben; Reaves, Eric J; Loayza, Luis; Gonzalez, Sofia; Bernal, Maria; Soto, Giselle; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Kasper, Matthew R; Tilley, Drake H; De Mattos, Carlos A; Brown, Jason R; Bausch, David G

    2013-06-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS), or Streptococcus pyogenes, is a common cause of acute pharyngitis as well as other diseases. Closed populations such as those living on military bases, nursing homes, and prisons are particularly vulnerable to GAS outbreaks due to crowding that facilitates person-to-person transmission. This report details a large outbreak of GAS pharyngitis at a Peruvian military training facility near Lima, Peru, in April 2012. Initial findings showed 145 cases. However, as the investigation continued it was revealed that some trainees may have concealed their illness to avoid real or perceived negative consequences of seeking medical care. A subsequent anonymous survey of all trainees revealed at least 383 cases of pharyngitis among the facility's 1,549 trainees and an attack rate of 34 percent among the 1,137 respondents. The epidemic curve revealed a pattern consistent with routine person-to-person transmission, although a point-source initiating event could not be excluded. Laboratory results showed GAS emm type 80.1 to be the culprit pathogen, an organism not commonly implicated in outbreaks of GAS in the Americas. Barious unique and illustrative features of outbreak investigation in military facilities and populations are discussed. PMID:23819536

  15. Usefulness of Leukocyte Esterase Test Versus Rapid Strep Test for Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A study to compare the usage of throat swab testing for leukocyte esterase on a test strip(urine dip stick-multi stick) to rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of Group A Beta hemolytic streptococci in cases of acute pharyngitis in children. Hypothesis: The testing of throat swab for leukocyte esterase on test strip currently used for urine testing may be used to detect throat infection and might be as useful as rapid strep. Methods: All patients who come with a complaint of sore throat and fever were examined clinically for erythema of pharynx, tonsils and also for any exudates. Informed consent was obtained from the parents and assent from the subjects. 3 swabs were taken from pharyngo-tonsillar region, testing for culture, rapid strep & Leukocyte Esterase. Results: Total number is 100. Cultures 9(+); for rapid strep== 84(-) and16 (+); For LE== 80(-) and 20(+) Statistics: From data configuration Rapid Strep versus LE test don’t seem to be a random (independent) assignment but extremely aligned. The Statistical results show rapid and LE show very agreeable results. Calculated Value of Chi Squared Exceeds Tabulated under 1 Degree Of Freedom (P<.0.0001) reject Null Hypothesis and Conclude Alternative Conclusions: Leukocyte esterase on throat swab is as useful as rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of strep pharyngitis on test strip currently used for urine dip stick causing acute pharyngitis in children. PMID:27335975

  16. Embryonic development and skeletogenesis of the pharyngeal jaw apparatus in the cichlid Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    le Pabic, Pierre; Stellwag, Edmund J; Scemama, Jean-Luc

    2009-11-01

    The evolution of a specialized pharyngeal jaw apparatus (PJA) has been argued to be the key evolutionary innovation that allowed the explosive adaptive radiation of cichlid fishes in East African lakes. Subsequent studies together with recent molecular phylogenies have shown that similar innovations evolved independently several times within the teleosts, which poses the questions: (1) how similar are the developmental mechanisms responsible for these changes in divergent taxa and (2) how did such complex features arise independently in evolution? A detailed knowledge of PJA development in cichlids and other teleosts is needed to address these questions. Here, we provide a detailed account of the development of the PJA in one species of cichlid, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), from the early segmentation and patterning of its embryonic precursors - pharyngeal arches 3 to 7 - to its ossification. We find that pharyngeal segmentation occurs sequentially from anterior to posterior during early segmentation stages through the mid-pharyngula period. We show a clear combinatorial code of Hox gene expression such that each posterior arch is defined by a distinctive Hox signature. Posterior arch chondrogenesis in tilapia is essentially complete by the end of the hatching period, and most elements become ossified over the next two days. Our results reveal that both the fusion of lower jaw bones and articulation between the neurocranium and upper jaws occur during post-embryonic development. PMID:19718717

  17. Developmental sexual dimorphism of the oral and pharyngeal portions of the vocal tract: An imaging studya

    PubMed Central

    Vorperian, Houri K.; Wang, Shubing; Schimek, E. Michael; Durtschi, Reid B.; Kent, Ray D.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Chung, Moo K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The anatomic origin for prepubertal vowel acoustic differences between males and females remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine developmental sex differences in vocal tract (VT) length and its oral and pharyngeal portions. Method Nine VT variables were measured from 605 imaging studies (MRI and CT) between birth and 19 years. Given sex differences in growth rate (Vorperian et al., 2009), assessment of sex differences was done using a localized comparison window of 60 months. Analysis entailed applying this comparison window first to four discrete age cohorts, followed by a progressive assessment where this comparison window was moved in one month increments from birth across all ages. Results Findings document significant postpubertal sex differences in both the oral and pharyngeal portions of the VT. Also, periods of significant prepubertal sex differences in the oral region first, followed by segments in the pharyngeal region. Conclusions Assessment of developmental sex differences using localized age ranges is effective in unveiling sex differences that growth rate differences may conceal. Findings on the presence of prepubertal sex differences in the oral region of the VT may clarify in part the anatomic basis of documented prepubertal acoustic differences. PMID:21106698

  18. [A patient with vertebral artery dissection who initially suffered from pharyngeal pain].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Omi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Abe, Hiroshi; Okawa, Masakazu; Higashi, Toshio; Matsumoto, Juntaro; Takano, Koichi; Inoue, Tooru

    2013-12-01

    We have encountered a case of a patient with bilateral vertebral artery (VA) dissection who suffered from severe pharyngeal pain. A 61-year-old man, who initially visited a nearby hospital for investigation of mild headache, was pointed out to have a left VA aneurysm. The next morning, severe pharyngeal pain on the right side suddenly occurred. The cause was unknown even when consultation was made to an otolaryngology and oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Sore throat improved in two days. On the 12th day after pharyngeal pain, the patient entered our hospital with a diagnosis of VA dissection. Imaging studies indicated severe stenosis of the right VA and an aneurysm of the left VA which confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral VA dissection. After severe stenosis of the right VA improved a little, the trapping of the left VA aneurysm was performed with bypass surgery of the occipital artery to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Although there have been reports of glossopharyngeal neuralgia due to compression of dissective aneurysms of VA, no report exists in terms of a sore throat due to VA dissection without glossopharyngeal neuralgia. This symptom was considered to be involved in the referred pain. PMID:24317884

  19. Relationship between pharyngitis and peri-odontoid pannus: A new etiology for some Chiari I malformations?

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Hendrix, Philipp; Oakes, Peter; Loukas, Marios; Chern, Joshua J; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Oakes, W Jerry

    2015-07-01

    The pathophysiology underlying Chiari I malformations (CIMs) provides room for debate with several theories attempting to address this issue. We retrospectively reviewed many of our past patients with pediatric CIMs (specifically, those with peri-odontoid pannus), and present a hypothesis for the development of the malformation in some of said patients. Our experience with the pediatric CIM has shown that almost 1 in 20 patients who present with symptoms is found to have a peri-odontoid pannus. These masses ranged in size from 4 to 11 mm in diameter. Forty percent had a history of clinically significant pharyngitis or pharyngeal abscess. Pannus formation around the dens (odontoid) resulted in ventral compression of the craniocervical junction in each of these patients. Highlighting the hypermobility that causes such lesions, following fusion, the pannus and symptoms in several patients were diminished. Impairment of normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation out of the fourth ventricle and across the craniocervical junction appears to be a plausible endpoint in this discussion and a suitable explanation for some patients with CIM. Still, the mechanisms by which cerebrospinal fluid circulation is compromised may be variable and are not well understood. This is the first study dedicated to the evaluation of pannus formation in the CIM population. We hypothesize that pharyngeal inflammatory conditions contribute to the formation and progression of hindbrain herniation in a small subset of patients with CIMs. PMID:25974330

  20. Does body mass index matter while selecting the flap type for pharyngeal reconstructions?

    PubMed

    Calli, Caglar; Teknos, Theodoros N; Agrawal, Amit; Schuller, David E; Ozer, Enver; Songu, Murat

    2014-05-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of patient-related factors, such as the body mass index (BMI) and tumor size, in selecting the flap type for the reconstruction of pharyngeal defects. This retrospective review included 182 patients with pharyngeal defect reconstructions with free and pedicled flaps at the Ohio State University from January 2005 to December 2008. We conducted a retrospective comparison of variety of different flap reconstruction techniques. We compared different flap reconstruction with BMI and tumor size without functional outcome such as swallowing and speech data. Although there was no statistically significant correlation (P > 0.05) when comparing the free flaps with pedicled flaps according to the BMI and tumor size, there was an obvious tendency to prefer radial forearm free flap over anterolateral thigh free flap in patients who are overweight and those with obesity with a ratio of 32:3. In the same group of patients, a similar tendency was observed to prefer fibular free flap over iliac crest free flap with a ratio of 14:5, whereas the ratio was becoming 3:5 in favor of iliac crest free flap over fibular free flap in patients with BMI of 24 or lower. Despite the fact that surgeons' experience with a certain flap type is one of the most important factors while determining which flap to reconstruct, BMI might have a significant impact while selecting the free flap types for the reconstruction of pharyngeal defects. PMID:24785755

  1. Microflora of Feta cheese from four Greek manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Urso, Rosalinda; Dolci, Paola; Comi, Giuseppe; Cocolin, Luca

    2008-08-15

    The components of the microflora of four Feta cheeses, produced by different Greek manufacturers, were determined by culture dependent and independent techniques. Isolates from microbiological media were first grouped by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and then representatives of each DGGE group were sequenced for identification purposes. DNA and RNA, extracted directly from the cheese, were subjected to PCR-DGGE. Moreover, Feta cheeses were subjected to FISH analysis in order to identify viable bacterial populations. The microbial ecology, as represented by the Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and yeast populations, was different for the four cheeses. The main LAB species isolated were Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus coryniformis and Lactobacillus fermentum. However, some inconsistencies were observed between the results obtained with the culture dependent and the culture independent approach. In the case of the yeasts, the results obtained by PCR-DGGE compared very well with those obtained by the conventional microbiological analysis and the main species found were Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia fermentans and C. zeylanoides. FISH analysis highlighted viable but not culturable populations of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactococcus spp. RAPD-PCR performed on the L. plantarum isolates revealed a cheese specific distribution and a temperature dependent clustering. PMID:18555549

  2. Microflora associated with spacecraft and assembly facility surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Duc, M. T.; Osman, S.; Dekas, A. E.; Moissl, C.; Newcombe, D.; Venkateswaran, K.

    The direct analysis of microbial populations contained within low biomass samples is germane to a multitude of NASA programs Although stringent maintenance helps to keep the bioburden associated with spacecraft and assembly facility surfaces nominal the microorganisms that do persist however sparse they may be threaten forward contamination on future missions While examining the cultivable microbial diversity associated with spacecraft and assembly facility surfaces over the past 6 years 1999-2005 the recurring predominance of Bacillus pumilus has been observed Since its endospores are often capable of withstanding exposure to peroxides UV and gamma radiation and long bouts of desiccation the repeated isolation of B pumilus from the surfaces of spacecraft may bear great consequence to planetary protection Microflora seemingly tailored to enduring environmentally harsh extreme conditions have also been isolated from these surfaces Upon subjecting samples collected from clean room surfaces to UV-C irradiation 5 hydrogen peroxide heat shock 85 C 15 minutes acidic pH 3 0 alkaline pH 11 0 and saline 25 NaCl conditions and incubated at varying temperatures 4 C to 65 C members of the Bacillus genera accounted for a mere 40 of the isolated population Furthermore isolates belonging to the Bacillaceae family were more physiologically diverse than those isolated in previous studies including thermophiles

  3. Microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin on human colonic microflora in chemostats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haihong; Yao, Junping; Wu, Qinghua; Wei, Yajing; Dai, Menghong; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the microbiological safety of tilmicosin on human intestinal microflora, four chemostat models of healthy human colonic ecosystems were exposed to tilmicosin (0, 0.436, 4.36, and 43.6 μg/mL) for 7 days. Prior to and during drug exposure, three microbiological endpoints were monitored daily including short-chain fatty acids, bacterial counts and macrolide susceptibility. Colonization resistance of each community was determined by 3 successive daily challenges of Salmonella typhimurium. Genes associated with virulence and macrolide resistance in Enterococcus faecalis were determined by PCR. Transcriptional expression of the virulence gene (gelE) in E. faecalis was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Our results showed that different concentrations of tilmicosin did not disrupt the colonization resistance in each chemostat. During exposure to 4.36 and 43.6 μg/mL tilmicosin, the Bacteroides fragilis population was significantly decreased while the proportion of resistant Enterococci increased. After long-term exposure to the highest concentration (43.6 μg/mL) of tilmicosin, the gelE gene was significantly up-regulated in the high-level macrolide resistant strains that also contained the ermB resistance gene. This study was the first of its kind to evaluate the microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin using a chemostat model. These findings also provide new insight into the co-occurrence of macrolide resistance and virulence in E. faecalis under tilmicosin selective pressure. PMID:26190303

  4. Aerobic granular processes: Current research trends.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Aerobic granules are large biological aggregates with compact interiors that can be used in efficient wastewater treatment. This mini-review presents new researches on the development of aerobic granular processes, extended treatments for complicated pollutants, granulation mechanisms and enhancements of granule stability in long-term operation or storage, and the reuse of waste biomass as renewable resources. A discussion on the challenges of, and prospects for, the commercialization of aerobic granular process is provided. PMID:26873285

  5. Selecting anti-microbial treatment of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Ruban, Katerina; Bellen, Gert

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a vaginal infectious condition which is often confused with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or with the intermediate microflora as diagnosed by Nugent's method to detect BV on Gram-stained specimens. However, although both conditions reflect a state of lactobacillary disruption in the vagina, leading to an increase in pH, BV and AV differ profoundly. While BV is a noninflammatory condition composed of a multiplex array of different anaerobic bacteria in high quantities, AV is rather sparely populated by one or two enteric commensal flora bacteria, like Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylocuccus aureus, or Escherichia coli. AV is typically marked by either an increased inflammatory response or by prominent signs of epithelial atrophy or both. The latter condition, if severe, is also called desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. As AV is per exclusionem diagnosed by wet mount microscopy, it is a mistake to treat just vaginal culture results. Vaginal cultures only serve as follow-up data in clinical research projects and are at most used in clinical practice to confirm the diagnosis or exclude Candida infection. AV requires treatment based on microscopy findings and a combined local treatment with any of the following which may yield the best results: antibiotic (infectious component), steroids (inflammatory component), and/or estrogen (atrophy component). In cases with Candida present on microscopy or culture, antifungals must be tried first in order to see if other treatment is still needed. Vaginal rinsing with povidone iodine can provide rapid relief of symptoms but does not provide long-term reduction of bacterial loads. Local antibiotics most suitable are preferably non-absorbed and broad spectrum, especially those covering enteric gram-positive and gram-negative aerobes, like kanamycin. To achieve rapid and short-term improvement of severe symptoms, oral therapy with amoxyclav or moxifloxacin can be used, especially in deep dermal vulvitis and

  6. [Investigation of subalin effect on urogenital microflora of pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Sirokvasha, E A; Paran'ko, S I; Kozitskaia, S N; Vinnikov, A I

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriological examination of 30 women with incomplete pregnancy has been conducted. Representatives of 18 genera of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria as well as yeast-like fungi of Candida genus were found. It has been established that spore-forming bacteria of the Bacillus genus from subalin preparation have antagonistic activity in respect of the strains of pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria with characteristic zones of growth depression of 12-15 mm. This demonstrates that the agents of infectional urogenital process are effectively suppressed by subalin. PMID:11944342

  7. Effect of dietary probiotic and high stocking density on the performance, carcass yield, gut microflora, and stress indicators of broilers.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Özcan; Köksal, Bekir H; Tatlı, Onur; Sevim, Ömer; Ahsan, Umair; Üner, Aykut G; Ulutaş, Pınar A; Beyaz, Devrim; Büyükyörük, Sadık; Yakan, Akın; Önol, Ahmet G

    2015-10-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of dietary probiotic supplementation and stocking density on the performance, relative carcass yield, gut microflora, and stress markers of broilers. One-day-old Ross 308 male broiler chickens (n = 480) were allocated to 4 experimental groups for 42 d. Each treatment had 8 replicates of 15 chicks each. Two groups were subjected to a high stocking density (HSD) of 20 birds/m² and the other 2 groups were kept at low stocking density (LSD) of 10 birds/m². A basal diet supplemented with probiotic 1 and 0.5 g/kg of diet (in starter and finisher diets, respectively) was fed to 2 treatments, one with HSD and the other with LSD, thereby making a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. There was no interaction between stocking density (LSD and HSD) and dietary probiotic (supplemented and unsupplemented) for all the variables. Feed intake and weight gain were significantly low and feed conversion ratio was poor in broilers at HSD. Dietary probiotic significantly enhanced the feed intake and weight gain in starter phase only. Dietary probiotic supplementation had no effect (P > 0.05) on total aerobs, Salmonella sp., and Lactobacilli populations in the intestines of broilers. However, HSD reduced the Lactobacilli population only (P < 0.05). Relative breast yields were significantly higher in broilers reared at LSD than HSD. Thigh meat yield was higher in broilers in HSD group compared to LSD. Dietary probiotic did not affect the relative carcass yield and weight of lymphoid organs. Serum malondialdehyde, corticosterone, nitric oxide, and plasma heterophil:lymphocyte ratio were not affected either by stocking density or dietary probiotic supplementation. In conclusion, HSD negatively affected the performance and intestinal Lactobacilli population of broilers only, whereas probiotic supplementation enhanced the performance of broilers during the starter phase only. Total aerobes, Salmonella, Lactobacilli carcass yield, and stress indicators

  8. Growth characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes as affected by a -native microflora in cooked ham under refrigerated and temperature abuse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the growth characteristics of L. monocytogenes as affected by a native microflora in cooked ham at refrigerated and abuse temperatures. A five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes and a native microflora isolated from cooked meat were inoculated alone (monocultured) or co-inoculate...

  9. [The symbiotic microflora associated with the tegument of proteocephalidean cestodes and the intestines of their fish hosts].

    PubMed

    Korneva, Zh V; Plotnikov, A O

    2006-01-01

    The indigenous symbiotic microflora associated with the tegument of proteocephalidean cestodes and the intestines of their fish hosts has been investigated in morphological and ecological aspects. The indigenous microflora associated with the cestode tegument consists of the nannobacteria population, which was present obligatorily on the surface of tegument, and the "deep microflora". The deep microflora associates with some few species of parasites only. Each individual host-parasite micro-biocenosis includes specific indigenous symbiotic microorganisms, with the differing microfloras of host intestine and parasite. Physiology, biochemistry and/or diet of hosts apparently influence on the symbiotic microflora's structure of parasites. The least bacteria abundance and diversity of their morphotypes were observed in the parasites from baby fishes. The diversity and abundance of bacteria were increased with the fish host ageing and the formation of the definitive structure of its intestine. It is an evidence of the gradual invading of the intestinal parasites (cestodes) tegument by bacterial cells. The invading is realized on the base of the microflora that was present in the food of fish host. The symbiotic microflora has specific morphological features, can regulate the homeostasis of the cestodes and fish hosts and also can maintain equilibrium of alimentary and immune interrelations in the host-parasite system. PMID:17042276

  10. Characterisation of biodegradation capacities of environmental microflorae for diesel oil by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Penet, Sophie; Vendeuvre, Colombe; Bertoncini, Fabrice; Marchal, Rémy; Monot, Frédéric

    2006-12-01

    In contaminated soils, efficiency of natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation largely depends on biodegradation capacities of the local microflorae. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of various microflorae towards diesel oil were determined in laboratory conditions. Microflorae were collected from 9 contaminated and 10 uncontaminated soil samples and were compared to urban wastewater activated sludge. The recalcitrance of hydrocarbons in tests was characterised using both gas chromatography (GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC). The microflorae from contaminated soils were found to exhibit higher degradation capacities than those from uncontaminated soil and activated sludge. In cultures inoculated by contaminated-soil microflorae, 80% of diesel oil on an average was consumed over 4-week incubation compared to only 64% in uncontaminated soil and 60% in activated sludge cultures. As shown by GC, n-alkanes of diesel oil were totally utilised by each microflora but differentiated degradation extents were observed for cyclic and branched hydrocarbons. The enhanced degradation capacities of impacted-soil microflorae resulted probably from an adaptation to the hydrocarbon contaminants but a similar adaptation was noted in uncontaminated soils when conifer trees might have released natural hydrocarbons. GCxGC showed that a contaminated-soil microflora removed all aromatics and all branched alkanes containing less than C(15). The most recalcitrant compounds were the branched and cyclic alkanes with 15-23 atoms of carbon. PMID:16477350

  11. Molecular Analysis of the Microflora Associated with Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M. A.; Banerjee, A.; Watson, T. F.; Wade, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular techniques have revealed many novel, presumed unculturable, taxa in oral infections. The aim of this study was to characterize the bacterial community of the middle and advancing front of carious dental lesions by cultural and molecular analyses. Samples were collected with a hand excavator from five teeth with carious lesions involving dentine. Samples were cultured on blood agar and Rogosa agar incubated in air plus 5% CO2 and on fastidious anaerobe agar anaerobically. DNA was also extracted directly from the samples and 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR with universal primers. PCR products were singularized by cloning, and the cloned inserts and cultured isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We identified 95 taxa among the 496 isolates and 1,577 clones sequenced; 44 taxa were detected by the molecular method alone; 31 taxa were previously undescribed. Only three taxa, Streptococcus mutans, Rothia dentocariosa, and an unnamed Propionibacterium sp., were found in all five samples. The predominant taxa by anaerobic cultivation were the novel Propionibacterium sp. (18%), Olsenella profusa (14%), and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (8%). The predominant taxa in the molecular analysis were Streptococcus mutans (16%), Lactobacillus gasseri/johnsonii (13%), and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (8%). There was no significant difference between the compositions of the microflora in the middle and advancing front samples (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon matched pairs, signed ranks test). In conclusion, combined cultural and molecular analyses have shown that a diverse bacterial community is found in dentinal caries and that numerous novel taxa are present. PMID:15243054

  12. Probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease: microflora ‘on the scope’

    PubMed Central

    Damaskos, Dimitrios; Kolios, George

    2008-01-01

    The intestinal microflora is a large bacterial community that colonizes the gut, with a metabolic activity equal to an organ and various functions that affect the physiology and pathology of the host's mucosal immune system. Intestinal bacteria are useful in promotion of human health, but certain components of microflora, in genetically susceptible individuals, contribute to various pathological disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical and experimental observations indicate an imbalance in protective and harmful microflora components in these disorders. Manipulation of gut flora to enhance its protective and beneficial role represents a promising field of new therapeutic strategies of inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we discuss the implication of gut flora in the intestinal inflammation that justifies the role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and we address the evidence for therapeutic benefits from their use in experimental models of colitis and clinical trials. PMID:18279467

  13. Microflora distributions in paleosols: a method for calculating the validity of radiocarbon-dated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, W.C.; Boyer, M.G.

    1986-08-01

    Microflora (bacteria and fungi) distributions in several paleosols from Mount Kenya, East Africa, provide important information about contamination of buried soil horizons dated by radiocarbon. High counts of bacteria and fungi in buried soils provide evidence for contamination by plant root effects or ground water movement. Profiles with decreasing counts versus depth appear to produce internally consistent and accurate radiocarbon dates. Profiles with disjunct or bimodal distributions of microflora at various depths produce internally inconsistent chronological sequences of radiocarbon-dated buried surfaces. Preliminary results suggest that numbers up to 5 x 10/sup 2/ g/sup -1/ for bacteria in buried A horizons do not appear to affect the validity of /sup 14/C dates. Beyond this threshold value, contamination appears to produce younger dates, the difference between true age and /sup 14/C age increasing with the amount of microflora contamination.

  14. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  15. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  16. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  17. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  18. A description on pharyngeal jaw apparatus and diets of halfbeak fish Zenarchopterus buffonis (Valenciennes 1847) in Malaysian waters

    SciTech Connect

    Abidin, Diana Atiqah Zainal Hashim, Marina; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.; Das, Simon K.

    2015-09-25

    Information on the feeding mechanism and diet of halfbeak fish species in harsh estuarine environment ecosystem is still lacking. The present study investigates the fine structure of pharyngeal jaw apparatus and diets of halfbeak fish Zenarchopterus buffonis. A total of 84 halfbeak fish samples have been collected from the coastal water of Peninsular Malaysia using fishing rod. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the micrographs of fine microstructure of the pharyngeal teeth. The fundamental anatomy of pharyngeal jaw apparatus displayed that the upper pharyngeal jaw (third pharyngobranchials) displays larger size of hook-like or tricuspid teeth which was analogous to tricuspid morphology. The lower pharyngeal jaw (fifth ceratobranchial) bears mainly conical teeth and appears triangular shape with two, short projections. The estimated TROPH values (1 − 3.2±0.55) denoted that halfbeak fish were omnivores in nature. The findings of this study was found to be useful as a baseline information for a better representation of the trophic flows associated with large medium and small surface water fishes.

  19. A description on pharyngeal jaw apparatus and diets of halfbeak fish Zenarchopterus buffonis (Valenciennes 1847) in Malaysian waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Diana Atiqah Zainal; Hashim, Marina; Das, Simon K.; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.

    2015-09-01

    Information on the feeding mechanism and diet of halfbeak fish species in harsh estuarine environment ecosystem is still lacking. The present study investigates the fine structure of pharyngeal jaw apparatus and diets of halfbeak fish Zenarchopterus buffonis. A total of 84 halfbeak fish samples have been collected from the coastal water of Peninsular Malaysia using fishing rod. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the micrographs of fine microstructure of the pharyngeal teeth. The fundamental anatomy of pharyngeal jaw apparatus displayed that the upper pharyngeal jaw (third pharyngobranchials) displays larger size of hook-like or tricuspid teeth which was analogous to tricuspid morphology. The lower pharyngeal jaw (fifth ceratobranchial) bears mainly conical teeth and appears triangular shape with two, short projections. The estimated TROPH values (1 - 3.2±0.55) denoted that halfbeak fish were omnivores in nature. The findings of this study was found to be useful as a baseline information for a better representation of the trophic flows associated with large medium and small surface water fishes.

  20. Evaluation of an EMG bioimpedance measurement system for recording and analysing the pharyngeal phase of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, Corinna; Schauer, Thomas; Nahrstaedt, Holger; Seidl, Rainer O

    2013-07-01

    A neuroprosthetic device for treating swallowing disorders requires an implantable measurement system capable to analysing the timing and quality of the swallowing process in real time. A combined EMG bioimpedance (EMBI) measurement system was developed and is evaluated here. The study was planned and performed as a case-control study. The studies were approved by the Charité Berlin ethics committee in votes EA1/160/09 and EA1/161/09. Investigations were carried out on healthy volunteers in order to examine the usefulness and reproducibility of measurements, the ability to distinguish between swallowing and head movements and the effect of different food consistencies. The correlation between bioimpedance and anatomical and functional changes occurring during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing in non-healthy patients was examined using videofluoroscopy (VFSS). 31 healthy subjects (15♂, 16♀) were tested over the course of 1350 swallows and 19 (17♂, 2♀) non-healthy patients over the course of 54 swallows. The signal curves obtained from both transcutaneous and subcutaneous measurement were similar, characteristic and reproducible (r > 0.5) and correlated with anatomical and functional changes during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing observed using VFSS. Statistically significant differences between head movements and swallowing movements, food volumes and consistencies were found. Neither the conductivity of the food, the sex of the test subject nor the position of the measurement electrodes exerted a statistically significant effect on the measured signal. EMBI is able to reproducibly map the pharyngeal phase of swallowing and changes associated with it both transcutaneously and subcutaneously. The procedure therefore appears to be suitable for use in performing automated evaluation of the swallowing process and for use as a component of an implant. PMID:23440435

  1. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia in preschool children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the discriminative validity, reproducibility, and prevalence of clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia according to gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It was a cross-sectional population-based study of 130 children diagnosed with CP at 18-36 months (mean=27.4, 81 males) and 40 children with typical development (TD, mean=26.2, 18 males). Sixteen signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment were directly observed in a videoed mealtime by a speech pathologist, and reported by parents on a questionnaire. Gross motor function was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The study found that 67.7% of children had clinical signs, and this increased with poorer gross motor function (OR=1.7, p<0.01). Parents reported clinical signs in 46.2% of children, with 60% agreement with direct clinical mealtime assessment (kappa=0.2, p<0.01). The most common signs on direct assessment were coughing (44.7%), multiple swallows (25.2%), gurgly voice (20.3%), wet breathing (18.7%) and gagging (11.4%). 37.5% of children with TD had clinical signs, mostly observed on fluids. Dysphagia cut-points were modified to exclude a single cough on fluids, with a modified prevalence estimate proposed as 50.8%. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia are common in children with CP, even those with ambulatory CP. Parent-report on 16 specific signs remains a feasible screening method. While coughing was consistently identified by clinicians, it may not reflect children's regular performance, and was not sufficiently discriminative in children aged 18-36 months. PMID:25562439

  2. Analysis of Pharyngeal Airway Using Lateral Cephalogram vs CBCT Images: A Cross-sectional Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bronoosh, Pegah; Khojastepour, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background : As the basic biological relationship of form and function, changes in the normal pattern of nasopharyngeal space can profoundly affect the development of the craniofacial growth. The lateral cephalogram, part of the patient’s normal records for orthodontic treatment, may show some of these changes either at the initial examination or later during treatment. The validity of the information the lateral cephalogram may present, have been questioned previously. The aim of this study was to assess correlation between the area and the volume measurements of pharyngeal airway size in a lateral cephalogram and a 3-dimensional (3D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan in adolescent subjects. Materials and Methods : CBCT scan and a lateral cephalogram of 35 subjects which were taken within 1 week were included in this study. Airway area of the region of interest from the lateral cephalogram and airway volume over the same of region of interest from the CBCT scan were assessed for all patients. The correlation between the area and the volume measurements were evaluated statistically by Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Mann Whitney U Test was used for comparing the area and the volume measurements in different sex. Results : Strong correlation was found between lateral cephalogram and CBCT measurements of pharyngeal airway. (r=0.831). Conclusion : Pharyngeal airway area on a lateral cephalogram is correlated strongly with volumetric data on CBCT images. Henceforth the use of CBCT images for volume measurements in orthodontic patients can aid in the better evaluation of airways and acted as a diagnostic instrument in this area. PMID:26464593

  3. Association between use of rapid antigen detection tests and adherence to antibiotics in suspected streptococcal pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Carl; Hernández, Silvia; Sierra, Nuria; Moragas, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Bayona, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few studies have analysed adherence to antibiotic treatment in pharyngitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) and treatment adherence among patients 18 years of age or over with pharyngitis treated with different antibiotic regimens. Design Prospective study from 2003 to 2008. Setting Office-based physician practices. Intervention The adherence of patients prior to the use of RADTs – no test was available until mid-2006 – was compared with the adherence associated with the use of RADTs. Subjects Patients with suspected streptococcal pharyngitis. Main outcome measures Patient adherence was assessed by electronic monitoring. The adherence outcomes considered were antibiotic-taking adherence, correct dosing, and good timing adherence during at least 80% of the antibiotic course. Results A total of 196 patients were recruited. The percentage of container openings was 77.9%±17.7%, being significantly higher for patients in whom the RADTs were performed compared with those in whom this test was not undertaken (80.1% vs. 70.8% for thrice-daily antibiotic regimens and 88.1% vs. 76.5% for twice-daily regimens; p < 0.01). The other variables of adherence were also better among patients undergoing RADT in both those who took at least 80% of the pills (71.3% vs. 42.2%; p < 0.001) as well as those with good timing adherence (52.5% vs. 32.8%; p < 0.01). Furthermore, correct dosing was always greater when the patient had undergone an RADT. Conclusion Adherence to antibiotic treatment is higher when an RADT is carried out at the consultation prior to administration of antibiotic treatment. PMID:20201628

  4. Severe Outcome of Pharyngeal-Cervical-Brachial Pure Motor Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bonanni, L.; Onofrj, V.; Scorrano, V.; Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present two further cases of the pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) form of GBS, with unfavourable outcome, showing dramatic dissociation between upper and lower body Symptoms. Both patients showed rapidly progressive motor denervation with disappearance of Compound Muscle Action Potentials (CMAPs) in upper limbs muscles. Sensory Nerve Action Potentials (SNAPs) were instead normal. Normal reflexes, F waves and action potentials were elicited in lower limbs. Despite i.v. Immunoglobulin treatment no recovery was observed and both patients died within a year from onset of symptoms. PMID:20309392

  5. [Loco-regional complications of pharyngitis: the example of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tschopp, J; Chuard, C

    2015-10-01

    Pharyngitis is a common cause of consultation in ambulatory medicine. Although it is benign in most cases, serious complications may happen and must be recognized quickly. Lemierre's syndrome is one of them. It consists in the association of thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and septic emboli that generally involve the lungs and is classically associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum. It is usually found in young and healthy adults and has an estimated mortality of 5%. Diagnosis relies essentially on the characteristic presentation of the disease. Therapy consists of surgical drainage of purulent collections and necrotic tissues associated with a prolonged course of antibiotics. Some authors also recommend a anticoagulation. PMID:26638515

  6. [Influence of development pace on pharyngeal teeth formula in Abramis brama (L.) bream: experimental data].

    PubMed

    Bolotovskii, A A; Levin, B A

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on acceleration and retardation of ontogenesis with thyroid manipulation has revealed direct changes in definitive dentition of pharyngeal bones in Abramis brama bream. As development pace accelerates, the number of teeth reduces to the formula 5-4. When development pace slows down, this number increases to the formula 6-5. Moreover, an additional minor row of teeth (1.6-5.1, 2.6-5.2) is formed. The observed changes transcend typical changes happening in nature. It is assumed that heterochronies provoke changes in the number of teeth. PMID:21786649

  7. Microflora inside closed modules with plant growth facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyablova, Natalya V.; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Shanturin, Nikolai; Deshevaya, Elena; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.

    Currently, plant growth facility (PGF) is included in the LSS in many scenarios of Martian expedition. A number of investigators assume growing of crops can accelerate microflora re-production in closed ecological system. To estimate experimentally the change of density of microbiological community in the isolated module, Chinese cabbage Brassica hinensis L., cv. Vesnyanka, has been grown in the closed climatic chambers in volume 0.07 m3, 3 m3 and 250 m3 under continuous illumination in the range of values of temperature and relative humidity of air 23 -270 and 30 -60%, respectively. There were no differences in growth and develop-ment of plants grown during 30 days on the test-beds in the laboratory room (control) and in the closed chamber by 0.07 m3 volume (test). The microbiological analysis of root zone has revealed the presence of exclusively saprophytic species -the typical representatives of the soil microbiota. Then the plants were growing during 45 days in the prototype of the conveyor space PGF "Phytocycle LED" placed inside the chamber of 3 m3 volume. Every 3 days 50 -60 cm3 of liquid imitator of air condensate (IAC) from inhabited module had been injected to the chamber to simulate air pollution. The content of colony-forming units of the micromycetes in the air of the chamber, on the inner surfaces of the climate chamber, internal and external surfaces of the PGF and the leaves did not exceed the permissible values. When the PGF has been installed during 14 days inside the inhabited module with volume of 250 m3, the representatives of saprophytic and conditioned-pathogenic species of micromycetes (Trichethe-cium rozeum, Trichoderma sp., Fuzarrium sp., Mucor sp., Penicillium sp.) have been found out exclusively on the open surfaces of artificial soil and water-saturated porous passage. The obtained data shows that PGF inside closed modules can assure microbiological safety when all wet surfaces are isolated from the gas environment.

  8. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females. PMID:22080322

  9. Actions of glutamate and ivermectin on the pharyngeal muscle of Ascaridia galli: a comparative study with Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Holden-Dye, L; Walker, R J

    2006-04-01

    The actions of glutamate and ivermectin were examined in the pharynx of Ascaridia galli and the results compared with those on the pharynx of Caenorhabditis elegans. In both preparations glutamate elicits a depolarization and inhibition of pharyngeal pumping, but the response of the pharynx of A. galli was much less than for C. elegans. This may be either because the pharyngeal membrane potential of the former is closely linked to the equilibrium potential for chloride ions (E(Cl)) while that of C. elegans is independent of E(Cl), or that there is a lower density of glutamate receptors on the pharyngeal muscle of A. galli compared with C. elegans. The maximum depolarization to glutamate of the pharyngeal muscle was 4.5+/-0.8 mV in A. galli while it was >25 mV in C. elegans. Picrotoxin was a weak antagonist of the glutamate response in both species. Flufenamic acid, pentobarbitone and flurazepam had no significant effect on either preparation at concentrations up to 100 microM. Three glutamate receptor agonists, ibotenate, kainate and quisqualate were all more potent than glutamate on the A. galli pharyngeal muscle. In contrast, only ibotenate was more potent than glutamate in C. elegans pharynx, the other two agonists being approximately 20 times less potent. The potency of ivermectin differed markedly between the two species, being approximately three orders of magnitude less potent on the pharynx of A. galli compared with C. elegans. This study demonstrates clear differences between the properties of the pharyngeal muscle of the two species and shows that care must be taken when extrapolating data from free-living to parasitic species of nematode. PMID:16442540

  10. Maté drinking and oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dasanayake, Ananda P; Silverman, Amanda J; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2010-02-01

    In Latin America, maté is consumed as a beverage regularly. Among the cancers that are associated with maté drinking is oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer, incidence of which is high in the region. In order to further understand this association between maté drinking and the risk of oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of related studies. All relevant studies published in English as original articles up to June 2009 were identified through a literature search using PubMed and Medline and by reviewing the references from the retrieved articles. Four case-control studies done in Latin America were identified. There were 879 maté users and 1128 non- or low-maté users in those studies with a total of 566 oral and oro-pharyngeal cancers. The adjusted association between maté drinking and oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer was significant within 3 of those studies. Meta-analysis yielded a significant summary odds ratio (OR) of 2.11 (95% confidence interval=1.39-3.19). Population Attributable Risk for maté drinking was 16%. While the epidemiological data indicate that maté users have an increased risk of oral and oro-pharyngeal cancer, little is known about whether this increased risk is due to the high temperature of the beverage when it is consumed or due to certain carcinogenic constituents that are present in maté. More human and animal studies are needed before a conclusion can be made on the oral and oro-pharyngeal carcinogenic risk of maté to humans. PMID:20036605

  11. The Effect of Rapid Antigen Detection Test on Antibiotic Prescription Decision of Clinicians and Reducing Antibiotic Costs in Children with Acute Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Kose, Engin; Sirin Kose, Seda; Akca, Deniz; Yildiz, Kerem; Elmas, Cengizhan; Baris, Mustafa; Anil, Murat

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of rapid antigen detection test (RADT) in the diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis, its impact on antibiotic prescription decision of pediatricians and influence on reduction of antibiotic treatment costs in children with pharyngitis. The study group consisted of 223 patients who were diagnosed with pharyngitis by pediatricians. The sensitivity and specificity of RADT were 92.1% (95% Cl: 78.6-98.3%) and 97.3% (95% Cl: 93.8-99.1%), respectively. In the first assessment, before performing RADT, pediatricians decided to prescribe antibiotics for 178 (79.8%) patients with pharyngitis. After learning RADT results, pediatricians finally decided to prescribe antibiotics for 83 (37.2%) patients with pharyngitis, and antibiotic prescription decreased by 42.6%. Antibiotic costs in non-Group A streptococcus pharyngitis, Group A streptococcus pharyngitis and all subjects groups decreased by 80.8%, 48%, and 76.4%, respectively. Performing RADT in children with pharyngitis has an important impact on treatment decision of clinicians, reduction of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions and antibiotic costs. PMID:26999012

  12. Effect of native microflora, waiting period, and storage temperature on Listeria monocytogenes serovars transferred from cantaloupe rind to fresh-cut pieces during preparation.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Olanya, Modesto; Geveke, David J; Sommers, Christopher H

    2012-11-01

    The most recent outbreak of listeriosis linked to consumption of fresh-cut cantaloupes indicates the need to investigate the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of native microflora of cantaloupe pieces during storage. Whole cantaloupes were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10(8)-CFU/ml suspension) for 10 min and air dried in a biosafety cabinet for 1 h and then treated (unwashed, water washed, and 2.5% hydrogen peroxide washed). Fresh-cut pieces (∼3 cm) prepared from these melons were left at 5 and 10°C for 72 h and room temperature (20°C) for 48 h. Some fresh-cut pieces were left at 20°C for 2 and 4 h and then refrigerated at 5°C. Microbial populations of fresh-cut pieces were determined by the plate count method or enrichment method immediately after preparation. Aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeast and mold of whole melon, and inoculated populations of L. monocytogenes on cantaloupe rind surfaces averaged 6.4, 3.3, and 4.6 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Only H(2)O(2) (2.5%) treatment reduced the aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeast and mold, and L. monocytogenes populations to 3.8, 0.9, and 1.8 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. The populations of L. monocytogenes transferred from melon rinds to fresh-cut pieces were below detection but were present by enrichment. Increased storage temperatures enhanced the lag phases and growth of L. monocytogenes. The results of this study confirmed the need to store fresh-cut cantaloupes at 5°C immediately after preparation to enhance the microbial safety of the fruit. PMID:23127699

  13. Microflora changes with norfloxacin and pivmecillinam in women with recurrent urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Norinder, Birgit Stattin; Norrby, Ragnar; Palmgren, Ann-Chatrin; Hollenberg, Sofia; Eriksson, Ulla; Nord, Carl Erik

    2006-04-01

    Similar changes in the periurethral and vaginal microflora were observed in 19 women with recurrent urinary tract infection following treatment with norfloxacin (NOR) or pivmecillinam (PIV). Escherichia coli strains were suppressed by both treatments. Staphylococcus spp. and enterococci colony counts increased following PIV treatment in the periurethral flora but remained stable with NOR. PMID:16569875

  14. Microflora Changes with Norfloxacin and Pivmecillinam in Women with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norinder, Birgit Stattin; Norrby, Ragnar; Palmgren, Ann-Chatrin; Hollenberg, Sofia; Eriksson, Ulla; Nord, Carl Erik

    2006-01-01

    Similar changes in the periurethral and vaginal microflora were observed in 19 women with recurrent urinary tract infection following treatment with norfloxacin (NOR) or pivmecillinam (PIV). Escherichia coli strains were suppressed by both treatments. Staphylococcus spp. and enterococci colony counts increased following PIV treatment in the periurethral flora but remained stable with NOR. PMID:16569875

  15. POULTRY DIGESTIVE MICROFLORA BIODIVERSITY AS INDICATED BY DENATURING GRADIENT GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Populations of digestive microflora in chickens change with age and are affected by diet, stresses, and performance enhancers. Culturing techniques used to profile a bacterial community may inadvertently select for some organisms, while excluding others. Several molecular-based techniques have b...

  16. EFFECTS OF NORMAL GUT MICROFLORA ADMINISTRATION ON POST-WEANING ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION IN SWINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the proposed research was to evaluate the effects of porcine- derived normal gut microflora (RPCF) on an experimental enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) infection in weaned pigs. The litters of eighteen sows, split into 3 studies, were used. Piglets in the RPCF group received the RPCF...

  17. SPECIAL APPLICATIONS OF INSECT GUT MICROFLORA IN KINETIC STUDIES OF MICROBIAL SUBSTRATE REMOVAL RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the highly controlled environment in which they live and their unique genetic history, the gut microflora of some insects may be useful for studying some of the underlying principles that govern the kinetics of uptake and metabolism of substrates by microorganisms. n t...

  18. Inhibitory effect on foodborne pathogens by native microflora associated with fresh peeled baby carrots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inhibitory effect of fresh peeled baby carrot and associated microflora on the viability and growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Pseudomonas marginalis in vitro and in situ was investigated. The population of viable L. mo...

  19. Intestinal microflora and homeostasis of the mucosal immune response: implications for probiotic bacteria?

    PubMed

    Blum, Stephanie; Schiffrin, Eduardo J

    2003-09-01

    The intestinal microflora can be considered a postnatally acquired organ that is composed of a large diversity of bacteria that perform important functions for the host and can be modulated by environmental factors, such as nutrition. Specific components of the intestinal microflora, including lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, have been associated with beneficial effects on the host, such as promotion of gut maturation and integrity, antagonisms against pathogens and immune modulation. Beyond this, the microflora seems to play a significant role in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis and prevention of inflammation. The contribution of the intestinal epithelial cell in the first line of defense against pathogenic bacteria and microbial antigens has been recognized. However, the interactions of intestinal epithelial cells with indigenous bacteria are less well understood. This review will summarize the increasing scientific attention to mechanisms of the innate immune response of the host towards different components of the microflora, and suggest a potential role for selected probiotic bacteria in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. PMID:14503689

  20. The effect of higher plant microflora on the microbial landscape of a closed ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, Lyalya; Gitelson, Josef; Borodina, Elena

    2012-07-01

    Having summarized certain data obtained earlier, we defined the aim of this work as an estimation of the effect of higher plant microflora on the microbial landscape of a closed ecosystem (CES). The microflora of such a component as higher plants can influence other system components not only by way of transfer with air and water flows, but also through the direct contact of the crew with the crops cultivated within CES when harvesting, thrashing, using them for food. Involving the higher plant component into the closed system the microorganism diversity and occurrence of microscopic fungi in other components of the closed ecosystem increased. The presence of microscopic fungi, especially on plants and in the air, is potentially dangerous for the health of the system residents. Since the contribution of the higher plant microflora (especially mycoflora) to the microbial landscape of a CES is significant, it is necessary to reduce the microbial flora of the higher plant component and limit its dispersion to other system components. One of the possible measures to limit the higher plant microflora colonization is air purification between components. Reducing the number of microscopic fungi by decreasing the humidity in the system's atmosphere should also be considered.

  1. Associations of GI microflora with campylobacter status in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Nextgeneration DNA sequencing is a powerful tool for food safety. One potential use for this technology is to compare the microflora of food animals hosting foodborne pathogens to pathogen-free animals to better understand the ecology of foodborne pathogens to design possible intervent...

  2. MODELING THE GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES AND NATIVE MICROFLORA IN SMOKED SALMON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smoked salmon contaminated with L. monocytogenes has been implicated in foodborne listeriosis. The objectives of this study were to model the growth characteristics and examine the growth relationship of L. monocytogenes and native microflora in smoked salmon. Smoked salmon samples with a native m...

  3. Independent evolution of the specialized pharyngeal jaw apparatus in cichlid and labrid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Mabuchi, Kohji; Miya, Masaki; Azuma, Yoichiro; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-01-01

    Background Fishes in the families Cichlidae and Labridae provide good probable examples of vertebrate adaptive radiations. Their spectacular trophic radiations have been widely assumed to be due to structural key innovation in pharyngeal jaw apparatus (PJA), but this idea has never been tested based on a reliable phylogeny. For the first step of evaluating the hypothesis, we investigated the phylogenetic positions of the components of the suborder Labroidei (including Pomacentridae and Embiotocidae in addition to Cichlidae and Labridae) within the Percomorpha, the most diversified (> 15,000 spp) crown clade of teleosts. We examined those based on 78 whole mitochondrial genome sequences (including 12 newly determined sequences) through partitioned Bayesian analyses with concatenated sequences (13,933 bp). Results The resultant phylogenies indicated that the Labridae and the remaining three labroid families have diverged basally within the Percomorpha, and monophyly of the suborder was confidently rejected by statistical tests using Bayes factors. Conclusion The resultant phylogenies indicated that the specified PJA evolved independently at least twice, once in Labridae and once in the common ancestor of the remaining three labroid families (including the Cichlidae). Because the independent evolution of pharyngeal jaws appears to have been followed by trophic radiations, we consider that our result supports, from the aspect of historical repeatability, the idea that the evolution of the specialized PJA provided these lineages with the morphological potential for their spectacular trophic radiations. The present result will provide a new framework for the study of functional morphology and genetic basis of their PJA. PMID:17263894

  4. Effects of theophylline on pharyngeal dilator and diaphragm muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E; Vafaie, H; Miller, M J

    1996-01-01

    Theophylline alleviates central and obstructive apneas of prematurity, and may improve adult obstructive sleep apnea. One mechanism of action appears to be a stimulatory effect on the motor output to upper airway dilator muscles. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether theophylline might have a second mechanism of action, namely that of improving the force and/or endurance of the pharyngeal dilator musculature. Rat sternohyoid muscle strips were studied in vitro and compared to diaphragm strips. The isometric twitch force and twitch kinetics of neither muscle were altered by theophylline (100 mg/l). Theophylline significantly slowed the rate at which the diaphragm fatigued during intermittent 40-Hz stimulation (p < 0.001). In contrast, theophylline produced no improvement in the fatigue resistance of the sternohyoid muscle. The degree of force potentiation during the early portion of the fatigue protocol was not altered by theophylline for either muscle. These results suggest that the mechanism by which theophylline improves obstructive apnea is unlikely to be due to a beneficial effect on pharyngeal dilator muscle force or endurance. PMID:8966372

  5. Randomized, single-blind evaluation of cefadroxil and phenoxymethyl penicillin in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pichichero, M E; Disney, F A; Aronovitz, G H; Talpey, W B; Green, J L; Francis, A B

    1987-01-01

    A total of 150 children from two pediatric practices with clinical and bacteriologic evidence of acute group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis randomly received cefadroxil monohydrate (75 children) or phenoxymethyl penicillin (75 children). Cefadroxil was given once daily, while penicillin was given three times daily. The treatment groups were similar in age, sex, race, illness severity, and acute GABHS symptomatology. Throat cultures were routine 3 to 5 days after the start of therapy and 2 and 14 days after the end of therapy. The bacterial cure rates were 90% (62 of 69) for cefadroxil-treated patients and 76% (52 of 68) for penicillin-treated patients. This difference was significant (P less than 0.04). The clinical response was satisfactory in 91% of cefadroxil-treated patients and 89% of penicillin-treated patients. We conclude that once-daily cefadroxil is at least as effective as three-times-daily penicillin in producing bacteriologic eradication and clinical symptomatic improvement in children with GABHS pharyngitis. PMID:3113329

  6. Peak morphology and scalp topography of the pharyngeal sensory-evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing is dependent upon sensory input to the brainstem and cortex. The event-related evoked potential provides a measure of neuronal electrical activity as it relates to a specific stimulus. Air-puff stimulation to the posterior pharyngeal wall produces a sensory-evoked potential (PSEP) waveform. The goal of this study was to characterize the scalp topography and morphology for the component peaks of the PSEP waveform. Twenty-five healthy men and women served as research participants. PSEPs were measured via a 32-electrode cap (10-20 system) connected to SynAmps2 Neuroscan EEG System. Air puffs were delivered directly to the oropharynx using a thin polyethylene tube connected to a flexible laryngoscope. The PSEP waveform is characterized by four early- and mid-latency component peaks: an early positivity (P1) and negativity (N1), followed by a mid-latency positivity (P2) and negativity (N2). The early positive peak P1 is localized bilaterally to the lateral parietal scalp, the N1 medially in the frontoparietal region, and the P2 and N2 with diffuse scalp locations. Somatosensory and premotor regions are possible anatomical correlates of peak locations. Based on the latencies of the peaks, they are likely analogous to somatosensory- and respiratory-related evoked potential peaks. PMID:20890713

  7. Effect of liquid bolus consistency and delivery method on aspiration and pharyngeal retention in dysphagia patients.

    PubMed

    Kuhlemeier, K V; Palmer, J B; Rosenberg, D

    2001-01-01

    There is no empirically derived consensus as to what food consistency types and method of food delivery (spoon, cup, straw) should be included in the videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFSS) studies. In the present study, we examine the rates of aspiration and pharyngeal retention in 190 dysphagic patients given thin (apple juice) and thick (apricot nectar) liquids delivered by teaspoon and cup and ultrathick (pudding-like) liquid delivered by teaspoon. Each patient was tested with each of the bolus/delivery method combinations. The fractions of patients exhibiting aspiration for each bolus/method of delivery combination were (1) thick liquids (cup), 13.2%; (2) thick liquids (spoon), 8.9%; (3) thin liquids (cup), 23.7%; (4) thin liquids (spoon), 15.8%, (5) ultrathick liquids (spoon), 5.8%. In each comparison [thick liquid (cup) vs. thick liquid (spoon), thin liquid (cup) vs. thin liquid (spoon), thick liquid (cup) vs. thin liquid (cup), thick liquid (spoon) vs. thin liquid (spoon), and thick liquid (spoon) vs. ultrathick liquid (spoon)], the p value for chi 2 was < 0.001. These results suggest that utilizing thin, thick, and ultrathick liquids and delivery by cup and spoon during a VFSS of a patient with mild or moderate dysphagia can increase the chances of identifying a consistency that the patient can swallow without aspirating and without pharyngeal retention after swallowing. PMID:11305221

  8. The Lateral Port Control Pharyngeal Flap: A Thirty-Year Evolution and Followup

    PubMed Central

    Boutros, Sean; Cutting, Court

    2013-01-01

    In 1971, Micheal Hogan introduced the Lateral Port Control Pharyngeal Flap (LPCPF) which obtained good results with elimination of VPI. However, there was a high incidence of hyponasality and OSA. We hypothesized that preoperative assessment with videofluoroscopy and nasal endoscopy would enable modification and customization of the LPCPF and result in improvement in the result in both hyponasality and obstructive apnea while still maintaining results in VPI. Thirty consecutive patients underwent customized LPCPF. All patients had preoperative diagnosis of VPI resulting from cleft palate. Patient underwent either videofluoroscopy or nasal endoscopy prior to the planning of surgery. Based on preoperative velar and pharyngeal movement, patients were assigned to wide, medium, or narrow port designs. Patients with significant lateral motion were given wide ports while patients with minimal movement were given narrow ports. There was a 96.66% success rate in the treatment of VPI with one patient with persistent VPI (3.33%). Six patients had mild hyponasality (20 %). Two patients had initial OSA (6.67%), one of which had OSA which lasted longer than six months (3.33%). The modifications of the original flap description have allowed for success in treatment of VPI along with an acceptably low rate of hyponasality and OSA. PMID:23365734

  9. Influence of Phytase Transgenic Corn on the Intestinal Microflora and the Fate of Transgenic DNA and Protein in Digesta and Tissues of Broilers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Guo, Jiang; Li, Sufen; Li, Ang; Zhang, Liyang; Liu, Zhenhua; Luo, Xugang

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of phytase transgenic corn (PTC) on intestinal microflora, and the fate of transgenic DNA and protein in the digesta and tissues of broilers. A total of 160 1-day-old Arbor Acres commercial male broilers were randomly assigned to 20 cages (8 chicks per cage) with 10 cages (replicates) for each treatment. Birds were fed with a diet containing either PTC (54.0% during 1-21 days and 61.0% during 22-42 days) or non-transgenic isogenic control corn (CC) for a duration of 42 days. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) between birds fed with the PTC diets and those fed with the CC diets in the quantities of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic bacteria, colibacillus and lactobacilli, or microbial diversities in the contents of ileum and cecum. Transgenic phyA2 DNA was not detected, but phyA2 protein was detected in the digesta of duodenum and jejunum of broilers fed with the PTC diets. Both transgenic phyA2 DNA and protein fragments were not found in the digesta of the ileum and rectum, heart, liver, kidney, and breast or thigh muscles of broilers fed with the PTC diets. It was concluded that PTC had no adverse effect on the quantity and diversity of gut microorganisms; Transgenic phyA2 DNA or protein was rapidly degraded in the intestinal tract and was not transferred to the tissues of broilers. PMID:26599444

  10. Influence of Phytase Transgenic Corn on the Intestinal Microflora and the Fate of Transgenic DNA and Protein in Digesta and Tissues of Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sufen; Li, Ang; Zhang, Liyang; Liu, Zhenhua; Luo, Xugang

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of phytase transgenic corn (PTC) on intestinal microflora, and the fate of transgenic DNA and protein in the digesta and tissues of broilers. A total of 160 1-day-old Arbor Acres commercial male broilers were randomly assigned to 20 cages (8 chicks per cage) with 10 cages (replicates) for each treatment. Birds were fed with a diet containing either PTC (54.0% during 1–21 days and 61.0% during 22–42 days) or non-transgenic isogenic control corn (CC) for a duration of 42 days. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) between birds fed with the PTC diets and those fed with the CC diets in the quantities of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic bacteria, colibacillus and lactobacilli, or microbial diversities in the contents of ileum and cecum. Transgenic phyA2 DNA was not detected, but phyA2 protein was detected in the digesta of duodenum and jejunum of broilers fed with the PTC diets. Both transgenic phyA2 DNA and protein fragments were not found in the digesta of the ileum and rectum, heart, liver, kidney, and breast or thigh muscles of broilers fed with the PTC diets. It was concluded that PTC had no adverse effect on the quantity and diversity of gut microorganisms; Transgenic phyA2 DNA or protein was rapidly degraded in the intestinal tract and was not transferred to the tissues of broilers. PMID:26599444

  11. Bifidobacterium strains from resident infant human gastrointestinal microflora exert antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Lievin, V; Peiffer, I; Hudault, S; Rochat, F; Brassart, D; Neeser, J; Servin, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—The gastrointestinal microflora exerts a barrier effect against enteropathogens. The aim of this study was to examine if bifidobacteria, a major species of the human colonic microflora, participates in the barrier effect by developing antimicrobial activity against enterovirulent bacteria.
METHODS—Antibacterial activity was examined in vitro against a wide range of Gram negative and Gram positive pathogens. Inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium SL1334 cell association and cell invasion was investigated in vitro using Caco-2 cells. Colonisation of the gastrointestinal tract in vivo by bifidobacteria was examined in axenic C3/He/Oujco mice. Antimicrobial activity was examined in vivo in axenic C3/He/Oujco mice infected by the lethal S typhimurium C5 strain.
RESULTS—Fourteen human bifidobacterium strains isolated from infant stools were examined for antimicrobial activity. Two strains (CA1 and F9) expressed antagonistic activity against pathogens in vitro, inhibited cell entry, and killed intracellular S typhimurium SL1344 in Caco-2 cells. An antibacterial component(s) produced by CA1 and F9 was found to be a lipophilic molecule(s) with a molecular weight of less than 3500. In the axenic C3/He/Oujco mice, CA1 and F9 strains colonised the intestinal tract and protected mice against S typhimurium C5 lethal infection.
CONCLUSION—Several bifidobacterium strains from resident infant human gastrointestinal microflora exert antimicrobial activity, suggesting that they could participate in the "barrier effect" produced by the indigenous microflora.


Keywords: bifidobacteria; infant microflora; gastrointestinal infection; antimicrobial; microbial infection; intestinal cells PMID:11034580

  12. Dry heat effects on survival of indigenous soil particle microflora and particle viability studies of Kennedy Space Center soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.; Gove, R.; Heisserer, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on attempts to obtain data concerning the dry heat resistance of particle microflora in Kennedy Space Center soil samples. The in situ dry heat resistance profiles at selected temperatures for the aggregate microflora on soil particles of certain size ranges were determined. Viability profiles of older soil samples were compared with more recently stored soil samples. The effect of increased particle numbers on viability profiles after dry heat treatment was investigated. These soil particle viability data for various temperatures and times provide information on the soil microflora response to heat treatment and are useful in making selections for spacecraft sterilization cycles.

  13. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  14. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  15. Aerobic Dance for Children: Resources and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Denise A.

    1986-01-01

    Aerobic dance classes may be safe for older children, but are inappropriate for children in the fourth grade and under. Programs for these children should emphasize creativity. Resources for program development are given. (MT)

  16. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  17. Aerobic dynamic feeding as a strategy for in situ accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoate in aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Gobi, K; Vadivelu, V M

    2014-06-01

    Aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) strategy was applied in sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) in aerobic granules. The aerobic granules were able to remove 90% of the COD from palm oil mill effluent (POME). The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the POME are the sole source of the PHA accumulation. In this work, 100% removal of propionic and butyric acids in the POME were observed. The highest amount of PHA produced in aerobic granules was 0.6833mgPHA/mgbiomass. The PHA formed was identified as a P (hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) P (HB-co-HV). PMID:24725384

  18. Physiological responses during aerobic dance of individuals grouped by aerobic capacity and dance experience.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, D; Ballor, D L

    1991-03-01

    This study examined the effects of aerobic capacity (peak oxygen uptake) and aerobic dance experience on the physiological responses to an aerobic dance routine. The heart rate (HR) and VO2 responses to three levels (intensities) of aerobic dance were measured in 27 women. Experienced aerobic dancers (AD) (mean peak VO2 = 42 ml.kg-1.min-1) were compared to subjects with limited aerobic dance experience of high (HI) (peak VO2 greater than 35 ml.kg-1.min-1) and low (LO) (peak VO2 less than 35 ml.kg-1.min-1) aerobic capacities. The results indicated the LO group exercised at a higher percentage of peak heart rate and peak VO2 at all three dance levels than did either the HI or AD groups (HI = AD). Design of aerobic dance routines must consider the exercise tolerance of the intended audience. In mixed groups, individuals with low aerobic capacities should be shown how and encouraged to modify the activity to reduce the level of exertion. PMID:2028095

  19. Comparison of a Ligase Chain Reaction-Based Assay and Cell Culture for Detection of Pharyngeal Carriage of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Andrew J.; Gilleran, Gerry; Eastick, Kirstine; Ross, Jonathan D. C.

    2000-01-01

    In 264 genitourinary medicine clinic attenders reporting recent fellatio, the prevalence of pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis determined by an expanded standard including cell culture and two in-house PCR tests was 1.5% in 194 women and zero in 70 men. The ligase chain reaction (Abbott LCx) had a specificity of 99.2% and a positive predictive value of 60%. PMID:10970416

  20. Effects of orthognathic surgery on pharyngeal airway and respiratory function during sleep in patients with mandibular prognathism.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, T; Kobayashi, T; Hasebe, D; Tanaka, R; Ike, M; Saito, C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine changes in overnight respiratory function and craniofacial and pharyngeal airway morphology following orthognathic surgery. The subjects were 40 patients in whom mandibular prognathism was corrected by orthognathic surgery: a one-jaw operation in 22 patients and a two-jaw operation in 18 patients. Morphological changes were studied using cone beam computed tomography immediately before surgery and at more than 6 months after surgery, and the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) was measured with a portable polysomnography system. Pharyngeal airway volume was decreased significantly after surgery, especially in the one-jaw operation group. AHI was not changed significantly after surgery in either group, although AHI in one patient in the one-jaw operation group was increased to 19 events/h. There was no significant change in pharyngeal airway morphology in that patient, but he was obesity class 1 and was 54 years old. In conclusion, some patients who are obese, have a large amount of mandibular setback, and/or are of relatively advanced age may develop sleep-disordered breathing after mandibular setback; a two-jaw operation should therefore be considered in skeletal class III patients who have such risks because it decreases the amount of pharyngeal airway space reduction caused by mandibular setback surgery. PMID:25027545

  1. Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations.

    PubMed

    Escot, Sophie; Blavet, Cédrine; Faure, Emilie; Zaffran, Stéphane; Duband, Jean-Loup; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-02-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital disease causing cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from defective development of neural crest cells (NCs) that colonize the pharyngeal arches and contribute to lower jaw, neck and heart tissues. Although TBX1 has been identified as the main gene accounting for the defects observed in human patients and mouse models, the molecular mechanisms underlying DGS etiology are poorly identified. The recent demonstrations that the SDF1/CXCR4 axis is implicated in NC chemotactic guidance and impaired in cortical interneurons of mouse DGS models prompted us to search for genetic interactions between Tbx1, Sdf1 (Cxcl12) and Cxcr4 in pharyngeal NCs and to investigate the effect of altering CXCR4 signaling on the ontogeny of their derivatives, which are affected in DGS. Here, we provide evidence that Cxcr4 and Sdf1 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal NC development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling causes misrouting of pharyngeal NCs in chick and dramatic morphological alterations in the mandibular skeleton, thymus and cranial sensory ganglia. Our results therefore support the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in DGS etiology. PMID:26755698

  2. Late-onset Rash in Patients with Group A Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis Treated with Amoxicillin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We observed late-onset rashes in patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Of 1028 patients with GAS pharyngitis, which was principally treated with amoxicillin, we evaluated those who developed a late-onset rash and excluded those with scarlet fever alone. Twenty-one patients developed a rash (2.0%, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.1%), 7 to 20 days (median, 8 days) after GAS pharyngitis onset. The rashes were characterized by maculopapules, which increased in size with coalescence and some developing into plaques, with a symmetrical distribution with a propensity for the extremities, including the palms and soles. The clinical courses of the patients were good, and the rashes subsided within 14 days. A non-immediate reaction to β-lactams, which usually manifests as a maculopapular rash, is a possible cause in our patients, however, repeated courses of amoxicillin in 3 patients did not induce the rash. The underlying mechanism of the late-onset rash after GAS pharyngitis with amoxicillin treatment remains unclear. PMID:26734124

  3. Late-onset Rash in Patients with Group A Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis Treated with Amoxicillin.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masahiko

    2015-12-01

    We observed late-onset rashes in patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Of 1028 patients with GAS pharyngitis, which was principally treated with amoxicillin, we evaluated those who developed a late-onset rash and excluded those with scarlet fever alone. Twenty-one patients developed a rash (2.0%, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.1%), 7 to 20 days (median, 8 days) after GAS pharyngitis onset. The rashes were characterized by maculopapules, which increased in size with coalescence and some developing into plaques, with a symmetrical distribution with a propensity for the extremities, including the palms and soles. The clinical courses of the patients were good, and the rashes subsided within 14 days. A non-immediate reaction to β-lactams, which usually manifests as a maculopapular rash, is a possible cause in our patients, however, repeated courses of amoxicillin in 3 patients did not induce the rash. The underlying mechanism of the late-onset rash after GAS pharyngitis with amoxicillin treatment remains unclear. PMID:26734124

  4. Patterning of the third pharyngeal pouch into thymus/parathyroid by Six and Eya1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Silvius, Derek; Davenport, Julie; Grifone, Raphaelle; Maire, Pascal; Xu, Pin-Xian

    2006-05-15

    Previous studies have suggested a role of the homeodomain Six family proteins in patterning the developing vertebrate head that involves appropriate segmentation of three tissue layers, the endoderm, the paraxial mesoderm and the neural crest cells; however, the developmental programs and mechanisms by which the Six genes act in the pharyngeal endoderm remain largely unknown. Here, we examined their roles in pharyngeal pouch development. Six1-/- mice lack thymus and parathyroid and analysis of Six1-/- third pouch endoderm demonstrated that the patterning of the third pouch into thymus/parathyroid primordia is initiated. However, the endodermal cells of the thymus/parathyroid rudiments fail to maintain the expression of the parathyroid-specific gene Gcm2 and the thymus-specific gene Foxn1 and subsequently undergo abnormal apoptosis, leading to a complete disappearance of organ primordia by E12.5. This thus defines the thymus/parathyroid defects present in the Six1 mutant. Analyses of the thymus/parathyroid development in Six1-/-;Six4-/- double mutant show that both Six1 and Six4 act synergistically to control morphogenetic movements of early thymus/parathyroid tissues, and the threshold of Six1/Six4 appears to be crucial for the regulation of the organ primordia-specific gene expression. Previous studies in flies and mice suggested that Eya and Six genes may function downstream of Pax genes. Our data clearly show that Eya1 and Six1 expression in the pouches does not require Pax1/Pax9 function, suggesting that they may function independently from Pax1/Pax9. In contrast, Pax1 expression in all pharyngeal pouches requires both Eya1 and Six1 function. Moreover, we show that the expression of Tbx1, Fgf8 and Wnt5b in the pouch endoderm was normal in Six1-/- embryos and slightly reduced in Six1-/-;Six4-/- double mutant, but was largely reduced in Eya1-/- embryos. These results indicate that Eya1 appears to be upstream of very early events in the initiation of thymus

  5. Pharyngeal morphogenesis requires fras1-itga8-dependent epithelial-mesenchymal interaction.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jared Coffin; Nichols, James T; Yan, Yi-Lin; Leonard, Isaac F; BreMiller, Ruth A; Amacher, Sharon L; Postlethwait, John H; Kimmel, Charles B

    2016-08-01

    Both Fras1 and Itga8 connect mesenchymal cells to epithelia by way of an extracellular 'Fraser protein complex' that functions in signaling and adhesion; these proteins are vital to the development of several vertebrate organs. We previously found that zebrafish fras1 mutants have craniofacial defects, specifically, shortened symplectic cartilages and cartilage fusions that spare joint elements. During a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a new zebrafish mutation, b1161, that we show here disrupts itga8, as confirmed using CRISPR-generated itga8 alleles. fras1 and itga8 single mutants and double mutants have similar craniofacial phenotypes, a result expected if loss of either gene disrupts function of the Fraser protein complex. Unlike fras1 mutants or other Fraser-related mutants, itga8 mutants do not show blistered tail fins. Thus, the function of the Fraser complex differs in the craniofacial skeleton and the tail fin. Focusing on the face, we find that itga8 mutants consistently show defective outpocketing of a late-forming portion of the first pharyngeal pouch, and variably express skeletal defects, matching previously characterized fras1 mutant phenotypes. In itga8 and fras1 mutants, skeletal severity varies markedly between sides, indicating that both mutants have increased developmental instability. Whereas fras1 is expressed in epithelia, we show that itga8 is expressed complementarily in facial mesenchyme. Paired with the observed phenotypic similarity, this expression indicates that the genes function in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Similar interactions between Fras1 and Itga8 have previously been found in mouse kidney, where these genes both regulate Nephronectin (Npnt) protein abundance. We find that zebrafish facial tissues express both npnt and the Fraser gene fibrillin2b (fbn2b), but their transcript levels do not depend on fras1 or itga8 function. Using a revertible fras1 allele, we find that the critical window for fras1 function in

  6. In vitro selection of enteric microflora for potential use as a competitive exclusion culture against Campylobacter in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The administration of nonpathogenic microflora in neonatal poultry has been employed to reduce or eliminate the colonization of enteric pathogens. This concept, also called competitive exclusion (CE), although effective against Salmonella, has not consistently worked against Campylobacter. Most CE...

  7. Taxonomy of Aerobic Marine Eubacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Linda; Baumann, Paul; Mandel, M.; Allen, Richard D.

    1972-01-01

    Two hundred and eighteen strains of nonfermentative marine bacteria were submitted to an extensive morphological, physiological, and nutritional characterization. All the strains were gram-negative, straight or curved rods which were motile by means of polar or peritrichous flagella. A wide variety of organic substrates served as sole sources of carbon and energy. The strains differed extensively in their nutritional versatility, being able to utilize from 11 to 85 carbon compounds. Some strains had an extracellular amylase, gelatinase, lipase, or chitinase and were able to utilize n-hexadecane and to denitrify. None of the strains had a yellow, cell-associated pigment or a constitutive arginine dihydrolase system, nor were they able to hydrolyze cellulose or agar. The results of the physiological and nutritional characterization were submitted to a numerical analysis which clustered the strains into 22 groups on the basis of phenotypic similarities. The majority of these groups were separable by a large number of unrelated phenotypic traits. Analysis of the moles per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) content in the deoxyribonucleic acid of representative strains indicated that the peritrichously flagellated groups had a GC content of 53.7 to 67.8 moles%; polarly flagellated strains had a GC content of 30.5 to 64.7 moles%. The peritrichously flagellated groups were assigned to the genus Alcaligenes. The polarly flagellated groups, which had a GC content of 43.2 to 48.0 moles%, were placed into a newly created genus, Alteromonas; groups which had a GC content of 57.8 to 64.7 moles% were placed into the genus Pseudomonas; and the remaining groups were left unassigned. Twelve groups were given the following designations: Alteromonas communis, A. vaga, A. macleodii, A. marinopraesens, Pseudomonas doudoroffi, P. marina, P. nautica, Alcaligenes pacificus, A. cupidus, A. venustus, and A. aestus. The problems of assigning species of aerobic marine bacteria to genera are

  8. Taxonomy of aerobic marine eubacteria.

    PubMed

    Baumann, L; Baumann, P; Mandel, M; Allen, R D

    1972-04-01

    Two hundred and eighteen strains of nonfermentative marine bacteria were submitted to an extensive morphological, physiological, and nutritional characterization. All the strains were gram-negative, straight or curved rods which were motile by means of polar or peritrichous flagella. A wide variety of organic substrates served as sole sources of carbon and energy. The strains differed extensively in their nutritional versatility, being able to utilize from 11 to 85 carbon compounds. Some strains had an extracellular amylase, gelatinase, lipase, or chitinase and were able to utilize n-hexadecane and to denitrify. None of the strains had a yellow, cell-associated pigment or a constitutive arginine dihydrolase system, nor were they able to hydrolyze cellulose or agar. The results of the physiological and nutritional characterization were submitted to a numerical analysis which clustered the strains into 22 groups on the basis of phenotypic similarities. The majority of these groups were separable by a large number of unrelated phenotypic traits. Analysis of the moles per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) content in the deoxyribonucleic acid of representative strains indicated that the peritrichously flagellated groups had a GC content of 53.7 to 67.8 moles%; polarly flagellated strains had a GC content of 30.5 to 64.7 moles%. The peritrichously flagellated groups were assigned to the genus Alcaligenes. The polarly flagellated groups, which had a GC content of 43.2 to 48.0 moles%, were placed into a newly created genus, Alteromonas; groups which had a GC content of 57.8 to 64.7 moles% were placed into the genus Pseudomonas; and the remaining groups were left unassigned. Twelve groups were given the following designations: Alteromonas communis, A. vaga, A. macleodii, A. marinopraesens, Pseudomonas doudoroffi, P. marina, P. nautica, Alcaligenes pacificus, A. cupidus, A. venustus, and A. aestus. The problems of assigning species of aerobic marine bacteria to genera are

  9. Comparison of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Pharyngeal, Rectal, and Urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Akbar; Asbel, Lenore; Baldwin, Tamara; Gratzer, Beau; Guerry, Sarah; Kerani, Roxanne P.; Pathela, Preeti; Pettus, Kevin; Soge, Olusegun O.; Stirland, Ali; Weinstock, Hillard S.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. surveillance for Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibilities is based exclusively on male urethral isolates. These data inform gonorrhea treatment guidelines, including recommendations for the treatment of extragenital infections, but data on the susceptibilities of extragenital isolates are limited. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral gonococcal isolates collected from men who have sex with men (MSM), at five sentinel sites throughout the United States. MICs were determined by the agar dilution method. Generalized linear models were used to compare (i) the proportions of isolates with elevated MICs and (ii) geometric mean MICs according to anatomic site, adjusted for city. In December 2011 to September 2013, totals of 205 pharyngeal, 261 rectal, and 976 urethral isolates were obtained. The proportions of isolates with elevated ceftriaxone MICs (≥0.125 μg/ml) did not differ according to anatomic site (0.5% of pharyngeal isolates, 1.5% of rectal isolates, and 1.7% of urethral isolates, with a city-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 0.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.0 to 3.9] for pharyngeal versus urethral isolates and an aOR of 0.9 [95% CI, 0.2 to 4.2] for rectal versus urethral isolates). The city-adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MICs of pharyngeal (0.0153 μg/ml) and rectal (0.0157 μg/ml) isolates did not differ from that of urethral isolates (0.0150 μg/ml) (ratios of geometric mean MICs of 1.02 [95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17] and 1.05 [95% CI, 0.93 to 1.19], respectively). Similar results were observed for other antimicrobials, including cefixime and azithromycin. These findings suggest that, at the population level, gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance based on urethral isolates from MSM adequately reflects the susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae strains circulating among MSM. PMID:25691638

  10. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates among men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Sarah; Zaidi, Akbar; Asbel, Lenore; Baldwin, Tamara; Gratzer, Beau; Guerry, Sarah; Kerani, Roxanne P; Pathela, Preeti; Pettus, Kevin; Soge, Olusegun O; Stirland, Ali; Weinstock, Hillard S

    2015-05-01

    U.S. surveillance for Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibilities is based exclusively on male urethral isolates. These data inform gonorrhea treatment guidelines, including recommendations for the treatment of extragenital infections, but data on the susceptibilities of extragenital isolates are limited. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral gonococcal isolates collected from men who have sex with men (MSM), at five sentinel sites throughout the United States. MICs were determined by the agar dilution method. Generalized linear models were used to compare (i) the proportions of isolates with elevated MICs and (ii) geometric mean MICs according to anatomic site, adjusted for city. In December 2011 to September 2013, totals of 205 pharyngeal, 261 rectal, and 976 urethral isolates were obtained. The proportions of isolates with elevated ceftriaxone MICs (≥ 0.125 μg/ml) did not differ according to anatomic site (0.5% of pharyngeal isolates, 1.5% of rectal isolates, and 1.7% of urethral isolates, with a city-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 0.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.0 to 3.9] for pharyngeal versus urethral isolates and an aOR of 0.9 [95% CI, 0.2 to 4.2] for rectal versus urethral isolates). The city-adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MICs of pharyngeal (0.0153 μg/ml) and rectal (0.0157 μg/ml) isolates did not differ from that of urethral isolates (0.0150 μg/ml) (ratios of geometric mean MICs of 1.02 [95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17] and 1.05 [95% CI, 0.93 to 1.19], respectively). Similar results were observed for other antimicrobials, including cefixime and azithromycin. These findings suggest that, at the population level, gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance based on urethral isolates from MSM adequately reflects the susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae strains circulating among MSM. PMID:25691638

  11. Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

  12. [Bioremediation of oil-polluted soil with an association including the fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and soil microflora].

    PubMed

    Pozdniakova, N N; Nikitina, V E; Turkovskaia, O V

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of application of the Pleurotus ostreatus D1-soil microflora to bioremediation of oil-polluted soils was studied. The fungus degraded mainly the aromatic fraction, whereas soil microflora intensely degraded paraffin and naphthene oil fractions. Introduction of the fungus Pleurotus ostreatus D to soil induces degradation of a wider range of oil hydrocarbons. It is reasonable to further investigate the discovered phenomenon in order to improve procedures of remediation of oil-polluted soils. PMID:18491600

  13. Severe viral oesophagitis, pharyngitis, and stomatitis as antecedents of ileocecal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Waluga, Marek; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Kajor, Maciej; Hartleb, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We present a 22-year-old male who developed a severe erosive oesophagitis extending to the pharynx and oral cavity without obvious risk factors. Endoscopic image suggested viral aetiology that could not be confirmed by routine serological diagnostics of infections with cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Herpes simplex virus. The histopathological evaluation also gave no definite clues to the aetiology of the inflammation. Treatment with acyclovir was ineffective, but gancyclovir therapy caused spectacular clinical improvement and healing of erosions. Two months later the patient presented febrile diarrhoea that was a symptom of ileocecal Crohn's disease proven by endoscopy, enterography, and histopathology. It is the first report of severe viral oesophagitis preceding clinical manifestation of Crohn's disease. This observation warrants further study towards the viral aetiology of oral, pharyngeal, and oesophageal erosions, frequently associated with Crohn's disease. PMID:25960815

  14. Facial diplegia, pharyngeal paralysis, and ophthalmoplegia after a timber rattlesnake envenomation.

    PubMed

    Madey, Jason J; Price, Amanda B; Dobson, Joseph V; Stickler, David E; McSwain, S David

    2013-11-01

    The timber rattlesnake, also known as Crotalus horridus, is well known to cause significant injury from toxins stored within its venom. During envenomation, toxic systemic effects immediately begin to cause damage to many organ systems including cardiovascular, hematologic, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and neurologic. One defining characteristic of the timber rattlesnake is a specific neurotoxin called crotoxin, or the "canebrake toxin," which is a potent β-neurotoxin affecting presynaptic nerves that can cause paralysis by inhibiting appropriate neuromuscular transmission. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old boy bitten twice on his calf by a timber rattlesnake, who presented with a life-threatening envenomation and suffered multisystem organ failure as well as a prominent presynaptic neurotoxicity resulting in facial diplegia, pharyngeal paralysis, and ophthalmoplegia. PMID:24196093

  15. In-vitro evaluation of three lasers for the potential treatment of equine pharyngeal lymphoid hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Lloyd P.; Weddle, Diann L.; Correa, Maria T.

    1993-07-01

    Three medical lasers, Argon, CO2, and Nd:YAG, were studied at power outputs of 5 watts, 5 watts, and 40 watts respectively. Laser irradiation was directed at the pharyngeal mucosa of sagittally split horses heads in a randomized fashion. Areas irradiated were measured immediately using hand held calipers, and after being prepared for microscopic examination to determine width and depth of penetration into the mucosa. The results indicated that tissue destruction produced by the CO2 laser was predictable compared to the Nd:YAG laser. The Argon laser, between 1 and 6 seconds of exposure, produced only superficial photoablation of mucosal tissue which did not extend into the muscular layer. The conclusion of this in vitro investigation was that the Argon laser irradiation applied transendoscopically may be a reasonable substitute for surgery and electrocautery commonly used to treat follicular lymphoid hyperplasia, a respiratory disease of young horses.

  16. Voice disorders in patients with suspected laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, J A; Noordzji, J P; Woo, P

    1998-03-01

    Many symptoms have been recognized in association with laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD), but reports of perceptual voice disorders in this condition have been lacking to date. Forty-nine patients with suspected LPRD were studied for five specific perceptual voice characteristics, and these characteristics were compared to the same characteristics in individuals who had never seen an Otolaryngologist for a voice disorder or throat problem (controls). Sixteen of the suspected LPRD patients also underwent 24-hour pH probe studies. All patients with suspected LPRD had significantly increased abnormal perceptual voice characteristics (musculoskeletal tension, hard glottal attack, glottal fry, restricted tone placement, and hoarseness) compared to the controls. Statistical objective differences between the two groups was demonstrated by the presence of increased shimmer in patients with suspected LPRD compared to controls. The differential diagnosis between functional voice disorders and LPRD may be complex, and perceptual parameters may overlap. Interdisciplinary evaluation is advocated. PMID:9619982

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of a pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in a Madagascar ground boa (Boa madagascariensis).

    PubMed

    Steeil, James C; Schumacher, Juergen; Hecht, Silke; Baine, Katherine; Ramsay, Edward C; Ferguson, Sylvia; Miller, Debra; Lee, Nathan D

    2013-03-01

    A 15-yr-old female Madagascar ground boa (Boa madagascariensis) presented with a history of anorexia, wheezing, and occasional open-mouth breathing. On oral examination, a firm, caseous mass was noted in the right caudoventral pharyngeal region, which was confirmed as a carcinoma on incisional biopsy. Advanced imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) was performed to evaluate local tumor invasion and to plan for palliative radiation therapy. However, following the second treatment (10 Gy), the mass had increased in size, and the snake was euthanatized. Radiation-associated vasculitis was noted within the soft tissues surrounding the mass and within muscles and the lung, which was verified on histopathology. The squamous cell carcinoma of the snake in this report was resistant to palliative radiation therapy. PMID:23505715

  18. A pharyngeal jaw evolutionary innovation facilitated extinction in Lake Victoria cichlids.

    PubMed

    McGee, Matthew D; Borstein, Samuel R; Neches, Russell Y; Buescher, Heinz H; Seehausen, Ole; Wainwright, Peter C

    2015-11-27

    Evolutionary innovations, traits that give species access to previously unoccupied niches, may promote speciation and adaptive radiation. Here, we show that such innovations can also result in competitive inferiority and extinction. We present evidence that the modified pharyngeal jaws of cichlid fishes and several marine fish lineages, a classic example of evolutionary innovation, are not universally beneficial. A large-scale analysis of dietary evolution across marine fish lineages reveals that the innovation compromises access to energy-rich predator niches. We show that this competitive inferiority shaped the adaptive radiation of cichlids in Lake Tanganyika and played a pivotal and previously unrecognized role in the mass extinction of cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria after Nile perch invasion. PMID:26612951

  19. The pharyngeal organ in the buccal cavity of the male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, supplies mucus for building bubble nests.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chao-Kai; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2010-11-01

    The male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, builds a bubble nest on the water surface to care for offspring during the reproductive period. To our knowledge, this study is the first to determine the composition of the bubble nest and to compare the pharyngeal organs of male and female Siamese fighting fish to determine the relationship between the pharyngeal organ and the ability to make bubble nests. Dot blots of the bubble nest probed with periodic acid-Schiff's (PAS) staining and Ponceau S solution revealed that the contents of the nest are glycoprotein rich. Dissection of the heads of Siamese fighting fish showed that the pharyngeal organ is located in the position through which inhaled air passes. The epithelial structure of the pharyngeal organ of the Siamese fighting fish, like that of other teleosts, has numerous wrinkles and papillae. Mucous goblet cells were observed on the epithelium of pharyngeal organs in male and female fish. The pharyngeal organ was found to be larger in male than in female fish. In addition, the epithelium of the pharyngeal organ in male fish has a greater number of mucous goblet cells than that in female fish. In Siamese fighting fish, this sexual dimorphism of the pharyngeal organ suggests that the male fish secretes more glycoprotein-rich mucus to build the bubble nest. Future work will focus on the type of mucous cells found in the epithelium of the pharyngeal organ that contributes to bubble formation and will determine the components of the mucus in the bubble nest. PMID:21039125

  20. Effect of hypothyroidism on myosin heavy chain expression in rat pharyngeal dilator muscles.

    PubMed

    Petrof, B J; Kelly, A M; Rubinstein, N A; Pack, A I

    1992-07-01

    Although the association between hypothyroidism and obstructive sleep apnea is well established, the effect of thyroid hormone deficiency on contractile proteins in pharyngeal dilator muscles responsible for maintaining upper airway patency is unknown. In the present study, the effects of hypothyroidism on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression were examined in the sternohyoid, geniohyoid, and genioglossus muscles of adult rats (n = 20). The relative proportions of MHC isoforms present were determined using MHC-specific monoclonal antibodies and oligonucleotide probes. All control muscles showed a paucity of type I MHC fibers, with greater than 90% of fibers containing fast-twitch type II MHCs. In the genioglossus muscle, a population of non-IIa non-IIb fast-twitch type II fibers (putatively identified as type IIx MHC fibers) were detected. Hypothyroidism induced significant changes in MHC expression in all muscles studied. In the sternohyoid, type I fibers increased from 6.2 to 16.9%, whereas type IIa fibers increased from 25.9 to 30.7%. Type I fibers in the geniohyoid increased from 1.2 to 12.8%, whereas type IIa fibers increased from 34.1 to 42.7%. The genioglossus showed the smallest relative increase in type I expression but the greatest induction of type IIa MHC. None of the muscles examined demonstrated reinduction of embryonic or neonatal MHC in response to thyroid hormone deficiency. In summary, hypothyroidism alters the MHC profile of pharyngeal dilators in a muscle-specific manner. These changes may play a role in the pathogenesis of obstructive apnea in hypothyroid patients. PMID:1506366

  1. Neuroimmune connections in ovine pharyngeal tonsil: potential site for prion neuroinvasion.

    PubMed

    Toppets, Vinciane; Piret, Joelle; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Lantier, Frederic; Lantier, Isabelle; Berthon, Patricia; Daube, Georges; Massart, Laurent; Grobet, Luc; Antoine, Nadine

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have established the involvement of nasal-associated lymphoid tissues, mainly the pharyngeal tonsil, in prion pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms of the associated neuroinvasion are still debated. To determine potential sites for prion neuroinvasion inside the ovine pharyngeal tonsil, the topography of heavy (200 kDa) and light (70 kDa) neurofilaments and of glial fibrillar acidic protein has been semi-quantitatively analysed inside the various compartments of the tonsil. The results show that the most innervated areas are the interfollicular area and the connective tissue located beneath the respiratory epithelium. The existence of rare synapses between follicular dendritic cells and nerve fibres inside the germinal centre indicates that this mechanism of neuroinvasion is possible but, since germinal centres of lymphoid follicles are poorly innervated, other routes of neuroinvasion are likely. The host PRNP genotype does not influence the pattern of innervation in these various tonsil compartments, unlike ageing during which an increase of nerve endings occurs in a zone of high trafficking cells beneath the respiratory epithelium. A minimal age-related increase of innervation inside the lymphoid follicles has also been observed. An increase in nerve fibre density around the lymphoid follicles, in an area rich in mobile cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells capable of capturing and conveying pathogen prion protein (PrPd), might ensure more efficient infectivity, not in the early phase but in the advanced phase of lymphoinvasion after the amplification of PrPd; alternatively, this area might even act as a direct site of entry during neuroinvasion. PMID:22427064

  2. Simultaneous videoradiography and pharyngeal solid state manometry (videomanometry) in 25 nondysphagic volunteers.

    PubMed

    Olsson, R; Nilsson, H; Ekberg, O

    1995-01-01

    Recent technological advances in manometry, including solid state transducers and computerized analysis, allows for reliable interpretation of intraluminal pharyngeal pressures. Simultaneous videoradiography (barium swallow) provides fluoroscopic control of the manometric sensors (videomanometry), thereby eliminating the uncertainty of sensor dislocation during laryngeal elevation. This is the first study describing normal manometric parameters in videomanometry during barium swallow. Seven manometric parameters and six videoradiographic parameters were analyzed. We included 25 nondysphagic volunteers with normal videoradiographic parameters in the study. The examination was performed in an upright physiologic position during 10-ml barium and dry swallows. Mean resting pressure in the upper esophageal sphincter was 89.6 +/- 32.6 (+/- 2 SD) mmHg. Mean residual pressure during relaxation of the upper esophageal sphincter was 7.2 +/- 8.0 (+/- 2 SD) mmHg during barium swallow and 3.8 +/- 6.2 (+/- 2 SD) mmHg during dry swallow. The mean duration of upper esophageal sphincter relaxation was 601 +/- 248 (+/- 2 SD) msec. The mean peristaltic contraction of the upper esophageal sphincter was 253.8 +/- 142.8 (+/- 2 SD) mmHg. Fourteen (56%) of the 25 had a measurable intrabolus pressure (mean 33.2 +/- 17.3 mmHg) at the level of the inferior pharyngeal constrictor. A specific finding was discovered when the epiglottis tilts down hitting the manometric sensor. This epiglottic tilt was identified in 7 subjects (28%) and caused pressures of around 600 mmHg. A standardized manometric technique is important in videomanometry, and normal values as described in this study are essential in clinical use. PMID:7859531

  3. Preliminary study of transoral robotic surgery for pharyngeal cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kazunori; Fukuhara, Takahiro; Kitano, Hiroya; Fujii, Taihei; Koyama, Satoshi; Yamasaki, Aigo; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Hiromi

    2016-03-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) with the da Vinci Surgical System has been used for the removal of pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers with the objective to improve functional and aesthetic outcomes without worsening survival. While TORS has been approved in many countries, Japan's FDA has not yet done so. Our hospital started using TORS with the approval of the Ethical Review Board and the Minimum Invasive Surgical Center Committee at Tottori University. No surgical outcomes of TORS for Japanese patients with head and neck cancer have been reported in Japan. This paper deals with the outcomes and feasibility of TORS for Japanese patients with pharyngeal cancer at our institution. TORS was performed for 10 patients with T1, T2, T3 oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 2013 and 2014. This is a single-institutional study. TORS could be completed for all cases, except one patient that was not candidate, and no intraoperative conversion to an open surgical procedure was required. Five patients underwent neck dissection, two of them concurrent and three staged. Of all patients, positive surgical margins were detected in two. The average blood loss including neck dissection was 21.5 ± 33.4 ml, the operation time was 183 ± 36 min and the console time was 103 ± 22 min. No tracheostomy had been performed either pre- or postoperatively, and there was no difference between preoperative and postoperative swallowing functions. In this single-institutional preliminary study, we demonstrated that TORS is a feasible and safe treatment. A clinical multi-institutional study of TORS for laryngopharyngeal cancer has been approved as an advanced medical system study and is under way. In the near future, it is expected that the efficacy and safety of TORS for laryngopharyngeal cancer will be confirmed as the result of this multiple-institutional clinical study in Japan. PMID:26645072

  4. Microbiological Degradation of Malodorous Substances of Swine Waste under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Denis; Bisaillon, Jean-Guy; Beaudet, Réjean; Sylvestre, M.; Ishaque, Muhammad; Morin, André

    1987-01-01

    Phenol, p-cresol, and volatile fatty acids (VFA; acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids) were used as odor indicators of swine waste. Aeration of the waste allowed the indigenous microorganisms to grow and degrade these malodorous substances. The time required for degradation of these substances varied according to the waste used, and it was not necessarily related to their concentrations. Using a minimal medium which contained one of the malodorous compounds as sole carbon source, we have selected from swine waste microorganisms that can grow in the medium. The majority of these microorganisms were able to degrade the same substrate when inoculated in sterilized swine waste but with an efficiency varying from one strain to the other. None of these strains was able to degrade all malodorous substances studied. Within 6 days of incubation these selected strains degraded the following: Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, phenol and all VFA; Alcaligenes faecalis, p-cresol and all VFA; Corynebacterium glutamicum and Micrococcus sp., phenol, p-cresol, and acetic and propionic acids; Arthrobacter flavescens, all VFA. On a laboratory scale, the massive inoculation of swine waste with C. glutamicum or Micrococcus sp. accelerated degradation of the malodorous substances. However, this effect was not observed with all of the various swine wastes tested. These results suggest that an efficient deodorization process of various swine wastes could be developed at the farm level based on the aerobic indigenous microflora of each waste. PMID:16347254

  5. [Growth peculiarities of commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the gut microflora in Crohn's disease patients].

    PubMed

    Gasparian, G; Balaian, M; Grigorian, A; Akopian, A; Manvelian, A; Mirzabekian, S; Trchunian, A; Pepoian, A

    2013-01-01

    Verhulst's logistic differential equation, popular in mathematical ecology, is used in modeling of population growth, neural networks, statistics, reaction models, Fermi distribution, modeling of tumor growth, etc. We used this function to characterize growth of commensal Escherichia coli isolates from gut microflora in Crohn's disease patients. The results of our investigations show differences in growth parameters of commensal E. coli, isolated from the gut microflora in Crohn's disease patients and healthy volunteers; it is most likely explained by the influence of chronic inflammatory processes on growth and reproduction of these bacteria. It has been established that the used mathematical model well characterizes growth of patients' gut E. coli isolates, and it can be important for the expedient probiotics' application during the disease. PMID:24455889

  6. [Microflora of the mucous membrane of human tonsils in the normal state and in pathology].

    PubMed

    Khusnutdinova, L M

    2006-01-01

    A total of 50 healthy persons and 50 chronic tonsillitis patients were examined with the use of the bacteriological method. The microflora of tonsillar mucous membrane was represented by 8 genera of facultative anaerobic microorganisms. In the biocenosis of the tonsillar mucosa of the healthy subjects the occurrence of Streptococcus was 1.5-fold greater than in that of the patients; microorganisms of the genus Staphylococcus prevailed on the tonsillar mucosa of chronic tonsillitis patients 1.3-fold prevailed more often and Klebsiella and Neisseria prevailed 4-fold more often. Among the microorganisms isolated from the patients, cultures simultaneously having two or more pathogenicity markers occurred twice as often as among the representatives of the microbiocenosis obtained from the healthy subjects. The microflora of the tonsillar mucosa of the chronic tonsillitis patients was characterized by resistance to penicillins, macrolides and aminoglygosides, but was simultaneously sensitive to lincosamides and glycopeptides. PMID:16532644

  7. Water soluble nanocurcumin extracted from turmeric challenging the microflora from human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Judy; Muthu, Manikandan; Chun, Se-Chul

    2016-11-15

    Water soluble nanocurcumin prepared from commercial turmeric powders was compared against ethanol extracted curcumin particles. The oral microflora from five different human volunteers was collected and the efficacy of solvent extracted curcumin versus water extracted nanocurcumin was demonstrated. Nanocurcumin activity against oral microflora confirms its antimicrobial potency. Confocal laser scanning microscopic results revealed the enhanced entry of nanocurcumin particles into microbial cells. The nanosized nature of nanocurcumin appears to have led to increased cellular interaction and thereby efficient destruction of microbial cells in the mouth. In addition, solubility of nanocurcumin is also believed to be a crucial factor behind its successful antimicrobial activity. This study proves that the bioactivity of a compound is greatly influenced by its solubility in water. This work recommends the use of water soluble nanocurcumin (extracted from turmeric) as potent substitute for curcumin in dental formulations. PMID:27283711

  8. The impact of systemic and copper pesticide applications on the phyllosphere microflora of tomatoes

    PubMed Central

    Ottesen, Andrea R; Gorham, Sasha; Pettengill, James B; Rideout, Steven; Evans, Peter; Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Contamination of tomatoes by Salmonella can occur in agricultural settings. Little is currently understood about how agricultural inputs such as pesticide applications may impact epiphytic crop microflora and potentially play a role in contamination events. We examined the impact of two materials commonly used in Virginia tomato agriculture: acibenzolar-S-methyl (crop protectant) and copper oxychloride (pesticide) to identify the effects these materials may exert on baseline tomato microflora and on the incidence of three specific genera; Salmonella, Xanthomonas and Paenibacillus. Results Approximately 186 441 16S rRNA gene and 39 381 18S rRNA gene sequences per independent replicate were used to analyze the impact of the pesticide applications on tomato microflora. An average of 3 346 677 (634 892 974 bases) shotgun sequences per replicate were used for metagenomic analyses. Conclusion A significant decrease in the presence of Gammaproteobacteria was observed between controls and copper-treated plants, suggesting that copper is effective at suppressing growth of certain taxa in this class. A higher mean abundance of Salmonella and Paenibacillus in control samples compared to treatments may suggest that both systemic and copper applications diminish the presence of these genera in the phyllosphere; however, owing to the lack of statistical significance, this could also be due to other factors. The most distinctive separation of shared membership was observed in shotgun data between the two different sampling time-points (not between treatments), potentially supporting the hypothesis that environmental pressures may exert more selective pressures on epiphytic microflora than do certain agricultural management practices. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25410588

  9. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethene without auxiliary substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kathrin R; Gaza, Sarah; Voropaev, Andrey; Ertl, Siegmund; Tiehm, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) represents a priority pollutant and is among the most frequently detected contaminants in groundwater. The current bioremediation measures have certain drawbacks like e.g. the need for auxiliary substrates. Here, the aerobic biodegradation of TCE as the sole growth substrate is demonstrated. This new process of metabolic TCE degradation was first detected in groundwater samples. TCE degradation was stable in an enriched mixed bacterial culture in mineral salts medium for over five years and repeated transfers of the culture resulting in a 10(10) times dilution of the original groundwater. Aerobic TCE degradation resulted in stoichiometric chloride formation. Stable carbon isotope fractionation was observed providing a reliable analytical tool to assess this new biodegradation process at field sites. The results suggest that aerobic biodegradation of TCE without auxiliary substrate could be considered as an option for natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites. PMID:24793109

  11. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  12. Qualitative assessment of vaginal microflora during use of tampons of various compositions.

    PubMed

    Onderdonk, A B; Zamarchi, G R; Rodriguez, M L; Hirsch, M L; Muñoz, A; Kass, E H

    1987-12-01

    The effect of vaginal tampons on the microbial flora during menstruation has recently been studied by several investigators. However, little information regarding the qualitative effects attributable to particular tampon fibers is available. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of polyacrylate rayon tampons and cotton-viscose rayon blend tampons on the qualitative bacterial counts obtained from tampons and concomitant vaginal swabs and to determine whether either of these tampon types alters the qualitative makeup of the vaginal microflora when compared with the microflora in the same women using all-cotton tampons or external catamenial pads. Tampon and swab samples were obtained as described previously (A. B. Onderdonk, G. R. Zamarchi, M. L. Rodriguez, M. L. Hirsch, A. Muñoz, and E. H. Kass, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:2774-2778). The genus and species of the six dominant bacterial species in each sample were identified, if possible. A statistical evaluation of the qualitative makeup of the microflora revealed that the same numerically dominant phenotypes were present regardless of sample type, sample time, or catamenial product. Predictable changes in total numbers among the dominant species were also noted when the data were evaluated by day of menstrual cycle. The correlation between the total numbers of each dominant species present was evaluated by day of cycle, and the findings are discussed. PMID:3435143

  13. [Effects of actinomycetes agent on ginseng growth and rhizosphere soil microflora].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-yan; Xue, Quan-hong; Shen, Guang-hui; Wang, Dong-sheng

    2013-08-01

    Taking the ginseng in Xiao Xing' an Mountains of Northeast China as test object, this paper studied the effects of applying Streptomyces pactum (Act12) on ginseng growth and on the soil microflora in root zone and root surface. After treated with Act12, the yield and quality of ginseng' s medicinal part improved, the induced enzyme activities in leaves and the root activity increased, and the numbers and proportions of soil bacteria and actinomycetes increased significantly while those of soil fungi decreased. Compared with the control, the soil microflora in treatment Act12 changed. The numbers of the dominant bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas koreensis, and Microbacterium oxydans were much higher in root zone soil and root surface soil, and the pathogen Plectosphaerella cucumerina decreased in root zone soil and disappeared in root surface soil. These results suggested that the addition of Act12 could improve the soil microflora, enhance the resistance and root activity of ginseng plant, and increase the ginseng yield and its quality. PMID:24380350

  14. Culturable bacterial microflora associated with nectarine fruit and their potential for control of brown rot.

    PubMed

    Janisiewicz, Wojciech J; Buyer, Jeffrey S

    2010-06-01

    Microflora of fruit surfaces have been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decay of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grape, apple, and citrus. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine fruit surfaces from the early stage of development until harvest. Identification of bacterial strains was made using MIDI (fatty acid methyl ester analysis) and Biolog systems. Biolog identified 35% and MIDI 53% of the strains. Thus results from MIDI were used to determine the frequency of occurrence of genera and species. The most frequently occurring genera were Curtobacterium (21.31%), followed by Pseudomonas (19.99%), Microbacterium (13.57%), Clavibacter (9.69%), Pantoea (6.59%), and Enterobacter (4.26%). The frequency of isolations of some bacteria - for example, the major pseudomonads (Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas putida, and Pseudomonas savastanoi) or Pantoea agglomerans - tended to decline as fruit developed. As Pseudomonas declined, Curtobacterium became more dominant. Time of isolation was a significant factor in the frequency of occurrence of different bacteria, indicating succession of the genera. Throughput screening of the bacterial strains against Monilinia fructicola on nectarine fruit resulted in the detection of strains able to control brown rot. The 10 best-performing antagonistic strains were subjected to secondary screening. Four strains reduced decay severity by more than 50% (51.7%-91.4% reduction) at the high pathogen inoculum concentration of 105 conidia/mL. PMID:20657618

  15. Influence of the destabilisation of the maternal digestive microflora on that of the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Brunel, A; Gouet, P

    1993-01-01

    By destabilising the digestive flora of pregnant rats by antibiotic treatment, it was shown that part of the digestive microflora of the neonate originated from the maternal faeces. A mixture of ampicillin, bacitracin neomycin and streptomycin associated with nystatin were administered ad libitum at three different times, 1-3, 3-5, and more than 5 days before the estimated date of littering. For each treatment, samples were taken from the faeces, teats, and vagina of dams and from the digestive tracts of neonates aged between 6 and 120 h, and analysed for the presence of staphylococci, enterococci, lactobacilli and coliform bacteria. Antibiotic treatment reduced digestive flora populations to levels lower than 10(2) g-1 but had less effect on the vaginal and cutaneous mammary flora. In the digestive microflora of the neonate, the enterococci were unevenly affected, whereas the staphylococci were considerably decreased and the lactobacilli almost completely eliminated; coliform bacteria were found sporadically and in small numbers. The traces of antibiotics found in milk are not sufficient to explain these modifications. Counts made in control animals on media fed the same antibiotic concentrations were not modified. This work underlined the awful consequences for the newborn of a serious perturbation of the mother flora and the necessity of its presence for a normal installation of the digestive microflora of the newborn. PMID:8513029

  16. INACTIVATION OF ENTERIC PATHOGENS DURING AEROBIC DIGESTION OF WASTEWATER SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of aerobic and anaerobic digestion on enteric viruses, enteric bacteria, total aerobic bacteria, and intestinal parasites were studied under laboratory and field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, the temperature of the sludge digestion was the major factor infl...

  17. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  18. Displacement of lower third molar into the lateral pharyngeal space in a case of mandibular angle fracture: An unusual complication

    PubMed Central

    Kasatwar, Akash; Bhola, Nitin; Borle, Rajiv; Rajanikanth, K.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the angle of the mandible accounts for nearly one-third of all fractures involved. The presence of lower third molar increases the risk of fracture in angle region. The third molar acts as an area of weakness leading to fracture lines passing medially, distally, and occasionally through it. Angle fracture leads to the mobility of the third molar and sometimes its displacement. Third molars maintain its position in favorable fracture and can be displaced in unfavorable fractures. Displacement of lower third molar in lateral pharyngeal space due to mandibular fracture is not seen commonly. To our knowledge, this is the first reported incidence of displacement of the third molar into lateral pharyngeal space in a case of mandibular fracture. PMID:27307673

  19. Inferior-based pharyngeal flap for correction of stress velopharyngeal incompetence in musicians: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Visser, A; van der Biezen, J J

    2012-07-01

    Stress velopharyngeal incompetence (SVPI) is a special form of velopharyngeal incompetence observed in musicians who play wind and brass instruments. Due to high intraoral pressures generated while playing, the velopharyngeal structures fail to seal off the nasopharynx properly, resulting in unwanted nasal air leakage or noises. We present two young female professional clarinetists who experience symptoms of SVPI that preclude the development of their professional career. Both musicians underwent an inferior based pharyngeal flap, a well-known flap frequently used in cleft palate surgery. Both musicians were symptom-free after surgery and remain free of nasal noises while playing the clarinet after 2 and 4 years of follow-up. We present a review of literature of management of SVPI and show that the inferior-based pharyngeal flap is a feasible option for management of these potentially career ending symptoms. PMID:22212382

  20. Composite growth model applied to human oral and pharyngeal structures and identifying the contribution of growth types.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Chung, Moo K; Vorperian, Houri K

    2013-11-13

    The growth patterns of different anatomic structures in the human body vary in terms of growth amount over time, growth rate and growth periods. The oral and pharyngeal structures, also known as vocal tract structures, are housed in the craniofacial complex where the cranium/brain follows a distinct neural growth pattern, and the face follows a distinct somatic or skeletal growth pattern. Thus, it is reasonable to expect the oral and pharyngeal structures to follow a combined or mixed growth pattern. Existing parametric growth models are limited in that they are mainly focused on modeling one particular type of growth pattern. In this paper, we propose a novel composite growth model using neural and somatic baseline curves to fit the combined growth pattern of select vocal tract structures. The method can also determine the overall percent contribution of each of the growth types. PMID:24226094

  1. Composite Growth Model Applied to Human Oral and Pharyngeal Structures and Identifying the Contribution of Growth Types

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chung, Moo K.; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2014-01-01

    The growth patterns of different anatomic structures in the human body vary in terms of growth amount over time, growth rate and growth periods. The oral and pharyngeal structures, also known as vocal tract structures, are housed in the craniofacial complex where the cranium/brain follows a distinct neural growth pattern, and the face follows a distinct somatic or skeletal growth pattern. Thus, it is reasonable to expect the oral and pharyngeal structures to follow a combined or mixed growth pattern. Existing parametric growth models are limited in that they are mainly focused on modeling one particular type of growth pattern. In this paper, we propose a novel composite growth model using neural and somatic baseline curves to fit the combined growth pattern of select vocal tract structures. The method can also determine the overall percent contribution of each of the growth types. PMID:24226094

  2. Reflections on Psychotherapy and Aerobic Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wade

    This document provides a series of reflections by a practicing psychologist on the uses of aerobic workouts in psychotherapy. Two case histories are cited to illustrate the contention that the mode of exercise, rather than simply its presence or absence, is the significant indicator of a patient's emotional well-being or psychopathology. The first…

  3. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  4. Response of aerobic rice to Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Das, Joy; Ramesh, K V; Maithri, U; Mutangana, D; Suresh, C K

    2014-03-01

    Rice cultivation under aerobic condition not only saves water but also opens up a splendid scope for effective application of beneficial root symbionts in rice crop unlike conventional puddled rice cultivation where water logged condition acts as constraint for easy proliferation of various beneficial soil microorganisms like arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Keeping these in view, an in silico investigation were carried out to explore the interaction of hydrogen phosphate with phosphate transporter protein (PTP) from P. indica. This was followed by greenhouse investigation to study the response of aerobic rice to Glomusfasciculatum, a conventional P biofertilizer and P. indica, an alternative to AM fungi. Computational studies using ClustalW tool revealed several conserved motifs between the phosphate transporters from Piriformospora indica and 8 other Glomus species. The 3D model of PTP from P. indica resembling "Mayan temple" was successfully docked onto hydrogen phosphate, indicating the affinity of this protein for inorganic phosphorus. Greenhouse studies revealed inoculation of aerobic rice either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both significantly enhanced the plant growth, biomass and yield with higher NPK, chlorophyll and sugar compared to uninoculated ones, P. indica inoculated plants being superior. A significantly enhanced activity of acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase were noticed in the rhizosphere soil of rice plants inoculated either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both, contributing to higher P uptake. Further, inoculation of aerobic rice plants with P. indica proved to be a better choice as a potential biofertilizer over mycorrhiza. PMID:24669667

  5. Media for the aerobic growth of campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of agar and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium was examined. The broth medium was supplemented with 0.0 to 0.2% agar and inoculated with 106 CFU/ml of Campylobacter coli 33559, Campylobacter fetus 27349, Campylobacter...

  6. Strengthening aerobic granule by salt precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Pan, Xiangliang; Li, Jun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Structural stability of aerobic granules is generally poor during long-term operation. This study precipitated seven salts inside aerobic granules using supersaturated solutions of (NH4)3PO4, CaCO3, CaSO4, MgCO3, Mg3(PO4)2, Ca3(PO4)2 or SiO2 to enhance their structural stability. All precipitated granules have higher interior strength at ultrasonic field and reveal minimal loss in organic matter degradation capability at 160-d sequential batch reactor tests. The strength enhancement followed: Mg3(PO4)2=CaSO4>SiO2>(NH4)3PO4>MgCO3>CaCO3=Ca3(PO4)2>original. Also, the intra-granular solution environment can be buffered by the precipitate MgCO3 to make the aerobic granules capable of degradation of organic matters at pH 3. Salt precipitation is confirmed a simple and cost-effective modification method to extend the applicability of aerobic granules for wastewater treatments. PMID:27377228

  7. AEROBIC DENITRIFICATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN FATE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Mississippi, as well as most nitrogen-degraded rivers and streams, NO3- is the dominant N species and therefore understanding its biogeochemical behavior is critical for accurate nitrogen fate modeling. To our knowledge this is the first work to report aerobic denitrificat...

  8. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  9. Ventilation and Speech Characteristics during Submaximal Aerobic Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan E.; Hipp, Jenny; Alessio, Helaine

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined alterations in ventilation and speech characteristics as well as perceived dyspnea during submaximal aerobic exercise tasks. Method: Twelve healthy participants completed aerobic exercise-only and simultaneous speaking and aerobic exercise tasks at 50% and 75% of their maximum oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2] max).…

  10. Adolescents' Interest and Performances in Aerobic Fitness Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin; Parrott, James

    2014-01-01

    This study examined adolescents' interest in aerobic fitness testing and its relation to the test performances. Adolescents (N = 356) from three middle schools participated in the study. The participants took two aerobic fitness tests: the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) and One-Mile Run (1MR) with a two-day interval,…

  11. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme. PMID:25661308

  12. A human model of restricted upper esophageal sphincter opening and its pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hongmei; Mei, Ling; Sharma, Tarun; Kern, Mark; Sanvanson, Patrick; Shaker, Reza

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia due to upper esophageal sphincter (UES) dysfunction is commonly encountered in the clinical setting. Selective experimental perturbation of various components of the deglutitive apparatus can provide an opportunity to improve our understanding of the swallowing physiology and pathophysiology. The aim is to characterize the pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena in an experimentally induced restriction of UES opening in humans. We studied 14 volunteers without any dysphagic symptoms (7 men, 66 ± 11 yr) but with various supraesophageal reflux symptoms. To induce UES restriction, we used a handmade device that with adjustment could selectively apply 0, 20, 30, or 40 mmHg pressure perpendicularly to the cricoid cartilage. Deglutitive pharyngeal and UES pressure phenomena were determined during dry and 5- and 10-ml water swallows × 3 for each of the UES perturbations. External cricoid pressure against the UES resulted in a significant increase in hypopharyngeal intrabolus pressure and UES nadir deglutitive relaxation pressure for all tested swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). Application of external cricoid pressure increased the length of the UES high pressure zone from 2.5 ± 0.2 to 3.1 ± 0.2, 3.5 ± 0.1, and 3.7 ± 0.1 cm for 20, 30, and 40 mmHg cricoid pressure, respectively (P < 0.05). External cricoid pressure had no significant effect on pharyngeal peristalsis. On the other hand, irrespective of external cricoid pressure deglutitive velopharyngeal contractile integral progressively increased with increased swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, acute experimental restriction of UES opening by external cricoid pressure manifests the pressure characteristics of increased resistance to UES transsphincteric flow observed clinically without affecting the pharyngeal peristaltic contractile function. PMID:27198193

  13. Increased risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer after gastrectomy for ulcer disease in a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lagergren, J; Lindam, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gastrectomy has been indicated as a risk factor for laryngeal cancer, and possibly also for pharyngeal cancer, but few studies are available. The postulated mechanism is increased bile reflux following gastrectomy. Methods: This was a population-based cohort study of patients who underwent gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease between 1964 and 2008 in Sweden. Follow-up data for cancer was obtained from the Swedish Cancer Register. Relative risk was calculated as standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: The gastrectomy cohort comprises 19 767 patients, contributing 348 231 person-years at risk. The observed number of patients with laryngeal (n=56) and pharyngeal cancer (n=28) was two-fold higher than the expected (SIR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.5–2.6 and SIR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.6–3.5, respectively). After exclusion of 5536 cohort members with tobacco- or alcohol-related disease, the point SIRs remained increased (SIR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1–2.2 and SIR: 1.7, 95% CI: 0.9–2.8, respectively). The SIRs of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer increased with time after gastrectomy (P for trend <0.0001), and were particularly increased ⩾30 years after gastrectomy (SIR: 4.8, 95% CI: 2.1–9.5 and SIR: 10.2, 95% CI: 3.7–22.3, respectively). Conclusion: Gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease might entail a long-term increased risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer. PMID:22453126

  14. Validation of the GeneXpert® CT/NG Assay for use with Male Pharyngeal and Rectal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, R; Smith, DM; Little, SJ; Mehta, SR

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The GeneXpert® CT/NG (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) assay is a point-of-care (POC) molecular diagnostic assay designed to rapidly test for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). However, the test is only approved for vaginal swabs, urine, and endocervical swabs. Here, we performed an evaluation of the GeneXpert® CT/NG assay to detect the presence of CT and GC on male pharyngeal and rectal swabs. Methods Men who have sex with men participating in an HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) screening program providing consent were enrolled into the study. Participants were asked to self-collect two pharyngeal and two rectal swabs. One set was tested on site using GeneXpert® and the other was sent to a reference lab for molecular testing using the APTIMA® system (Hologic, San Diego, CA). Results A total of 570 swabs were collected from 144 patients. GeneXpert® detected 13/15 rectal swabs testing CT positive by the APTIMA® assay (relative sensitivity=88.2%), 1/2 pharyngeal swabs testing CT positive (relative sensitivity=50%), and 7/9 pharyngeal swabs testing NG positive (relative sensitivity =77.8%). No discordance was observed for rectal NG swabs. Conclusions Although less sensitive than the APTIMA® assay for the molecular detection of NG and CT, GeneXpert®’s potential as a rapid POC diagnostic still make it a viable diagnostic test for STI screening. Molecular POC diagnostics, such as this, will allow more thorough screening of at risk individuals, and enhance the ability of clinics to provide same-day diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Penney, Carla; Porter, Robert; O'Brien, Mary; Daley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18-24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = -11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  16. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18–24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = −11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  17. Analogue simulation of pharyngeal airflow response to Twin Block treatment in growing patients with Class II(1) and mandibular retrognathia.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wu, Wei; Yan, Guijun; Liu, Li; Liu, Hong; Li, Guojv; Li, Jing; Liu, Dongxu

    2016-01-01

    The flow dynamics of respiratory airflow is the basic factor that influences the ventilation function of the upper airway. This research aimed to investigate the pharyngeal flow field characteristics after Twin Block (TB) treatment in growing patients with Class II(1) and mandibular retrognathia by computation fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of patients who have completed TB treatment (n = 30) and about to accept TB treatment (n = 30) were reconstructed. After CFD simulation, correlations between the pharyngeal pressure drop and morphological parameters were further analyzed. During inspiration, we found that the pressure minimum occurred in the hypopharynx, while the maximum pressure drop and velocity was located in the oropharynx. After TB treatment, the oropharynx and hypopharynx showed significant differences in airflow features, and the most obvious change was observed in the oropharynx. A significant correlation was discovered between the change amount of oropharyngeal pressure drop and volume (r = 0.694, p = 0.001), mean cross-sectional area (r = 0.859, p = 0.000), and ratio of the minimum and mean cross-sectional area (r = 0.898, p = 0.000) of the oropharynx. Our research suggested that the pharyngeal airflow characteristics response positively to mandibular advancement with the enlargement in volume, cross-sectional area and more uniform oropharyngeal area distribution. PMID:27188799

  18. The Influence of Monoamine Oxidase Variants on the Risk of Betel Quid-Associated Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Wu, Ju-Hui; Huang, Jhen-Hao; Chen, Chun-Chia; Lee, Ka-Wo

    2014-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) and areca nut (AN) (major BQ ingredient) are group I human carcinogens illustrated by International Agency for Research on Cancer and are closely associated with an elevated risk of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx. The primary alkaloid of AN, arecoline, can be metabolized via the monoamine oxidase (MAO) gene by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the variants of the susceptible candidate MAO genes are associated with OPMDs and oral and pharyngeal cancer. A significant trend of MAO-A mRNA expression was found in in vitro studies. Using paired human tissues, we confirmed the significantly decreased expression of MAO-A and MAO-B in cancerous tissues when compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Moreover, we determined that MAO-A single nucleotide polymorphism variants are significantly linked with oral and pharyngeal cancer patients in comparison to OPMDs patients [rs5953210 risk G-allele, odds ratio = 1.76; 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.01]. In conclusion, we suggested that susceptible MAO family variants associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer may be implicated in the modulation of MAO gene activity associated with ROS. PMID:25389533

  19. [Successful tracheal intubation through the air-Q intubating laryngeal airway in a patient with severe pharyngeal edema].

    PubMed

    Ishio, Junichi; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nakano, Shoko; Omoto, Haruka; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Tanaka, Motoshige; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was diagnosed with severe pharyngeal edema after neck lymph node dissection for cancer of the external ear canal. He was scheduled for an emergency tracheotomy, but preoperative fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed airway and glottic obstruction due to severe pharyngeal edema. As difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation were anticipated, intubation under spontaneous ventilation was performed to avoid a "can't ventilate, can't intubate" situation. The first attempt to intubate the patient using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope with a thin Intlock resulted in failure due to hindered visualization of the glottis. Therefore, a size 3.5 air-Q intubating laryngeal airway was inserted using a bronchofiberscope to perform tracheal intubation through a laryngeal mask. Successful tracheal intubation was achieved while maintaining spontaneous ventilation. The air-Q intubating laryngeal airway can be useful in the setting of anticipated difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation, as in the case of severe pharyngeal edema. PMID:24558935

  20. Analogue simulation of pharyngeal airflow response to Twin Block treatment in growing patients with Class II1 and mandibular retrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Wu, Wei; Yan, Guijun; Liu, Li; Liu, Hong; Li, Guojv; Li, Jing; Liu, Dongxu

    2016-01-01

    The flow dynamics of respiratory airflow is the basic factor that influences the ventilation function of the upper airway. This research aimed to investigate the pharyngeal flow field characteristics after Twin Block (TB) treatment in growing patients with Class II1 and mandibular retrognathia by computation fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of patients who have completed TB treatment (n = 30) and about to accept TB treatment (n = 30) were reconstructed. After CFD simulation, correlations between the pharyngeal pressure drop and morphological parameters were further analyzed. During inspiration, we found that the pressure minimum occurred in the hypopharynx, while the maximum pressure drop and velocity was located in the oropharynx. After TB treatment, the oropharynx and hypopharynx showed significant differences in airflow features, and the most obvious change was observed in the oropharynx. A significant correlation was discovered between the change amount of oropharyngeal pressure drop and volume (r = 0.694, p = 0.001), mean cross-sectional area (r = 0.859, p = 0.000), and ratio of the minimum and mean cross-sectional area (r = 0.898, p = 0.000) of the oropharynx. Our research suggested that the pharyngeal airflow characteristics response positively to mandibular advancement with the enlargement in volume, cross-sectional area and more uniform oropharyngeal area distribution. PMID:27188799

  1. Low-power CO2 laser in the treatment of chronic pharyngitis: a five-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Nicola, Jorge H.

    1994-09-01

    Spatial and temporal coherence are properties of laser light we studied for some time as responsible for biophysical phenomena, capable of significant contributions in the treatment of chronic inflammatory lesions. In this paper we present the results of five years experience in the application of CO2 low power laser (LPL) therapy as a new means of treating chronic pharyngitis. Based on our previous studies, we selected 85 patients with nonspecific chronic pharyngitis to be treated at our laser unit. The patients were grouped as follows: Group I, 40 patients, predominance of hyperemic aspect; and Group II, 45 patients, predominance of hypertrophied aspect. Both groups were submitted to low power irradiation of CO2 laser in eight to ten sessions, one week interval according to the evolution of symptoms. The good results obtained lead us to conclude that this new application for LPL is very suitable for systematic treatment of chronic pharyngitis: a very common and disturbing symptom for a great number of ear, nose, and throat patients, still lacking an effective form of therapy.

  2. A method for motion compensation of a moving nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and its application to frequency analysis of pharyngeal pulsation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S N; Murata, T; Ebina, Y; Okada, H; Miki, T

    1998-05-13

    A new sequential image processing method for motion compensation of a moving object with stringy shape has been developed for estimating the pharyngeal pulsation of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans under several environmental conditions. The method is based on the pixel data transfer on a new image frame while changing the boundary shape and the position but preserving the conformation of the inner structure of an object. All digitized image frames of C. elegans were first converted to motion-compensated images to arrange the pulsation site in the same region of the every transformed frame. The pulsation site was then automatically detected by determining the pixels where the temporal brightness variation was much larger than that of the other pixels. Finally, the pulsation frequency was determined by the Fourier analysis. The validity of our method has been confirmed by analyzing various test data, and the method has been applied for detecting the pharyngeal pulsation frequencies of C. elegans on some environmental conditions, i.e. feed bacteria-free/rich, doping of nerve inactivating ethyl-alcohol and nerve stimulant neurochemical substance of serotonin. The motion compensation method automatically provided reasonable pulsation frequencies which were found to be comparable to those obtained by manual counting. Thus the method is useful for systematic investigations on the variation of pharyngeal pulsation associated with the activity change of the nervous system in environments. PMID:9684336

  3. Allometric shape change of the lower pharyngeal jaw correlates with a dietary shift to piscivory in a cichlid fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellig, Christoph J.; Kerschbaumer, Michaela; Sefc, Kristina M.; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2010-07-01

    The morphological versatility of the pharyngeal jaw of cichlid fishes is assumed to represent a key factor facilitating their unparalleled trophic diversification and explosive radiation. It is generally believed that the functional design of an organism relates to its ecology, and thus, specializations to different diets are typically associated with distinct morphological designs, especially manifested in the cichlids’ pharyngeal jaw apparatus. Thereby, the lower pharyngeal jaw (LPJ) incorporates some of the most predictive features for distinct diet-related morphotypes. Thus, considering that piscivorous cichlids experience an ontogenetic dietary shift from typically various kinds of invertebrates to fish, concomitant morphological changes in the LPJ are expected. Using Lepidiolamprologus elongatus, a top predator in the shallow rocky habitat of Lake Tanganyika, as model, and applying geometric and traditional morphometric techniques, we demonstrate an allometric change in ontogenetic LPJ shape development coinciding with the completion of the dietary shift toward piscivory. The piscivorous LPJ morphotype is initiated in juvenile fish by increasing elongation and narrowing of the LPJ and—when the fish reach a size of 80-90 mm standard length—further refined by the elongation of the posterior muscular processes, which serve as insertion for the fourth musculus levator externus. The enlarged muscular processes of the fully mature piscivorous morphotype provide for the construction of a powerful lever system, which allows the large individuals to process large prey fish and rely on exclusive piscivory.

  4. High temperature effect on microflora of radish root-inhabited zone and nutrient solutions for radish growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, E. V.; Tirranen, L. S.

    The effect of high temperatures (35 and 45 °C) on microflora of the root zone of radish plants grown in phytotron was evaluated by the response of microorganisms from 9 indicator groups. Phytotron air temperature elevated to 35 °C for 20 hours caused no significant changes in qualitative and quantitative composition of the root microflora in experimental plants. By the end of the experiment, the species diversity of microflora had changed. The amount of phytopathogenic microorganisms decreased which can be interpreted as more stable co-existence of microflora with plants. The numbers of microbes from other indicator groups was in dynamic equilibrium. The plants' condition did not deteriorate either. Exposure to the temperature of 45 °C for 7 hours have been found to change the numbers and species diversity in the radish root zone microflora. The microorganisms were observed to increase their total numbers at the expense of certain indicator groups. Bacteria increased spore forms at the stage of spores. Colon bacillus bacteria of increased their numbers by the end of experiment by an order. By the end of experiment the roots of experiment plants had microscopic fungi from Mucor, Aspergillus, Trichoderma, Cladosporium genera. The observed changes in the microbial complex seem to be associated with the changes of root emissions and general deterioration of the plants' condition. It is suggested that the response of the microorganisms can be indicative of the condition of plants under investigation.

  5. Light and hydrogen peroxide inhibit C. elegans Feeding through gustatory receptor orthologs and pharyngeal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bhatla, Nikhil; Horvitz, H Robert

    2015-02-18

    While gustatory sensing of the five primary flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and savory) has been extensively studied, pathways that detect non-canonical taste stimuli remain relatively unexplored. In particular, while reactive oxygen species cause generalized damage to biological systems, no gustatory mechanism to prevent ingestion of such material has been identified in any organism. We observed that light inhibits C. elegans feeding and used light as a tool to uncover molecular and neural mechanisms for gustation. Light can generate hydrogen peroxide, and we discovered that hydrogen peroxide similarly inhibits feeding. The gustatory receptor family members LITE-1 and GUR-3 are required for the inhibition of feeding by light and hydrogen peroxide. The I2 pharyngeal neurons increase calcium in response to light and hydrogen peroxide, and these responses require GUR-3 and a conserved antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin PRDX-2. Our results demonstrate a gustatory mechanism that mediates the detection and blocks ingestion of a non-canonical taste stimulus, hydrogen peroxide. PMID:25640076

  6. A morphometric analysis of polymorphism in the pharyngeal dentition of Cichlasoma minckleyi (Teleostei: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Trapani, Josh

    2004-10-01

    Dental polymorphism in teleost fishes often involves production of a robust dentition, or "molarization", in one morph. The lower pharyngeals of a sample of wild-caught individuals of the polymorphic Cuatro Cienegas cichlid, Cichlasoma minckleyi (Kornfield and Taylor) (Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 96 (1983) 253), were measured to investigate morphological changes associated with molarization. Principal components analysis demonstrates that dental variability in this species increases in larger fish, and that only the molariform morph contributes to this increase. Reduced major axis regression analyses between pairs of variables indicate that the papilliform morph increases both tooth measures and numbers, whereas the molariform morph maintains a relatively constant number of teeth as it produces teeth of progressively larger size. In the papilliform morph, negative allometric scaling between tooth size and dentigerous area is compensated for by addition of teeth. Tooth size variables are isometric in the molariform morph, and tooth numbers are nearly static. These results are consistent with those reported for other polymorphic cichlid species. Further study is required to elucidate the mechanisms whereby tooth form in polyphyodont species may respond to environmental factors (like food hardness), but possibilities include direct mechanical influences or transmission of signals via nerves to developing replacement teeth. PMID:15308427

  7. Sequential Coordination between Lingual and Pharyngeal Pressures Produced during Dry Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Jitsuro; Aoyagi, Yoichiro; Ono, Takahiro; Hori, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Wakami; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Kumakura, Isami; Minagi, Shogo; Tsubahara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oropharyngeal pressure flow dynamics during dry swallowing in ten healthy subjects. Tongue pressure (TP) was measured using a sensor sheet system with five measuring points on the hard palate, and pharyngeal pressure (PP) was measured using a manometric catheter with four measuring points. The order and correlations of sequential events, such as onset, peak, and offset times of pressure production, at each pressure measuring point were analyzed on the synchronized waveforms. Onset of TP was earlier than that of PP. The peak of TP did not show significant differences with the onset of PP, and it was earlier than that of PP. There was no significant difference between the offset of TP and PP. The onset of PP was temporally time-locked to the peak of TP, and there was an especially strong correlation between the onset of PP and TP at the posterior-median part on the hard palate. The offset of PP was temporally time-locked to that of TP. These results could be interpreted as providing an explanation for the generation of oropharyngeal pressure flow to ensure efficient bolus transport and safe swallowing. PMID:25580436

  8. Longitudinal analysis of the group A Streptococcus transcriptome in experimental pharyngitis in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Virtaneva, Kimmo; Porcella, Stephen F; Graham, Morag R; Ireland, Robin M; Johnson, Claire A; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Babar, Imran; Parkins, Larye D; Romero, Romina A; Corn, G Judson; Gardner, Don J; Bailey, John R; Parnell, Michael J; Musser, James M

    2005-06-21

    Identification of the genetic events that contribute to host-pathogen interactions is important for understanding the natural history of infectious diseases and developing therapeutics. Transcriptome studies conducted on pathogens have been central to this goal in recent years. However, most of these investigations have focused on specific end points or disease phases, rather than analysis of the entire time course of infection. To gain a more complete understanding of how bacterial gene expression changes over time in a primate host, the transcriptome of group A Streptococcus (GAS) was analyzed during an 86-day infection protocol in 20 cynomolgus macaques with experimental pharyngitis. The study used 260 custom Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) chips, and data were confirmed by TaqMan analysis. Colonization, acute, and asymptomatic phases of disease were identified. Successful colonization and severe inflammation were significantly correlated with an early onset of superantigen gene expression. The differential expression of two-component regulators covR and spy0680 (M1_spy0874) was significantly associated with GAS colony-forming units, inflammation, and phases of disease. Prophage virulence gene expression and prophage induction occurred predominantly during high pathogen cell densities and acute inflammation. We discovered that temporal changes in the GAS transcriptome were integrally linked to the phase of clinical disease and host-defense response. Knowledge of the gene expression patterns characterizing each phase of pathogen-host interaction provides avenues for targeted investigation of proven and putative virulence factors and genes of unknown function and will assist vaccine research. PMID:15956184

  9. Light and hydrogen peroxide inhibit C. elegans feeding through gustatory receptor orthologs and pharyngeal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bhatla, Nikhil; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While gustatory sensing of the five primary flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and savory) has been extensively studied, pathways that detect non-canonical taste stimuli remain relatively unexplored. In particular, while reactive oxygen species cause generalized damage to biological systems, no gustatory mechanism to prevent ingestion of such material has been identified in any organism. We observed that light inhibits C. elegans feeding and used light as a tool to uncover molecular and neural mechanisms for gustation. Light can generate hydrogen peroxide, and we discovered that hydrogen peroxide similarly inhibits feeding. The gustatory receptor family members LITE-1 and GUR-3 are required for the inhibition of feeding by light and hydrogen peroxide. The I2 pharyngeal neurons increase calcium in response to light and hydrogen peroxide, and these responses require GUR-3 and a conserved antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin PRDX-2. Our results demonstrate a gustatory mechanism that mediates the detection and blocks ingestion of a non-canonical taste stimulus, hydrogen peroxide. PMID:25640076

  10. Artificial neural network classification of pharyngeal high-resolution manometry with impedance data

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Mielens, Jason D.; Omari, Taher I.; Rommel, Nathalie; Jiang, Jack J.; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To use classification algorithms to classify swallows as safe, penetration, or aspiration based on measurements obtained from pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM) with impedance. Study design Case series evaluating new method of data analysis. Method Multilayer perceptron (MLP), an artificial neural network (ANN), was evaluated for its ability to classify swallows as safe, penetration, or aspiration. Data were collected from 25 disordered subjects swallowing 5 or 10 ml boluses. Following extraction of relevant parameters, a subset of the data was used to train the models and the remaining swallows were then independently classified by the ANN. Results A classification accuracy of 89.4±2.4% was achieved when including all parameters. Including only manometry-related parameters yielded a classification accuracy of 85.0±6.0% while including only impedance-related parameters yielded a classification accuracy of 76.0±4.9%. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis yielded areas under the curve (AUC) of 0.8912 for safe, 0.8187 for aspiration, and 0.8014 for penetration. Conclusions Classification models show high accuracy in classifying swallows from dysphagic patients as safe or unsafe. HRM-impedance with ANN represents one method which could be used clinically to screen for patients at risk for penetration or aspiration. PMID:23070810

  11. Is pepsin detected in the saliva of patients who experience pharyngeal reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Printza, A; Speletas, M; Triaridis, S; Wilson, J

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate if pepsin is detected, with an activity assay, in the saliva of patients with a clinical diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and can therefore be used as a diagnostic marker of laryngopharyngeal reflux. Study design: Pilot, prospective study. Methods: Adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of LPR collected whole saliva samples on regular intervals for a day, and upon experiencing symptoms attributed to LPR. Patients were selected on the basis of presence of severe symptoms and laryngoscopic findings of laryngopharyngeal reflux and symptoms of gastroesopharyngeal reflux. They reported voice disorders, dysphagia, throat clearing, excessive secretions, breathing difficulties, cough, globus sensation and throat pain. Control participants reported the absence of pharyngeal and laryngeal symptoms and of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Saliva samples were assayed with fibrinogen on an agarose gel plate. The detection of pepsin was based on the presence of peptic activity which was qualitatively evaluated. Results: The control participants had negative assays. No saliva samples from the LPR patients, collected at regular sampling, tested positive for pepsin. All the samples collected at the presence of symptoms and following regurgitation episodes tested negative for pepsin. Saliva samples pH ranged from 7 to 8. Conclusions: Pepsin was not detected, with an activity assay, in the saliva of patients with a clinical diagnosis of LPR. A concentration method might be more sensitive although saliva and swallowing physiology renders the detection of pepsin in the saliva difficult. PMID:19582210

  12. Real-Time 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pharyngeal Airway in Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Chul; Lebel, R. Marc; Wu, Ziyue; Davidson Ward, Sally L.; Khoo, Michael C.K.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of real-time 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with simultaneous recording of physiological signals for identifying sites of airway obstruction during natural sleep in pediatric patients with sleep-disordered breathing. Methods Experiments were performed using a three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) gradient echo sequence with prospective undersampling based on golden-angle radial spokes, and L1-norm regularized iterative self-consistent parallel imaging (L1-SPIRiT) reconstruction. This technique was demonstrated in three healthy adult volunteers and five pediatric patients with sleep-disordered breathing. External airway occlusion was used to induce partial collapse of the upper airway on inspiration and test the effectiveness of the proposed imaging method. Apneic events were identified using information available from synchronized recording of mask pressure and respiratory effort. Results Acceptable image quality was obtained in seven of eight subjects. Temporary airway collapse induced via inspiratory loading was successfully imaged in all three volunteers, with average airway volume reductions of 63.3%, 52.5%, and 33.7%. Central apneic events and associated airway narrowing/closure were identified in two pediatric patients. During central apneic events, airway obstruction was observed in the retropalatal region in one pediatric patient. Conclusion Real-time 3D MRI of the pharyngeal airway with synchronized recording of physiological signals is feasible and may provide valuable information about the sites and nature of airway narrowing/collapse during natural sleep. PMID:23788203

  13. Palato-pharyngeal cine photography: a technique for developing continuing education films.

    PubMed

    Smith, H W

    1977-04-01

    A method of Cine photography has been developed to record a variety of plastic and reconstructive surgical procedures in the oral cavity and pharynx. Effective classroom teaching of surgical closure of the cleft palate and the various palatal lengthening procedures including pharyngeal flaps, has been hampered by the lack of quality teaching films demonstrating surgical techniques in color. The small size of the structures involved and the delicate nature of the surgery requires that the surgeon work at close range and directly in front of the mouth. To avoid the shadows cast by the sides of the oral cavity, the surgeon's hands and frequent change of position by the professional photographic team, a head-mounted Cine camera was employed. A "through the surgeon's eye" view for the camera was accomplished by using a parallelogram of beam-splitting mirrors. The resulting photographic film provides the classroom audience with a sense of being in the surgeon's operating position thus having a view superior to that obtained by the surgeon's first assistant. An elaborate system of counter-balancing provides the surgeon with a weightless camera, mirror, and light complex mounted on a football helmet. The football helmet merely served as an interlocking unit enabling the surgeon to compose his own movie while operating. PMID:65708

  14. Adsorption of surfactant lipids by single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse lung upon pharyngeal aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kapralov, Alexander A; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E; Kisin, Elena R; Kotchey, Gregg P; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2012-05-22

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells, and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids: phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (∼108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted "coating" whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B, and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  15. Pharyngeal Presentation of Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report with Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    DiSalvo, Dale S; Oberman, Benjamin S; Warrick, Joshua I; Goldenberg, David

    2016-06-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome; GS) is an X-linked dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the porcupine homolog (PORCN) gene and is typically embryonically lethal for males. The presence of disease in males is usually the result of post-zygotic mutation, but may also be due to mosaicism. The presentation of this disorder is highly variable, but generally is characterized by cutaneous, skeletal, ocular, oral, dental, and aural defects. Cutaneous manifestations include foci of hypoplastic skin, abnormal pigmentation, and papillomatous growths. We present both the first case of a patient with GS related laryngeal obstruction due to papillary lymphoid hyperplasia in an adult, and the first case in a male patient. Clinical, histologic, and genetic features of the disease are discussed. Operative technique for management of the patient with pharyngeal lesions is detailed, and intraoperative photos are showcased. The challenge in airway evaluation and management is also highlighted as manifestations of GS are rarely encountered in the airway and can cause laryngeal obstruction. PMID:26577212

  16. Tonsillar microbiota in children with PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tejesvi, M V; Uhari, M; Tapiainen, T; Pirttilä, A M; Suokas, M; Lantto, U; Koivunen, P; Renko, M

    2016-06-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) is a childhood febrile syndrome of unknown origin that is often cured with tonsillectomy. We aimed to compare the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients with those of controls. We used next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils of 30 PFAPA patients and 24 controls. We found significant differences in the presence and relative abundance of many bacteria between PFAPA cases and controls. For example, cyanobacteria, potential producers of microcystins and other toxins, were more common in the case samples (14/30, 47 %) than in the controls (4/24, 17 %, p = 0.02), and the mean relative abundance of cyanobacteria was higher in the case samples (0.2 %) than in the controls (0.01 %, p = 0.01). Streptococci were present in all samples in both groups, but their mean relative abundance was lower in the case samples (3.7 %) than in the controls (9.6 %, p = 0.01). Typical nasopharyngeal microbes such as fusobacteria, Prevotella, Tannerella, Porphyromonas, and Parvimonas dominated the microbiota of the tonsils in both groups. The microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients differed significantly from those of the controls. Tonsillar microbiota may play a role in triggering the inflammatory processes that lead to symptoms of PFAPA. PMID:27025724

  17. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome: a Review of the Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Vanoni, Federica; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    PFAPA syndrome represents the most common cause of recurrent fever in children in European populations, and it is characterized by recurrent episodes of high fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis, and aphthous stomatitis. Many possible causative factors have been explored so far, including infectious agents, immunologic mechanisms and genetic predisposition, but the exact etiology remains unclear. Recent findings demonstrate a dysregulation of different components of innate immunity during PFAPA flares, such as monocytes, neutrophils, complement, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, suggesting an inflammasome-mediated innate immune system activation and supporting the hypothesis of an autoinflammatory disease. Moreover, in contrast with previous considerations, the strong familial clustering suggests a potential genetic origin rather than a sporadic disease. In addition, the presence of variants in inflammasome-related genes, mostly in NLRP3 and MEFV, suggests a possible role of inflammasome-composing genes in PFAPA pathogenesis. However, none of these variants seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, indicating a high genetic heterogeneity as well as an oligogenic or polygenic genetic background. PMID:26984802

  18. Brain and behavioral effects of swallowing carbonated water on the human pharyngeal motor system.

    PubMed

    Elshukri, Omsaad; Michou, Emilia; Mentz, Hannah; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-02-15

    Chemical stimulation of the swallowing network with carbonation and citric acid has been investigated, showing potential benefits on swallowing of dysphagic patients. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we investigated the effects of 5 ml liquid bolus swallows of carbonated, citric acid, and still water on a swallowing reaction-time tasks paradigm in 16 healthy adults (8 male, mean age 33 ± 3.7 yr, protocol 1). We then investigated the net effects of "sensory bolus interventions" (40 repeated swallows every 15 s) of the three different liquid boluses on corticobulbar excitability, as examined with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 16 participants (8 female, mean age 33 ± 3.7 yr, protocol 2). The findings showed that a larger number of correctly timed swallows (within a predetermined time window) was accomplished mainly with carbonated liquids (z = -2.04, P = 0.04 vs. still water, protocol 1). Both carbonated and citric acid liquid interventions with 40 swallows increased corticobulbar excitability of the stronger pharyngeal projection, suggesting a similar modulatory pathway for the effects on swallowing. However, carbonation showed superiority (P = 0.04, F = 4.75, 2-way ANOVA), with the changes lasting up to 60 min following the intervention. These results hold significance for future further and in-depth physiological investigations of the differences between different stimuli on swallowing neural network. PMID:26607248

  19. Effect of surgical mandibular advancement on pharyngeal airway dimensions: a three-dimensional computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Kochar, G D; Chakranarayan, A; Kohli, S; Kohli, V S; Khanna, V; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Verma, M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the changes in pharyngeal airway space (PAS) in patients with a skeletal class II malocclusion managed by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy for mandibular advancement, using three-dimensional (3D) registration. The sample comprised 16 patients (mean age 21.69±2.80 years). Preoperative (T0) and postoperative (T1) computed tomography scans were recorded. Linear, cross-sectional area (CSA), and volumetric parameters of the velopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx were evaluated. Parameters were compared with paired samples t-tests. Highly significant changes in dimension were measured in both sagittal and transverse planes (P<0.001). CSA measurements increased significantly between T0 and T1 (P<0.001). A significant increase in PAS volume was found at T1 compared with T0 (P<0.001). The changes in PAS were quantified using 3D reconstruction. Along the sagittal and transverse planes, the greatest increase was seen in the oropharynx (12.16% and 11.50%, respectively), followed by hypopharynx (11.00% and 9.07%) and velopharynx (8.97% and 6.73%). CSA increased by 41.69%, 34.56%, and 28.81% in the oropharynx, hypopharynx, and velopharynx, respectively. The volumetric increase was greatest in the oropharynx (49.79%) and least in the velopharynx (38.92%). These established quantifications may act as a useful guide for clinicians in the field of dental sleep medicine. PMID:26691933

  20. Halzoun, an allergic pharyngitis syndrome in Lebanon: the trematode Dicrocoelium dendriticum as an additional cause.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Georges; Haddad, Charles; Otrock, Zaher K; Jaber, Fadel; Farra, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Halzoun syndrome typically manifests in the form of an allergic pharyngitis following the consumption of raw or undercooked ovine liver. First described in Lebanon in 1905, it was initially attributed to Fasciola hepatica, while later publications have attributed it to other pathogens. There has been no definitive documentation of the pathogen causing the Lebanese Halzoun syndrome. The aim of our study was to identify the parasite responsible for the pathogenesis of the Lebanese Halzoun syndrome. 32 patients with typical clinical symptoms of Halzoun syndrome were recruited in the emergency room at our hospital from 2005 to 2007. One parasite was isolated from a patient's expectorations, and two others were isolated from pieces of a raw sheep liver retrieved from the patients' dishes. A piece of infected goat liver intended for consumption was also collected from a local butcher. All parasites were examined microscopically for identification. All patients presented with immune allergic-like symptoms of the eyes, ears, nose, or throat. All collected parasites were identified as Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Our study has identified D. dendriticum, rather than Linguatula serrata or F. hepatica, as the prime suspect in the pathogenesis of the Lebanese Halzoun syndrome. PMID:23022355

  1. [Research advances in denitrogenation characteristics of aerobic denitrifiers].

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-Cheng; Zhao, Min; Lu, Lei; Zhao, Li-Yan

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of aerobic denitrifiers is the enrichment and breakthrough of traditional denitrification theory. Owing to their unique superiority in denitrogenation, aerobic denitrifiers have become a hotspot in the study of bio-denitrogenation of waste water. Under aerobic conditions, the aerobic denitrifiers can utilize organic carbon sources for their growth, and produce N2 from nitrate and nitrite. Most of the denitrifiers can also proceed with heterotrophic nitrification simultaneously, transforming NH4(+)-N to gaseous nitrogen. In this paper, the denitrogenation characteristics and action mechanisms of some isolated aerobic denitrifiers were discussed from the aspects of electron theory and denitrifying enzyme system. The effects of the environmental factors DO, carbon sources, and C/N on the denitrogenation process of aerobic denitrifiers were analyzed, and the screening methods as well as the present and potential applications of aerobic denitrifiers in wastewater treatment were described and discussed. PMID:20873638

  2. Anaerobic Microflora of Everglades Sediments: Effects of Nutrients on Population Profiles and Activities

    PubMed Central

    Drake, H. L.; Aumen, N. G.; Kuhner, C.; Wagner, C.; Griesshammer, A.; Schmittroth, M.

    1996-01-01

    Everglades sediments (wetland soils) near sources of agricultural runoff had low redox potentials, were blackened with sulfide, and displayed high porewater phosphorus (total) concentrations and high water column conductivities. These sediments yielded 10(sup3)- to 10(sup4)-fold-higher numbers of culturable anaerobes, including methanogens, sulfate reducers, and acetate producers, than did sediments from Everglades and Lake Okeechobee comparative control sites not as directly associated with agricultural runoff. These observations demonstrated that there was a general, rather than specific, enhancement of the anaerobic microflora in the sediments most likely influenced by agricultural runoff. Despite these differences in microfloral patterns, methylmercury and total mercury levels were similar among these contrasting sediments. Although available sulfate and phosphorus appeared to stimulate the productivity of sulfate reducers in Everglades sediments, the number of culturable sulfate reducers did not directly correspond to the concentration of sulfate and phosphorus in porewaters. Microcosms supplemented with sulfate, nitrate, and phosphate altered the initial capacities of the sediment microflora to produce acetate and methane from endogenous matter. For sediments nearest sources of agricultural runoff, phosphorus temporarily enhanced acetate formation and initially suppressed methane production, sulfate enhanced acetate formation but did not significantly alter the production of methane, and nitrate totally suppressed the initial production of both methane and acetate. In regards to the latter, microbes capable of dissimilating nitrate to ammonium were present in greater culturable numbers than denitrifiers. In microcosms, acetate was a major source of methane, and supplemental hydrogen was directed towards the synthesis of acetate via CO(inf2)-dependent acetogenesis. These findings demonstrate that Everglades sediments nearest agricultural runoff have enhanced

  3. Comparison between Gram stain and culture for the characterization of vaginal microflora: Definition of a distinct grade that resembles grade I microflora and revised categorization of grade I microflora

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, Rita; Verstraelen, Hans; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda; Van Simaey, Leen; De Ganck, Catharine; De Backer, Ellen; Temmerman, Marleen; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Background The microbiological diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis is usually made using Nugent's criteria, a useful but rather laborious scoring system based on counting bacterial cell types on Gram stained slides of vaginal smears. Ison and Hay have simplified the score system to three categories and added a fourth category for microflora with a predominance of the Streptococcus cell type. Because in the Nugent system several cell types are not taken into account for a final score, we carried out a detailed assessment of the composition of the vaginal microflora in relation to standard Gram stain in order the improve the diagnostic value of the Gram stain. To this purpose we compared Gram stain based categorization of vaginal smears with i) species specific PCR for the detection of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae and with ii) tDNA-PCR for the identification of most cultivable species. Results A total of 515 samples were obtained from 197 pregnant women, of which 403 (78.3%) were categorized as grade I microflora, 46 (8.9%) as grade II, 22 (4.3%) as grade III and 8 (1.6%) as grade IV, according to the criteria of Ison and Hay. Another 36 samples (7.0%) were assigned to the new category 'grade I-like', because of the presence of diphtheroid bacilli cell types. We found that 52.7% of the grade I-like samples contained Bifidobacterium spp. while L. crispatus was present in only 2.8% of the samples and G. vaginalis and A. vaginae were virtually absent; in addition, the species diversity of this category was similar to that of grade II specimens. Based on the presence of different Lactobacillus cell types, grade I specimens were further characterized as grade Ia (40.2%), grade Iab (14.9%) and grade Ib (44.9%). We found that this classification was supported by the finding that L. crispatus was cultured from respectively 87.0% and 76.7% of grade Ia and Iab specimens while this species was present in only 13.3% of grade Ib specimens, a category in which L

  4. The influence of native gut microflora on the colonization and infection of Salmonella gallinarum in chickens.

    PubMed

    Silva, E N; Snoeyenbos, G H; Weinack, O M; Smyser, C F

    1981-01-01

    A native intestinal microflora of chickens that is protective against paratyphoid salmonellae appeared to be partially protective against Salmonella gallinarum and abbreviated the excretion time of S. gallinarum in White Leghorn chicks. Treated birds had a lower incidence of systemic infection measured by liver and spleen culture, and fewer birds developed infection in the intestinal tract. Most of the chickens positive by cloacal swabs excreted S. gallinarum throughout the test period. The low level of protection provided by competitive exclusion suggested that the practice would not prove useful in the practical control of fowl typhoid. PMID:7271664

  5. Impact of probiotic drugs, based on Enterobacter faecium autostrains, on human intestinal microflora in confined habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Batov, Alexey; Usanova, Nonna

    The aim of research: Investigation of influence of probiotic drugs based on autostrains of Enter-obacter faecium, selected from the crew in long term isolation experiment in confined habitat. It is known that during long-term presence in confined habitat the risk of infectious diseases increases. One of the main infectious risk occurs during first 20 days of isolation as a result of exchange of strains and stress-mediated disbacterioses. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate activities of probiotics to avoid this risk. Furthermore, in case of super long term autonomous flight there should be possibilities of application of autochthonous microflora strains as pro-biotics to strengthen colonial resistance of crews. Materials and methods: In the experiment there were used probiotic drugs based on autostrains of E. faecium, selected from the crew before the experiment. Probiotic drugs were consumed during 30 days since the beginning of the experiment with the break of consumption between 10th to 19th day. Results: Comparing the state of intestinal microflora of the crew on the baseline and 14th day of experiment re-vealed remarkable changes of microflora: the increasing of concentration of bifidobacteria and E. faecium (approximately 10 times), elimination of hemolytic streptococcus, yeasts, reduction of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative non-fermenting rods, lactobacilli and normal E.coli. On the 45th day of isolation, 15 days after finishing of auto-strains administration, there fere signs of restoration of disbacteriosis: the quantitative decreasing lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and normal E.coli, increasing of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative nonfermentive rods. Conclusion: Thus we managed to avoid risk of pathogenicity potential growth in first 2 decades of isolation. Application of probiotic, based on the autostrains of E. faecium leads to insignificant changes of concentration of lactobacteries, bifidobacteries, normal E. coli and to

  6. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on microflora and some quality attributes of grape juice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Mecnun; Buzrul, Sencer; Alpas, Hami

    2013-03-01

    Red and white grape juices were treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) at three different pressures, temperature and time values to investigate the effects of HHP on natural microflora and some quality attributes of the juices. Increased pressure, temperature and time showed significant effect on the microbial reduction and no microbial growth were observed in HHP-treated grape juices up to 90 days. HHP had little or no effect on pH and color of the juices. Although 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation was observed in heat pasteurized samples, no HMF was detected in HHP-treated juices. This study demonstrated that HHP could be used as an alternative to heat treatment.

  7. Pglyrp-Regulated Gut Microflora Prevotella falsenii, Parabacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides eggerthii Enhance and Alistipes finegoldii Attenuates Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dziarski, Roman; Dowd, Scot E.; Gupta, Dipika

    2016-01-01

    Dysbiosis is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is unclear which specific intestinal bacteria predispose to and which protect from IBD and how they are regulated. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (Pglyrps) are antibacterial, participate in maintaining intestinal microflora, and modulate inflammatory responses. Mice deficient in any one of the four Pglyrp genes are more sensitive to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, and stools from Pglyrp-deficient mice transferred to wild type (WT) germ-free mice predispose them to much more severe colitis than stools from WT mice. However, the identities of these Pglyrp-regulated bacteria that predispose Pglyrp-deficient mice to colitis or protect WT mice from colitis are not known. Here we identified significant changes in β-diversity of stool bacteria in Pglyrp-deficient mice compared with WT mice. The most consistent changes in microbiome in all Pglyrp-deficient mice were in Bacteroidales, from which we selected four species, two with increased abundance (Prevotella falsenii and Parabacteroides distasonis) and two with decreased abundance (Bacteroides eggerthii and Alistipes finegoldii). We then gavaged WT mice with stock type strains of these species to test the hypothesis that they predispose to or protect from DSS-induced colitis. P. falsenii, P. distasonis, and B. eggerthii all enhanced DSS-induced colitis in both WT mice with otherwise undisturbed intestinal microflora and in WT mice with antibiotic-depleted intestinal microflora. By contrast, A. finegoldii (which is the most abundant species in WT mice) attenuated DSS-induced colitis both in WT mice with otherwise undisturbed intestinal microflora and in WT mice with antibiotic-depleted intestinal microflora, similar to the colitis protective effect of the entire normal microflora. These results identify P. falsenii, P. distasonis, and B. eggerthii as colitis-promoting species and A. finegoldii as colitis-protective species. PMID

  8. Pglyrp-Regulated Gut Microflora Prevotella falsenii, Parabacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides eggerthii Enhance and Alistipes finegoldii Attenuates Colitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dziarski, Roman; Park, Shin Yong; Kashyap, Des Raj; Dowd, Scot E; Gupta, Dipika

    2016-01-01

    Dysbiosis is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is unclear which specific intestinal bacteria predispose to and which protect from IBD and how they are regulated. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (Pglyrps) are antibacterial, participate in maintaining intestinal microflora, and modulate inflammatory responses. Mice deficient in any one of the four Pglyrp genes are more sensitive to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, and stools from Pglyrp-deficient mice transferred to wild type (WT) germ-free mice predispose them to much more severe colitis than stools from WT mice. However, the identities of these Pglyrp-regulated bacteria that predispose Pglyrp-deficient mice to colitis or protect WT mice from colitis are not known. Here we identified significant changes in β-diversity of stool bacteria in Pglyrp-deficient mice compared with WT mice. The most consistent changes in microbiome in all Pglyrp-deficient mice were in Bacteroidales, from which we selected four species, two with increased abundance (Prevotella falsenii and Parabacteroides distasonis) and two with decreased abundance (Bacteroides eggerthii and Alistipes finegoldii). We then gavaged WT mice with stock type strains of these species to test the hypothesis that they predispose to or protect from DSS-induced colitis. P. falsenii, P. distasonis, and B. eggerthii all enhanced DSS-induced colitis in both WT mice with otherwise undisturbed intestinal microflora and in WT mice with antibiotic-depleted intestinal microflora. By contrast, A. finegoldii (which is the most abundant species in WT mice) attenuated DSS-induced colitis both in WT mice with otherwise undisturbed intestinal microflora and in WT mice with antibiotic-depleted intestinal microflora, similar to the colitis protective effect of the entire normal microflora. These results identify P. falsenii, P. distasonis, and B. eggerthii as colitis-promoting species and A. finegoldii as colitis-protective species. PMID

  9. Aerobic workout and bone mass in females.

    PubMed

    Alfredson, H; Nordström, P; Lorentzon, R

    1997-12-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate bone mass in females participating in aerobic workout. Twenty-three females (age 24.1 +/- 2.7 years), participating in aerobic workout for about 3 hours/week, were compared with 23 age-, weight- and height-matched non-active females. Areal bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in total body, head, whole dominant humerus, lumbar spine, right femoral neck, Ward's triangle, trochanter femoris, in specific sites in right femur diaphysis, distal femur, proximal tibia and tibial diaphysis, and bone mineral content (BMC) was measured in the whole dominant arm and right leg, using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The aerobic workout group had significantly (P < 0.05-0.01) higher BMD in total body (3.7%), lumbar spine (7.8%), femoral neck (11.6%), Ward's triangle (11.7%), trochanter femoris (9.6%), proximal tibia (6.8%) and tibia diaphysis (5.9%) compared to the non-active controls. There were no differences between the groups concerning BMD of the whole dominant humerus, femoral diaphysis, distal femur and BMC and lean mass of the whole dominant arm and right leg. Leaness of the whole dominant arm and leg was correlated to BMC of the whole dominant arm and right leg in both groups. In young females, aerobic workout containing alternating high and low impact movements for the lower body is associated with a higher bone mass in clinically important sites like the lumbar spine and hip, but muscle strengthening exercises like push-ups and soft-glove boxing are not associated with a higher bone mass in the dominant humerus. It appears that there is a skeletal adaptation to the loads of the activity. PMID:9458499

  10. Nitrification and aerobic denitrification in anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Alzate Marin, Juan C; Caravelli, Alejandro H; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of achieving nitrogen (N) removal using a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) exposed to anoxic/aerobic (AN/OX) phases, focusing to achieve aerobic denitrification. This process will minimize emissions of N2O greenhouse gas. The effects of different operating parameters on the reactor performance were studied: cycle duration, AN/OX ratio, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration (DOC), and organic load. The highest inorganic N removal (NiR), close to 70%, was obtained at pH=7.5, low organic load (440mgCOD/(Lday)) and high aeration given by 12h cycle, AN/OX ratio=0.5:1.0 and DOC higher than 4.0mgO2/L. Nitrification followed by high-rate aerobic denitrification took place during the aerobic phase. Aerobic denitrification could be attributed to Tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs) with phenotype of glycogen accumulating organisms using polyhydroxyalkanoate and/or glycogen storage. The proposed AN/OX system constitutes an eco-friendly N removal process providing N2 as the end product. PMID:26512862

  11. Aerobic and two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion with pure oxygen and air aeration.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Gregor D; Ros, Milenko

    2008-01-01

    The degradability of excess activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant was studied. The objective was establishing the degree of degradation using either air or pure oxygen at different temperatures. Sludge treated with pure oxygen was degraded at temperatures from 22 degrees C to 50 degrees C while samples treated with air were degraded between 32 degrees C and 65 degrees C. Using air, sludge is efficiently degraded at 37 degrees C and at 50-55 degrees C. With oxygen, sludge was most effectively degraded at 38 degrees C or at 25-30 degrees C. Two-stage anaerobic-aerobic processes were studied. The first anaerobic stage was always operated for 5 days HRT, and the second stage involved aeration with pure oxygen and an HRT between 5 and 10 days. Under these conditions, there is 53.5% VSS removal and 55.4% COD degradation at 15 days HRT - 5 days anaerobic, 10 days aerobic. Sludge digested with pure oxygen at 25 degrees C in a batch reactor converted 48% of sludge total Kjeldahl nitrogen to nitrate. Addition of an aerobic stage with pure oxygen aeration to the anaerobic digestion enhances ammonium nitrogen removal. In a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion process within 8 days HRT of the aerobic stage, the removal of ammonium nitrogen was 85%. PMID:17251012

  12. Cloacal aerobic bacterial flora and absence of viruses in free-living slow worms (Anguis fragilis), grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and European Adders (Vipera berus) from Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker; Mock, Ronja; Burgkhardt, Eileen; Junghanns, Anja; Ortlieb, Falk; Szabo, Istvan; Marschang, Rachel; Blindow, Irmgard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Disease problems caused by viral or bacterial pathogens are common in reptiles kept in captivity. There is no information available on the incidence of viral pathogens or the physiological cloacal bacterial flora of common free-living reptiles in Germany. Therefore, 56 free-living reptiles including 23 European adders (Vipera berus), 12 grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and 21 slow worms (Anguis fragilis) were investigated on the island Hiddensee in northeastern Germany. Pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were taken immediately after capture. Bacteriological examination was performed from the cloacal swabs to study the aerobic cloacal flora. Molecular biological examination included amplification of DNA or RNA from adeno-, rana- and ferlaviruses as well as culturing on Russell's viper heart cells for virus isolation. Salmonella spp. were isolated from European adders but not from the other reptiles examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration was determined from the isolated Salmonella spp. However, some potentially human pathogenic bacteria, such as Proteus vulgaris, Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli were isolated. Viruses were not detected in any of the examined reptiles. To the authors' best knowledge, the present study is the first survey of viral pathogens in free-living snakes and slow worms in Germany and the first survey of cloacal aerobic bacterial flora of slow worms. PMID:24866333

  13. Effects of pharyngeal water stimulation on swallowing behaviors in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Hatakeyama, Aya; Kitada, Yasuyuki; Tsujimura, Takanori; Taniguchi, Hiroshige; Inoue, Makoto

    2013-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine whether the interval between swallows and the electromyographic (EMG) burst patterns of the suprahyoid muscles is affected by peripheral inputs during swallowing. Eighteen normal adults were asked to perform repetitive voluntary swallowing as quickly as possible, and three variables of swallowing were measured and evaluated, i.e., the swallowing intervals and the time interval between the onset and peak (rising time) and between the peak and offset (falling time) of the suprahyoid EMG burst. During recording, pharyngeal fluid infusion was applied with distilled water or 0.3 M NaCl solution at a very slow infusion rate (0.2 mL/min). The former and latter were used to activate and inhibit the excitation of water-sensitive receptors in the pharynx, respectively. The swallowing interval was significantly shorter during infusion of water than during infusion of NaCl solution. The rising time was also significantly shorter during infusion of water than during infusion of NaCl solution. There was a linear positive correlation between these values and facilitatory effects: the longer either the swallowing interval or rising time with infusion of 0.3 M NaCl solution, the stronger the facilitation of swallowing by the activation of water receptors. Facilitatory effects on the swallowing interval and rising time showed a linear correlation. It is suggested that weak liquid stimulation changed sensory inputs into the swallowing center and synchronously modulated the swallowing interval and time interval between the onset and peak of the EMG burst. PMID:23857168

  14. Extension of the Caenorhabditis elegans Pharyngeal M1 Neuron Axon Is Regulated by Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Refai, Osama; Rohs, Patricia; Mains, Paul E.; Gaudet, Jeb

    2013-01-01

    The guidance of axons to their correct targets is a critical step in development. The C. elegans pharynx presents an attractive system to study neuronal pathfinding in the context of a developing organ. The worm pharynx contains relatively few cells and cell types, but each cell has a known lineage and stereotyped developmental patterns. We found that extension of the M1 pharyngeal axon, which spans the entire length of the pharynx, occurs in two distinct phases. The first proximal phase does not require genes that function in axon extension (unc-34, unc-51, unc-115, and unc-119), whereas the second distal phase does use these genes and is guided in part by the adjacent g1P gland cell projection. unc-34, unc-51, and unc-115 had incompletely penetrant defects and appeared to act in conjunction with the g1P cell for distal outgrowth. Only unc-119 showed fully penetrant defects for the distal phase. Mutations affecting classical neuronal guidance cues (Netrin, Semaphorin, Slit/Robo, Ephrin) or adhesion molecules (cadherin, IgCAM) had, at best, weak effects on the M1 axon. None of the mutations we tested affected the proximal phase of M1 elongation. In a forward genetic screen, we isolated nine mutations in five genes, three of which are novel, showing defects in M1, including axon overextension, truncation, or ectopic branching. One of these mutations appeared to affect the generation or differentiation of the M1 neuron. We conclude that M1 axon extension is a robust process that is not completely dependent on any single guidance mechanism. PMID:24048649

  15. Some mice feature 5th pharyngeal arch arteries and double-lumen aortic arch malformations.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Stefan H; Weninger, Wolfgang J

    2012-01-01

    A 5th pair of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs) has never been identified with certainty in mice. Murines in general are considered to not develop a 5th pair. If true, the significance of the mouse as a model for researching the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries is limited. We aimed to investigate whether mouse embryos develop a 5th pair of PAAs and to identify malformations known to be caused by defective remodelling of the 5th PAAs. We employed the high-resolution episcopic microscopy method for creating digital volume data and three-dimensional (3D) computer models of the great intrathoracic arteries of 30 mouse embryos from days 12-12.5 post conception and 180 mouse fetuses from days 14.5 and 15.5 post conception. The 3D models of the fetuses were screened for the presence of a double-lumen aortic arch malformation. We identified such a malformation in 1 fetus. The 3D models of the embryos were analysed for the presence of 5th PAAs. Six of the 30 embryos (20%) showed a 5th PAA bilaterally, and an additional 9 (30%) showed a 5th PAA unilaterally. Our results prove that some mice do develop a 5th pair of PAAs. They also show that malformations which occur rarely in humans and result from defective remodelling of the left 5th PAA can be identified in mice as well. Thus, the mouse does represent an excellent model for researching the mechanisms driving PAA remodelling and the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries. PMID:22287557

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility Evaluation of Group A Streptococcus Isolated from Children with Pharyngitis: A Study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Group A streptococcus (GAS) to antibiotics usually used in Iran for treatment of GAS pharyngitis in children. Materials and Methods From 2011 to 2013, children 3-15 years of age with acute tonsillopharyngitis who attended Mofid Children's Hospital clinics and emergency ward and did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in a prospective study in a sequential manner. The isolates strains from throat culture were identified as GAS by colony morphology, gram staining, beta hemolysis on blood agar, sensitivity to bacitracin, a positive pyrrolidonyl aminopeptidase (PYR) test result, and the presence of Lancefield A antigen determined by agglutination test. Antimicrobial susceptibility was identified by both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods. Results From 200 children enrolled in this study, 59 (30%) cases were culture positive for GAS. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G. The prevalence of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin resistance by broth dilution method was 33.9%, 57.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. Surprisingly, 8.4% of GAS strains were resistant to rifampin. In this study, 13.5% and 32.2% of the strains were resistant to clindamycin and ofloxacin, respectively. Conclusion The high rate of resistance of GAS to some antibiotics in this study should warn physicians, especially in Iran, to use antibiotics restrictedly and logically to prevent the rising of resistance rates in future. It also seems that continuous local surveillance is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic option for GAS treatment. PMID:26788405

  17. fras1 shapes endodermal pouch 1 and stabilizes zebrafish pharyngeal skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Jared Coffin; Walker, Macie B.; Carney, Thomas J.; Huycke, Tyler R.; Yan, Yi-Lin; BreMiller, Ruth A.; Gai, Linda; DeLaurier, April; Postlethwait, John H.; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Kimmel, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Lesions in the epithelially expressed human gene FRAS1 cause Fraser syndrome, a complex disease with variable symptoms, including facial deformities and conductive hearing loss. The developmental basis of facial defects in Fraser syndrome has not been elucidated. Here we show that zebrafish fras1 mutants exhibit defects in facial epithelia and facial skeleton. Specifically, fras1 mutants fail to generate a late-forming portion of pharyngeal pouch 1 (termed late-p1) and skeletal elements adjacent to late-p1 are disrupted. Transplantation studies indicate that fras1 acts in endoderm to ensure normal morphology of both skeleton and endoderm, consistent with well-established epithelial expression of fras1. Late-p1 formation is concurrent with facial skeletal morphogenesis, and some skeletal defects in fras1 mutants arise during late-p1 morphogenesis, indicating a temporal connection between late-p1 and skeletal morphogenesis. Furthermore, fras1 mutants often show prominent second arch skeletal fusions through space occupied by late-p1 in wild type. Whereas every fras1 mutant shows defects in late-p1 formation, skeletal defects are less penetrant and often vary in severity, even between the left and right sides of the same individual. We interpret the fluctuating asymmetry in fras1 mutant skeleton and the changes in fras1 mutant skeletal defects through time as indicators that skeletal formation is destabilized. We propose a model wherein fras1 prompts late-p1 formation and thereby stabilizes skeletal formation during zebrafish facial development. Similar mechanisms of stochastic developmental instability might also account for the high phenotypic variation observed in human FRAS1 patients. PMID:22782724

  18. Effects of different types of pharyngeal packing in patients undergoing nasal surgery: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Mohd Meesam; Singh, Raj Bahadur; Rasheed, Mohd Asim; Sarkar, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    Context: Postoperative throat complaints such as postoperative sore throat (POST), dysphagia, and hoarseness frequently arises after tracheal intubation and throat packing for patient undergoing general anesthesia. This condition is very disturbing to patient. Avoiding POST is a major priority for these patients because preventing postoperative complications contributes to patient satisfaction. Aims: To describe and analyze the postoperative throat effects of nasopharyngeal packing and oropharyngeal packing in patients undergoing nasal surgery. Settings and Design: A randomized comparative study. Subjects and Methods: After obtaining approval of Ethical Committee 40 patients were included in study. After this patient were randomly allocated into two groups of 20 each. Group A - in which the oropharynx was packed and Group B - inwhich the nasopharynx was packed. General anesthesia were given and throat packing was done and patients were interviewed postoperatively for any throat complications such as sore throat, difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia), hoarseness of voice, throat irritation, and any other symptom pertaining to the study were noted and data were analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: T-test to compare the age, while Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare sex distribution, sore throat, dysphagia, hoarseness, and throat irritation. Results: Results showed statistically significant difference in incidence and severity of POST in Group A patients when compared to Group B patients to be more. Patients in Group A had a higher incidence of dysphagia when compared to their Group B counterparts. With respect to the incidence of hoarseness and throat irritation, there was no statistical significance between the groups. Conclusion: We concluded that the site of pharyngeal packing influences the incidence and severity of POST and as well as the incidence of dysphagia after general anesthesia. The use of nasopharyngeal packing in the patients

  19. Tempol ameliorates pharyngeal dilator muscle dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Skelly, J Richard; Edge, Deirdre; Shortt, Christine M; Jones, James F X; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2012-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is implicated in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), an oxidative stress disorder prevalent in men. Pharmacotherapy for OSAS is an attractive option, and antioxidant treatments may prove beneficial. We examined the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on breathing and pharyngeal dilator muscle structure and function in male and female rats. Additionally, we tested the efficacy of antioxidant treatment in preventing (chronic administration) or reversing (acute administration) CIH-induced effects in male rats. Adult male and female Wistar rats were exposed to alternating cycles of normoxia and hypoxia (90 s each; Fi(O(2)) = 5% O(2) at nadir; Sa(O(2)) ∼ 80%) or sham treatment for 8 h/d for 9 days. Tempol (1 mM, superoxide dismutase mimetic) was administered to subgroups of sham- and CIH-treated animals. Breathing was assessed by whole-body plethysmography. Sternohyoid muscle contractile and endurance properties were examined in vitro. Muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area and the activity of key metabolic enzymes were determined. CIH decreased sternohyoid muscle force in male rats only. This was not attributable to fiber transitions or alterations in oxidative or glycolytic enzyme activity. Muscle weakness after CIH was prevented by chronic Tempol supplementation and was reversed by acute antioxidant treatment in vitro. CIH increased normoxic ventilation in male rats only. Sex differences exist in the effects of CIH on the respiratory system, which may contribute to the higher prevalence of OSAS in male subjects. Antioxidant treatment may be beneficial as an adjunct OSAS therapy. PMID:21868712

  20. Dynamics of Midgut Microflora and Dengue Virus Impact on Life History Traits in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Casey L.; Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh; Severson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:25193134

  1. Pyrosequencing of Plaque Microflora In Twin Children with Discordant Caries Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yongxing; Xie, Lingzhi; Li, Yuhong; Jiang, Han; Du, Minquan

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent successes in the control of dental caries, the mechanism of caries development remains unclear. To investigate the causes of dental decay, especially in early childhood caries, the supragingival microflora composition of 20 twins with discordant caries phenotypes were analyzed using high-throughput pyrosequencing. In addition, the parents completed a lifestyle questionnaire. A total of 228,789 sequencing reads revealed 10 phyla, 84 genera, and 155 species of microflora, the relative abundances of these strains varied dramatically among the children, Comparative analysis between groups revealed that Veillonella, Corynebacterium and Actinomyces were presumed to be caries-related genera, Fusobacterium, Kingella and Leptotrichia were presumed to be healthy-related genus, yet this six genera were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Moreover, a cluster analysis revealed that the microbial composition of samples in the same group was often dissimilar but that the microbial composition observed in twins was usually similar. Although the genetic and environmental factors that strongly influence the microbial composition of dental caries remains unknown, we speculate that genetic factors primarily influence the individual's susceptibility to dental caries and that environmental factors primarily regulate the microbial composition of the dental plaque and the progression to caries. By using improved twins models and increased sample sizes, our study can be extended to analyze the specific genetic and environmental factors that affect the development of caries. PMID:26524687

  2. Conversion of (Meth)acrylic acids to methane granular sludge: Initiation by specific anerobic microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Shtarkman, N.B.; Obraztova, A.Y.; Laurinavichyus, K.S.; Galushko, A.S.; Akimenko, V.K.

    1995-03-01

    The role of a specific anaerobic microflora in the initiation of degradation of (meth)acrylic acids to methane by granular sludge from a UASB reactor was investigated. Associations of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the anaerobic sludge, which was used for a long time for treatment of wastewater from (meth)acrylate production, were able to realize the initial stage of (meth)acrylic acid decomposition, i.e., a conversion of acrylic and methacrylic acids to propionic and isobutyric acids, respectively. When added to granules, these association played a role of an {open_quotes}initiator{close_quotes} of the degradation process, which was then continued by the granular sludge microflora utilizing propionate and isobutyrate. Some characteristics of the granules adapted to propionate or isobutyrate are presented. The rates of propionate and isobutyrate consumption by adapted granules is, respectively, 21 and 53 times higher than the values obtained for nonadapted granules. A combined use of {open_quotes}initiating{close_quotes} bacteria and adapted granules provided degradation of (meth)acrylic acids with a maximum methane yield. The possibility is discussed of employing the granules, which are adapted to short-chain fatty acids, and the {open_quotes}initiating{close_quotes} bacteria, which accomplish the initial steps of the organic material decomposition to lower fatty acids, for the conversion of various chemical compounds to methane. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Prebiotic inulin: Useful dietary adjuncts to manipulate the livestock gut microflora

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, A.K.; Jayapal, Natasha; Senani, S.; Kolte, A.P.; Sridhar, Manpal

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing appreciation on the relevance of gastrointestinal microflora in both ruminants and non-ruminants owing to revelation of their role in several physiological functions including digestion, nutrient utilization, pathogen exclusion, gastrointestinal development, immunity system, gut gene expression and quality of animal products. The ban imposed on the use of antibiotics and hormones in feed has compelled animal researchers in finding an alternative which could overcome the issues of conventional feed additives. Though the concept of prebiotic was evolved keeping in mind the gastrointestinal flora of human beings, presently animal researchers are exploring the efficiency of prebiotic (inulin) for modulating the gut ecosystem of both ruminants and non-ruminants. It was revealed that prebiotic inulin is found to exhibit desirable changes in the gut of non-ruminants like poultry, swine, rabbit etc for augmenting gut health and improvement of product quality. Similarly, in ruminants the prebiotic reduces rumen ammonia nitrogen, methane production, increase microbial protein synthesis and live weight gains in calves. Unlike other feed additives, prebiotic exhibits its effect in multipronged ways for overall increase in the performances of the animals. In coming days, it is expected that prebiotics could be the part of diets in both ruminants and non-ruminants for enabling modulation of gut microflora vis a vis animals productivity in ecological ways. PMID:24159277

  4. In vitro antimicrobial effects of grape seed extract on peri-implantitis microflora in craniofacial implants

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Binit; Theerathavaj, M.L. Srithavaj; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the antimicrobial effects of grape seed on peri-implantitis microflora. Methods The grape seed extract was tested against peri-implantitis microflora most commonly found in craniofacial implants including reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Candida albicans (C. albicans) and clinical strains of S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia) and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis) by disk diffusion test. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum cidal concentrations (MCC) were determined using modified agar dilution millpore method. The extract was further combined with polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol, and was tested for antimicrobial effects. Results Grape seed extract showed positive inhibitory effects with S. aureus at MIC of 0.625 mg/mL and MCC of 1.25 mg/mL respectively. However the extracts showed minimal or no reactivity against strains of E. coli, K. pneumonia, C. parapsilosis and C. albicans. The use of grape seed extract in combination with polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol also showed dose dependent inhibitory effect on S. aureus. Conclusions The results of the study showed that grape seed has potential antimicrobial effects which can be further studied and developed to be used in the treatment of infected skin-abutment interface of craniofacial implants. PMID:23569854

  5. Production of experimental ulcerative colitis in gnotobiotic guinea pigs with simplified microflora.

    PubMed Central

    Onderdonk, A B; Franklin, M L; Cisneros, R L

    1981-01-01

    Conventional guinea pigs provided with a solution of 5% (wt/vol) degraded carrageenan as the sole source of oral fluids developed ulcerations of their ceca and large intestines within 30 days. Similar lesions were not detected in germfree guinea pigs treated in an identical manner, suggesting that an intestinal microflora was necessary for development of intestinal lesions. To simplify the bacterial flora required for production of cecal ulcerations, 10 pools consisting of 10 bacterial strains each were isolated from the cecal microflora of carrageenan-treated animals. Groups of germfree guinea pigs were associated with 2 of the 10 pools by orogastric intubation and observed for development of disease. One-half of each group was treated with carrageenan. The two bacterial pools were characterized by the presence of cytopathic effects for WI-38 and Vero cells, increased chemotactic activity, and increased concentrations of long-chain fatty acids. The results indicated that animals associated with those two pools developed cecal ulcerations during carrageenan treatment. Preliminary results also indicated that cecal ulcerations developed in germfree animals mono-associated with a strain of Bacteroides vulgatus isolated from one of the pools, regardless of whether carrageenan was administered, suggesting a bacterial involvement in disease development in the absence of carrageenan treatment. PMID:7216487

  6. Dynamics of midgut microflora and dengue virus impact on life history traits in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Hill, Casey L; Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh; Severson, David W

    2014-12-01

    Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:25193134

  7. A fermentation assay to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents on gut microflora.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavelu, S; Ruzickova, G; Zrustova, J; Brooker, J D

    2006-10-01

    The measurement of gas produced as a fermentation end product in vitro was correlated with absorbance as a measure of bacterial growth and was used as a rapid screening procedure to test the antimicrobial activity of certain essential oil and tannin secondary plant metabolites on gastrointestinal microorganisms from chickens. The assay was optimised using Clostridium perfringens and Lactobacillus fermentum, and tested in antimicrobial assays against C. perfringens; the minimum inhibitory concentration for each essential oil and condensed tannin was determined. The effect of penicillin-G on C. perfringens, in both growth and fermentation assays, was similar, and for all secondary metabolites tested, concentrations that inhibited fermentation were also bacteriocidal. The assay was also used to demonstrate the effect of dietary composition and enzyme supplementation on fermentation of mixed gut microflora in vitro; results are compared with in vivo results for the same dietary treatments. The data demonstrate that the effects of bioactive secondary plant products and feed composition on individual organisms or mixed gut microflora can be tested by analysis of fermentative activity in vitro, and that this provides a rapid assay for testing potential poultry feed additives before in vivo trials. PMID:16632004

  8. ELF communications system ecological monitoring program: Litter decomposition and microflora studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhn, Johann N.; Bagley, Susan T.; Pickens, James B.

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Navy has completed a program monitoring flora, fauna, and ecological relationships for possible effects from electromagnetic fields produced by its Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System. This report documents studies of litter decomposition and soil microflora conducted near its transmitting antenna in Michigan. From 1982 through 1993 researchers from the Michigan Technological University (MTU) monitored overall litter decomposition, as well as microflora (bacteria and fungi) important both as processors of organic material and causative agents of tree disease. Studies were performed in areas near (treatment) and far (control) from the ELF antenna Study parameters included total number of streptomycete individuals and species; mass loss of maple, oak, and pine leaf litter; and frequency of red pine mortality from Armillaria root disease. The MTU research team used several statistical models; however, nested analysis of covariance was the most frequently used test. Based on the results of their study, MTU investigators conclude that the EM fields produced by the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility-Republic, Michigan did not affect soil bacteria populations or the spread of the root disease. Loss of foliar mass suggests a statistically significant, but modest, increase in the rate of litter decomposition, possibly associated with electromagnetic exposure.

  9. Oatmeal porridge: impact on microflora-associated characteristics in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Valeur, Jørgen; Puaschitz, Nathalie G; Midtvedt, Tore; Berstad, Arnold

    2016-01-14

    Oatmeal porridge has been consumed for centuries and has several health benefits. We aimed to investigate the effect of oatmeal porridge on gut microflora functions. A total of ten healthy subjects ingested 60 g oatmeal porridge daily for 1 week. The following microflora-associated characteristics were assessed before and after the intervention: intestinal gas production following lactulose ingestion, faecal excretion of SCFA and faecal levels of urease and β-galactosidase. In addition, rectal levels of PGE2 were measured. Microbial fermentation as evaluated by intestinal gas production and excretion of SCFA did not change significantly following the dietary intervention. However, faecal levels of β-galactosidase and urease decreased after eating oatmeal porridge (P=0·049 and 0·031, respectively). Host inflammatory state, as measured by rectal levels of PGE2, also decreased, but the change was not significant (P=0·168). The results suggest that oatmeal porridge has an effect on gut microbial functions and may possess potential prebiotic properties that deserve to be investigated further. PMID:26511097

  10. Ecological role of algobacterial cenosis links (chlorella - associated microflora or associated bacteria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechurkin, N. S.

    The problems of interrelation of microalgae and bacteria in the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle are discussed. The cause and mechanisms of algobacterial cenosis formation still have been explained contradictorily. This work views the results of experimental and theoretical study of algobacterial cenosis functioning by the example of microalga Chlorella vulgaris and associated microflora. The representatives of Pseudomonas mainly predominate in the Chlorella microbial complex. The experiment at non-sterile batch cultivation of Chlorella on Tamya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase of microalgal biomass. Microflora of Chlorella can use organic materials evolved by Chlorella after photosynthesis for reproduction. Moreover, microorganisms can use dying cells of Chlorella, i.e. form the "producer - reducer" biocycle. To understand the cenosis-forming role of microalgae the mathematical model of the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle was constructed taking into consideration the opportunities for microorganisms of using Chlorella photosynthates, dying cells and contribution of links to the nitrogen cycle. The theoretical investigation showed that the biomass of associated bacteria growing on glucose and detritus exceeds the biomass of bacteria using only microalgal photosynthates, which is comparable with experimental data.

  11. A study of relations between physicochemical properties of crude oils and microbiological characteristics of reservoir microflora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchenko, I. G.; Polishchuk, Yu. M.; Peremitina, T. O.

    2015-10-01

    The dependence of the population and activity of reservoir microflora upon the chemical composition and viscosity of crude oils has been investigated, since it allows the problem of improvement in the technologies and enhancement of oil recovery as applied to production of difficult types of oils with anomalous properties (viscous, heavy, waxy, high resin) to be solved. The effect of the chemical composition of the oil on the number, distribution, and activity of reservoir microflora has been studied using data on the microbiological properties of reservoir water of 16 different fields in oil and gas basins of Russia, Mongolia, China, and Vietnam. Information on the physicochemical properties of crude oils of these fields has been obtained from the database created at the Institute of Petroleum Chemistry, Siberian Branch on the physicochemical properties of oils throughout the world. It has been found that formation water in viscous oil reservoirs is char acterized by a large population of heterotrophic and sulfate reducing bacteria and the water of oil fields with a high paraffin content, by population of denitrifying bacteria.

  12. Appropriately Prescribing Antibiotics for Patients With Pharyngitis: A Physician-Based Approach vs a Nurse-Only Triage and Treatment Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Undeland, Duane K.; Kowalski, Todd J.; Berth, Wendy L.; Gundrum, Jacob D.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and appropriateness of antibiotic use in adult patients with pharyngitis who opted for a nurse-only triage and treatment algorithm vs patients who underwent a physician-directed clinical evaluation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to query the electronic medical record database at our institution, a large multispecialty health care system in LaCrosse, WI, we identified adult patients diagnosed as having pharyngitis from September 1, 2005, through August 31, 2007. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome data were collected retrospectively. RESULTS: Of 4996 patients who sought treatment for pharyngitis, 3570 (71.5%) saw a physician and 1426 (28.5%) opted for the nurse-only triage and treatment algorithm. Physicians adhered to antibiotic-prescribing guidelines in 3310 (92.7%) of 3570 first visits, whereas nurses using the algorithm adhered to guidelines in 1422 (99.7%) of 1426 first visits (P<.001). Physicians were significantly less likely to follow guidelines at patients' subsequent visits for a single pharyngitis illness than at their initial one (92.7% [3310/3570] vs 83.7% [406/485]; P<.001). CONCLUSION: Instituting a simple nurse-only triage and treatment algorithm for patients presenting with pharyngitis appears to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. PMID:21037044

  13. The emission of volatile compounds during the aerobic and the combined anaerobic/aerobic composting of biowaste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smet, Erik; Van Langenhove, Herman; De Bo, Inge

    Two different biowaste composting techniques were compared with regard to their overall emission of volatile compounds during the active composting period. In the aerobic composting process, the biowaste was aerated during a 12-week period, while the combined anaerobic/aerobic composting process consisted of a sequence of a 3-week anaerobic digestion (phase I) and a 2-week aeration period (phase II). While the emission of volatiles during phase I of the combined anaerobic/aerobic composting process was measured in a full-scale composting plant, the aerobic stages of both composting techniques were performed in pilot-scale composting bins. Similar groups of volatile compounds were analysed in the biogas and the aerobic composting waste gases, being alcohols, carbonyl compounds, terpenes, esters, sulphur compounds and ethers. Predominance of alcohols (38% wt/wt of the cumulative emission) was observed in the exhaust air of the aerobic composting process, while predominance of terpenes (87%) and ammonia (93%) was observed in phases I and II of the combined anaerobic/aerobic composting process, respectively. In the aerobic composting process, 2-propanol, ethanol, acetone, limonene and ethyl acetate made up about 82% of the total volatile organic compounds (VOC)-emission. Next to this, the gas analysis during the aerobic composting process revealed a strong difference in emission profile as a function of time between different groups of volatiles. The total emission of VOC, NH 3 and H 2S during the aerobic composting process was 742 g ton -1 biowaste, while the total emission during phases I and II of the combined anaerobic/aerobic composting process was 236 and 44 g ton -1 biowaste, respectively. Taking into consideration the 99% removal efficiency of volatiles upon combustion of the biogas of phase I in the electricity generator, the combined anaerobic/aerobic composting process can be considered as an attractive alternative for aerobic biowaste composting because of

  14. Group A Streptococcus Adheres to Pharyngeal Epithelial Cells with Salivary Proline-rich Proteins via GrpE Chaperone Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Jumpei; Terao, Yutaka; Morisaki, Ichijiro; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2012-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is an important human pathogen that frequently causes pharyngitis. GAS organisms can adhere to and invade pharyngeal epithelial cells, which are overlaid by salivary components. However, the role of salivary components in GAS adhesion to pharyngeal cells has not been reported precisely. We collected human saliva and purified various salivary components, including proline-rich protein (PRP), statherin, and amylase, and performed invasion assays. The GAS-HEp-2 association ratio (invasion/adhesion ratio) and invasion ratio of GAS were increased significantly with whole human saliva and PRP, while the anti-PRP antibody inhibited the latter. GAS strain NY-5, which lacks M and F proteins on the cell surface, was promoted to cohere with HEp-2 cells by whole human saliva and PRP. The 28-kDa protein of GAS bound to PRP and was identified as GrpE, a chaperone protein, whereas the N-terminal of GrpE was found to bind to PRP. A GrpE-deficient mutant of GAS strain B514Sm, TR-45, exhibited a reduced ability to adhere to and invade HEp-2 cells. Microscopic observations showed the GrpE was mainly expressed on the surface of the cell division site of GAS. Furthermore, GrpE-deficient mutants of GAS and Streptococcus pneumoniae showed an elongated morphology as compared with the wild type. Taken together, this is the first study to show an interaction between salivary PRP and GAS GrpE, which plays an important role in GAS infection on the pharynx, whereas the expression of GrpE on the surface of GAS helps to maintain morphology. PMID:22566698

  15. The role of the Pax1/9 gene in the early development of amphioxus pharyngeal gill slits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Li, Guang; Liu, Xian; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2015-01-01

    The pharynx is a major characteristic of chordates. Compared with vertebrates, amphioxus has an advantage for the study of pharynx development, as embryos lack neural crest, and the pharynx is mainly derived from endoderm cells. The Pax1/9 subfamily genes have essential roles in vertebrate pharyngeal patterning, but it is not known if the Pax1/9 gene has similar functions in amphioxus pharynx development. To answer this question, we examined the Pax1/9 gene expression pattern in amphioxus embryos at different developmental stages, and observed morphological changes following Pax1/9 knockdown. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that Pax1/9 expression was initiated during early neurula stage and rapidly peaked during mid-neurula stage. Furthermore, in situ hybridization analysis showed that Pax1/9 transcripts were localized exclusively in the most endodermal region of the developing pharynx in early neurula stage embryos; however, Pax1/9 expression was strikingly down-regulated in the region where gill slits would form from the fusion of endoderm and ectoderm in subsequent developmental stages and was maintained in the border regions between adjacent gill slits. Knockdown of Pax1/9 function using both morpholino and siRNA approaches led to embryonic defects in the first three gill slits, and fusion of the first two gill slits. Moreover, the expression levels of the pharyngeal marker genes Six1/2 and Tbx1/10 were reduced in Pax1/9 knockdown embryos. From these observations, we concluded that the Pax1/9 gene has an important role in the initial differentiation of amphioxus pharyngeal endoderm and in the formation of gill slits, most likely via modulation of Six1/2 and Tbx1/10 expression. PMID:25504927

  16. The aerobic and anaerobic bacteriology of perirectal abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H

    1997-01-01

    The microbiology of perirectal abscesses in 144 patients was studied. Aerobic or facultative bacteria only were isolated in 13 (9%) instances, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 27 (19%) instances, and mixed aerobic and anaerobic flora were isolated in 104 (72%) instances. A total of 325 anaerobic and 131 aerobic or facultative isolates were recovered (2.2 anaerobic isolates and 0.9 aerobic isolates per specimen). The predominant anaerobes were as follows: Bacteroides fragilis group (85 isolates), Peptostreptococcus spp. (72 isolates), Prevotella spp. (71 isolates), Fusobacterium spp. (21 isolates), Porphyromonas spp. (20 isolates), and Clostridium spp. (15 isolates). The predominant aerobic and facultative bacteria were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus (34 isolates), Streptococcus spp. (28 isolates), and Escherichia coli (19 isolates). These data illustrate the polymicrobial aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of perirectal abscesses. PMID:9350771

  17. Growth of Aerobic Ripening Bacteria at the Cheese Surface Is Limited by the Availability of Iron

    PubMed Central

    Back, Alexandre; Irlinger, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses is composed of various species of bacteria and yeasts that contribute to the production of the desired organoleptic properties. The objective of the present study was to show that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical aerobic ripening bacteria in cheese. For that purpose, we investigated the effect of iron or siderophore addition in model cheeses that were coinoculated with a yeast and a ripening bacterium. Both iron and the siderophore desferrioxamine B stimulated the growth of ripening bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, and Brevibacterium. The extent of stimulation was strain dependent, and generally, the effect of desferrioxamine B was greater than that of iron. Measurements of the expression of genes related to the metabolism of iron by Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 by real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that these genes were transcribed during growth in cheese. The addition of desferrioxamine B increased the expression of two genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport binding proteins. The addition of iron decreased the expression of siderophore biosynthesis genes and of part of the genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport components. It was concluded that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical cheese surface bacteria. The selection of strains with efficient iron acquisition systems may be useful for the development of defined-strain surface cultures. Furthermore, the importance of iron metabolism in the microbial ecology of cheeses should be investigated since it may result in positive or negative microbial interactions. PMID:22367081

  18. Manure source and age affect survival of zoonotic pathogens during aerobic composting at sublethal temperatures.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Smith, Chris; Jiang, Xiuping; Flitcroft, Ian D; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    Heat is the primary mechanism by which aerobic composting inactivates zoonotic bacterial pathogens residing within animal manures, but at sublethal temperatures, the time necessary to hold the compost materials to ensure pathogen inactivation is uncertain. To determine the influence of the type of nitrogen amendment on inactivation of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in compost mixtures stored at sublethal temperatures, specific variables investigated in these studies included the animal source of the manure, the initial carbon/nitrogen (C:N) ratio of the compost mixture, and the age of the manure. Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were both inactivated more rapidly in chicken and swine compost mixtures stored at 20°C when formulated to an initial C:N ratio of 20:1 compared with 40:1, whereas a C:N ratio did not have an effect on inactivation of these pathogens in cow compost mixtures. Pathogen inactivation was related to the elevated pH of the samples that likely arises from ammonia produced by the indigenous microflora in the compost mixtures. Indigenous microbial activity was reduced when compost mixtures were stored at 30°C and drier conditions (<10% moisture level) were prevalent. Furthermore, under these drier conditions, Salmonella persisted to a greater extent than L. monocytogenes, and the desiccation resistance of Salmonella appeared to convey cross-protection to ammonia. Salmonella persisted longer in compost mixtures prepared with aged chicken litter compared with fresh chicken litter, whereas E. coli O157:H7 survived to similar extents in compost mixtures prepared with either fresh or aged cow manure. The different responses observed when different sources of manure were used in compost mixtures reveal that guidelines with times required for pathogen inactivation in compost mixtures stored at sublethal temperatures should be dependent on the source of nitrogen, i.e., type of animal manure, present. PMID:25710145

  19. Four treatment failures of pharyngeal gonorrhoea with ceftriaxone (500 mg) or cefotaxime (500 mg), Sweden, 2013 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Golparian, D; Ohlsson, Ak; Janson, H; Lidbrink, P; Richtner, T; Ekelund, O; Fredlund, H; Unemo, M

    2014-01-01

    We describe four cases in Sweden of verified treatment failures of pharyngeal gonorrhoea with ceftriaxone (500 mg; n=3) or cefotaxime (500 mg; n=1) monotherapy. All the ceftriaxone treatment failures were caused by the internationally spreading multidrug-resistant gonococcal NG-MAST genogroup 1407 clone. Increased awareness of treatment failures is crucial particularly when antimicrobial monotherapy is used. Frequent test of cure and appropriate verification/falsification of suspected treatment failures, as well as implementation of recommended dual antimicrobial therapy are imperative. PMID:25108533

  20. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. PMID:24247983

  1. Effect of Exposure to Hyperoxic, Hypobaric, and Hyperbaric Environments on Concentrations of Selected Aerobic and Anaerobic Fecal Flora of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gillmore, James D.; Gordon, Francis B.

    1975-01-01

    Alterations in selected aerobic and anaerobic fecal microflora of the mouse were determined during exposure to hyperoxic and normoxic hypo- and hyperbaric environments. Examination of fecal cultures obtained during exposure for 6 weeks to either 60 or 77% oxygen concentration at 1 atmosphere absolute revealed little alteration in the aerobic or anaerobic flora. There appeared to be only a retardation in the reduction of the Klebsiella-Enterobacter flora which normally occurs after weaning. During exposure to hypobaric environments (100% O2, 0.2 atmosphere absolute), significant alterations in concentrations of Escherichia coli, slow lactose fermenters, Klebsiella-Enterobacter, and enterococci were found in some instances. All alterations were toward increased concentrations. Variations in concentrations of different colony types of obligately anaerobic gram-positive (anGPR) and gram-negative (anGNR) rods cultured during the same experiments also occurred. One colony type of anGPR appeared to decrease while a second type increased in numbers. Concentrations of three colony types of anGNR were generally, but not always, increased. During hyperbaric exposure (2.8% O2, 7.5 atmospheres absolute), increased concentrations of Klebsiella-Enterobacter, E. coli, slow lactose fermenters and enterococci were also noted. Changes in numbers of both colony types of anGPR, when occurring, were in the direction of lower numbers. Alteration in numbers of anGNR were in both directions but were more frequent in the direction of higher numbers. After return to normal air for 4 weeks of either hypo- or hyperbaric exposure, fecal concentrations of all organisms tended to revert toward control values with the exception of the anGPR which remained in lower concentrations after termination of the hyperbaric exposure. These observations indicate that, despite the great variation in the fecal flora among individual mice, it is possible to discover the effects induced by altered gaseous

  2. Growth Characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes and Native Microflora in Smoked Salmon Stored at Refrigerated and Abuse Temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smoked salmon contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in outbreaks of foodborne listeriosis. The objective of this study was to examine the growth characteristics of L. monocytogenes and native microflora in smoked salmon stored at refrigerated and abuse temperatures. Smoked s...

  3. Antimicrobial Active Clothes Display No Adverse Effects on the Ecological Balance of the Healthy Human Skin Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Hoefer, Dirk; Hammer, Timo R.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive public use of antimicrobial clothes has raised issues concerning skin health. A placebo-controlled side-to-side study was run with antimicrobial clothes versus fabrics of similar structure but minus the antimicrobial activity, to evaluate possible adverse effects on the healthy skin microflora. Sixty volunteers were enrolled. Each participant received a set of form-fitting T-shirts constructed in 2 halves: an antibacterial half, displaying activities of 3–5 log-step reductions due to silver-finishes or silver-loaded fibres and a nonantibacterial control side. The microflora of the scapular skin was analyzed weekly for opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms over six weeks. The antibacterial halves did not disturb the microflora in number or composition, whereas a silver-containing deodorant displayed a short-term disturbance. Furthermore, parameters of skin morphology and function (TEWL, pH, moisture) did not show any significant shifts. In summary, antimicrobial clothes did not show adverse effects on the ecological balance of the healthy skin microflora. PMID:22363849

  4. Flavonoid metabolite 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid formed by human microflora decreases arterial blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Najmanová, Iveta; Pourová, Jana; Vopršalová, Marie; Pilařová, Veronika; Semecký, Vladimír; Nováková, Lucie; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2016-05-01

    There are reports of positive effects of quercetin on cardiovascular pathologies, however, mainly due to its low biovailability, the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report that one metabolite formed by human microflora (3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid)relaxed isolated rat aorta and decreased arterial blood pressure in rats. PMID:26790841

  5. [Indigenous microflora associated with the tegument of Triaenophorus nodulosus (Cestoda) and the intestine of its pike host].

    PubMed

    Korneva, Zh V; Plotnikov, A O

    2006-01-01

    Investigations of the indigenous microflora associated with the mucous intestines of fish and its cestode parasites have been for the first time carried out using the methods of transmission and scanning electron microscopy. New data on the bacterial biodiversity in the cestode and its fish host are obtained. Nanobacteria and spirochaetes are for the first time revealed in a fish host together with the previously known bacteria forming the intestinal microflora of fish. Spirochaetes were shown to be associated with the intestines of a pike host only, while nanobacteria cover abundantly the surface of the apical parts of the intestinal microvilli and the apical parts of the microtriches in the cestode tegument. The similarity of the bacterial floras associated with the apical surface of the parasite tegument and the intestine of the host should be noted. At the same time, deeper bacterial communities represented by obligate symbionts are specific. Thus, there is a normal indigenous microflora in cestodes, associated with the tegumental surface. This symbiotic microflora has specific morphological features and provides the balance of relations in the parasite-host system. PMID:17285757

  6. Identifying and characterizing microflora of stone fruits to select antagonists for control of brown rot with emphasis on latent infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit surface microflora has been the richest source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. The establishment of populations of these organisms and their interaction with decay causing pathogens in fruit wounds has been the basis for the development of current postharvest ...

  7. Identifying and characterizing microflora of stone fruits to select antagonists for control of brown rot with emphasis on latent infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit surface microflora has been the most productive source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. The establishment of populations of these organisms and their interaction with decay causing pathogens in fruit wounds has been the basis for the development of current pos...

  8. Evaluating the therapeutic efficacy, tolerability, and safety of an aqueous extract of Costus speciosus rhizome in acute pharyngitis and acute tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsh, Zainab A.; Al-Khatib, Talal A.; Al-Muhayawi, Saad M.; ElAssouli, Sufian M.; Elfiky, Iman A.; Mourad, Samiha A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of an aqueous extract of Costus speciosus (C. speciosus) rhizome in pediatric and adult patients suffering from acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis as an alternative to antibiotics use. Methods: This pilot cohort trial was conducted at King Abdulaziz University in Saudi Arabia between May and December 2014, among 15 patients with acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis who were administered nasal drops of aqueous extract of C. speciosus rhizome at a dose of 15-30 drops every 8 hours for 3 days. The primary outcome measure was the clinical improvement and remission rate within the first 5 days. Results: The administration of C. speciosus resulted in an improvement in acute symptoms in 60% of the patients treated within the first 24 hours, and remission rate of 93% by day 5, without any recorded adverse effects. Conclusion: This study revealed a significant efficacy of the aqueous extract of C. speciosus rhizome in acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis. PMID:26219454

  9. Sequence-Based Identification of Aerobic Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Wallace, Richard J.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Taylor, Tony; Imperatrice, Carol; Leonard, Deborah G. B.; Wilson, Rebecca W.; Mann, Linda; Jost, Kenneth C.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the utility of 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing for identifying clinically significant species of aerobic actinomycetes. A total of 28 reference strains and 71 clinical isolates that included members of the genera Streptomyces, Gordonia, and Tsukamurella and 10 taxa of Nocardia were studied. Methods of nonsequencing analyses included growth and biochemical analysis, PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of the 439-bp Telenti fragment of the 65 hsp gene, susceptibility testing, and, for selected isolates, high-performance liquid chromatography. Many of the isolates were included in prior taxonomic studies. Sequencing of Nocardia species revealed that members of the group were generally most closely related to the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strains. However, the sequences of Nocardia transvalensis, N. otitidiscaviarum, and N. nova isolates were highly variable; and it is likely that each of these species contains multiple species. We propose that these three species be designated complexes until they are more taxonomically defined. The sequences of several taxa did not match any recognized species. Among other aerobic actinomycetes, each group most closely resembled the associated reference strain, but with some divergence. The study demonstrates the ability of partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify members of the aerobic actinomycetes, but the study also shows that a high degree of sequence divergence exists within many species and that many taxa within the Nocardia spp. are unnamed at present. A major unresolved issue is the type strain of N. asteroides, as the present one (ATCC 19247), chosen before the availability of molecular analysis, does not represent any of the common taxa associated with clinical nocardiosis. PMID:15184431

  10. Pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinus changes after maxillomandibular advancement with counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Prado, FB; Rossi, AC; Freire, AR; Groppo, FC; De Moraes, M; Caria, PHF

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to cephalometrically evaluate the pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinus changes after maxillomandibular advancement counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusion. Methods The study included 49 patients (98 lateral teleradiographs; 36 females and 13 males) who were analysed in the pre-operative (1 week before surgery) and post-operative (6 months after surgery) periods. In each lateral teleradiography, the dimensions of the inferior and superior pharyngeal airway space, TB-PhW1 [the point between the posterior aspect of the tongue to the dorsal pharyngeal wall (oropharynx) (TB) and the point on the dorsal pharyngeal wall closest to TB (PhW1)] and UP-PhW2 [and the point between the posterior aspect of the soft palate to the dorsal pharyngeal wall (nasopharynx) (UP) (PhW2)] measurements were evaluated, as well as the dimensions of the frontal and sphenoid sinuses. The differences between the two operative times were evaluated by Student's t-test. Results All measurements showed excellent reproducibility for the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC > 0.9; p < 0.0001). There was an increase in the measurements TB-PhW1 and UP-PhW2 and a decrease in the dimensions of the frontal and sphenoid sinuses after orthognathic surgery. Conclusions The morphology of the superior and inferior pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinuses changes after 6 months of maxillomandibular advancement counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusion. PMID:22116128

  11. Propofol sedation versus no sedation in detection of pharyngeal and upper gastrointestinal superficial squamous cell carcinoma using endoscopic narrow band imaging: a multicenter prospective trial.

    PubMed

    He, Yuqi; Zhao, Yuqing; Fu, Kuangi; Du, Yongqiang; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jianxun; Jin, Peng; Zhao, Xiaojun; Li, Na; Guo, Hua; Li, Jiandong; Zhao, Fayun; Sheng, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous propofol can provide a superior quality of sedation compared to standard sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, the utility of propofol sedation for the endoscopic early detection of superficial pharyngeal and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has not been investigated. In a multicenter, prospective trial, 255 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) were assigned to receive propofol sedation or no sedation according to their own willingness. The primary aim was to compare the detection rates of superficial cancer in the pharyngeal region and the esophagus between two groups. The secondary aim was to evaluate factors associated with technical adequacy. The detection rate was higher in the propofol sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (6.06% vs. 2.40%), but not significantly (P=0.22). However, the small lesion (less than 10 mm in diameter) detection rate was higher in sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (88.89% vs. 33.33%; P=0.048). The median time for pharyngeal observation in the sedation group was faster than in the no sedation group (20.6 s vs. 44.3 s; P<0.001). Ninety-five percent of H&N region evaluations were totally complete in sedation compared with sixty percent in the no sedation group (P<0.001). The overall p value indicated that only smoking habit was associated with incomplete pharyngeal observation (P<0.05), and it was more difficult to accomplish a complete pharyngeal observation in patients who smoked more than 10 packs per day. Intravenous propofol sedation compared to no intravenous sedation during conventional upper gastrointestinal endoscopy can facilitate a more complete pharyngeal examination and increase the detection rate of superficial H&N squamous cell carcinoma in high risk patients. PMID:26770478

  12. Propofol sedation versus no sedation in detection of pharyngeal and upper gastrointestinal superficial squamous cell carcinoma using endoscopic narrow band imaging: a multicenter prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuqi; Zhao, Yuqing; Fu, Kuangi; Du, Yongqiang; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jianxun; Jin, Peng; Zhao, Xiaojun; Li, Na; Guo, Hua; Li, Jiandong; Zhao, Fayun; Sheng, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous propofol can provide a superior quality of sedation compared to standard sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. However, the utility of propofol sedation for the endoscopic early detection of superficial pharyngeal and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has not been investigated. In a multicenter, prospective trial, 255 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) were assigned to receive propofol sedation or no sedation according to their own willingness. The primary aim was to compare the detection rates of superficial cancer in the pharyngeal region and the esophagus between two groups. The secondary aim was to evaluate factors associated with technical adequacy. The detection rate was higher in the propofol sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (6.06% vs. 2.40%), but not significantly (P=0.22). However, the small lesion (less than 10 mm in diameter) detection rate was higher in sedation vs. no sedation group for H&N region (88.89% vs. 33.33%; P=0.048). The median time for pharyngeal observation in the sedation group was faster than in the no sedation group (20.6 s vs. 44.3 s; P<0.001). Ninety-five percent of H&N region evaluations were totally complete in sedation compared with sixty percent in the no sedation group (P<0.001). The overall p value indicated that only smoking habit was associated with incomplete pharyngeal observation (P<0.05), and it was more difficult to accomplish a complete pharyngeal observation in patients who smoked more than 10 packs per day. Intravenous propofol sedation compared to no intravenous sedation during conventional upper gastrointestinal endoscopy can facilitate a more complete pharyngeal examination and increase the detection rate of superficial H&N squamous cell carcinoma in high risk patients. PMID:26770478

  13. Aerobic degradation of olive mill wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Benitez, J; Beltran-Heredia, J; Torregrosa, J; Acero, J L; Cercas, V

    1997-02-01

    The degradation of olive mill wastewater by aerobic microorganisms has been investigated in a batch reactor, by conducting experiments where the initial concentration of organic matter, quantified by the chemical oxygen demand, and the initial biomass were varied. The evolution of the chemical oxygen demand, biomass and the total contents of phenolic and aromatic compounds were followed through each experiment. According to the Contois model, a kinetic expression for the substrate utilization rate is derived, and its biokinetic constants are evaluated. This final predicted equation agrees well with all the experimental data. PMID:9077005

  14. [Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification of the Hypothermia Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium: Arthrobacter arilaitensis].

    PubMed

    He, Teng-xia; Ni, Jiu-pai; Li, Zhen-lun; Sun, Quan; Ye Qing; Xu, Yi

    2016-03-15

    High concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen were employed to clarify the abilities of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. Meanwhile, by means of inoculating the strain suspension into the mixed ammonium and nitrate, ammonium and nitrite nitrogen simulated wastewater, we studied the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. In addition, cell optical density was assayed in each nitrogen removal process to analyze the relationship of cell growth and nitrogen removal efficiency. The results showed that the hypothermia denitrification strain Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 exhibited high nitrogen removal efficiency during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal rates were 65.0%, 100% and 61.2% respectively when strain Y-10 was cultivated for 4 d at 15°C with initial ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen concentrations of 208.43 mg · L⁻¹, 201.16 mg · L⁻¹ and 194.33 mg · L⁻¹ and initial pH of 7.2. Nitrite nitrogen could only be accumulated in the medium containing nitrate nitrogen during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification process. Additionally, the ammonium nitrogen was mainly removed in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. In short, Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 could conduct nitrification and denitrification effectively under aerobic condition and the ammonium nitrogen removal rate was more than 80.0% in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. PMID:27337904

  15. Survival prognostic factors for lateral bucco-pharyngeal junction squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Yann; Robin, Yves-Marie; Bedoui, Sophie El; Fournier, Charles; Penel, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) localized at the lateral buccopharyngeal junction are frequent occurrences in our experience. This anatomical site gives the tumor ample space to spread in different directions, making tumor management all the more difficult. We focused our study on this localization to underline their specificities and evaluate our practices. In the Department of Head and Neck Oncology at the Centre Oscar Lambret, 57 patients with lateral bucco-pharyngeal junction SCC were treated from 1995 to 2000. Epidemiological data were extracted from the medical chart. Description of the tumor was based on clinical and imaging data. Treatment modalities frequently combined surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Protocol was adapted with the health status and the aggressiveness of the disease. Follow-up and survival rates are outlined below. Fifty men and seven women with a mean age of 57 years constitute the patient population. Forty-nine out of 57 presented a history of smoking, and 44 out of 46 presented a history of alcoholism. Patient overall clinical status, social and family background were also discussed. Thirty-one of fifty-seven tumors were categorized as T1 or T2. Forty-five out of fifty-seven presented limited lymph-node involvement. Tumor extension, growth pathology and degree of differentiation were described. Twenty-eight out of fifty-seven had undergone primary surgery. Primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy was delivered to the others. The modality of the different treatments and their results were specified. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 52.7% and the 3-year overall survival rate was 48.2%. The mean survival rate was 3 years. Univariate analysis was performed on all occasions. Gender (P=0.008), surgery first versus non-surgical treatment first (P=0.03), spread beyond the midline (P=0.03), and small tumors T1 T2 versus T3 T4 (P=0.003) were predictive factors of overall survival. A Multivariate analysis showed that the

  16. Polymeric implant materials for the reconstruction of tracheal and pharyngeal mucosal defects in head and neck surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rickert, Dorothee

    2011-01-01

    The existing therapeutical options for the tracheal and pharyngeal reconstruction by use of implant materials are described. Inspite of a multitude of options and the availability of very different materials none of these methods applied for tracheal reconstruction were successfully introduced into the clinical routine. Essential problems are insufficiencies of anastomoses, stenoses, lack of mucociliary clearance and vascularisation. The advances in Tissue Engineering (TE) offer new therapeutical options also in the field of the reconstructive surgery of the trachea. In pharyngeal reconstruction far reaching developments cannot be recognized at the moment which would allow to give a prognosis of their success in clinical application. A new polymeric implant material consisting of multiblock copolymers was applied in our own work which was regarded as a promising material for the reconstruction of the upper aerodigestive tract (ADT) due to its physicochemical characteristics. In order to test this material for applications in the ADT under extreme chemical, enzymatical, bacterial and mechanical conditions we applied it for the reconstruction of a complete defect of the gastric wall in an animal model. In none of the animals tested either gastrointestinal complications or negative systemic events occurred, however, there was a multilayered regeneration of the gastric wall implying a regular structured mucosa. In future the advanced stem cell technology will allow further progress in the reconstruction of different kind of tissues also in the field of head and neck surgery following the principles of Tissue Engineering. PMID:22073099

  17. The duration of stage transition during pharyngeal swallowing among young-elderly, and mid-elderly individuals

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon; Koh, Hyeung Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Understanding the normal movements of the pharyngeal stage is important in the assessment of dysphagia. This study classified an elderly population into young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals and investigated the difference in stage transition duration between the two groups to provide basic material for assessment of dysphagia in old age. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of the study were 12 middle-aged individuals (40–49 years), young-elderly individuals (65–74 years), and 9 mid-elderly individuals (75–84 years). Stage transition duration was defined as the time from the moment food boluses passed the ramus of the mandible until the start of upward movement of the hyoid. All image data were measured using a videofluoroscopic study. Difference in measured values for stage transition duration between the groups were confirmed with one-way analysis of variance. [Results] Although analysis of variance was significantly longer in the young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals than in the middle-aged individuals, there was no significant difference in stage transition duration between the young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals. [Conclusion] In this study, there was no significant difference between the young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals in the movement speed of muscles related to pharyngeal swallowing. PMID:27313360

  18. The duration of stage transition during pharyngeal swallowing among young-elderly, and mid-elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Haewon; Koh, Hyeung Woo

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Understanding the normal movements of the pharyngeal stage is important in the assessment of dysphagia. This study classified an elderly population into young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals and investigated the difference in stage transition duration between the two groups to provide basic material for assessment of dysphagia in old age. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of the study were 12 middle-aged individuals (40-49 years), young-elderly individuals (65-74 years), and 9 mid-elderly individuals (75-84 years). Stage transition duration was defined as the time from the moment food boluses passed the ramus of the mandible until the start of upward movement of the hyoid. All image data were measured using a videofluoroscopic study. Difference in measured values for stage transition duration between the groups were confirmed with one-way analysis of variance. [Results] Although analysis of variance was significantly longer in the young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals than in the middle-aged individuals, there was no significant difference in stage transition duration between the young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals. [Conclusion] In this study, there was no significant difference between the young-elderly and mid-elderly individuals in the movement speed of muscles related to pharyngeal swallowing. PMID:27313360

  19. Adhesion of type A Pasteurella mulocida to rabbit pharyngeal cells and its possible role in rabbit respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Glorioso, J C; Jones, G W; Rush, H G; Pentler, L J; Darif, C A; Coward, J E

    1982-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida serotype A was found in association with the mucosal epithelium of the nasopharynges of rabbits with respiratory tract infections. The bacteria specifically attached to squamous epithelial cells of the pharyngeal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro and to some tissue culture cell lines such as HeLa. All strains with serotype A capsules were adhesive. With the exception of one serotype D strain, strains with capsular serotypes B, D, and E were at least 10-fold less adhesive. Bacterial adhesiveness was much reduced after pronase digestion, heat treatment, and homogenization, but removal of the hyaluronic acid capsule increased adhesion. Electron microscopy revealed that fimbriae were produced by an adhesive pasteurella strain, but not by two nonadherent strains. The attachment of the former strain to pharyngeal and HeLa cells was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Together, these findings suggest that this amino sugar may be a component of the receptor on both animal cell surfaces and that the fimbriae may be the adhesions. It is proposed that bacterial attachment has a role in colonization and infection of rabbit upper respiratory mucosae. Images PMID:7068213

  20. Great vessel development requires biallelic expression of Chd7 and Tbx1 in pharyngeal ectoderm in mice

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Victoria; McCue, Karen; Roberts, Catherine; Kyriakopoulou, Vanessa; Beddow, Sarah; Barrett, Angela N.; Vitelli, Francesca; Prescott, Katrina; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Devriendt, Koen; Bosman, Erika; Steffes, Georg; Steel, Karen P.; Simrick, Subreena; Basson, M. Albert; Illingworth, Elizabeth; Scambler, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Aortic arch artery patterning defects account for approximately 20% of congenital cardiovascular malformations and are observed frequently in velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). In the current study, we screened for chromosome rearrangements in patients suspected of VCFS, but who lacked a 22q11 deletion or TBX1 mutation. One individual displayed hemizygous CHD7, which encodes a chromodomain protein. CHD7 haploinsufficiency is the major cause of coloboma, heart defect, atresia choanae, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, and ear anomalies/deafness (CHARGE) syndrome, but this patient lacked the major diagnostic features of coloboma and choanal atresia. Because a subset of CHARGE cases also display 22q11 deletions, we explored the embryological relationship between CHARGE and VCSF using mouse models. The hallmark of Tbx1 haploinsufficiency is hypo/aplasia of the fourth pharyngeal arch artery (PAA) at E10.5. Identical malformations were observed in Chd7 heterozygotes, with resulting aortic arch interruption at later stages. Other than Tbx1, Chd7 is the only gene reported to affect fourth PAA development by haploinsufficiency. Moreover, Tbx1+/–;Chd7+/– double heterozygotes demonstrated a synergistic interaction during fourth PAA, thymus, and ear morphogenesis. We could not rescue PAA morphogenesis by restoring neural crest Chd7 expression. Rather, biallelic expression of Chd7 and Tbx1 in the pharyngeal ectoderm was required for normal PAA development. PMID:19855134

  1. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning.

    PubMed

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity-induced plasticity with specific cognitive training-induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity. PMID:27146330

  2. Characterization and aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, G.; Pavlostathis, S.G.; Li, J.; Purdue, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Monoterpenes are biogenic chemicals and occur in abundance in nature. Large-scale industrial use of these chemicals has recently been initiated in an attempt to replace halogenated solvents and chlorofluorocarbons which have been implicated in the stratospheric depletion of ozone. This study examined four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, {alpha}-pinene, {gamma}-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and {alpha}-terpineol). Water solubility, vapor pressure, and octanol/water partition coefficients were estimated. Aerobic biodegradability tests were conducted in batch reactors by utilizing forest soil extract and enriched cultures as inoculum. The hydrophobic nature and high volatility of the hydrocarbons restricted the investigation to relatively low aqueous concentrations. Each monoterpene was analyzed with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector after extraction from the aqueous phase with isooctane. Terpene mineralization was tested by monitoring liquid-phase carbon, CO{sub 2} production and biomass growth. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols readily degraded under aerobic conditions. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. The intrinsic biokinetics coefficients for the degradation of d-limonene and {alpha}-terpineol were estimated by using cultures enriched with the respective monoterpenes. Monoterpene biodegradation followed Monod kinetics.

  3. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity–induced plasticity with specific cognitive training–induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity. PMID:27146330

  4. The Effect of Chlortetracycline Meditation on the Coliform Microflora of Newly Hatched Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, S. L.; Blackwood, A. C.; Dale, D. G.

    1963-01-01

    Newly hatched chicks were medicated with chlortetracycline at levels of 0, 400, 800 and 1200 mg. per imperial gallon of drinking water, for the first 5 days in the brooders. Coliform microflora of the ceca were counted when the chicks were first removed from the incubator and at 2 and 5 days of age. The numbers of coliforms decreased with increasing levels of the antibiotic and with increasing age. Sixtyfour per cent of the coliforms were E. coli and of these a large proportion were resistant to chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline in vitro. There was a trend towards increasing incidence of isolation of other resistant gram negative rods with increasing levels of chlortetracycline medication. PMID:17649431

  5. Effect of Low-Roughage Diets on the Microflora and Lipid Metabolism in the Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Latham, M. J.; Storry, J. E.; Sharpe, M. Elisabeth

    1972-01-01

    Changing the diet of five lactating cows and one nonlactating cow from high to low roughage induced milk fat depression in the lactating cows and altered the composition of the rumen microflora. While the numbers of lactic and propionic acid-producing bacteria increased, the numbers of Butyrivibrio spp. decreased. The numbers of lipolytic bacteria and the in vitro lipolytic activity of the rumen fluid were also decreased, as was the extent of hydrogenation of linoleic and linolenic acids combined in soybean oil incubated in vitro with rumen fluid. It is suggested that among the bacterial population in the rumen the vibrios, which were adversely affected by the low-roughage diets, may contribute significantly to both lipolysis and hydrogenation in the rumen. PMID:16349951

  6. Effect of some sulphur compounds on soil microflora of spruce rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Lettl, A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of a long-term application of sulphite, thiosulphate and sodium sulphate on the soil microflora and spruce seedlings was investigated in a pot experiment. Sulphur compounds decreased the concentration of bacteria, including thiobacilli, increased the concentration of microscopic fungi and sulphate-reducing bacteria; they inhibited respiration, nitrification and oxidation of thiosulphate, stimulated ammonification and oxidation of elemental sulphur. In certain cases the spruce rhizosphere exhibited just the opposite effect. In the rhizosphere the sulphate-reducing bacteria was suppressed together with thiobacilli, whose unit oxidative activity increased substantially. Growth of seedlings was inhibited by sulphite and stimulated by thiosulphate and sulphate. Sulphite, the effects of which were similar to those of sulphur dioxide immissions, was the most effective compound. In regions influenced by immissions the soil is apparently intoxicated by the absorbed sulphite. PMID:7274844

  7. Hydrogen respiratory test: pilot examinations for evaluation of the small intestinal colonization by normal microflora.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, O V; Salinas, Yu E; Vasilieva, E A; Kozlov, A V; Yashina, N V; Loginov, I A; Dalin, M V

    2013-04-01

    Respiration hydrogen analyzer H2Rate has been used in pilot examinations of a group of students. This method for noninvasive diagnosis of small intestinal diseases promotes proper interpretation of the results. Free hydrogen level in the exhaled air increases as a result of lactulose (diagnostic agent) cleavage by enteric microflora within about 3 h. Based on the experimental data, the main groups with characteristic curves reflecting the time course of hydrogen concentrations have been distinguished. Excessive bacterial colonization of the intestine can correspond to emergence of characteristic peaks of hydrogen concentrations in the curve. Hydrogen concentrations in exhaled air can also be analyzed to evaluate the rate of the substrate propulsion in the middle compartment of the intestine. PMID:23658932

  8. New insights into the pathophysiology of IBS: intestinal microflora, gas production and gut motility.

    PubMed

    Gasbarrini, A; Lauritano, E C; Garcovich, M; Sparano, L; Gasbarrini, G

    2008-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex disorder clinically characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habit. Its pathogenetic mechanisms are still incompletely known; genes, psychosocial factors, changes in gastrointestinal motility and visceral hypersensitivity are traditionally thought to play a crucial role in symptom generation. Recent studies have identified new additional factors that can interact with the established mechanisms. Dysregulation of brain-gut axis, gastrointestinal infection, low-grade infiltration and activation of mast cells in the intestinal mucosa with consequent release of bioactive substances, and altered serotonin metabolism are the emerging factors of IBS pathogenesis. Finally, modification of small bowel and colonic microflora and altered gas balance may be of relevance in at least some subgroups of IBS patients. New therapies can be developed only on the basis of a better understanding of the heterogeneous picture of the pathophysiology of IBS. PMID:18924450

  9. The role of intestinal microflora in the activation of benzidine and benzidine congener based dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Cerniglia, C.E.; Franklin, W.; Campbell, W.L. )

    1988-09-01

    Benzidine-based dyes are widely used in the dye manufacturing, textile dyeing, color paper printing and leather industries. Some benzidine based dyes have been shown to be carcinogenic due to their biotransformation in the liver or in the gastrointestinal tract to benzidine, a long recognized human urinary bladder carcinogen. Occupational exposure to workers can be through skin absorption, inhalation and ingestion of the benzidine based dyes. Previous studies of benzidine based dye metabolism have shown that enzymatic reduction of the azo group, yielding benzidine is an essential step in the activation of these compounds to genotoxic species. Azo reduction activity is present in both the liver and gastrointestinal tract and little is known whether the first step in the toxification process of benzidine based dyes occurs at either site. They are investigating the capacity of intestinal microflora to metabolize benzidine-based dyes and determine their overall importance in the activation of this class of industrially important chemicals.

  10. Longitudinal Study of the Dynamics of Vaginal Microflora during Two Consecutive Menstrual Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Lopes dos Santos Santiago, Guido; Cools, Piet; Verstraelen, Hans; Trog, Marijke; Missine, Griet; Aila, Nabil El; Verhelst, Rita; Tency, Inge; Claeys, Geert; Temmerman, Marleen; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the vaginal microflora (VMF) has been well studied, information on the fluctuation of the different bacterial species throughout the menstrual cycle and the information on events preceding the presence of disturbed VMF is still very limited. Documenting the dynamics of the VMF during the menstrual cycle might provide better insights. In this study, we assessed the presence of different Lactobacillus species in relation to the BV associated species during the menstrual cycle, assessed the influence of the menstrual cycle on the different categories of vaginal microflora and assessed possible causes, such as menstruation and sexual intercourse, of VMF disturbance. To our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study in which swabs and Gram stains were available for each day of two consecutive menstrual cycles, whereby 8 grades of VMF were distinguished by Gram stain analysis, and whereby the swabs were cultured every 7th day and identification of the bacterial isolates was carried out with a molecular technique. Methods Self-collected vaginal swabs were obtained daily from 17 non pregnant, menarchal volunteers, and used for daily Gram staining and weekly culture. Bacterial isolates were identified with tDNA-PCR and 16 S rRNA gene sequencing. Results Nine women presented with predominantly normal VMF and the 8 others had predominantly disturbed VMF. The overall VMF of each volunteer was characteristic and rather stable. Menses and antimicrobials were the major disturbing factors of the VMF. Disturbances were always accompanied by a rise in Gram positive cocci, which also appeared to be a significant group within the VMF in general. Conclusions We observed a huge interindividual variability of predominantly stable VMF types. The importance of Gram positive cocci in VMF is underestimated. L. crispatus was the species that was most negatively affected by the menses, whereas the presence of the other lactobacilli was less variable. PMID:22140538

  11. Subgingival microflora and treatment in prepubertal periodontitis associated with chronic idiopathic neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kamma, J J; Lygidakis, N A; Nakou, M

    1998-09-01

    Prepubertal periodontitis affects both primary and permanent dentition. The purpose of this study was to examine the composition of subgingival microflora of the permanent dentition in an 11-year-old Caucasian female, who had premature exfoliation of her deciduous teeth on her 5th year of age, and the response of this condition to the antibiotic therapy and supportive periodontal care. Gingival tissues were highly inflamed and alveolar bone loss was detected radiographically. The girl had experienced frequent upper respiratory tract infections, tonsilitis and recurrent otitis media. Her mother had history of early onset periodontitis associated with chronic idiopathic neutropenia. Blood chemistry tests and immunological examinations were also performed. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from the proximal sites of permanent molars, incisors, canines and maxillary premolars. 27 different microbial species were isolated from the subgingival microflora. Among the predominant species were Porphyromonas gingivalis (17.6%-7.3%), Prevotella intermedia (12.4%-4.7%), Capnocytophaga sputigena (14.4%-10.4%), Capnocytophaga ochracea (13.2%-6.9%) and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (9.3%-5.5%). Periodontal treatment consisted of scaling, root planing in conjunction with antibiotic administration of Augmentin 312.5 mg and Flagyl 200 mg, each t.i.d. for 10 days. 3 weeks after the antibiotic therapy, bacterial samples were collected from the same sites. All the periodontal pathogens were recovered in lower levels and A.actinomycetemcomitans was almost eliminated in the 3-week period. The evaluation of clinical indices at 3, 6 and 12 months showed that periodontal treatment in conjunction with antibiotics was effective and rapidly followed by marked clinical improvement. The microbiological monitoring at 3, 6 and 12 months after antibiotic treatment and each time prior to supportive periodontal care, revealed that the periodontal pathogens fluctuated in low levels even

  12. The Microfloras and Sensory Profiles of Selected Protected Designation of Origin Italian Cheeses.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Giuseppe; Carpino, Stefania

    2014-02-01

    Approximately 39 Italian cheeses carry protected designation of origin (PDO) status. These cheeses differ in their manufacturing technology and the microbial flora which comprise the finished products. The evolution of lactic microflora in cheeses with PDO status is of particular interest because the biochemical activities of these organisms participate in cheesemaking and may play an acknowledged role in the development of organoleptic characteristics during ripening. Nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) constitute complex microbial associations that are characterized by the occurrence of various species and many biotypes as a result of a number of selective conditions persisting during the manufacturing process and different ecological niches. The evolution of different species during ripening of Fiore Sardo showed that, when present, Lactobacillus paracasei persists and dominates the microflora of the cheese in the last period of ripening, suggesting that this species, more resistant to the constraints of the mature cheese, could be involved in proteolysis and in other enzymatic processes occurring during cheese ripening. In contrast, the stretching step typical of pasta filata cheese, such as Ragusano, induced a simplification of the raw milk profiles, allowing the persistence only of some predominant species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis, and Streptococcus macedonicus, after the stretching step. Lactobacillus plantarum and L. paracasei were isolated from ripened Castelmagno PDO cheese samples with the highest frequencies. These species, generally absent in the milk, occur in dairy ecosystems and dominate the bacterial flora of many ripened semihard cheeses. In PDO long-ripened Italian cheese such as Parmigiano Reggiano, the NSLAB population is mainly formed by L. paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Pediococcus acidilactici. Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and L

  13. Characterization of the fungal microflora in raw milk and specialty cheeses of the province of Quebec.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Karine; Touchette, Marilyne; St-Gelais, Daniel; Labrie, Steve

    2012-09-01

    The cheese microbial ecosystem is complex, and the presence of non-starter adventitious microorganisms in milk may have an influence on the organoleptic characteristics of cheese. The aim of this study was to analyze the composition and diversity of the fungal flora of raw milk destined for cheesemaking from 19 dairy farms in Quebec and to monitor their evolution throughout ripening. Six hundred ten yeast and mold isolates were collected from raw milk and raw milk cheeses over a 9-month period. Based on the sequences of the rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, 67% of the raw milk isolates were yeasts, which were assigned to 37 species across 11 genera, while 33% were molds, which were assigned to 33 species across 25 genera. A semi-quantitative analysis of the yeasts and molds in the raw milk from four farms was performed over a 5-month period. The composition and diversity of the fungal microflora were totally different for each farm, each of which had a unique species profile. To determine whether adventitious yeast strains from the milk could develop in raw milk cheese, a multilocus-sequence-typing (MLST) analysis was performed on 13 Issatchenkia orientalis (syn. Pichia kudriavzevii, anamorph: Candida krusei) isolates. The same MLST genotypes were identified for strains independently isolated from raw milk and raw milk cheese from a farm processing its own milk. This study contributes to the understanding of the natural fungal microflora of raw milk and suggests that non-starter yeasts and molds can transfer from raw milk to raw milk cheese and may influence cheese ripening. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s13594-011-0051-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:23125908

  14. The Acute Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Measures of Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Inza L.; And Others

    The immediate response of stress to aerobic exercise was measured by utilizing the Palmar Sweat Index (PSI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Forty subjects (20 male and 20 female) from the ages of 18-30 sustained a single bout of aerobic activity for 30 minutes at 60 percent of their maximum heart rate. Pre-treatment procedures…

  15. Psychological Benefits of Aerobic Running: Implications for Mental Health Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effect of aerobic running on psychological functioning and its adjunctive use in mental health counseling. Concludes that mental health counselors can provide more comprehensive services if they expand the psychoeducational model to include physiological parameters such as aerobic running that are associated with optimum mental…

  16. The Psychology, Physiology, and Creativity of Middle School Aerobic Exercisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated effects of aerobic running program on psychological and physical fitness and creative abilities of eight-grade school children. Students (n=85) were randomly assigned to aerobic running treatment groups or to control groups who participated in traditional, nonaerobic physical education. Found statistically significant increases for…

  17. Aerobic Fitness Thresholds Associated with Fifth Grade Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittberg, Richard; Cottrell, Lesley A.; Davis, Catherine L.; Northrup, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Whereas effects of physical fitness and physical activity on cognitive function have been documented, little is known about how they are related. Purpose: This study assessed student aerobic fitness measured by FITNESSGRAM Mile times and/or Pacer circuits and whether the nature of the association between aerobic fitness and…

  18. Factors associated with low levels of aerobic fitness among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of low aerobic fitness levels and to analyze the association with sociodemographic factors, lifestyle and excess body fatness among adolescents of southern Brazil. Methods: The study included 879 adolescents aged 14-19 years the city of São José/SC, Brazil. The aerobic fitness was assessed by Canadian modified test of aerobic fitness. Sociodemographic variables (skin color, age, sex, study turn, economic level), sexual maturation and lifestyle (eating habits, screen time, physical activity, consumption of alcohol and tobacco) were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Excess body fatness was evaluated by sum of skinfolds triceps and subscapular. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results: Prevalence of low aerobic fitness level was 87.5%. The girls who spent two hours or more in front screen, consumed less than one glass of milk by day, did not smoke and had an excess of body fatness had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. White boys with low physical activity had had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. Conclusions: Eight out of ten adolescents were with low fitness levels aerobic. Modifiable lifestyle factors were associated with low levels of aerobic fitness. Interventions that emphasize behavior change are needed. PMID:26743851

  19. Aerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This manual contains the textual material for a single-lesson unit on aerobic sludge digestion. Topic areas addressed include: (1) theory of aerobic digestion; (2) system components; (3) performance factors; (4) indicators of stable operation; and (5) operational problems and their solutions. A list of objectives, glossary of key terms, and…

  20. EFFECTS OF CORN SILAGE INOCULANTS ON AEROBIC STABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerobic stability of corn silage can be a major problem for farmers particularly in warm weather. Silage inoculants, while the most common type of silage additive, have not been consistently effective at improving aerobic stability. This study investigated new and proposed inoculant products over ...

  1. Aerobic Activity--Do Physical Education Programs Provide Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGing, Eileen

    1989-01-01

    High school physical education curricula should concentrate less on sport skill development and competition, and more on health-related fitness and aerobic activity. Results are reported from a study of the type and amount of aerobic exercise provided in 29 high school physical education programs in a large metropolitan area. (IAH)

  2. Sexual dimorphism in primate aerobic capacity: a phylogenetic test.

    PubMed

    Lindenfors, Patrik; Revell, L J; Nunn, C L

    2010-06-01

    Male intrasexual competition should favour increased male physical prowess. This should in turn result in greater aerobic capacity in males than in females (i.e. sexual dimorphism) and a correlation between sexual dimorphism in aerobic capacity and the strength of sexual selection among species. However, physiological scaling laws predict that aerobic capacity should be lower per unit body mass in larger than in smaller animals, potentially reducing or reversing the sex difference and its association with measures of sexual selection. We used measures of haematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) counts from 45 species of primates to test four predictions related to sexual selection and body mass: (i) on average, males should have higher aerobic capacity than females, (ii) aerobic capacity should be higher in adult than juvenile males, (iii) aerobic capacity should increase with increasing sexual selection, but also that (iv) measures of aerobic capacity should co-vary negatively with body mass. For the first two predictions, we used a phylogenetic paired t-test developed for this study. We found support for predictions (i) and (ii). For prediction (iii), however, we found a negative correlation between the degree of sexual selection and aerobic capacity, which was opposite to our prediction. Prediction (iv) was generally supported. We also investigated whether substrate use, basal metabolic rate and agility influenced physiological measures of oxygen transport, but we found only weak evidence for a correlation between RBC count and agility. PMID:20406346

  3. 40 CFR 796.3100 - Aerobic aquatic biodegradation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. 796.3100 Section 796.3100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Transformation Processes § 796.3100 Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 796.3100 - Aerobic aquatic biodegradation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. 796.3100 Section 796.3100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Transformation Processes § 796.3100 Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 796.3100 - Aerobic aquatic biodegradation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. 796.3100 Section 796.3100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Transformation Processes § 796.3100 Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. (a)...

  6. Heart rate during aerobics classes in women with different previous experience of aerobics.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, R M; Kalaja, M K; Kalaja, S P; Holmala, E B; Paavolainen, L M; Tummavuori, M; Virtanen, P; Rusko, H K

    2001-01-01

    This study measured heart rate during floor and step aerobic classes at three intensity levels. A group of 20 female occasional exercisers [mean age 33 (SD 8) years, mean body mass index 21 (SD 2) kg.m-2 volunteered to participate in six aerobic classes (three floor classes, three step classes) and in a laboratory test as members of one of two groups according to their prestudy regular participation in aerobics classes. Subjects in group A had participated four or more times a week and those of group B less than twice a week. The characteristics of the groups were as follows: group A, n = 10, mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 38.7 (SD 3.6) ml.kg-1.min-1, mean maximal heart rate (HRmax) 183 (SD 8) beats.min-1; group B, n = 10, VO2max 36.1 (SD 3.6) ml.kg-1.min-1, HRmax 178 (SD 7) beats.min-1. Each class consisted of a warm-up, a 20 min period of structured aerobic exercise (cardiophase) and a cool-down. The cardiophase was planned and guided as light, (rate of perceived exertion, RPE 11-12), moderate (RPE 13-14) or heavy (RPE 15-17) by an experienced instructor. The mean heart rates during the light classes were 72 (step) and 74 (floor) %HRmax in group A and 75 (step) and 79 (floor) %HRmax in group B; during the moderate classes, 84 (step) and 80 (floor) %HRmax in group A and 82 (step) and 83 (floor) %HRmax in group B, and during the heavy classes 89 (step and floor) %HRmax in group A and 88 (step) and 92 (floor) %HRmax in group B. Differences in heart rate and %HRmax were not statistically significant between the groups. However, differences in heart rate and %HRmax between the intensities (light vs moderate, moderate vs heavy and light vs heavy) were significant within both groups (all, P < 0.01). Based on the results, we conclude that intensity management during the aerobics classes was generally successful regardless of the participants' prior participation in aerobics. However, some individuals who were older and/or had less prior participation tended to

  7. The neural crest-enriched microRNA miR-452 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal signaling in the first pharyngeal arch

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Neil T.; Cordes, Kimberly R.; White, Mark P.; Ivey, Kathryn N.; Srivastava, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a subset of multipotent, migratory stem cells that populate a large number of tissues during development and are important for craniofacial and cardiac morphogenesis. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of development and disease, little is known about their role in NCC development. Here, we show that loss of miRNA biogenesis by NCC-specific disruption of murine Dicer results in embryos lacking craniofacial cartilaginous structures, cardiac outflow tract septation and thymic and dorsal root ganglia development. Dicer mutant embryos had reduced expression of Dlx2, a transcriptional regulator of pharyngeal arch development, in the first pharyngeal arch (PA1). miR-452 was enriched in NCCs, was sufficient to rescue Dlx2 expression in Dicer mutant pharyngeal arches, and regulated non-cell-autonomous signaling involving Wnt5a, Shh and Fgf8 that converged on Dlx2 regulation in PA1. Correspondingly, knockdown of miR-452 in vivo decreased Dlx2 expression in the mandibular component of PA1, leading to craniofacial defects. These results suggest that post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs is required for differentiation of NCC-derived tissues and that miR-452 is involved in epithelial-mesenchymal signaling in the pharyngeal arch. PMID:21098571

  8. Features of follicular dendritic cells in ovine pharyngeal tonsil: an in vivo and in vitro study in the context of scrapie pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Toppets, Vinciane; Defaweux, Valerie; Piret, Joelle; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Grobet, Luc; Antoine, Nadine

    2011-05-15

    Although the alimentary tract has been suggested as the most likely portal of entry in natural scrapie, a growing amount of data indicates that the respiratory system and more specifically the pharyngeal tonsils serve as a natural portal of entry for scrapie. This study describes for the first time the broad cell populations in the lymphoid compartment of pharyngeal tonsils and more specifically inside the lymphoid follicles where the scrapie agent accumulates during the period of latency. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), stromal cells located in the light zone of the germinal centre of lymphoid follicles, seem to be the principal causal factor in the accumulation of the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. Knowing that efficient lymphoreticular prion propagation requires PrPc expression, we analysed the expression of PrPc with the mouse monoclonal antibody Pri 909 both in situ and on FDC-cluster-enriched cell suspensions. In situ, a positive staining was observed in the germinal centre of pharyngeal lymph follicles. The germinal centre labelling was due to the presence of a follicular dendritic network as revealed after immunogold staining of isolated FDC clusters. Our results suggest that the pharyngeal lymphoreticular system and more specifically PrPc expressing follicular dendritic cells could serve as a prion "reservoir" during the latency phase, thus playing a key role during the scrapie lymphoinvasion. PMID:21353313

  9. Grainyhead-like 3 regulation of endothelin-1 in the pharyngeal endoderm is critical for growth and development of the craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Sebastian; Simkin, Johanna; Darido, Charbel; Partridge, Darren D; Georgy, Smitha R; Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Lieschke, Graham J; Doggett, Karen; Heath, Joan K; Jane, Stephen M

    2014-08-01

    Craniofacial development is a highly conserved process that requires complex interactions between neural crest cells (NCCs) and pharyngeal tissues derived from all three germ layers. Signals emanating from the pharyngeal endoderm drive differentiation of NCCs into craniofacial cartilage, and disruption of this process underpins several human craniofacial defects (CFD). Here, we demonstrate that morpholino (MO)-mediated knockdown in zebrafish of the highly conserved transcription factor grainyhead-like 3 (grhl3), which is selectively expressed in the pharyngeal endoderm, leads to severe hypoplasia of the lower jaw cartilages. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved grhl-binding sites in gene regulatory regions identified endothelin-1 (edn1) as a putative direct grhl3 target gene, and this was confirmed by chromatin precipitation (ChIP) assays in zebrafish embryos. Injection of sub-phenotypic concentrations of MOs targeting both grhl3 and edn1 induced jaw abnormalities, and injection of edn1 mRNA into grhl3-morphants rescued both pharyngeal expression of the downstream effectors of edn1, and jaw cartilage formation. This study sheds new light on the role of endodermal endothelin-1 in vertebrate jaw development, and highlights potential new genetic defects that could underpin human CFD. PMID:24915580

  10. Brain aerobic glycolysis and motor adaptation learning

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Benjamin J.; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev Neil; Vlassenko, Andrei G.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2016-01-01

    Ten percent to 15% of glucose used by the brain is metabolized nonoxidatively despite adequate tissue oxygenation, a process termed aerobic glycolysis (AG). Because of the known role of glycolysis in biosynthesis, we tested whether learning-induced synaptic plasticity would lead to regionally appropriate, learning-dependent changes in AG. Functional MRI (fMRI) before, during, and after performance of a visual–motor adaptation task demonstrated that left Brodmann area 44 (BA44) played a key role in adaptation, with learning-related changes to activity during the task and altered resting-state, functional connectivity after the task. PET scans before and after task performance indicated a sustained increase in AG in left BA 44 accompanied by decreased oxygen consumption. Intersubject variability in behavioral adaptation rate correlated strongly with changes in AG in this region, as well as functional connectivity, which is consistent with a role for AG in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27217563

  11. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications is discussed. PMID:25436035

  12. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Strand, S. E.; Dykes, J.; Chiang, V.

    1984-01-01

    α-Glucoisosaccharinic acid (GISA), a major by-product of kraft paper manufacture, was synthesized from lactose and used as the carbon source for microbial media. Ten strains of aerobic bacteria capable of growth on GISA were isolated from kraft pulp mill environments. The highest growth yields were obtained with Ancylobacter spp. at pH 7.2 to 9.5. GISA was completely degraded by cultures of an Ancylobacter isolate. Ancylobacter cell suspensions consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide in response to GISA addition. A total of 22 laboratory strains of bacteria were tested, and none was capable of growth on GISA. GISA-degrading isolates were not found in forest soils. Images PMID:16346467

  13. Brain aerobic glycolysis and motor adaptation learning.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Benjamin J; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev Neil; Vlassenko, Andrei G; Shimony, Joshua S; Rutlin, Jerrel; Raichle, Marcus E

    2016-06-28

    Ten percent to 15% of glucose used by the brain is metabolized nonoxidatively despite adequate tissue oxygenation, a process termed aerobic glycolysis (AG). Because of the known role of glycolysis in biosynthesis, we tested whether learning-induced synaptic plasticity would lead to regionally appropriate, learning-dependent changes in AG. Functional MRI (fMRI) before, during, and after performance of a visual-motor adaptation task demonstrated that left Brodmann area 44 (BA44) played a key role in adaptation, with learning-related changes to activity during the task and altered resting-state, functional connectivity after the task. PET scans before and after task performance indicated a sustained increase in AG in left BA 44 accompanied by decreased oxygen consumption. Intersubject variability in behavioral adaptation rate correlated strongly with changes in AG in this region, as well as functional connectivity, which is consistent with a role for AG in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27217563

  14. New Routes for Aerobic Biodegradation of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barrie F.; Gilchrist, Darrin C.

    1991-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an osmolyte in marine plants, is biodegraded by cleavage of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) or by demethylation to 3-methiolpropionate (MMPA) and 3-mercaptopropionate (MPA). Sequential demethylation has been observed only with anoxic slurries of coastal sediments. Bacteria that grew aerobically on MMPA and DMSP were isolated from marine environments and phytoplankton cultures. Enrichments with DMSP selected for bacteria that generated DMS, whereas MMPA enrichments selected organisms that produced methanethiol (CH3SH) from either DMSP or MMPA. A bacterium isolated on MMPA grew on MMPA and DMSP, but rapid production of CH3SH from DMSP occurred only with DMSP-grown cells. Low levels of MPA accumulated during growth on MMPA, indicating demethylation as well as demethiolation of MMPA. The alternative routes for DMSP biodegradation via MMPA probably impact on net DMS fluxes to the marine atmosphere. PMID:16348607

  15. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  16. Contemporary Pharyngeal and Invasive emm1 and Invasive emm12 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Exhibit Similar In Vivo Selection for CovRS Mutants in Mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenchao; Liu, Mengyao; Chen, Daniel G; Yiu, Rossana; Fang, Ferric C; Lei, Benfang

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes diverse infections ranging from common pharyngitis to rare severe invasive infections. Invasive GAS isolates can have natural mutations in the virulence regulator CovRS, which result in enhanced expression of multiple virulence genes, suppressed the expression of the protease SpeB, and increased virulence. It is believed that CovRS mutations arise during human infections with GAS carrying wild-type CovRS and are not transmissible. CovRS mutants of invasive GAS of the emm1 genotype arise readily during experimental infection in mice. It is possible that invasive GAS arises from pharyngeal GAS through rare genetic mutations that confer the capacity of mutated GAS to acquire covRS mutations during infection. The objective of this study was to determine whether contemporary pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates have a reduced propensity to acquire CovRS mutations in vivo compared with invasive emm1 GAS and whether emm3, emm12, and emm28 GAS acquire CovRS mutants in mouse infection. The propensity of invasive and pharyngeal emm1 and invasive emm3, emm12, and emm28 SpeBA+ isolates to acquire variants with the SpeBA- phenotype was determined during subcutaneous infection of mice. The majority of both invasive and pharyngeal emm1 SpeBA+ isolates and two of three emm12 isolates, but not emm3 and emm28 isolates, were found to acquire SpeBA- variants during skin infection in mice. All analyzed SpeBA- variants of emm1 and emm12 GAS from the mouse infection acquired covRS mutations and produced more platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase SsE. Thus, contemporary invasive and pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates and emm12 GAS have a similar capacity to acquire covRS mutations in vivo. The rarity of severe invasive infections caused by GAS does not appear to be attributable to a reduced ability of pharyngeal isolates to acquire CovRS mutations. PMID:27611332

  17. The Termite Gut Microflora as an Oxygen Sink: Microelectrode Determination of Oxygen and pH Gradients in Guts of Lower and Higher Termites

    PubMed Central

    Brune, A.; Emerson, D.; Breznak, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    circumneutral. The oxic status of the peripheral hindgut lumen and its substantial oxygen consumption, together with previous reports of large numbers of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the hindgut microflora, challenge the notion that termite hindguts are a purely anoxic environment and, together with the steep axial pH gradients in higher termites, refine our concept of this tiny microbial habitat. PMID:16535076

  18. [Research of aerobic granule characteristics with different granule age].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Man; Yang, Chang-Zhu; Pu, Wen-Hong; Luo, Ying-Dong; Gong, Jian-Yu

    2012-03-01

    In the SBR reactor, we studied the different style, physicochemical characteristic, pollutants removal and microbial activity between the short age and long age aerobic granule, respectively. The short age aerobic granule was cultivated from activated floccules sludge and the other was gotten from aerobic granular sludge which was operated stably more than one year. The results indicated that the wet density, the specific gravity and integrated coefficient (IC) of the short age aerobic granule were 1.066 g x cm(-1), 1.013 g x cm(-3) and 98.7%, respectively. And that of long age were 1.026 g x cm(-3), 1.010 g x cm(-3) and 98.4%, respectively. All of them were higher than the long age aerobic granule. The mean diameters of them were 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively. The settling velocity of short age and long age aerobic granule were 0.005-0.032 m x s(-1) and 0.003-0.028 m x s(-1), respectively, and two kinds of aerobic granule settling velocity increased with the diameter increased. SVI of the former was lower. The COD removal rates of two aerobic granules were above 90%, and the NH4(+) -N removal rates of them were about 85%. The results of the COD effluent concentration, NH4(+) -N effluent concentration and the pollutants concentration in a typical cycle indicated that the short age aerobic granule had better pollutants removal efficiency. The TP removal rates of them were between 40% -90% and 32% -85%, respectively. The TN removal rates of them were about 80%. The SOUR(H) SOUR(NH4) and SOUR(NO2) of the short age aerobic granule were 26.4, 14.8 and 11.2 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. And that of long age were 25.2, 14.4 and 8.4 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. In summary, the aerobic granule had significantly different physical and chemical characteristics because of different granule age, and the short age aerobic granule exhibited better pollutants removal ability, higher microbial activity and more stability than the long age aerobic granule. PMID:22624385

  19. Effects of Kettlebell Training on Aerobic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Falatic, J Asher; Plato, Peggy A; Holder, Christopher; Finch, Daryl; Han, Kyungmo; Cisar, Craig J

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of a kettlebell training program on aerobic capacity. Seventeen female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate soccer players (age: 19.7 ± 1.0 years, height: 166.1 ± 6.4 cm, weight: 64.2 ± 8.2 kg) completed a graded exercise test to determine maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max). Participants were assigned to a kettlebell intervention group (KB) (n = 9) or a circuit weight-training (CWT) control group (n = 8). Participants in the KB group completed a kettlebell snatch test to determine individual snatch repetitions. Both groups trained 3 days a week for 4 weeks in addition to their off-season strength and conditioning program. The KB group performed the 15:15 MVO2 protocol (20 minutes of kettlebell snatching with 15 seconds of work and rest intervals). The CWT group performed multiple free-weight and dynamic body-weight exercises as part of a continuous circuit program for 20 minutes. The 15:15 MVO2 protocol significantly increased V̇O2max in the KB group. The average increase was 2.3 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹, or approximately a 6% gain. There was no significant change in V̇O2max in the CWT control group. Thus, the 4-week 15:15 MVO2 kettlebell protocol, using high-intensity kettlebell snatches, significantly improved aerobic capacity in female intercollegiate soccer players and could be used as an alternative mode to maintain or improve cardiovascular conditioning. PMID:26102260

  20. Sequential anaerobic/aerobic biotreatment of bark leachate.

    PubMed

    Frigon, J C; Cimpoia, R; Guiot, S R

    2003-01-01

    Bark leachate is generated from sawmill operations such as log storage sites and contains polymeric tannins, carbohydrates, organic acids, phenolic and resin compounds. The present study was aimed at assessing the performance of a sequential anaerobic and aerobic treatment, for both chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal, under various combinations of operational conditions, in the continuous mode. After anaerobic treatment in a five litres upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor, the leachate was directed into two parallel aerobic reactors, either an activated sludge unit or a fixed film submerged filter (packed with polyethylene Flexirings), both of a volume of one litre and oxygenated by air diffusion. For a leachate of 22 gCOD/l, an overall COD removal of 96-98% was achieved at an hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 4 days for the anaerobic reactor and one day for either aerobic systems. The phenol concentration generally increased after anaerobic treatment but was below the detection limit (50 ppb) after aerobic polishing. Radiorespirometric microcosms with 14C-labelled phenol confirmed that phenol was mineralized in the aerobic reactors. The performances of both aerobic systems were similar for COD and phenol removal. Thus, a sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment was able to effectively address the contamination of a bark leachate discharge, including phenols. PMID:14640219

  1. Cardioprotective Properties of Aerobic and Resistance Training Against Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Barboza, C A; Souza, G I H; Oliveira, J C M F; Silva, L M; Mostarda, C T; Dourado, P M M; Oyama, L M; Lira, F S; Irigoyen, M C; Rodrigues, B

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise training on ventricular morphometry and function, physical capacity, autonomic function, as well as on ventricular inflammatory status in trained rats prior to myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: sedentary+Sham, sedentary+myocardial infarction, aerobic trained+myocardial infarction, and resistance trained+myocardial infarction. Sham and myocardial infarction were performed after training periods. In the days following the surgeries, evaluations were performed. Aerobic training prevents aerobic (to a greater extent) and resistance capacity impairments, ventricular dysfunction, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic disorders (vagal tonus decrease and sympathetic tonus increase) triggered by myocardial infarction. Resistance training was able to prevent negative changes to aerobic and resistance capacity (to a greater extent) but not to ventricular dysfunction, and it prevented cardiovascular sympathetic increments. Additionally, both types of training reduced left ventricle inflammatory cytokine concentration. Our results suggest that aerobic and, for the first time, dynamic resistance training were able to reduce sympathetic tonus to the heart and vessels, as well as preventing the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the left ventricle of trained groups. These data emphasizes the positive effects of aerobic and dynamic resistance training on the prevention of the negative changes triggered by myocardial infarction. PMID:26928914

  2. Upper limb aerobic training improves aerobic fitness and all-out performance of America's Cup grinders.

    PubMed

    Adami, Paolo Emilio; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Rodio, Angelo; Squeo, Maria Rosaria; Corsi, Loretta; Quattrini, Filippo Maria; Fattorini, Luigi; Bernardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This research on "America's Cup" grinders investigated the effects of a specific eight-week long-arm cranking ergometer (ACE) training on upper body (UB) aerobic fitness (ventilatory threshold - Tvent, respiratory compensation point- RCP, -oxygen uptake peak - VO₂peak) and high intensity working capacity. The training consisted of sessions carried out for 20-30 mins, three times per week, at an intensity between the UB-Tvent and UB-RCP, and replaced part of a typical lower limb aerobic training whilst maintaining the usual weekly schedule of callisthenics, resistance training and sailing. Seven sailors, including four grinders and three mastmen (age 30 ± 5.5 years, height 1.9 ± 0.04 m, body mass 102 ± 3.6 kg), were evaluated through both an ACE cardiopulmonary maximal exercise test (CPET) and an ACE all-out up to exhaustion exercise test, before and after the ACE training. UB aerobic fitness improved significantly: UB-VO₂peak increased from 4.29 ± 0.442 to 4.52 ± 0.522 l·min(-1) (6.4 ± 3.66%), VO₂ at UB-Tvent from 2.42 ± 0.282 to 2.97 ± 0.328 l·min(-1) (22.8 ± 5.09%) and VO₂ at UB-RCP from 3.25 ± 0.402 to 3.75 ± 0.352 l·min(-1) (16.1 ± 10.83%). Peak power at the ACE CPET increased from 351 ± 27.5 to 387 ± 33.5 W (10.5 ± 6.93%). The all-out test total mechanical work increased from 28.9 ± 2.35 to 40.1 ± 3.76 kJ (72.1 ± 4.67%). In conclusion, a high intensity aerobic ACE training can be effective in improving grinding performance by increasing UB aerobic fitness and all-out working capacity. PMID:25357134

  3. Recent advances and key challenges in investigations of the flow inside human oro-pharyngeal-laryngeal airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, A.; Uddin, M.; Shinneeb, A.-M.; Ball, C. G.

    2012-07-01

    The oro-pharyngeal-laryngeal human airway is a complex geometry; the flow physics within are subjected to and influenced by a variety of different factors that produce jet-like flow, re-circulating flows that are enhanced by curvature, detached and secondary flows. Simulation and experiment are the tools available to the fluid dynamics researcher. Simulation results obtained from direct and large-eddy simulation, and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and associated models of turbulence are reviewed. Experimental data obtained through the use of flow visualisation, hot-wire anemometry and particle image velocimetry are also reviewed. A comparison of data obtained from the application of these tools reveals many inconsistencies that are explored in this article. While much progress has been made to understand some of the physics of the flow in the human airway, we continue to uncover new and significant fluid dynamic behaviour. Finally, future research directions are suggested.

  4. Non-linear associations between laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clues from artificial intelligence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, E

    2006-01-01

    Summary The relationship between the different symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease remain markedly obscure due to the high underlying non-linearity and the lack of studies focusing on the problem. Aim of this study was to evaluate the hidden relationships between the triad of symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease using advanced mathematical techniques, borrowed from the artificial intelligence field, in a cohort of patients with oesophagitis. A total of 388 patients (from 60 centres) with endoscopic evidence of oesophagitis were recruited. The severity of oesophagitis was scored by means of the Savary-Miller classification. PST algorithm was employed. This study shows that laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are correlated even if in a non-linear way. PMID:17345935

  5. Non-linear associations between laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clues from artificial intelligence analysis.

    PubMed

    Grossi, E

    2006-10-01

    The relationship between the different symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease remain markedly obscure due to the high underlying non-linearity and the lack of studies focusing on the problem. Aim of this study was to evaluate the hidden relationships between the triad of symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease using advanced mathematical techniques, borrowed from the artificial intelligence field, in a cohort of patients with oesophagitis. A total of 388 patients (from 60 centres) with endoscopic evidence of oesophagitis were recruited. The severity of oesophagitis was scored by means of the Savary-Miller classification. PST algorithm was employed. This study shows that laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are correlated even if in a non-linear way. PMID:17345935

  6. The surgical repair of benign tracheo-oesophageal/pharyngeal fistula in patients on mechanical ventilation for severe neurological injuries†.

    PubMed

    Daddi, Niccolò; Tassi, Valentina; Belloni, Gian Piero; Mattioli, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Acquired benign tracheo-oesophageal or pharyngeal fistulas (TO/PF) in neurological patients who cannot be weaned from mechanical ventilation represent a highly demanding clinical problem. We report on 3 patients on intermittent or continuous mechanical ventilation who successfully underwent tracheal resection and direct repair of the digestive fistula. Postoperative mechanical ventilation was provided through a modified silicone Safe-T-Tube, with which the cranial branch can be occluded with an internal inflatable balloon, inserted through tracheostomy performed at or below the level of the cricoid-tracheal suture line. Since the T prosthesis does not have an external cuff in the distal branch, a trans-tracheal open ventilation (TOV) technique was adopted. All patients, after a period that ranged from 21 h to 38 days from surgery, were restored to spontaneous breath; tracheal and oesophageal sutures healed normally. PMID:26306514

  7. Changes in the masticatory muscles, periodontal tissues, and the pharyngeal ring in Wistar rats in chronic psychophysical stress.

    PubMed

    Antonova, I N

    2008-11-01

    Experimental studies performed on 120 male Wistar rats using morphometric and histological methods demonstrated changes in oral cavity tissues on exposure to chronic psychophysical stress (dosed swimming). The masticatory muscles showed foci of non-infective inflammation, dystrophic changes in muscle fibers, and contractures. The periodontal ligament showed impairments to the microcirculation with congestion of the venous bed, local bleeding into the tissue, changes in the directions of bundles of collagen fibers, and deformation of bundles. The tissues of the pharyngeal ring showed decreases in lymphocyte content, progressive loosening of connective tissue, and decreases in non-degranulated mast cell numbers, as compared with controls. The intensity of these changes depended on the level of physical loading and the individual adaptive capacity of the animals. These structural changes in the tissues may be the etiopathogenetic basis of the development of chronic inflammatory periodontal diseases. PMID:18975112

  8. [Aerogenic microflora in animal husbandry and poultry breeding areas, criteria of its harmful effect and hygienic regulation].

    PubMed

    Erman, M I; Eglite, M E; Olefir, A I; Kalinina, L N

    1989-01-01

    In consequence of the analysis of workers' health status and microbic contamination of the working zone of animal and poultry husbandry production area the study established direct dependence of microorganism sensitization rate, incidence of infectious and allergic skin and respiratory diseases on microbic aerosol concentration. Feasibility of aerogenic microflora standardization was substantiated proceeding from the comparison of hygienic and clinical findings; MAC for microbic aerosol was set up for the working zone. PMID:2744566

  9. Anaerobic digestion of dairy cattle manure autoheated by aerobic pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Achkari-Begdouri, A.

    1989-01-01

    A novel way to heat anaerobic digesters was investigated. Dairy cattle manure was autoheated by an aerobic pretreatment process and then fed to the anaerobic digester. Important physical properties of the dairy cattle manure were determined. These included bulk density, specific heat, thermal conductivity and the rheological properties; consistency coefficient, behavior index and apparent viscosity. These parameters were used to calculate the overall heat transfer coefficients, and to estimate the heat losses from the aerobic reactor to the outside environment. The total energy balance of the aerobic treatment system was then established. An optimization study of the main parameters influencing the autoheating process showed that the total solids, the air flow rate and the stirring speed for operation of the aerobic pretreatment should be approximately 7%, 70 L/H and 1,400 rpm respectively. Temperatures as high as 65C were reached in 40 hours of aerobic treatment. At the above recommended levels of total solids, the air flow rate and the stirring speed, there was little difference in the energy requirements for heating the influent by aeration and heating the influent by a conventional heating system. In addition to the temperature increase, the aerobic pretreatment assisted in balancing the anaerobic digestion process and increased the methanogenesis of the dairy cattle manure. Despite the 8% decomposition of organic matter that occurred during the aerobic pretreatment process, methane production of the digester started with the aerobically heated manure was significantly higher (at least 20% higher) than of the digester started with conventionally heated manure. The aerobic system successfully autoheated the dairy cattle manure with an energy cost equal to that of conventionally heated influent.

  10. Variation in sessile microflora during biofilm formation on AISI-304 stainless steel coupons.

    PubMed

    de França, F P; Lutterbach, M T

    1996-07-01

    Coupons of stainless steel type AISI-304 were exposed to the industrial cooling system of a petrochemical plant fed by seawater from the Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in order to study the in situ formation of biofilms. Bacteria, microalgae and fungi were detected on the coupons as soon as 48 h after exposure. Their respective numbers were determined at times 48, 96 and 192 h and over the following 8 weeks. Aerobic, anaerobic and sulfate-reducing bacteria were quantified according to the technique of the most probable number, and fungi by the pour plate technique. The number of microorganisms present in the forming biofilm varied over the experimental period, reaching maximal levels of 14 x 10(11) cells cm-2, 30 x 10(13) cells cm-2, 38 x 10(11) cells cm-2 and 63 x 10(5) cells cm-2, respectively, for aerobic bacteria, anaerobic bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fungi, and the dynamics of this variation depended on the group of microorganisms. Bacillus sp, Escherichia coli, Serratia sp and Pseudomonas putrefaciens were identified among the aerobic bacteria isolated. Additionally, microalgae and bacteria of the genus Gallionella were also detected. Nonetheless, no evidence of corrosion was found on the stainless steel type AISI-304 coupons over the experimental period. PMID:8987686

  11. Feeding Cyprinus carpio with infectious materials mediates cyprinid herpesvirus 3 entry through infection of pharyngeal periodontal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), also known as Koi herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of a mortal disease in common and koi carp. Recently, we investigated the entry of CyHV-3 in carp using bioluminescence imaging and a CyHV-3 recombinant strain expressing luciferase (LUC). We demonstrated that the skin is the major portal of entry after inoculation of carp by immersion in water containing CyHV-3. While this model of infection mimics some natural conditions in which infection takes place, other epidemiological conditions could favour entry of virus through the digestive tract. Here, we investigated whether ingestion of infectious materials mediates CyHV-3 entry through the digestive tract. Carp were fed with materials contaminated with the CyHV-3 LUC recombinant (oral contamination) or immersed in water containing the virus (contamination by immersion). Bioluminescence imaging analyses performed at different times post-infection led to the following observations: (i) the pharyngeal periodontal mucosa is the major portal of entry after oral contamination, while the skin is the major portal of entry after contamination by immersion. (ii) Both modes of inoculation led to the spreading of the infection to the various organs tested. However, the timing and the sequence in which some of the organs turned positive were different between the two modes of inoculation. Finally, we compared the disease induced by the two inoculation modes. They led to comparable clinical signs and mortality rate. The results of the present study suggest that, based on epidemiological conditions, CyHV-3 can enter carp either by skin or periodontal pharyngeal mucosal infection. PMID:22276598

  12. Anatomical and physiological studies of bigheaded carps demonstrate that the epibranchial organ functions as a pharyngeal taste organ

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne; Ghosal, Ratna; Caprio, John; Claus, Aaron W.; Sorensen, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    The epibranchial organ (EO) is an enigmatic tubular organ found in the pharyngeal cavity of many filter-feeding fishes. We investigated whether it might function as a taste organ that mediates aggregation and ingestion of planktonic food within the buccal cavity. The EO and associated structures of bighead and silver carps, two successful and invasive planktivorous fishes, were examined using histological and electrophysiological techniques. Both species possess finely structured gill rakers that extend directly via a series of protrusions into each of the four blind canals which are organized as the muscular EO, suggesting that the gill rakers and EO probably function in an integrated manner. Both the interior and exterior surfaces of the EOs of both species are covered with high densities of taste buds and solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) as well as mucous cells. Conversely, taste buds are scarce in both the buccal cavities and external portions of the head and mouth of both species. Electrophysiological recordings from a caudal branch of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) found to innervate the EO showed it to be sensitive to chemicals found in a planktonic diet. l-Amino acids accounted for some, but not all of the neural activity. We conclude that taste buds and SCCs located on the EO and gill rakers probably serve to chemically detect food particles, which the EO then aggregates by mucus secretion before eventually expelling them onto the floor of the pharynx for ingestion. This specialized, pharyngeal chemosensory structure may explain the feeding success of these, and perhaps other planktivorous, filter-feeding fishes. PMID:25214490

  13. Metabolism of apigenin and related compounds in the rat. Metabolite formation in vivo and by the intestinal microflora in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, L. A.; Smith, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    1. The metabolism of a group of flavonoid compounds related in structure to apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone) and including apigenin, apiin, naringin, phlorrhizin, acacetin, kaempferol, robinin, chrysin, tectochrysin and 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, was studied both in vivo after oral administration to the rat, and in vitro in cultures of micro-organisms derived from the intestine of the rat. 2. The rat intestinal microflora is capable of effecting degradation of flavonoid compounds to metabolites observed in the urine after oral administration of the specific flavonoid. 3. All compounds possessing free 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups in the A ring and a free 4′-hydroxyl group in the B ring gave rise to ring-fission products, which included 4′-hydroxyphenylacyl derivatives. 4. On anaerobic incubation in a thioglycollate medium, intestinal micro-organisms can effect flavonoid-ring fission, cleavage of glycosidic bonds and the reduction of double bonds in the side chains of certain metabolites. 5. Two flavonoids (chrysin and tectochrysin) undergo hydroxylation in the 4′-position in vivo but not during incubation with the intestinal microflora in vitro. 6. Observations on the metabolism of other compounds substituted in the 4′-position, e.g. epiafzelechin, pelargonin and the isoflavones, genistein, biochanin A, daidzein and formononetin, by the intestinal microflora of the rat are also reported. PMID:4638796

  14. Non-cultural methods of human microflora evaluation for the benefit of crew medical control in confined habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Lana, Moukhamedieva; Georgy, Osipov; Aleksey, Batov; Zoya, Soloviova; Robert, Mardanov; Yana, Panina; Anna, Gegenava

    2011-05-01

    Current control of human microflora is a great problem not only for the space medicine but also for practical health care. Due to many reasons its realization by classical bacteriological method is difficult in practical application or cannot be done. To evaluate non-cultural methods of microbial control of crews in a confined habitat we evaluated two different methods. The first method is based on digital treatment of microbial visual images, appearing after gram staining of microbial material from natural sample. This way the rate between gram-positive and gram-negative microbe could be gained as well as differentiation of rods and cocci could be attained, which is necessary for primary evaluation of human microbial cenosis in remote confined habitats. The other non-culture method of human microflora evaluation is gas chromatomass spectrometry (gcms) analysis of swabs gathered from different body sites. Gc-ms testing of swabs allows one to validate quantitative and special microflora based on specific lipid markers analysis.

  15. Aerobic Exercise Program Reduces Anger Expression Among Overweight Children

    PubMed Central

    Tkacz, Joseph; Young-Hyman, Deborah; Boyle, Colleen A.; Davis, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the effect of a structured aerobic exercise program on anger expression in healthy overweight children. Overweight, sedentary children were randomly assigned to an aerobic exercise program or a no-exercise control condition. All children completed the Pediatric Anger Expression Scale at baseline and posttest. Anger Out and Anger Expression scores were lower for the exercise condition at posttest. Fitness improvements contributed significantly to final models, and points earned for adherence correlated negatively with posttest Anger Out. An aerobic exercise program might be an effective strategy to reduce anger expression, including reduction of aggressive behavior, in overweight children. PMID:19168916

  16. Considerations in prescribing preflight aerobic exercise for astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1987-01-01

    The physiological effects of prolonged exposure to weightlessness are discussed together with the effects of aerobic exercise on human characteristics affected by weightlessness. It is noted that, although early data on orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight led to a belief that a high level of aerobic fitness for astronauts was detrimental to orthostatic tolerance on return to earth, most of the data available today do not suport this contention. Aerobic fitness was found to be beneficial to cardiovascular function and to mental performance; therefore, it may be important in performing extravehicular activities during flight.

  17. Evaluation of Biodegradability of Waste Before and After Aerobic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowska-Kisielewicz, Monika; Jędrczak, Andrzej; Sadecka, Zofia

    2014-12-01

    An important advantage of use of an aerobic biostabilization of waste prior to its disposal is that it intensifies the decomposition of the organic fraction of waste into the form which is easily assimilable for methanogenic microorganisms involved in anaerobic decomposition of waste in the landfill. In this article it is presented the influence of aerobic pre-treatment of waste as well as leachate recirculation on susceptibility to biodegradation of waste in anaerobic laboratory reactors. The research has shown that in the reactor with aerobically treated waste stabilized with recilculation conversion of the organic carbon into the methane is about 45% higher than in the reactor with untreated waste stabilized without recirculation.

  18. Characterization of microflora and transformation of organic matters in urban sewer system.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Bin; Jiao, Ding; Sun, Guangxi; Wang, Baobao; Wang, Xiaochang C

    2015-11-01

    A study was conducted using a pilot sewer system consisting of 35 sequential sections, totalling 1200 m of gravity pipe. Urban sewage flowed into the sewer system at a constant flow rate until it reached physical and microbiological steady states. Microflora in the biofilm that attached to the inner surface along the pipe length were analysed. The organic compositions in both the liquid and gaseous phases of the sewer system were monitored. The results showed that typical fermentation bacteria, such as bacteroidetes and bacillus, were abundant in the system, indicating that the anoxic environment (DO = 0.3 mg/L) was suitable for fermentative bacterial growth. This resulted in a substantial reduction of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) along the pipe length and an increase of the biodegradable oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand (BOD/COD) ratio from 0.68 at the beginning of the sewer system to 0.84 at the end of the sewer system; this was an indication of a transformation of organic matters from less-biodegradable to more-biodegradable products. Via molecular weight (MW) analysis, it was further identified that the larger organic molecules (MW > 10,000 Da) were transformed into products with smaller molecular weights. Regarding the fermentation products, the concentrations of the volatile fatty acids (VFAs) increased dramatically in the initial 600-m sections and then remained constant for the later sections except for the end section of the sewer; acetic acid was found to be the primary product of the VFAs. Gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) were found to increase along the length of the sewer system, whereas the concentrations of ethanol, lactic acid, and hydrogen (H2) were high at the beginning of the sewer and then decreased in the rear sections of the sewer system. It could thus be concluded that in an urban wastewater sewer system, fermentative microflora could perform important roles in contributing to organic matter removal and

  19. Effects of immune stress on growth performance, immunity, and cecal microflora in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yang, X J; Li, W L; Feng, Y; Yao, J H

    2011-12-01

    Immune stress is the loss of immune homeostasis by external forces. This study investigated the effects of different types of immune stress on growth performance, immunity, and the distribution of cecal microflora in broiler chickens. In total, 540 one-day-old Cobb 500 broilers were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 5 (n = 108 birds/group) treatments: 1) no vaccination; 2) simplified vaccination, which included the infectious bronchitis vaccine (H120), the inactivated avian influenza vaccine (AI), the live vaccine strain Clone-30 of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and the combined inactive vaccine for infectious bursal diseases and the Newcastle disease vaccine (ND-IB); 3) normal vaccination (simplified vaccination + second dose of ND-IB, H120, and AI); 4) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stress (normal vaccination+LPS); or 5) cyclophosphamide (CPM) stress (normal vaccination+CPM).The results showed that the average BW and average feed intake decreased significantly after treatment with LPS or CPM (P < 0.05). Chickens that were challenged by LPS or CPM had a lower ileal CP digestibility than that of the control group (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the levels of secreted IgA decreased significantly at 42 d of age in the chickens that were treated with LPS or CPM (P < 0.01). The proliferation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell and the levels of serum IgG in the LPS-challenged chickens were higher than those in the control group chickens at 21 and 42 d of age, respectively (P < 0.05). Six clusters were identified at 21 d of age, but cluster 6 was a single sample. Only 5 clusters were identified at 42 d of age. The enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR fingerprints of the cecal samples from the no vaccination and the simplified vaccination groups clustered together with high coefficients. The ERIC-PCR fingerprints of the 3 cecal samples from the CPM and LPS treatment groups clustered together with high coefficients among them. The

  20. Effects of a Rebound Exercise Training Program on Aerobic Capacity and Body Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomassoni, Teresa L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if aerobic dancing on rebound exercise equipment (minitrampolines) is an effective way to improve aerobic capacity and body composition. Although aerobic capacity improved, percent body fat did not change. Results were similar to those produced by conventional aerobic dance programs of like intensity. (MT)

  1. Issues of Health, Appearance and Physical Activity in Aerobic Classes for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore what appearance-focused messages were conveyed by aerobic instructors in aerobic classes for women. This qualitative research was influenced by the concept of wellness and how feminist pedagogy can be applied to promote individuals' well-being in aerobic classes. The practices of five aerobic instructors…

  2. Characteristics of aerobic granulation at mesophilic temperatures in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fenghao; Park, Seyong; Kim, Moonil

    2014-01-01

    Compact and structurally stable aerobic granules were developed in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) at mesophilic temperatures (35°C). The morphological, biological and chemical characteristics of the aerobic granulation were investigated and a theoretical granulation mechanism was proposed according to the results of the investigation. The mature aerobic granules had compact structure, small size (mean diameter of 0.24 mm), excellent settleability and diverse microbial structures, and were effective for the removal of organics and nitrification. The growth kinetics demonstrated that the biomass growth depended on coexistence and interactions between heterotrophs and autotrophs in the granules. The functions of heterotrophs and autotrophs created a compact and secure layer on the outside of the granules, protecting the inside sludge containing environmentally sensitive and slow growing microorganisms. The mechanism and the reactor performance may promise feasibility and efficiency for treating industry effluents at mesophilic temperatures using aerobic granulation. PMID:24211486

  3. Prediction of Maximum Aerobic Power in Untrained Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolgener, Forrest A.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents an equation for predicting maximum aerobic power in untrained females from values of percent body fat, weight, and submaximal values of heart rate, respiratory quotient, and expired gas. (MJB)

  4. Saline storage of aerobic granules and subsequent reactivation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Lin, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Loss of structural stability and bioactivity during long-term storage and operation is primary challenge to field applications of aerobic granular processes. This study for the first time stored aerobic granules in 5%w/w NaCl solution at 4°C for 187d. The stored granules were then successfully reactivated and used for 85d in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) and continuous-flow reactors (CFR) at varying levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD). High-throughput sequencing results reveal that Thauera sp., Paracoccus sp., and Nitrosomonas sp. were the predominant in the stored aerobic granules, and Pseudoxanthomonas sp. accumulated during the reactivation process. Saline storage, in which cells are in an unculturable state by saline stress, is a promising storage process for aerobic granules. PMID:25270079

  5. Aerobic capacity is correlated with the ranking of boxers.

    PubMed

    Bruzas, Vidas; Stasiulis, Arvydas; Cepulenas, Algirdas; Mockus, Pranas; Statkeviciene, Birute; Subacius, Vitalijus

    2014-08-01

    The goal was to assess the aerobic capacity of boxers and its relation with sport mastery. Participants were 12 boxers from the Lithuanian national team (VO₂max - 58.03 ± 3.00 ml/kg/min) of different weight classes. Their sport mastery ranking was established according to their achieved results during the last years of participation in amateur boxing contests. In a graduated treadmill running test, the boxers' aerobic capacity indices were established. Running speed at first and second ventilatory thresholds, VO₂max, and maximal oxygen pulse had moderate to strong correlations with the boxers' sport mastery ranking. Aerobic capacity is an important fitness component of boxers in all weight categories. Special attention should be paid to development of cardiac capacity in the boxers' training processes, as with aerobic power and anaerobic threshold training. PMID:25153738

  6. Aerobic exercise and endurance: improving fitness for health benefits.

    PubMed

    Wilmore, Jack H

    2003-05-01

    Clinicians who understand how the body responds to exercise, how aerobic training improves cardiovascular fitness, and the benefits and principles of prescribing aerobic exercise can effectively encourage patients to become active and optimize programs for those already active. Patients who are active at an early age and who continue to enjoy active lifestyles as adults will attenuate the normal losses in cardiovascular endurance, strength, and flexibility that accompany aging and sedentary living, thereby maintaining greater independence throughout their life spans. PMID:20086470

  7. Continuous fermentative hydrogen production from a wheat starch co-product by mixed microflora.

    PubMed

    Hussy, I; Hawkes, F R; Dinsdale, R; Hawkes, D L

    2003-12-20

    For the transition to the hydrogen economy, hydrogen must be produced sustainably, e.g., by the fermentation of agricultural material. Continuous fermentative production of hydrogen from an insoluble substrate in nonsterile conditions is yet to be reported. In this study hydrogen production using mixed microflora from heat-treated digested sewage sludge in nonsterile conditions from a particulate co-product of the wheat flour industry (7.5 g L(-1) total hexose) at 18- and 12-hour hydraulic retention times, pH 4.5 and 5.2, 30 degrees C and 35 degrees C was examined. In continuous operation, hydrogen yields of approximately 1.3 moles hydrogen/mole hexose consumed were obtained, but decreased if acetate or propionate levels rose, indicating metabolism shifted towards hydrogen consumption by homoacetogenesis or propionate producers. These shifts occurred both at pH 4.5 and 5.2. Sparging the reactor with nitrogen to reduce hydrogen in the off-gas from 50% to 7% gave stable operation with a hydrogen yield of 1.9 moles hydrogen /mole hexose consumed over an 18-day period. PMID:14595774

  8. Molecular Characterization of Subject-Specific Oral Microflora during Initial Colonization of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Patricia I.; Chalmers, Natalia I.; Rickard, Alexander H.; Kong, Colin; Milburn, Craig L.; Palmer, Robert J.; Kolenbrander, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    The initial microbial colonization of tooth surfaces is a repeatable and selective process, with certain bacterial species predominating in the nascent biofilm. Characterization of the initial microflora is the first step in understanding interactions among community members that shape ensuing biofilm development. Using molecular methods and a retrievable enamel chip model, we characterized the microbial diversity of early dental biofilms in three subjects. A total of 531 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed, and 97 distinct phylotypes were identified. Microbial community composition was shown to be statistically different among subjects. In all subjects, however, 4-h and 8-h communities were dominated by Streptococcus spp. belonging to the Streptococcus oralis/Streptococcus mitis group. Other frequently observed genera (comprising at least 5% of clone sequences in at least one of the six clone libraries) were Actinomyces, Gemella, Granulicatella, Neisseria, Prevotella, Rothia, and Veillonella. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed that the proportion of Streptococcus sp. sequences in the clone libraries coincided with the proportion of streptococcus probe-positive organisms on the chip. FISH also revealed that, in the undisturbed plaque, not only Streptococcus spp. but also the rarer Prevotella spp. were usually seen in small multigeneric clusters of cells. This study shows that the initial dental plaque community of each subject is unique in terms of diversity and composition. Repetitive and distinctive community composition within subjects suggests that the spatiotemporal interactions and ecological shifts that accompany biofilm maturation also occur in a subject-dependent manner. PMID:16597990

  9. The Role of Gut Microflora and the Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Neuroendocrine System in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Parth J.; Nayi, Vipul R.; Johnson, David A.; Vinik, Aaron I.

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic has drastically impacted the state of health care in the United States. Paralleling this epidemic is the incidence of diabetes mellitus, with a notable shift toward a much younger age of onset. While central to the pathogenesis of diabetes associated with obesity is the role of inflammation attributed to “adiposopathy.” Emerging data suggest that changes in sympathetic/parasympathetic balance regulated by the brain precede changes in the inflammatory cascade. It has now been established that the gut microflora contributes significantly to the activation and inhibition of autonomic control and impact the set of the neuroinflammatory inhibitory reflex mediated by the cholinergic nervous system. There has been a paradigm shift toward further investigating commensal bacteria in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes mellitus and its complications, as dysbiosis is thought to play a pivotal role in diabetic-associated disorders. This paper is intended to evaluate the role of intestinal dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and examine the potential for restoration of balance via use of probiotics. PMID:27375553

  10. Influence of cabbage processing methods and prebiotic manipulation of colonic microflora on glucosinolate breakdown in man.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Zoë; Louis, Petra; Mihajlovski, Agnès; Rungapamestry, Vanessa; Ratcliffe, Brian; Duncan, Alan J

    2007-08-01

    Glucosinolate consumption from brassica vegetables has been implicated in reduction of cancer risk. The isothiocyanate breakdown products of glucosinolates appear to be particularly important as chemoprotective agents. Before consumption, brassica vegetables are generally cooked, causing the plant enzyme, myrosinase, to be denatured, influencing the profile of glucosinolate breakdown products produced. Some human intestinal microflora species show myrosinase-like activity (e.g. bifidobacteria). We aimed to increase bifidobacteria by offering a prebiotic (inulin) in a randomised crossover study. Six volunteers consumed inulin (10 g/d) for 21 d followed by a 21 d control period (no inulin). Treatment periods were reversed for the remaining six volunteers. During the last 5 d of each period two cabbage-containing meals were consumed. Total urine output was collected for 24 h following each meal. Cabbage was microwaved for 2 min (lightly cooked) or 5.5 min (fully cooked). Faecal samples were collected at the start and after the inulin and control treatments. Bifidobacteria were enumerated by real-time PCR. Allyl isothiocyanate production was quantified by measuring urinary excretion of allyl mercapturic acid (AMA). Bifidobacteria increased following prebiotic supplementation (P < 0.001) but there was no impact of this increase on AMA excretion. AMA excretion was greater following consumption of lightly cooked cabbage irrespective of prebiotic treatment (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the most effective way to increase isothiocyanate production may be to limit the length of time that brassica vegetables are cooked prior to consumption. PMID:17403273

  11. Castration influences intestinal microflora and induces abdominal obesity in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Kitakaze, Tomoya; Mitani, Takakazu; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (i.e. androgen deficiency) raises the risk for abdominal obesity in men. The mechanism for this obesity is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that hypogonadism after castration caused abdominal obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed, but not in standard diet (SD)-fed, C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, the phenotype was not induced in mice treated with antibiotics that disrupt the intestinal microflora. In HFD-fed mice, castration increased feed efficiency and decreased fecal weight per food intake. Castration also induced in an increase of visceral fat mass only in the absence of antibiotics in HFD-fed mice, whereas subcutaneous fat mass was increased by castration irrespective of antibiotics. Castration reduced the expression in the mesenteric fat of both adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase in HFD-fed mice, which was not observed in the presence of antibiotics. Castration decreased thigh muscle (i.e. quadriceps and hamstrings) mass, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and increased liver triglyceride levels in a HFD-dependent manner, whereas these changes were not observed in castrated mice treated with antibiotics. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and Lactobacillus species increased in the feces of HFD-fed castrated mice. These results show that androgen (e.g. testosterone) deficiency can alter the intestinal microbiome and induce abdominal obesity in a diet-dependent manner. PMID:26961573

  12. The Role of Gut Microflora and the Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Neuroendocrine System in Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Nayi, Vipul R; Johnson, David A; Vinik, Aaron I

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic has drastically impacted the state of health care in the United States. Paralleling this epidemic is the incidence of diabetes mellitus, with a notable shift toward a much younger age of onset. While central to the pathogenesis of diabetes associated with obesity is the role of inflammation attributed to "adiposopathy." Emerging data suggest that changes in sympathetic/parasympathetic balance regulated by the brain precede changes in the inflammatory cascade. It has now been established that the gut microflora contributes significantly to the activation and inhibition of autonomic control and impact the set of the neuroinflammatory inhibitory reflex mediated by the cholinergic nervous system. There has been a paradigm shift toward further investigating commensal bacteria in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes mellitus and its complications, as dysbiosis is thought to play a pivotal role in diabetic-associated disorders. This paper is intended to evaluate the role of intestinal dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and examine the potential for restoration of balance via use of probiotics. PMID:27375553

  13. Assessment of Fecal Microflora Changes in Pigs Supplemented with Herbal Residue and Prebiotic

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Ashis Kumar; Jayaram, C.; Jayapal, N.; Sondhi, N.; Kolte, A. P.; Senani, S.; Sridhar, M.; Dhali, A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic usage in animals as a growth promoter is considered as public health issue due to its negative impact on consumer health and environment. The present study aimed to evaluate effectiveness of herbal residue (ginger, Zingiber officinale, dried rhizome powder) and prebiotic (inulin) as an alternative to antibiotics by comparing fecal microflora composition using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. The grower pigs were offered feed containing antibiotic (tetracycline), ginger and inulin separately and un-supplemented group served as control. The study revealed significant changes in the microbial abundance based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs) among the groups. Presumptive identification of organisms was established based on the fragment length of OTUs generated with three restriction enzymes (MspI, Sau3AI and BsuRI). The abundance of OTUs representing Bacteroides intestinalis, Eubacterium oxidoreducens, Selonomonas sp., Methylobacterium sp. and Denitrobacter sp. was found significantly greater in inulin supplemented pigs. Similarly, the abundance of OTUs representing Bacteroides intestinalis, Selonomonas sp., and Phascolarcobacterium faecium was found significantly greater in ginger supplemented pigs. In contrast, the abundance of OTUs representing pathogenic microorganisms Atopostipes suicloacalis and Bartonella quintana str. Toulouse was significantly reduced in ginger and inulin supplemented pigs. The OTUs were found to be clustered under two major phylotypes; ginger-inulin and control-tetracycline. Additionally, the abundance of OTUs was similar in ginger and inulin supplemented pigs. The results suggest the potential of ginger and prebioticsto replace antibiotics in the diet of grower pig. PMID:26176779

  14. Changes in intestinal microflora of Caenorhabditis elegans following Bacillus nematocida B16 infection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Hui, Fengli; Kan, Yunchao; Yao, Lunguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pathogenic bacteria on a host and its symbiotic microbiota is vital and widespread in the biotic world. The soil-dwelling opportunistic bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 uses a "Trojan horse" mechanism to kill Caenorhabditis elegans. The alterations in the intestinal microflora that occur after B16 infection remain unknown. Here, we analyzed the intestinal bacteria presented in normal and infected worms. The gut microbial community experienced a complex change after B16 inoculation, as determined through marked differences in species diversity, structure, distribution and composition between uninfected and infected worms. Regardless of the worm's origin (i.e., from soil or rotten fruits), the diversity of the intestinal microbiome decreased after infection. Firmicutes increased sharply, whereas Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria decreased to different degrees. Fusobacteria was only present 12 h post-infection. After 24 h of infection, 1228 and 1109 bacterial species were identified in the uninfected and infected groups, respectively. The shared species reached 21.97%. The infected group had a greater number of Bacillus species but a smaller number of Pediococcus, Halomonas, Escherichia and Shewanella species (P < 0.01). Therefore, this study provides the first evaluation of the alterations caused by pathogenic bacteria on symbiotic microbiota using C. elegans as the model species. PMID:26830015

  15. The effects of bee pollen extracts on the broiler chicken's gastrointestinal microflora.

    PubMed

    Kačániová, Miroslava; Rovná, Katarína; Arpášová, Henrieta; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Haščík, Peter; Cuboň, Juraj; Pavelková, Adriana; Chlebo, Róbert; Bobková, Alica; Stričík, Michal

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of bee pollen ethanolic extracts on the in vivo gastrointestinal tract microflora colonization of broiler chickens. A completely randomized experiment based on six treatments (different concentrations of bee pollen - 0, 5, 15, 25, 35 and 45 g kg(-1) diet) was used during 7 weeks. The highest count of faecal Enterococci was found in the experimental group with the addition of 15 g of pollen (8.85 ± 0.87 log CFU g(-1)) per 1 kg of feed mixture. The highest count of Lactobacilli was detected in the experimental group with 35 g of pollen per 1 kg of feed mixture and the highest number of the Enterobacteriaceae genera count was found in the control group (8.43 ± 0.15 log CFU g(-1)). Moreover, the MALDI TOF MS Biotyper identified the following genera: Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, as well as Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. fermentum and L. salivarius from the Lactobacilli group and Enterococcus avium, E. casseliflavus, E. cecorum, E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. gallinarum, E. hirae and E. malodoratus from the Enterococci group. Additionally, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of pollen against five bacteria species isolated from gastrointestinal tracts of chickens were tested. The best antimicrobial effect of the pollen extract was detected against K. oxytoca. PMID:23548478

  16. The impact of prulifloxacin on vaginal lactobacillus microflora: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Tempera, G; Furneri, P M; Cianci, A; Incognito, T; Marano, M R; Drago, F

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of a repeated-dose regimen with prulifloxacin in comparison to amoxicillin/clavulanate on vaginal lactobacillus microflora. Thirty healthy female volunteers were treated with prulifloxacin or amoxicillin/clavulanate in this open, randomized, parallel-group, repeated-dose study. Vaginal signs and symptoms were assessed at the first doctor's Visit 0 (3 weeks prior to the start of the study), and subsequent examinations (1, 3, 5, 6, 7 and 8) (followup). Some volunteers treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate showed increased pH values and 73.3% of them had lower lactobacillus flora at Visit 3. this reduction was still present in 66.7% 3 days after the last dose and in 26.7% of subjects at the follow-up, about 7 - 13 days after the last dose. The situation was completely normalized at the second follow-up about one month after treatment stop. On the contrary, the repeated administration of prulifloxacin 600 mg tablets affected neither the pH nor the lactobacillus component of the vaginal flora in healthy fertile women. The oral administration of prulifloxacin may have advantages over some other antimicrobial agents because it preserves the normal vaginal microbiota in healthy women. PMID:20071288

  17. Assessment of Fecal Microflora Changes in Pigs Supplemented with Herbal Residue and Prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Ashis Kumar; Jayaram, C; Jayapal, N; Sondhi, N; Kolte, A P; Senani, S; Sridhar, M; Dhali, A

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic usage in animals as a growth promoter is considered as public health issue due to its negative impact on consumer health and environment. The present study aimed to evaluate effectiveness of herbal residue (ginger, Zingiber officinale, dried rhizome powder) and prebiotic (inulin) as an alternative to antibiotics by comparing fecal microflora composition using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. The grower pigs were offered feed containing antibiotic (tetracycline), ginger and inulin separately and un-supplemented group served as control. The study revealed significant changes in the microbial abundance based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs) among the groups. Presumptive identification of organisms was established based on the fragment length of OTUs generated with three restriction enzymes (MspI, Sau3AI and BsuRI). The abundance of OTUs representing Bacteroides intestinalis, Eubacterium oxidoreducens, Selonomonas sp., Methylobacterium sp. and Denitrobacter sp. was found significantly greater in inulin supplemented pigs. Similarly, the abundance of OTUs representing Bacteroides intestinalis, Selonomonas sp., and Phascolarcobacterium faecium was found significantly greater in ginger supplemented pigs. In contrast, the abundance of OTUs representing pathogenic microorganisms Atopostipes suicloacalis and Bartonella quintana str. Toulouse was significantly reduced in ginger and inulin supplemented pigs. The OTUs were found to be clustered under two major phylotypes; ginger-inulin and control-tetracycline. Additionally, the abundance of OTUs was similar in ginger and inulin supplemented pigs. The results suggest the potential of ginger and prebioticsto replace antibiotics in the diet of grower pig. PMID:26176779

  18. Identification of the Bacterial Microflora in Dairy Products by Temporal Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ogier, Jean-Claude; Son, Olivier; Gruss, Alexandra; Tailliez, Patrick; Delacroix-Buchet, Agnes

    2002-01-01

    Numerous microorganisms, including bacteria, yeasts, and molds, are present in cheeses, forming a complex ecosystem. Among these organisms, bacteria are responsible for most of the physicochemical and aromatic transformations that are intrinsic to the cheesemaking process. Identification of the bacteria that constitute the cheese ecosystem is essential for understanding their individual contributions to cheese production. We used temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) to identify different bacterial species present in several dairy products, including members of the genera Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Enterococcus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus. The TTGE technique is based on electrophoretic separation of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragments by using a temperature gradient. It was optimized to reveal differences in the 16S rDNA V3 regions of bacteria with low-G+C-content genomes. Using multiple control strains, we first set up a species database in which each species (or group of species) was characterized by a specific TTGE fingerprint. TTGE was then applied to controlled dairy ecosystems with defined compositions, including liquid (starter), semisolid (home-made fermented milk), and solid (miniature cheese models) matrices. Finally, the potential of TTGE to describe the bacterial microflora of unknown ecosystems was tested with various commercial dairy products. Subspecies, species, or groups of species of lactic acid bacteria were distinguished in dairy samples. In conclusion, TTGE was shown to distinguish bacterial species in vitro, as well as in both liquid and solid dairy products. PMID:12147461

  19. Castration influences intestinal microflora and induces abdominal obesity in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Kitakaze, Tomoya; Mitani, Takakazu; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (i.e. androgen deficiency) raises the risk for abdominal obesity in men. The mechanism for this obesity is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that hypogonadism after castration caused abdominal obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed, but not in standard diet (SD)-fed, C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, the phenotype was not induced in mice treated with antibiotics that disrupt the intestinal microflora. In HFD-fed mice, castration increased feed efficiency and decreased fecal weight per food intake. Castration also induced in an increase of visceral fat mass only in the absence of antibiotics in HFD-fed mice, whereas subcutaneous fat mass was increased by castration irrespective of antibiotics. Castration reduced the expression in the mesenteric fat of both adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase in HFD-fed mice, which was not observed in the presence of antibiotics. Castration decreased thigh muscle (i.e. quadriceps and hamstrings) mass, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and increased liver triglyceride levels in a HFD-dependent manner, whereas these changes were not observed in castrated mice treated with antibiotics. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and Lactobacillus species increased in the feces of HFD-fed castrated mice. These results show that androgen (e.g. testosterone) deficiency can alter the intestinal microbiome and induce abdominal obesity in a diet-dependent manner. PMID:26961573

  20. Changes in intestinal microflora of Caenorhabditis elegans following Bacillus nematocida B16 infection

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Hui, Fengli; Kan, Yunchao; Yao, Lunguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pathogenic bacteria on a host and its symbiotic microbiota is vital and widespread in the biotic world. The soil-dwelling opportunistic bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 uses a “Trojan horse” mechanism to kill Caenorhabditis elegans. The alterations in the intestinal microflora that occur after B16 infection remain unknown. Here, we analyzed the intestinal bacteria presented in normal and infected worms. The gut microbial community experienced a complex change after B16 inoculation, as determined through marked differences in species diversity, structure, distribution and composition between uninfected and infected worms. Regardless of the worm’s origin (i.e., from soil or rotten fruits), the diversity of the intestinal microbiome decreased after infection. Firmicutes increased sharply, whereas Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria decreased to different degrees. Fusobacteria was only present 12 h post-infection. After 24 h of infection, 1228 and 1109 bacterial species were identified in the uninfected and infected groups, respectively. The shared species reached 21.97%. The infected group had a greater number of Bacillus species but a smaller number of Pediococcus, Halomonas, Escherichia and Shewanella species (P < 0.01). Therefore, this study provides the first evaluation of the alterations caused by pathogenic bacteria on symbiotic microbiota using C. elegans as the model species. PMID:26830015