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Sample records for phase 2b trial

  1. A Sequential Phase 2b Trial Design for Evaluating Vaccine Efficacy and Immune Correlates for Multiple HIV Vaccine Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Grove, Douglas; Gabriel, Erin; Huang, Ying; Gray, Glenda; Hammer, Scott M.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Self, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Five preventative HIV vaccine efficacy trials have been conducted over the last 12 years, all of which evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) to prevent HIV infection for a single vaccine regimen versus placebo. Now that one of these trials has supported partial VE of a prime-boost vaccine regimen, there is interest in conducting efficacy trials that simultaneously evaluate multiple prime-boost vaccine regimens against a shared placebo group in the same geographic region, for accelerating the pace of vaccine development. This article proposes such a design, which has main objectives (1) to evaluate VE of each regimen versus placebo against HIV exposures occurring near the time of the immunizations; (2) to evaluate durability of VE for each vaccine regimen showing reliable evidence for positive VE; (3) to expeditiously evaluate the immune correlates of protection if any vaccine regimen shows reliable evidence for positive VE; and (4) to compare VE among the vaccine regimens. The design uses sequential monitoring for the events of vaccine harm, non-efficacy, and high efficacy, selected to weed out poor vaccines as rapidly as possible while guarding against prematurely weeding out a vaccine that does not confer efficacy until most of the immunizations are received. The evaluation of the design shows that testing multiple vaccine regimens is important for providing a well-powered assessment of the correlation of vaccine-induced immune responses with HIV infection, and is critically important for providing a reasonably powered assessment of the value of identified correlates as surrogate endpoints for HIV infection. PMID:23181167

  2. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. Methods We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50–90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene–liposome complex or 0·9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Findings Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3·7%, 95% CI 0·1–7·3; p=0·046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Interpretation Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of

  3. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men

    PubMed Central

    Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; Bentley, Carter; Gilbert, Peter B.; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Gray, Glenda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study. Methods HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo) were estimated by Cox models. Results Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67%) enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections). The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001) but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62). Conclusion The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539 PMID:26368824

  4. Extended evaluation of a Phase 1/2 trial on dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival after immunizations with an advanced generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine in late stage colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Joseph P.; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S.; Rice, Adrian; Latchman, Yvette; Xu, Younong; Messerschmidt, Gerald L.; Chaudhry, Arvind; Morse, Michael A.; Jones, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    A phase 1/2 clinical trial evaluating dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival on metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients after immunotherapy with an advanced generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine was performed. We report our extended observations on long-term overall survival and further immune analyses on a subset of treated patients including assessment of cytolytic T cell responses, T-regulatory (Treg) to T-effector (Teff) cell ratios, flow cytometry on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and determination of HLA-A2 status. An overall survival of 20% (median survival of 11 months) was observed during long-term follow-up and no long-term adverse effects were reported. Cytolytic T cell responses increased after immunizations and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were induced whether or not patients were HLA-A2 positive or Ad5 immune. PBMC samples from a small subset of patients were available for follow-up immune analyses. It was observed that the levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) specific CMI activity decreased from their peak values during follow-up in 5 patients analyzed. Preliminary results revealed that activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in a post immunization sample exhibiting high CMI activity. Treg to Teff cell ratios were assessed and samples from 3 of 5 patients exhibited a decrease in Treg to Teff cell ratio during the treatment protocol. Based upon the favorable safety and immunogenicity data obtained, we plan to perform an extensive immunologic and survival analysis on mCRC patients to be enrolled in a randomized/controlled clinical trial that investigates Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) as a single agent with booster immunizations. PMID:25956394

  5. Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Phase 2B Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaperoth, Paige Thomas; Long, Anne; Carpenter, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) formation flying mission, which consists of four spacecraft flying in a tetrahedral formation, has challenging navigation requirements associated with determining and maintaining the relative separations required to meet the science requirements. The baseline navigation concept for MMS is for each spacecraft to independently estimate its position, velocity and clock states using GPS pseudorange data provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center-developed Navigator receiver and maneuver acceleration measurements provided by the spacecraft's attitude control subsystem. State estimation is performed onboard in real-time using the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System flight software, which is embedded in the Navigator receiver. The current concept of operations for formation maintenance consists of a sequence of two maintenance maneuvers that is performed every 2 weeks. Phase 2b of the MMS mission, in which the spacecraft are in 1.2 x 25 Earth radii orbits with nominal separations at apogee ranging from 30 km to 400 km, has the most challenging navigation requirements because, during this phase, GPS signal acquisition is restricted to less than one day of the 2.8-day orbit. This paper summarizes the results from high-fidelity simulations to determine if the MMS navigation requirements can be met between and immediately following the maintenance maneuver sequence in Phase 2b.

  6. Final results of the EORTC 18871/DKG 80-1 randomised phase III trial. rIFN-alpha2b versus rIFN-gamma versus ISCADOR M versus observation after surgery in melanoma patients with either high-risk primary (thickness >3 mm) or regional lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kleeberg, U R; Suciu, S; Bröcker, E B; Ruiter, D J; Chartier, C; Liénard, D; Marsden, J; Schadendorf, D; Eggermont, A M M

    2004-02-01

    Between 1988 and 1996, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Melanoma Group (EORTC-MG) performed a prospective, randomised phase III adjuvant trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of low dose recombinant interferon-alpha 2 b (rIFN-alpha2b) (1 MU) or recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma), (0.2 mg) both given subcutaneously (s.c.), every other day (qod), for 12 months in comparison with an untreated control group. The German Cancer Society (DKG) added a fourth arm with Iscador M, a popular mistletoe extract. High-risk stage II patients (thickness >3 mm) and stage III patients (positive lymph nodes) without distant metastasis were randomised and followed until their first progression or death. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed. From 1988 to 1996, a total of 830 patients were randomised: 423 in the three-arm EORTC 18871 trial and 407 patients in the four-arm DKG 80-1 trial. The median follow-up was 8.2 years and a total of 537 relapses and 475 deaths were reported. At 8 years, the disease-free interval (DFI) rate was 32.4% and the overall survival (OS) rate was 40.0%. In terms of the DFI, the hazard ratio estimates (95% Confidence Intervals (CI)) were: 1.04 (0.84, 1.30) for the comparison of rIFN-alpha2b versus control, 0.96 (0.77, 1.20) for rIFN-gamma versus control, and 1.32 (0.93, 1.87) for Iscador M versus control. In terms of OS, the corresponding estimates (95% CI) for the 3 treatment comparisons were: for IFN-alpha2b 0.96 (0.76, 1.21), for rIFN-gamma 0.87 (0.69, 1.10) and for Iscador M 1.21 (0.84, 1.75), respectively. The results show no clinical benefit for adjuvant treatment with low dose rIFN-alpha2b or rIFN-gamma or with Iscador M in high-risk melanoma patients. PMID:14746858

  7. Extended evaluation of a phase 1/2 trial on dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival after immunizations with an advanced-generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine in late-stage colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Balint, Joseph P; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Rice, Adrian; Latchman, Yvette; Xu, Younong; Messerschmidt, Gerald L; Chaudhry, Arvind; Morse, Michael A; Jones, Frank R

    2015-08-01

    A phase 1/2 clinical trial evaluating dosing, safety, immunogenicity, and overall survival on metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients after immunotherapy with an advanced-generation Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) vaccine was performed. We report our extended observations on long-term overall survival and further immune analyses on a subset of treated patients including assessment of cytolytic T cell responses, T regulatory (Treg) to T effector (Teff) cell ratios, flow cytometry on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and determination of HLA-A2 status. An overall survival of 20 % (median survival 11 months) was observed during long-term follow-up, and no long-term adverse effects were reported. Cytolytic T cell responses increased after immunizations, and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were induced whether or not patients were HLA-A2 positive or Ad5 immune. PBMC samples from a small subset of patients were available for follow-up immune analyses. It was observed that the levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific CMI activity decreased from their peak values during follow-up in five patients analyzed. Preliminary results revealed that activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in a post-immunization sample exhibiting high CMI activity. Treg to Teff cell ratios were assessed, and samples from three of five patients exhibited a decrease in Treg to Teff cell ratio during the treatment protocol. Based upon the favorable safety and immunogenicity data obtained, we plan to perform an extensive immunologic and survival analysis on mCRC patients to be enrolled in a randomized/controlled clinical trial that investigates Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D) as a single agent with booster immunizations. PMID:25956394

  8. H-T Phase Diagram of Flux Line Lattice Structure in YNi2B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, N.; Tsukagoshi, H.; Yano, F.; Nagata, T.; Kawano-Furukawa, H.; Yoshizawa, H.; Yethiraj, M.; Takeya, H.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-09-01

    The detailed flux line lattice (FLL) structure in YNi2B2C was investigated using small angle neutron scattering and the complete H-T phase diagram was determined. The FLL in YNi2B2C shows a change of symmetry only in the low magnetic field region between 0.05 to 0.2 T. The observed square lattice is governed by an anisotropic Fermi velocity. Contrary to the theoretical prediction, a square lattice driven by an anisotropic superconducting gap does not appear below 5 T.

  9. The Preparation and Characterization of INTEC Phase 2b Composition Variation Study Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Staples; B. A. Scholes; L. L. Torres; C. A. Musick; B. R. Boyle; D. K. Peeler; J. D. Vienna

    2000-02-01

    The second phase of the composition variation study (CVS) for the development of glass compositions to immobilize Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) high level wastes (HLW) is complete. This phase of the CVS addressed waste composition of high activity waste fractions (HAW) from the initial separations flowsheet. Updated estimates if INTEC calcined HLW compositions and of high activity waste fractions proposed to be separated from dissolved calcine were used as the waste component for this CVS phase. These wastes are of particular interest because high aluminum, calcium, zirconium, fluorine, potassium, and low iron and sodium content places them outside the vitrification experience in the Department of Energy complex. Because of the presence of calcium and fluorine, two major zirconia calcine components not addressed in Phase I, a series of scooping tests, designated Phase 2a, were performed. The results of these tests provided information on the effects of calcium and fluoride solubility and their impacts on product properties and composition boundary information for Phase 2b. Details and results of Phase 2a are reported separately. Through application of statistical techniques and the results of Phase 2a, a test matrix was defined for Phase 2b of the CVS. From this matrix, formulations were systematically selected for preparation and characterization with respect to visual and optical homogeneity, viscosity as a function of melt temperature, liquidus temperature (TL), and leaching properties based on response to the product consistency test. The results of preparing and characterizing the Phase 2b glasses are presented in this document. Based on the results, several formulations investigated have suitable properties for further development. A full analysis of the composition-product characteristic relationship of glasses being developed for immobilizing INTEC wastes will be performed at the completion of composition-property relationship

  10. The behaviors of anatase and TiO2(B) phase coexisting nanosheets under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanwei; Li, Wentao; Ren, Xiangting; Yu, Zhenhai; Samanta, Sudeshna; Yan, Shuai; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Lin

    2016-03-01

    High pressure behaviors of anatase TiO2 and TiO2(B) coexisting nanosheets were investigated using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction revealed that upon compression an α-PbO2 phase appeared at 11.4 GPa, and then the baddeleyite phase appeared at 23.6 GPa. Upon decompression the anatase phase still existed obviously and TiO2(B) phase almost cannot be observed. The Raman spectrum at ambient pressure presented the typical curve of anatase TiO2, however the pressure dependence for compression and decompression did not show the common phase transion from anatase to α-PbO2 or to baddeleyite. This is different from high pressure behaviors of other TiO2 nanostructures and could be attributed to the existence of small amount of TiO2(B) at the starting materials. The pressure relationship of the Raman frequencies shift slope indicated the coexistence nanosheet has high incompressibility compared with other TiO2 nanomaterials and corresponding bulks.

  11. Safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of VGX-3100, a therapeutic synthetic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus 16 and 18 E6 and E7 proteins for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b trial

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Cornelia L; Morrow, Matthew P; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Shen, Xuefei; Dallas, Michael; Yan, Jian; Edwards, Lance; Parker, R Lamar; Denny, Lynette; Giffear, Mary; Brown, Ami Shah; Marcozzi-Pierce, Kathleen; Shah, Divya; Slager, Anna M; Sylvester, Albert J; Khan, Amir; Broderick, Kate E; Juba, Robert J; Herring, Timothy A; Boyer, Jean; Lee, Jessica; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite preventive vaccines for oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is common, and current treatments are ablative and can lead to long-term reproductive morbidity. We assessed whether VGX-3100, synthetic plasmids targeting HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 and E7 proteins, delivered by electroporation, would cause histopathological regression in women with CIN2/3. Methods Efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of VGX-3100 were assessed in CIN2/3 associated with HPV-16 and HPV-18, in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b study. Patients from 36 academic and private gynaecology practices in seven countries were randomised (3:1) to receive 6 mg VGX-3100 or placebo (1 mL), given intramuscularly at 0, 4, and 12 weeks. Randomisation was stratified by age (<25 vs ≥25 years) and CIN2 versus CIN3 by computer-generated allocation sequence (block size 4). Funder and site personnel, participants, and pathologists were masked to treatment. The primary efficacy endpoint was regression to CIN1 or normal pathology 36 weeks after the first dose. Per-protocol and modified intention-to-treat analyses were based on patients receiving three doses without protocol violations, and on patients receiving at least one dose, respectively. The safety population included all patients who received at least one dose. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT01304524) and EudraCT (number 2012-001334-33). Findings Between Oct 19, 2011, and July 30, 2013, 167 patients received either VGX-3100 (n=125) or placebo (n=42). In the per-protocol analysis 53 (49.5%) of 107 VGX-3100 recipients and 11 (30.6%) of 36 placebo recipients had histopathological regression (percentage point difference 19.0 [95% CI 1.4–36.6]; p=0.034). In the modified intention-to-treat analysis 55 (48.2%) of 114 VGX-3100 recipients and 12 (30.0%) of 40 placebo recipients had histopathological regression (percentage point difference 18.2 [95% CI

  12. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Charbonneau, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear

  13. Complex Structures in the Reentrant Phase Diagram of HoNi_2B_2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, J.; Zhang, J.; Olinger, A., Jr.; Metlushko, V.; Delong, L.; Canfield, P.

    1996-03-01

    HoNi_2B_2C exhibits a resistive onset to superconductivity near 9.0 K, followed by transitions to incommensurate magnetic order (IMO) at 6.0 K and 5.5 K, and commensurate antiferromagnetic order (AFM) at TN = 5.2 K. Vibrating reed (VR) and resistance data reveal two previously unobserved lines of magnetic anomalies in both the upper superconducting (SC) and lower reentrant SC regions for H || a*b*. The wide region between the upper onset of SC and the first magnetic anomaly reflects weak vortex pinning, possibly due to a subtle buildup of IMO from well above 8K. The interplay between SC and magnetic order is evident in abrupt displacements of transition lines to IMO near their crossing with the reentrant normal transition line for 5.2phase transitions. * Funded by NSF Grant #EHR-9108764 ** Funded by DoE DER/OBS Contract #W-7405-Eng-82

  14. Magnetic and superconducting phase diagrams in ErNi2B2C

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, J.A.; Crespo, M.; Guillamon, I.; Suderow, Hermann; Vieira, S.; Garcia Hernandez, M.; Budko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul

    2012-03-30

    We present measurements of the superconducting upper critical field Hc2(T) and the magneticphasediagram of the superconductor ErNi2B2C made with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The magnetic field was applied in the basal plane of the tetragonal crystal structure. We have found large gapless regions in the superconductingphasediagram of ErNi2B2C, extending between different magnetic transitions. A close correlation between magnetic transitions and Hc2(T) is found, showing that superconductivity is strongly linked to magnetism.

  15. Pressure effect on magnetic phase transition and spin-glass-like behavior of GdCo2B2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guang-Hui, Hu; Ling-Wei, Li; Umehara, Izuru

    2016-06-01

    We systematically investigate the effect of pressure on the magnetic properties of GdCo2B2 on the basis of alternating current (AC) susceptibility, AC heat capacity and electrical resistivity measurements under pressures up to 2.2 GPa. A detailed magnetic phase diagram under pressure is determined. GdCo2B2 exhibits three anomalies that apparently reflect magnetic phase transitions, respectively, at temperatures T C = 20.5 K, T 1 = 18.0 K and T N = 11.5 K under ambient pressure. Under pressures up to 2.2 GPa, these anomalies are observed to slightly increase at T C and T 1, and they coincide with each other above 1.6 GPa. Conversely, they decrease at T N and disappear under pressures higher than 1.4 GPa. The results indicate that the low-temperature magnetic phases can be easily suppressed by pressure. Moreover, the spin-glass-like behavior of GdCo2B2 is examined in terms of magnetization, aging effect and frequency dependence of AC susceptibility. A separation between the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetization curves becomes evident at a low magnetic field of 0.001 T. A long-time relaxation behavior is observed at 4 K. The freezing temperature T f increases with frequency increasing. Project supported by JSPS KAKENHI (Grant No. 24540366, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)).

  16. Interferon-alpha 2b quantification in inclusion bodies using reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography (RP-UPLC).

    PubMed

    Cueto-Rojas, H F; Pérez, N O; Pérez-Sánchez, G; Ocampo-Juárez, I; Medina-Rivero, E

    2010-04-15

    Interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha 2b) is a recombinant therapeutic cytokine produced as inclusion bodies using a strain of Escherichia coli as expression system. After fermentation and recovery, it is necessary to know the amount of recombinant IFN-alpha 2b, in order to determine the yield and the load for solubilization, and chromatographic protein purification steps. The present work details the validation of a new short run-time and fast sample-preparation method to quantify IFN-alpha 2b in inclusion bodies using Reversed Phase-Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-UPLC). The developed method demonstrated an accuracy of 100.28%; the relative standard deviations for method precision, repeatability and inter-day precision tests were found to be 0.57%, 1.54% and 1.83%, respectively. Linearity of the method was assessed in the range of concentrations from 0.05 mg/mL to 0.5 mg/mL, the curve obtained had a determination coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9989. Detection and quantification limits were found to be 0.008 mg/mL and 0.025 mg/mL, respectively. The method also demonstrated robustness for changes in column temperature, and specificity against host proteins and other recombinant protein expressed in the same E. coli strain. PMID:20299292

  17. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of bicrystal phase TiO2 nanotubes containing TiO2-B and anatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanxi; Zhu, Kerong; Qi, Mengyao; Zhuang, Yonglong; Cheng, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Bicrystal phase TiO2 nanotubes (NTS) containing monoclinic TiO2-B and anatase were prepared by the hydrothermal reaction of anatase nanoparticles with NaOH aqueous solution and a heat treatment. Their structure was characterized by XRD, TEM and Raman spectra. The results showed that the bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS were formed after calcining H2Ti4O9·H2O NTS at 573 K. The bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS exhibit significantly higher photocatalytic activity than the single phase anatase NTS and Dessuga P-25 nanoparticles in the degradation of Methyl Orange aqueous solution under ultraviolet light irradiation, which is attributed to the large surface and interface areas of the bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS.

  18. Cytomegalovirus vaccine: phase II clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Steininger, C

    2014-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most significant viral pathogens during pregnancy and in immunocompromised patients. Antiviral prophylactic strategies are limited by toxicities, drug-drug interactions and development of antiviral resistance. A safe and protective vaccine against CMV is highly desirable in view of the potential positive impact on CMV-associated morbidity and mortality as well as healthcare costs. Unfortunately, this demand could not be met in the past four decades although development of a CMV vaccine has been ranked at the highest priority by the US Institute of Medicine. Multiple different vaccine candidates have been developed and evaluated in phase I clinical trials and few succeeded to phase II trials. Nevertheless, two different vaccines showed recently promising results in trials that studied healthy adults and immunocompromised solid-organ and bone-marrow transplant recipients, respectively. The gB/MF59 vaccine exhibited a vaccine efficacy of 50% in healthy, postpartum females. In transplant patients, gB/MF59 and the DNA vaccine TransVax both limited the periods of viraemia and consequently the need for antiviral treatment. The success of these trials is encouraging and will probably give new impetus to the development of an effective CMV vaccine. Sterilizing immunity may not be attainable in the near future and may not be necessary for a CMV vaccine to have a significant impact on health care as discussed in the present review. PMID:24283990

  19. Complex high-temperature phase transitions in Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Verdal, Nina; Her, Jae-Hyuk; Stavila, Vitalie; Soloninin, Alexei V.; Babanova, Olga A.; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.; Rush, John J.

    2014-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} indicate hysteretic transformations to high-temperature phases at ≈615 K and 529 K, respectively, upon heating (1 K/min) from room temperature. X-ray and neutron powder diffraction measurements corroborate the phase-change behavior. For Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data are consistent with a previous study suggesting that the overall face-centered-cubic arrangement of icosahedral B{sub 12}H{sub 12}{sup 2−} anions is maintained upon transformation to the high-temperature polymorph, although the anions are now orientationally disordered and the Li{sup +} cations crystallographically disordered within an enlarged lattice. For Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data indicate the existence of three different high-temperature phases in addition to the known low-temperature monoclinic phase. The highest-temperature structure possesses Im3{sup -}m symmetry and exhibits a body-centered-cubic arrangement of orientationally disordered anions. The interstitial, disordered Na{sup +} cations appear to favor off-center positions within the distorted tetrahedral sites formed by the anions in this structure. An intermediate Pm3{sup -}n-symmetric phase at lower temperature is the result of a partial ordering of this higher-temperature structure. A third, minor, face-centered-cubic phase coexists with these high-temperature polymorphs. {sup 1}H NMR measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} reveal an approximately two-orders-of-magnitude increase in the reorientational jump rate of the anions in both cases upon transformation to their high-temperature structures. The enhanced anion mobilities were corroborated by neutron scattering fixed-window scans across the respective phase boundaries. The inherent cation disorder associated with these high-temperature polymorphs suggests their potential use as superionic

  20. Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis due to Hepatitis C Virus (CH-C) in India: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Daily Interferon-alfa-2b and Ribavirin with Daily Interferon-alfa-2b and Glycyrrhizin—A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Subrat K; Sreenivas, V; Gupta, Siddharth Datta; Kumar, Shakti; Chawla, Yogesh K; Tandon, Anurag; Habeeb, Aejaz; Kar, Premashish; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Sarin, Shiv K; Amarapurkar, DN; Arankalle, Vidya; Gupte, Mohan D; Gupta, Sushma; Mukherjee, Deepali; Seth, Divya; Goyal, Rohit; Tandon, Badri N

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Pegylated-interferon-alfa (PEG-IFN-α) with ribavirin is an established treatment in chronic hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) (CH-C). Such treatment is expensive and in resource-poor countries such as India, alternative less expensive therapy is needed. Methods Multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing two treatment regimens (interferon-alfa-2b [IFN-α-2b] 3 million unit/day [MU/day] and ribavirin 1000 mg/day [I+R] vs IFN-α-2b 3 MU/day and glycyrrhizin 250 mg [I+G]) in CH-C. Viral, host characteristics and therapeutic responses were assessed (ICMR—6 months trial for chronic hepatitis—CTRI/2008/091/000105). Results One hundred and thirty-one patients meeting the inclusion criteria were randomized to I + G (n=64) or I+R (n=67) during the period February 2002 to May 2005. About 85% (I+G=53, I+R=58) completed 6 months of treatment and 89% of them (I+G=46, I+R=53) completed 6 months of follow-up after completion of treatment. Hepatitis C virus genotype 3 was the major type detected (71% patients). The mean log10 viral load (copies/mL), histological activity index, and fibrosis stage for all patients were 5.1 ± 0.98, 5 ± 2, and 2± 1.5, respectively. Sustained viral response (SVR) was significantly higher in I + R group than in I + G group (65.7% vs 46.9%, OR=2.2, P = 0.03). Treatment with I + G was associated with significantly lower frequencies of leukopenia (2% vs 17%, P <0.01) and anemia (8% vs 40%, P <0.001) as compared to treatment with I + R. Conclusion Genotype 3 HCV infection with low viral load is prevalent in India. Daily IFN with ribavirin showed significantly better responses. Leukopenia and anemia were significantly more in ribavirin group. Responses observed with IFN + ribavirin were similar to the reported response rates with PEG-IFN suggesting that this modality may be considered as a cheaper alternative of treatment for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:25755401

  1. Phase 2B experimental design for the INEEL glass composition variation study

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.

    2000-08-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Offices of Science and Technology (through the Tanks Focus Area [TFA]) and Waste Management are sponsoring a partnership among Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for a collaborative glass composition variation study (CVS). The purpose of the CVS is to investigate property - composition relationships within a glass-composition region compatible with the expected range of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) high-activity wastes (HAWs). The CVS has been conducted in phases to allow INEEL, PNNL, and SRTC researchers to adjust the glass composition region of interest as flowsheet options are refined and/or waste-stream compositions become more defined.

  2. Hospice benefits and phase I cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Byock, Ira; Miles, Steven H

    2003-02-18

    Medicare denies hospice coverage to patients with terminal illnesses who enroll as participants in phase I studies, which assess the toxicity and dosing of potential treatments for incurable diseases. Federal regulations require patients to forgo curative therapies, and they interpret phase I agents as treatment for the terminal condition for which hospice care was elected. Thus, by enrolling as a participant in a phase I trial, a patient otherwise eligible for hospice is rendered ineligible. Private insurers have similar provisions for children and adults younger than 65 years of age. Such exclusions are not defensible on ethical or clinical grounds. Policymakers, insurers, and institutional review boards all have a role in resolving this problem. PMID:12585832

  3. Improving Alzheimer's disease phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry D; Carrillo, Maria C; Ryan, J Michael; Gold, Michael; Gallagher, Kim; Grundman, Michael; Berman, Robert M; Ashwood, Timothy; Siemers, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many drugs have been studied as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease, but only four have demonstrated sufficient efficacy to be approved as treatments, of which three are in the same class. This lack of success has raised questions both in the pharmaceutical industry and academia about the future of Alzheimer's disease therapy. The high cost and low success rate of drug development across many disease areas can be attributed, in large part, to late-stage clinical failures (Schachter and Ramoni, Nat Rev Drug Discov 2007;6:107-8). Thus, identifying in phase II, or preferably phase I, drugs that are likely to fail would have a dramatic impact on the costs associated with developing new drugs. With this in mind, the Alzheimer's Association convened a Research Roundtable on June 23 and 24, 2011, in Washington, DC, bringing together scientists from academia, industry, and government regulatory agencies to discuss strategies for improving the probability of phase II trial results predicting success when considering the go/no-go decision-making process leading to the initiation of phase III. PMID:23164548

  4. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Supplementation During HCV Therapy With Pegylated Interferon-α 2b Plus Ribavirin: Effect on Work Performance; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Pennisi, Manuela; Gagliano, Caterina; Vacante, Marco; Malaguarnera, Michele; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Bertino, Gaetano; Caraci, Filippo; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Background: The health status of employees with chronic hepatitis C has major implications for organizations and labour market. Objectives: To assess the effects of Acetyl-L-Carnitine administration on work productivity, daily activity, and fatigue in subjects with chronic hepatitis C treated with Pegylated-Interferon-α2b and Ribavirin. Patients and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, placebo controlled, double blind clinical trial, 30 subjects (Group A) with chronic hepatitis, received Pegylated-Interferon-α2b (1.5 mg/kg per week) plus Ribavirin and placebo, while 32 subjects (Group B) received the same dosage of Pegylated-Interferon-α2b plus Ribavirin plus 2g Acetyl-L-Carnitine twice per day, for 12 months. Work productivity loss, impairment in daily activities, presenteeism, absenteeism, have been assessed using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire. We also evaluated severity of fatigue, mental fatigue and physical fatigue. Results: Significant difference were observed in physical fatigue, mental fatigue and severity of fatigue, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and viremia after 12 months treatment. In Group B we observed a significant decrease of presenteeism and daily activity impairment after 6 months, 12 months and at follow up. A significant increase of work productivity was observed after 12 months and at follow up. Conclusions: Office workers with chronic hepatitis C, treated with Pegylated-Interferon-α2b plus Ribavirin, had work performance loss. In subjects treated with Acetyl-L-Carnitine supplementation we observed increased daily activity and reduced presenteeism and fatigue. Acetyl-L-Carnitinegroup had a smaller reduction of productivity comparing to placebo group. PMID:24910702

  5. Improving the operational efficiency of Phase 2 and 3 trials.

    PubMed

    Ganju, Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    The period toward the end of patients' participation in late stage blinded clinical trials is highly resource intensive for the sponsor. Consider first a Phase 3 trial. If the trial is a success, the sponsor has to implement the next steps, which might be filing for approval of the drug with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To shorten the time interval between trial completion and submission of the package to the FDA, sponsors front-load as much work as is possible at risk. The approach is efficient if the trial succeeds but is inefficient if it fails. For a failed trial, the sponsor is unlikely to proceed with the plan that assumed success. Phase 2 trials are also at risk of being inefficient. Many activities, such as planning for drug interaction studies, thorough QT studies, or site selection for Phase 3 trials, are set in motion prior to completion of the Phase 2 trial. The work going on in parallel is wasted if the trial fails. The proposal to improve the efficiency is to let an independent entity provide the sponsor critical information at an earlier time necessary to reevaluate activities ongoing in parallel and external to the trial. PMID:27439520

  6. Hydrothermal phase stability study of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Jeffrey J.; Matthew Mann, J.; Zens, Timothy W.C.; McClory, John W.

    2014-08-15

    Growth of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} by the hydrothermal method was attempted in 10{sup −6} M LiOH, by both spontaneous nucleation and transport growth. Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} grew out of the first spontaneous nucleation reaction, while the seed dissolved and γ-LiBO{sub 2} formed during the transport growth reactions. A species thermodynamic stability study showed that γ-LiBO{sub 2} formed exclusively from 350 °C to 550 °C, and Li{sub 3}B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2} was observed at 250 °C; Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was not observed. A solubility study on Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} did not achieve equilibrium conditions, but did demonstrate that γ-LiBO{sub 2} is significantly more thermodynamically stable than Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} under the tested conditions. Formation of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} hydrothermally was shown to result from kinetic growth. - Graphical abstract: Every boron in lithium γ-metaborate is tetrahedrally coordinated with oxygen, and each tetrahedron is linked to four other tetrahedrons, creating a strong B-O lattice surrounding the lithium atoms. - Highlights: • Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was grown hydrothermally via spontaneous nucleation in 10{sup −6} M LiOH. • γ-LiBO{sub 2} formed from 350 °C to 550 °C and Li{sub 3}B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2} was observed at 250 °C. • A solubility study showed γ-LiBO{sub 2} to be more thermodynamically stable than Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. • Hydrothermal formation of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was shown to result from kinetic growth.

  7. Participants' perceptions of a phase I colon cancer chemoprevention trial.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, K S; Stoltzfus, C; Chamberlain, R M; Lorimor, R J; Steinbach, G; Winn, R J

    1996-12-01

    To assess participants' perceptions of a phase I colon cancer chemoprevention trial using a calcium intervention, questionnaires were mailed to trial participants at the conclusion of the study. Responses to questionnaire items reported here include (1) perceived benefits and barriers of participation, (2) interest in participating in future trials, (3) willingness to pay trial expenses out of pocket, and (4) posttrial continuation of the calcium regimen. The study found that the most highly rated trial benefit was the perception of potential colon cancer prevention; the trial barrier reported to be the most troublesome was inappropriate or mistaken billing for study visits. Three fourths of the subjects expressed an interest in future trials of the same duration. For trials of longer duration, this percentage decreased to 66%. Approximately half did not object to participation in future trials involving placebos, and just over one third indicated that they would either definitely (8%) or probably (27%) have joined the calcium trial even if they had to pay some study expenses out of pocket. Over 90% indicated they would continue taking the calcium pills if calcium is shown to be effective. The level of perceived benefits was positively associated with reported interest in participating in future trials of the same and longer durations, and the level of reported difficulty with trial pills and procedures was inversely related to interest in future placebo-controlled trials. The results of this study, in conjunction with results of prospective studies of trial participation, may be applied in future chemoprevention trials to facilitate recruitment, reduce attrition, and promote positive trial experiences for participants by emphasizing frequently reported benefits and minimizing frequently reported barriers. PMID:8974209

  8. Ongoing EEG Phase as a Trial-by-Trial Predictor of Perceptual and Attentional Variability

    PubMed Central

    VanRullen, R.; Busch, N. A.; Drewes, J.; Dubois, Julien

    2011-01-01

    Even in well-controlled laboratory environments, apparently identical repetitions of an experimental trial can give rise to highly variable perceptual outcomes and behavioral responses. This variability is generally discarded as a reflection of intrinsic noise in neuronal systems. However, part of this variability may be accounted for by trial-by-trial fluctuations of the phase of ongoing oscillations at the moment of stimulus presentation. For example, the phase of an electro-encephalogram (EEG) oscillation reflecting the rapid waxing and waning of sustained attention can predict the perception of a subsequent visual stimulus at threshold. Similar ongoing periodicities account for a portion of the trial-by-trial variability of visual reaction times. We review the available experimental evidence linking ongoing EEG phase to perceptual and attentional variability, and the corresponding methodology. We propose future tests of this relation, and discuss the theoretical implications for understanding the neuronal dynamics of sensory perception. PMID:21716580

  9. Phase I trials of antitumour agents: fundamental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Toloi, Diego de Araujo; Jardim, Denis Leonardo Fontes; Hoff, Paulo Marcelo Gehm; Riechelmann, Rachel Simões Pimenta

    2015-01-01

    Phase I trials are an important step in the development of new drugs. Because of the advancing knowledge of cancer’s molecular biology, these trials offer an important platform for the development of new agents and also for patient treatment. Therefore, comprehension of their peculiar terminology and methodology are increasingly important. Our objectives were to review the fundamental concepts of phase I designs and to critically contextualise this type of study as a therapeutic option for patients with refractory cancer. PMID:25729414

  10. The Myth of Equipoise in Phase 1 Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Shamoo, Adil E.

    2008-01-01

    Phase 1 clinical research trials using healthy volunteers are conducted for the sole purpose of serving the public good (a utilitarian concept). The literature on equipoise analysis does not exclude phase 1 trials with controls or healthy volunteers from the claim of being in “equipoise.” The continued perpetuation of this ethically and scientifically invalid concept undermines the ethics of research with human subjects. PMID:19099004

  11. Efficacy, Safety, and Dose of Pafuramidine, a New Oral Drug for Treatment of First Stage Sleeping Sickness, in a Phase 2a Clinical Study and Phase 2b Randomized Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Christian; Yeramian, Patrick D.; Merolle, Ada; Serge, Kazadi Kyanza; Mpanya, Alain; Lutumba, Pascal; Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Lubaki, Jean-Pierre Fina; Mpoto, Alfred Mpoo; Thompson, Mark; Munungu, Blaise Fungula; Josenando, Théophilo; Bernhard, Sonja C.; Olson, Carol A.; Blum, Johannes; Tidwell, Richard R.; Pohlig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis [HAT]) is caused by protozoan parasites and characterized by a chronic progressive course, which may last up to several years before death. We conducted two Phase 2 studies to determine the efficacy and safety of oral pafuramidine in African patients with first stage HAT. Methods The Phase 2a study was an open-label, non-controlled, proof-of-concept study where 32 patients were treated with 100 mg of pafuramidine orally twice a day (BID) for 5 days at two trypanosomiasis reference centers (Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo [DRC]) between August 2001 and November 2004. The Phase 2b study compared pafuramidine in 41 patients versus standard pentamidine therapy in 40 patients. The Phase 2b study was open-label, parallel-group, controlled, randomized, and conducted at two sites in the DRC between April 2003 and February 2007. The Phase 2b study was then amended to add an open-label sequence (Phase 2b-2), where 30 patients received pafuramidine for 10 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was parasitologic cure at 24 hours (Phase 2a) or 3 months (Phase 2b) after treatment completion. The primary safety outcome was the rate of occurrence of World Health Organization Toxicity Scale Grade 3 or higher adverse events. All subjects provided written informed consent. Findings/Conclusion Pafuramidine for the treatment of first stage HAT was comparable in efficacy to pentamidine after 10 days of dosing. The cure rates 3 months post-treatment were 79% in the 5-day pafuramidine, 100% in the 7-day pentamidine, and 93% in the 10-day pafuramidine groups. In Phase 2b, the percentage of patients with at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event was notably higher after pentamidine treatment (93%) than pafuramidine treatment for 5 days (25%) and 10 days (57%). These results support continuation of the development program for pafuramidine into Phase 3. PMID:26881924

  12. One-step hydrothermal conversion of VO2(B) into W-doped VO2(M) and its phase transition and optical switching properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifu; Zhang, Xiongzhi; Huang, Yu; Huang, Chi; Niu, Fei; Meng, Changgong; Tan, Xiaoyu

    2014-02-01

    W-doped monoclinic vanadium dioxide VO2(M) nanobelts have been transformed from VO2(B) nanobelts in the presence of tungstic acid by a facile one-step hydrothermal route for the first time. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and variable-temperature infrared spectroscopy (IR). The results show that W atoms are doped into the crystal lattice of VO2(M) matrix, and the morphology and size of the as-obtained VO2(M) nanobelts are dependent on that of the precursor VO2(B). The phase transition temperature (Tc) of W-doped VO2(M) can be tuned by W doping. The variable-temperature IR reveals that the as-synthesized W-doped VO2(M) nanobelts have outstanding thermochromic characters and optical switching properties.

  13. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups. PMID:25904313

  14. Phase I and Phase II Objective Response Rates are Correlated in Pediatric Cancer Trials: An Argument for Better Clinical Trial Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jonathan C; Huang, Peng; Cohen, Kenneth J

    2016-07-01

    Although many phase I trials report tumor response, formal analysis of efficacy is deferred to phase II. We reviewed paired phase I and II pediatric oncology trials to ascertain the relationship between phase I and II objective response rate (OR%). Single-agent phase I trials were paired with corresponding phase II trials (comparable study drug, dosing schedule, and population). Phase I trials without efficacy data or a matching phase II trial were excluded. OR% was tabulated for all trials, and phase II authors' subjective conclusions regarding efficacy were documented; 35 pairs of trials were analyzed. The correlation between phase I and II OR% was 0.93. Between phase II studies with a "positive" conclusion versus a "negative" one, there was a statistically significant difference in mean phase I OR% (32.0% vs. 4.5%, P<0.001). Thirteen phase II studies were undertaken despite phase I OR% of 0%; only 1 had a "positive" conclusion, and none exceeded OR% of 15%. OR% are highly correlated between phase I and II pediatric oncology trials. Although not a formal measure of drug efficacy, phase I OR% may provide an estimate of phase II response, inform phase II study design, and should be given greater consideration. PMID:27164535

  15. Thirty years of phase I radiochemotherapy trials: Latest development.

    PubMed

    Rivoirard, Romain; Vallard, Alexis; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Ben Mrad, Majed; Wang, Guoping; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Diao, Peng; Dubanchet, Alexandre; Deutsch, Eric; Rancoule, Chloe; Magne, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Radiochemotherapy is undergoing a complete expansion. Currently, possibilities of treatment combination are skyrocketting, with different anticancer and targeted molecules, different radiotherapy techniques, and dose escalation with each therapy. The development of a modern phase I radiochemotherapy trial becomes more and more complex and should be fully investigated. In the literature, there are no exhaustive reviews describing the necessity of their characteristics. The present article explores historical and current phase I clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and anticancer therapies. Selected trials were identified by searching in PubMed databases. A total of 228 studies were identified in the last three decades, and a portrait of their characteristics is presented. As expected, most frequently studied malignancies were head and neck cancers, followed by non-small cell lung cancer and brain cancer. Toxicity is reported in more than 90% of the studies. Most studies were published since 2010, at the area of targeted therapies, but mainly concerned classical chemotherapies (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil). The present review highlights some limits. Indeed, methodology seems not optimised and could be based on more accurate methods of dose-escalation. The present portrait of phase I radiochemotherapy trials suggests that radiochemotherapy notion must be reinvented and trials should be adapted to its complexity. Step by step method does not sound like an option anymore. Let us build the future of radiochemotherapy on past evidences. PMID:26922167

  16. Efficacy and Tolerability of Peginterferon α-2a and Peginterferon α-2b, Both plus Ribavirin, for Chronic Hepatitis C: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Liping; Yang, Lei; Chen, Xiaorong

    2013-01-01

    Background. The efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon α-2a and peginterferon α-2b in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients remain controversial. Methods. PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane libraries were electronically searched until August 30, 2012. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated by two reviewers independently. Results. The overall sustained virologic response (SVR) rate of the peginterferon α-2a group was significantly higher than that of the peginterferon α-2b group (46.7% versus 42.4%, P value = 0.01). The same tendency was observed for naïve, genotype 1/4, and genotype 2/3 patients. The early virologic response (EVR) and end-of-treatment response (ETR) rates were significantly higher in the peginterferon α-2a group than in the peginterferon α-2b group (56.1% versus 49.8%, P < 0.0001; 67.9% versus 56.6%, P < 0.00001, resp.). Peginterferon α-2a had a significantly lower discontinuation rate than peginterferon α-2b (27.9% versus 33.9%, P < 0.0001) in naïve patients. In both naïve CHC and hepatitis C virus genotype 1 patients, peginterferon α-2a had a higher relapse rate than peginterferon α-2b. Conclusions. Peginterferon α-2a has superior efficacy with higher EVR, ETR, and SVR than peginterferon α-2b for CHC patients, both plus ribavirin. Peginterferon α-2a might obtain a similar or even lower discontinuation rate than peginterferon α-2b. However, peginterferon α-2a had a higher relapse rate than peginterferon α-2b. PMID:23662098

  17. Simultaneous determination of vitamins B1, B2, B6, and niacinamide in multivitamin pharmaceutical preparations by paired-ion reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kwok, R P; Rose, W P; Tabor, R; Pattison, T S

    1981-09-01

    A high-pressure liquid chromatographic procedure for the simultaneous determination of vitamins B1, B2, B6, and niacinamide in multivitamin pharmaceutical preparations was developed and evaluated. The method uses paired-ion reversed-phase partition chromatography for baseline separation of the four water-soluble vitamins. This method was applied to the analysis of a multivitamin and multivitamin-multimineral tablets, and a technique was developed to reduce vitamin adsorption by the minerals. The results obtained by this method were compared with those obtained by the official methods. It was concluded that this method is fast, accurate, specific, and suitable for routine quality control use. PMID:6101144

  18. The rapid enrollment design for Phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Wang, Yunfei; Foster, Matthew C

    2016-07-10

    We propose a dose-finding design for Phase I oncology trials where each new patient is assigned to the dose most likely to be the target dose given observed data. The main model assumption is that the dose-toxicity curve is non-decreasing. This method is beneficial when it is desirable to assign a patient to a dose as soon as the patient is enrolled into a study. To prevent assignments to doses with limited toxicity information in fast accruing trials we propose a conservative rule that assigns temporary fractional toxicities to patients still in follow-up. We also recommend always using a safety rule in any fast accruing dose-finding trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26833922

  19. Intraocular pressure efficacy of glaucoma medications versus placebo in phase II compared to later phase trials.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, R Allan; Nelson, Lindsay A; Stewart, Jeanette A; Stewart, William C

    2013-02-01

    This review aimed to compare the predictive value between the untreated reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) from baseline or placebo measured in early phase clinical trials to phase III and IV results for glaucoma medicines. Published, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel, single-masked or double-masked clinical trials with at least one phase II, III and IV study available were reviewed. This study included 50 articles evaluating 9 medicines from 59 active arms and 18 placebo arms. For all studies the phase II IOP reduction from placebo showed less decrease compared to the decrease from baseline (p<0.04). For all medicines, reductions from morning baseline in phase II did not predict better than the decrease from placebo for phase III (p=0.15) or IV (p=0.08) reductions in IOP. In contrast, diurnal IOP reduction from baseline in phase II predicted decreases better than placebo in phase III (p=0.007) and IV (p=0.02). Generally, for prostaglandins, β blockers and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors for the morning trough and diurnal curve there was no difference in pressure reduction from baseline for phase II compared to phase III or IV (p≥0.23). In contrast, where comparisons were available for the decrease in pressure from placebo there were differences for phase II compared to phase III and phase IV (p≤0.02). This study suggests that in early phase glaucoma trials, using the reduction from untreated baseline in general better approximates the results of later regulatory and post-commercialisation trials than the decrease from placebo. PMID:23060621

  20. Are licensed canine parvovirus (CPV2 and CPV2b) vaccines able to elicit protection against CPV2c subtype in puppies?: A systematic review of controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Blanco, Beatriz; Catala-López, Ferrán

    2015-10-22

    Severe gastroenteritis caused by canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV2) is a serious life-threatening disease in puppies less than 4-months of age. The emergence of new variants has provoked some concern about the cross-protection elicited by licensed canine parvovirus modified-live type 2 (CPV2) and type 2b (CPV2b) vaccines against the most recent subtype CPV2c. A systematic review was carried out to assess the efficacy of commercial vaccines. We conducted a literature search of Pub Med/MEDLINE from January 1990 to May 2014. This was supplemented by hand-searching of related citations and searches in Google/Google Scholar. Controlled clinical trials in which vaccinated puppies were challenged with CPV2c virus were evaluated. Reporting of outcome measures and results for vaccine efficacy were critically appraised through a variety of clinical signs, serological tests, virus shedding and the ability to overcome maternally derived antibodies (MDA) titres. Six controlled clinical trials were included in the review. In most cases, the results of the selected studies reported benefits in terms of clinical signs, serological tests and virus shedding. However, MDA interference was not considered or evaluated in 5 of the selected trials. No accurate definitions of baseline healthy status and/or clinical outcomes were provided. Methods of randomization, allocation concealment and blinding were usually poorly reported. As a result of the limited number of included studies matching the inclusion criteria, the small sample sizes, short follow-up and the methodological limitations observed, it was not possible to reach a final conclusion regarding the cross-protection of licensed CPV2 and CPV2b vaccines against the subtype 2c in puppies. Further and specifically designed trials are required in order to elucidate whether cross-protection is acquired from licensed CPV vaccines. PMID:26249827

  1. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  2. Early phase clinical trials to identify optimal dosing and safety

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Natalie; Hansen, Aaron R.; Siu, Lillian L.; Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of early stage clinical trials is to determine the recommended dose and toxicity profile of an investigational agent or multi-drug combination. Molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) and immunotherapies have distinct toxicities from chemotherapies that are often not dose dependent and can lead to chronic and sometimes unpredictable side effects. Therefore utilizing a dose escalation method that has toxicity based endpoints may not be as appropriate for determination of recommended dose, and alternative parameters such as pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic outcomes are potentially appealing options. Approaches to enhance safety and optimize dosing include improved preclinical models and assessment, innovative model based design and dose escalation strategies, patient selection, the use of expansion cohorts and extended toxicity assessments. Tailoring the design of phase I trials by adopting new strategies to address the different properties of MTAs is required to enhance the development of these agents. This review will focus on the limitations to safety and dose determination that have occurred in the development of MTAs and immunotherapies. In addition, strategies are proposed to overcome these challenges to develop phase I trials that can more accurately define the recommended dose and identify adverse events. PMID:25160636

  3. Biomarkers in phase I–II chemoprevention trials: lessons from the NCI experience

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Early phase clinical trials are an essential component of chemopreventive drug development to identify signals of drug efficacy that can subsequently be explored definitively in phase III trials. Whereas phase I trials focus on safety and identification of optimal dose and schedule for cancer prevention, phase II trials focus on intermediate endpoints that are variably related to cancer development. The United States National Cancer Institute supports a programme devoted to early phase cancer prevention clinical trials. The experience, along with the benefits and limitations of the range of biomarker endpoints used in these studies, are reviewed here. PMID:26635903

  4. Negative results in phase III trials of complex interventions: cause for concern or just good science?

    PubMed

    Crawford, Mike J; Barnicot, Kirsten; Patterson, Sue; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Not all interventions that show promise in exploratory trials will be supported in phase III studies. But the high failure rate in recent trials of complex mental health interventions is a concern. Proper consideration of trial processes and greater use of adaptive trial designs could ensure better use of available resources. PMID:27369475

  5. GNOSIS: Guidelines for neuro-oncology: Standards for investigational studies—reporting of phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Susan M.; Reynolds, Sharon L.; Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Buckner, Jan C.; Kaplan, Richard S.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    We present guidelines to standardize the reporting of phase 1 and phase 2 neuro-oncology trials. The guidelines are also intended to assist with accurate interpretation of results from these trials, to facilitate the peer-review process, and to expedite the publication of important and accurate manuscripts. Our guidelines are summarized in a checklist format that can be used as a framework from which to construct a phase 1 or 2 clinical trial. PMID:16212807

  6. Designing a series of decision-theoretic phase II trials in a small population.

    PubMed

    Hee, Siew Wan; Stallard, Nigel

    2012-12-30

    This paper introduces a decision-theoretic design for a series of phase II trials. Instead of designing phase II trials individually, we proposed a development plan that consists of a series of phase II trials and one phase III trial such that the long-term expected utility on the whole is optimized. The phase II trials are conducted sequentially, and patients are recruited sequentially to each phase II trial. At each interim stage, a decision is made to continue recruiting patients to the current trial, to stop and recommend the treatment proceeds to a phase III trial, to stop and initiate a new phase II trial or to stop and cease the development plan. The methodology uses a hybrid approach in which it is assumed that the data from the final phase III trial will be analysed using a classical frequentist hypothesis test. The expected power of this test based on some specified prior distribution for the effect of the experimental treatment is then used in a utility function, which is used to obtain the optimal design for the whole series of trials. PMID:22927289

  7. Anisotropy in the vortex phase diagram and the pinning force density in the basal plane of YNi 2B 2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pradip; Tomy, C. V.; Takeya, H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grover, A. K.

    2009-02-01

    We present the magnetic field dependence of the critical current density from dc magnetization measurements concerning the anisotropic behaviour of flux line lattice (FLL) in a single crystal of YNi2B2C. The peak effect (PE) phenomenon is observed for all crystallographic orientations, but the second magnetization peak (SMP) anomaly is observed only for H∥a. Our study reveals that the FLL obtained when H∥[1 1 0] is better ordered within the basal plane. However, the FLL for H∥c is found to be even more ordered than that for H∥[1 1 0]. The perfect square symmetry of the FLL for H∥c is perhaps responsible for promoting the realization of the best spatial order of the FLL prior to the onset of the PE, indicating a correlation between the crystalline lattice and the vortex lattice. We have also found a change over in the power law governing the decay of the critical current density which is identified as a crossover from weak to weaker pinning regime in the phase diagram.

  8. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characterization of a new formulation containing synergistic proportions of interferons alpha-2b and gamma (HeberPAG®) in patients with mycosis fungoides: an open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The synergistic combination of interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and IFN gamma results in more potent in vitro biological effects mediated by both IFNs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate by first time the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in patients with mycosis fungoides. Methods An exploratory, prospective, open-label clinical trial was conducted. Twelve patients, both genders, 18 to 75 years-old, with mycosis fungoides at stages IB to III, were eligible for the study. All of them received intramuscularly a single high dose (23 × 106 IU) of a novel synergistic IFN mixture (HeberPAG®) for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma concentrations were measured during 96 hours by commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) specific for each IFN. Other blood IFN-inducible markers and laboratory variables were used as pharmacodynamics and safety criteria. Results The pharmacokinetic evaluation by EIA yielded a similar pattern for both IFNs that are also in agreement with the well-known described profiles for these molecules when these are administered separately. The average values for main parameters were: Cmax: 263 and 9.3 pg/mL; Tmax: 9.5 and 6.9 h; AUC: 4483 and 87.5 pg.h/mL, half-life (t1/2): 4.9 and 13.4 h; mean residence time (MRT): 13.9 and 13.5 h, for serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma, respectively. The pharmacodynamic variables were strongly stimulated by simultaneous administration of both IFNs: serum neopterin and beta-2 microglobulin levels (β2M), and stimulation of 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS1) mRNA expression. The most encouraging data was the high increment of serum neopterin, 8.0 ng/mL at 48 h, not been described before for any unmodified or pegylated IFN. Additionally, β2M concentration doubled the pre-dose value at 24–48 hours. For both variables the values remained clearly upper baseline levels at 96 hours. Conclusions HeberPAG®possesses improved

  9. Reverse phase protein microarrays advance to use in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance A; Espina, Virginia

    2010-12-01

    Individualizing cancer therapy for molecular targeted inhibitors requires a new class of molecular profiling technology that can map the functional state of the cancer cell signal pathways containing the drug targets. Reverse phase protein microarrays (RPMA) are a technology platform designed for quantitative, multiplexed analysis of specific phosphorylated, cleaved, or total (phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated) forms of cellular proteins from a limited amount of sample. This class of microarray can be used to interrogate tissue samples, cells, serum, or body fluids. RPMA were previously a research tool; now this technology has graduated to use in research clinical trials with clinical grade sensitivity and precision. In this review we describe the application of RPMA for multiplexed signal pathway analysis in therapeutic monitoring, biomarker discovery, and evaluation of pharmaceutical targets, and conclude with a summary of the technical aspects of RPMA construction and analysis. PMID:20974554

  10. [Tolerance of riluzole in a phase IIIb clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Lacomblez, L; Dib, M; Doppler, V; Faudet, A; Robin, V; Salachas, F; Bensimon, G; Meininger, V

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of an early drug access programme launched in 1995, a multicentre open study was initiated in France in order to assess, inter alia, the safety of riluzole (50 mg twice a day) in a total of 2069 patients from 28 centres. This programme, a phase IIIb study with direct individual benefit, had two main objectives: to enable patients to receive riluzole therapy pending regulatory approval and commercial availability and to provide further data on the safety of riluzole in a broader ALS population. The most frequent adverse events related to riluzole treatment were: asthenia, nausea and elevation of serum transaminase levels. These observations, similar to data derived from previous pivotal clinical trials, confirm that riluzole has a satisfactory tolerability profile. PMID:12090150

  11. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Nathalie; Flament, Caroline; Locher, Clara; Desbois, Mélanie; Rey, Annie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Pautier, Patricia; Le Cesne, Axel; Soria, Jean-Charles; Paci, Angelo; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    We performed a Phase I clinical trial from October 2007 to October 2009, enrolling patients affected by refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of interleukin (IL)-2 combined with low dose cyclophosphamide (CTX) and imatinib mesylate (IM). In a companion paper published in this issue of OncoImmunology, we show that the MTD of IL-2 is 6 MIU/day for 5 consecutive days, and that IL-2 increases the impregnation of both IM and of its main metabolite, CGP74588. Among the secondary objectives, we wanted to determine immunological markers that might be associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and/or overall survival (OS). The combination therapy markedly reduced the absolute counts of B, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells in a manner that was proportional to IL-2 dose. There was a slight (less than 2-fold) increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) among CD4+ T cells in response to IM plus IL-2. The natural killer (NK)-cell compartment was activated, exhibiting a significant upregulation of HLA-DR, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD56. The abundance of HLA-DR+ NK cells after one course of combination therapy positively correlated with both PFS and OS. The IL-2-induced rise of the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio calculated after the first cycle of treatment was also positively associated with OS. Overall, the combination of IM and IL-2 promoted the rapid expansion of HLA-DR+ NK cells and increased the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio, both being associated with clinical benefits. This combinatorial regimen warrants further investigation in Phase II clinical trials, possibly in patients affected by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a setting in which T and NK cells may play an important therapeutic role. PMID:23525357

  12. A 48-week randomized phase 2b study evaluating cenicriviroc versus efavirenz in treatment-naive HIV-infected adults with C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Melanie; Saag, Michael; DeJesus, Edwin; Gathe, Joseph; Lalezari, Jay; Landay, Alan L.; Cade, Jerry; Enejosa, Jeffrey; Lefebvre, Eric; Feinberg, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy, safety, and anti-inflammatory effects of cenicriviroc (CVC), an oral, once-daily C-C chemokine receptor types 5 and 2 antagonist, with those of efavirenz (EFV) in treatment-naive, HIV-1-infected adults. Design: A 48-week, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy phase 2b trial at 43 institutions (USA and Puerto Rico). Methods: Study participants (HIV-1 RNA ≥1000 copies/ml, CD4+ cell count ≥200 cells/μl, C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus) were randomized 2 : 2 : 1 to CVC 100 mg (CVC100), CVC 200 mg (CVC200), or EFV 600 mg, each administered with emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Key end points were virologic success (HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml) at week 24 (primary) and week 48 (secondary), safety/tolerability at weeks 24 and 48. Study sites and patients remained blinded until week 48. Results: A total of 143 patients were randomized (CVC100, n = 59; CVC200, n = 56; EFV, n = 28). Virologic success was obtained at week 24 in 76, 73, and 71% of study participants for CVC100, CVC200, and EFV, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV), and at week 48 in 68, 64, and 50%, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV). Resistance mutations emerged in five and zero CVC and EFV-treated study participants, respectively. Virologic nonresponse and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance decreased when CVC minimum plasma concentration was at least 47.8 ng/ml. Treatment-related adverse events of at least grade 2 and discontinuations because of adverse events were less frequent in CVC-treated study participants. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased with CVC, but increased with EFV. C-C chemokine ligand type 2 (CCL2) (aka monocyte chemotactic protein-1) increased in a dose-dependent manner, whereas soluble CD14 levels decreased with CVC. Conclusion: CVC showed efficacy and favorable safety in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected study participants, supporting selection of CVC

  13. Recent developments in A2B adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A selective, high-affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist will be useful as a pharmacological tool to help determine the role of the A(2B)AR in inflammatory diseases and angiogenic diseases. Based on early A(2B)AR-selective ligands with nonoptimal pharmaceutical properties, such as 15 (MRS 1754: K(i)(hA(2B)) = 2 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 403 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 503 NM, and K(i)(hA(3)) = 570 nM), several groups have discovered second-generation A(2B)AR ligands that are suitable for development. Scientists at CV Therapeutics have discovered the selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist 22, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative, (CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM). Compound 22 has demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (T(1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat), and it is a functional antagonist at the A(2B)AR(K (B) = 6 nM). In a mouse model of asthma, compound 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent efficacy supporting the role of the A(2B)AR in asthma. In two Phase I clinical trails, 22 (CVT-6883) was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once-daily dosing. Baraldi et al. have independently discovered a selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 30 (MRE2029F20), 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 200 nM; K(i)(hA(2A), A(3)) > 1,000, that has been selected for development in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals. Compound 30 has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist of the A(2B)AR, and it has been radiolabeled for use in pharmacological studies. A third compound, 58 (LAS-38096), is a 2-aminopyrimidine derivative (discovered by the Almirall group) that has high A(2B)AR affinity and selectivity (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM), and 58 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. A fourth selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 54 (OSIP339391 K(i))(hA(2B)) = 0.5 nM; K(i))(hA(1

  14. Adaptive dose modification for phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yiyi; Pan, Haitao; Yuan, Ying

    2016-09-10

    Most phase I dose-finding methods in oncology aim to find the maximum-tolerated dose from a set of prespecified doses. However, in practice, because of a lack of understanding of the true dose-toxicity relationship, it is likely that none of these prespecified doses are equal or reasonably close to the true maximum-tolerated dose. To handle this issue, we propose an adaptive dose modification (ADM) method that can be coupled with any existing dose-finding method to adaptively modify the dose, when it is needed, during the course of dose finding. To reflect clinical practice, we divide the toxicity probability into three regions: underdosing, acceptable, and overdosing regions. We adaptively add a new dose whenever the observed data suggest that none of the investigational doses are likely to be located in the acceptable region. The new dose is estimated via a nonparametric dose-toxicity model based on local polynomial regression. The simulation study shows that ADM substantially outperforms the similar existing method. We applied ADM to a phase I cancer trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27027650

  15. Fit 2-B FATHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    Fit 2-B FATHERS is a parenting-skills education program for incarcerated adult males. The goals of this program are for participants to have reduced recidivism rates and a reduced risk of their children acquiring criminal records. These goals are accomplished by helping participants become physically, practically, and socially fit for the demands…

  16. 78 FR 39736 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Considerations for the Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... clinical trial design, including product characteristics, manufacturing considerations and preclinical... document provides recommendations with respect to these products as to clinical trial design, including... of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food...

  17. The application of human phase 0 microdosing trials: A systematic review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Pernille; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Laursen, Maria B; Schmitz, Alexander; Jensen, Paw; Johnsen, Hans E

    2016-06-01

    A decreasing number of new therapeutic drugs reaching the clinic has led to the publication of regulatory guidelines on human microdosing trials by the European Medicines Agency in 2004 and the US Food and Drug Administration in 2006. Microdosing trials are defined by the administration of 1/100th of the therapeutic dose and designed to investigate basic drug properties. This review investigates the current application of phase 0 trials in medical research. Thirty-three studies found in PubMed and EMBASE were systematically reviewed for aim and analytical method. Pharmacokinetic studies have been a major focus of phase 0 trials, but drug distribution, drug-drug interactions, imaging and pharmacogenomics have also been investigated. Common analytical methods were tandem mass liquid chromatography, accelerator mass spectrometry and positron emission tomography. New ongoing trials are investigating the pharmacodynamics and chemoresistance of marketed drugs, suggesting that the application of phase 0 trials is still evolving. PMID:26428262

  18. The evolution of phase I trials in cancer medicine: a critical review of the last decade.

    PubMed

    Tolcher, Anthony W

    2011-12-01

    The advent of targeted therapies, combined with an unsustainable rate of failure in oncology drug development, has resulted in a number of new approaches to clinical trials. Early clinical trials are no exception, with efforts to improve the eventual success rate of late stage trials through evolving phase I trial methodologies, the addition of extensive pharmacodynamic studies, and early adoption of patient selection strategies. Unfortunately, some of these new approaches have met with mixed results. Furthermore, no clear metrics are available to determine whether these designs are more successful than previous strategies. This review examines the evolution of phase I trials and draws upon several examples of strategies that have been successful as well as those that have not, and outlines a pragmatic approach to phase I trials as our understanding of the molecular biology of individual malignancies emerges. PMID:22059910

  19. The Risk-Escalation Model: A Principled Design Strategy for Early-Phase Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Should first-in-human trials be designed to maximize the prospect of therapeutic benefit for volunteers, prioritize avoidance of unintended harms, or aim for some happy medium between the two? Perennial controversies surrounding initiation and design of early-phase trials hinge on how this question is resolved. In this paper, we build on the premise that the task of early-phase testing is to optimize various components of a potential therapy so that later, confirmatory trials have the maximal probability of informing drug development and clinical care. We then explore three strategies that investigators might use to manage trial risks while optimizing a therapy, using cell therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) as an example. We argue that an iterative application of maximin strategies over successive cohorts and trials, which we call the “risk-escalation model,” establishes a moral principle that should guide decision-making in early-phase trials. PMID:25109092

  20. Optimizing operational efficiencies in early phase trials: The Pediatric Trials Network experience.

    PubMed

    England, Amanda; Wade, Kelly; Smith, P Brian; Berezny, Katherine; Laughon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Performing drug trials in pediatrics is challenging. In support of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the formation of the Pediatric Trials Network (PTN) in 2010. Since its inception, the PTN has developed strategies to increase both efficiency and safety of pediatric drug trials. Through use of innovative techniques such as sparse and scavenged blood sampling as well as opportunistic study design, participation in trials has grown. The PTN has also strived to improve consistency of adverse event reporting in neonatal drug trials through the development of a standardized adverse event table. We review how the PTN is optimizing operational efficiencies in pediatric drug trials to increase the safety of drugs in children. PMID:26968616

  1. Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1): Serving as the prototype for the F2B-1 shipboard fighter, the XF2B-1 differed visually in having a pointed spinner and an unbalanced rudder. Like many aircraft of its day, the Boeing model 69 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  2. Resampling the N9741 Trial to Compare Tumor Dynamic Versus Conventional End Points in Randomized Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manish R.; Gray, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Karrison, Theodore G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The optimal end point for randomized phase II trials of anticancer therapies remains controversial. We simulated phase II trials by resampling patients from N9741, a randomized phase III trial of chemotherapy regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer, and compared the power of various end points to detect the superior therapy (FOLFOX [infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin] had longer overall survival than both IROX [irinotecan plus oxaliplatin] and IFL [irinotecan and bolus fluorouracil plus leucovorin]). Methods Tumor measurements and progression-free survival (PFS) data were obtained for 1,471 patients; 1,002 had consistently measured tumors and were resampled (5,000 replicates) to simulate two-arm, randomized phase II trials with α = 0.10 (one sided) and 20 to 80 patients per arm. End points included log ratio of tumor size at 6, 12, and 18 weeks relative to baseline; time to tumor growth (TTG), estimated using a nonlinear mixed-effects model; and PFS. Arms were compared using rank sum tests for log ratio and TTG and a log-rank test for PFS. Results For FOLFOX versus IFL, TTG and PFS had similar power, with both exceeding the power of log ratio at 18 weeks; for FOLFOX versus IROX, TTG and log ratio at 18 weeks had similar power, with both exceeding the power of PFS. The best end points exhibited > 80% power with 60 to 80 patients per arm. Conclusion TTG is a powerful end point for randomized phase II trials of cytotoxic therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer; it was either comparable or superior to PFS and log ratio at 18 weeks. Additional studies will be needed to clarify the potential of TTG as a phase II end point. PMID:25349295

  3. Observation of a Field-Driven Structural Phase Transition in the Flux Line Lattice in ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect

    Eskildsen, M.; Andersen, N.; Mortensen, K.; Bolle, C.; Lieber, C.; Oxx, S.; Sridhar, S.; Canfield, P.

    1997-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and magnetic decoration both demonstrate a topological transition in the flux line lattice (FLL) in ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. The high-field square lattice slowly transforms into a hexagonal lattice via an area preserving [100] rhombohedral distortion below roughly 500Oe. The square FLL is aligned with the [110] direction of the tetragonal crystal, while the two domains of the hexagonal FLL are aligned with [100] and [010]. The differences in pinning for the two FLL topologies are reflected in the rf kinetic inductance. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Phase IIB/III Trial of Tenecteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results of a Prematurely Terminated Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haley, E. Clarke; Thompson, John L.P.; Grotta, James C.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Hemmen, Thomas G.; Brown, Devin L.; Fanale, Christopher; Libman, Richard; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Levine, Steven R.; Johnston, Karen C.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Levy, Gilberto; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intravenous alteplase (rt-PA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use remains limited. In a previous pilot dose-escalation study, intravenous tenecteplase showed promise as a potentially safer alternative. Therefore, a Phase IIB clinical trial was begun to a) choose a best dose of tenecteplase to carry forward, and b) to provide evidence for either promise or futility of further testing of tenecteplase versus rt-PA. If promise was established, then the trial would continue as a Phase III efficacy trial comparing the selected tenecteplase dose to standard rt-PA. Methods: The trial began as a small, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial comparing 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg/kg tenecteplase with standard 0.9 mg/kg rt-PA in patients with acute stroke within 3 hours of onset. An adaptive sequential design used an early (24 hour) assessment of major neurological improvement balanced against occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) to choose a “best” dose of tenecteplase to carry forward. Once a “best” dose was established, the trial was to continue until at least 100 pairs of the selected tenecteplase dose versus standard rt-PA could be compared by 3 month outcome using the modified Rankin Scale in an interim analysis. Decision rules were devised to yield a clear recommendation to either stop for futility or to continue into Phase III. Results: The trial was prematurely terminated for slow enrollment after only 112 patients had been randomized at 8 clinical centers between 2006 and 2008. The 0.4 mg/kg dose was discarded as inferior after only 73 patients were randomized, but the selection procedure was still unable to distinguish between 0.1 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg as a propitious dose at the time the trial was stopped. There were no statistically persuasive differences in 3 month outcomes between the remaining tenecteplase groups and rt-PA. Symptomatic ICH rates were highest in the

  5. Embracing failure: What the Phase III progesterone studies can teach about TBI clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite positive preclinical studies and two positive Phase II clinical trials, two large Phase III clinical trials of progesterone treatment of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) recently ended with negative results, so a 100% failure rate continues to plague the field of TBI trials. Methods: This paper reviews and analyses the trial structures and outcomes and discusses the implications of these failures for future drug and clinical trial development. Persistently negative trial outcomes have led to disinvestment in new drug research by companies and policy-makers and disappointment for patients and their families, failures which represent a major public health concern. The problem is not limited to TBI. Failure rates are high for trials in stroke, sepsis, cardiology, cancer and orthopaedics, among others. Results: This paper discusses some of the reasons why the Phase III trials have failed. These reasons may include faulty extrapolation from pre-clinical data in designing clinical trials and the use of subjective outcome measures that accurately reflect neither the nature of the deficits nor long-term quantitative recovery. Conclusions: Better definitions of injury and healing and better outcome measures are essential to change the embrace of failure that has dominated the field for over 30 years. This review offers suggestions to improve the situation. PMID:26274493

  6. SACALC2B

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-02-08

    SACALC2B calculates the average solid angle subtended by a rectangular or circular detector window to a coaxial or non-coaxial rectangular, circular or point source, including where the source and detector planes are not parallel. SACALC_CYL calculates the average solid angle subtended by a cylinder to a rectangular or circular source, plane or thick, at any location and orientation. This is needed, for example, in calculating the intrinsic gamma efficiency of a detector such as amore » GM tube. The program also calculates the number of hits on the cylinder side and on each end, and the average path length through the detector volume (assuming no scattering or absorption). Point sources can be modelled by using a circular source of zero radius.« less

  7. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  8. Giving monoclonal antibodies to healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials: is it safe?

    PubMed Central

    Tranter, Elizabeth; Peters, Gary; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been studied in healthy volunteers in phase 1, but few data have been published on the safety of that practice. We aimed to review the available data, and thereby to estimate the risks of participation in phase 1 trials of MAbs. We searched PubMed, the ClinicalTrials.gov database and Google, using the search terms ‘monoclonal antibody’, ‘phase 1’ and ‘healthy volunteers’. We identified 70 completed trials of MAbs in healthy volunteers, but the published data were too sparse to allow confident assessment of the risks of MAbs in healthy volunteers. Our best estimate of risk of a life-threatening adverse event was between 1 : 425 and 1 : 1700 volunteer-trials, but all such events occurred in a single trial (of TGN1412). In a phase 1 trial of a small molecule, the risk of death or a life-threatening adverse event appears to be 1 : 100 000–1 000 000 volunteer-trials, which is similar to the risk of many ordinary daily activities. Most people would consider that level of risk to be ‘minimal’ or ‘negligible’ and, therefore, acceptable. On that basis, the safety record of MAbs in healthy volunteers has been ruined by the TGN1412 disaster. However, that experience is unlikely to be repeated, because of improvements in governance and practice of phase 1 trials. If the experience of TGN1412 is disregarded, it seems reasonable to continue using healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials of MAbs, provided that there are scientific and medical reasons to conclude that the risk is truly minimal. PMID:23438102

  9. Predictive value of phase I trials for safety in later trials and final approved dose: analysis of 61 approved cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Jardim, Denis L; Hess, Kenneth R; Lorusso, Patricia; Kurzrock, Razelle; Hong, David S

    2014-01-15

    Phase I trials use a small number of patients to define a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the safety of new agents. We compared data from phase I and registration trials to determine whether early trials predicted later safety and final dose. We searched the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website for drugs approved in nonpediatric cancers (January 1990-October 2012). The recommended phase II dose (R2PD) and toxicities from phase I were compared with doses and safety in later trials. In 62 of 85 (73%) matched trials, the dose from the later trial was within 20% of the RP2D. In a multivariable analysis, phase I trials of targeted agents were less predictive of the final approved dose (OR, 0.2 for adopting ± 20% of the RP2D for targeted vs. other classes; P = 0.025). Of the 530 clinically relevant toxicities in later trials, 70% (n = 374) were described in phase I. A significant relationship (P = 0.0032) between increasing the number of patients in phase I (up to 60) and the ability to describe future clinically relevant toxicities was observed. Among 28,505 patients in later trials, the death rate that was related to drug was 1.41%. In conclusion, dosing based on phase I trials was associated with a low toxicity-related death rate in later trials. The ability to predict relevant toxicities correlates with the number of patients on the initial phase I trial. The final dose approved was within 20% of the RP2D in 73% of assessed trials. PMID:24190980

  10. Inside information: Financial conflicts of interest for research subjects in early phase clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Helft, Paul R; Ratain, Mark J; Epstein, Richard A; Siegler, Mark

    2004-05-01

    In recent years, several research subjects have told us that they had bought or intended to buy stock in the companies sponsoring the clinical trials in which they were enrolled. This situation has led us to ask what, if any, are physician-investigators' scientific, ethical, and legal responsibilities concerning research subjects who choose to buy stock in the companies sponsoring the clinical trials in which they are participating. Although the scope of this problem is unknown and is likely to be small, this commentary examines the scientific, ethical, and legal concerns raised by such activities on the part of research subjects enrolled in early phase clinical trials. In addition, this commentary also outlines the basis for our opinion that research subjects involved in an early phase clinical trial should avoid the financial conflicts of interest created by trading stock in the company sponsoring the clinical trial. PMID:15126602

  11. Development of drugs for celiac disease: review of endpoints for Phase 2 and 3 trials

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Klaus; Dawson, Jill; Hussain, Fez; Murray, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a lifelong disorder for which there is currently only one known, effective treatment: a gluten-free diet. New treatment approaches have recently emerged; several drugs are in Phase 2 trials and results appear promising; however, discussion around regulatory endpoints is in its infancy. We will briefly discuss the drugs that are under development and then shift our attention to potential trial endpoints, such as patient-reported outcomes, histology, serology, gene expression analysis and other tests. We will outline the differing requirements for proof-of-concept Phase 2 trials and Phase 3 registration trials, with a particular emphasis on current thinking in regulatory agencies. We conclude our paper with recommendations and a glossary of regulatory terms, to enable readers who are less familiar with regulatory language to take maximum advantage of this review. PMID:25725041

  12. Development of drugs for celiac disease: review of endpoints for Phase 2 and 3 trials.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Klaus; Dawson, Jill; Hussain, Fez; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    Celiac disease is a lifelong disorder for which there is currently only one known, effective treatment: a gluten-free diet. New treatment approaches have recently emerged; several drugs are in Phase 2 trials and results appear promising; however, discussion around regulatory endpoints is in its infancy. We will briefly discuss the drugs that are under development and then shift our attention to potential trial endpoints, such as patient-reported outcomes, histology, serology, gene expression analysis and other tests. We will outline the differing requirements for proof-of-concept Phase 2 trials and Phase 3 registration trials, with a particular emphasis on current thinking in regulatory agencies. We conclude our paper with recommendations and a glossary of regulatory terms, to enable readers who are less familiar with regulatory language to take maximum advantage of this review. PMID:25725041

  13. Understanding cognitive processes behind acceptance or refusal of phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Mazzocco, Ketti; Gorini, Alessandra; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Participation in phase I trials gives patients the chance to obtain control over their disease by trying an experimental therapy. The patients' vulnerability, the informed consent process aiming at understanding the purpose and potential benefits of the phase I trial, and the complexity of the studies may impact the patient's final decision. Emotionally difficult health conditions may induce patients to succumb to cognitive biases, allocating attention only on a part of the provided information. Filling the gap in patients' information process can foster the implementation of strategies to help physicians tailor clinical trials' communication providing personalized support and tailored medical information around patients' need, so avoiding cognitive biases in patients and improving informed shared decision quality. The aim of the present review article focuses on the analysis of cognitive and psychological factors that affect patients' decision to participate or not to early phase clinical trials. PMID:26852078

  14. Defining, Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating Phase 4 HIV Prevention Effectiveness Trials for Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Spielberg, Freya; McAuliffe, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The efficacy of behavioral HIV prevention interventions has been convincingly demonstrated in a large number of randomized controlled phase 3 research outcome trials. Little research attention has been directed toward studying the effectiveness of the same interventions when delivered by providers to their own clients or community members, however. This article argues for the need to conduct phase 4 effectiveness trials of HIV prevention interventions that have been found efficacious in the research arena. Such trials can provide important information concerning the impact of interventions when applied in heterogeneous “real-world” circumstances. This article raises design issues and methodologic questions that need to be addressed in the conduct of phase 4 trials of behavioral interventions. These issues include the selection and training of service providers engaged in such trials, maintenance of fidelity to intervention protocol in provider-delivered interventions, determination of intervention core elements versus aspects that require tailoring, selection of relevant phase 4 study outcomes, interpretation of findings indicative of field effectiveness, sustainability, and other aspects of phase 4 trial design. PMID:18301131

  15. Microstructure, microhardness, phase analysis and chemical composition of laser remelted FeB-Fe2B surface layers produced on Vanadis-6 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Swadźba, Radosław; Popławski, Mikołaj; Bartkowski, Dariusz

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the study results of the diffusion boronized layer and their laser modification. Diffusion boronized processes were carried out on Vanadis-6 steel at 900 °C for 5 h. Boronized layers were characterized by dual-phase microstructure consisting of iron borides having a microhardness in the range from 1800 to 1400 HV. The laser heat treatment was carried out using CO2 laser after diffusion boronizing process. The research goals of this paper was analysis of microstructure, microhardness as well as phase and chemical composition of boronized layers after laser modification. Microstructure of boronized layer after laser modification consisted of remelted zone, heat affected zone and substrate. Remelted zone was characterized by microstructure consisted of boron-martensite eutectic. In this zone, the phases of borides and carbides were detected. Boronized layers after laser modification were characterized by the mild gradient of microhardness from surface to the substrate.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL COMBUSTION RESEARCH APPLIED TO POLLUTION FORMATION. VOLUME 2B. PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY OF TWO-PHASE SYSTEMS: DEVOLATILIZATION AND VOLATILE REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reports included in the three-part volume describe eight studies by various investigators, to better understand the physics and chemistry of two-phase combustion with respect to pollution formation. Volume IIb gives information on the influence of various combustion parameter...

  17. Phase 0 clinical trials: towards a more complete ethics critique

    PubMed Central

    Hill, T Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Summary In efforts to modernise the entire drug-development process, making it more efficient, less costly, and ultimately of real benefit to patients, The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) authorised the use of exploratory IND or early Phase I (Phase 0) studies. Quite different in structure from Phase I, II, and III studies, the Phase 0 construct understandably poses a set of ethical problems not seen in the other research phases and so far not adequately addressed by ethicists. In an effort to deal with this deficiency, this paper proposes an ethics critique, based not on the usual concept of benefit, but on the means–end relation, and placed within an ethic of science derived from the practice of science. PMID:22518199

  18. The two-faced angel: do phase I clinical trials have a place in modern hospice?

    PubMed

    Ross, Daniel S

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly, bioethicists have been exploring the possibility of making phase I clinical trials available to hospice patients. Phase I clinical trials are designed to test a drug's safety and dosage, not its effectiveness. Participants in these studies generally do not understand that the purpose of the investigation is not to benefit them, thus challenging the notion of informed consent. But furthermore, the idea that patients believe experimental drugs will help them is contrary to the principles of hospice. Also, the very nature of the research in phase I conflicts with hospice's methods. For these reasons, this paper finds that the two models must remain distinct. PMID:17146915

  19. Phase I and II clinical trials for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Khushalani, Nikhil I

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global public health problem with considerable heterogeneity in pathogenesis and clinical presentation across geographic regions. Improved understanding of the molecular biology of this disease has opened avenues for targeted intervention. An individualized treatment approach is required for optimal management of this cancer. Overcoming resistance to therapy requires combining targeted agents with the traditional options of chemotherapy/radiation therapy, and also targeting more than 1 pathway of carcinogenesis at a time. Encouraging molecular hypothesis and biomarker-driven trials will lead to improved patient outcomes and may eventually enable the therapeutic nihilism associated with gastric cancer to be overcome. PMID:22098835

  20. Phase 2 trial design in neuro-oncology revisited: a report from the RANO group.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Evanthia; Wu, Wenting; Cloughesy, Timothy; Lamborn, Kathleen; Mann, Bhupinder; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A; Wick, Wolfgang; Macdonald, David; Armstrong, Terri S; Weller, Michael; Vogelbaum, Michael; Colman, Howard; Sargent, Daniel J; van den Bent, Martin J; Gilbert, Mark; Chang, Susan

    2012-05-01

    Advances in the management of gliomas, including the approval of agents such as temozolomide and bevacizumab, have created an evolving therapeutic landscape in glioma treatment, thus affecting our ability to reliably use historical controls to comparatively assess the activity of new therapies. Furthermore, the increasing availability of novel, targeted agents--which are competing for a small patient population, in view of the low incidence of primary brain tumours--draws attention to the need to improve the efficiency of phase 2 clinical testing in neuro-oncology to expeditiously transition the most promising of these drugs or combinations to potentially practice-changing phase 3 trials. In this report from the Response Assessment in Neurooncology (RANO) group, we review phase 2 trial designs that can address these challenges and capitalise on scientific and clinical advances in brain tumour treatment in neuro-oncology to accelerate and optimise the selection of drugs deserving further testing in phase 3 trials. Although there is still a small role for single-arm and non-comparative phase 2 designs, emphasis is placed on the potential role that comparative randomised phase 2 designs--such as screening designs, selection designs, discontinuation designs, and adaptive designs, including seamless phase 2/3 designs--can have. The rational incorporation of these designs, as determined by the specific clinical setting and the trial's endpoints or goals, has the potential to substantially advance new drug development in neuro-oncology. PMID:22554547

  1. Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin (MAP) Plus Maintenance Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b Versus MAP Alone in Patients With Resectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma and Good Histologic Response to Preoperative MAP: First Results of the EURAMOS-1 Good Response Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bielack, Stefan S.; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Whelan, Jeremy S.; Marina, Neyssa; Jovic, Gordana; Hook, Jane M.; Krailo, Mark D.; Gebhardt, Mark; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Meyer, James; Nadel, Helen; Randall, R. Lor; Deffenbaugh, Claudia; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Brennan, Bernadette; Letson, G. Douglas; Teot, Lisa A.; Goorin, Allen; Baumhoer, Daniel; Kager, Leo; Werner, Mathias; Lau, Ching C.; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Gelderblom, Hans; Meyers, Paul; Gorlick, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard; Helmke, Knut; Eriksson, Mikael; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Schomberg, Paula; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Kühne, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; van den Berg, Henk; Böhling, Tom; Picton, Susan; Renard, Marleen; Reichardt, Peter; Gerss, Joachim; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Morris, Carol; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.; Seddon, Beatrice; Calaminus, Gabriele; Michelagnoli, Maria; Dhooge, Catharina; Sydes, Matthew R.; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EURAMOS-1, an international randomized controlled trial, investigated maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) in patients whose osteosarcoma showed good histologic response (good response) to induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods At diagnosis, patients age ≤ 40 years with resectable high-grade osteosarcoma were registered. Eligibility after surgery for good response random assignment included ≥ two cycles of preoperative MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin), macroscopically complete surgery of primary tumor, < 10% viable tumor, and no disease progression. These patients were randomly assigned to four additional cycles MAP with or without IFN-α-2b (0.5 to 1.0 μg/kg per week subcutaneously, after chemotherapy until 2 years postregistration). Outcome measures were event-free survival (EFS; primary) and overall survival and toxicity (secondary). Results Good response was reported in 1,041 of 2,260 registered patients; 716 consented to random assignment (MAP, n = 359; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 357), with baseline characteristics balanced by arm. A total of 271 of 357 started IFN-α-2b; 105 stopped early, and 38 continued to receive treatment at data freeze. Refusal and toxicity were the main reasons for never starting IFN-α-2b and for stopping prematurely, respectively. Median IFN-α-2b duration, if started, was 67 weeks. A total of 133 of 268 patients who started IFN-α-2b and provided toxicity information reported grade ≥ 3 toxicity during IFN-α-2b treatment. With median follow-up of 44 months, 3-year EFS for all 716 randomly assigned patients was 76% (95% CI, 72% to 79%); 174 EFS events were reported (MAP, n = 93; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 81). Hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.12; P = .214) from an adjusted Cox model. Conclusion At the preplanned analysis time, MAP plus IFN-α-2b was not statistically different from MAP alone. A considerable proportion of patients never started IFN-α-2b or stopped

  2. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs. PMID:25274584

  3. Toward phase 4 trials in heart failure: A social and corporate responsibility of the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Beneby, Glen S

    2015-12-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition, requiring polypharmacy, allied health supports and regular monitoring. All these factors are needed to ensure compliance and to deliver the positive outcomes demonstrated from randomized controlled trials. Unfortunately many centers around the world are unable to match trial level support. The outcomes for many communities are thus unclear. Research design factors in post-marketing surveillance to address this issue. Phase 4 studies is the name given to trials designed to obtain such community level data and thus address issues of external validity. CHF phase 4 studies are relatively underutilized. We feel the onus for this research lies with the health profession. In this commentary we provide arguments as to why phase 4 studies should be viewed as a social and corporate responsibility of health professional that care for clients with CHF. PMID:26713277

  4. Toward phase 4 trials in heart failure: A social and corporate responsibility of the medical profession

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Beneby, Glen S

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition, requiring polypharmacy, allied health supports and regular monitoring. All these factors are needed to ensure compliance and to deliver the positive outcomes demonstrated from randomized controlled trials. Unfortunately many centers around the world are unable to match trial level support. The outcomes for many communities are thus unclear. Research design factors in post-marketing surveillance to address this issue. Phase 4 studies is the name given to trials designed to obtain such community level data and thus address issues of external validity. CHF phase 4 studies are relatively underutilized. We feel the onus for this research lies with the health profession. In this commentary we provide arguments as to why phase 4 studies should be viewed as a social and corporate responsibility of health professional that care for clients with CHF. PMID:26713277

  5. Statistical controversies in clinical research: requiem for the 3 + 3 design for phase I trials

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, X.; Ezzalfani, M.; Le Tourneau, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 95% of published phase I trials have used the 3 + 3 design to identify the dose to be recommended for phase II trials. However, the statistical community agrees on the limitations of the 3 + 3 design compared with model-based approaches. Moreover, the mechanisms of action of targeted agents strongly challenge the hypothesis that the maximum tolerated dose constitutes the optimal dose, and more outcomes including clinical and biological activity increasingly need to be taken into account to identify the optimal dose. Patients and methods We review key elements from clinical publications and from the statistical literature to show that the 3 + 3 design lacks the necessary flexibility to address the challenges of targeted agents. Results The design issues raised by expansion cohorts, new definitions of dose-limiting toxicity and trials of combinations are not easily addressed by the 3 + 3 design or its extensions. Conclusions Alternative statistical proposals have been developed to make a better use of the complex data generated by phase I trials. Their applications require a close collaboration between all actors of early phase clinical trials. PMID:26088197

  6. Definitional-mission report: Combined-cycle power plant, Sultan Iskandar Power Station Phase 2-B, Tenaga Nasional BHD, Malaysia. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Kadagathur, G.

    1990-12-10

    Tenaga Nasional BHD (TEN) formerly known as National Electricity Board of Malaysia is proposing to construct a Combined Cycle Power Plant at Pasir Gudang. The project is known as Sultan Iskandar Power Station Phase 2 (SIPS-2). U.S. engineering companies and U.S. equipment manufacturers are having difficulty in procuring contracts from the Malaysian Power Industry. To date, the industry is dominated by consortia with British and Swiss participation. Several U.S. engineering companies have approached the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) to assist them in breaking into the Malaysian utility market by supporting their effort on their current proposals for SIPS-2 project. It is recommended that TDP should approve a grant to TEN that would provide funds for engineering upto the preparation of equipment specifications and associated technology transfer. The grant along with the weak dollar should be attractive enough for TEN to strongly consider consortia with U.S. companies very favorably. The project also offers a potential for the export of U.S. manufactured equipment in the range of $170 million.

  7. A two-stage patient enrichment adaptive design in phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Song, James X

    2014-01-01

    Illustrated is the use of a patient enrichment adaptive design in a randomized phase II trial which allows the evaluation of treatment benefits by the biomarker expression level and makes interim adjustment according to the pre-specified rules. The design was applied to an actual phase II metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) trial in which progression-free survival (PFS) in two biomarker-defined populations is evaluated at both interim and final analyses. As an extension, a short-term biomarker is used to predict the long-term PFS in a Bayesian model in order to improve the precision of hazard ratio (HR) estimate at the interim analysis. The characteristics of the extended design are examined in a number of scenarios via simulations. The recommended adaptive design is shown to be useful in a phase II setting. When a short-term maker which correlates with the long-term PFS is available, the design can be applied in smaller early phase trials in which PFS requires longer follow-up. In summary, the adaptive design offers flexibility in randomized phase II patient enrichment trials and should be considered in an overall personalized healthcare (PHC) strategy. PMID:24342820

  8. Strategies to Minimize Risks and Exploitation in Phase One Trials on Healthy Subjects*

    PubMed Central

    Shamoo, Adil E.; Resnik, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the literature on phase one trials has focused on ethical and safety issues in research on patients with advanced cancer, but this article focuses on healthy, adult subjects. The article makes six specific recommendations for protecting the rights and welfare of healthy subjects in phase one trials: 1) because phase one trials are short in duaration (usually 1 to 3 months), researchers should gather more data on the short-term and long-term risks of participation in phase one studies by healthy subjects; 2) researchers should develop strict inclusion/exclusion criteria that exclude unhealthy or vulnerable subjects, such as decisionally impaired people, in phase one studies; 3) subjects should not participate in more than one phase one study at the same time and should wait at least 30 days between participating in different studies; 4) researchers should develop a database to keep track of phase one participants; 5) subjects should be guaranteed a minimum wage equivalent to the equivalent type of unskilled labor, but there should be no upper limits on wages; and 6) subjects should be allowed to engage in collective bargaining with research sponsors. PMID:16754430

  9. Historical controls for phase II surgically based trials requiring gross total resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Prados, Michael D; Chang, Susan M

    2007-10-01

    New treatments for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are frequently tested in phase II surgically based clinical trials that require gross total resection (GTR). In order to determine efficacy in such single-arm phase II clinical trials, the results are often compared to those from a historical control group that is not limited to patients with GTR. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) can define risk groups within historical control groups; however, RPA analyses to date included patients irrespective of whether a patient had a GTR or not. To provide a more appropriate historical control group for surgically based trials requiring a GTR, we sought to determine survival for a group of patients with newly diagnosed GBM, all of who underwent GTR and were treated on prospective clinical trials. GTR was defined as removal of >90% of the enhancing mass, determined by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Of 893 patients with GBM treated during these trials, 153 underwent GTR. The median survival for the GTR group was 71 weeks (95% CI 65-76) which was better than those who did not have a GTR. Within the GTR group, the median age was 54 years (range 25-77 years), and median Karnofsky Performance Score was 90 (range 60-100). Considering only patients with GTR, age at diagnosis continued to be a statistically significant prognostic factor. Patients treated during surgically based phase II studies should be matched with a historical control group restricted to patients with similar pretreatment variables, including GTR. PMID:17457513

  10. Structural crossover from nonmodulated to long-period modulated tetragonal phase and anomalous change in ferroelectric properties in the lead-free piezoelectric N a1 /2B i1 /2Ti O3-BaTi O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Badari Narayana; Khatua, Dipak Kumar; Garg, Rohini; Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2015-06-01

    The highly complex structure-property interrelationship in the lead-free piezoelectric (x )N a1 /2B i1 /2Ti O3- (1 -x ) BaTi O3 is a subject of considerable contemporary debate. Using comprehensive x-ray, neutron diffraction, dielectric, and ferroelectric studies, we have shown the existence of a new criticality in this system at x =0.80 , i.e., well within the conventional tetragonal phase field. This criticality manifests as a nonmonotonic variation of the tetragonality and coercivity and is shown to be associated with a crossover from a nonmodulated tetragonal phase (for x <0.8 ) to a long-period modulated tetragonal phase (for x >0.80 ). It is shown that the stabilization of long-period modulation introduces a characteristic depolarization temperature in the system. While differing qualitatively from the two-phase model often suggested for the critical compositions of this system, our results support the view with regard to the tendency in perovskites to stabilize long-period modulated structures as a result of complex interplay of antiferrodistortive modes [Bellaiche and Iniguez, Phys. Rev. B 88, 014104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.014104; Prosandeev, Wang, Ren, Iniguez, ands Bellaiche, Adv. Funct. Mater. 23, 234 (2013), 10.1002/adfm.201201467].

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma: reasons for phase III failure and novel perspectives on trial design.

    PubMed

    Llovet, Josep M; Hernandez-Gea, Virginia

    2014-04-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem. Most patients with HCC experience a recurrence after resection/ablation or are diagnosed at advanced stages. Sorafenib remains the only approved systemic drug for these patients. Molecular therapies targeting signaling cascades involved in hepatocarcinogenesis have been explored in phase III clinical trials. However, none of the drugs tested have shown positive results in the first-line (brivanib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and linifanib) or second-line (brivanib, everolimus) setting after sorafenib progression. Reasons for failure are heterogeneous and include lack of understanding of critical drivers of tumor progression/dissemination, liver toxicity, flaws in trial design, or marginal antitumoral potency. These trials are also challenging time to progression as a surrogate endpoint of survival. Trials ongoing testing drugs head-to-head versus sorafenib in "all comers" might have difficulties in achieving superior results in the first line. Novel trials are also designed testing drugs in biomarker-based subpopulations of patients with HCC. Most common mutations, however, are undruggable, such as p53 and CTNNB1. Two types of studies are proposed: (i) phase II pivotal proof-of-concept studies testing drugs blocking potential oncogenic addiction loops, such as the one testing MEK inhibitors in RAS(+) patients or amplification of FGF19 as a target; and (ii) phase II to III studies using biomarker-based trial enrichment for defining HCC subpopulations, such as the case of enriching for MET-positive tumors. These strategies have been deemed successful in breast, melanoma, and lung cancers, and are expected to change the landscape of trial design of HCC. PMID:24589894

  12. Negotiating decisions during informed consent for pediatric Phase I oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Patricia A; Magtanong, Ruth V; Leek, Angela C; Hizlan, Sabahat; Yamokoski, Amy D; Kodish, Eric D

    2012-04-01

    During informed consent conferences (ICCs) for Phase I trials, oncologists must present complex information while addressing concerns. Research on communication that evolves during ICCs remains largely unexplored. We examined communication during ICCs for pediatric Phase I cancer trials using a stratified random sample from six pediatric cancer centers. A grounded theory approach identified key communication steps and factors influencing the negotiation of decisions for trial participation. Analysis suggests that during ICCs, families, patients, and clinicians exercise choice and control by negotiating micro-decisions in two broad domains: drug logic and logistics, and administration/scheduling. Micro-decisions unfold in a four-step communication process: (1) introduction of an issue; (2) response; (3) negotiation of the issue; and (4) resolution and decision. Negotiation over smaller micro-decisions is prominent in ICCs and merits further study. PMID:22565583

  13. Next-generation fire extinguishing agent. Phase 2: Laboratory tests and scoping trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapscott, Robert E.; May, John H.; Moore, Joanne P.; Lee, Michael E.; Walker, Joseph L.

    1990-04-01

    Concepts were orginated for next-generation fire extinguishing agents. In Phase 2, laboratory tests and scoping trials were performed to initiate a program for replacement of halon fire extinguishants in Air Force fire protection and firefighter training. Facilities were also established to perform laser Raman spectroscopic investigations of flame suppression halon agents, and initial, baseline Raman studies were carried out.

  14. Telehealth Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adults Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Sue; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I trial investigated the viability of telehealth delivery of the Camperdown Program with adults who stutter. This program involves speech restructuring. Method: All treatment was conducted remotely with participant-clinician contact occurring by telephone and e-mail. Results: Ten adults completed the program. The group showed…

  15. Webcam Delivery of the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering: A Phase I Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Sue; Smith, Kylie; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Lidcombe Program is an operant treatment for early stuttering shown with meta-analysis to have a favorable odds ratio. However, many clients are unable to access the treatment because of distance and lifestyle factors. In this Phase I trial, we explored the potential efficacy, practicality, and viability of an Internet webcam Lidcombe…

  16. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  17. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I clinical trial explored the viability of webcam Internet delivery of the Camperdown Program for adolescents who stutter. Method and Procedure: Participants were 3 adolescents ages 13, 15, and 16 years, with moderate-severe stuttering. Each was treated with the Camperdown Program delivered by webcam with no clinic attendance.…

  18. Effectiveness of a Therapeutic Summer Camp for Children with ADHD: Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantson, Julie; Wang, Pan Pan; Grizenko-Vida, Michael; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Harvey, William; Joober, Ridha; Grizenko, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-week therapeutic summer day camp for children with ADHD, which included a social skills training program and parent psychoeducation and training program. This was an open-label, nonrandomized Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial. Method: Parents completed the Weiss…

  19. [Phase II trial of peplomycin in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sampi, K; Kumai, R; Hattori, M; Kaneko, Y; Sakurai, M

    1985-05-01

    Seventeen patients with malignant lymphoma were entered into a phase II study of peplomycin (PEP) to determine the efficacy of the drug. There were 8 males and 9 females with a median age of 64 yrs (range 3-74 yrs) and a median PS 3 (range 2-4). Three of these were children. At first PEP was given intermittently and intramuscularly (8 cases) at a dose of 10 mg every one (3 cases) or two (5 cases) weeks, and then intravenously by 22-hr continuous infusion (9 cases) at a dose of 5 mg per day for 5 days. Mean cumulative dose was 78 mg. Objective responses were obtained in 6 patient (35%). CR lasting 4 weeks was obtained in one patient with diffuse mixed-type lymphoma. Five patients, one with diffuse medium-sized cell type and 3 with diffuse large cell type, had PR, lasting 6, 7, 7, 9, and 50+ weeks, respectively. Pulmonary fibrosis was found in two patients on autopsy and interstitial pneumonia in two patients clinically. Temporary high fever occurred in 7 patients, stomatitis in 3 patients and anorexia in 3 patients. PMID:2581513

  20. Novel approaches to incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies into phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fillit, H; Cummings, J; Neumann, P; McLaughlin, T; Salavtore, P; Leibman, C

    2010-10-01

    The societal and individual costs of Alzheimer's disease are significant, worldwide. As the world ages, these costs are increasing rapidly, while health systems face finite budgets. As a result, many regulators and payers will require or at least consider phase III cost-effectiveness data (in addition to safety and efficacy data) for drug approval and reimbursement, increasing the risks and costs of drug development. Incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease presents a number of challenges. We propose several specific suggestions to improve the design of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials. We propose that acute episodes of care are key outcome measures for pharmacoeconomic studies. To improve the possibility of detecting a pharmacoeconomic impact in phase III, we suggest several strategies including; study designs for enrichment of pharmacoeconomic outcomes that include co-morbidity of patients; reducing variability of care that can affect pharmacoeconomic outcomes through standardized care management; employing administrative claims data to better capture meaningful pharmacoeconomic data; and extending clinical trials in open label follow-up periods in which pharmacoeconomic data are captured electronically by administrative claims. Specific aspects of power analysis for pharmacoeconomic studies are presented. The particular pharmacoeconomic challenges caused by the use of biomarkers in clinical trials, the increasing use of multinational studies, and the pharmacoeconomic challenges presented by biologicals in development for Alzheimer's disease are discussed. In summary, since we are entering an era in which pharmacoeconomic studies will be essential in drug development for supporting regulatory approval, payor reimbursement and integration of new therapies into clinical care, we must consider the design and incorporation of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials more seriously

  1. A randomized phase II trial of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2-interferon alpha in advanced renal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jayson, G. C.; Middleton, M.; Lee, S. M.; Ashcroft, L.; Thatcher, N.

    1998-01-01

    A randomized phase II trial was performed to compare the efficacy and toxicity of interleukin 2 (IL-2) with an IL-2 and interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) regimen for the treatment of metastatic renal carcinoma. Sixty patients with recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who had previously undergone a nephrectomy were randomized to receive three cycles of IL-2 or IL-2 with IFN-alpha2b. Eighteen MU of IL-2 were administered subcutaneously on Mondays-Fridays for 3 weeks out of 4. Those patients randomized to receive the combination received the same regimen of IL-2 with 9 MU of IFN-alpha2b subcutaneously on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays for 3 weeks out of 4. Thirty patients were randomized to receive each arm. Twenty-nine were evaluable in each arm. Twenty-two patients received three cycles of IL-2 but only 14 patients received three cycles of IL-2/IFN-alpha because of the greater toxicity of the combination. The principal toxicities included nausea, fatigue and fever. There were no complete responses in either arm and only two patients who were treated with IL-2 attained a partial response. Twelve patients in each arm had stable disease and 15 patients in the IL-2 arm and 16 patients in the IL-2/IFN-alpha arm progressed through treatment. There were no significant differences in survival. Ten patients who received IL-2 are alive with a median follow-up of 266 days, whereas six patients who received IL-2/IFN-alpha are alive after a median of 278 days. The median survival from the time of identification of metastatic disease is 444 days in the IL-2 arm and 381 days in the IL-2/IFN-alpha arm. The IL-2/IFN-alpha combination is more toxic than IL-2 alone and this resulted in a reduced number of cycles of treatment. However, the median survival of the two groups was the same, suggesting that further evaluation of the IL-2/IFN-alpha combination should be confined to large prospective randomized clinical trials. PMID:9703284

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  3. Laboratory and field trials of Coriolis mass flow metering for three-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feibiao; Henry, Manus; Tombs, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A new three-phase flow metering technology is discussed in this paper, which combines Coriolis mass flow and water cut readings and without applying any phase separation [1]. The system has undergone formal laboratory trials at TUV NEL (National Engineering Laboratory), UK and at VNIIR (National Flow Laboratory), Kazan, Russia; a number of field trials have taken place in Russia. Laboratory trial results from the TUV NEL will be described in detail. For the 50mm (2") metering system, the total liquid flow rate ranged from 2.4 kg/s up to 11 kg/s, the water cut ranged from 0% to 100%, and the gas volume fraction (GVF) from 0 to 50%. In a formally observed trial, 75 test points were taken at a temperature of approximately 40 °C and with a skid inlet pressure of approximately 350 kPa. Over 95% of the test results fell within the desired specification, defined as follows: the total (oil + water) liquid mass flow error should fall within ± 2.5%, and the gas mass flow error within ± 5.0%. The oil mass flow error limit is ± 6.0% for water cuts less than 70%, while for water cuts between 70% and 95% the oil mass flow error limit is ± 15.0%. These results demonstrate the potential for using Coriolis mass flow metering combined with water cut metering for three-phase (oil/water/gas) measurement.

  4. Inter-trial alignment of EEG data and phase-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testorf, M. E.; Horak, P.; Connolly, A.; Holmes, G. L.; Jobst, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    Neuro-scientific studies are often aimed at imaging brain activity, which is time-locked to external stimuli. This provides the possibility to use statistical methods to extract even weak signal components, which occur with each stimulus. For electroencephalographic recordings this concept is limited by inevitable time jitter, which cannot be controlled in all cases. Our study is based on a cross-correlation analysis of trials to alignment trials based on the recorded data. This is demonstrated both with simulated signals and with clinical EEG data, which were recorded intracranially. Special attention is given to the evaluation of the time-frequency resolved phase-locking across multiple trails.

  5. Design Considerations for Dose-Expansion Cohorts in Phase I Trials

    PubMed Central

    Iasonos, Alexia; O'Quigley, John

    2013-01-01

    Phase I trials are increasingly including dose-expansion cohorts after the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) has been reached to better characterize the toxicity profile or identify early signs of efficacy within a specific disease population. This article provides guidelines on how to monitor safety and re-evaluate the MTD using data obtained from expansion cohorts of phase I protocols. We illustrate how to implement a sequential monitoring rule for safety using a completed phase I trial that included an expansion cohort. We compare the accuracy of the revised MTD with the MTD obtained before expansion and with the true MTD based on simulated trials. The percent of trials that led to a change in the MTD, how far the revised MTD was from the true MTD, and the toxicity rates associated with each level are reported. When toxicity outcomes from the expansion cohort are taken into account, there is a 50% chance that a new, higher MTD will be recommended. Significant improvement in the accuracy of the MTD is obtained 30% of the time (ie, revised MTD is exactly the true MTD), and moderate improvement is obtained 80% of the time when the revised MTD is within a level from true MTD. Failure to include toxicity outcomes from additional patients treated during the expansion phase may result in a less accurate estimate of the MTD. This article provides investigators of phase I protocols with methodological tools to monitor safety and/or efficacy for patients accrued during the expansion phase and to update or confirm the established MTD. PMID:24101039

  6. Phase 3 Trials of Ixekizumab in Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Kenneth B; Blauvelt, Andrew; Papp, Kim A; Langley, Richard G; Luger, Thomas; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Reich, Kristian; Amato, David; Ball, Susan G; Braun, Daniel K; Cameron, Gregory S; Erickson, Janelle; Konrad, Robert J; Muram, Talia M; Nickoloff, Brian J; Osuntokun, Olawale O; Secrest, Roberta J; Zhao, Fangyi; Mallbris, Lotus; Leonardi, Craig L

    2016-07-28

    Background Two phase 3 trials (UNCOVER-2 and UNCOVER-3) showed that at 12 weeks of treatment, ixekizumab, a monoclonal antibody against interleukin-17A, was superior to placebo and etanercept in the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. We report the 60-week data from the UNCOVER-2 and UNCOVER-3 trials, as well as 12-week and 60-week data from a third phase 3 trial, UNCOVER-1. Methods We randomly assigned 1296 patients in the UNCOVER-1 trial, 1224 patients in the UNCOVER-2 trial, and 1346 patients in the UNCOVER-3 trial to receive subcutaneous injections of placebo (placebo group), 80 mg of ixekizumab every 2 weeks after a starting dose of 160 mg (2-wk dosing group), or 80 mg of ixekizumab every 4 weeks after a starting dose of 160 mg (4-wk dosing group). Additional cohorts in the UNCOVER-2 and UNCOVER-3 trials were randomly assigned to receive 50 mg of etanercept twice weekly. At week 12 in the UNCOVER-3 trial, the patients entered a long-term extension period during which they received 80 mg of ixekizumab every 4 weeks through week 60; at week 12 in the UNCOVER-1 and UNCOVER-2 trials, the patients who had a response to ixekizumab (defined as a static Physicians Global Assessment [sPGA] score of 0 [clear] or 1 [minimal psoriasis]) were randomly reassigned to receive placebo, 80 mg of ixekizumab every 4 weeks, or 80 mg of ixekizumab every 12 weeks through week 60. Coprimary end points were the percentage of patients who had a score on the sPGA of 0 or 1 and a 75% or greater reduction from baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI 75) at week 12. Results In the UNCOVER-1 trial, at week 12, the patients had better responses to ixekizumab than to placebo; in the 2-wk dosing group, 81.8% had an sPGA score of 0 or 1 and 89.1% had a PASI 75 response; in the 4-wk dosing group, the respective rates were 76.4% and 82.6%; and in the placebo group, the rates were 3.2% and 3.9% (P<0.001 for all comparisons of ixekizumab with placebo). In the UNCOVER-1 and

  7. Randomized trial of high-dose interferon-alpha-2b combined with ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C: Correlation between amino acid substitutions in the core/NS5A region and virological response to interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nami; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Saneto, Hiromi; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Takaki, Shintaro; Aikata, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shoichi; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of high-dose interferon (IFN)-alpha-2b with standard dose of IFN-alpha-2b in combination with ribavirin (RBV) for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and to investigate the predictive factors associated with virological response. Two hundred Japanese patients with high HCV viral load (>100 KIU/ml) were randomized to 6 or 10 mega units (MU) of 24-week IFN-alpha-2b with RBV. Predictive factors were investigated; including pretreatment amino acid (aa) sequences of the core region and the IFN-sensitive determining region (ISDR). The sustained virological response rate was not different in the two groups (24% vs. 30%) but the incidence of depression was significantly higher in the 10 MU group than 6 MU group (7% vs. 0%, P = 0.02). Younger age (<60) and HCV genotype (2a/b) were significant predictors of sustained virological response. In patients infected with genotype 1b, substitutions of core aa 70 and/or 91 were predictive for non-virological response (P < 0.001), and substitutions in the ISDR was observed frequently in virological responders. Early viral kinetics study showed that serum HCV core antigen decreased more slowly in both patients with aa 70 and/or 91 substitutions in the core and with absence of substitutions in the ISDR. In conclusion, the use of a higher dose of IFN-alpha-2b in combination with RBV did not improve virological response but resulted in higher incidence of depression. Amino acid substitutions in the core and ISDR are predictive of virological response to the therapy in patients with genotype 1b and high viral load. PMID:19235866

  8. Utility of colposcopy in a phase 2 portion of a microbicide clinical trial of BufferGel and 0.5% PRO 2000 Gel

    PubMed Central

    Chirenje, Zvavahera M; Mâsse, Benoît R; Maslankowski, Lisa A; Ramjee, Gita; Coletti, Anne S; Tembo, Tchangani N; Magure, Tsitsi M; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Kelly, Cliff; Hillier, Sharon; Karim, Abdool

    2012-01-01

    Background The majority of new HIV infections are acquired through heterosexual transmission. There is urgent need for prevention methods to compliment behavior change and condom use. Topical microbicide represent a potential strategy for reduction of HIV transmission in women. Methods Monthly Colposcopy evaluations were performed during pelvic examinations among 299 women enrolled in the Phase 2 portion of HPTN 035 study at four sites (1 in USA, 3 in Southern Africa). This was a phase 2/2b, multisite, randomized, and controlled clinical trial with four arms: BufferGel, 0.5% PRO2000 Gel, placebo gel and no gel. At two of the sites, pelvic examinations were conducted by the use of naked eye without colposcopy. Results A colposcopy finding of any kind was detected in 48% of participants at baseline compared to 40% at 3 months (p =0.04). The lower rates were also observed in vaginal discharge (22% at baseline, 16% at 3 months, p=0.06), erythema (15% at baseline, 8% at 3 months, p=0.004). The trend towards significance at p=0.05 disappear when utilizing stringent statistical significance levels. A pelvic finding of any kind was detected in 71% of colposcopy participants compared to 41% of participants who had naked eye examination only conducted at two sites that performed both colposcopy and naked eye without colposcopy. Use of colposcopy yielded significantly higher rates of participants with deep epithelial disruption, erythema and ecchymosis. We observed no cases of incident Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, or Syphilis during the three month follow up. There were 2 cases of incident HIV during 3-month study period neither of which was associated with any abnormal colposcopy evaluation findings. Conclusion No safety signals were observed in the 4 study arms, allowing seamless transition from phase 2 to 2b. Colposcopy utility in microbicide clinical trials has minimal value given high rates of background noise findings of no relevant clinical significance. PMID:22944480

  9. Clinical Development of a Cytomegalovirus DNA Vaccine: From Product Concept to Pivotal Phase 3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Larry R.; Wloch, Mary K.; Chaplin, Jennifer A.; Gerber, Michele; Rolland, Alain P.

    2013-01-01

    2013 marks a milestone year for plasmid DNA vaccine development as a first-in-class cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA vaccine enters pivotal phase 3 testing. This vaccine consists of two plasmids expressing CMV antigens glycoprotein B (gB) and phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) formulated with a CRL1005 poloxamer and benzalkonium chloride (BAK) delivery system designed to enhance plasmid expression. The vaccine’s planned initial indication under investigation is for prevention of CMV reactivation in CMV-seropositive (CMV+) recipients of an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT). A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled phase 2 proof-of-concept study provided initial evidence of the safety of this product in CMV+ HCT recipients who underwent immune ablation conditioning regimens. This study revealed a significant reduction in viral load endpoints and increased frequencies of pp65-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells in vaccine recipients compared to placebo recipients. The results of this endpoint-defining trial provided the basis for defining the primary and secondary endpoints of a global phase 3 trial in HCT recipients. A case study is presented here describing the development history of this vaccine from product concept to initiation of the phase 3 trial. PMID:26344340

  10. Phase II screening trial of lithium carbonate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, D.H.; Forshew, D.A.; Katz, J.S.; Barohn, R.J.; Valan, M.; Bromberg, M.B.; Goslin, K.L.; Graves, M.C.; McCluskey, L.F.; McVey, A.L.; Mozaffar, T.; Florence, J.M.; Pestronk, A.; Ross, M.; Simpson, E.P.; Appel, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To use a historical placebo control design to determine whether lithium carbonate slows progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: A phase II trial was conducted at 10 sites in the Western ALS Study Group using similar dosages (300–450 mg/day), target blood levels (0.3–0.8 mEq/L), outcome measures, and trial duration (13 months) as the positive trial. However, taking riluzole was not a requirement for study entry. Placebo outcomes in patients matched for baseline features from a large database of recent clinical trials, showing stable rates of decline over the past 9 years, were used as historical controls. Results: The mean rate of decline of the ALS Functional Rating Scale–Revised was greater in 107 patients taking lithium carbonate (−1.20/month, 95% confidence interval [CI] −1.41 to −0.98) than that in 249 control patients (−1.01/month, 95% CI −1.11 to −0.92, p = 0.04). There were no differences in secondary outcome measures (forced vital capacity, time to failure, and quality of life), but there were more adverse events in the treated group. Conclusions: The lack of therapeutic benefit and safety concerns, taken together with similar results from 2 other recent trials, weighs against the use of lithium carbonate in patients with ALS. The absence of drift over time and the availability of a large database of patients for selecting a matched historical control group suggest that use of historical controls may result in more efficient phase II trials for screening putative ALS therapeutic agents. Classification of evidence: This study provided Class IV evidence that lithium carbonate does not slow the rate of decline of function in patients with ALS over 13 months. Neurology® 2011;77:973–979 PMID:21813790

  11. Evaluating the performance of copula models in phase I-II clinical trials under model misspecification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditionally, phase I oncology trials are designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), defined as the highest dose with an acceptable probability of dose limiting toxicities(DLT), of a new treatment via a dose escalation study. An alternate approach is to jointly model toxicity and efficacy and allow dose escalation to depend on a pre-specified efficacy/toxicity tradeoff in a phase I-II design. Several phase I-II trial designs have been discussed in the literature; while these model-based designs are attractive in their performance, they are potentially vulnerable to model misspecification. Methods Phase I-II designs often rely on copula models to specify the joint distribution of toxicity and efficacy, which include an additional correlation parameter that can be difficult to estimate. We compare and contrast three models for the joint probability of toxicity and efficacy, including two copula models that have been proposed for use in phase I-II clinical trials and a simple model that assumes the two outcomes are independent. We evaluate the performance of the various models through simulation both when the models are correct and under model misspecification. Results Both models exhibited similar performance, as measured by the probability of correctly identifying the optimal dose and the number of subjects treated at the optimal dose, regardless of whether the data were generated from the correct or incorrect copula, even when there is substantial correlation between the two outcomes. Similar results were observed for a simple model that assumes independence, even in the presence of strong correlation. Further simulation results indicate that estimating the correlation parameter in copula models is difficult with the sample sizes used in Phase I-II clinical trials. Conclusions Our simulation results indicate that the operating characteristics of phase I-II clinical trials are robust to misspecification of the copula model but that a simple

  12. An integrated dose-finding tool for phase I trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengjie; Wang, Sue-Jane; Ji, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    In the past 25 years, the 3+3 design has been the most popular approach for planning phase I dose-finding trials in oncology. During the same time period, major development of more efficient model-based designs has been made by statistical researchers aiming to improve the clinical practice of dose finding in oncology. Despite the effort, 3+3 is still the most frequently used designs in practice. Part of the reason is due to the lack of software tools that allow comparison of different designs, including 3+3 and other model-based methods, in a head-to-head and easy-to-use fashion. To this end, we introduce NextGen-DF, a next-generation tool for designing oncology dose-finding trials that allows for construction, comparison, and calibration of multiple designs via internet, in real time, and independent of computer operating systems. Through NextGen-DF, we present massive and user-generated comparison results based on over 4 million simulated trials, which clearly indicate the inferiority of 3+3. To our knowledge, the reported crowd-sourcing results are the largest and most objective comparison across major dose-finding methods to date. NextGen-DF is expected to improve patient care and drug development by providing safer and more efficient designs for phase I oncology trials. NextGen-DF is available at www.compgenome.org/NGDF. PMID:26419937

  13. Parent Perspectives on Decisions to Participate in a Phase I Hepatocyte Transplant Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dreyzin, Alexandra; Barnato, Amber; Soltys, Kyle; Farris, Coreen; Sada, Rachel; Haberman, Kimberly; Fox, Ira

    2013-01-01

    We examined factors that affect decision-making for families presented with a phase I clinical trial of hepatocyte transplant as a potential alternative to liver transplant for their children among two groups: 1) families who were actually offered enrollment in the hepatocyte trial and; 2) families whose children had liver transplants before the trial was available. We conducted semi-structured interviews about actual and hypothetical decision-making regarding trial participation and used grounded theory analysis to identify common themes. The most common motivator for participation was decline in the child's health. The most common deterrent was lack of data from prior hepatocyte transplants, particularly compared to data available about liver transplant. Interviewees' point of comparison for evaluating relative benefits and risks of hepatocyte transplant oscillated between the alternative of doing nothing while waiting for a liver (the relevant alternative) versus the alternative of getting a liver. These results suggest that families' reluctance to participate may result from misconceptions about severity of the child's disease, underestimating risks of liver transplant, or confusion about the role of hepatocyte transplant in the treatment pathway. Clarification of available treatment alternatives and associated risks as part of informed consent may improve the quality of decision-making regarding trial enrollment. PMID:24251638

  14. Parent perspectives on decisions to participate in a phase I hepatocyte transplant trial.

    PubMed

    Dreyzin, Alexandra; Barnato, Amber E; Soltys, Kyle A; Farris, Coreen; Sada, Rachel; Haberman, Kimberly; Fox, Ira J

    2014-02-01

    We examined factors that affect decision-making for families presented with a phase I clinical trial of hepatocyte transplant as a potential alternative to liver transplant for their children among two groups: (i) families who were actually offered enrollment in the hepatocyte trial and; (ii) families whose children had liver transplants before the trial was available. We conducted semi-structured interviews about actual and hypothetical decision-making regarding trial participation and used grounded theory analysis to identify common themes. The most common motivator for participation was decline in the child's health. The most common deterrent was lack of data from prior hepatocyte transplants, particularly when compared with data available about liver transplant. Interviewees' point of comparison for evaluating relative benefits and risks of hepatocyte transplant oscillated between the alternative of doing nothing while waiting for a liver (the relevant alternative) vs. the alternative of getting a liver. These results suggest that families' reluctance to participate may result from misconceptions about severity of the child's disease, underestimating risks of liver transplant, or confusion about the role of hepatocyte transplant in the treatment pathway. Clarification of available treatment alternatives and associated risks as part of informed consent may improve the quality of decision-making regarding trial enrollment. PMID:24251638

  15. Alirocumab for hyperlipidemia: ODYSSEY Phase III clinical trial results and US FDA approval indications.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eli M

    2016-03-01

    A new class of lipid-lowering drugs, inhibitors of PCSK9 has been generating impressive clinical trial data over the last several years, and alirocumab (Praluent) has become the first to be approved by the US FDA. Alirocumab has been shown to lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 45-62% with a safety profile generally comparable to placebo. Alirocumab is a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9 administered subcutaneously and has been evaluated in 16 Phase III clinical trials, the majority of which have been enrolled or completed. This article will be a review of the available Phase III safety and efficacy data of the ODYSSEY studies including a brief description of each of the 16 studies. PMID:26785741

  16. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program (Consortia) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Five cancer research centers lead multiple collaborative networks to assess potential cancer preventive agents and to conduct early clinical development of promising preventive agents. Also called the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, the studies require extensive biomarker analysis, investigation of the biologic effects of the cancer preventive agents on their intended molecular targets and on multiple endpoints associated with carcinogenesis, and correlation with clinically relevant endpoints.  | Systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents through five major medical research centers.

  17. The fiduciary obligation of the physician-researcher in phase IV trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this manuscript, we argue that within the context of phase IV, physician-researchers retain their fiduciary obligation to treat the patient-participants. Discussion We first clarify why the perspective that research ethics ought to be differentiated from clinical ethics is not applicable in phase IV, and therefore, why therapeutic orientation is most convivial in this phase. Next, assuming that ethics guidelines may be representative of common morality, we show that ethics guidelines see physician-researchers primarily as physicians and only secondarily as researchers. We then elaborate on what a fiduciary obligation is and how some of the obligations are default duties. Lastly, we look at the fiduciary obligation of the physician-researcher in phase IV interventional trials. Conclusion The fiduciary obligation to treat is not as easily waived as in earlier trials. Assuming the entwinement of research and practice in phase IV, physician-researchers, in collaboration with other researchers, investigators, and research ethics committees, should ensure that in terms of study design, methodology, and research practice, the therapeutic value of the research to the patient-participants is not diminished. PMID:24507449

  18. Estimation of drug cost avoidance and pathology cost avoidance through participation in NCIC Clinical Trials Group phase III clinical trials in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tang, P.A.; Hay, A.E.; O’Callaghan, C.J.; Mittmann, N.; Chambers, C.R.; Pater, J.L.; Leighl, N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cost avoidance occurs when, because of provision of a drug therapy [drug cost avoidance (dca)] or a pathology test [pathology cost avoidance (pca)] during trial participation, health care payers need not pay for standard treatments or testing. The aim of our study was to estimate the total dca and pca for Canadian patients enrolled in relevant phase iii trials conducted by the ncic Clinical Trials Group. Methods Phase iii trials that had completed accrual and resulted in dca or pca were identified. The pca was calculated based on the number of patients screened and the test cost. The dca was estimated based on patients randomized, the protocol dosing regimen, drug cost, median dose intensity, and median duration of therapy. Costs are presented in Canadian dollars. No adjustment was made for inflation. Results From 1999 to 2011, 4 trials (1479 patients) resulted in pca and 17 trials (3195 patients) resulted in dca. The total pca was estimated at $4,194,849, which included testing for KRAS ($141,058), microsatellite instability ($18,600), and 21-gene recurrence score ($4,035,191). The total dca was estimated at $27,952,512, of which targeted therapy constituted 43% (five trials). The combined pca and dca was $32,147,361. Conclusions Over the study period, trials conducted by the ncic Clinical Trials Group resulted in total cost avoidance (pca and dca) of approximately $7,518 per patient. Although not all trials lead to cost avoidance, such savings should be taken account when the financial impact of conducting clinical research is being considered. PMID:26985151

  19. Novel therapies for resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FONT) phase II clinical trial: study design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The lack of adequate randomized clinical trials (RCT) has hindered identification of new therapies that are safe and effective for patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), especially in patients who fail to respond to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies. Recent basic science advances have led to development of alternative treatments that specifically target aberrant pathways of fibrosis which are relevant to disease progression in FSGS. There is a need for a flexible Phase II study design which will test such novel antifibrotic strategies in order to identify agents suitable for phase III testing. Methods/Design The Novel Therapies for Resistant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FONT) project is a multicenter Phase I/II RCT designed to investigate the potential efficacy of novel therapies for resistant FSGS. Adalimumab and galactose will be evaluated against conservative therapy consisting of the combination of lisinopril, losartan and atorvastatin. The sample size is defined to assure that if one of the treatments has a superior response rate compared to that of the other treatments, it will be selected with high probability for further evaluation. Comparison of primary and secondary endpoints in each study arm will enable a choice to be made of which treatments are worthy of further study in future Phase III RCT. Discussion This report highlights the key features of the FONT II RCT including the two-step outcome analysis that will expedite achievement of the study objectives. The proposed phase II study design will help to identify promising agents for further testing while excluding ineffective agents. This staged approach can help to prevent large expenditures on unworthy therapeutic agents in the management of serious but rare kidney diseases Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00814255 PMID:21310077

  20. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  1. Phase II Trial of Concurrent Sunitinib and Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Oligometastases

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Charles C. L.; Ko, Eric C.; Sung, Max W.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stock, Richard G.; Packer, Stuart H.; Forsythe, Kevin; Genden, Eric M.; Schwartz, Myron; Lau, K. H. Vincent; Galsky, Matthew; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Chen, Shu-hsia; Kao, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    Background Preclinical data suggest that sunitinib enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy. We tested the combination of sunitinib and hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in a cohort of patients with historically incurable distant metastases. Methods Twenty five patients with oligometastases, defined as 1–5 sites of active disease on whole body imaging, were enrolled in a phase II trial from 2/08 to 9/10. The most common tumor types treated were head and neck, liver, lung, kidney and prostate cancers. Patients were treated with the recommended phase II dose of 37.5 mg daily sunitinib (days 1–28) and IGRT 50 Gy (days 8–12 and 15–19). Maintenance sunitinib was used in 33% of patients. Median follow up was 17.5 months (range, 0.7 to 37.4 months). Results The 18-month local control, distant control, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 75%, 52%, 56% and 71%, respectively. At last follow-up, 11 (44%) patients were alive without evidence of disease, 7 (28%) were alive with distant metastases, 3 (12%) were dead from distant metastases, 3 (12%) were dead from comorbid illness, and 1 (4%) was dead from treatment-related toxicities. The incidence of acute grade ≥ 3 toxicities was 28%, most commonly myelosuppression, bleeding and abnormal liver function tests. Conclusions Concurrent sunitinib and IGRT achieves major clinical responses in a subset of patients with oligometastases. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00463060 PMID:22761653

  2. Phase III Preclinical Trials in Translational Stroke Research: Community Response on Framework and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Henninger, Nils; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-08-01

    The multicenter phase III preclinical trial concept is currently discussed to enhance the predictive value of preclinical stroke research. After public announcement, we collected a community feedback on the concept with emphasis on potential design features and guidelines by an anonymous survey. Response analysis was conducted after plausibility checks by applying qualitative and quantitative measures. Most respondents supported the concept, including the implementation of a centralized steering committee. Based on received feedback, we suggest careful, stepwise implementation and to leave selected competencies and endpoint analysis at the discretion of participating centers. Strict application of quality assurance methods is accepted, but should be harmonized. However, received responses also indicate that the application of particular quality assurance models may require more attention throughout the community. Interestingly, clear and pragmatic preferences were given regarding publication and financing, suggesting the establishing of writing committees similar to large-scale clinical trials and global funding resources for financial support. The broad acceptance among research community encourages phase III preclinical trial implementation. PMID:27297402

  3. Obtaining Valid Laboratory Data in Clinical Trials Conducted in Resource Diverse Settings: Lessons Learned from a Microbicide Phase III Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Crucitti, Tania; Fransen, Katrien; Maharaj, Rashika; Tenywa, Tom; Massinga Loembé, Marguerite; Murugavel, Kailapuri Gangatharan; Mendonca, Kevin; Abdellati, Said; Beelaert, Greet; Van Damme, Lut

    2010-01-01

    Background Over the last decade several phase III microbicides trials have been conducted in developing countries. However, laboratories in resource constrained settings do not always have the experience, infrastructure, and the capacity to deliver laboratory data meeting the high standards of clinical trials. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a laboratory quality assurance program which was implemented during a phase III clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of the candidate microbicide Cellulose Sulfate 6% (CS) [1]. Methodology In order to assess the effectiveness of CS for HIV and STI prevention, a phase III clinical trial was conducted in 5 sites: 3 in Africa and 2 in India. The trial sponsor identified an International Central Reference Laboratory (ICRL), responsible for the design and management of a quality assurance program, which would guarantee the reliability of laboratory data. The ICRL provided advice on the tests, assessed local laboratories, organized trainings, conducted supervision visits, performed re-tests, and prepared control panels. Local laboratories were provided with control panels for HIV rapid tests and Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG) amplification technique. Aliquots from respective control panels were tested by local laboratories and were compared with results obtained at the ICRL. Results Overall, good results were observed. However, discordances between the ICRL and site laboratories were identified for HIV and CT/NG results. One particular site experienced difficulties with HIV rapid testing shortly after study initiation. At all sites, DNA contamination was identified as a cause of invalid CT/NG results. Both problems were timely detected and solved. Through immediate feedback, guidance and repeated training of laboratory staff, additional inaccuracies were prevented. Conclusions Quality control guidelines when applied in field laboratories ensured the reliability and validity of final study data

  4. Precision Medicine for Molecularly Targeted Agents and Immunotherapies in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Juanita; Harris, Sam; Roda, Desam; Yap, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology promises the matching of genomic, molecular, and clinical data with underlying mechanisms of a range of novel anticancer therapeutics to develop more rational and effective antitumor strategies in a timely manner. However, despite the remarkable progress made in the understanding of novel drivers of different oncogenic processes, success rates for the approval of oncology drugs remain low with substantial fiscal consequences. In this article, we focus on how recent rapid innovations in technology have brought greater clarity to the biological and clinical complexities of different cancers and advanced the development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in clinical trials. We discuss the key challenges of identifying and validating predictive biomarkers of response and resistance using both tumor and surrogate tissues, as well as the hurdles associated with intratumor heterogeneity. Finally, we outline evolving strategies employed in early-phase trial designs that incorporate omics-based technologies. PMID:26609214

  5. Therapeutic Intervention in Multiple Sclerosis with Alpha B-Crystallin: A Randomized Controlled Phase IIa Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, Johannes M.; Bsibsi, Malika; Nacken, Peter J.; Verbeek, Richard; Venneker, Edna H.G.

    2015-01-01

    As a molecular chaperone and activator of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated protective responses by microglia and macrophages, the small heat shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HspB5) exerts therapeutic effects in different animal models for neuroinflammation, including the model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, HspB5 can also stimulate human antigen-specific memory T cells to release IFN-γ, a cytokine with well-documented detrimental effects during MS. In this study, we explored in a Phase IIa randomized clinical trial the therapeutic application of HspB5 in relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS), using intravenous doses sufficient to support its protective effects, but too low to trigger pathogenic memory T-cell responses. These sub-immunogenic doses were selected based on in vitro analysis of the dose-response profile of human T cells and macrophages to HspB5, and on the immunological effects of HspB5 in healthy humans as established in a preparatory Phase I study. In a 48-week randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind Phase IIa trial, three bimonthly intravenous injections of 7.5, 12.5 or 17.5 mg HspB5 were found to be safe and well tolerated in RR-MS patients. While predefined clinical endpoints did not differ significantly between the relatively small groups of MS patients treated with either HspB5 or placebo, repeated administration especially of the lower doses of HspB5 led to a progressive decline in MS lesion activity as monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was not seen in the placebo group. Exploratory linear regression analysis revealed this decline to be significant in the combined group receiving either of the two lower doses, and to result in a 76% reduction in both number and total volumes of active MRI lesions at 9 months into the study. These data provide the first indication for clinical benefit resulting from intervention in RR-MS with HspB5. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Phase I: NCT02442557; Phase IIa: NCT02442570 PMID

  6. Phase I clinical trial of multiple-peptide vaccination for patients with advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) is extremely poor and only a few standard treatments are available for this condition. We performed a phase I trial to investigate the safety, immune response and anti-tumor effect of vaccination with three peptides derived from cancer-testis antigens. Methods This study was conducted as a phase I trial. Nine patients with advanced BTC who had unresectable tumors and were refractory to standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Three HLA-A*2402 restricted epitope peptides-cell division cycle associated 1 (CDCA1), cadherin 3 (CDH3) and kinesin family member 20A (KIF20A)-were administered subcutaneously, and the adverse events and immune response were assessed. The clinical effects observed were the tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The three-peptide vaccination was well-tolerated up to a dose of 3 mg per peptide (9 mg total). No grade 3 or 4 adverse events were observed after vaccination. Peptide-specific T cell immune responses were observed in all patients and stable disease was observed in 5 of 9 patients. The median PFS and OS were 3.4 and 9.7 months. The Grade 2 injection site reaction and continuous vaccination after PD judgment appeared to be prognostic of OS. Conclusions Multiple-peptide vaccination was well tolerated and induced peptide-specific T-cell responses. Trial registration This study was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR000003229). PMID:24606884

  7. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac, atorvastatin, and prebiotic dietary fiber for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mahoney, Michelle R; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Sontag, Stephen J; Schoen, Robert E; Benya, Richard; Lawson, Michael J; Weinberg, David S; Stoffel, Elena; Chiorean, Michael; Heigh, Russell; Levine, Joel; Della'Zanna, Gary; Rodriguez, Luz; Richmond, Ellen; Gostout, Christopher; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2011-02-01

    Sulindac, atorvastatin, or prebiotic dietary fiber may reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, clinical trial data are currently limited. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving subjects 40 years or older, with previously resected colon cancer or multiple/advanced colorectal adenomas. Magnification chromoendoscopy (MCE) was performed to identify and characterize rectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF); eligibility criteria required five or more rectal ACFs at baseline. Intervention assignments were as follows: (a) atorvastatin 20 mg qd; (b) sulindac 150 mg bid; (c) oligofructose-enriched inulin (as ORAFTI®Synergy1) 6 gm bid; or (d) control (maltodextrin) 6 gm bid, for 6 months. Percent change in rectal ACF number (%ΔACF) within arm was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints included changes in proliferation (Ki67) and apoptosis (caspase-3), as measured from normal mucosa biopsy samples. Among 85 eligible randomized subjects, 76 (86%) completed the trial per protocol. The median (range) of rectal ACF was 9 (5-34) and 8 (0-37) at baseline and postintervention, respectively. The median (SD) for %ΔACF was 5.6 (-69% to 143%), -18.6 (-83% to 160%), -3.6 (-88% to 83%), and -10.0 (-100% to 117%) in the atorvastatin, sulindac, ORAFTI®Synergy1 and control arms, respectively. Neither within-arm (P = 0.12-0.59) nor between-arm (P = 0.30-0.92) comparisons of %ΔACF were statistically significant. The active and control interventions also seemed to have similar effects on mucosal proliferation and apoptosis (P > 0.05 for each comparison). Data from this multicenter, phase II trial do not provide convincing evidence of CRC risk reduction from 6-month interventions with atorvastatin, sulindac, or ORAFTI®Synergy1, although statistical power was limited by the relatively small sample size. PMID:21209397

  8. Evaluation of utility of pharmacokinetic studies in phase I trials of two oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kehua; House, Larry; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Seminerio, Michael J.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There are many phase I trials of oncology drug combinations, very few of which report clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions. We hypothesized that the utility of such pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies is low in the absence of a mechanistic hypothesis. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed 152 phase I (2 drug) combination studies published in 2007–2011. Results Only 28 (18%) studies had an implicit or explicit rationale, either inhibition/induction of a drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter, co-substrates for the same enzyme or transporter, potential for end-organ toxicity, or protein binding. Only 12 (8%) studies demonstrated a statistically significant DDI, based on change in clearance (or area under the curve) of parent drug and/or active metabolite. There was a strong association between a rationale and a demonstrable drug interaction, as only 2% of studies without a rationale demonstrated a DDI, compared to 32% of studies with a rationale (Fisher’s exact test, p<10−6). Conclusion DDI studies should not be routinely performed as part of phase I trials of oncology combinations. PMID:24056785

  9. KEEPING A STEP AHEAD - FORMATIVE PHASE OF A WORKPLACE INTERVENTION TRIAL TO PREVENT OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Zapka, Jane; Lemon, Stephenie C.; Estabrook, Barbara B.; Jolicoeur, Denise G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Ecological interventions hold promise for promoting overweight and obesity prevention in worksites. Given the paucity of evaluative research in the hospital worksite setting, considerable formative work is required for successful implementation and evaluation. Purpose This paper describes the formative phases of Step Ahead, a site-randomized controlled trial of a multi-level intervention that promotes physical activity and healthy eating in 6 hospitals in central Massachusetts. The purpose of the formative research phase was to increase the feasibility, effectiveness and likelihood of sustainability of the intervention. Design and Procedures The Step Ahead ecological intervention approach targets change at the organization, the interpersonal work environment and the individual levels. The intervention was developed using fundamental steps of intervention mapping and important tenets of participatory research. Formative research methods were used to engage leadership support and assistance and to develop an intervention plan that is both theoretically and practically grounded. This report uses observational data, program minutes and reports, and process tracking data. Developmental Strategies and Observations Leadership involvement (key informant interviews and advisory boards), employee focus groups and advisory boards, and quantitative environmental assessments cultivated participation and support. Determining multiple foci of change and designing measurable objectives and generic assessment tools to document progress are complex challenges encountered in planning phases. Lessons Learned Multi-level trials in diverse organizations require flexibility and balance of theory application and practice-based perspectives to affect impact and outcome objectives. Formative research is an essential component. PMID:18073339

  10. A Phase 1 Trial of MSP2-C1, a Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine Containing 2 Isoforms of MSP2 Formulated with Montanide® ISA 720

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James S.; Marjason, Joanne; Elliott, Suzanne; Fahey, Paul; Bang, Gilles; Malkin, Elissa; Tierney, Eveline; Aked-Hurditch, Hayley; Adda, Christopher; Cross, Nadia; Richards, Jack S.; Fowkes, Freya J. I.; Boyle, Michelle J.; Long, Carole; Druilhe, Pierre; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a previous Phase 1/2b malaria vaccine trial testing the 3D7 isoform of the malaria vaccine candidate Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2), parasite densities in children were reduced by 62%. However, breakthrough parasitemias were disproportionately of the alternate dimorphic form of MSP2, the FC27 genotype. We therefore undertook a dose-escalating, double-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase 1 trial in healthy, malaria-naïve adults of MSP2-C1, a vaccine containing recombinant forms of the two families of msp2 alleles, 3D7 and FC27 (EcMSP2-3D7 and EcMSP2-FC27), formulated in equal amounts with Montanide® ISA 720 as a water-in-oil emulsion. Methodology/Principal Findings The trial was designed to include three dose cohorts (10, 40, and 80 µg), each with twelve subjects receiving the vaccine and three control subjects receiving Montanide® ISA 720 adjuvant emulsion alone, in a schedule of three doses at 12-week intervals. Due to unexpected local reactogenicity and concern regarding vaccine stability, the trial was terminated after the second immunisation of the cohort receiving the 40 µg dose; no subjects received the 80 µg dose. Immunization induced significant IgG responses to both isoforms of MSP2 in the 10 µg and 40 µg dose cohorts, with antibody levels by ELISA higher in the 40 µg cohort. Vaccine-induced antibodies recognised native protein by Western blots of parasite protein extracts and by immunofluorescence microscopy. Although the induced anti-MSP2 antibodies did not directly inhibit parasite growth in vitro, IgG from the majority of individuals tested caused significant antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI) of parasite growth. Conclusions/Significance As the majority of subjects vaccinated with MSP2-C1 developed an antibody responses to both forms of MSP2, and that these antibodies mediated ADCI provide further support for MSP2 as a malaria vaccine candidate. However, in view of the reactogenicity of this formulation, further

  11. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting. PMID:24273128

  12. First update of the International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--Chapter 2b: genetically modified source pigs.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Peter J; Ayares, David; Wolf, Eckhard; Cooper, David K C

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification of the source pig offers the opportunity to improve the engraftment and survival of islet xenografts. The type of modification can be tailored to the transplant setting; for example, intraportal islet xenografts have been shown to benefit from the expression of anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory transgenes, whereas cytoprotective transgenes are probably more relevant for encapsulated islets. The rapid development of pig genetic engineering, particularly with the introduction of genome editing techniques such as CRISPR-Cas, has accelerated the generation of new pig lines with multiple modifications. With pre-clinical testing in progress, it is an opportune time to consider any implications of genetic modification for the conditions for undertaking clinical trials. Obviously, the stringent requirements to fulfill designated pathogen-free status that are applied to wild-type pigs will apply equally to genetically modified (GM) source pigs. In addition, it is important from a safety perspective that the genetic modifications are characterized at the molecular level (e.g., integration site, absence of off-target mutations), the phenotypic level (e.g., durability and stability of transgene expression), and the functional level (e.g., protection of islets in vitro or in vivo, absence of detrimental effects on insulin secretion). The assessment of clinical trial protocols using GM pig islets will need to be performed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account a range of factors including the particular genetic modification(s) and the site and method of delivery. PMID:26926888

  13. Web-based data management for a phase II clinical trial in ALS.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Richard; Kaufmann, Petra; Barsdorf, Alexandra I; Arbing, Rachel; Montes, Jacqueline; Thompson, John L P

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to report on the creation, features and performance of a web-based data management system for a two-stage phase II randomized clinical trial of Co-Enzyme Q10 in ALS. We created a relatively comprehensive web-based data system that provided electronic data entry; patient management utilities; adverse event reporting, safety monitoring, and invoice generation; and standardized coding for medications and adverse events. In stage 1, clinical sites submitted 7207 forms reporting on 105 patients followed for 10 months. Less than 0.7% of submitted forms contained errors. At the time of the delivery of the analysis data set, only four errors remained unresolved. Data were available quickly, with a median time from event to data posting of two days. The data set was locked and the analysis data set produced nine days after the final patient visit. A survey of trial personnel yielded generally positive feedback, with 75% of respondents wishing to use a similar system in the future. Given sufficient resources, a comprehensive web-based data management system can meet the need for clean, available data in clinical trials in ALS and similar diseases, and can contribute significantly to their efficient execution. PMID:19922127

  14. A PCA approach to population analysis: with application to a Phase II depression trial.

    PubMed

    Marostica, Eleonora; Russu, Alberto; Gomeni, Roberto; Zamuner, Stefano; De Nicolao, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    For psychiatric diseases, established mechanistic models are lacking and alternative empirical mathematical structures are usually explored by a trial-and-error procedure. To address this problem, one of the most promising approaches is an automated model-free technique that extracts the model structure directly from the statistical properties of the data. In this paper, a linear-in-parameter modelling approach is developed based on principal component analysis (PCA). The model complexity, i.e. the number of components entering the PCA-based model, is selected by either cross-validation or Mallows' Cp criterion. This new approach has been validated on both simulated and clinical data taken from a Phase II depression trial. Simulated datasets are generated through three parametric models: Weibull, Inverse Bateman and Weibull-and-Linear. In particular, concerning simulated datasets, it is found that the PCA approach compares very favourably with some of the popular parametric models used for analyzing data collected during psychiatric trials. Furthermore, the proposed method performs well on the experimental data. This approach can be useful whenever a mechanistic modelling procedure cannot be pursued. Moreover, it could support subsequent semi-mechanistic model building. PMID:23504512

  15. Should pregnant women be included in phase IV clinical drug trials?

    PubMed

    Briggs, Gerald G; Polifka, Janine E; Wisner, Katherine L; Gervais, Eric; Miller, Richard K; Berard, Anick; Koren, Gideon; Forinash, Alicia; Towers, Craig V

    2015-12-01

    Relatively few drugs, especially those recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, have published human pregnancy experience. Although all drugs contain animal reproduction data, these are usually not predictive of human risk. Clinical trials in pregnant women are rarely conducted because of ethical and legal concerns, and it may be many years before sufficient observational data are collected to guide clinical treatment decisions. Because many of these drugs will be used in pregnancy, human data are needed shortly after the drugs come to the market. Lack of human data leads to uncertainty over whether a drug can be safely prescribed for a pregnant patient. Unless there are compelling scientific and ethical reasons to exclude them, pregnant women should be included in phase IV clinical trials (postmarketing studies to obtain additional information, including the risks, benefits, and optimal use of a drug). This paper examines how physicians currently counsel pregnant women when there are no human data and proposes an alternative method in which knowledge regarding risks associated with the use of drugs during pregnancy can be enhanced in a clinical trial setting. PMID:26008178

  16. Breast cancer follow-up strategies in randomized phase III adjuvant clinical trials: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of different breast cancer follow-up procedures to decrease breast cancer mortality are still an object of debate, even if intensive follow-up by imaging modalities is not recommended by international guidelines since 1997. We conducted a systematic review of surveillance procedures utilized, in the last ten years, in phase III randomized trials (RCTs) of adjuvant treatments in early stage breast cancer with disease free survival as primary endpoint of the study, in order to verify if a similar variance exists in the scientific world. Follow-up modalities were reported in 66 RCTs, and among them, minimal and intensive approaches were equally represented, each being followed by 33 (50%) trials. The minimal surveillance regimen is preferred by international and North American RCTs (P = 0.001) and by trials involving more than one country (P = 0.004), with no relationship with the number of participating centers (P = 0.173), with pharmaceutical industry sponsorship (P = 0.80) and with trials enrolling > 1000 patients (P = 0.14). At multivariate regression analysis, only geographic location of the trial was predictive for a distinct follow-up methodology (P = 0.008): Western European (P = 0.004) and East Asian studies (P = 0.010) use intensive follow-up procedures with a significantly higher frequency than international RCTs, while no differences have been detected between North American and international RCTs. Stratifying the studies according to the date of beginning of patients enrollment, before or after 1998, in more recent RCTs the minimal approach is more frequently followed by international and North American RCTs (P = 0.01), by trials involving more than one country (P = 0.01) and with more than 50 participating centers (P = 0.02). It would be highly desirable that in the near future breast cancer follow-up procedures will be homogeneous in RCTs and everyday clinical settings. PMID:24438135

  17. Progressive Staging of Pilot Studies to Improve Phase III Trials for Motor Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the suboptimal research pathways that finally led to multicenter randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) of treadmill training with partial body weight support and of robotic assistive devices, strategically planned successive stages are proposed for pilot studies of novel rehabilitation interventions Stage 1, consideration-of-concept studies, drawn from animal experiments, theories, and observations, delineate the experimental intervention in a small convenience sample of participants, so the results must be interpreted with caution. Stage 2, development-of-concept pilots, should optimize the components of the intervention, settle on most appropriate outcome measures, and examine dose-response effects. A well-designed study that reveals no efficacy should be published to counterweight the confirmation bias of positive trials. Stage 3, demonstration-of-concept pilots, can build out from what has been learned to test at least 15 participants in each arm, using random assignment and blinded outcome measures. A control group should receive an active practice intervention aimed at the same primary outcome. A third arm could receive a substantially larger dose of the experimental therapy or a combinational intervention. If only 1 site performed this trial, a different investigative group should aim to reproduce positive outcomes based on the optimal dose of motor training. Stage 3 studies ought to suggest an effect size of 0.4 or higher, so that approximately 50 participants in each arm will be the number required to test for efficacy in a stage 4, proof-of-concept MRCT. By developing a consensus around acceptable and necessary practices for each stage, similar to CONSORT recommendations for the publication of phase III clinical trials, better quality pilot studies may move quickly into better designed and more successful MRCTs of experimental interventions. PMID:19240197

  18. A randomized clinical trial of peginterferon alpha-2b with or without entecavir in patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B: Role of host and viral factors associated with treatment response.

    PubMed

    Tangkijvanich, P; Chittmittraprap, S; Poovorawan, K; Limothai, U; Khlaiphuengsin, A; Chuaypen, N; Wisedopas, N; Poovorawan, Y

    2016-06-01

    Combining peginterferon (PEG-IFN) and a potent nucleoside/nucleotide analogue might improve treatment response in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy of PEG-IFN alpha-2b with or without entecavir in HBeAg-negative CHB and to investigate predictors of response. A total of 126 treatment-naïve patients were randomly assigned to receive monotherapy (n = 63) or combination therapy (n = 63) for 48 weeks. Virological response (VR) was defined as HBV DNA level <2000 IU/mL at week 96. Baseline factors including polymorphisms in the IFNL3 (rs12979860) and HLA-DPA1 (rs3077) genes and on-treatment viral kinetics were determined. At week 48, rates of undetectable HBV DNA were lower in the monotherapy than combination groups, but rates of HBsAg clearance and decline were comparable. At week 96, there was no difference between the corresponding groups regarding virological response (41.3% vs 38.1%, P = 0.856), HBsAg clearance (9.5% vs 4.8%, P = 0.491) and HBsAg decline. Baseline HBsAg level [odds ratio (OR): 3.14 (1.34-7.69), P = 0.012] and rs3077 polymorphism [OR: 2.78 (1.27-6.11), P = 0.011] were independent predictors of response. Patients carried GG genotype of rs3077 with low baseline HBV (<1000 IU/mL) had high probability of achieving VR (76.5%) and HBsAg clearance (29.4%). None of the patients without decrease in HBsAg combined with <2 log10 HBV DNA decline at week 12 achieved a virological response. In conclusion, the combination therapy lead to greater on-treatment HBV DNA suppression but did not improve virological response and HBsAg clearance/decline over monotherapy. Host and viral factors could help optimize decision-making at baseline and during PEG-IFN-based therapy. PMID:26387494

  19. Screened selection design for randomised phase II oncology trials: an example in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As there are limited patients for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia trials, it is important that statistical methodologies in Phase II efficiently select regimens for subsequent evaluation in larger-scale Phase III trials. Methods We propose the screened selection design (SSD), which is a practical multi-stage, randomised Phase II design for two experimental arms. Activity is first evaluated by applying Simon’s two-stage design (1989) on each arm. If both are active, the play-the-winner selection strategy proposed by Simon, Wittes and Ellenberg (SWE) (1985) is applied to select the superior arm. A variant of the design, Modified SSD, also allows the arm with the higher response rates to be recommended only if its activity rate is greater by a clinically-relevant value. The operating characteristics are explored via a simulation study and compared to a Bayesian Selection approach. Results Simulations showed that with the proposed SSD, it is possible to retain the sample size as required in SWE and obtain similar probabilities of selecting the correct superior arm of at least 90%; with the additional attractive benefit of reducing the probability of selecting ineffective arms. This approach is comparable to a Bayesian Selection Strategy. The Modified SSD performs substantially better than the other designs in selecting neither arm if the underlying rates for both arms are desirable but equivalent, allowing for other factors to be considered in the decision making process. Though its probability of correctly selecting a superior arm might be reduced, it still performs reasonably well. It also reduces the probability of selecting an inferior arm. Conclusions SSD provides an easy to implement randomised Phase II design that selects the most promising treatment that has shown sufficient evidence of activity, with available R codes to evaluate its operating characteristics. PMID:23819695

  20. Twenty-Seven Years of Phase III Trials for Patients with Extensive Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Disappointing Results

    PubMed Central

    Oze, Isao; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Takigawa, Nagio; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. Methods and Findings We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. Results: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS) increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE) regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine–based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. Conclusions and Significance The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care. PMID:19915681

  1. Optimal adaptive two-stage designs for early phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Wilding, Gregory E; Hutson, Alan D; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2016-04-15

    Simon's optimal two-stage design has been widely used in early phase clinical trials for Oncology and AIDS studies with binary endpoints. With this approach, the second-stage sample size is fixed when the trial passes the first stage with sufficient activity. Adaptive designs, such as those due to Banerjee and Tsiatis (2006) and Englert and Kieser (2013), are flexible in the sense that the second-stage sample size depends on the response from the first stage, and these designs are often seen to reduce the expected sample size under the null hypothesis as compared with Simon's approach. An unappealing trait of the existing designs is that they are not associated with a second-stage sample size, which is a non-increasing function of the first-stage response rate. In this paper, an efficient intelligent process, the branch-and-bound algorithm, is used in extensively searching for the optimal adaptive design with the smallest expected sample size under the null, while the type I and II error rates are maintained and the aforementioned monotonicity characteristic is respected. The proposed optimal design is observed to have smaller expected sample sizes compared to Simon's optimal design, and the maximum total sample size of the proposed adaptive design is very close to that from Simon's method. The proposed optimal adaptive two-stage design is recommended for use in practice to improve the flexibility and efficiency of early phase therapeutic development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26526165

  2. Phase II randomised trial of chemoradiotherapy with FOLFOX4 or cisplatin plus fluorouracil in oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, T; Yataghène, Y; Etienne, P L; Michel, P; Senellart, H; Raoul, J L; Mineur, L; Rives, M; Mirabel, X; Lamezec, B; Rio, E; Le Prisé, E; Peiffert, D; Adenis, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a valuable treatment option for localised oesophageal cancer (EC), but improvement is still needed. A randomised phase II trial was initiated to assess the feasibility and efficacy in terms of the endoscopic complete response rate (ECRR) of radiotherapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin and fluorouracil (FOLFOX4) or cisplatin/fluorouracil. Methods: Patients with unresectable EC (any T, any N, M0 or M1a), or medically unfit for surgery, were randomly assigned to receive either six cycles (three concomitant and three post-radiotherapy) of FOLFOX4 (arm A) or four cycles (two concomitant and two post-radiotherapy) of cisplatin/fluorouracil (arm B) along with radiotherapy 50 Gy in both arms. Responses were reviewed by independent experts. Results: A total of 97 patients were randomised (arm A/B, 53/44) and 95 were assessable. The majority had squamous cell carcinoma (82% arm A/B, 42/38). Chemoradiotherapy was completed in 74 and 66%. The ECRR was 45 and 29% in arms A and B, respectively. Median times to progression were 15.2 and 9.2 months and the median overall survival was 22.7 and 15.1 months in arms A and B, respectively. Conclusion: Chemoradiotherapy with FOLFOX4, a well-tolerated and convenient combination with promising efficacy, is now being tested in a phase III trial. PMID:20940718

  3. Escalation with Overdose Control Using Time to Toxicity for Cancer Phase I Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tighiouart, Mourad; Liu, Yuan; Rogatko, André

    2014-01-01

    Escalation with overdose control (EWOC) is a Bayesian adaptive phase I clinical trial design that produces consistent sequences of doses while controlling the probability that patients are overdosed. However, this design does not take explicitly into account the time it takes for a patient to exhibit dose limiting toxicity (DLT) since the occurrence of DLT is ascertained within a predetermined window of time. Models to estimate the Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) that use the exact time when the DLT occurs are expected to be more precise than those where the variable of interest is categorized as presence or absence of DLT, given that information is lost in the process of categorization of the variable. We develop a class of parametric models for time to toxicity data in order to estimate the MTD efficiently, and present extensive simulations showing that the method has good design operating characteristics relative to the original EWOC and a version of time to event EWOC (TITE-EWOC) which allocates weights to account for the time it takes for a patient to exhibit DLT. The methodology is exemplified by a cancer phase I clinical trial we designed in order to estimate the MTD of Veliparib (ABT-888) in combination with fixed doses of gemcitabine and intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced, un-resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:24663812

  4. Phase 1 trial of vocimagene amiretrorepvec and 5-fluorocytosine for recurrent high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Cloughesy, Timothy F; Landolfi, Joseph; Hogan, Daniel J; Bloomfield, Stephen; Carter, Bob; Chen, Clark C; Elder, J Bradley; Kalkanis, Steven N; Kesari, Santosh; Lai, Albert; Lee, Ian Y; Liau, Linda M; Mikkelsen, Tom; Nghiemphu, Phioanh Leia; Piccioni, David; Walbert, Tobias; Chu, Alice; Das, Asha; Diago, Oscar R; Gammon, Dawn; Gruber, Harry E; Hanna, Michelle; Jolly, Douglas J; Kasahara, Noriyuki; McCarthy, David; Mitchell, Leah; Ostertag, Derek; Robbins, Joan M; Rodriguez-Aguirre, Maria; Vogelbaum, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Toca 511 (vocimagene amiretrorepvec) is an investigational nonlytic, retroviral replicating vector (RRV) that delivers a yeast cytosine deaminase, which converts subsequently administered courses of the investigational prodrug Toca FC (extended-release 5-fluorocytosine) into the antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil. Forty-five subjects with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma were treated. The end points of this phase 1, open-label, ascending dose, multicenter trial included safety, efficacy, and molecular profiling; survival was compared to a matching subgroup from an external control. Overall survival for recurrent high-grade glioma was 13.6 months (95% confidence interval, 10.8 to 20.0) and was statistically improved relative to an external control (hazard ratio, 0.45; P = 0.003). Tumor samples from subjects surviving more than 52 weeks after Toca 511 delivery disproportionately displayed a survival-related mRNA expression signature, identifying a potential molecular signature that may correlate with treatment-related survival rather than being prognostic. Toca 511 and Toca FC show excellent tolerability, with RRV persisting in the tumor and RRV control systemically. The favorable assessment of Toca 511 and Toca FC supports confirmation in a randomized phase 2/3 trial (NCT02414165). PMID:27252174

  5. Novel Agents for Multiple Myeloma to Overcome Resistance in Phase III Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of novel agents such as bortezomib and lenalidomide into initial therapy for multiple myeloma has improved the response rate of induction regimens. Also, these drugs are being increasingly used in the peri-transplant setting for transplant-eligible patients, and as part of consolidation and/or maintenance after front-line treatment, including in transplant-ineligible patients. Together, these and other strategies have contributed to a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival in myeloma patients, and an increasing proportion are able to sustain a remission for many years. Despite these improvements, however, the vast majority of patients continue to suffer relapses, which suggests a prominent role for either primary, innate drug resistance, or secondary, acquired drug resistance. As a result, there remains a strong need to develop new proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, as well as new drug classes, which would be effective in the relapsed and/or refractory setting, and overcome drug resistance. This review will focus on novel drugs that have reached phase III trials, including carfilzomib and pomalidomide, which have recently garnered regulatory approvals. In addition, agents that are in phase II or III, potentially registration-enabling trials will be described as well, to provide an overview of the possible landscape in the relapsed and/or refractory arena over the next five years. PMID:24135408

  6. Clinical trials with oncolytic reovirus: Moving beyond phase I into combinations with standard therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, K.J.; Vile, R.G.; Melcher, A.; Chester, J.; Pandha, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    It is time for those working on oncolytic viruses to take stock of the status of the field. We now have at our disposal an array of potential therapeutic agents, and are beginning to conduct early-phase clinical trials in patients with relapsed/metastatic cancers. By drawing on lessons learned during the development of other biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies and targeted small molecule inhibitors, we are now in a position to chart the course of the next wave of trials that will go beyond the phase I studies of safety and feasibility. In this article we review our approach to the development of oncolytic viruses as cancer therapeutics. In doing so, we emphasise the fact that this process is modular and involves multiple iterative steps between the laboratory and the clinic. Ultimately, at least in the medium term, the future of oncolytic virotherapy lies in combination regimens with standard anti-cancer agents such as radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:20223697

  7. A preliminary Phase I trial of partially purified interferon-gamma in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Foon, K A; Abrams, P G; Heyman, M R; Ochs, J J; Watson, T; Maluish, A; Oldham, R K

    1984-12-01

    Thirty-three patients were treated in an escalating single-dose trial of partially purified nonrecombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The first seven patients received intramuscular injections of IFN-gamma in doses up to 20 X 10(6) units/m2. When it became clear that these patients had no detectable antiviral activity in their serum, subsequent patients were treated by the intravenous route of administration, generally with 2-h infusions. A total of 26 patients received the agent intravenously in single escalating doses ranging from 0.2 to 60 X 10(6) units/m2, on a twice-weekly schedule for 4-6 weeks. The most common toxicities encountered included fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, and occasional nausea and vomiting. No myelosuppression or hepatic toxicity was observed. A maximum tolerated dose for single-dose intravenous administration was defined as 50 X 10(6) units/m2 on the basis of unacceptable fatigue and prolonged systolic hypotension. Antiviral activity was detected in the serum following doses greater than 2 X 10(6) units/m2 when the IFN-gamma was administered intravenously. No evidence of antitumor activity was seen in this Phase I trial, although the treatment regimen employed did not lead to high or prolonged levels of serum IFN activity in the majority of patients. An accurate assessment of the antitumor activity of this particular IFN-gamma preparation will require Phase II trials employing multiple-treatment regimens. PMID:6439828

  8. A phase I clinical trial of continual alternating etoposide and topotecan in refractory solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Penson, R T; Seiden, M V; Matulonis, U A; Appleman, L J; Fuller, A F; Goodman, A; Campos, S M; Clark, J W; Roche, M; Eder, J P

    2005-07-11

    The goal of this phase I study was to develop a novel schedule using oral etoposide and infusional topotecan as a continually alternating schedule with potentially optimal reciprocal induction of the nontarget topoisomerase. The initial etoposide dose was 15 mg m(-2) b.i.d. days (D)1-5 weeks 1,3,5,7,9 and 11, escalated 5 mg per dose per dose level (DL). Topotecan in weeks 2,4,6,8,10 and 12 was administered by 96 h infusion at an initial dose of 0.2 mg m(-2) day(-1) with a dose escalation of 0.1, then at 0.05 mg m(-2) day(-1). Eligibility criteria required no organ dysfunction. Two dose reductions or delays were allowed. A total of 36 patients with a median age of 57 (22-78) years, received a median 8 (2-19) weeks of chemotherapy. At DL 6, dose-limiting toxicities consisted of grade 3 nausea, vomiting and intolerable fatigue. Three patients developed a line-related thrombosis or infection and one subsequently developed AML. There was no febrile neutropenia. There were six radiologically confirmed responses (18%) and 56% of patients demonstrated a response or stable disease, typically with only modest toxicity. Oral etoposide 35 mg m(-2) b.i.d. D1-5 and 1.8 mg m(-2) 96 h (total dose) infusional topotecan D8-11 can be administered on an alternating continual weekly schedule for at least 12 weeks, with promising clinical activity. PMID:15986034

  9. Three phase III randomized controlled trials of topical resiquimod 0.01-percent gel to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences.

    PubMed

    Mark, Karen E; Spruance, Spotswood; Kinghorn, George R; Sacks, Stephen L; Slade, Herbert B; Meng, Tze-Chiang; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Wald, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Resiquimod, a Toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonist, stimulates production of cytokines that promote an antigen-specific T helper type 1 acquired immune response. Animal and phase II human trials showed posttreatment efficacy in reducing recurrent herpes lesion days and/or time to first recurrence. Three phase III randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled trials of topical resiquimod to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences were conducted in healthy adults with ≥4 recurrences within the prior year. Participants applied resiquimod 0.01% gel or vehicle gel 2 times per week for 3 weeks to each recurrence for 12 months. Trials 1 and 2 had 2:1 resiquimod-vehicle randomization. Trial 3 had 1:1:1 randomization for resiquimod and 500 mg valacyclovir orally twice daily for 5 days (RESI-VAL), resiquimod and oral placebo (RESI-PLA), and vehicle and oral placebo (VEH-PLA). The median time to first recurrence was similar for resiquimod and vehicle (trial 1, 60 and 56 days, P=0.7; trial 2, 54 and 48 days, P=0.47; trial 3, 51 [RESI-VAL], 55 [RESI-PLA], and 44 [VEH-PLA] days, P=not significant [NS]). The median time to healing of initial treated recurrence was longer for resiquimod (trial 1, 18 compared to 10 days, P<0.001; trial 2, 19 compared to 13 days, P=0.16; trial 3, 14 [RESI-VAL], 16 [RESI-PLA], and 8 [VEH-PLA] days, P<0.001). In trials 1 and 2, moderate to severe erythema and erosion/ulceration at the application site were more common in resiquimod recipients. In conclusion, no posttreatment efficacy of resiquimod 0.01% gel was observed. Increased application site reactions and initial recurrence healing time are consistent with resiquimod-induced cytokine effects. PMID:24709264

  10. Design of Phase I Combination Trials: Recommendations of the Clinical Trial Design Task Force of the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee

    PubMed Central

    Paller, Channing J.; Bradbury, Penelope A.; Ivy, S. Percy; Seymour, Lesley; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Huang, Erich; Collyar, Deborah; Groshen, Susan; Reeves, Steven; Ellis, Lee M.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Rosner, Gary L.; LeBlanc, Michael L.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are combined in an effort to treat a heterogeneous tumor or to maximize the pharmacodynamic effect. The development of combination regimens, while desirable, poses unique challenges. These include the selection of agents for combination therapy that may lead to improved efficacy while maintaining acceptable toxicity, the design of clinical trials that provide informative results for individual agents and combinations, and logistical and regulatory challenges. The phase 1 trial is often the initial step in the clinical evaluation of a combination regimen. In view of the importance of combination regimens and the challenges associated with developing them, the Clinical Trial Design (CTD) Task Force of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Investigational Drug Steering Committee developed a set of recommendations for the phase 1 development of a combination regimen. The first two recommendations focus on the scientific rationale and development plans for the combination regimen; subsequent recommendations encompass clinical design aspects. The CTD Task Force recommends that selection of the proposed regimens be based on a biological or pharmacological rationale supported by clinical and/or robust and validated preclinical evidence, and accompanied by a plan for subsequent development of the combination. The design of the phase 1 clinical trial should take into consideration the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as overlapping toxicity. Depending on the specific hypothesized interaction, the primary endpoint may be dose optimization, pharmacokinetics, and/or pharmacodynamic (i.e., biomarker). PMID:25125258

  11. Early-Phase Clinical Trials In The Community: Results From the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program Early-Phase Working Group Baseline Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zaren, Howard A.; Nair, Suresh; Go, Ronald S.; Enos, Rebecca A.; Lanier, Keith S.; Thompson, Michael A.; Zhao, Jinxiu; Fleming, Deborah L.; Leighton, John C.; Gribbin, Thomas E.; Bryant, Donna M.; Carrigan, Angela; Corpening, Jennifer C.; Csapo, Kimberly A.; Dimond, Eileen P.; Ellison, Christie; Gonzalez, Maria M.; Harr, Jodi L.; Wilkinson, Kathy; Denicoff, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) formed an Early-Phase Working Group to facilitate site participation in early-phase (EP) trials. The Working Group conducted a baseline assessment (BA) to describe the sites' EP trial infrastructure and its association with accrual. Methods: EP accrual and infrastructure data for the sites were obtained for July 2010-June 2011 and 2010, respectively. Sites with EP accrual rates at or above the median were considered high-accruing sites. Analyses were performed to identify site characteristics associated with higher accrual onto EP trials. Results: Twenty-seven of the 30 NCCCP sites participated. The median number of EP trials open per site over the course of July 2010-June 2011 was 19. Median EP accrual per site was 14 patients in 1 year. Approximately half of the EP trials were Cooperative Group; most were phase II. Except for having a higher number of EP trials open (P = .04), high-accruing sites (n = 14) did not differ significantly from low-accruing sites (n = 13) in terms of any single site characteristic. High-accruing sites did have shorter institutional review board (IRB) turnaround time by 20 days, and were almost three times as likely to be a lead Community Clinical Oncology Program site (small sample size may have prevented statistical significance). Most sites had at least basic EP trial infrastructure. Conclusion: Community cancer centers are capable of conducting EP trials. Infrastructure and collaborations are critical components of success. This assessment provides useful information for implementing EP trials in the community. PMID:23814525

  12. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  13. Considerations in the rational design and conduct of phase I/II pediatric clinical trials: avoiding the problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, S M; Reed, M D; Wells, T G; Kearns, G L

    2007-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a heightened awareness of the need to include children in the drug development process. With this awareness has come an expansion of the infrastructure for conducting studies in children and an increase in the sponsorship of pediatric clinical trials. However, the growth in pediatric research has, in many cases, not been accompanied by an increase in the involvement of trained pediatric investigators when it comes to trial design and/or interpretation. Pediatric phase I/II protocols continue to span a spectrum from those that are carefully constructed to those that are poorly designed. This paper highlights the basic elements of phase I/II protocols that merit unique consideration when the clinical trial involves children. Illustrations are provided from our experience, which highlight problems that may arise when trials are not designed with the pediatric patient in mind. PMID:17329988

  14. Hemiablative Focal Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy: A Phase II Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Joseph; Chin, Yaw Sinn; Malouf, David; Howie, Andrew; Enari, Komiti Ese

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of focal brachytherapy (BT) is to provide effective prostate cancer control for low-risk disease but with reduced genitourinary, gastrointestinal and sexual side effects in a cost-effective way. Objective The aim of this study is to describe a phase II study examining technical and dosimetric feasibility and toxicity, quality of life changes, and local control with post-treatment biopsy outcomes in men with early stage low volume prostate cancer treated with focal iodine-125 seed BT. Methods The study design is a prospective, multicenter trial with a planned sample size of 20 patients including men with a minimum age of 60 years, a life expectancy estimated to be greater than 10 years, with low or low-tier intermediate risk prostate cancer, unilateral disease on the biopsy, and a Gleason score of ≤3+4 and <25% cores involved. The investigations specific for the study are multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (Mp-MRI) baseline, at 20 and 36 months to rule out high grade disease and a transperineal mapping biopsy (baseline and at 36 months) for more accurate patient selection. The hemigland region will receive 144 Gy. Standard normal tissue constraints will be considered as for a whole gland (WG) implant. Dosimetric parameters will be evaluated at day 30 after the implant. Toxicity and quality of life will be evaluated with international validated questionnaires focusing on urinary, rectal, sexual domain, and general health-related quality of life. The patients will complete this assessment at baseline and then approximately every 6 months after the implant up to 10 years. Results To date, one patient is involved in the trial. He underwent the pre-implant investigations which found bilateral disease. Therefore, a standard seed implant was performed. If the results from this trial provide evidence that the treatment is safe, feasible, and improves toxicity, funding will be sought to conduct a large, multicenter, randomized controlled

  15. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  16. Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial: study protocol for a phase II/III multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kanako; Misawa, Sonoko; Sato, Yasunori; Sobue, Gen; Yabe, Ichiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kusunoki, Susumu; Kikuchi, Seiji; Nakashima, Ichiro; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Kohara, Nobuo; Kanda, Takashi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a fatal systemic disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia and the overproduction of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Recently, the prognosis of POEMS was substantially improved by introduction of therapeutic intervention for myeloma. However, no randomised clinical trial has been performed because of the rarity and severity of the disease. Methods and analysis The Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial is a phase II/III multicentre, double-blinded, randomised, controlled trial that aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a 24-week treatment with thalidomide in POEMS syndrome, with an additional 48-week open-label safety study. Adults with POEMS syndrome who have no indication for transplantation are assessed for eligibility at 12 tertiary neurology centres in Japan. Patients who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive thalidomide (100–300 mg daily) plus dexamethasone (12 mg/m2 on days 1–4 of a 28-day cycle) or placebo plus dexamethasone. Both treatments were administered for 24 weeks (six cycles; randomised comparative study period). Patients who complete the randomised study period or show subacute deterioration during the randomised period participate in the subsequent 48-week open-label safety study (long-term safety period). The primary end point of the study is the reduction rate of serum VEGF levels at 24 weeks. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each hospital. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, Japan (No. 22-1716). The J-POST Trial is currently ongoing and is due to finish in August 2015. The findings of this trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations and will also be disseminated to participants. Trial registration number

  17. Unbiased estimation in seamless phase II/III trials with unequal treatment effect variances and hypothesis-driven selection rules.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David S; Prevost, A Toby; Bowden, Jack

    2016-09-30

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials offer an efficient way to select an experimental treatment and perform confirmatory analysis within a single trial. However, combining the data from both stages in the final analysis can induce bias into the estimates of treatment effects. Methods for bias adjustment developed thus far have made restrictive assumptions about the design and selection rules followed. In order to address these shortcomings, we apply recent methodological advances to derive the uniformly minimum variance conditionally unbiased estimator for two-stage seamless phase II/III trials. Our framework allows for the precision of the treatment arm estimates to take arbitrary values, can be utilised for all treatments that are taken forward to phase III and is applicable when the decision to select or drop treatment arms is driven by a multiplicity-adjusted hypothesis testing procedure. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27103068

  18. Phase I trial of bortezomib and dacarbazine in melanoma and soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Poklepovic, Andrew; Youseffian, Leena; Winning, Mary; Birdsell, Christine A.; Crosby, Nancy A.; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Roberts, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose Preclinical studies in human melanoma cell lines and murine xenograft tumor models suggest that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib enhances the activity of the cytotoxic agent dacarbazine. We performed a phase I trial of bortezomib and dacarbazine in melanoma, soft tissue sarcoma, and amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation tumors. The primary objective was to identify recommended phase II doses for the combination. Experimental design Bortezomib and dacarbazine were both administered intravenously once weekly. All patients received prophylactic antiemetics. Dose escalation proceeded using a standard 3+3 design. Response was assessed according to NCI RECIST v1.0. Results Twenty eight patients were enrolled to six dose levels. Bortezomib 1.6 mg/m2 and dacarbazine 580 mg/m2 are the recommended phase II weekly doses. The combination was generally well tolerated. Among 15 patients with melanoma there was one durable complete response in a patient with an exon-11 cKIT mutation, and one partial response. Among 12 patients with soft tissue sarcoma there was one partial response. Conclusions Bortezomib 1.6 mg/m2 and dacarbazine 580 mg/m2 administered intravenously once weekly is well tolerated and has at least minimal activity in melanoma and soft tissue sarcoma. PMID:23315028

  19. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  20. In situ photoimmunotherapy for melanoma: an ongoing phase I clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Perry, Lisa A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In situ Photoimmunotherapy (ISPI) was developed to treat metastatic tumors using a combination of phototherapy and immunotherapy. It utilizes local intervention through photothermal destruction of existing solid tumors and through immune response modifier to elicit host anti-tumor responses. Such combination in pre-clinical studies has shown promise in cancer treatment by eradicating the primary tumors and also controlling metastases at distant sites. ISPI has been used in our preliminary clinical studies for melanoma patients and the outcome has been extremely encouraging. In 2006, we began enrolling patients in a new phase I immunotherapy trial for advanced cutaneous melanoma. This trial is based on our previous results which indicated that we had developed an effective treatment for advanced melanoma. Of the first six patients treated, (4 stage IV, and 2 surgically unresectable stage III), 2 of the stage IV patients are still alive, one tumor free, and one with a possible treatable recurrence after 2 1/2 years. We have also discovered that recurrences of the skin cancer can be retreated by the same technique and that treatment seems to blunt the virulence of the disease and make it more treatable. These initial results indicate that ISPI probably will have the ability to prolong survival in selected cases of advanced melanoma, and potentially cure a significant percentage of treated patients.

  1. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-09-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3-6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  2. Phase I trial of intramuscularly administered tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, A A; Casper, E S; Gabrilove, J L; Templeton, M A; Sherwin, S A; Oettgen, H F

    1989-03-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscularly administered recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) was conducted in 19 adult patients with advanced solid tumors. The agent was administered daily for up to five consecutive days every other week for two to four courses. Doses of rTNF ranged from 5 to 200 micrograms/m2/d. Dose-limiting toxicities were encountered at doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d. Toxicities included tenderness, erythema and induration at the site of injection, fatigue, fever, chills, headache, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Moderate to marked reductions in WBC and platelet counts were observed regularly at the highest dose levels, but none were clinically significant. Hepatic enzyme elevation was seen frequently, and two patients developed hyperbilirubinemia. Only one of seven patients treated with doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d completed the planned course of therapy. Even at the highest dose levels, serum concentrations of rTNF could only rarely be detected in the serum. No therapeutic responses were observed. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of rTNF in this trial was 150 micrograms/m2/d, administered for two courses. PMID:2918329

  3. Recombinant leukocyte A interferon in advanced breast cancer. Results of a phase II efficacy trial.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Mayer, D; Ochs, J J; Abrams, P G; Knost, J A; Foon, K A; Fein, S; Oldham, R K

    1983-05-01

    Nineteen patients with advanced refractory metastatic breast cancer no longer responsive to chemotherapy were treated in the first phase II efficacy trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA), a highly purified single molecular species of alpha interferon prepared by recombinant DNA methods. Patients received a previously determined maximum tolerated dose for this agent (50 X 10(6) U/m2 body surface area) by intramuscular injection three times weekly for up to 3 months. The symptoms of toxicity observed in this trial resemble those previously reported for alpha interferons and include fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, and leukopenia. All patients required dose reductions, most often for reasons of severe fatigue. Of the 17 patients evaluable for tumor response, one patient had stable disease and 16 had evidence of tumor progression. We conclude that IFL-rA is not an active agent in the treatment of advanced, refractory breast cancer when used at a maximum tolerated dose on this treatment schedule. PMID:6342490

  4. Phase I Randomized Clinical Trial of VRC DNA and rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Delivery by Intramuscular (IM), Subcutaneous (SC) and Intradermal (ID) Administration (VRC 011)

    PubMed Central

    Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Holman, LaSonji; Bailer, Robert T.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phase 1 evaluation of the VRC HIV DNA and rAd5 vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) supported proceeding to a Phase 2 b efficacy study. Here we report comparison of the IM, subcutaneous (SC) and intradermal (ID) routes of administration. Methods Sixty subjects were randomized to 6 schedules to evaluate the IM, SC or ID route for prime injections. Three schedules included DNA primes (Wks 0,4,8) and 3 schedules included rAd5 prime (Wk0); all included rAd5 IM boost (Wk24). DNA vaccine dosage was 4 mg IM or SC, but 0.4 mg ID, while all rAd5 vaccinations were 1010 PU. All injections were administered by needle and syringe. Results Overall, 27/30 subjects completed 3 DNA primes; 30/30 subjects completed rAd5 primes. Mild local pruritus (itchiness), superficial skin lesions and injection site nodules were associated with ID and SC, but not IM injections. All routes induced T-cell and antibody immune responses after rAd5 boosting. Overall, >95% had Env antibody and >80% had Env T-cell responses. Conclusions The pattern of local reactogenicity following ID and SC injections differed from IM injections but all routes were well-tolerated. There was no evidence of an immunogenicity advantage following SC or ID delivery, supporting IM delivery as the preferred route of administration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00321061 PMID:24621858

  5. Phase II trial of weekly Docetaxel, Zoledronic acid, and Celecoxib for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kattan, Joseph; Bachour, Marwan; Farhat, Fadi; El Rassy, Elie; Assi, Tarek; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-08-01

    Background Treatment options for patients with metastatic castration-resistance prostate cancer are unsatisfactory. Docetaxel monotherapy offers promising results with a tolerable toxicity profile. However, enhancing the clinical index of Docetaxel-based therapy remains the ultimate goal. Methods We conducted a phase II, open label, multinational prospective trial to evaluate the efficacy of weekly Docetaxel combined with Zoledronic acid and Celecoxib. Eligible patients received 25 mg/m(2) Docetaxel weekly for 3 consecutive weeks every 4 weeks, 4 mg Zoledronic acid every 4 weeks, and 200 mg oral Celecoxib twice daily. Enrollment was terminated prematurely upon the publication of reports of cardiac toxicity associated with cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 inhibitors. Results Our study enrolled 22 patients with a median of 4.7 cycles per patient. The median overall survival (OS) was 9.8 months (range 0.7 to 24.1 months) with 36 % and 4.5 % survival rates at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Our patients had a biologic response in 40.1 % of cases and a palliative response in 72.7 %. Among the eight patients with measurable disease, three had partial responses, two had stable disease, and three had progressive disease, leading to a response rate (RR) of 62.5 %. The observed toxicities were mild and limited to grade 3 events. Nine patients had anemia (40.1 %), 5 had sensory neuropathy (22.7 %) and 2 had stomatitis (9.1 %). Conclusion The combination of Docetaxel, Celecoxib, and Zoledronic acid failed to improve OS or to offer an acceptable biologic response. We do not believe that there is compelling evidence to include either Celecoxib or Zoledronic acid in further phase II/III trials. PMID:27159981

  6. Phase 3 Trials of Thermosensitive Ciprofloxacin Gel for Middle Ear Effusion in Children with Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Albert H.; White, David R.; Moss, Jonathan R.; Bear, Moraye; LeBel, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy, safety, and microbiology of a thermosensitive otic suspension of ciprofloxacin (OTO-201) in children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Study Design Two randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled phase 3 trials. Patients were randomized to intratympanic OTO-201 or sham. Setting Children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Subjects/Methods Studies evaluated 532 patients (6 months to 17 years old) in a combined analysis of efficacy (treatment failure: presence of otorrhea, otic or systemic antibiotic use, lost to follow-up, missed visits), safety (audiometry, otoscopy, tympanometry), and microbiology. Results There was a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures in patients receiving OTO-201 vs tympanostomy tubes alone (1) on days 4, 8, 15, and 29; (2) on day 15, primary end point (23.0% vs 45.1%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.341; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 49%); and (3) on day 15, blinded-assessor otorrhea treatment failure (7.0% vs 19.4%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.303; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 64%). Per-protocol and subgroup analyses (baseline demographics, pathogen type, culture status, effusion type, microbiologic response) supported these findings. There were no drug-related serious adverse events; the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events in both groups were pyrexia, postoperative pain, nasopharyngitis, cough, and upper respiratory tract infection. OTO-201 administration had no evidence of increased tube occlusion and no negative effect on audiometry, tympanometry, or otoscopy. Conclusions Combined analysis of 2 phase 3 trials demonstrated a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures through day 15 compared with TT alone when OTO-201 was administered intratympanically for otitis media with bilateral middle ear effusion at time of tympanostomy tube placement. PMID:27188702

  7. Targeted T cell Therapy in Stage IV Breast Cancer: A Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Lawrence G.; Thakur, Archana; Al-Kadhimi, Zaid; Colvin, Gerald A.; Cummings, Francis J.; Legare, Robert D.; Dizon, Don S.; Kouttab, Nicola; Maizel, Abby; Colaiace, William; Liu, Qin; Rathore, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study reports a phase I immunotherapy (IT) trial in 23 women with metastatic breast cancer consisting of eight infusions of anti-CD3 × anti-HER2 bispecific antibody (HER2Bi) armed anti-CD3 activated T cells (ATC) in combination with low dose interleukin 2 (IL-2) and granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor to determine safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), technical feasibility, T cell trafficking, immune responses, time to progression, and overall survival (OS). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN ATC were expanded from leukapheresis product using IL-2 and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody and armed with HER2Bi. In 3+3 dose escalation design, groups of 3 patients received 5, 10, 20, or 40 × 109 armed ATC (aATC) per infusion. RESULTS There were no dose limiting toxicities and the MTD was not defined. It was technically feasible to grow 160 × 109 ATC from a single leukapheresis. aATC persisted in the blood for weeks and trafficked to tumors. Infusions of aATC induced anti-breast cancer responses and increases in immunokines. At 14.5 weeks after enrollment, 13 of 22 (59.1%) evaluable patients had stable disease and 9 of 22 (40.9%) had progressive disease. The median OS was 36.2 months for all patients, 57.4 months for HER2 3+ patients, and 27.4 months for HER2 0–2+ patients. CONCLUSIONS Targeting HER2 positive and negative tumors with aATC infusions induced anti-tumor responses, increases in Th1 cytokines and IL-12 serum levels that suggest that aATC infusions vaccinated patients against their own tumors. These results provide a strong rationale for conducting phase II trials. PMID:25688159

  8. Evidence of Blood Stage Efficacy with a Virosomal Malaria Vaccine in a Phase IIa Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Fiona M.; Porter, David W.; Okitsu, Shinji L.; Westerfeld, Nicole; Vogel, Denise; Todryk, Stephen; Poulton, Ian; Correa, Simon; Hutchings, Claire; Berthoud, Tamara; Dunachie, Susanna; Andrews, Laura; Williams, Jack L.; Sinden, Robert; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Pluschke, Gerd; Zurbriggen, Rinaldo; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research indicates that a combination vaccine targeting different stages of the malaria life cycle is likely to provide the most effective malaria vaccine. This trial was the first to combine two existing vaccination strategies to produce a vaccine that induces immune responses to both the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages of the P. falciparum life cycle. Methods This was a Phase I/IIa study of a new combination malaria vaccine FFM ME-TRAP+PEV3A. PEV3A includes peptides from both the pre-erythrocytic circumsporozoite protein and the blood-stage antigen AMA-1. This study was conducted at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. The participants were healthy, malaria naïve volunteers, from Oxford. The interventions were vaccination with PEV3A alone, or PEV3A+FFM ME-TRAP. The main outcome measure was protection from malaria in a sporozoite challenge model. Other outcomes included measures of parasite specific immune responses induced by either vaccine; and safety, assessed by collection of adverse event data. Results We observed evidence of blood stage immunity in PEV3A vaccinated volunteers, but no volunteers were completely protected from malaria. PEV3A induced high antibody titres, and antibodies bound parasites in immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, we observed boosting of the vaccine-induced immune response by sporozoite challenge. Immune responses induced by FFM ME-TRAP were unexpectedly low. The vaccines were safe, with comparable side effect profiles to previous trials. Although there was no sterile protection two major observations support an effect of the vaccine-induced response on blood stage parasites: (i) Lower rates of parasite growth were observed in volunteers vaccinated with PEV3A compared to unvaccinated controls (p = 0.012), and this was reflected in the PCR results from PEV3A vaccinated volunteers. These showed early control of parasitaemia by some volunteers in this

  9. Progress in the discovery of selective, high affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists as clinical candidates.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff

    2009-03-01

    The selective, high affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AdoR) antagonists that were synthesized by several research groups should aid in determining the role of the A(2B) AdoR in inflammatory diseases like asthma or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and angiogenic diseases like diabetic retinopathy or cancer. CV Therapeutics scientists discovered the selective, high affinity A(2B) AdoR antagonist 10, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative [CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM] that has favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (t (1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat). Compound 10 demonstrated functional antagonism at the A(2B) AdoR (K(B) = 6 nM) and efficacy in a mouse model of asthma. In two phase 1 clinical trials, CVT-6883 was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once daily dosing. A second compound 20, 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine, has been nominated for development from Baraldi's group in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals that has favorable A(2B) AdoR affinity and selectivity [K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 1,000; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM], and it has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist. A third compound 32, a 2-aminopyrimidine, from the Almirall group has high A(2B) AdoR affinity and selectivity [K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM], and 32 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. Since three highly selective, high affinity A(2B) AdoR antagonists have been nominated for development with 10 (CVT-6883) being the furthest along in the development process, the role of the A(2B) AdoR in various disease states will soon be established. PMID:18568423

  10. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called interferons. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ... allergic to peginterferon alfa-2b injection (PegIntron, Sylatron), interferon alfa-2b (Intron), any other medications, or any ...

  11. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Barkati, Maroie; Williams, Scott G.; Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat; Dyk, Sylvia van; See, Andrew; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  12. Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine and Tanespimycin (17AAG) in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: A Mayo Clinic Phase II Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Katrina S.; Kim, George P.; Foster, Nathan R.; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Erlichman, Charles; McWilliams, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that stabilizes many oncogenic proteins. HSP90 inhibitors may sensitize tumors to cytotoxic agents by causing client protein degradation. Gemcitabine, which has modest activity in pancreas cancer, activates Chk1, a client protein of HSP90. This phase II trial was designed to determine whether 17AAG could enhance the clinical activity of gemcitabine through degradation of Chk1 in patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer. Methods A multicenter, prospective study combining gemcitabine and 17AAG enrolled patients with stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma, adequate liver and kidney function, ECOG performance status 0-2, and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The primary goal was to achieve a 60% overall survival at six months. Sixty-six patients were planned for accrual, with an interim analysis after 25 patients enrolled. Results: After a futility analysis to achieve the endpoint, accrual was halted with 21 patients enrolled. No complete or partial responses were seen. 40% of patients were alive at 6 months. Median overall survival was 5.4 months. Tolerability was moderate, with 65% of patients having ≥ grade 3 adverse events (AE), and 15% having grade 4 events. Conclusions The lack of clinical activity suggests that targeting Chk1 by inhibiting HSP90 is not important in pancreatic cancer sensitivity to gemcitabine alone. Further studies of HSP90 targeted agents with gemcitabine alone are not warranted. PMID:25952464

  13. Phase 1b Randomized Trial and Follow-Up Study in Uganda of the Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine Candidate BK-SE36

    PubMed Central

    Yeka, Adoke; Balikagala, Betty; Suzuki, Nahoko; Shirai, Hiroki; Yagi, Masanori; Ito, Kazuya; Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio; Nsereko, Christopher; Okada, Takuya; Kanoi, Bernard N.; Tetsutani, Kohhei; Arisue, Nobuko; Itagaki, Sawako; Tougan, Takahiro; Ishii, Ken J.; Ueda, Shigeharu; Egwang, Thomas G.; Horii, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    . Risk ratio for BKSE1.0 was 0.48 (95% CI, 0.24–0.98; p = 0.04). Conclusion BK-SE36 is safe and immunogenic. The promising potential of BK-SE36, observed in the follow-up study, warrants a double-blind phase 1/2b trial in children under 5 years. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN71619711 ISRCTN71619711 PMID:23724021

  14. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  15. A phase II trial of sequential ribonucleotide reductase inhibition in aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Zeidner, Joshua F.; Karp, Judith E.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Smith, B. Douglas; Gojo, Ivana; Gore, Steven D.; Levis, Mark J.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Ivy, S. Percy; Pratz, Keith W.; McDevitt, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a varied group of disorders that can have prolonged chronic phases, but eventually accelerate and can transform into a secondary acute myeloid leukemia that is ultimately fatal. Triapine is a novel inhibitor of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase. Sequential inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with triapine and an M1 ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor (fludarabine) was noted to be safe, and led to a 29% complete plus partial response rate in myeloproliferative neoplasms. This article reports the findings of a phase II trial of triapine (105 mg/m2/day) followed by fludarabine (30 mg/m2/day) daily for 5 consecutive days in 37 patients with accelerated myeloproliferative neoplasms and secondary acute myeloid leukemia. The overall response rate was 49% (18/37), with a complete remission rate of 24% (9/37). Overall response rates and complete remissions were seen in all disease subsets, including secondary acute myeloid leukemia, in which the overall response rate and complete remission rate were 48% and 33%, respectively. All patients with known JAK2 V617F mutations (6/6) responded. The median overall survival of the entire cohort was 6.9 months, with a median overall survival of both overall responders and complete responders of 10.6 months. These data further demonstrate the promise of sequential inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase in patients with accelerated myeloproliferative neoplasms and secondary acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00381550). PMID:24362550

  16. A phase I trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Schefter, Tracey E. . E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Timmerman, Robert D.; Cardenes, Higinia R.; Baron, Anna; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A multicenter Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three liver metastases, tumor diameter <6 cm, and adequate liver function. The first cohort received 36 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in three fractions (F). Subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to a chosen maximum of 60 Gy/3F. At least 700 mL of normal liver had to receive a total dose <15 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 liver or intestinal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2/6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (10 male, 8 female): median age, 55 years (range, 26-83 years); most common primary site, colorectal (6 patients); median aggregate gross tumor volume, 18 ml (range, 3-98 ml). Four patients had multiple tumors. No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3F without reaching MTD. Conclusions: Biologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated in patients with limited liver metastases. Results of this study form the basis for an ongoing Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy over three fractions for liver metastases.

  17. Phase I Trials in Patients with Relapsed, Advanced Upper Gastrointestinal Carcinomas – Experience in a Specialist Unit

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Naureen; Sclafani, Francesco; Shah, Krunal; Judson, Ian; Molife, L Rhoda; Banerji, Udai; de Bono, Johann S; Cunningham, David; Kaye, Stan B

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional therapeutic options for patients with advanced upper gastrointestinal cancers (UGIC) are limited. Following first-line treatments, some patients are offered experimental therapies, including participation in Phase I trials. This study aims to describe the experience of UGIC patients treated in a dedicated Phase I unit. Methods Patient, tumour and treatment characteristics, and clinical outcomes of UGIC patients treated consecutively at the Drug Development Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, between 2005 and 2009, were recorded. Results Ninety-six patients who previously received a median of 2 [range 1-4] lines of chemotherapies were treated in 30 Phase I trials. Of 81 evaluable patients, 9 achieved RECIST-objective response (11%) with a 6-month clinical benefit rate of 14%. Overall median progression free and overall survival were 7.0 weeks (95%CI: 5.6-8.4) and 19.0 weeks (95%CI: 17.4-20.6), respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 37 patients (39%) and led to trial discontinuation in 9 (9%); no toxicity-related death was recorded. In the multivariate analysis, serum albumin (<35g/dl, HR2.0, p=0.002) and lactate dehydrogenase (>192umol/l, HR1.7, p=0.016) were prognostic of overall survival. Conclusion Phase I clinical trials can be considered a reasonable option in selected patients with relapsed UGIC. The use of objective prognosticators may improve selection and risk/benefit profile of patients. Mini-Abstract There are no published data on the experience of phase I trials in UGIC. We present largest data of treating UGIC in phase I setting confirming the feasibility of this approach. PMID:24445485

  18. HIV-specific humoral responses benefit from stronger prime in phase Ib clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Huang, Yunda; Karuna, Shelly T.; Chappuis, Samuel; Gaillard, Julien; Kochar, Nidhi; Shen, Xiaoying; Allen, Mary A.; Ding, Song; Hural, John; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Graham, Barney S.; Gilbert, Peter B.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Montefiori, David C.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Frahm, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Vector prime-boost immunization strategies induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses. We examined the priming dose and administration order of heterologous vectors in HIV Vaccine Trials Network 078 (HVTN 078), a randomized, double-blind phase Ib clinical trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of heterologous prime-boost regimens, with a New York vaccinia HIV clade B (NYVAC-B) vaccine and a recombinant adenovirus 5–vectored (rAd5-vectored) vaccine. METHODS. NYVAC-B included HIV-1 clade B Gag-Pol-Nef and gp120, while rAd5 included HIV-1 clade B Gag-Pol and clades A, B, and C gp140. Eighty Ad5-seronegative subjects were randomized to receive 2 × NYVAC-B followed by 1 × 1010 PFU rAd5 (NYVAC/Ad5hi); 1 × 108 PFU rAd5 followed by 2 × NYVAC-B (Ad5lo/NYVAC); 1 × 109 PFU rAd5 followed by 2 × NYVAC-B (Ad5med/NYVAC); 1 × 1010 PFU rAd5 followed by 2 × NYVAC-B (Ad5hi/NYVAC); or placebo. Immune responses were assessed 2 weeks after the final vaccination. Intracellular cytokine staining measured T cells producing IFN-γ and/or IL-2; cross-clade and epitope-specific binding antibodies were determined; and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were assessed with 6 tier 1 viruses. RESULTS. CD4+ T cell response rates ranged from 42.9% to 93.3%. NYVAC/Ad5hi response rates (P ≤ 0.01) and magnitudes (P ≤ 0.03) were significantly lower than those of other groups. CD8+ T cell response rates ranged from 65.5% to 85.7%. NYVAC/Ad5hi magnitudes were significantly lower than those of other groups (P ≤ 0.04). IgG response rates to the group M consensus gp140 were 89.7% for NYVAC/Ad5hi and 21.4%, 84.6%, and 100% for Ad5lo/NYVAC, Ad5med/NYVAC, and Ad5hi/NYVAC, respectively, and were similar for other vaccine proteins. Overall nAb responses were low, but aggregate responses appeared stronger for Ad5med/NYVAC and Ad5hi/NYVAC than for NYVAC/Ad5hi. CONCLUSIONS. rAd5 prime followed by NYVAC boost is superior to the reverse regimen for both vaccine

  19. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Quaranta, Brian P.; Pura, John A.; Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gerber, Leah; Haake, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  20. Follow-up of 6-10-Year-Old Stuttering Children after Lidcombe Program Treatment: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koushik, Sarita; Shenker, Rosalee; Onslow, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I trial sought to establish (1) whether the Lidcombe Program is viable for school-age children, (2) whether there is any indication that it requires modification for school-age children, (3) whether treatment effects are durable, (4) how many treatment sessions appear to be required to significantly reduce stuttering frequency…

  1. 78 FR 69690 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Considerations for the Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... and Gene Therapy Products'' that appeared in the Federal Register of July 2, 2013 (78 FR 39736). The... 2, 2013 (78 FR 39736), FDA published a notice announcing the availability of a draft guidance... of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Extension of Comment...

  2. Erythropoietin Neuroprotection in Neonatal Cardiac Surgery: A Phase I/II Safety and Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Andropoulos, Dean B.; Brady, Ken; Easley, R. Blaine; Dickerson, Heather A.; Voigt, Robert G.; Shekerdemian, Lara S.; Meador, Marcie R.; Eisenman, Carol A.; Hunter, Jill V.; Turcich, Marie; Rivera, Carlos; McKenzie, E. Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Neonates undergoing complex congenital heart surgery have a significant incidence of neurological problems. Erythropoietin has anti-apoptotic, anti-excitatory, and anti-inflammatory properties to prevent neuronal cell death in animal models, and improves neurodevelopmental outcomes in full term neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. We designed a prospective phase I/II trial of erythropoietin neuroprotection in neonatal cardiac surgery to assess safety, and indicate efficacy. Methods Neonates undergoing surgery for D-transposition of the great vessels, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, or aortic arch reconstruction were randomized to 3 perioperative doses of erythropoietin, or placebo. Neurodevelopmental testing with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was performed at age 12 months. Results 59 patients received study drug. Safety profile, including MRI brain injury, clinical events, and death, was not different between groups. 3 patients in each group died. 42 patients (22 erythropoietin, 20 placebo, 79% of survivors) returned for 12-month follow-up. The mean Cognitive Scores were erythropoietin, 101.1 ± 13.6, placebo, 106.3 ± 10.8 (p=0.19); Language Scores were erythropoietin 88.5 ± 12.8, placebo 92.4 ± 12.4 (p=0.33); and Motor Scores were erythropoietin 89.9 ± 12.3, placebo 92.6 ± 14.1, (p=0.51). Conclusions Safety profile for erythropoietin administration was not different than placebo. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were not different between groups, however this pilot study was not powered to definitively address this outcome. Lessons learned from the current study suggest optimized study design features for a larger prospective trial to definitively address the utility of erythropoietin for neuroprotection in this population. PMID:23102686

  3. Phase II Trial of Upfront Bevacizumab, Irinotecan, and Temozolomide for Unresectable Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Emil; Desjardins, Annick; Reardon, David A.; Lipp, Eric S.; Miller, Elizabeth; Herndon, James E.; McSherry, Frances; Friedman, Henry S.; Vredenburgh, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Lessons Learned Trials focusing on unresectable multifocal glioblastoma are needed because of the extremely poor prognosis and challenges in receiving standard therapy, such as concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. Developing a strategy to chemically debulk tumors before radiation and/or surgery is warranted. Background. Extent of resection remains a key prognostic factor in glioblastoma (GBM), with gross total resection providing a better prognosis than biopsy or subtotal resection. We conducted a phase II trial of upfront therapy with bevacizumab (BV), irinotecan (CPT-11), and temozolomide (TMZ) prior to chemoradiation in patients with unresectable, subtotally resected, and/or multifocal GBM. Methods. Patients received up to 4 cycles of TMZ at 200 mg/m2 per day on days 1–5 (standard dosing) and BV at 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks on a 28-day cycle. CPT-11 was given every 2 weeks on a 28-day cycle at 125 mg/m2 or 340 mg/m2 depending on antiepileptic drugs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was done every 4 weeks, and treatment continued as long as there was no tumor progression or unmanageable toxicity. The primary endpoint was tumor response rate, with a goal of 26% or greater. Results. Forty-one patients were enrolled from December 2009 to November 2010. Radiographic responses were as follows: 9 patients (22.0%) had partial respons!e, 25 (61.0%) had stable disease, and 2 (4.9%) had progression; 5 patients were not assessed. Cumulative response rate was 22%. Median overall survival was 12 months (95% confidence interval: 7.2–13.5 months). Conclusion. Upfront treatment with BV, TMZ, and CPT-11 is tolerable and can lead to radiographic response in unresectable and/or subtotally resected GBM. PMID:26025933

  4. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  5. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-01-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3–6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  6. A phase 1 clinical trial of flavopiridol consolidation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients following chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Awan, Farrukh T; Jones, Jeffrey A; Maddocks, Kami; Poi, Ming; Grever, Michael R; Johnson, Amy; Byrd, John C; Andritsos, Leslie A

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who receive chemoimmunotherapy and do not achieve complete remission experience significantly shortened progression-free interval (PFS). Additionally, the majority of patients treated for relapsed disease demonstrate evidence of measurable disease. Eradication of minimal residual disease (MRD) results in improved PFS and overall survival. Maintenance therapy might result in eradication of MRD and improve response duration but might be associated with an increase in incidence of infectious complications. Flavopiridol is a broad cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor with established safety and efficacy in patients with relapsed CLL, particularly patients with high-risk cytogenetic features. A pharmacologically derived schedule was utilized as consolidation therapy in this phase I study to assess the safety and feasibility of outpatient therapy with flavopiridol in patients with low tumor burden. Flavopiridol was administered as a 30-min loading dose of 30 mg/m(2) followed by a 4-h infusion of 30 mg/m(2) once weekly for 3 weeks every 5 weeks (1 cycle) for planned 2 cycles in ten patients. Therapy was extremely well tolerated and no patient developed acute tumor lysis syndrome. The most common toxicities were gastrointestinal. Of the patients, 22 % improved their response from a PR to CR. Eighty-eight percent experienced a reduction in tumor burden as measured by extent of bone marrow involvement including patients with del17p and complex karyotype. The study establishes the safety and efficacy of flavopiridol as consolidation therapy after chemoimmunotherapy for patients with CLL. Further evaluation is required in larger trials for the utility of CDK inhibitors as consolidation or maintenance strategies.Registration number at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00377104. PMID:27118540

  7. Phase I trial of thymidylate synthase poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) vaccine in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cusi, Maria Grazia; Botta, Cirino; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Rossetti, Maria Grazia; Dreassi, Elena; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Fioravanti, Antonella; Martino, Elodia Claudia; Gandolfo, Claudia; Pagliuchi, Marco; Basile, Assunta; Carbone, Salvatore Francesco; Ricci, Veronica; Micheli, Lucia; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Pirtoli, Luigi; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2015-09-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) is a 27-mer peptide vaccine containing the amino acidic sequences of three epitopes with HLA-A2.1-binding motifs of TS, an enzyme overexpressed in cancer cells, which plays a crucial role in DNA repair and replication. Based on the results of preclinical studies, we designed a phase Ib trial (TSPP/VAC1) to investigate, in a dose escalation setting, the safety and the biological activity of TSPP vaccination alone (arm A) or in combination with GM-CSF and IL-2 (arm B) in cancer patients. Twenty-one pretreated metastatic cancer patients, with a good performance status (ECOG ≤ 1) and no severe organ failure or immunological disease, were enrolled in the study (12 in arm A, nine in arm B) between April 2011 and January 2012, with a median follow-up of 28 months. TSPP resulted safe, and its maximal tolerated dose was not achieved. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. The most common adverse events were grade 2 dermatological reactions to the vaccine injection, cough, rhinitis, fever, poly-arthralgia, gastro-enteric symptoms and, to a lesser extent, moderate hypertension and hypothyroidism. We detected a significant rise in auto-antibodies and TS-epitope-specific CTL precursors. Furthermore, TSPP showed antitumor activity in this group of pretreated patients; indeed, we recorded one partial response and seven disease stabilizations (SD) in arm A, and three SD in arm B. Taken together, our findings provide the framework for the evaluation of the TSPP anti-tumor activity in further disease-oriented clinical trials. PMID:26031574

  8. Phase 1 clinical trials of DAS181, an inhaled sialidase, in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Zenilman, Jonathan M; Fuchs, Edward J; Hendrix, Craig W; Radebaugh, Christine; Jurao, Robert; Nayak, Seema U; Hamilton, Robert G; McLeod Griffiss, J

    2015-11-01

    DAS181, (study drug, Fludase®) was developed for treatment of influenza and parainfluenza infections. Delivered by inhalation, DAS181 cleaves sialic acid receptors from respiratory epithelial cells. Treatment of influenza for three days with DAS181 reduced viral shedding. To increase deposition in the upper airways and decrease systemic absorption, the particle size was increased to 10μm. We conducted two Phase I trials with three cohorts, randomized 2:1, active drug to placebo. The initial cohort got a single 20mg dose of DAS181, or placebo; the second, 20mg DAS181 or placebo for 10days, and the third got 20mg of DAS181 or placebo for 3days. Formulations differed slightly in their excipients. Subjects in the 1- and 3-day cohorts completed dosing without serious adverse events. Two subjects in the 10-day cohort stopped at Day 9 after developing respiratory and systemic symptoms, and a third experienced a decrease in FEV1 (Forced Expiratory Volume in 1s) after the 9th dose and a further decline after the 10th dose. Plasma DAS181, in the 10-day cohort, peaked and began falling before the last dose. Antibodies, predominately IgG with neutralizing activity, were detected in 15/18 subjects by Day 30. The highest IgG concentrations were in the 10-day cohort. The respiratory adverse events occurring after seven days and rapid drug clearance during continued dosing are consistent with the induction of DAS181 antibodies. This could preclude use of this medication for longer than seven days or for repeated courses. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration Nos. NCT 00527865 and NCT 01651494.). PMID:26391974

  9. Phase 1 trial of a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide for patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Laigle-Donadey, Florence; Zohar, Sarah; Capelle, Laurent; Behin, Anthony; Tibi, Annick; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Lacomblez, Lucette; Taillibert, Sophie; Puybasset, Louis; Van Effenterre, Remy; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2006-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODNs) display a strong immunostimulating activity and drive the immune response toward the Th1 (T helper type 1) phenotype. These ODNs have shown promising efficacy in preclinical studies when injected locally in several cancer models. We conducted a phase 1 trial to define the safety profile of CpG-28, a phosphorothioate CpG ODN, administered intratumorally by convection-enhanced delivery in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Cohorts of three to six patients were treated with escalating doses of CpG-28 (0.5-20 mg), and patients were observed for at least four months. Twenty-four patients entered the trial. All patients had previously been treated with radiotherapy, and most patients had received one or several types of chemotherapy. Median age was 58 years (range, 25-73) and median KPS was 80% (range, 60%-100%). Adverse effects possibly or probably related to the studied drug were moderate and consisted mainly in worsening of neurological conditions (four patients), fever above 38 degrees C that disappeared within a few days (five patients), and reversible grade 3 lymphopenia (seven patients). Only one patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. Preliminary evidence of activity was suggested by a minor response observed in two patients and an overall median survival of 7.2 months. In conclusion, CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 20 mg per injection in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Main side effects were limited to transient worsening of neurological condition and fever. PMID:16443949

  10. METHODOLOGY OF THE FIELD ADMINISTRATION OF STROKE THERAPY - MAGNESIUM (FAST-MAG) PHASE 3 TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel; Pratt, Frank; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Prehospital initiation by paramedics may enable delivery of neuroprotective therapies to stroke patients in the hyperacute period when they are most effective in preclinical studies. Magnesium is neuroprotective in experimental stroke models and has been shown to be safe with signals of potential efficacy when started early after onset of human cerebral ischemia. Aims 1) To demonstrate that paramedic initiation of the neuroprotective agent magnesium sulfate in the field is an efficacious and safe treatment for acute stroke; 2) To demonstrate that field enrollment of acute stroke patients is a practical and feasible strategy for phase 3 stroke trials, permitting enrollment of greater numbers of patients in hyperacute time windows. Design Multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, pivotal clinical trial. Study Procedures The study is enrolling 1700 patients (850 in each arm) with likely acute stroke, including both cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage patients. Inclusion criteria are: 1) likely stroke as identified by the modified Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen (mLAPSS), 2) age 40–95, 3) symptom onset within 2 hours of treatment initiation, and 4) deficit present ≥ 15 minutes. Paramedics administer a loading dose of magnesium sulfate (Mg) or matched placebo in the field, 4 grams over 15 minutes. In the Emergency Department, a maintenance infusion follows, 16 grams Mg or matched placebo over 24 hours. Outcomes The primary endpoint is the modified Rankin Scale measure of global disability, assessed using the Rankin Focused Assessment, 90 days after treatment. Secondary efficacy endpoints include the NIHSS (neurologic deficit), Barthel Index (activities of daily living), and the Stroke Impact Scale (quality of life). PMID:24444116

  11. A phase 1 clinical trial of flavopiridol consolidation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients following chemoimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Farrukh T.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Maddocks, Kami; Poi, Ming; Grever, Michael R.; Johnson, Amy; Byrd, John C.; Andritsos, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who receive chemoimmunotherapy and do not achieve complete remission experience significantly shortened progression-free interval (PFS). Additionally, the majority of patients treated for relapsed disease demonstrate evidence of measurable disease. Eradication of minimal residual disease (MRD) results in improved PFS and overall survival. Maintenance therapy might result in eradication of MRD and improve response duration but might be associated with an increase in incidence of infectious complications. Flavopiridol is a broad cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor with established safety and efficacy in patients with relapsed CLL, particularly patients with high-risk cytogenetic features. A pharmacologically derived schedule was utilized as consolidation therapy in this phase I study to assess the safety and feasibility of outpatient therapy with flavopiridol in patients with low tumor burden. Flavopiridol was administered as a 30-min loading dose of 30 mg/m2 followed by a 4-h infusion of 30 mg/ m2 once weekly for 3 weeks every 5 weeks (1 cycle) for planned 2 cycles in ten patients. Therapy was extremely well tolerated and no patient developed acute tumor lysis syndrome. The most common toxicities were gastrointestinal. Of the patients, 22 % improved their response from a PR to CR. Eighty-eight percent experienced a reduction in tumor burden as measured by extent of bone marrow involvement including patients with del17p and complex karyotype. The study establishes the safety and efficacy of flavopiridol as consolidation therapy after chemoimmunotherapy for patients with CLL. Further evaluation is required in larger trials for the utility of CDK inhibitors as consolidation or maintenance strategies. Registration number at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00377104. PMID:27118540

  12. A phase I clinical trial assessing the safety and tolerability of combretastatin A4 phosphate injections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Wu, Lingying; Yang, Sheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Haijun; Xu, Haiyan; Sun, Kelin; Zhang, Shuxiang; Han, Xiaohong; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2014-04-01

    Combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) is a prodrug that selectively destroys tumor blood vessels, and has shown efficacy as a targeted anticancer drug in both animal models and clinical trials. The aims of this single-center, open label, phase I clinical trial were to investigate the safety and tolerability of CA4P administered intravenously to patients aged 18-65 years with advanced solid tumors. Using a dose-escalation protocol, patients were assigned to five groups that received injections with 20 (n=3), 33 (n=3), 50 (n=11), 65 (n=6), or 85 (n=2) mg/m² CA4P. Patients in the 20 and 85 mg/m² groups received a single dose and the other groups received multiple doses. Adverse events (AE), cardiovascular parameters, and biochemical investigations were studied, and the maximum tolerated dose was determined. Of twenty-five patients enrolled, eight were withdrawn/excluded (not because of AE). There were no deaths. A total of 394 AE occurred in the 25 patients, with 89.3% considered related/possibly related to the drug. AE included headache and dizziness (19.8%), tumor-induced pain (14.2%), vascular vagal excitation (10.7%), and vomiting (9.4%). Ninety-five percent of AE were mild (grades 0-II), with only 5% being grade III-IV. Drug administration was associated with biphasic changes in heart rate and blood pressure, and only limited abnormalities in the laboratory investigations performed. The maximum tolerated dose was 65 mg/m². We conclude that CA4P is generally well tolerated, with the vast majority of AE that occurred being of mild severity. Further studies will establish the role of CA4P in cancer therapy. PMID:24500030

  13. A Phase I Trial of DFMO Targeting Polyamine Addiction in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Saulnier Sholler, Giselle L.; Gerner, Eugene W.; Bergendahl, Genevieve; MacArthur, Robert B.; VanderWerff, Alyssa; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Bond, Jeffrey P.; Ferguson, William; Roberts, William; Wada, Randal K.; Eslin, Don; Kraveka, Jacqueline M.; Kaplan, Joel; Mitchell, Deanna; Parikh, Nehal S.; Neville, Kathleen; Sender, Leonard; Higgins, Timothy; Kawakita, Masao; Hiramatsu, Kyoko; Moriya, Shun-suke; Bachmann, André S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common cancer in infancy and most frequent cause of death from extracranial solid tumors in children. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) expression is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in NB patients. This study investigated safety, response, pharmacokinetics, genetic and metabolic factors associated with ODC in a clinical trial of the ODC inhibitor difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) ± etoposide for patients with relapsed or refractory NB. Methods and Findings Twenty-one patients participated in a phase I study of daily oral DFMO alone for three weeks, followed by additional three-week cycles of DFMO plus daily oral etoposide. No dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were identified in patients taking doses of DFMO between 500-1500 mg/m2 orally twice a day. DFMO pharmacokinetics, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ODC gene and urinary levels of substrates for the tissue polyamine exporter were measured. Urinary polyamine levels varied among patients at baseline. Patients with the minor T-allele at rs2302616 of the ODC gene had higher baseline levels (p=0.02) of, and larger decreases in, total urinary polyamines during the first cycle of DFMO therapy (p=0.003) and had median progression free survival (PFS) that was over three times longer, compared to patients with the major G allele at this locus although this last result was not statistically significant (p=0.07). Six of 18 evaluable patients were progression free during the trial period with three patients continuing progression free at 663, 1559 and 1573 days after initiating treatment. Median progression-free survival was less among patients having increased urinary polyamines, especially diacetylspermine, although this result was not statistically significant (p=0.056). Conclusions DFMO doses of 500-1500mg/m2/day are safe and well tolerated in children with relapsed NB. Children with the minor T allele at rs2302616 of the ODC gene with relapsed or refractory NB

  14. Weight Loss During the Intensive Intervention Phase of the Weight-Loss Maintenance Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Jack F.; Gullion, Christina M.; Stevens, Victor J.; Brantley, Phillip J.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Ard, Jamy D.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Dalcin, Arlene; Erlinger, Thomas P.; Funk, Kristine; Laferriere, Daniel; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Loria, Catherine M.; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen; Vollmer, William M.; Svetkey, Laura P.

    2008-01-01

    Background To improve methods for long-term weight management, the Weight Loss Maintenance (WLM) trial, a four-center randomized trial, was conducted to compare alternative strategies for maintaining weight loss over a 30-month period. This paper describes methods and results for the initial 6-month weight-loss program (Phase I). Methods Eligible adults were aged ≥25, overweight or obese (BMI=25–45 kg/m2), and on medications for hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. Anthropomorphic, demographic, and psychosocial measures were collected at baseline and 6 months. Participants (n=1685) attended 20 weekly group sessions to encourage calorie restriction, moderate-intensity physical activity, and the DASH (dietary approaches to stop hypertension) dietary pattern. Weight-loss predictors with missing data were replaced by multiple imputation. Results Participants were 44% African American and 67% women; 79% were obese (BMI≥30), 87% were taking anti-hypertensive medications, and 38% were taking antidyslipidemia medications. Participants attended an average of 72% of 20 group sessions. They self-reported 117 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week, kept 3.7 daily food records per week, and consumed 2.9 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. The Phase-I follow-up rate was 92%. Mean (SD) weight change was −5.8 kg (4.4), and 69% lost at least 4 kg. All race–gender subgroups lost substantial weight: African-American men (−5.4 kg ± 7.7); African-American women (−4.1 kg ± 2.9); non–African-American men (−8.5 kg ± 12.9); and non–African-American women (−5.8 kg ± 6.1). Behavioral measures (e.g., diet records and physical activity) accounted for most of the weight-loss variation, although the association between behavioral measures and weight loss differed by race and gender groups. Conclusions The WLM behavioral intervention successfully achieved clinically significant short-term weight loss in a diverse population of high-risk patients

  15. A Phase I Clinical Trial of Safingol in Combination with Cisplatin in Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Mark A.; Carvajal, Richard D.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Gonen, Mithat; Cane, Lauren M.; Schwartz, Gary K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important mediator of cancer cell growth and proliferation. Production of S1P is catalyzed by sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK). Safingol, (L-threo-dihydrosphingosine) is a putative inhibitor of SphK. We conducted a phase I trial of safingol (S) alone and in combination with cisplatin (C). Experimental Design A 3+3 dose escalation was used. For safety, S was given alone 1 week before the combination. S + C were then administered every 3 weeks. S was given over 60–120 minutes (min), depending on dose. 60 min later, C was given over 60 min. The C dose of 75 mg/m2 was reduced in cohort 4 to 60 mg/m2 due to excessive fatigue. Results 43 patients were treated. 41 were evaluable for toxicity and 37 for response. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was S 840 mg/m2 over 120 min C 60 mg/m2, every 3 weeks. DLTs attributed to cisplatin included fatigue and hyponatremia. DLT from S was hepatic enzyme elevation. S pharmacokinetic parameters were linear throughout the dose range with no significant interaction with C. Patients treated at or near the MTD achieved S levels of > 20 µM and maintained levels ≥ 5 µM for 4 hours. The best response was stable disease in 6 patients for on average 3.3 months (range 1.8 – 7.2 m). One patient with adrenal cortical cancer had significant regression of liver and lung metastases and another had prolonged stable disease. S was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in S1P in plasma. Conclusions Safingol, the first putative SphK inhibitor to enter clinical trials, can be safely administered in combination with cisplatin. Reversible dose-dependent hepatic toxicity was seen, as expected from preclinical data. Target inhibition was achieved with downregulation of S1P. The recommended phase 2 dose is S 840 mg/m2 and C 60 mg/m2, every 3 weeks. PMID:21257722

  16. A Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial of Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To provide data on the short-term effect of intravitreal bevacizumab for diabetic macular edema (DME). Design Randomized phase 2 clinical trial. Participants 121 eyes of 121 subjects (109 eligible for analysis) with DME and Snellen acuity equivalent ranging from 20/32-20/320. Interventions Random assignment to one of five groups: focal photocoagulation at baseline (N=19, Group A), intravitreal injection of 1.25mg bevacizumab at baseline and 6 weeks (N=22, Group B), intravitreal injection of 2.5mg bevacizumab at baseline and 6 weeks (N=24, Group C), intravitreal injection of 1.25mg bevacizumab at baseline and sham injection at 6 weeks (N=22, Group D), or intravitreal injection of 1.25mg bevacizumab at baseline and 6 weeks with photocoagulation at 3 weeks (N=22, Group E). Main Outcome Measures Central subfield thickness (CST) on optical coherence tomography and best-corrected visual acuity (VA) were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Results At baseline, median CST was 411 microns and median Snellen VA equivalent was 20/50. Compared with Group A, Groups B and C had a greater reduction in CST at 3 weeks and about one line better median visual acuity over 12 weeks. There were no meaningful differences between Groups B and C in CST reduction or VA improvement. A CST reduction >11% (the reliability limit) was present at 3 weeks in 36/84 (43%) bevacizumab-treated eyes and in 5/18 (28%) eyes treated with laser alone, and at 6 weeks in 31/84 (37%) and 9/18 (50%) eyes, respectively. Combining focal photocoagulation with bevacizumab resulted in no apparent short-term benefit or adverse outcomes. Endophthalmitis developed in one eye. The following events occurred during the first 24 weeks in subjects treated with bevacizumab without attributing cause to the drug: myocardial infarction (N=2), congestive heart failure (N=1), elevated blood pressure (N=3), and worsened renal function (N=3). Conclusion These results demonstrate that

  17. Phase II trial of capecitabine plus nab-paclitaxel in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kornek, Gabriela; Prager, Gerald; Stranzl, Nadja; Laengle, Friedrich; Schindl, Martin; Friedl, Josef; Klech, Julia; Roethlin, Sabine; Zielinski, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Combination chemotherapy regimens including fluoropyrimidines as well as albumin-bound paclitaxel have shown promising results in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPC). Based on the recently described excellent therapeutic index of capecitabine plus nab-paclitaxel in metastatic breast cancer, the present phase II trial was initiated. Methods Patients with previously untreated mPC were treated with capecitabine (825 mg/m2 orally bid on days 1-15) and nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1 and 8) every 3 weeks. In patients without clinically relevant adverse reactions after the 1st treatment course (≤ grade 2 toxicities according to NCI-CTC vs. 4.0, exuding alopecia and fatigue of any degree) and adequate bone marrow function, the nab-paclitaxel dose was escalated to 100 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 and 15 of each cycle; this intra-individual dose escalation was maintained during subsequent treatment courses if tolerated. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) according to RECIST criteria, assessed by an independent radiological review committee with evaluation performed every 2 months. Results Between 12/2013 and 01/2015, 30 patients were entered in this monocentric academic phase II trial. All patients had an ECOG performance status of 0-1, 80% had liver metastases and 23% had biliary stents in place at time of study initiation. Median CA19-9 was 1,004 U/mL (0.9-100.000 U/mL). In all patients except 2, a dose escalation of nab-paclitaxel after the 1st treatment course could be accomplished. The most common grade 3 adverse events (AEs) included transient sensory neuropathy (23%), (afebrile) neutropenia (17%), hand-foot-syndrome (13%) and phototoxic skin reaction (10%). Among 29 RECIST-response assessable patients, the ORR was 41.4% and stable disease (SD) was noted in 34.5%, resulting in a disease control rate (DCR) of 76%. After a median follow-up duration of 10.3 months (range, 1.9-19.0 months), 13/30 patients (43

  18. Sorafenib in advanced melanoma: a Phase II randomised discontinuation trial analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, T; Ahmad, T; Flaherty, K T; Gore, M; Kaye, S; Marais, R; Gibbens, I; Hackett, S; James, M; Schuchter, L M; Nathanson, K L; Xia, C; Simantov, R; Schwartz, B; Poulin-Costello, M; O'Dwyer, P J; Ratain, M J

    2006-09-01

    The effects of sorafenib--an oral multikinase inhibitor targeting the tumour and tumour vasculature--were evaluated in patients with advanced melanoma enrolled in a large multidisease Phase II randomised discontinuation trial (RDT). Enrolled patients received a 12-week run-in of sorafenib 400 mg twice daily (b.i.d.). Patients with changes in bi-dimensional tumour measurements <25% from baseline were then randomised to sorafenib or placebo for a further 12 weeks (ie to week 24). Patients with > or =25% tumour shrinkage after the run-in continued on open-label sorafenib, whereas those with > or =25% tumour growth discontinued treatment. This analysis focussed on secondary RDT end points: changes in bi-dimensional tumour measurements from baseline after 12 weeks and overall tumour responses (WHO criteria) at week 24, progression-free survival (PFS), safety and biomarkers (BRAF, KRAS and NRAS mutational status). Of 37 melanoma patients treated during the run-in phase, 34 were evaluable for response: one had > or =25% tumour shrinkage and remained on open-label sorafenib; six (16%) had <25% tumour growth and were randomised (placebo, n=3; sorafenib, n=3); and 27 had > or =25% tumour growth and discontinued. All three randomised sorafenib patients progressed by week 24; one remained on sorafenib for symptomatic relief. All three placebo patients progressed by week-24 and were re-started on sorafenib; one experienced disease re-stabilisation. Overall, the confirmed best responses for each of the 37 melanoma patients who received sorafenib were 19% stable disease (SD) (ie n=1 open-label; n=6 randomised), 62% (n=23) progressive disease (PD) and 19% (n=7) unevaluable. The overall median PFS was 11 weeks. The six randomised patients with SD had overall PFS values ranging from 16 to 34 weeks. The most common drug-related adverse events were dermatological (eg rash/desquamation, 51%; hand-foot skin reaction, 35%). There was no relationship between V600E BRAF status and disease

  19. Protocol for the CHEST Australia Trial: a phase II randomised controlled trial of an intervention to reduce time-to-consult with symptoms of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sonya R; Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil; Walter, Fiona M; Mazza, Danielle; Habgood, Emily; Kutzer, Yvonne; Martin, Andrew; Goodall, Stephen; Barnes, David J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, with 1.3 million new cases diagnosed every year. It has one of the lowest survival outcomes of any cancer because over two-thirds of patients are diagnosed when curative treatment is not possible. International research has focused on screening and community interventions to promote earlier presentation to a healthcare provider to improve early lung cancer detection. This paper describes the protocol for a phase II, multisite, randomised controlled trial, for patients at increased risk of lung cancer in the primary care setting, to facilitate early presentation with symptoms of lung cancer. Methods/analysis The intervention is based on a previous Scottish CHEST Trial that comprised of a primary-care nurse consultation to discuss and implement a self-help manual, followed by self-monitoring reminders to improve symptom appraisal and encourage help-seeking in patients at increased risk of lung cancer. We aim to recruit 550 patients from two Australian states: Western Australia and Victoria. Patients will be randomised to the Intervention (a health consultation involving a self-help manual, monthly prompts and spirometry) or Control (spirometry followed by usual care). Eligible participants are long-term smokers with at least 20 pack years, aged 55 and over, including ex-smokers if their cessation date was less than 15 years ago. The primary outcome is consultation rate for respiratory symptoms. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from The University of Western Australia's Human Research Ethics Committee (RA/4/1/6018) and The University of Melbourne Human Research Committee (1 441 433). A summary of the results will be disseminated to participants and we plan to publish the main trial outcomes in a single paper. Further publications are anticipated after further data analysis. Findings will be presented at national and international conferences from late 2016. Trial

  20. Study of therapeutic hypothermia (32 to 35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial): outcome of the pilot phase of the trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical trials in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are challenging. Previous trials of complex interventions were conducted in high-income countries, reported long lead times for site setup and low screened-to-recruitment rates. In this report we evaluate the internal pilot phase of an international, multicentre TBI trial of a complex intervention to assess: design and implementation of an online case report form; feasibility of recruitment (sites and patients); feasibility and effectiveness of delivery of the protocol. Methods All aspects of the pilot phase of the trial were conducted as for the main trial. The pilot phase had oversight by independent Steering and Data Monitoring committees. Results Forty sites across 12 countries gained ethical approval. Thirty seven of 40 sites were initiated for recruitment. Of these, 29 had screened patients and 21 randomized at least one patient. Lead times to ethics approval (6.8 weeks), hospital approval (18 weeks), interest to set up (61 weeks), set up to screening (11 weeks), and set up to randomization (31.6 weeks) are comparable with other international trials. Sixteen per cent of screened patients were eligible. We found 88% compliance rate with trial protocol. Conclusion The pilot data demonstrated good feasibility for this large international multicentre randomized controlled trial of hypothermia to control intracranial pressure. The sample size was reduced to 600 patients because of homogeneity of the patient group and we showed an optimized cooling intervention could be delivered. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN34555414. PMID:24004918

  1. INSAT-2A and 2B development mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayan, M. N.; Rao, M. Nageswara; Nataraju, B. S.; Viswanatha, N.; Chary, M. Laxmana; Balan, K. S.; Murthy, V. Sridhara; Aller, Raju; Kumar, H. N. Suresha

    1994-01-01

    The Indian National Satellite (INSAT) 2A and 2B have deployment mechanisms for deploying the solar array, two C/S band antenna reflectors and a coilable lattice boom with sail. The mechanisms have worked flawlessly on both satellites. The configuration details, precautions taken during the design phase, the test philosophy, and some of the critical analysis activities are discussed.

  2. A Phase I Trial of Samarium-153-Lexidronam Complex for Treatment of Clinically Nonmetastatic High-Risk Prostate Cancer: First Report of a Completed Study

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Trabulsi, Edouard; Intenzo, Charles; Lavarino, Jorosali; Xu Yihuan; Chervoneva, Inna

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose of samarium-153 EDTMP ({sup 153}Sm) with hormonal therapy (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in high-risk clinically nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk M0 prostate cancer patients (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >7, or >T3) were eligible for this prospective trial of dose-escalated radioactive {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (.25-2.0 mCi/kg) as primary or postoperative therapy. After 1 month of HT, we administered {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP followed by 4 more months of HT, 46.8 Gy to the pelvic region and 23.4 Gy to the prostate target (TD = 70.2 Gy). The primary endpoint was Grade III toxicity or higher by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Twenty-nine patients enrolled (median prostate-specific antigen = 8.2 ng/mL, 27/29 (93%) T stage {>=}T2b, 24/29 (83%) had Gleason >7) and received {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (.25 mCi/kg, 4 patients; 0.5 mCi/kg, 4 patients; 0.75 mCi/kg, 6 patients; 1.0 mCi/kg, 6 patients; 1.5 mCi/kg, 5 patients; 2.0mCi/kg, 4 patients). Twenty-eight patients underwent all planned therapy without delays (1 patient required surgery before the start of RT). With a median follow-up time of 23 months, there were 2 patients (7 %) experiencing Grade III hematologic toxicity. There were no other Grade III or IV side effects. Conclusions: Our trial demonstrates that 2 mCi/kg {sup 153}Sm -EDTMP with HT and RT was safe and feasible in men with high-risk M0 prostate cancer. A Phase II study to test this treatment is currently underway by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group.

  3. Interactive Software "Isotonic Design using Normalized Equivalent Toxicity Score (ID-NETS©TM)" for Cancer Phase I Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengjia; Wang, Zhibo; Wang, Haibin; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Kowalski, Jeanne; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2013-01-01

    Isotonic Design using Normalized Equivalent Toxicity Score (ID-NETS) is a novel Phase I design that integrates the novel toxicity scoring system originally proposed by Chen et al. [1] and the original Isotonic Design proposed by Leung et al. [2]. ID-NETS has substantially improved the accuracy of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) estimation and trial efficiency in the Phase I clinical trial setting by fully utilizing all toxicities experienced by each patient and treating toxicity response as a quasi-continuous variable instead of a binary indicator of dose limiting toxicity (DLT). To facilitate the incorporation of the ID-NETS method into the design and conduct of Phase I clinical trials, we have designed and developed a user-friendly software, ID-NETS(©TM), which has two functions: 1) Calculating the recommended dose for the subsequent patient cohort using available completed data; and 2) Performing simulations to obtain the operating characteristics of a trial designed with ID-NETS. Currently, ID-NETS(©TM)v1.0 is available for free download at http://winshipbbisr.emory.edu/IDNETS.html. PMID:23847695

  4. Stopped hearts, amputated toes and NASA: contemporary legends among healthy volunteers in US phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    The first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans is referred to as a phase I clinical trial. The purpose of these studies is to test the safety of the drugs and to establish appropriate doses that can later be given to patients. Most of these studies are conducted under controlled, in-patient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. To explore healthy volunteers’ experiences in clinical trials, an ethnographic study was conducted at six in-patient phase I clinics in the USA. In addition to the observation of clinic activities (from informed consent procedures to dosing to blood draws), 268 semi-structured interviews were conducted, 33 with clinic staff and 235 with healthy volunteers. Drawing on this dataset, this article explores healthy volunteers’ exchange of contemporary legends about phase I clinical trials. In addition to potentially scaring the listener and communicating distrust in the medical community, these incredible stories help participants cope with perceived stigma and establish a gradient of risk of trial participation, creating potential boundaries to their participation in medical research. The article argues that contemporary legends play a productive role in society, shaping how people view themselves and others and influencing their decisions about risky activities. PMID:25601069

  5. Phase I Trial of Sorafenib Following Liver Transplantation in Patients with High-Risk Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Abby B.; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Finn, Richard S.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Goyal, Abhishek; Venook, Alan P.; Blanke, Charles D.; Verna, Elizabeth C.; Dove, Lorna; Emond, Jean; Kato, Tomoaki; Samstein, Benjamin; Busuttil, Ronald; Remotti, Helen; Coffey, Amy; Brown Jr, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation offers excellent long-term survival for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who fall within established criteria. For those outside such criteria, or with high-risk pathologic features in the explant, HCC recurrence rates are higher. We conducted a multicenter phase I trial of sorafenib in liver transplantation patients with high-risk HCC. Subjects had HCC outside the Milan criteria (pre- or post-transplant), poorly differentiated tumors, or vascular invasion. We used a standard 3+3 phase I design with a planned duration of treatment of 24 weeks. Correlative studies included the number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs), plasma biomarkers, and tumor expression of p-Erk, p-Akt, and c-Met in tissue micro-arrays. We enrolled 14 patients with a median age of 63 years. Of these, 93% were men and 71% had underlying hepatitis C virus (HCV) and 21% had HBV. The maximum tolerated dose of sorafenib was 200 mg BID. Grade 3-4 toxicities seen in >10% of subjects included leukopenia (21%), elevated gamma-glutamyl transferase (21%), hypertension (14%), hand-foot syndrome (14%) and diarrhea (14%). Over a median follow-up of 953 days, one patient died and four recurred. The mean CEC number at baseline was 21 cells/4 ml for those who recurred, and 80 cells/4 ml for those who did not (p=0.10). Mean soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 levels decreased after 1 month on sorafenib (p=0.09), but did not correlate with recurrence. There was a trend for tumor c-Met expression to correlate with increased risk of recurrence. Post-transplant sorafenib was found to be feasible and tolerable at 200 mg PO BID. The effect of post-transplant sorafenib on recurrence-free survival is potentially promising but needs further validation in a larger study. PMID:26020033

  6. Nivolumab for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Motzer, Robert J.; Rini, Brian I.; McDermott, David F.; Redman, Bruce G.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Harrison, Michael R.; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Drabkin, Harry A.; George, Saby; Logan, Theodore F.; Margolin, Kim A.; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Lambert, Alexandre M.; Waxman, Ian M.; Hammers, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nivolumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G4 programmed death–1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody that restores T-cell immune activity. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity, dose-response relationship, and safety of nivolumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients and Methods Patients with clear-cell mRCC previously treated with agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway were randomly assigned (blinded ratio of 1:1:1) to nivolumab 0.3, 2, or 10 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the dose-response relationship as measured by progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results A total of 168 patients were randomly assigned to the nivolumab 0.3- (n = 60), 2- (n = 54), and 10-mg/kg (n = 54) cohorts. One hundred eighteen patients (70%) had received more than one prior systemic regimen. Median PFS was 2.7, 4.0, and 4.2 months, respectively (P = .9). Respective ORRs were 20%, 22%, and 20%. Median OS was 18.2 months (80% CI, 16.2 to 24.0 months), 25.5 months (80% CI, 19.8 to 28.8 months), and 24.7 months (80% CI, 15.3 to 26.0 months), respectively. The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was fatigue (24%, 22%, and 35%, respectively). Nineteen patients (11%) experienced grade 3 to 4 treatment-related AEs. Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile across the three doses studied in mRCC. No dose-response relationship was detected as measured by PFS. These efficacy and safety results in mRCC support study in the phase III setting. PMID:25452452

  7. A phase I trial of the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir in adults with solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Gills, Joell J.; Ballas, Marc S.; Bernstein, Wendy B.; Komiya, Takefumi; Dechowdhury, Roopa; Morrow, Betsy; Root, Hyejeong; Chun, Guinevere; Helsabeck, Cynthia; Steinberg, Seth M.; LoPiccolo, Jaclyn; Kawabata, Shigeru; Gardner, Erin R.; Figg, William D.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Nelfinavir is an HIV protease inhibitor being repurposed as an anti-cancer agent in preclinical models and in small oncology trials, yet the MTD of nelfinavir has not been determined. Therefore, we conducted a Phase Ia study to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities (DLT) of nelfinavir in subjects with advanced solid tumors. Adults with refractory cancers were given oral nelfinavir twice daily with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses. Twenty-eight subjects were enrolled. Nelfinavir was generally well tolerated. Common adverse events included diarrhea, anemia, and lymphopenia, which were mostly mild. The DLT was rapid-onset neutropenia that was reversible. The MTD was established at 3125 mg twice daily. In an expansion cohort at the MTD, one of 11 (9%) evaluable subjects had a confirmed partial response. This, plus two minor responses, occurred in subjects with neuroendocrine tumors of the midgut or pancreatic origin. Thirty-six percent of subjects had stable disease for more than 6 months. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Nelfinavir inhibited AKT and induced markers of ER stress. In summary, nelfinavir is well tolerated in cancer patients at doses 2.5 times the FDA-approved dose for HIV management and showed preliminary activity in tumors of neuroendocrine origin. PMID:25327558

  8. A phase I clinical trial of thymidine kinase-based gene therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sangro, B; Mazzolini, G; Ruiz, M; Ruiz, J; Quiroga, J; Herrero, I; Qian, C; Benito, A; Larrache, J; Olagüe, C; Boan, J; Peñuelas, I; Sádaba, B; Prieto, J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this phase I clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of intratumoral administration of a first-generation adenoviral vector encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene (Ad.TK) followed by systemic ganciclovir to patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Secondarily, we have analyzed its antitumor effect. Ten patients were enrolled in five dose-level cohorts that received from 10¹⁰ to 2 × 10¹² viral particles (vp). Ad.TK was injected intratumorally and patients received up to three doses at 30-day intervals. Positron emission tomography was used to monitor TK gene expression. Ad.TK injection was feasible in 100% of cases. Treatment was well tolerated and dose-limiting toxicity was not achieved. Cumulative toxicity was not observed. Hepatic toxicity was absent even in cirrhotic patients. Fever, flu-like syndrome, pain at the injection site and pancytopenia were the most common side effects. No partial responses were observed and 60% of patients showed tumor stabilization of the injected lesion. Importantly, two patients who received the highest dose showed signs of intratumoral necrosis by imaging procedures. One of them achieved a sustained stabilization and survived for 26 months. In conclusion, Ad.TK can be safely administered by intratumoral injection to patients with HCC up to 2 × 10¹² vp per patient. PMID:20689572

  9. A phase I clinical trial of Fansimef (mefloquine plus sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine) in Brazilian male subjects

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, J. M.; Sheth, U. K.; de Oliveira, R. M. G.; Gomes, A. T.; Cavalcante, E. Q.

    1985-01-01

    A double-blind, randomized phase I clinical trial was carried out to compare Fansimef (a fixed-dose combination of mefloquine, sulfadoxine, and pyrimethamine) with sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine (Fansidar) for safety and tolerance. Twenty adult male Brazilian subjects from malaria endemic areas were studied for a period of 66 days, which included 2 days before and 63 days after drug administration. Both drugs were well tolerated and safe, as seen from the absence of drug-induced changes in the various laboratory, haematological, and biochemical parameters measured. Fansimef produced a complete clearance of parasites on day 3, with an “S” type response in one subject who had blood smears which were positive for Plasmodium falciparum on day 0. Two subjects in the sufladoxine—pyrimethamine group also had P. falciparum infections on day 0; the parasitaemia was cleared on day 2 in one of these subjects and on day 3 in the other, but an early RI response (recrudescence) was observed in the former case. Relapses due to P. vivax occurred in both groups. Side-effects due to Fansimef included mild dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. The incidence of dizziness and nausea was similar in the sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine group. In both groups, these side-effects were mild, short-lived and did not require specific treatment. Thus, Fansimef in an oral dose of three tablets (total of 750 mg mefloquine (base) plus 1500 mg sulfadoxine plus 75 mg pyrimethamine) was found to be well tolerated and safe. PMID:3899398

  10. A Phase I Trial of Preoperative Partial Breast Radiotherapy: Patient Selection, Target Delineation, and Dose Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Arya, Ritu; Yoo, Sua; Baker, Jay A.; Chang, Zheng; Palta, Manisha; Duffy, Eileen; Horton, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) into clinical practice is limited by the need for specialized equipment and training. The accessible external beam technique yields unacceptable complication rates, likely due to large post-operative target volumes. We designed a phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy to the intact tumor utilizing widely available technology. Methods Patients received 15, 18, or 21Gy in a single fraction to the breast tumor plus margin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in conjunction with standard computed tomography (CT)-based planning to identify contrast enhancing tumor. Skin markers and an intra-tumor biopsy marker were utilized for verification during treatment. Results MRI imaging was critical for target delineation as not all breast tumors were reliably identified on CT scan. Breast shape differences were consistently seen between CT and MRI but did not impede image registration or tumor identification. Target volumes were markedly smaller than historical post-operative volumes and normal tissue constraints were easily met. A biopsy marker within the breast proved sufficient for set up localization. Conclusions This single fraction linear-accelerator based ABPI approach can be easily incorporated at most treatment centers. In vivo targeting may improve accuracy and can reduce the dose to normal tissues. PMID:25834942

  11. Phase 2 trial of ixazomib in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma not refractory to bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S K; LaPlant, B; Roy, V; Reeder, C B; Lacy, M Q; Gertz, M A; Laumann, K; Thompson, M A; Witzig, T E; Buadi, F K; Rivera, C E; Mikhael, J R; Bergsagel, P L; Kapoor, P; Hwa, L; Fonseca, R; Stewart, A K; Chanan-Khan, A; Rajkumar, S V; Dispenzieri, A

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 trial was designed to evaluate ixazomib, an orally bioavailable proteasome inhibitor, in patients with myeloma who have limited prior exposure to bortezomib. Thirty-three patients with relapsed multiple myeloma were enrolled. Ixazomib was given at 5.5 mg weekly for 3 of 4 weeks. Dexamethasone was added for lack of a minor response (MR) by end of cycle 2 or lack of a partial response (PR) by end of cycle 4 or for disease progression at any time. Median age was 69 years; patients had a median of two prior therapies (range 1-7). A grade 3 or 4 adverse event considered at least possibly related to drug was seen in 19 (59%) and 6 (19%) patients, respectively. The most common adverse events were thrombocytopenia, fatigue, nausea and diarrhea. Dexamethasone was initiated in 22 (67%) patients, 17 for not reaching the desired response and 5 for progression. Response (⩾PR) to single agent was seen in five patients within four cycles of therapy including three patients with PR, one patient with complete response (CR) and one patient with stringent CR. Six additional patients with either an MR (2) or SD (4) achieved a PR after addition of dexamethasone, translating to an overall response rate of 34%. PMID:26275080

  12. Phase 2 trial of ixazomib in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma not refractory to bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S K; LaPlant, B; Roy, V; Reeder, C B; Lacy, M Q; Gertz, M A; Laumann, K; Thompson, M A; Witzig, T E; Buadi, F K; Rivera, C E; Mikhael, J R; Bergsagel, P L; Kapoor, P; Hwa, L; Fonseca, R; Stewart, A K; Chanan-Khan, A; Rajkumar, S V; Dispenzieri, A

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 trial was designed to evaluate ixazomib, an orally bioavailable proteasome inhibitor, in patients with myeloma who have limited prior exposure to bortezomib. Thirty-three patients with relapsed multiple myeloma were enrolled. Ixazomib was given at 5.5 mg weekly for 3 of 4 weeks. Dexamethasone was added for lack of a minor response (MR) by end of cycle 2 or lack of a partial response (PR) by end of cycle 4 or for disease progression at any time. Median age was 69 years; patients had a median of two prior therapies (range 1–7). A grade 3 or 4 adverse event considered at least possibly related to drug was seen in 19 (59%) and 6 (19%) patients, respectively. The most common adverse events were thrombocytopenia, fatigue, nausea and diarrhea. Dexamethasone was initiated in 22 (67%) patients, 17 for not reaching the desired response and 5 for progression. Response (⩾PR) to single agent was seen in five patients within four cycles of therapy including three patients with PR, one patient with complete response (CR) and one patient with stringent CR. Six additional patients with either an MR (2) or SD (4) achieved a PR after addition of dexamethasone, translating to an overall response rate of 34%. PMID:26275080

  13. A phase I randomized, multicenter trial of CPX in adult subjects with mild cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Nael A; Standaert, Thomas A; Teresi, Mary; Tuthill, Cynthia; Launspach, Janice; Kelley, Thomas J; Milgram, Laura J H; Hilliard, Kathleen A; Regelmann, Warren E; Weatherly, Mark R; Aitken, Moira L; Konstan, Michael W; Ahrens, Richard C

    2002-02-01

    CPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) is a novel compound currently under development as a potential treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF). The drug has been shown to increase chloride efflux and CFTR trafficking in vitro in CF airway cells. This phase I multicenter, single-dose, placebo-controlled trial was performed at four institutions. Thirty-seven subjects homozygous for the Delta F(508) allele were studied in an escalating dose protocol of seven single-dose cohorts (1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, and 1,000 mg) to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of CPX. Efficacy was determined using nasal transepithelial potential difference and sweat chloride measurements prior to dosing and at 1, 2, and 4 hr postdose. The incidence of adverse events in the treatment group was similar to that with placebo, indicating safety of the single doses studied. One serious adverse event (an acute pulmonary exacerbation) occurred 13 days after dosing, and was not considered related to the study drug. The maximal plasma CPX concentration and total amount of CPX absorbed appeared to be linearly related to dose, but was highly variable throughout the dose range studied, suggesting inconsistent absorption. There was no apparent effect of single-dose administration on either nasal transepithelial potential difference or sweat chloride measurements. The positive safety and pharmacokinetic findings of this study support continued development of CPX as a potential therapeutic for CF. PMID:11802244

  14. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  15. Insulin degludec does not increase antibody formation versus insulin glargine: an evaluation of phase IIIa trials.

    PubMed

    Vora, J; Seufert, J; Solberg, H; Kinduryte, O; Johansen, T; Hollander, P

    2016-07-01

    We examined insulin antibody formation in patients with type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with once-daily insulin degludec (IDeg) or insulin glargine (IGlar) to evaluate the impact of antibody formation on efficacy and safety. Insulin antibodies were measured using subtraction radioimmunoassays in six phase IIIa clinical trials using IDeg (n = 2250) and IGlar (n = 1184). Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to evaluate associations between cross-reacting antibodies and change from baseline glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin dose. IDeg- and IGlar-specific antibodies remained low [<1% bound/total radioactivity (B/T)] and with low levels of antibodies cross-reacting with human insulin in patients with T1D (<20% B/T) and T2D (<6% B/T). Spearman's correlation coefficients between insulin antibody levels and change in HbA1c or insulin dose were low in both treatment groups. No clinically meaningful differences in adverse event (AE) rates were observed in patients with >10% B/T or without an absolute increase in antibodies cross-reacting with human insulin. IDeg treatment resulted in few immunogenic responses in patients with T1D and T2D; antibody formation was not associated with change in HbA1c, insulin dose or rates of AEs. PMID:26663320

  16. Time controlled pulsatile transdermal delivery of nicotine: A phase I feasibility trial in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Felix; Kummer, Oliver; Guercioni, Stefania; Imanidis, Georgios; Drewe, Juergen

    2016-06-28

    Nicotine substitution is a mainstay component in smoking cessation schemes. Current products including patches are poorly effective mainly because they do not give smokers the same pharmacokinetic profile of nicotine as cigarette consumption. This work evaluates a new computer operated delivery system for time controlled pulsatile transdermal administration of nicotine in a phase I clinical trial with twelve heavy smoking male volunteers. The device was affixed to the ventral side of the leading lower arm of the subjects and was programmed to deliver two pulses of drug within 16h with three delivery rates in a consecutive dose escalation study. Tolerability of the three increasing doses of nicotine was established. Plasma concentration of nicotine exhibited two peaks and one trough and reached therapeutically effective levels that behaved linearly with the drug load concentration of the device. In vivo input rate, delivered amount and elimination kinetics were deduced by pharmacokinetic modeling to analyze device performance. Timing, dose and duration of delivery were controlled by system operation parameters. Hence, feasibility of controlled pulsatile delivery of nicotine at predetermined intervals was demonstrated. After additional optimization, preprogrammed or on demand administration to meet individualized and circadian replacement needs should improve smoking cessation efficacy. PMID:27090163

  17. Phase II trial of cyclophosphamide, leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil 24-hour infusion and tamoxifen in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Eckel, F; Lersch, C; Lippl, F; Assmann, G; Schulte-Frohlinde, E

    2000-09-01

    Leucovorin modulates the cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the treatment of cancer. 24-hour infusion of 5-FU has been shown to enhance antitumor activity in colorectal cancer compared to bolus infusion. According to experimental data cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen may enhance the effectiveness of leucovorin and 5-FU. A phase II trial was initiated to evaluate the effect of a combination of low-dose cyclophosphamide (C), leucovorin (L), 5-FU (F) and tamoxifen (T) (CLFT) in advanced pancreatic cancer. Fifty patients were treated monthly with 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide and weekly with 500 mg/m2 leucovorin followed by a 24-hour infusion of 2000 mg/m2 5-FU and tamoxifen 20 mg bid. Three patients had a partial response (6%), two a minor response (4%) and 32 (64%) no change of disease. The median survival time was 8.5 months for all patients, the median time to progression of disease was 4.6 months and the 1-year survival rate was 28%. CLFT was fairly well tolerated. These data suggest that biochemical modulation of 24-hour infusional 5-FU with leucovorin together with cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen has some positive effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:11144522

  18. Phase I Trial of Tipifarnib (R115777) Concurrent With Radiotherapy in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth . E-mail: moyal.elizabeth@claudiusregaud.fr; Laprie, Anne; Delannes, Martine; Poublanc, Muriel; Catalaa, Isabelle; Dalenc, Florence; Berchery, Delphine; Sabatier, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe; De Porre, Peter; Alaux, Beatrice; Toulas, Christine

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To conduct a Phase I trial to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of tipifarnib in combination with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT) for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: After resection or biopsy, tipifarnib was given 1 week before and then continuously during RT (60 Gy), followed by adjuvant administration until progression. The tipifarnib dose during RT was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 200 mg/day. Results: Thirteen patients were enrolled, and 12 were evaluable for MTD. Of these patients, 7 had undergone biopsy, 4 had partial resection, and 1 had gross total resection. No dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed during the concomitant treatment at 200 mg. All 3 patients at 300 mg experienced DLT during the concomitant treatment: 1 with sudden death and 2 with acute pneumonitis. The MTD was reached at 300 mg. The adjuvant treatment was suppressed from the protocol after a case of pneumonitis during this treatment. Six additional patients were included at 200 mg/day of the new protocol, confirming the safety of this treatment. Of the 9 evaluable patients, 1 had partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 3 had rapid progression; the patient with gross total resection was relapse-free after 21 months. Median survival of the evaluable patients was 12 months (range, 5.2-21 months). Conclusion: Tipifarnib (200 mg/day) concurrent with standard radiotherapy is well tolerated in patients with glioblastoma. Preliminary efficacy results are encouraging.

  19. A multiple-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Knost, J A; Fein, S; Abrams, P G; Foon, K A; Ochs, J J; Schoenberger, C; Maluish, A E; Oldham, R K

    1982-11-19

    Eighty-one patients with a variety of refractory disseminated malignant neoplasms have been treated in the first multiple fixed-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA). Each patient received IFL-rA by intramuscular injection, three times weekly for 28 days. Dosages were escalated in different patients from 1 to 136 x 10(6) units per injection. The toxic reactions seen with IFL-rA resembled those of nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon and included fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, myalgia, headache, occasional nausea and vomiting, and dose-dependent reversible leukopenia and hepatic transaminase elevations. The pharmacokinetics of IFL-rA were also comparable with nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon. Objective evidence of antitumor activity was seen in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, and melanoma, indicating that IFL-rA, the first genetically engineered biological response modifier available for testing in cancer patients, is biologically active in vivo. PMID:6752447

  20. Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) Fails to Demonstrate Efficacy in a Prospective Multicenter Phase II Trial on Lung Malignancies: The ALICE Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ricke, Jens Jürgens, Julian H. W.; Deschamps, Frederic; Tselikas, Lambros; Uhde, Katja; Kosiek, Ortrud; Baere, Thierry De

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo assess safety and efficacy of irreversible electroporation (IRE) of lung malignancies.Materials and MethodsPatients with primary and secondary lung malignancies and preserved lung function were included in this prospective single arm trial. Primary and secondary endpoints were safety and efficacy. Recruitment goal was 36 subjects in 2 centers. Patients underwent IRE under general anesthesia with probe placement performed in Fluoroscopy-CT. The IRE system employed was NanoKnife{sup ®} (Angiodynamics). System settings for the ablation procedure followed the manufacturer’s recommendations. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to evaluate the correlation of nine technical parameters with local tumor control. Median follow up was 12 months.ResultsThe expected efficacy was not met at interim analysis and the trial was stopped prematurely after inclusion of 23 patients (13/10 between both centers). The dominant tumor entity was colorectal (n = 13). The median tumor diameter was 16 mm (8–27 mm). Pneumothoraces were observed in 11 of 23 patients with chest tubes required in 8 (35 %). Frequently observed alveolar hemorrhage never led to significant hemoptysis. 14/23 showed progressive disease (61 %). Stable disease was found in 1 (4 %), partial remission in 1 (4 %) and complete remission in 7 (30 %) patients. The relative increase of the current during ablation was significantly higher in the group treated successfully as compared to the group presenting local recurrence (p < 0.05). Needle tract seeding was found in three cases (13 %).ConclusionsIRE is not effective for the treatment of lung malignancies. We hypothesize that the energy deposition with current IRE probes is highly sensitive to air exposure.

  1. Community perceptions on the secondary health benefits established by malaria vaccine trials (RTS,S phase 2 and phase 3) at the Korogwe site in North Eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies conducted thus far have demonstrated that the malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has a promising safety profile. Within the context of planning for future vaccine trials and for the purpose of building on previous research that has been undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa with regard to community perceptions about clinical studies, this research aimed to explore the community perceptions on the secondary health benefits established by the malaria vaccine trials (RTS,S Phase 2 and Phase 3) at the Korogwe site in Tanzania. Methods An exploratory qualitative study design was used. Participants were recruited from the Korogwe site. Sampling techniques were purposive and random. A total of five focus group discussions and six in-depth interviews were conducted. Interview guides with open-ended questions were employed to collect data. Male and female parents whose infants participated and those whose infants did not participate in the trials, health workers and community leaders were interviewed. Thematic analysis framework was used to analyse the data. Results The activities of a malaria vaccine project appeared to be well known to the community. Respondents had largely positive views towards the secondary health benefits which have been established by malaria vaccine trials. The project has led to a massive investment in health care infrastructure and an improvement in health care services across the study areas. The project was perceived by the community to have established major secondary health benefits. Misconceptions amongst respondents, especially with regard to blood samples, were also observed in this study. Conclusion Despite some misconceptions with regard to the conduct of malaria vaccine trials, especially on blood sampling, generally this study observed that most participants were positive about the secondary health benefits brought about by the malaria vaccine trials in Korogwe. PMID:23651535

  2. Safety of bosutinib versus imatinib in the phase 3 BELA trial in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cortes, Jorge E; Lipton, Jeff H; Dmoszynska, Anna; Wong, Raymond S; Rossiev, Victor; Pavlov, Dmitri; Gogat Marchant, Karin; Duvillié, Ladan; Khattry, Navin; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Brümmendorf, Tim H

    2014-01-01

    Bosutinib, an orally active, Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated clinical activity and acceptable tolerability in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP CML). This updated analysis of the BELA trial assessed the safety profile and management of toxicities of bosutinib versus imatinib in adults with newly diagnosed (≤6 months) CP CML after >30 months from accrual completion. Among patients randomized to bosutinib 500 mg/d (n = 250) or imatinib 400 mg/d (n = 252), 248 and 251, respectively, received ≥1 dose of study treatment. Adverse events (AEs; any grade) with bosutinib versus imatinib were significantly more common for certain gastrointestinal events (diarrhea, 70% vs. 26%; P < 0.001; vomiting, 33% vs. 16%; P < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (33% vs. 9%; P < 0.001) and aspartate aminotransferase (28% vs. 10%; P < 0.001) elevations, and pyrexia (19% vs. 12%; P = 0.046). AEs significantly less common with bosutinib included edema (periorbital, 2% vs. 14%; P < 0.001; peripheral, 5% vs. 12%; P = 0.006), musculoskeletal (myalgia, 5% vs. 12%; P = 0.010; muscle cramps, 5% vs. 22%; P < 0.001; bone pain, 4% vs. 11%; P = 0.003), increased creatine phosphokinase (8% vs. 20%; P < 0.001), neutropenia (13% vs. 30%; P < 0.001), and leukopenia (9% vs. 22%; P < 0.001). Between-group differences in the incidence of cardiac and vascular AEs were not significant. Diarrhea was typically transient, mostly Grade 1/2, occurring early during treatment, and was manageable with antidiarrheal medication. Despite higher rates of aminotransferase elevation with bosutinib, events were managed in most patients with dose modification and/or concomitant medication. Bosutinib had a manageable safety profile distinct from that of imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed CP CML. Am. J. Hematol. 89:947–953, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID

  3. Amyloid PET Screening for Enrichment of Early-Stage Alzheimer Disease Clinical Trials: Experience in a Phase 1b Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Sevigny, Jeff; Suhy, Joyce; Chiao, Ping; Chen, Tianle; Klein, Gregory; Purcell, Derk; Oh, Joonmi; Verma, Ajay; Sampat, Mehul; Barakos, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is being investigated as a screening tool to identify amyloid-positive patients as an enrichment strategy for Alzheimer disease (AD) clinical trial enrollment. In a multicenter, phase 1b trial, patients meeting clinical criteria for prodromal or mild AD underwent florbetapir PET scanning at screening. PET, magnetic resonance imaging, and coregistered PET/magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed by 2 independent readers and binary visual readings tabulated. Semiquantitative values of cortical to whole cerebellar standard uptake value ratios were computed (threshold 1.10). Of 278 patients with an evaluable PET scan, 170 (61%) and 185 (67%) were amyloid-positive by visual reading and quantitative analysis, respectively; 39% were excluded from the study due to an amyloid-negative scan based on visual readings. More ApoE ε4 carriers than noncarriers were amyloid-positive (80% vs. 43%). Comparison of visual readings with quantitative results identified 21 discordant cases (92% agreement). Interreader and intrareader agreements from visual readings were 98% and 100%, respectively. Amyloid PET imaging is an effective and feasible screening tool for enrollment of amyloid-positive patients with early stages of AD into clinical trials. PMID:26885819

  4. International Phase III Trial Assessing Neoadjuvant Cisplatin, Methotrexate, and Vinblastine Chemotherapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of the BA06 30894 Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This article presents the long-term results of the international multicenter randomized trial that investigated the use of neoadjuvant cisplatin, methotrexate, and vinblastine (CMV) chemotherapy in patients with muscle-invasive urothelial cancer of the bladder treated by cystectomy and/or radiotherapy. Nine hundred seventy-six patients were recruited between 1989 and 1995, and median follow-up is now 8.0 years. Patients and Methods This was a randomized phase III trial of either no neoadjuvant chemotherapy or three cycles of CMV. Results The previously reported possible survival advantage of CMV is now statistically significant at the 5% level. Results show a statistically significant 16% reduction in the risk of death (hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72 to 0.99; P = .037, corresponding to an increase in 10-year survival from 30% to 36%) after CMV. Conclusion We conclude that CMV chemotherapy improves outcome as first-line adjunctive treatment for invasive bladder cancer. Two large randomized trials (by the Medical Research Council/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Southwest Oncology Group) have confirmed a statistically significant and clinically relevant survival benefit, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by definitive local therapy should be viewed as state of the art, as compared with cystectomy or radiotherapy alone, for deeply invasive bladder cancer. PMID:21502557

  5. Pediatric Phase II Trials of Poly-ICLC in the Management of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Lisa L.R.; Crawford, John R.; Makale, Milan T.; Milburn, Mehrzad; Joshi, Shweta; Salazar, Andres M.; Hasenauer, Beth; VandenBerg, Scott R.; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Durden, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Brain tumors are the most common solid tumor diagnosed in childhood that account for significant morbidity and mortality. New therapies are urgently needed; hence, we conducted the first ever prospective open-label phase II trials of the biological response modifier, poly-ICLC, in children with brain tumors. Poly-ICLC is a synthetic double-stranded RNA that has direct antiviral, antineoplastic, and immune adjuvant effects. A total of 47 children representing a variety of brain tumor histopathologic subtypes were treated with poly-ICLC. On the basis of the results of the initial phase II trial, an expanded prospective phase II trial in low-grade glioma (LGG) has been initiated. MRI was used to acquire volume-based measures of tumor response. No dose-limiting toxicities have been observed. In the initial study 3 of 12 subjects with progressive high-grade gliomas (HGGs) responded, and 2 of 4 children with progressive LGG experienced stable disease for 18 to 24 months. In the follow-up LGG phase II study, 2 of 5 LGG patients were stable over 18 months, with 1 stable for 6 months. Overall 5 of 10 LGG patients have responded. On the basis of low toxicity and the promising LGG response, poly-ICLC may be effective for childhood LGG, and the results justify biomarker studies for personalization of poly-ICLC as a single agent or adjuvant. PMID:24309609

  6. Protocol for Care After Lymphoma (CALy) trial: a phase II pilot randomised controlled trial of a lymphoma nurse-led model of survivorship care

    PubMed Central

    Joske, David; Bulsara, Max; Bulsara, Caroline; Monterosso, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lymphoma is the sixth most common cancer diagnosed in Australia and internationally. Owing to the aggressive nature of the disease and intensity of treatment, survivors face long-term effects that impact on quality of life. Current models of follow-up post-treatment fail to address these complex issues. Given that 74% of patients with lymphoma cancer now survive 5 years beyond diagnosis and treatment, it is important to address this gap in care. Aim To determine self-reported informational and practical needs, anxiety, depression, stress, coping and empowerment at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Methods and analysis A pilot randomised controlled trial will test the effect of a nurse-led lymphoma survivorship clinic compared with usual post-treatment care at a large tertiary cancer centre in Western Australia. The intervention will comprise three face-to-face appointments with delivery of tailored resources, a survivorship care plan and treatment summary (SCP TS). The SCP TS will be given to the participant and general practitioner (GP). Intervention participants will be interviewed at completion to explore the perceived value of the intervention components and preferred dose. An evaluation developed for GPs will assess receipt and use of SCP TS. The primary intent of analysis will be to address the feasibility of a larger trial and requisite effect and sample size. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been granted by the University of Notre Dame Australia and Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Western Australia. Peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations will report the results of this phase II trial. Trial registration number ANZCTRN12615000530527; Pre-results. PMID:27194317

  7. Phase boundary at x =0.03 and its anomalous influence on the structure and properties in the lead-free piezoelectric (1 -x ) N a1 /2B i1 /2Ti O3-(x ) BaTi O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Badari Narayana; Avdeev, Maxim; Kennedy, Brendan; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2015-12-01

    The complexity associated with local structures continues to pose challenges with regard to the understanding of the structure-property relationship in N a1 /2B i1 /2Ti O3 -based lead-free piezoceramics. (1 -x ) N a1 /2B i1 /2Ti O3-(x ) BaTi O3 is an extensively studied system because of its interesting piezoelectric properties. Recently, a room temperature phase boundary was reported at x =0.03 in this system [Ma et al., Adv. Funct. Mater. 23, 5261 (2013), 10.1002/adfm.201300640]. In the present work we have examined this subtle phase boundary using x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, dielectric measurements as a function of composition (x <0.06 ) , temperature, and electric field. Our results show that this boundary separates an R 3 c +C c -like structural state for x <0.03 from an R 3 c + cubiclike structural state for 0.03 ≤x ≤0.05 in the unpoled specimens. This phase boundary is characterized by an anomalous reduction in the depolarization temperature, and a suppression of the tetragonal distortion of the high temperature P 4 b m phase. Our results also provide the clue to understand the pathway leading to the cubiclike structure of the critical composition x =0.06 , known for its highest piezoelectric response.

  8. Chelating agent free-solid phase extraction (CAF-SPE) of Co(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II) by new nano hybrid material (ZrO2/B2O3).

    PubMed

    Yalçinkaya, Ozcan; Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Türker, Ali Rehber

    2011-11-15

    New nano hybrid material (ZrO(2)/B(2)O(3)) was synthesized and applied as a sorbent for the separation and/or preconcentration of Co(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II) in water and tea leaves prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Synthesized nano material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The optimum conditions for the quantitative recovery of the analytes, including pH, eluent type and volume, flow rate of sample solution were examined. The effect of interfering ions was also investigated. Under the optimum conditions, adsorption isotherms and adsorption capacities have been examined. The recoveries of Co(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II) were 96 ± 3%, 95 ± 3%, 98 ± 4% at 95% confidence level, respectively. The analytical detection limits for Co(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) were 3.8, 3.3, and 3.1 μg L(-1), respectively. The reusability and adsorption capacities (32.2 mg g(-1) for Co, 46.5 mg g(-1) for Cu and 109.9 mg g(-1) for Cd) of the sorbent were found as satisfactory. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analyzing certified reference material (GBW-07605 Tea leaves) and spiked real samples. The method was applied for the determination of analytes in tap water and tea leaves. PMID:21889841

  9. Design and analysis of phase III trials with ordered outcome scales: the concept of the sliding dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gordon D; Barer, David; Choi, Sung; Fernandes, Helen; Gregson, Barbara; Lees, Kennedy R; Maas, Andrew I R; Marmarou, Anthony; Mendelow, A David; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Taylor, Gillian S; Teasdale, Graham M; Weir, Christopher J

    2005-05-01

    The conventional approach to the analysis of a Phase III trial in head injury or stroke takes an ordered scale measuring functional outcome and collapses the scale to a binary outcome of favorable versus unfavorable. This discards potentially relevant information which limits statistical power and moreover is not in accord with clinical practice. We propose an alternative approach where a favorable outcome is defined as better than would be expected, taking account of each individual patient's baseline prognosis. This is illustrated through a worked example based on data from a Phase III trial in head injury. The approach is also compared with the proportional odds model, which is another statistical approach that can exploit an ordered outcome scale. The approach raises issues of clinical, statistical, and regulatory importance, and we initiate what we believe needs to become a widespread debate amongst the community involved in clinical research in head injury and stroke. PMID:15892597

  10. Dynamics of distraction: competition among auditory streams modulates gain and disrupts inter-trial phase coherence in the human electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Ponjavic-Conte, Karla D; Hambrook, Dillon A; Pavlovic, Sebastian; Tata, Matthew S

    2013-01-01

    Auditory distraction is a failure to maintain focus on a stream of sounds. We investigated the neural correlates of distraction in a selective-listening pitch-discrimination task with high (competing speech) or low (white noise) distraction. High-distraction impaired performance and reduced the N1 peak of the auditory Event-Related Potential evoked by probe tones. In a series of simulations, we explored two theories to account for this effect: disruption of sensory gain or a disruption of inter-trial phase consistency. When compared to these simulations, our data were consistent with both effects of distraction. Distraction reduced the gain of the auditory evoked potential and disrupted the inter-trial phase consistency with which the brain responds to stimulus events. Tones at a non-target, unattended frequency were more susceptible to the effects of distraction than tones within an attended frequency band. PMID:23326548

  11. Phase I clinical trial of O-Acetylated pectin conjugate, a plant polysaccharide based typhoid vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Szu, Shousun C.; Lin, Kimi F-Y; Hunt, Steven; Chu, Chiayung; Thinh, Nguyen Duc

    2014-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. Vi capsular polysaccharide conjugate vaccine demonstrated safety and efficacy in young children in high endemic regions. A novel typhoid conjugate vaccine based on plant polysaccharide pectin was studied in a phase I trial. Methods Fruit pectin, having the same carbohydrate backbone structure as Vi, was purified from citrus peel and used as the polysaccharide source to prepare a semi-synthetic typhoid conjugate vaccine. Pectin was chemically O-acetylated (OAcPec) to antigenically resemble Vi and conjugated to carrier protein rEPA, a recombinant exoprotein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 25 healthy volunteers, 18–45 years old, were injected once with OAcPec-rEPA. Safety and IgG antibodies reactive with Vi and pectin were analyzed. Results No vaccine associated serious adverse reaction was reported. Six weeks after the injection of OAcPec-rEPA, 64% of the volunteers elicited >4 fold rise of anti-Vi IgG. At 26 weeks the level declined, but the difference between the levels at 6 and 26 weeks are not statistically significant. There is a direct correlation between the level of anti-Vi IgG before and after the injection (R2 = 0.96). The anti-Vi IgG can be absorbed by Vi, but not by pectin. There was no corresponding increase of anti-pectin after the injection, indicating the antibody response to OAcPec-rEPA was specific to Vi. There is no Vi-rEPA data in US adults for comparison of immune responses. The OAcPec-rEPA elicited significantly less IgG anti-Vi in US adults than those by Vi-rEPA in Vietnamese adults. Conclusion The O-acetylated pectin conjugate, a plant based typhoid vaccine, is safe and immunogenic in adult volunteers. PMID:24657719

  12. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter: Comparative Dosimetric Findings of a Phase 4 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank A.; Julian, Thomas B.; Cuttino, Laurie W.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Methods and Materials: Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. Results: Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Conclusions: Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals.

  13. Phase 2 trial of erlotinib plus sirolimus in adults with recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, David A.; Desjardins, Annick; Vredenburgh, James J.; Gururangan, Sridharan; Friedman, Allan H.; Herndon, James E.; Marcello, Jennifer; Norfleet, Julie A.; McLendon, Roger E.; Sampson, John H.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the anti-tumor activity and safety of erlotinib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, plus sirolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, among patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a phase 2, open-label, single-arm trial. Thirty-two patients received daily erlotinib and sirolimus. The doses of erlotinib and sirolimus were 150 mg and 5 mg for patients not on concurrent CYP3A-inducing anti-epileptics (EIAEDS), and 450 mg and 10 mg for patients on EIAEDS. Evaluations were performed every two months. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival and secondary endpoints included safety and overall survival. Archival tumor samples were assessed for EGFR, EGFRvIII, PTEN, pAKT and pS6. Enrolled patients were heavily pre-treated including 53% who had received three or more prior chemotherapy agents and 28% who had received prior bevacizumab therapy. The most common grade ≥2 adverse events were rash (59%), mucositis (34%) and diarrhea (31%). Grade 3 or higher events were rare. Best radiographic response included stable disease in 15 patients (47%); no patients achieved either a CR or PR. The estimated 6-month progression-free survival was 3.1% for all patients. Progression-free survival was better for patients not on EIAEDs (P = 0.03). Tumor markers failed to show an association with PFS except for increased pAKT expression which achieved borderline significance (P = 0.045). Although neither rash nor diarrhea had an association with outcome, hyperlipidemia was associated with longer PFS (P = 0.029). Erlotinib plus sirolimus was well tolerated but had negligible activity among unselected recurrent GBM patients. PMID:19562254

  14. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  15. A phase I trial of retroviral BRCA1sv gene therapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tait, D L; Obermiller, P S; Redlin-Frazier, S; Jensen, R A; Welcsh, P; Dann, J; King, M C; Johnson, D H; Holt, J T

    1997-11-01

    Gene transfer of BRCA1sv (a normal splice variant of BRCA1) into ovarian cancer cells produces growth inhibition in vitro and tumor suppression in nude mouse xenografts. As an initial step toward gene replacement therapy for ovarian cancer, we conducted a Phase I trial to assess the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of i.p. BRCA1sv retroviral vector therapy. Following placement of an indwelling Port-a-Cath in patients, a dose escalation study was performed of four daily i.p. infusions spanning doses from 3 to 300 ml (i.e., 10(10) viral particles) at half-log intervals (23 cycles in 12 patients). Gene transfer and expression were documented by PCR, Southern blot, reverse transcription-PCR, and nuclease protection assays. Pharmacokinetics were assessed by PCR and Southern blots detecting vector DNA, and toxicity was evaluated by clinical exam and fluid analysis. Three of 12 patients developed an acute sterile peritonitis, which spontaneously resolved within 48 h. Plasma and peritoneal antibodies to the retroviral envelope protein were detected only in patients treated with the highest dose levels but not in others, despite repeat dosing for an interval of up to 4 months. Eight patients showed stable disease for 4-16 weeks, and three patients showed tumor reduction with diminished miliary tumor implants at reoperation (two patients) and radiographic shrinkage of measurable disease (one patient). The vector-related complication of peritonitis was observed in three patients but resolved quickly as in preclinical mouse studies. Ovarian cancer may provide an important model for retroviral gene therapy studies due to vector stability, minimal antibody response, and access to tumor by i.p. therapy. PMID:9815585

  16. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  17. Phase I trial combining gemcitabine and treosulfan in advanced cutaneous and uveal melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Corrie, P G; Shaw, J; Spanswick, V J; Sehmbi, R; Jonson, A; Mayer, A; Bulusu, R; Hartley, J A; Cree, I A

    2005-01-01

    Gemcitabine and treosulfan are DNA-damaging agents. Preclinical studies suggest that synergism exists when melanoma cells are exposed to both drugs concurrently. We conducted a phase I trial in advanced melanoma patients to determine the optimal dose of gemcitabine to be combined with treosulfan. Cohorts of three patients received increasing doses of gemcitabine, commencing at 0.5 g m−2, followed by a fixed dose of 5.0 g m−2 treosulfan on day one of a 21-day cycle. Patients alternately received a first cycle of single-agent gemcitabine or treosulfan before subsequent cycles of both drugs. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected in cycles 1 and 2 at various time points until 48 h post-treatment. The single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay was used to measure chemotherapy-induced DNA damage. A total of 27 patients were enrolled, no objective responses were observed, but two uveal melanoma patients had minor responses. Dose-limiting myelosuppression was reached at 3.0 g m−2 gemcitabine. DNA single-strand breaks were detected 4 h post-gemcitabine, repaired by 24 h. DNA interstrand crosslinks were detected 4 h post-treosulfan, fully removed by 48 h. Following combination chemotherapy, treosulfan-induced DNA crosslinks persisted, still being detectable 48 h post-treatment, supporting the hypothesis that gemcitabine potentiates treosulfan-induced cytotoxicity. The recommended regimen for further study is 2.5 g m−2 gemcitabine combined with 5.0 g m−2 treosulfan. PMID:15886706

  18. A phase I clinical trial of mefloquine in Brazilian male subjects

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, José-Maria

    1983-01-01

    A double-blind, randomized phase I clinical trial was carried out to compare mefloquine with sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine for safety and tolerance. Twenty adult male Brazilian subjects from areas endemic for malaria were studied for a period of 66 days, which included 2 days of basal studies and a 63-day follow-up after drug administration. Subjects received either mefloquine, given as a single oral dose of 1000 mg (4 × 250-mg tablets) or sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine (2 tablets, each containing 500 mg of sulfadoxine plus 25 mg of pyrimethamine). Clinical examination, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and haematological, biochemical, stool, and urine analyses were carried out before drug administration and at various intervals afterwards. Peripheral blood smears were examined for malarial parasites. Both drugs were well tolerated and safe as seen from the absence of drug-induced changes in the various laboratory assay results. There was an improvement in body weight, red blood cell count, haemoglobin, and erythrocyte volume fraction values for all patients during the study. In subjects who had positive smears for Plasmodium falciparum, mefloquine produced complete clearance on day 1 with an S-type response (3 cases). Sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine produced complete clearance on day 2 in 5 subjects, but a delayed RI-type response (recrudescence) was observed in 2 cases and an early RI response in one case. P. vivax relapses occurred in both groups. Side-effects of mefloquine included mild diarrhoea (20%) and dizziness (40%); dizziness was also observed with sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine (20%). In both groups, side-effects were mild, short-lived and needed no specific treatment. Thus, mefloquine in an oral dose of 1000 mg was found to be well tolerated and safe in adult male Brazilian volunteers from endemic areas. No drug-related adverse reactions were observed. In cases where P. falciparum infection was present, there was a complete parasite clearance with no recrudescence

  19. Preliminary Results of a Phase II Trial of Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Szymonifka, Jackie D.; Mahajan, Anita; Friedmann, Alison M.; Yong Yeap, Beow; Goebel, Claire P.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Grosshans, David R.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Marcus, Karen J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This prospective phase II study was designed to assess disease control and to describe acute and late adverse effects of treatment with proton radiotherapy in children with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Patients and Methods Fifty-seven patients with localized RMS (age 21 years or younger) or metastatic embryonal RMS (age 2 to 10 years) were enrolled between February 2005 and August 2012. All patients were treated with chemotherapy based on either vincristine, actinomycin, and cyclophosphamide or vincristine, actinomycin, and ifosfamide–based chemotherapy and proton radiation. Surgical resection was based on tumor site and accessibility. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0, was used to assess and grade adverse effects of treatment. Concurrent enrollment onto Children's Oncology Group or European Pediatric Sarcoma Study Group protocols was allowed. All pathology and imaging were reviewed at the treating institution. Results Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 14 to 102 months) for survivors. Five-year event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS), and local control (LC) were 69%, 78%, and 81%, respectively, for the entire cohort. The 5-year LC by risk group was 93% for low-risk and 77% for intermediate-risk disease. There were 13 patients with grade 3 acute toxicity and three patients with grade 3 late toxicity. There were no acute or late toxicities higher than grade 3. Conclusion Five-year LC, EFS, and OS rates were similar to those observed in comparable trials that used photon radiation. Acute and late toxicity rates were favorable. Proton radiation appears to represent a safe and effective radiation modality for pediatric RMS. PMID:25332253

  20. Phase II Trial of Capecitabine and Weekly Docetaxel for Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Marur, Shanthi; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Cher, Michael L.; Dickow, Brenda; Smith, Daryn W.; Al Hasan, Samir A.; Eliason, James

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Synergy is observed with the combination of capecitabine and docetaxel due to docetaxel mediated up-regulation of thymidine phosphorylase. A phase II trial was performed with the combination for metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Eligible patients had metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer, no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease and normal organ function. Docetaxel (36 mg/m2 per week intravenously) on days 1, 8 and 15, and capecitabine (1,250 mg/m2 per day in 2 divided doses) on days 5 to 18 were administered in 28-day cycles. The response was assessed every 2 cycles. Biomarker correlative studies were performed on blood dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, and the thymidine phosphorylase-to-dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase and thymidine synthase-to-dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase ratios in available prostate tumor tissue. Results A total of 30 patients with a median age of 69 years were enrolled in the study. We noted bone pain in 21 patients (70%), Gleason score 8 or higher in 18 (60%), measurable disease progression in 9, bone scan progression in 18 and prostate specific antigen progression in 22. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was seen in 3 patients and grade 3 hand-foot syndrome was found in 2. No treatment related deaths occurred. A prostate specific antigen response of 50% or greater decrease was observed in 22 patients (73%), of whom 9 (30%) had 90% or greater decrease. A partial response was noted in 5 of 9 patients (56%) with measurable disease. Median time to progression was 6.7 months (90% CI 4.2–7.7) and median overall survival was 22.0 months (90% CI 18.4–25.3). Conclusions The combination was well tolerated and it demonstrated favorable response rates with durable remission and survival outcomes. PMID:19447430

  1. Phase I Trial of Bortezomib and Concurrent External Beam Radiation in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Chen Changhu; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Swing, Robyn; Raben, David

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated dose of bortezomib with concurrent external beam radiation therapy in patients with incurable solid malignant tumors requiring palliative therapy. Methods and Materials: An open label, dose escalation, phase I clinical trial evaluated the safety of three dose levels of bortezomib administered intravenously (1.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 1.3 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}/ dose) once weekly with concurrent radiation in patients with histologically confirmed solid tumors and a radiographically appreciable lesion suitable for palliative radiation therapy. All patients received 40 Gy in 16 fractions to the target lesion. Dose-limiting toxicity was the primary endpoint, defined as any grade 4 hematologic toxicity, any grade {>=}3 nonhematologic toxicity, or any toxicity requiring treatment to be delayed for {>=}2 weeks. Results: A total of 12 patients were enrolled. Primary sites included prostate (3 patients), head and neck (3 patients), uterus (1 patient), abdomen (1 patient), breast (1 patient), kidney (1 patient), lung (1 patient), and colon (1 patient). The maximum tolerated dose was not realized with a maximum dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}. One case of dose-limiting toxicity was appreciated (grade 3 urosepsis) and felt to be unrelated to bortezomib. The most common grade 3 toxicity was lymphopenia (10 patients). Common grade 1 to 2 events included nausea (7 patients), infection without neutropenia (6 patients), diarrhea (5 patients), and fatigue (5 patients). Conclusions: The combination of palliative external beam radiation with concurrent weekly bortezomib therapy at a dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2} is well tolerated in patients with metastatic solid tumors. The maximum tolerated dose of once weekly bortezomib delivered concurrently with radiation therapy is greater than 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}.

  2. Inflammatory Markers in Schizophrenia: Comparing Antipsychotic Effects in Phase 1 of the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jonathan M.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Davis, Vicki G.; Goff, Donald C.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; Davis, Sonia M.; Hsiao, John K.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin are systemic inflammatory markers (IM) that positively correlate with cardiovascular (CV) risk. Despite the known CV effects of atypical antipsychotics, there is limited prospective data on IM changes during treatment. Methods IM outcomes were compared between antipsychotic treatment groups in the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial phase 1 using subjects with laboratory assessments at baseline and 3 months (n=789). Results There were significant treatment differences in CRP, E-selectin and ICAM-1 at 3 months, with a differential impact of baseline values on the CRP and ICAM-1 results. In overall comparisons, quetiapine and olanzapine had the highest median levels for CRP, and olanzapine for E-selectin and ICAM-1. Olanzapine was significantly different after baseline adjustment than perphenazine (p=0.001) for E-selectin, and, in those with low baseline CRP (< 1 mg/L), olanzapine was significantly different than perphenazine (p<0.001), risperidone (p<0.001) and ziprasidone (p=0.002) for CRP. Perphenazine had the lowest 3-month ICAM-1 levels in subjects with baseline ICAM-1 above the median, but the differences were not statistically significant vs. olanzapine (p=0.010), quetiapine (p=0.010) and risperidone (p=0.006) after controlling for multiple comparisons. The 18-month repeated measures CRP analysis confirmed the significantly higher values for olanzapine in those with low baseline CRP. Conclusions This analysis provides further evidence for differential antipsychotic metabolic liabilities as measured by changes in systemic inflammation. CRP may emerge as a useful target for CV risk outcomes in schizophrenia patients. PMID:19640511

  3. Impact of Antipsychotic Treatment on Nonfasting Triglycerides in the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial Phase 1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jonathan M.; Davis, Vicki G.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Goff, Donald C.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; Davis, Sonia M.; Daumit, Gail L.; Hsiao, John; Swartz, Marvin S.; Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent literature documents a stronger association between nonfasting triglycerides (TG) and cardiovascular risk compared to fasting TG. Given concerns over antipsychotic effects on serum TG, this analysis explored changes in nonfasting TG in phase 1 of the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial. Methods Change in nonfasting TG, adjusted for baseline value, was compared between antipsychotic treatment groups using subjects with nonfasting laboratory assessments at baseline and 3 months. Results Among the 246 subjects there were significant treatment differences in 3-month change from baseline (p=0.009). The greatest increases in median and adjusted mean nonfasting TG levels were seen among those randomized to quetiapine (mean +54.7 mg/dl, median +26 mg/dl) and olanzapine (mean +23.4 mg/dl, median +26.5 mg/dl), while ziprasidone was neutral (mean +0.0 mg/dl, median + 8 mg/dl), and decreases were seen with risperidone (mean −18.4 mg/dl, median −6.5 mg/dl) and perphenazine (mean −1.3 mg/dl, median −22 mg/dl). Pairwise comparisons indicated a significant between-group difference for perphenazine vs. olanzapine (p=0.002) and a trend for perphenazine vs. quetiapine (p=0.006). Conclusions This analysis provides further evidence for differential antipsychotic metabolic liabilities, and confirms signals for the effects of olanzapine and quetiapine on serum TG seen in earlier CATIE analyses. Future consensus recommendations will clarify the role of nonfasting TG monitoring in routine clinical practice. PMID:18534821

  4. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy; Maru, Dipen M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Clemons, Marilyn V.; Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  6. Immunological evaluation of the new stable ultrasound contrast agent LK565: a phase one clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Funke, B; Maerz, HK; Okorokow, S; Polata, S; Lehmann, I; Sack, U; Wild, P; Geisler, T; Zotz, RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) allow the enhancement of vascular definition, thereby providing more diagnostic information. LK565 is a new second-generation UCA based on synthetic polymers of aspartic acid which is eliminated from the blood stream via phagocytosis. LK565 forms very stable air-filled microspheres and is capable of repeated passage through the pulmonary capillary bed after peripheral intravenous injection. This characteristic allows examination of the cardiac function or extracardiac vessel abnormalities up to 15 minutes. Methods A phase one clinical study was conducted on 15 healthy volunteers to identify the development of an undesirable immune response. Phagocytosis capacity, TNF-α secretion, and MHC class II upregulation of monocytes was monitored, as well as microsphere specific antibody development (IgM, IgG). Furthermore, the kinetics of the activation surface markers CD69, CD25, CD71, and CD11b on leukocytes were analyzed. Results Due to LK565-metabolism the administration of the UCA led to saturation of phagocytes which was reversible after 24 hrs. Compared to positive controls neither significant TNF-α elevation, neither MHC class II and activation surface markers upregulation, nor specific antibody development was detectable. Conclusion The administration of LK565 provides a comfortable duration of signal enhancement, esp. in echocardiography, without causing a major activation cascade or triggering an adaptive immune response. To minimize the risk of undesirable adverse events such as anaphylactoid reactions, immunological studies should be included in clinical trials for new UCAs. The use of LK565 as another new ultrasound contrast agent should be encouraged as a safe means to provide additional diagnostic information. PMID:15357870

  7. Phase I/II trial of 2-weekly docetaxel combined with cisplatin plus fluorouracil in metastatic esophageal cancer (JCOG0807).

    PubMed

    Hironaka, Shuichi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Kii, Takayuki; Kato, Ken; Tsushima, Takahiro; Chin, Keisho; Tomori, Akihisa; Okuno, Tatsuya; Taniki, Toshikatsu; Ura, Takashi; Matsushita, Hisayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Doki, Yuichiro; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Fujitani, Kazumasa; Taira, Koichi; Seki, Shiko; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-09-01

    We carried out a phase I/II trial of adding 2-weekly docetaxel to cisplatin plus fluorouracil (CF) therapy (2-weekly DCF regimen) in esophageal cancer patients to investigate its safety and antimetastatic activity. Patients received 2-weekly docetaxel (30 mg/m(2) [dose level (DL)1] or 40 mg/m(2) [DL2] with a 3 + 3 design in phase I, on days 1 and 15) in combination with fixed-dose CF (80 mg/m(2) cisplatin, day 1; 800 mg/m(2) fluorouracil, days 1-5) repeated every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in phase I and central peer review-based response rate in phase II. At least 22 responders among 50 patients were required to satisfy the primary endpoint with a threshold of 35%. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in phase I and II. In phase I, 10 patients were enrolled with DLT of 0/3 at DL1 and 2/7 in DL2. Considering DLT and treatment compliance, the recommended phase II dose was determined as DL1. In phase II, the response rate was 62% (P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval, 48-75%); median overall survival and progression-free survival were 11.1 and 5.8 months, respectively. Common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (25%), anemia (36%), hyponatremia (29%), anorexia (24%), and nausea (11%). No febrile neutropenia was observed. Pneumonitis caused treatment-related death in one patient. The 2-weekly DCF regimen showed promising antimetastatic activity and tolerability. A phase III study comparing this regimen with CF therapy is planned by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group. This study was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000001737. PMID:25041052

  8. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3-62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2-4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. PMID:25801797

  9. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  10. Investigation of Class 2b Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2002-04-03

    The popularity of trucks in the class 2 category--that is, those with a 6,000 to 10,000 pounds (lbs) gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)--has increased since the late 1970s/early 1980s. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine vehicles in the upper portion of the class 2 weight range (designated as vehicle class 2b) and to assess their impact. Vehicles in class 2b (8,500-10,000 lbs GVWR) include pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and large vans (i.e., not minivans). Oak Ridge National Laboratory researched each individual truck model to determine which models were class 2b trucks and arrived at four methodologies to derive sales volumes. Two methods--one for calendar year and one for model year sales--were recommended for producing believable and reliable results. The study indicates that 521,000 class 2b trucks were sold in calendar year 1999--6.4% of sales of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Eighty-two percent of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were pickups; one third of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were diesel. There were 5.8 million class 2b trucks on the road in 2000, which amounts to 7.8% of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Twenty-four percent of the class 2b truck population is diesel. Estimates show that class 2b trucks account for 8% of annual miles traveled by trucks under 10,000 lbs and 9% of fuel use. Data on class 2b trucks are scarce. As the Tier 2 standards, which apply to passenger vehicles in the 8,500-10,000 lb GVWR category, become effective, additional data on class 2b trucks may become available--not only emissions data, but data in all areas. At the moment, distinguishing class 2b trucks from class 2 trucks in general is a substantial task requiring data on an individual model level.

  11. Safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a mammalian cell-culture-derived influenza vaccine: a sequential Phase I and Phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Groth, N; Montomoli, E; Gentile, C; Manini, I; Bugarini, R; Podda, A

    2009-01-29

    This sequential, observer-blind, randomised, single-centre, combined Phase I and Phase II clinical trial compared the tolerability and immunogenicity of a single intramuscular dose of a novel cell-culture-derived influenza vaccine (CCIV), produced in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, with a conventional egg-based vaccine. The immunogenicity of both vaccines was assessed by SRH assay, a well-recognized test by EMEA, in compliance with the requirements of the EU Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP). The Phase I part of the trial comprised 40 healthy adults (18-40 years of age); the subsequent Phase II part involved 200 healthy adult (n=80, 18-60 years of age) and elderly (n=120, > or =61 years of age) subjects. Both vaccines showed similar reactogenicity and any solicited local or systemic reactions were mostly mild or moderate. Regarding immunogenicity, both the CCIV and the control vaccine met all of the EU Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use criteria for influenza vaccines for each strain and in both age groups. In conclusion, the CCIV produced in mammalian cell-culture is as well tolerated and as immunogenic as the control egg-based vaccine in non-elderly and elderly adults. PMID:19027046

  12. Flux Line Lattice Structure in YNi2B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano-Furukawa, Hazuki; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Tsukagoshi, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Chiyako; Nagata, Takashi; Sakiyama, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Yethiraj, Mohana; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-01

    Recently Nakai et al. reported a theoretical H-T phase diagram of flux line lattice (FLL) structure in which successive transitions from a triangular, a square (\\squarev), a triangular and another square (\\squareg) occur with increasing a magnetic field. Here \\squarev and \\squareg indicate the FLL structures reflecting anisotropies in the Fermi velocity and the superconducting gap, respectively. In the case of YNi2B2C, \\squarev and \\squareg should rotate by 45°. The low field transition from triangular to \\squarev is observed in RENi2B2C (\\textit{RE}=Er, Tm, Lu, and Y). However, there is no experimental evidence for the appearance of \\squareg phase so far. We studied the FLL structure of YNi2B2C in the higher field region by small-angle neutron scattering. Our results show that a large area of the H-T phase diagram is occupied by \\squarev phase and there is no evidence for the appearance of \\squareg lattice.

  13. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2b injection is used in people with malignant melanoma (a life-threatening cancer that begins in certain ... is used to reduce the chance that malignant melanoma will come back and must be started within ...

  14. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... inject into your stomach if you are very thin. Use a different spot for each injection. Do not inject peginterferon alfa-2b into an area where the skin is sore, red, bruised, scarred, irritated, or infected; has stretch marks ...

  15. 1-Phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane, 1-Ph-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11). Synthesis, Characterization, and Structure As Determined in the Gas Phase by Electron Diffraction, in the Crystalline Phase at 199 K by X-ray Diffraction, and by ab Initio Computations.

    PubMed

    Brain, Paul T.; Cowie, Jill; Donohoe, David J.; Hnyk, Drahomír; Rankin, David W. H.; Reed, David; Reid, Bruce D.; Robertson, Heather E.; Welch, Alan J.; Hofmann, Matthias; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué

    1996-03-13

    The compound 1-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12), 1-C(6)H(5)-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11) (1), has been synthesized and characterized by a complete assignment of its (11)B NMR spectrum via (11)B{(1)H}/(11)B{(1)H} (COSY), (1)H{(11)B(selective)} and (1)H{(11)B}/(1)H{(11)B} (COSY) spectroscopy. An electron- and X-ray diffraction investigation of 1, complemented by ab initio calculations, has been undertaken. The gas-phase electron-diffraction (GED) data can be fitted by several models describing conformations which differ in the position of the phenyl ring with respect to the carborane cage. Local symmetries ofC(2)(v)() and D(6)(h)() for the 1,2-C(2)B(10) and C(6) moieties, respectively, were adopted in the GED model in order to simplify the problem. In addition, constraints among the close-lying C-C and B-B bonds were employed. However, even though such simplifications led to satisfactory refinements (R(G) = 0.069-0.071), a unique, definitive solution could not be gained. The (C-C)(mean), (C-B)(mean) and (B-B)(mean) bond lengths,r(a), are ca. 1.44, 1.72, and 1.78 Å, respectively. The C(6) hexagon, with r(a)(C-C) = ca. 1.394 Å, either eclipses the C(1)-C(2) vector (overall C(s)() symmetry) or more or less eclipses the C(1)-B(4) cluster bond (overall C(1) symmetry). In contrast, in the solid at 199 K, the ring lies at a position intermediate between the two GED positions, as determined by X-ray crystallography [C(8)H(16)B(10), monoclinic P2(1)/a: a = 12.047(3) Å, b = 18.627(4) Å, c = 12.332(5) Å, beta = 110.09(4) degrees, Z = 8]. The C-B distances span the range 1.681(6)-1.743(5) Å, and B-B lengths lie between 1.756(6) and 1.795(6) Å. A similar conformation was found for the theoretical (RHF/6-31G level) structure which was fully optimized in C(1) symmetry. The r(e) distances are consistent with the dimensions derived in the experimental studies. IGLO calculations of the (11)B chemical shifts, in addition to SCF single-point energies of the GED structures

  16. Randomized Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Moreno, Beatriz; Berenguer, Joan; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Arnaiz, Joan-Albert; Andreu, Enrique J.; Fernández, Begoña; Bullich, Santi; Sánchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Graus, Francesc; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled studies of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiple sclerosis suggested some beneficial effect. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phase II study we investigated their safety and efficacy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Efficacy was evaluated in terms of cumulative number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (GEL) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 6 months and at the end of the study. Methods Patients unresponsive to conventional therapy, defined by at least 1 relapse and/or GEL on MRI scan in past 12 months, disease duration 2 to 10 years and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 3.0–6.5 were randomized to receive IV 1–2×106 bone-marrow-derived-MSCs/Kg or placebo. After 6 months, the treatment was reversed and patients were followed-up for another 6 months. Secondary endpoints were clinical outcomes (relapses and disability by EDSS and MS Functional Composite), and several brain MRI and optical coherence tomography measures. Immunological tests were explored to assess the immunomodulatory effects. Results At baseline 9 patients were randomized to receive MSCs (n = 5) or placebo (n = 4). One patient on placebo withdrew after having 3 relapses in the first 5 months. We did not identify any serious adverse events. At 6 months, patients treated with MSCs had a trend to lower mean cumulative number of GEL (3.1, 95% CI = 1.1–8.8 vs 12.3, 95% CI = 4.4–34.5, p = 0.064), and at the end of study to reduced mean GEL (−2.8±5.9 vs 3±5.4, p = 0.075). No significant treatment differences were detected in the secondary endpoints. We observed a non-significant decrease of the frequency of Th1 (CD4+ IFN-γ+) cells in blood of MSCs treated patients. Conclusion Bone-marrow-MSCs are safe and may reduce inflammatory MRI parameters supporting their immunomodulatory properties. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01228266 PMID:25436769

  17. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank; Julian, Thomas; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  18. Oral ponesimod in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: a randomised phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Tomas; Boster, Aaron; Fernández, Óscar; Freedman, Mark S; Pozzilli, Carlo; Bach, Doris; Berkani, Ouali; Mueller, Markus S; Sidorenko, Tatiana; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Melanson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective This double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-finding phase IIb study evaluated the efficacy and safety of ponesimod, an oral selective S1P1 receptor modulator, for the treatment of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods 464 patients were randomised to receive once-daily oral ponesimod 10, 20 or 40 mg, or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the cumulative number of new T1 gadolinium-enhanced (T1 Gd+) lesions per patient recorded every 4 weeks from weeks 12 to 24 after study drug initiation. Secondary endpoints were the annualised confirmed relapse rate (ARR) and time to first confirmed relapse. Safety and tolerability were also evaluated. Results The mean cumulative number of new T1 Gd+ lesions at weeks 12–24 was significantly lower in the ponesimod 10 mg (3.5; rate ratio (RR) 0.57; p=0.0318), 20 mg (1.1; RR 0.17; p<0.0001) and 40 mg (1.4; RR 0.23; p<0.0001) groups compared with placebo (6.2). The mean ARR was lower with 40 mg ponesimod versus placebo, with a maximum reduction of 52% (0.25 vs 0.53; p=0.0363). The time to first confirmed relapse was increased with ponesimod compared with placebo. The proportion of patients with ≥1 treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) was similar across ponesimod groups and the placebo group. Frequently reported AEs with higher incidence in the three ponesimod groups compared with placebo were anxiety, dizziness, dyspnoea, increased alanine aminotransferase, influenza, insomnia and peripheral oedema. Conclusions Once-daily treatment with ponesimod 10, 20 or 40 mg significantly reduced the number of new T1 Gd+ lesions and showed a beneficial effect on clinical endpoints. Ponesimod was generally well tolerated, and further investigation of ponesimod for the treatment of RRMS is under consideration. Trial registration number NCT01006265. PMID:24659797

  19. To tell or not to tell: male partner engagement in a Phase 3 microbicide efficacy trial in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Christine A; Friedland, Barbara A; Morar, Neetha S; Katzen, Lauren L; Ramjee, Gita; Mokgatle, Mathildah M; Ahmed, Khatija

    2015-01-01

    Gender norms that privilege men's sexual power and pleasure, and distrust of condom use in intimate relationships, leave women vulnerable to HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Vaginal microbicides allow women to exert a degree of control over their sexual health, through responsibility for product insertion as well as the possibility of covert use. In practice, however, the uptake of new HIV-prevention products is heavily influenced by partnership dynamics. This paper presents a secondary analysis of data from two qualitative sub-studies conducted during a Phase 3 microbicide efficacy trial in South Africa. Using transcripts from in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 278 female trial participants and 27 male partners, we investigated the extent to which women disclosed microbicide use to their partners, and the level and types of male engagement with microbicide use. Most women chose to communicate with their partners about the trial, but the timing and content of associated discussions differed according to their motivation for disclosure. Men provided their partners with both moral and practical support, but reported a desire for greater involvement in decision-making surrounding microbicide uptake and use. The findings inform recommendations for constructive male participation in future trials and, ultimately, introduction of a marketed product. PMID:25913101

  20. The choice of test in phase II cancer trials assessing continuous tumour shrinkage when complete responses are expected

    PubMed Central

    Mander, Adrian P

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, phase II cancer trials test a binary endpoint formed from a dichotomisation of the continuous change in tumour size. Directly testing the continuous endpoint provides considerable gains in power, although also results in several statistical issues. One such issue is when complete responses, i.e. complete tumour removal, are observed in multiple patients; this is a problem when normality is assumed. Using simulated data and a recently published phase II trial, we investigate how the choice of test affects the operating characteristics of the trial. We propose using parametric tests based on the censored normal distribution, comparing them to the t-test and Wilcoxon non-parametric test. The censored normal distribution fits the real dataset well, but simulations indicate its type-I error rate is inflated, and its power is only slightly higher than the t-test. The Wilcoxon test has deflated type I error. For two-arm designs, the differences are much smaller. We conclude that the t-test is suitable for use when complete responses are present, although positively skewed data can result in the non-parametric test having higher power. PMID:22179821

  1. Evaluating results from the multiple myeloma patient subset treated with denosumab or zoledronic acid in a randomized phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Raje, N; Vadhan-Raj, S; Willenbacher, W; Terpos, E; Hungria, V; Spencer, A; Alexeeva, Y; Facon, T; Stewart, A K; Feng, A; Braun, A; Balakumaran, A; Roodman, G D

    2016-01-01

    In a phase 3 trial of denosumab vs zoledronic acid in patients (n=1776) with bone metastases and solid tumors or multiple myeloma, denosumab was superior to zoledronic acid for the primary end point of prevention of skeletal-related events. There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups; however, an ad hoc overall survival analysis in the multiple myeloma subset of patients (n=180) favored zoledronic acid (hazard ratio (HR) 2.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13–4.50; P=0.014). In the present analysis, we found imbalances between the groups with respect to baseline risk characteristics. HRs with two-sided 95% CIs were estimated using the Cox model. After adjustment in a covariate analysis, the CI crossed unity (HR 1.86; 95% CI 0.90–3.84; P=0.0954). Furthermore, we found a higher rate of early withdrawals for the reasons of lost to follow-up and withdrawal of consent in the zoledronic acid group; after accounting for these, the HR was 1.31 (95% CI 0.80–2.15; P=0.278). In conclusion, the survival results in multiple myeloma patients in this trial were confounded and will eventually be resolved by an ongoing phase 3 trial. PMID:26745852

  2. Exploring response signals and targets in aggressive unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: an analysis of targeted therapy phase 1 trials

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Ishwaria M.; Falchook, Gerald S.; Kaseb, Ahmed O.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Fu, Siqing; Subbiah, Vivek; Hong, David S.; Naing, Aung; Sarina, A. Piha-Paul; Akmal, Owais; Janku, Filip; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have limited effective therapeutic options. Given the rapid advanced in drug development and emergence of novel agents, we analyzed the characteristics and outcomes of HCC patients treated on early phase trials with an emphasis on targeted therapies. METHODS We reviewed the records of consecutive HCC patients evaluated in the Phase I Clinical Trials Program at MD Anderson from March 2004. RESULTS Thirty-nine patients were not treated due to poor performance status (n = 22, 56%) and decision to pursue alternate therapies (n = 10, 27%). Of 61 treated patients (median age, 60 years; median prior therapies, 3), eight patients (13%) attained stable disease lasting ≥6 months; four (7%) had a partial response, mainly with anti-angiogenic or multikinase inhibitors. Median Phase I progression-free survival (PFS) was 2.6 months versus 4.4 months (p 0.019) and 4.1 months (p 0.27) for their first-, and second-line FDA-approved therapy. Molecular analysis showed frequent PTEN loss (10/19 patients, 53%) and P53 mutation (4/4 patients tested). On multivariate analysis, independent factors predicting shorter survival were white ethnicity/race (p 0.031), cirrhosis (p 0.016), and serum sodium (p 0.0013). CONCLUSIONS In our heavily-pretreated HCC patients, the phase I PFS was comparable to that of 2nd-line therapy, highlighting a potential role for clinical trials after progression on first-line therapy. The response rate (SD>6 months/PR) of 20% was observed with early signals of activity in regimens combining inhibitors of angiogenesis, multiple kinases and mTOR with preliminary molecular analysis revealing prevalence of PTEN loss. PMID:26164085

  3. Ten Years after the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors’ Clinical Trial Registration Initiative, One Quarter of Phase 3 Pediatric Epilepsy Clinical Trials Still Remain Unpublished: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Anette; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Ries, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although selective reporting of clinical trial results introduces bias into evidence based clinical decision making, publication bias in pediatric epilepsy is unknown today. Since there is a considerable ambiguity in the treatment of an important and common clinical problem, pediatric seizures, we assessed the public availability of results of phase 3 clinical trials that evaluated treatments of seizures in children and adolescents as a surrogate for the extent of publication bias in pediatric epilepsy. Methods We determined the proportion of published and unpublished study results of phase 3 clinical trials that were registered as completed on ClinicalTrials.gov. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed, and Google Scholar for publications and contacted principal investigators or sponsors. The analysis was performed according to STROBE criteria. Results Considering studies that were completed before 2014 (N = 99), 75 (76%) pediatric phase 3 clinical trials were published but 24 (24%) remained unpublished. The unpublished studies concealed evidence from 4,437 patients. Mean time-to-publication was 25 SD ± 15.6 months, more than twice as long as mandated. Conclusion Ten years after the ICMJE’s clinical trials registration initiative there is still a considerable amount of selective reporting and delay of publication that potentially distorts the body of evidence in the treatment of pediatric seizures. PMID:26735955

  4. Dasatinib or imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia: 2-year follow-up from a randomized phase 3 trial (DASISION).

    PubMed

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; Shah, Neil P; Cortes, Jorge E; Baccarani, Michele; Agarwal, Mohan B; Undurraga, María Soledad; Wang, Jianxiang; Ipiña, Juan Julio Kassack; Kim, Dong-Wook; Ogura, Michinori; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Junghanss, Christian; Milone, Jorge H; Nicolini, Franck E; Robak, Tadeusz; Van Droogenbroeck, Jan; Vellenga, Edo; Bradley-Garelik, M Brigid; Zhu, Chao; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Dasatinib is a highly potent BCR-ABL inhibitor with established efficacy and safety in imatinib-resistant/-intolerant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In the phase 3 DASISION trial, patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase (CP) CML were randomized to receive dasatinib 100 mg (n = 259) or imatinib 400 mg (n = 260) once daily. Primary data showed superior efficacy for dasatinib compared with imatinib after 12 months, including significantly higher rates of complete cytogenetic response (CCyR), confirmed CCyR (primary end point), and major molecular response (MMR). Here, 24-month data are presented. Cumulative response rates by 24 months in dasatinib and imatinib arms were: CCyR in 86% versus 82%, MMR in 64% versus 46%, and BCR-ABL reduction to ≤ 0.0032% (4.5-log reduction) in 17% versus 8%. Transformation to accelerated-/ blast-phase CML on study occurred in 2.3% with dasatinib versus 5.0% with imatinib. BCR-ABL mutations, assessed after discontinuation, were detected in 10 patients in each arm. In safety analyses, fluid retention, superficial edema, myalgia, vomiting, and rash were less frequent with dasatinib compared with imatinib, whereas pleural effusion and grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia were more frequent with dasatinib. Overall, dasatinib continues to show faster and deeper responses compared with imatinib, supporting first-line use of dasatinib in patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00481247. PMID:22160483

  5. Dasatinib or imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia: 2-year follow-up from a randomized phase 3 trial (DASISION)

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neil P.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Baccarani, Michele; Agarwal, Mohan B.; Undurraga, María Soledad; Wang, Jianxiang; Kassack Ipiña, Juan Julio; Kim, Dong-Wook; Ogura, Michinori; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Junghanss, Christian; Milone, Jorge H.; Nicolini, Franck E.; Robak, Tadeusz; Van Droogenbroeck, Jan; Vellenga, Edo; Bradley-Garelik, M. Brigid; Zhu, Chao; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Dasatinib is a highly potent BCR-ABL inhibitor with established efficacy and safety in imatinib-resistant/-intolerant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In the phase 3 DASISION trial, patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase (CP) CML were randomized to receive dasatinib 100 mg (n = 259) or imatinib 400 mg (n = 260) once daily. Primary data showed superior efficacy for dasatinib compared with imatinib after 12 months, including significantly higher rates of complete cytogenetic response (CCyR), confirmed CCyR (primary end point), and major molecular response (MMR). Here, 24-month data are presented. Cumulative response rates by 24 months in dasatinib and imatinib arms were: CCyR in 86% versus 82%, MMR in 64% versus 46%, and BCR-ABL reduction to ≤ 0.0032% (4.5-log reduction) in 17% versus 8%. Transformation to accelerated-/ blast-phase CML on study occurred in 2.3% with dasatinib versus 5.0% with imatinib. BCR-ABL mutations, assessed after discontinuation, were detected in 10 patients in each arm. In safety analyses, fluid retention, superficial edema, myalgia, vomiting, and rash were less frequent with dasatinib compared with imatinib, whereas pleural effusion and grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia were more frequent with dasatinib. Overall, dasatinib continues to show faster and deeper responses compared with imatinib, supporting first-line use of dasatinib in patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00481247. PMID:22160483

  6. The Public Repository of Xenografts Enables Discovery and Randomized Phase II-like Trials in Mice.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth C; Murakami, Mark A; Christodoulou, Alexandra; Christie, Amanda L; Köster, Johannes; DeSouza, Tiffany A; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Kallgren, Scott P; Liu, Huiyun; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Plana, Olivia; Montero, Joan; Stevenson, Kristen E; Rao, Prakash; Vadhi, Raga; Andreeff, Michael; Armand, Philippe; Ballen, Karen K; Barzaghi-Rinaudo, Patrizia; Cahill, Sarah; Clark, Rachael A; Cooke, Vesselina G; Davids, Matthew S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Dorfman, David M; Eaton, Hilary; Ebert, Benjamin L; Etchin, Julia; Firestone, Brant; Fisher, David C; Freedman, Arnold S; Galinsky, Ilene A; Gao, Hui; Garcia, Jacqueline S; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Graubert, Timothy A; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Halilovic, Ensar; Harris, Marian H; Herbert, Zachary T; Horwitz, Steven M; Inghirami, Giorgio; Intlekoffer, Andrew M; Ito, Moriko; Izraeli, Shai; Jacobsen, Eric D; Jacobson, Caron A; Jeay, Sébastien; Jeremias, Irmela; Kelliher, Michelle A; Koch, Raphael; Konopleva, Marina; Kopp, Nadja; Kornblau, Steven M; Kung, Andrew L; Kupper, Thomas S; LaBoeuf, Nicole; LaCasce, Ann S; Lees, Emma; Li, Loretta S; Look, A Thomas; Murakami, Masato; Muschen, Markus; Neuberg, Donna; Ng, Samuel Y; Odejide, Oreofe O; Orkin, Stuart H; Paquette, Rachel R; Place, Andrew E; Roderick, Justine E; Ryan, Jeremy A; Sallan, Stephen E; Shoji, Brent; Silverman, Lewis B; Soiffer, Robert J; Steensma, David P; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Stone, Richard M; Tamburini, Jerome; Thorner, Aaron R; van Hummelen, Paul; Wadleigh, Martha; Wiesmann, Marion; Weng, Andrew P; Wuerthner, Jens U; Williams, David A; Wollison, Bruce M; Lane, Andrew A; Letai, Anthony; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Ritz, Jerome; Brown, Myles; Long, Henry; Aster, Jon C; Shipp, Margaret A; Griffin, James D; Weinstock, David M

    2016-04-11

    More than 90% of drugs with preclinical activity fail in human trials, largely due to insufficient efficacy. We hypothesized that adequately powered trials of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) in mice could efficiently define therapeutic activity across heterogeneous tumors. To address this hypothesis, we established a large, publicly available repository of well-characterized leukemia and lymphoma PDXs that undergo orthotopic engraftment, called the Public Repository of Xenografts (PRoXe). PRoXe includes all de-identified information relevant to the primary specimens and the PDXs derived from them. Using this repository, we demonstrate that large studies of acute leukemia PDXs that mimic human randomized clinical trials can characterize drug efficacy and generate transcriptional, functional, and proteomic biomarkers in both treatment-naive and relapsed/refractory disease. PMID:27070704

  7. Evaluating a novel treatment for coronary artery inflammation in acute Kawasaki disease: A Phase I/IIa trial of atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Tremoulet, Adriana H; Jain, Sonia; Burns, Jane C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Since the 1980s, the primary treatment of acute Kawasaki disease (KD) has been intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin. However, 5-10% of children with acute KD will develop coronary artery abnormalities despite treatment within the first ten days after fever onset. There is no approved adjunctive therapy to prevent progression of coronary artery damage in these patients Areas covered The rationale and study design of a Phase I/IIa trial of atorvastatin in children with acute KD and coronary artery inflammation is presented. The studies of host genetics and KD pathogenesis leading up to this trial are reviewed. Expert opinion The repurposing of well-studied drugs used in the adult population is a cost-effective and efficient strategy to identify new therapies for pediatric diseases. Exploiting the anti-inflammatory, non-lipid-lowering effects of statins may open up new applications for this class of drugs for the pediatric age group.

  8. AplusB: A Web Application for Investigating A + B Designs for Phase I Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Graham M.; Sweeting, Michael J.; Mander, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    In phase I cancer clinical trials, the maximum tolerated dose of a new drug is often found by a dose-escalation method known as the A + B design. We have developed an interactive web application, AplusB, which computes and returns exact operating characteristics of A + B trial designs. The application has a graphical user interface (GUI), requires no programming knowledge and is free to access and use on any device that can open an internet browser. A customised report is available for download for each design that contains tabulated operating characteristics and informative plots, which can then be compared with other dose-escalation methods. We present a step-by-step guide on how to use this application and provide several illustrative examples of its capabilities. PMID:27403961

  9. AplusB: A Web Application for Investigating A + B Designs for Phase I Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Graham M; Sweeting, Michael J; Mander, Adrian P

    2016-01-01

    In phase I cancer clinical trials, the maximum tolerated dose of a new drug is often found by a dose-escalation method known as the A + B design. We have developed an interactive web application, AplusB, which computes and returns exact operating characteristics of A + B trial designs. The application has a graphical user interface (GUI), requires no programming knowledge and is free to access and use on any device that can open an internet browser. A customised report is available for download for each design that contains tabulated operating characteristics and informative plots, which can then be compared with other dose-escalation methods. We present a step-by-step guide on how to use this application and provide several illustrative examples of its capabilities. PMID:27403961

  10. A Phase I/II Trial of Topotecan and Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hedde, Jan-Peter; Neuhaus, Thomas . E-mail: t.neuhaus@jk-bonn.de; Schueller, Heinrich; Metzler, Ute; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.; Kleinschmidt, Rolf; Losem, Christoph; Lange, Oliver; Grohe, Christian; Stier, Sebastian; Ko, Yon-Dschun

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Outcomes in patients with brain metastases undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are hardly encouraging, and an improvement in results is therefore needed. One possible approach is the addition of chemotherapeutics. However the data presented thus far are also disappointing. A promising substance in this setting could become topotecan, which is known to cross the blood-brain barrier and additionally offers radiosensitizing effects. Therefore we performed a phase I/II trial to evaluate the feasibility of a concurrent radiochemotherapy regimen. Methods and Materials: From January 1999 to July 2001, a total of 75 patients (10 in phase I and 65 in phase II) were included. The WBRT was applied with a fraction size of 2 Gy/day for a total of 40 Gy. Topotecan was administered as a 30-min infusion with 0.2 to 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days over 4 weeks within 2 h to radiation therapy. Results: Because of the higher toxic rates seen in patients receiving 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day, the recommended dosage for phase II was 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}/day. In this group Grade 3/4 hematologic and nonhematologic side effects occurred in 19% and 21% of the patients, respectively. The overall response rate was 72% with an overall survival of 17 weeks and 30 weeks among the responders. Conclusions: Based on the moderate toxicity profile presented here we recommend to perform a phase III trial to confirm the promising phase I/II data.

  11. Randomized two-stage Phase II clinical trial designs based on Barnard's exact test.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Ma, Changxing; Hutson, Alan D; Wilding, Gregory E

    2013-01-01

    In areas such as oncology, two-stage designs are often preferred as compared to one-stage designs due to the ability to stop the trial early when faced with evidence of lack of sufficient efficacy and the associated sample size savings. We present exact two-stage designs based on Barnard's exact test for differences in proportions and compare the designs to those proposed by Kepner ( 2010 ) and Jung ( 2010 ). In addition, we present tables of decision rules under a variety of assumed realities for use in trial planning. The procedure is recommended for use due to the substantial sample size savings experienced. PMID:23957517

  12. Phase I Clinical Trial of Valacyclovir and Standard of Care Cyclophosphamide in Children With Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Dan; Gulley, Margaret L.; Tang, Weihua; Wokocha, Clifford; Mechanic, Oren; Hosseinipour, Mina; Gold, Stuart H.; Nguluwe, Nelson; Mwansambo, Charles; Shores, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated Burkitt lymphoma in Africa are limited because of chemotherapy-associated toxicity. Since other EBV-associated diseases respond to antiviral agents, we investigated adding an antiviral agent, valacyclovir, to the current chemotherapy regimen in Malawi. In this phase I safety study, we showed that cyclophosphamide combined with valacyclovir was safe. Phase II efficacy trials should now be undertaken. Background Nucleoside analogues, including acyclovir, ganciclovir, and their precursors, have shown some efficacy against several Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases, including active EBV infection and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). They have also been proposed as a possible treatment for EBV-associated malignancies, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. The safety of nucleoside analogues in combination with chemotherapy in the developing world has not been studied and is necessary before any large scale efficacy trials are conducted. Patients and Methods Children 3–15 years old meeting inclusion criteria were assigned to a 3+3 dose escalation trial of combination valacyclovir (15 and 30 mg/kg, 3 times daily for 40 days) and cyclophosphamide (CPM) (40 mg/kg day 1, 60 mg/kg on days 8, 18, and 28) or CPM monotherapy. Subjects were monitored for clinical and laboratory toxicity and had EBV levels measured regularly. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was our primary outcome. Results We found that the combination of valacyclovir and CPM was safe and did not lead to any DLT compared with CPM monotherapy. The most common side effects were vomiting, abdominal pain, and tumor site pain, which were similar in both arms. Patients with measurable serum EBV showed decreased loads over their treatment course. Conclusions We recommend a phase II valacyclovir dose of 30 mg/kg 3 times daily for 40 days. We also observed that 6 of our 12 patients with presumed Burkitt lymphoma had measurable EBV viral

  13. Comprehensive safety assessment of a human inactivated diploid enterovirus 71 vaccine based on a phase III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Yujia; Jiang, Zhiwei; Li, Chanjuan; Wang, Ling; Xia, Jielai

    2016-04-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). In a previous phase III trial in children, a human diploid cell-based inactivated EV71 vaccine elicited EV71 specific immune responses and protection against EV71 associated HFMD. This study aimed to assess the factors influencing the severity of adverse events observed in this previous trial. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial of a human diploid vaccine carried out in 12,000 children in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01569581). Solicited events were recorded for 7 days and unsolicited events were reported for 28 days after each injection. Age trend analysis of adverse reaction was conducted in each treatment group. Multiple logistic regression models were built to identify factors influencing the severity of adverse reactions. Fewer solicited adverse reactions were observed in older participants within the first 7 days after vaccination (P < 0.0001), except local pain and pruritus. More severe adverse reactions were observed after the initial injection than after the booster injection. Serious cold or respiratory tract infections (RTI) were observed more often in children aged 6-36 months than in older children. Only the severity of local swelling was associated with body mass index. Children with throat discomfort before injection had a higher risk of serious cold or RTI. These results indicated that the human diploid cell-based vaccine achieved a satisfactory safety profile. PMID:26837471

  14. A Phase II Multicenter Trial With Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Livedoid Vasculopathy Assessing Pain on a Visual Analog Scale

    PubMed Central

    Drabik, Attyla; Hillgruber, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Background Livedoid vasculopathy is an orphan skin disease characterized by recurrent thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. It manifests itself almost exclusively in the ankles, the back of the feet, and the distal part of the lower legs. Because of the vascular occlusion, patients suffer from intense local ischemic pain. Incidence of livedoid vasculopathy is estimated to be around 1:100,000. There are currently no approved treatments for livedoid vasculopathy, making off-label therapy the only option. In Europe, thromboprophylactic treatment with low-molecular-weight heparins has become widely accepted. Objective The aim of this trial is the statistical verification of the therapeutic effects of the anticoagulant rivaroxaban in patients suffering from livedoid vasculopathy. Methods We performed a therapeutic phase IIa trial designed as a prospective, one-armed, multicenter, interventional series of cases with a calculated sample size of 20 patients. The primary outcome is the assessment of local pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) as an intraindividual difference of 2 values between baseline and 12 weeks. Results Enrollment started in December 2012 and was still open at the date of submission. The study is expected to finish in November 2014. Conclusions Livedoid vasculopathy is associated with increased thrombophilia in the cutaneous microcirculation and the continuous use of anticoagulants helps improve the symptoms. The causes of cutaneous infarctions are heterogenous, but ultimately follow the known mechanisms of the coagulation cascade. Rivaroxaban affects the coagulation cascade and inhibits the factor Xa–dependent conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, thereby considerably reducing the risk of thrombosis. Trial Registration Trial Registration EudraCT Number: 2012-000108-13-DE; https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search?query=eudract_number:2012-000108-13 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UCktWVCA); German Clinical

  15. The prognostic significance of left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with advanced cancer treated in phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Said, R.; Banchs, J.; Wheler, J.; Hess, K. R.; Falchook, G.; Fu, S.; Naing, A.; Hong, D.; Piha-Paul, S.; Ye, Y.; Yeh, E.; Wolff, R. A.; Tsimberidou, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background New targeted agents may cause acute cardiac events. The purpose of our study was to investigate the incidence and the prognostic significance of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in phase I trials. Patients and methods Between October 2008 and September 2011, the records of 1166 consecutive patients with advanced cancer treated in the Phase I Clinic who underwent echocardiography were retrospectively reviewed. Results Most of the patients were White (78%), and the most common tumor types were colorectal cancer and melanoma. Of 1166 patients, 177 (15.2%) patients had an LVEF of <50%. No difference in overall survival (OS) between patients with LVEF ≥ 50% and patients with LVEF < 50% was seen (median OS 7.4 versus 7.0 months, P = 0.84). Patients with LVEF ≤ 35% had shorter survival compared with those with LVEF between 35% and 50% (median 4.2 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In multivariate analysis of patients with LVEF < 50%, independent factors predicting longer survival were LVEF > 35%, ≤2 prior systemic therapies, ≤2 metastatic sites, and normal lactate dehydrogenase and albumin levels. Conclusion Echocardiography would improve patient selection for enrollment in phase I clinical trials. These data suggest that it is safe to treat patients with LVEF between 35% and 50%. PMID:24356639

  16. Syllable-Timed Speech Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Cheryl; O'Brian, Sue; Harrison, Elisabeth; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This clinical trial determined the outcomes of a simple syllable-timed speech (STS) treatment for school-age children who stutter. Method: Participants were 10 children, ages 6-11 years, who stutter. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS at near normal speech rates. The technique was practiced in the clinic…

  17. Camperdown Program for Adults Who Stutter: A Student Training Clinic Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocomazzo, Nadia; Block, Susan; Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Iverach, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: During speech pathology professional preparation there is a need for adequate student instruction with speech-restructuring treatments for adults. An important part of that clinical educational experience is to participate in a clinical setting that produces outcomes equivalent to those attained during clinical trials. A previous…

  18. Data-driven risk identification in phase III clinical trials using central statistical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Catherine; Venet, David; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    Our interest lies in quality control for clinical trials, in the context of risk-based monitoring (RBM). We specifically study the use of central statistical monitoring (CSM) to support RBM. Under an RBM paradigm, we claim that CSM has a key role to play in identifying the "risks to the most critical data elements and processes" that will drive targeted oversight. In order to support this claim, we first see how to characterize the risks that may affect clinical trials. We then discuss how CSM can be understood as a tool for providing a set of data-driven key risk indicators (KRIs), which help to organize adaptive targeted monitoring. Several case studies are provided where issues in a clinical trial have been identified thanks to targeted investigation after the identification of a risk using CSM. Using CSM to build data-driven KRIs helps to identify different kinds of issues in clinical trials. This ability is directly linked with the exhaustiveness of the CSM approach and its flexibility in the definition of the risks that are searched for when identifying the KRIs. In practice, a CSM assessment of the clinical database seems essential to ensure data quality. The atypical data patterns found in some centers and variables are seen as KRIs under a RBM approach. Targeted monitoring or data management queries can be used to confirm whether the KRIs point to an actual issue or not. PMID:26233672

  19. Early Phase Clinical Trials with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 and Malaria Vectored Vaccines in The Gambia: Frontline Challenges in Study Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Afolabi, Muhammed O.; Adetifa, Jane U.; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B.; Viebig, Nicola K.; Kampmann, Beate; Bojang, Kalifa

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and malaria are among the most important infectious diseases in developing countries. Existing control strategies are unlikely to curtail these diseases in the absence of efficacious vaccines. Testing of HIV and malaria vaccines candidates start with early phase trials that are increasingly being conducted in developing countries where the burden of the diseases is high. Unique challenges, which affect planning and implementation of vaccine trials according to internationally accepted standards have thus been identified. In this review, we highlight specific challenges encountered during two early phase trials of novel HIV-1 and malaria vectored vaccine candidates conducted in The Gambia and how some of these issues were pragmatically addressed. We hope our experience will be useful for key study personnel involved in day-to-day running of similar clinical trials. It may also guide future design and implementation of vaccine trials in resource-constrained settings. PMID:24615122

  20. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival. PMID:25867139

  1. Treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme with cetuximab, radiotherapy and temozolomide (GERT) – phase I/II trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E; Heeger, Steffen; Haselmann, Renate; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background The implementation of combined radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) has lead to a significant increase in overall survival times in patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, outcome still remains unsatisfactory. The majority of GBMs show an overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, addition of EGFR-inhibition with cetuximab to the current standard treatment approach with radiotherapy and TMZ seems promising. Methods/design GERT is a one-armed single-center phase I/II trial. In a first step, dose-escalation of TMZ from 50 mg/m2 to 75 mg/m2 together with radiotherapy and cetuximab will be performed. Should safety be proven, the phase II trial will be initiated with the standard dose of 75 mg/m2 of TMZ. Cetuximab will be applied in the standard application dose of 400 mg/m2 in week 1, thereafter at a dose of 250 mg/m2 weekly. A total of 46 patients will be included into this phase I/II trial. Primary endpoints are feasibility and toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall and progression-free survival. An interim analysis will be performed after inclusion of 15 patients into the main study. Patients' enrolment will be performed over a period of 2 years. The observation time will end 2 years after inclusion of the last patient. Discussion The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined RCHT-immunotherapy with TMZ and cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with primary GBM. PMID:16709245

  2. Follow-up of phase I trial of adalimumab and rosiglitazone in FSGS: III. Report of the FONT study group

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with resistant primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) are at high risk of progression to chronic kidney disease stage V. Antifibrotic agents may slow or halt this process. We present outcomes of follow-up after a Phase I trial of adalimumab and rosiglitazone, antifibrotic drugs tested in the Novel Therapies in Resistant FSGS (FONT) study. Methods 21 patients -- 12 males and 9 females, age 16.0 ± 7.5 yr, and estimated GFR (GFRe) 121 ± 56 mL/min/1.73 m2 -- received adalimumab (n = 10), 24 mg/m2 every 14 days or rosiglitazone (n = 11), 3 mg/m2 per day for 16 weeks. The change in GFRe per month prior to entry and after completion of the Phase I trial was compared. Results 19 patients completed the 16-week FONT treatment phase. The observation period pre-FONT was 18.3 ± 10.2 months and 16.1 ± 5.7 months after the study. A similar percentage of patients, 71% and 56%, in the rosiglitazone and adalimumab cohorts, respectively, had stabilization in GFRe, defined as a reduced negative slope of the line plotting GFRe versus time without requiring renal replacement therapy after completion of the FONT treatment period (P = 0.63). Conclusion Nearly 50% of patients with resistant FSGS who receive novel antifibrotic agents may have a legacy effect with delayed deterioration in kidney function after completion of therapy. Based on this proof-of-concept preliminary study, we recommend long-term follow-up of patients enrolled in clinical trials to ascertain a more comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of experimental treatments. PMID:20113498

  3. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  4. Analysis of Mutations in the Gene Encoding Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Brincidofovir Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, E. Randall; Foster, Scott; Brundage, Tom; Chou, Sunwen; Prichard, Mark N.; Kleiboeker, Steven; Wilson, Chad; Colville, Donella; Mommeja-Marin, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Brincidofovir is an oral antiviral in development for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease. Cytomegalovirus genotyping results from a phase 2 trial comparing brincidofovir to placebo for prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients provided initial data on the clinical resistance profile for brincidofovir. In this study, no known resistance-associated mutations were detected in brincidofovir-treated subjects; identified genotypic substitutions did not confer resistance to cytomegalovirus antivirals in vitro, suggesting that these changes represent polymorphisms unrelated to brincidofovir resistance. Lack of evidence for genotypic resistance during prophylaxis suggests that first-line use of brincidofovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus infection may preserve downstream options for patients. PMID:26941282

  5. Analysis of Mutations in the Gene Encoding Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Brincidofovir Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lanier, E Randall; Foster, Scott; Brundage, Tom; Chou, Sunwen; Prichard, Mark N; Kleiboeker, Steven; Wilson, Chad; Colville, Donella; Mommeja-Marin, Herve

    2016-07-01

    Brincidofovir is an oral antiviral in development for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease. Cytomegalovirus genotyping results from a phase 2 trial comparing brincidofovir to placebo for prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients provided initial data on the clinical resistance profile for brincidofovir. In this study, no known resistance-associated mutations were detected in brincidofovir-treated subjects; identified genotypic substitutions did not confer resistance to cytomegalovirus antivirals in vitro, suggesting that these changes represent polymorphisms unrelated to brincidofovir resistance. Lack of evidence for genotypic resistance during prophylaxis suggests that first-line use of brincidofovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus infection may preserve downstream options for patients. PMID:26941282

  6. Phase II trial of carboplatin plus oral etoposide for elderly patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, K.; Masuda, N.; Fukuoka, M.; Yana, T.; Hirashima, T.; Komiya, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Kawahara, M.; Atagi, S.; Ogawara, M.; Negoro, S.; Kudoh, S.; Furuse, K.

    1998-01-01

    A phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the Egorin's carboplatin dosing formula with 14-day oral etoposide in 38 elderly patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). The overall response rate was 81%. Median survival times were 15.1 months for 16 limited-disease (LD) and 8.6 months for 22 extensive-disease (ED) patients. Myelosuppression was the principal side-effect. This regimen is an active regimen in the treatment of elderly SCLC patients. PMID:9667675

  7. FemZone trial: a randomized phase II trial comparing neoadjuvant letrozole and zoledronic acid with letrozole in primary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this prospectively randomized phase II trial (Trial registration: EUCTR2004-004007-37-DE) was to compare the clinical response of primary breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant therapy with letrozole alone (LET) or letrozole and zoledronic acid (LET + ZOL). Methods Patients were randomly assigned to receive either LET 2.5 mg/day (n = 79) or the combination of LET 2.5 mg/day and a total of seven infusions of ZOL 4 mg every 4 weeks (n = 89) for 6 months. Primary endpoint was clinical response rate as assessed by mammogram readings. The study was terminated prematurely due to insufficient recruitment. We report here on an exploratory analysis of this data. Results Central assessment of tumor sizes during the treatment period was available for 131 patients (66 LET, 65 LET + ZOL). Clinical responses (complete or partial) were seen in 54.5% (95% CI: 41.8-66.9) of the patients in the LET arm and 69.2% (95% CI: 56.6-80.1) of those in the LET + ZOL arm (P = 0.106). A multivariate model showed an OR of 1.72 (95% CI: 0.83-3.59) for the experimental arm. Conclusion No increase in the clinical response rate was observed with the addition of ZOL to a neoadjuvant treatment regimen with LET. However a trend towards a better reponse in the LET + ZOL arm could be observed. This trend is consistent with previous studies that have investigated the addition of ZOL to chemotherapy, and it may support the evidence for a direct antitumor action of zoledronic acid. PMID:24499441

  8. Using “Clinical Trial Diaries” to Track Patterns of Participation for Serial Healthy Volunteers in U.S. Phase I Studies

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Heather B.; Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Phase I testing of investigational drugs relies on healthy volunteers as research participants. Many U.S. healthy volunteers enroll repeatedly in clinical trials for the financial compensation. Serial participants are incentivized to ignore restrictions on their participation, and no centralized clinical trial registry prevents dual enrollment. Little is currently known about how healthy volunteers participate in studies over time, hampering the development of policies to protect this group. We detail a methodology developed as part of a longitudinal study to track in real-time healthy volunteers’ Phase I participation. Illustrating these data through three case studies, we document how healthy volunteers use strategies, such as qualifying for studies at more than one clinic and traveling significant distances, to maximize their participation. Our findings suggest that “clinical trial diaries” can generate critical information about serial research participation and point to ethical issues unique to healthy volunteers’ involvement in Phase I clinical trials. PMID:25742668

  9. Potential cytochrome P-450 drug–drug interactions in adults with metastatic solid tumors and effect on eligibility for Phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wisinski, Kari B.; Cantu, Colby A.; Eickhoff, Jens; Osterby, Kurt; Tevaarwerk, Amye J.; Heideman, Jennifer; Liu, Glenn; Wilding, George; Johnston, Susan; Kolesar, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Potential cytochrome P-450 (CYP) drug–drug interactions in adults with metastatic solid tumors and their effect on eligibility for Phase I clinical trials were characterized. Methods This study included adult patients with metastatic solid tumors seen by a medical oncologist from January 2008 through July 2011. The medications used by these patients were identified. Each medication's potential for interacting with CYP isozymes was also characterized. Medication changes required to meet Phase I trial eligibility criteria were also reviewed. Results Data from 1773 patients were analyzed: 1489 were not enrolled in a Phase I trial and 284 were enrolled in a Phase I trial. Polypharmacy was significantly more prevalent in the group enrolled in a Phase I trial compared with those not enrolled (95% versus 80%, p < 0.001). The majority of patients not enrolled in a Phase I trial were taking at least one CYP isozyme inhibitor (87%) and at least one CYP isozyme inducer (45%). In a separate analysis, four Phase I trials were evaluated. Of 295 screened patients, 3.2% could not enroll due to concurrent medications. Charts from 74 enrolled patients revealed 655 concurrent medications—93 medications required further review for eligibility involving 51 (69%) of patients. Of the 93 medications, 38 (41%) were stopped and 41 (44%) were changed for the study. Conclusion Polypharmacy and the use of medications that interact with CYP isoyzmes were common in adult patients with metastatic solid tumors. Patients enrolling in Phase I studies often require medication changes to meet eligibility requirements. PMID:25987691

  10. Subcutaneous Progesterone Is Effective and Safe for Luteal Phase Support in IVF: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of the Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doblinger, Jakob; Cometti, Barbara; Trevisan, Silvia; Griesinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize efficacy and safety data on a new progesterone compound which is available for subcutaneous administration as compared to vaginally administered progesterone for luteal phase support in patients undergoing IVF treatment. Design Data from two randomized phase III trials (07EU/Prg06 and 07USA/Prg05) performed according to GCP standards with a total sample size of 1435 per-protocol patients were meta-analyzed on an individual patient data level. Setting University affiliated reproductive medicine unit. Patients Subcutaneous progesterone was administered to a total of 714 subjects and vaginal progesterone was administered to a total of 721 subjects who underwent fresh embryo transfer after ovarian stimulation followed by IVF or ICSI. The subjects were between 18 and 42 years old and had a BMI <30kg/m2. Interventions Subcutaneous progesterone 25 mg daily vs. either progesterone vaginal gel 90 mg daily (07EU/Prg06) or 100 mg intravaginal twice a day (07USA/Prg05) for luteal phase support in IVF patients. Main outcome measures Ongoing pregnancy rate beyond 10 gestational weeks, live birth rate and OHSS risk. Results The administration of subcutaneous progesterone versus intra-vaginal progesterone had no impact on ongoing pregnancy likelihood (OR = 0.865, 95% CI 0.694 to 1.077; P = n.s.), live birth likelihood (OR = 0.889, 95% CI 0.714 to 1.106; P = n.s.) or OHSS risk (OR = 0.995, 95% CI 0.565 to 1.754; P = n.s.) in regression analyses accounting for clustering of patients within trials, while adjusting for important confounders. Only female age and number of oocytes retrieved were significant predictors of live birth likelihood and OHSS risk. Conclusion No statistical significant or clinical significant differences exist between subcutaneous and vaginal progesterone for luteal phase support. PMID:26991890

  11. Phase 2 Randomised Controlled Trial and Feasibility Study of Future Care Planning in Patients with Advanced Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, Martin A; Cudmore, Sarah; Highet, Gill; Robertson, Shirley; Donald, Lisa; Stephen, Jacqueline; Haga, Kristin; Hogg, Karen; Weir, Christopher J; Murray, Scott A; Boyd, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    Future Care Planning (FCP) rarely occurs in patients with heart disease until close to death by which time the potential benefits are lost. We assessed the feasibility, acceptability and tested a design of a randomised trial evaluating the impact of FCP in patients and carers. 50 patients hospitalised with acute heart failure or acute coronary syndrome and with predicted 12 month mortality risk of >20% were randomly allocated to FCP or usual care for 12 weeks upon discharge and then crossed-over for the next 12 weeks. Quality of life, symptoms and anxiety/distress were assessed by questionnaire. Hospitalisation and mortality events were documented for 6 months post-discharge. FCP increased implementation and documentation of key decisions linked to end-of-life care. FCP did not increase anxiety/distress (Kessler score -E 16.7 (7.0) vs D 16.8 (7.3), p = 0.94). Quality of life was unchanged (EQ5D: E 0.54(0.29) vs D 0.56(0.24), p = 0.86) while unadjusted hospitalised nights was lower (E 8.6 (15.3) vs D 11.8 (17.1), p = 0.01). Qualitative interviews indicated that FCP was highly valued by patients, carers and family physicians. FCP is feasible in a randomised clinical trial in patients with acute high risk cardiac conditions. A Phase 3 trial is needed urgently. PMID:27090299

  12. Phase 2 Randomised Controlled Trial and Feasibility Study of Future Care Planning in Patients with Advanced Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denvir, Martin A.; Cudmore, Sarah; Highet, Gill; Robertson, Shirley; Donald, Lisa; Stephen, Jacqueline; Haga, Kristin; Hogg, Karen; Weir, Christopher J.; Murray, Scott A.; Boyd, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    Future Care Planning (FCP) rarely occurs in patients with heart disease until close to death by which time the potential benefits are lost. We assessed the feasibility, acceptability and tested a design of a randomised trial evaluating the impact of FCP in patients and carers. 50 patients hospitalised with acute heart failure or acute coronary syndrome and with predicted 12 month mortality risk of >20% were randomly allocated to FCP or usual care for 12 weeks upon discharge and then crossed-over for the next 12 weeks. Quality of life, symptoms and anxiety/distress were assessed by questionnaire. Hospitalisation and mortality events were documented for 6 months post-discharge. FCP increased implementation and documentation of key decisions linked to end-of-life care. FCP did not increase anxiety/distress (Kessler score -E 16.7 (7.0) vs D 16.8 (7.3), p = 0.94). Quality of life was unchanged (EQ5D: E 0.54(0.29) vs D 0.56(0.24), p = 0.86) while unadjusted hospitalised nights was lower (E 8.6 (15.3) vs D 11.8 (17.1), p = 0.01). Qualitative interviews indicated that FCP was highly valued by patients, carers and family physicians. FCP is feasible in a randomised clinical trial in patients with acute high risk cardiac conditions. A Phase 3 trial is needed urgently. PMID:27090299

  13. Utility-Based Optimization of Combination Therapy Using Ordinal Toxicity and Efficacy in Phase I/II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Houede, Nadine; Thall, Peter F.; Nguyen, Hoang; Paoletti, Xavier; Kramar, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An outcome-adaptive Bayesian design is proposed for choosing the optimal dose pair of a chemotherapeutic agent and a biologic agent used in combination in a phase I/II clinical trial. Patient outcome is characterized as a vector of two ordinal variables accounting for toxicity and treatment efficacy. A generalization of the Aranda-Ordaz model (1983, Biometrika 68, 357–363) is used for the marginal outcome probabilities as functions of dose pair, and a Gaussian copula is assumed to obtain joint distributions. Numerical utilities of all elementary patient outcomes, allowing the possibility that efficacy is inevaluable due to severe toxicity, are obtained using an elicitation method aimed to establish consensus among the physicians planning the trial. For each successive patient cohort, a dose pair is chosen to maximize the posterior mean utility. The method is illustrated by a trial in bladder cancer, including simulation studies of the method’s sensitivity to prior parameters, the numerical utilities, correlation between the outcomes, sample size, cohort size and starting dose pair. PMID:19673865

  14. A Qualitative Study of Phase III Cancer Clinical Trial Enrollment Decision-Making: Perspectives from Adolescents, Young Adults, Caregivers, and Providers

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lisa A.; Reilly, Anne; Deatrick, Janet A.; Balis, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The mortality reduction rate for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer has not demonstrated the same rate of improvement as for children, due partly to insufficient phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment. This study describes three key components of phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment—family decision-making patterns, factors that influence AYAs' involvement, and attitudes (perceived barriers and benefits) toward trial participation—and evaluated a measure of attitudes. Methods: Participants were AYAs (15–23 years old at study) diagnosed with cancer and offered a phase III cancer clinical trial within the past 3–21 months, their primary caregivers, and their healthcare providers. Interviews assessed: (a) phase III clinical trial decision-making experiences and (b) relevance of the Pediatric Research Participation Questionnaire (PRPQ) in the assessment of AYAs' attitudes toward enrollment on phase III cancer clinical trials. Results: Thirteen AYAs, 16 caregivers, and 11 providers were interviewed. Four decision-making patterns were identified, with AYA abdicates to caregiver and caregiver-based and AYA-endorsed the most commonly described, but with variation across respondents. Distress and reduced health-related quality of life limited AYAs' involvement in the enrollment decision, while developmental and emotional maturity facilitated involvement. Perceived barriers and benefits to enrollment were reported, and the PRPQ was deemed relevant with minor modifications. Conclusions: Findings suggest that AYAs may not be fully involved in phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment decision-making, and caregivers and providers are challenged to overcome factors that limit their involvement. The PRPQ shows promise as a tool for systematically evaluating clinical trial attitudes. PMID:24669354

  15. A Qualitative Study of Phase III Cancer Clinical Trial Enrollment Decision-Making: Perspectives from Adolescents, Young Adults, Caregivers, and Providers.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Lamia P; Schwartz, Lisa A; Reilly, Anne; Deatrick, Janet A; Balis, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The mortality reduction rate for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer has not demonstrated the same rate of improvement as for children, due partly to insufficient phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment. This study describes three key components of phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment-family decision-making patterns, factors that influence AYAs' involvement, and attitudes (perceived barriers and benefits) toward trial participation-and evaluated a measure of attitudes. Methods: Participants were AYAs (15-23 years old at study) diagnosed with cancer and offered a phase III cancer clinical trial within the past 3-21 months, their primary caregivers, and their healthcare providers. Interviews assessed: (a) phase III clinical trial decision-making experiences and (b) relevance of the Pediatric Research Participation Questionnaire (PRPQ) in the assessment of AYAs' attitudes toward enrollment on phase III cancer clinical trials. Results: Thirteen AYAs, 16 caregivers, and 11 providers were interviewed. Four decision-making patterns were identified, with AYA abdicates to caregiver and caregiver-based and AYA-endorsed the most commonly described, but with variation across respondents. Distress and reduced health-related quality of life limited AYAs' involvement in the enrollment decision, while developmental and emotional maturity facilitated involvement. Perceived barriers and benefits to enrollment were reported, and the PRPQ was deemed relevant with minor modifications. Conclusions: Findings suggest that AYAs may not be fully involved in phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment decision-making, and caregivers and providers are challenged to overcome factors that limit their involvement. The PRPQ shows promise as a tool for systematically evaluating clinical trial attitudes. PMID:24669354

  16. A phase II clinical trial of mefloquine in Brazilian male subjects

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, José-Maria

    1983-01-01

    Mefloquine was compared with sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine for safety and efficacy in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial in adult males from a malaria-endemic area of Brazil. A total of 99 oligosymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers with Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia took part in the trial; 49 were given 1000 mg of mefloquine and the remainder received 1500 mg of sulfadoxine plus 75 mg of pyrimethamine, in a single oral dose. Mefloquine was 100% successful in clearing parasitaemia within 7 days; there were no recrudescences. Sulfadoxine—pyrimethamine was less successful; 35 cases showed an S-type response, 8 an RI response, 3 an RII, and 2 an RIII response. The side-effects of mefloquine were mild and transient and included headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and diarrhoea. A satisfactory weight gain and rise in haemoglobin level were seen in both groups. PMID:6360401

  17. [Citalopram in depression (results of an open multicenter study in phase IV of the clinical trial)].

    PubMed

    Vinar, O; Svestka, J; Koníková, M

    1993-12-01

    249 depressed patients were treated by 35 psychiatrists in an open multicenter trial during 6 weeks with citalopram. The protocol enabled that naturalistic treatment conditions could be kept. The results were rated with the help of the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale. The treatment was successful in 77% of the patients. 5 patients dropped out because of adverse effects, 8 patients did not finish the trial due to insufficient efficacy. In 160 patients (64.2%) no adverse effects were registered. Transient mild headaches in 8.4% and nausea in 4% were the most frequent adverse events. The best effects were observed in patients who were rated as moderately ill (82.8% ameliorated) at pretreatment. Nevertheless, also 66.7% of those rated as severely ill before the treatment improved substantially. In patients treated with higher doses than 20 mg/day, the improvement rate was not higher than in those treated with 20 mg daily. PMID:8124734

  18. Feeding and Bleeding: The Institutional Banalization of Risk to Healthy Volunteers in Phase I Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Phase I clinical trials are the first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans. The majority of these studies are conducted under controlled, inpatient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. This article draws on an ethnographic study of six phase I clinics in the United States, including 268 semistructured interviews with research staff and healthy volunteers. In it, I argue that an institutional banalization of risk structures the perceptions of research staff and healthy volunteers participating in the studies. For research staff, there are three mechanisms by which risk becomes banal: a perceived homogeneity of studies, Fordist work regimes, and data-centric discourse. For healthy volunteers, repeat study participation contributes to the institutional banalization of risk both through the process of desensitization to risk and the formation of trust in the clinics. I argue that the institutional banalization of risk also renders invisible ethical concerns about exploitation of underprivileged groups in pharmaceutical research. PMID:25914430

  19. Structural stability of W2B5 under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Shekar, N. V. Chandra; Sahu, P. Ch.

    2015-05-01

    High-pressure structural stability studies have been carried out on tungsten boride W2B5 up to maximum pressure of 36 GPa using a Mao-Bell diamond-anvil cell at beamline BR-12 of the ELETTRA synchrotron facility (λ = 0.68881 Å). The hexagonal phase (S.G:P63/mmc) of W2B5 is stable up to the maximum pressure studied. The bulk modulus is estimated to be ~347 GPa using the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The variation of lattice parameters and bond lengths B-B and W-B have been studied and the c-axis is seen to be marginally more compressible than the a-axis.

  20. Expectation of Volunteers Towards the Vaccine Efficacy of the Prime-Boost HIV Vaccine Phase III Trial During Unblinding

    PubMed Central

    Khowsroy, Kessuda; Sabmee, Yupa; Laowarakul, Pataramon; Wattanakitwichai, Jutarat; Auetian, Jiraporn; Lothong, Kannika; Boondao, Roongtip; Maythaarttaphong, Sarawan; Yaemwong, Sunee; Excler, Jean-Louis; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A Phase III community-based HIV vaccine trial using the ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E prime-boost regimen (RV144) showed a modest vaccine efficacy of 31.2% against HIV acquisition. Participant's understanding of the trial is a key element of its success. This study aimed to understand participant's expectation and response to the overall results of the trial as well after unblinding. Using an open-ended questionnaire, data were collected from 400 participants who came for the unblinding visit. Fifty-three percent received the vaccine and 47% were placebo recipients. The median age was 30 years (range: 22–37). The observed vaccine efficacy of 31.2% was lower than expected by 67.75% of participants compared to higher than expected (by 6%), as expected (by 11.25%), and those with no expectation (15%). A majority of participants (71.5%) were happy and proud, and indicated that it was a good result. The rest were sad or disappointed (22.75%) or acquiescent (5.75%). After unblinding, 67.92% of the vaccine recipients had a positive response and 32.08% were acquiescent. Among placebo recipients, 85.11% were acquiescent and 10.11% indicated that being assigned to the vaccine group would have been better even though vaccine efficacy was only 31.2%. Despite the modest vaccine efficacy, a majority of study participants acknowledged the value of the trial and hoped that information from RV144 could be used for future vaccine development. PMID:24906244

  1. Design and Initial Results of a Multi-Phase Randomized Trial of Ceftriaxone in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, James D.; Shefner, Jeremy M.; Conwit, Robin; Schoenfeld, David; Keroack, Myles; Felsenstein, Donna; Krivickas, Lisa; David, William S.; Vriesendorp, Francine; Pestronk, Alan; Caress, James B.; Katz, Jonathan; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Pascuzzi, Robert; Glass, Jonathan; Rezania, Kourosh; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Greenblatt, David J.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ceftriaxone increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter, EAAT2, which might protect from glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. A trial using a novel three stage nonstop design, incorporating Phases I-III, tested ceftriaxone in ALS. Stage 1 determined the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in subjects with ALS. Stage 2 evaluated safety and tolerability for 20-weeks. Analysis of the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety was used to determine the ceftriaxone dosage for Stage 3 efficacy testing. Methods In Stage 1, 66 subjects at ten clinical sites were enrolled and randomized equally into three study groups receiving intravenous placebo, ceftriaxone 2 grams daily or ceftriaxone 4 grams daily divided BID. Participants provided serum and cerebrospinal fluid for pharmacokinetic analysis on study day 7. Participants continued their assigned treatment in Stage 2. The Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) reviewed the data after the last participants completed 20 weeks on study drug. Results Stage 1 analysis revealed linear pharmacokinetics, and CSF trough levels for both dosage levels exceeding the pre-specified target trough level of 1 µM (0.55 µg/mL). Tolerability (Stages 1 and 2) results showed that ceftriaxone at dosages up to 4 grams/day was well tolerated at 20 weeks. Biliary adverse events were more common with ceftriaxone but not dose-dependent and improved with ursodeoxycholic (ursodiol) therapy. Conclusions The goals of Stages 1 and 2 of the ceftriaxone trial were successfully achieved. Based on the pre-specified decision rules, the DSMB recommended the use of ceftriaxone 4 g/d (divided BID) for Stage 3, which recently closed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00349622. PMID:23613806

  2. Phase II Trial of Sorafenib in Patients with Chemotherapy Refractory Metastatic Esophageal and Gastroesophageal (GE) Junction Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Vakiani, Efsevia; Ku, Geoffrey Y.; Herrera, Jessica M.; Tang, Laura H.; Bouvier, Nancy; Viale, Agnès; Socci, Nicholas D.; Capanu, Marinela; Berger, Michael; Ilson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR2) directed therapies result in a modest survival benefit for patients with advanced esophageal and gastroesophageal (GE) junction cancer. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) may contribute to escape from VEGFR2 inhibition. We evaluated the efficacy of sorafenib, a broad spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting VEGFR2 and PDGFR as well as RET and RAF1, in patients with metastatic chemotherapy refractory esophageal and GE junction cancer. Patients and Methods This phase II trial of sorafenib 400 mg twice daily enrolled chemotherapy refractory patients with metastatic esophageal and GE junction cancer with primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS) rate at two months. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, objective response rate and toxicity. Results Among 34 patients, 8 week Kaplan-Meier estimated PFS was 61% (90%CI 45 to 73%). Median PFS is 3.6 months (95% CI 1.8 to 3.9 months), with median overall survival OS 9.7 months (95% CI 5.9 to 11.6 months). Grade 3 toxicities were uncommon and included hand foot skin reaction, rash, dehydration and fatigue. One patient (3%) with ongoing complete response and remains on trial for over 5 years. Whole exome sequencing of this tumor revealed mutations in many cancer-associated genes including ARID1A, PIK3CA, and TP53, and focal amplifications of HMGA2 and MET. Conclusion Sorafenib therapy results in disease stabilization and encouraging PFS in patients with refractory esophageal and GE junction cancer. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00917462 PMID:26275293

  3. Experimental Treatment of Ebola Virus Disease with TKM-130803: A Single-Arm Phase 2 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, Amanda; Gannon, Fiona; Carson, Gail; Idriss, Baimba; Massaquoi, Thomas; Gandi, Regina; Joseph, Sebatu; Osman, Hassan K.; Brooks, Timothy J. G.; Simpson, Andrew J. H.; Goodfellow, Ian; Thorne, Lucy; Arias, Armando; Merson, Laura; Castle, Lyndsey; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Pardinaz-Solis, Raul; Hope-Gill, Benjamin; Ferri, Mauricio; Grove, Jennifer; Kowalski, Mark; Stepniewska, Kasia; Lang, Trudie; Whitehead, John; Olliaro, Piero; Samai, Mohammed; Horby, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Background TKM-130803, a small interfering RNA lipid nanoparticle product, has been developed for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD), but its efficacy and safety in humans has not been evaluated. Methods and Findings In this single-arm phase 2 trial, adults with laboratory-confirmed EVD received 0.3 mg/kg of TKM-130803 by intravenous infusion once daily for up to 7 d. On days when trial enrolment capacity was reached, patients were enrolled into a concurrent observational cohort. The primary outcome was survival to day 14 after admission, excluding patients who died within 48 h of admission. After 14 adults with EVD had received TKM-130803, the pre-specified futility boundary was reached, indicating a probability of survival to day 14 of ≤0.55, and enrolment was stopped. Pre-treatment geometric mean Ebola virus load in the 14 TKM-130803 recipients was 2.24 × 109 RNA copies/ml plasma (95% CI 7.52 × 108, 6.66 × 109). Two of the TKM-130803 recipients died within 48 h of admission and were therefore excluded from the primary outcome analysis. Of the remaining 12 TKM-130803 recipients, nine died and three survived. The probability that a TKM-130803 recipient who survived for 48 h will subsequently survive to day 14 was estimated to be 0.27 (95% CI 0.06, 0.58). TKM-130803 infusions were well tolerated, with 56 doses administered and only one possible infusion-related reaction observed. Three patients were enrolled in the observational cohort, of whom two died. Conclusions Administration of TKM-130803 at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg/d by intravenous infusion to adult patients with severe EVD was not shown to improve survival when compared to historic controls. Trial registration Pan African Clinical Trials Registry PACTR201501000997429 PMID:27093560

  4. Designing drug trials for Alzheimer's disease: what we have learned from the release of the phase III antibody trials: a report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force.

    PubMed

    Vellas, Bruno; Carrillo, Maria C; Sampaio, Cristina; Brashear, H Robert; Siemers, Eric; Hampel, Harald; Schneider, Lon S; Weiner, Michael; Doody, Rachelle; Khachaturian, Zaven; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Grundman, Michael; Broich, Karl; Giacobini, Ezio; Dubois, Bruno; Sperling, Reisa; Wilcock, Gordon K; Fox, Nick; Scheltens, Philip; Touchon, Jacques; Hendrix, Suzanne; Andrieu, Sandrine; Aisen, Paul

    2013-07-01

    An international task force of investigators from academia, industry, nonprofit foundations, and regulatory agencies met in Monte Carlo, Monaco, on October 31, 2012, to review lessons learned from the recent bapineuzumab and solanezumab trials, and to incorporate insights gained from these trials into future clinical studies. Although there is broad consensus that Alzheimer's disease (AD) should be treated during its earliest stages, the concept of secondary prevention has evolved to be described more accurately as treatment of preclinical, presymptomatic, or early AD. There continues to be a strong emphasis on biomarkers and a need for new biomarkers; however, there has also been a realization, based on completed trials, that the most reliable indicator of clinical efficacy across the entire spectrum of disease from asymptomatic to AD dementia is likely a measure of cognition. The task force made many recommendations that should improve the likelihood of success in future trials, including larger phase 2 or combined phase 2/phase 3 studies, clear evidence of target engagement in the central nervous system, evidence of downstream effects on biomarkers before initiating phase 3 studies, consideration of adaptive and targeted trial designs, and use of sensitive measures of cognition as the most robust indicator of treatment benefit. PMID:23809364

  5. Update on the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): a randomised controlled phase 3 clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. Infections after stroke occur in 30% of stroke patients and are strongly associated with unfavourable outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers infection rate in patients after stroke, however, the effect of preventive antibiotic treatment on functional outcome after stroke has not yet been investigated.The Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS) is an ongoing, multicentre, prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end point trial of preventive antibiotic therapy in acute stroke. Patients are randomly assigned to either ceftriaxone at a dose of 2 g, given every 24 hours intravenously for four-days, in addition to stroke-unit care, or standard stroke-unit care without preventive antibiotic therapy. Aim of the study is to assess whether preventive antibiotic treatment improves functional outcome at three months by preventing infections. Results To date, 2,470 patients have been included in PASS. Median stroke severity of the first 2,133 patients (second interim analysis) is 5 (IQR 3 to 9) on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Due to the PROBE design, no outcome data are available yet. In the initial trial protocol we proposed a dichotomisation of the mRS as primary analysis of outcome and ordinal regression analysis as secondary analysis of primary outcome, requiring a sample size of 3,200 patients. However, ordinal analysis of outcome data is becoming increasingly more common in acute stroke trials, as it increases statistical power. For PASS, funding is insufficient for inclusion of 3,200 patients with the overall inclusion rate of 15 patients per week. Therefore we change the analysis of our primary outcome from dichotomisation to ordinal regression analysis on the mRS. Power analysis showed that with similar assumptions 2,550 patients are needed using ordinal regression analysis. We expect to complete follow-up in June 2014. A full statistical analysis plan will be

  6. Bosutinib Versus Imatinib in Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Results From the BELA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Jorge E.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Dyagil, Irina; Griskevicius, Laimonas; Malhotra, Hemant; Powell, Christine; Gogat, Karïn; Countouriotis, Athena M.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bosutinib is an oral Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The phase III Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (BELA) trial compared bosutinib with imatinib in newly diagnosed, chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients and Methods A total of 502 patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to bosutinib 500 mg per day or imatinib 400 mg per day. Results The complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) rate at 12 months was not different for bosutinib (70%; 95% CI, 64% to 76%) versus imatinib (68%; 95% CI, 62% to 74%; two-sided P = .601); therefore, the study did not achieve its primary end point. The major molecular response (MMR) rate at 12 months was higher with bosutinib (41%; 95% CI, 35% to 47%) compared with imatinib (27%; 95% CI, 22% to 33%; two-sided P < .001). Time to CCyR and MMR was faster with bosutinib compared with imatinib (two-sided P < .001 for both). On-treatment transformation to accelerated/blast phase occurred in four patients (2%) on bosutinib compared with 10 patients (4%) on imatinib. A total of three CML-related deaths occurred on the bosutinib arm compared with eight on the imatinib arm. The safety profiles of bosutinib and imatinib were distinct; GI and liver-related events were more frequent with bosutinib, whereas neutropenia, musculoskeletal disorders, and edema were more frequent with imatinib. Conclusion This ongoing trial did not meet its primary end point of CCyR at 12 months, despite the observed higher MMR rate at 12 months, faster times to CCyR and MMR, fewer on-treatment transformations to accelerated/blast phase, and fewer CML-related deaths with bosutinib compared with imatinib. Each drug had a distinct safety profile. PMID:22949154

  7. Phase I trial of FOLFIRI in combination with sorafenib and bevacizumab in patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, George; Borad, Mitesh J.; Johnson, Elizabeth; Qin, Rui; Lensing, Janet; Puttabasavaiah, Suneetha; Wright, John; Erlichman, Charles; Grothey, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A previous phase II trial in patients with chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer demonstrated a 63 % disease control rate with a combination of bevacizumab and sorafenib. This phase I trial sought to determine the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of bevacizumab and sorafenib combined with standard cytotoxic therapy for advanced gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Methods A standard 3 + 3 trial design utilized 3 escalating sorafenib dose levels: (1) 200 mg daily, days 3–7, 10–14; (2) 200 mg twice daily, days 3–6, 10–13; and (3) 200 mg twice daily, days 3–7, 10–14 combined with standard dose FOLFIRI (5-fluouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan) and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg), repeated every 14 days. Results Fifteen patients were evaluable for safety and response assessment. There were no dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) at dose level 1 or 2. At dose level 3, two patients experienced DLTs (asymptomatic grade 3 hypophosphatemia, grade 3 dehydration and diarrhea). The MTD was determined to be dose level 2: sorafenib 200 mg twice daily, days 3–6, 10–13 combined with FOLFIRI and bevacizumab at standard doses. Four patients had a partial response and 8 had stable disease as best response (disease control rate of 80 %). Three patients with CRC had disease control >12 months. Conclusions The MTD of this regimen is sorafenib 200 mg twice daily, days 3–6, 10–13 combined with standard doses of FOLFIRI and bevacizumab. Dual antiangiogenic treatment combined with cytotoxic therapy may provide prolonged disease stabilization for select patients with advanced GI malignancies. PMID:26581401

  8. Evaluation of the Safety and Benefit of Phase I Oncology Trials for Patients With Primary CNS Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Mrinal M.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Muzikansky, Alona; Sanchez, Armando J.; Desideri, Serena; Ye, Xiaobu; Ivy, S. Percy; Nabors, L. Burt; Prados, Michael; Grossman, Stuart; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with high-grade gliomas (HGG) are frequently excluded from first-in-human solid tumor trials because of perceived poor prognosis, excessive toxicities, concomitant drug interactions, and poor efficacy. We conducted an analysis of outcomes from select, single-agent phase I studies in patients with HGG. We compared outcomes to pooled analysis of published studies in solid tumors with various molecular and cytotoxic drugs evaluated as single agents or as combinations. Patient and Methods Individual records of patients with recurrent HGG enrolled onto Adult Brain Tumor Consortium trials of single-agent, cytotoxic or molecular agents from 2000 to 2008 were analyzed for baseline characteristics, toxicities, responses, and survival. Results Our analysis included 327 patients with advanced, refractory HGG who were enrolled onto eight trials involving targeted molecular (n = 5) and cytotoxic (n = 3) therapies. At enrollment, patients had a median Karnofsky performance score of 90 and median age of 52 years; 62% were men, 63% had glioblastoma, and the median number of prior systemic chemotherapies was one. Baseline laboratory values were in an acceptable range to meet eligibility criteria. Patients were on the study for a median of two cycles (range, < one to 56 cycles), and 96% were evaluable for primary end points. During cycle 1, grade ≥ 3 nonhematologic and grade ≥ 4 hematologic toxicities were 5% (28 of 565 adverse events) and 0.9% (five of 565 adverse events), respectively, and 66% of these occurred at the highest dose level. There was one death attributed to drug. Overall response rate (complete and partial response) was 5.5%. Median progression-free and overall survival times were 1.8 and 6 months, respectively. Conclusion Patients with HGG who meet standard eligibility criteria may be good candidates for solid tumor phase I studies with single-agent molecular or cytotoxic drugs with favorable preclinical rationale and pharmacokinetic properties

  9. Phase I Trial of Simultaneous In-Field Boost With Helical Tomotherapy for Patients With One to Three Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Yartsev, Slav; Yaremko, Brian; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Hammond, Alex; Lock, Michael; Yu, Edward; Ash, Robert; Caudrelier, Jean-Michelle; Khuntia, Deepak; Bailey, Laura; Bauman, Glenn

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative to surgical resection for selected intracranial lesions. Integrated image-guided intensity-modulated-capable radiotherapy platforms such as helical tomotherapy (HT) could potentially replace traditional radiosurgery apparatus. The present study's objective was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of a simultaneous in-field boost integrated with whole brain radiotherapy for palliative treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases using HT. Methods and Materials: The inclusion/exclusion criteria and endpoints were consistent with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9508 radiosurgery trial. The cohorts were constructed with a 3 + 3 design; however, additional patients were enrolled in the lower dose tolerable cohorts during the toxicity assessment periods. Whole brain radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered with a 5-30-Gy (total lesion dose of 35-60 Gy in 10 fractions) simultaneous in-field boost delivered to the brain metastases. The maximally tolerated dose was determined by the frequency of neurologic Grade 3-5 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0, dose-limiting toxicity events within each Phase I cohort. Results: A total of 48 patients received treatment in the 35-Gy (n = 3), 40-Gy (n = 16), 50-Gy (n = 15), 55-Gy (n = 8), and 60-Gy (n = 6) cohorts. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity events in any of the trial cohorts. The 3-month RECIST assessments available for 32 of the 48 patients demonstrated a complete response in 2, a partial response in 16, stable disease in 6, and progressive disease in 8 patients. Conclusion: The delivery of 60 Gy in 10 fractions to one to three brain metastases synchronously with 30 Gy whole brain radiotherapy was achieved without dose-limiting central nervous system toxicity as assessed 3 months after treatment. This approach is being tested in a Phase II efficacy trial.

  10. Intravitreal Sirolimus for the Treatment of Geographic Atrophy: Results of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Philip A.; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.; Wong, Wai T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the safety and effects of intravitreal sirolimus for the potential treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). Methods. The study was a single-center, open-label, phase I/II trial enrolling six participants with bilateral GA treated with intravitreal sirolimus in only one randomly assigned eye, with the fellow eye as control. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in total GA area from baseline on color fundus photography (CFP); secondary outcomes included changes in GA area on fundus autofluorescence (FAF), visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT), and macular sensitivity from baseline. Results. Although no systemic adverse events were attributed to treatment, two of six participants had ocular adverse events that were possibly associated. The treated eye of one participant developed abnormal paralesional changes on FAF that were associated with accelerated retinal thinning. This accelerated retinal thinning was also seen in the treated eye of a second participant. Because of concern that these events were associated with treatment, treatment was suspended. Comparisons of treated and fellow eyes for change in visual acuity, change in GA area, and change in CRT showed no evidence of treatment benefit and generally favored the untreated fellow eye. Conclusions. While paralesional FAF changes and rapid retinal thinning observed are potentially part of the natural course of GA, they may possibly be related to treatment. No general evidence of anatomical or functional benefit was detected in treated eyes. Further data on intravitreal sirolimus for GA treatment will be available from a larger phase II trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01445548.) PMID:25525171

  11. Field production and functional evaluation of chloroplast-derived interferon-α2b

    PubMed Central

    Arlen, Philip A.; Falconer, Regina; Cherukumilli, Sri; Cole, Amy; Cole, Alexander M.; Oishi, Karen K.; Daniell, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Summary Type I interferons (IFNs) inhibit viral replication and cell growth and enhance the immune response, and therefore have many clinical applications. IFN-α2b ranks third in world market use for a biopharmaceutical, behind only insulin and erythropoietin. The average annual cost of IFN-α2b for the treatment of hepatitis C infection is $26 000, and is therefore unavailable to the majority of patients in developing countries. Therefore, we expressed IFN-α2b in tobacco chloroplasts, and transgenic lines were grown in the field after obtaining United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) approval. Stable, site-specific integration of transgenes into chloroplast genomes and homoplasmy through several generations were confirmed. IFN-α2b levels reached up to 20% of total soluble protein, or 3 mg per gram of leaf (fresh weight). Transgenic IFN-α2b had similar in vitro biological activity to commercially produced PEG-Intron™ when tested for its ability to protect cells against cytopathic viral replication in the vesicular stomatitis virus cytopathic effect (VSV CPE) assay and to inhibit early-stage human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The antitumour and immunomodulating properties of IFN-α2b were also seen in vivo . Chloroplast-derived IFN-α2b increased the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on splenocytes and the total number of natural killer (NK) cells. Finally, IFN-α2b purified from chloroplast transgenic lines (cpIFN-α2b) protected mice from a highly metastatic tumour line. This demonstration of high levels of expression of IFN-α2b, transgene containment and biological activity akin to that of commercial preparations of IFN-α2b facilitated the first field production of a plant-derived human blood protein, a critical step towards human clinical trials and commercialization. PMID:17490449

  12. Zika Phase I Clinical Trial Material—From Research to Release in 90 Days | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Over the past 12 months, we’ve grown accustomed to seeing Zika in the news. The virus has been linked to thousands of cases of microcephaly in Brazilian babies. Numerous countries, including the United States, have reported Zika-related deaths. And there is no vaccine available at this time. In the face of what has become a global health crisis, the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) responded to a call from Anthony Fauci, Ph.D., head, NIAID, to get a candidate vaccine into human trials by the summer of 2016.

  13. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.

    1996-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950`s While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma.

  14. A phase 1/2a follistatin gene therapy trial for becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jerry R; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Gomez, Ana M; Flanigan, Kevin M; Lowes, Linda P; Alfano, Lindsay N; Berry, Katherine; Meadows, Eric; Lewis, Sarah; Braun, Lyndsey; Shontz, Kim; Rouhana, Maria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Rosales, Xiomara Q; Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Govoni, Alessandra; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Hogan, Mark J; Kaspar, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a variant of dystrophin deficiency resulting from DMD gene mutations. Phenotype is variable with loss of ambulation in late teenage or late mid-life years. There is currently no treatment for this condition. In this BMD proof-of-principle clinical trial, a potent myostatin antagonist, follistatin (FS), was used to inhibit the myostatin pathway. Extensive preclinical studies, using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver follistatin, demonstrated an increase in strength. For this trial, we used the alternatively spliced FS344 to avoid potential binding to off target sites. AAV1.CMV.FS344 was delivered to six BMD patients by direct bilateral intramuscular quadriceps injections. Cohort 1 included three subjects receiving 3 × 10(11) vg/kg/leg. The distance walked on the 6MWT was the primary outcome measure. Patients 01 and 02 improved 58 meters (m) and 125 m, respectively. Patient 03 showed no change. In Cohort 2, Patients 05 and 06 received 6 × 10(11) vg/kg/leg with improved 6MWT by 108 m and 29 m, whereas, Patient 04 showed no improvement. No adverse effects were encountered. Histological changes corroborated benefit showing reduced endomysial fibrosis, reduced central nucleation, more normal fiber size distribution with muscle hypertrophy, especially at high dose. The results are encouraging for treatment of dystrophin-deficient muscle diseases. PMID:25322757

  15. Toxicological Studies of 212Pb Intravenously or Intraperitoneally Injected into Mice for a Phase 1 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Milenic, Diane E.; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Solivella, María S.; Banaga, Eileen; Torgue, Julien; Besnainou, Sarah; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.

    2015-01-01

    Faced with the novelty of a 212Pb-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) for clinical translation, concerns were expressed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding 212Pb prematurely released from the mAb-chelate conjugate. The objective of this study was to simulate the worst case scenario of such a failure. Groups of Balb/c mice (n = 9–20) were administered 212Pb by intraperitoneal (0.0925–1.85 MBq) or intravenous (0.0925–1.11 MBq) injection and then euthanized at 7 or 90 days to assess acute or chronic effects. Weights were recorded prior to injection of the 212Pb and at the end of the observation periods. Blood samples were collected for clinical chemistry and blood cell analysis. Thirty tissues were harvested and formalin fixed for histopathological examination. Treatment related effects of the 212Pb were observed in the bone marrow, spleen, kidneys and the liver. Histological alterations in these organs were considered mild to moderate, indicating low grade toxicity, and not considered severe enough to affect function. This data was presented to the FDA and determined to be acceptable. The clinical trial with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab was approved in January 2011 and the trial opened at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in July. PMID:26213947

  16. Toxicological Studies of 212Pb Intravenously or Intraperitoneally Injected into Mice for a Phase 1 Trial.

    PubMed

    Milenic, Diane E; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Solivella, María S; Banaga, Eileen; Torgue, Julien; Besnainou, Sarah; Brechbiel, Martin W; Baidoo, Kwamena E

    2015-01-01

    Faced with the novelty of a 212Pb-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) for clinical translation, concerns were expressed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding 212Pb prematurely released from the mAb-chelate conjugate. The objective of this study was to simulate the worst case scenario of such a failure. Groups of Balb/c mice (n = 9-20) were administered 212Pb by intraperitoneal (0.0925-1.85 MBq) or intravenous (0.0925-1.11 MBq) injection and then euthanized at 7 or 90 days to assess acute or chronic effects. Weights were recorded prior to injection of the 212Pb and at the end of the observation periods. Blood samples were collected for clinical chemistry and blood cell analysis. Thirty tissues were harvested and formalin fixed for histopathological examination. Treatment related effects of the 212Pb were observed in the bone marrow, spleen, kidneys and the liver. Histological alterations in these organs were considered mild to moderate, indicating low grade toxicity, and not considered severe enough to affect function. This data was presented to the FDA and determined to be acceptable. The clinical trial with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab was approved in January 2011 and the trial opened at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in July. PMID:26213947

  17. Position on zinc delivery to olfactory nerves in intranasal insulin phase I-III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hamidovic, A

    2015-11-01

    Zinc in pancreatic insulin is essential for processing and action of the peptide, while in commercial preparations zinc promotes hexameric structure and prevents aggregate formation. In 2002, for the first time, insulin was delivered to humans intranasally with resulting cerebrospinal fluid insulin increases, but steady peripheral insulin levels. The novel method of increasing brain insulin levels without changes in the periphery resulted in an expansion of brain insulin research in clinical trials. As pre-clinical research has shown that brain insulin modulates a number functions, including food cravings and eating behavior, learning and memory functions, stress and mood regulation; realization of beneficial effects of insulin in modulating these functions in clinical populations became a possibility with the new direct-to-brain insulin delivery methodology. However, zinc, being integral to insulin structure and function, is neurotoxic, and has resulted in adverse effects to human health. In the last century, intranasal zinc was given preventively during the time of polio outbreak, and in the 21st century intranasal zinc was widely used over the counter to prevent common cold. In both cases, patients experienced partial or complete loss of smell. This paper is the first one to analyze zinc salts and concentrations of those two epidemiological adversities and directly compare formulations distributed to the public with animal toxicity data. The information gained from animal and epidemiological data provides a foundation for the formation of opinion given in this paper regarding safety of intranasal zinc in emerging clinical trials with intranasal insulin. PMID:26386292

  18. A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Rifapentine plus Moxifloxacin-Based Regimen for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Mello, Fernanda C. Q.; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Loredo, Carla; Durovni, Betina; Armstrong, Derek T.; Efron, Anne; Barnes, Grace L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Savic, Radojka M.; Dooley, Kelly E.; Cohn, Silvia; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of rifapentine and moxifloxacin administered daily with other anti-tuberculosis drugs is highly active in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy. The objective of this phase 2 clinical trial was to determine the bactericidal activity, safety, and tolerability of a regimen comprised of rifapentine, moxifloxacin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide administered daily during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Methods Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to receive either rifapentine (approximately 7.5 mg/kg) plus moxifloxacin (investigational arm), or rifampin (approximately 10 mg/kg) plus ethambutol (control) daily for 8 weeks, along with isoniazid and pyrazinamide. The primary endpoint was sputum culture status at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Results 121 participants (56% of accrual target) were enrolled. At completion of 8 weeks of treatment, negative cultures using Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium occurred in 47/60 (78%) participants in the investigational arm vs. 43/51 (84%, p = 0.47) in the control arm; negative cultures using liquid medium occurred in 37/47 (79%) in the investigational arm vs. 27/41 (66%, p = 0.23) in the control arm. Time to stable culture conversion was shorter for the investigational arm vs. the control arm using liquid culture medium (p = 0.03), but there was no difference using LJ medium. Median rifapentine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) was 313 mcg*h/mL, similar to recent studies of rifapentine dosed at 450–600 mg daily. Median moxifloxacin AUC0-24 was 28.0 mcg*h/mL, much lower than in trials where rifapentine was given only intermittently with moxifloxacin. The proportion of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiological ineligibility was higher in the investigational arm vs. the control arm (11/62 [18%] vs. 3/59 [5%], p = 0.04) although the proportions of grade 3 or higher adverse events were

  19. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  20. The performance of model-based versus rule-based phase I clinical trials in oncology : A quantitative comparison of the performance of model-based versus rule-based phase I trials with molecularly targeted anticancer drugs over the last 2 years.

    PubMed

    van Brummelen, E M J; Huitema, A D R; van Werkhoven, E; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M

    2016-06-01

    Phase I studies with anticancer drugs are used to evaluate safety and tolerability and to choose a recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Traditionally, phase I trial designs are rule-based, but for several years there is a trend towards model-based designs. Simulations have shown that model-based designs perform better, faster and are safer to establish the RP2D than rule-based designs. However, the superiority of model-based designs has never been confirmed based on true trial performance in practice. To aid evidence-based decisions for designing phase I trials, we compared publications of model-based and rule-based phase I trials in oncology. We reviewed 172 trials that have been published in the last 2 years and assessed the following operating characteristics: efficiency (trial duration, population size, dose-levels), patient safety (dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs)) and treatment optimality (percentage of patients treated below and at or above the recommended phase 2 dose). Our results showed a non-significant but clinically relevant difference in trial duration. Model-based trials needed 10 months less than rule-based trials (26 versus 36 months; p = 0.25). Additionally, fewer patients were treated at dose-levels below the RP2D (31 % versus 40 %; p = 0.73) while safety was preserved (13 % DLTs versus 14 % DLTs). In this review, we provide evidence to encourage the use of model-based designs for future phase I studies, based on a median of 10 months of time gain, acceptable toxicity rates and minimization of suboptimal treatment. PMID:26960536

  1. Phase II trial of standard versus increased transfusion volume in Ugandan children with acute severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe anemia (SA, hemoglobin <6 g/dl) is a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission in Africa, with significant in-hospital mortality. The underlying etiology is often infectious, but specific pathogens are rarely identified. Guidelines developed to encourage rational blood use recommend a standard volume of whole blood (20 ml/kg) for transfusion, but this is commonly associated with a frequent need for repeat transfusion and poor outcome. Evidence is lacking on what hemoglobin threshold criteria for intervention and volume are associated with the optimal survival outcomes. Methods We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a higher volume of whole blood (30 ml/kg; Tx30: n = 78) against the standard volume (20 ml/kg; Tx20: n = 82) in Ugandan children (median age 36 months (interquartile range (IQR) 13 to 53)) for 24-hour anemia correction (hemoglobin >6 g/dl: primary outcome) and 28-day survival. Results Median admission hemoglobin was 4.2 g/dl (IQR 3.1 to 4.9). Initial volume received followed the randomization strategy in 155 (97%) patients. By 24-hours, 70 (90%) children in the Tx30 arm had corrected SA compared to 61 (74%) in the Tx20 arm; cause-specific hazard ratio = 1.54 (95% confidence interval 1.09 to 2.18, P = 0.01). From admission to day 28 there was a greater hemoglobin increase from enrollment in Tx30 (global P <0.0001). Serious adverse events included one non-fatal allergic reaction and one death in the Tx30 arm. There were six deaths in the Tx20 arm (P = 0.12); three deaths were adjudicated as possibly related to transfusion, but none secondary to volume overload. Conclusion A higher initial transfusion volume prescribed at hospital admission was safe and resulted in an accelerated hematological recovery in Ugandan children with SA. Future testing in a large, pragmatic clinical trial to establish the effect on short and longer-term survival is warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.Gov identifier: NCT01461590

  2. Periodontal Tissue Regeneration Using Fibroblast Growth Factor -2: Randomized Controlled Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Masahiro; Nakashima, Keisuke; Kowashi, Yusuke; Fujii, Takeo; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Sasano, Takashi; Furuuchi, Toshi; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Noguchi, Toshihide; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Iwayama, Yukio; Takashiba, Shogo; Kurihara, Hidemi; Ninomiya, Masami; Kido, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Toshihiko; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa; Hara, Yoshitaka; Izumi, Yuichi; Hirofuji, Takao; Imai, Enyu; Omae, Masatoshi; Watanuki, Mitsuru; Murakami, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    Background The options for medical use of signaling molecules as stimulators of tissue regeneration are currently limited. Preclinical evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 can promote periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to clarify the activity of FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of periodontal tissue lost by periodontitis and to evaluate the safety of such stimulation. Methodology/Principal Findings We used recombinant human FGF-2 with 3% hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as vehicle and conducted a randomized double-blinded controlled trial involving 13 facilities. Subjects comprised 74 patients displaying a 2- or 3-walled vertical bone defect as measured ≥3 mm apical to the bone crest. Patients were randomly assigned to 4 groups: Group P, given HPC with no FGF-2; Group L, given HPC containing 0.03% FGF-2; Group M, given HPC containing 0.1% FGF-2; and Group H, given HPC containing 0.3% FGF-2. Each patient underwent flap operation during which we administered 200 µL of the appropriate investigational drug to the bone defect. Before and for 36 weeks following administration, patients underwent periodontal tissue inspections and standardized radiography of the region under investigation. As a result, a significant difference (p = 0.021) in rate of increase in alveolar bone height was identified between Group P (23.92%) and Group H (58.62%) at 36 weeks. The linear increase in alveolar bone height at 36 weeks in Group P and H was 0.95 mm and 1.85 mm, respectively (p = 0.132). No serious adverse events attributable to the investigational drug were identified. Conclusions Although no statistically significant differences were noted for gains in clinical attachment level and alveolar bone gain for FGF-2 groups versus Group P, the significant difference in rate of increase in alveolar bone height (p = 0.021) between Groups P and H at 36 weeks suggests that some efficacy could be expected from FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of

  3. A phase 3 tRial comparing capecitabinE in combination with SorafenIb or pLacebo for treatment of locally advanced or metastatIc HER2-Negative breast CancEr (the RESILIENCE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic/antiproliferative activity. A randomized phase 2b screening trial in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced breast cancer demonstrated a significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) when sorafenib was added to capecitabine versus placebo (median 6.4 versus 4.1 months; hazard ratio = 0.58; P = 0.001). Most drug-related adverse events were Grade 1/2 in severity with the exception of Grade 3 hand-foot skin reaction/syndrome (44% versus 14%, respectively). These results suggest a role for the combination of sorafenib and capecitabine in breast cancer and supported a phase 3 confirmatory trial. Here we describe RESILIENCE - a multinational, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial - assessing the addition of sorafenib to first- or second-line capecitabine in advanced HER2-negative breast cancer. Methods/design Eligibility criteria include ≥18 years of age, ≤1 prior chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease, and resistant to/failed taxane and anthracycline or no indication for further anthracycline. Prior treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is not allowed. Patients with significant cardiovascular disease or active brain metastases are not eligible. Patients are stratified by hormone-receptor status, geographic region, and prior metastatic chemotherapy status and randomized (1:1) to capecitabine (1000 mg/m2 orally twice daily (BID), days 1 to 14 of 21) in combination with sorafenib (orally BID, days 1 to 21, total dose 600 mg/day) or matching placebo. Capecitabine and sorafenib/placebo doses can be escalated to 1250 mg/m2 BID and 400 mg BID, respectively, as tolerated, or reduced to manage toxicity. Dose re-escalation after a reduction is allowed for sorafenib/placebo but not for capecitabine. This dosing algorithm was designed to mitigate dermatologic and other toxicity, in addition to detailed guidelines

  4. Treatment patterns of adjuvant interferon-α2b for high-risk melanoma: a retrospective study of the Grupo Español Multidisciplinar de Melanoma – Prima study

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Virtudes; Malvehy, Josep; Berrocal, Alfonso; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Quindós, María; Soria, Ainara; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Palacio, Isabel; Cerezuela, Pablo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Alonso, Lorenzo; Samaniego, Elia; Ballesteros, Ana; Puértolas, Teresa; Díaz-Beveridge, Rodrigo; de la Cruz-Merino, Luis; López Castro, Rafael; López López, Rafael; Stevinson, Kendall; del Barrio, Patricia; Tornamira, Maria V.; Guillém, Vicente; Martín-Algarra, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) has been studied extensively in clinical trials, but there have been few studies of real-world use. The aim of this study is to describe the IFN-α2b real-world patterns in patients with high-risk melanoma in Spain. This was a retrospective and multicentre chart review study of an unselected cohort of patients with melanoma at high risk for relapse (stage IIB/IIC/III) treated with IFN-α2b. Patterns were assessed in terms of dose and compliance to planned treatment. A survival analysis was carried out for the full population and according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. Of 327 patients treated with IFN-α2b, 318 received a high-dose regimen following the standard Kirkwood scheme; thus, patterns are described for this regimen. A total of 121 (38%) and 88 (28%) patients had at least one dose reduction during the induction and maintenance phases, respectively. Dose delay was required in fewer than 10% of patients. A total of 78, 40 and 38% of the patients completed the induction phase, maintenance phase and completed treatment, respectively. The median progression-free and overall survival for the full population were 3.2 and 10.5 years, respectively. There were no differences in progression-free survival and overall survival according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (31%) and fatigue (30%). High-dose IFN-α2b is the most frequently used regimen in Spain as an adjuvant systemic treatment for high-risk melanoma. Despite poor compliance, in this retrospective study, IFN-α2b treatment provided a benefit consistent with that described previously. PMID:26958991

  5. Treatment patterns of adjuvant interferon-α2b for high-risk melanoma: a retrospective study of the Grupo Español Multidisciplinar de Melanoma - Prima study.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Enrique; Soriano, Virtudes; Malvehy, Josep; Berrocal, Alfonso; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Quindós, María; Soria, Ainara; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Palacio, Isabel; Cerezuela, Pablo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Alonso, Lorenzo; Samaniego, Elia; Ballesteros, Ana; Puértolas, Teresa; Díaz-Beveridge, Rodrigo; de la Cruz-Merino, Luis; López Castro, Rafael; López López, Rafael; Stevinson, Kendall; Del Barrio, Patricia; Tornamira, Maria V; Guillém, Vicente; Martín-Algarra, Salvador

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvant interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) has been studied extensively in clinical trials, but there have been few studies of real-world use. The aim of this study is to describe the IFN-α2b real-world patterns in patients with high-risk melanoma in Spain. This was a retrospective and multicentre chart review study of an unselected cohort of patients with melanoma at high risk for relapse (stage IIB/IIC/III) treated with IFN-α2b. Patterns were assessed in terms of dose and compliance to planned treatment. A survival analysis was carried out for the full population and according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. Of 327 patients treated with IFN-α2b, 318 received a high-dose regimen following the standard Kirkwood scheme; thus, patterns are described for this regimen. A total of 121 (38%) and 88 (28%) patients had at least one dose reduction during the induction and maintenance phases, respectively. Dose delay was required in fewer than 10% of patients. A total of 78, 40 and 38% of the patients completed the induction phase, maintenance phase and completed treatment, respectively. The median progression-free and overall survival for the full population were 3.2 and 10.5 years, respectively. There were no differences in progression-free survival and overall survival according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (31%) and fatigue (30%). High-dose IFN-α2b is the most frequently used regimen in Spain as an adjuvant systemic treatment for high-risk melanoma. Despite poor compliance, in this retrospective study, IFN-α2b treatment provided a benefit consistent with that described previously. PMID:26958991

  6. Phase II trial of whole-cell pertussis vaccine vs an acellular vaccine containing agglutinogens.

    PubMed

    Miller, E; Ashworth, L A; Robinson, A; Waight, P A; Irons, L I

    1991-01-12

    An acellular pertussis vaccine containing agglutinogens 2 and 3, pertussis toxin, and filamentous haemagglutinin was developed by the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research in the UK. 188 infants were entered into a randomised blind trial and received either the acellular or a whole-cell vaccine, combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, in a 3, 5, and 8-10 month schedule. Local reactions were similar in the two groups but significantly fewer infants had systemic symptoms after the acellular vaccine. Mean log-antibody titres to the agglutinogen and toxin components were higher with the acellular than with the whole-cell vaccine. Persistence of antibodies one year after the third dose was also better in the acellular group. PMID:1670725

  7. Phase I/II Trial of Imatinib and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Melanoma and Other Advanced Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Betty K.; Rosen, Mark A.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gallagher, Maryann; Chen, Helen; Sehgal, Chandra; O’Dwyer, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor signaling in the tumor microenvironment appear to cooperate in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a phase I trial combining bevacizumab (i.v. every 2 weeks) and imatinib (oral daily). Once a recommended phase II dose combination was established, a phase II trial was initiated in patients with metastatic melanoma. A Simon 2-stage design was used with 23 patients required in the first stage and 41 patients in total should the criteria to proceed be met. We required that 50% of the patients be progression-free at 16 weeks. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and power Doppler ultrasonography were performed in patients with metastatic tumors amenable to imaging with these methods at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results. A total of 17 patients were accrued to 4 dose and combination levels. Bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks could be safely combined with imatinib 800 mg daily. Common toxicities included fatigue, nausea, vomiting, edema, proteinuria, and anemia, but were not commonly severe. A total of 23 patients with metastatic melanoma (48% with American Joint Commission on Cancer stage M1c; median age, 63 years) were enrolled in the first stage of phase II. The 16-week progression-free survival rate was 35%, leading to termination of phase II after the first stage. In the small subset of patients who remained on study with lesions evaluable by DCE-MRI, significant decreases in tumor vascular permeability were noted, despite early disease progression using the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors. Conclusion. Bevacizumab and imatinib can be safely combined at the maximum doses used for each agent. We did not observe significant clinical activity with this regimen in melanoma patients. Implications for Practice: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted antiangiogenic therapy has proven clinical efficacy as a

  8. DNA Priming for Seasonal Influenza Vaccine: A Phase 1b Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bellamy, Abbie R.; Belshe, Robert; Bernstein, David I.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Patel, Shital M.; Renehan, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad; Schwartz, Richard; Koup, Richard; Bailer, Robert T.; Yamshchikov, Galina V.; Enama, Mary E.; Sarwar, Uzma; Larkin, Brenda; Graham, Barney S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of current influenza vaccines is limited in vulnerable populations. DNA vaccines can be produced rapidly, and may offer a potential strategy to improve vaccine immunogenicity, indicated by studies with H5 influenza DNA vaccine prime followed by inactivated vaccine boost. Methods Four sites enrolled healthy adults, randomized to receive 2011/12 seasonal influenza DNA vaccine prime (n=65) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (n=66) administered intramuscularly with Biojector. All subjects received the 2012/13 seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine, trivalent (IIV3) 36 weeks after the priming injection. Vaccine safety and tolerability was the primary objective and measurement of antibody response by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) was the secondary objective. Results The DNA vaccine prime-IIV3 boost regimen was safe and well tolerated. Significant differences in HAI responses between the DNA vaccine prime and the PBS prime groups were not detected in this study. Conclusion While DNA priming significantly improved the response to a conventional monovalent H5 vaccine in a previous study, it was not effective in adults using seasonal influenza strains, possibly due to pre-existing immunity to the prime, unmatched prime and boost antigens, or the lengthy 36 week boost interval. Careful optimization of the DNA prime-IIV3 boost regimen as related to antigen matching, interval between vaccinations, and pre-existing immune responses to influenza is likely to be needed in further evaluations of this vaccine strategy. In particular, testing this concept in younger age groups with less prior exposure to seasonal influenza strains may be informative. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01498718 PMID:25950433

  9. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  10. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial: an analysis of the interventions related with the oximeter readings

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen; Cabañas, Fernando; López-Ortego, Paloma; Sanchez, Laura; Ybarra, Marta; Dempsey, Eugene; Greisen, Gorm; Austin, Topun; Claris, Olivier; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Lemmers, Petra; Pichler, Gerhard; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; van Bel, Frank; Wolf, Martin; Pellicer, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Background The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. Aims To analyse rStO2-alarm-related clinical decisions and their heterogeneity in the NIRS experimental group (NIRS monitoring visible) and their impact on rStO2 and SpO2. Methods Continuous data from NIRS devices and the alarms (area under the curve of the rStO2 out of range had accumulated 0.2%h during 10 min), clinical data at discrete time points and interventions prompted by the alarms were recorded. Results Sixty-seven infants had data that fulfilled the requirements for this analysis. 1107 alarm episodes were analysed. The alarm triggered a treatment guideline intervention in 25% of the cases; the type of intervention chosen varied among clinical sites. More than 55% of alarms were not followed by an intervention (‘No action’); additionally, in 5% of alarms the rStO2 value apparently was considered non-reliable and the sensor was repositioned. The percentage of unresolved alarms at 30 min after ‘No action’ almost doubled the treatment guideline intervention (p<0.001). Changes in peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), were observed only after treatment guideline interventions. Conclusions This study shows that 25% of rStO2 alarms were followed by a clinical intervention determined by the treatment guideline. However, the rStO2 and SpO2 returned to normal ranges after the intervention, supporting the notion that decisions taken by the clinicians were appropriate. Trial registration number ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01590316. PMID:26645538

  11. Phase II clinical trial of ex vivo-expanded cytokine-induced killer cells therapy in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2014-09-01

    Second-line chemotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer has shown disappointing survival outcomes due to rapid disease progression and performance deterioration. The aim of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adoptive immunotherapy using ex vivo-expanded, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who showed disease progression during gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. For generation of CIK cells, peripheral blood samples were collected from each patient and cultured with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody and IL-2. Patients received CIK cells intravenously 10 times, every week for 5 weeks and then every other week for 10 weeks. Twenty patients were enrolled between November 2009 and September 2010. The disease control rate was 25 % (4/16 patients). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 11.0 weeks (95 % CI 8.8-13.2), and the median overall survival (OS) was 26.6 weeks (95 % CI 8.6-44.6). Grade 3 toxicities included general weakness in two patients and thrombocytopenia in one patient. Grade 4 hematologic or non-hematologic toxicity was not observed. Patients showed improvement in pancreatic pain, gastrointestinal distress, jaundice, body image alterations, altered bowel habits, health satisfaction, and sexuality when assessing quality of life (QoL). Adoptive immunotherapy using CIK cells showed comparable PFS and OS to survival data of previous trials that assessed conventional chemotherapies while maintaining tolerability and showing encouraging results in terms of patient QoL in gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer (clinicalTrials.gov number NCT00965718). PMID:24916038

  12. Results of a Randomized Phase I Gene Therapy Clinical Trial of Nononcolytic Fowlpox Viruses Encoding T Cell Costimulatory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Won; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; DeRaffele, Gail; Jagoda, Michael C.; Broucek, Joseph R.; Zloza, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic viruses have shown promise as gene delivery vehicles in the treatment of cancer; however, their efficacy may be inhibited by the induction of anti-viral antibody titers. Fowlpox virus is a nonreplicating and nononcolytic vector that has been associated with lesser humoral but greater cell-mediated immunity in animal tumor models. To test whether fowlpox virus gene therapy is safe and can elicit immune responses in patients with cancer, we conducted a randomized phase I clinical trial of two recombinant fowlpox viruses encoding human B7.1 or a triad of costimulatory molecules (B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3; TRICOM). Twelve patients (10 with melanoma and 2 with colon adenocarcinoma) enrolled in the trial and were randomized to rF-B7.1 or rF-TRICOM administered in a dose escalation manner (∼3.7×107 or ∼3.7×108 plaque-forming units) by intralesional injection every 4 weeks. The therapy was well tolerated, with only four patients experiencing grade 1 fever or injection site pain, and there were no serious adverse events. All patients developed anti-viral antibody titers after vector delivery, and posttreatment anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody titers were detected in the two patients with colon cancer. All patients developed CD8+ T cell responses against fowlpox virus, but few responses against defined tumor-associated antigens were observed. This is the first clinical trial of direct (intratumoral) gene therapy with a nononcolytic fowlpox virus. Treatment was well tolerated in patients with metastatic cancer; all subjects exhibited anti-viral antibody responses, but limited tumor-specific T cell responses were detected. Nononcolytic fowlpox viruses are safe and induce limited T cell responses in patients with cancer. Further development may include prime–boost strategies using oncolytic viruses for initial priming. PMID:24484178

  13. Rituximab in the Treatment of Refractory Adult and Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Adult Polymyositis: A Randomized, Placebo-phase Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G.; Ascherman, Dana P.; Levesque, Marc C.; Barohn, Richard J.; Feldman, Brian M.; Harris-Love, Michael O.; Koontz, Diane C.; Fertig, Noreen; Kelley, Stephanie S.; Pryber, Sherrie L.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rockette, Howard E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of rituximab in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-phase, trial of adult and pediatric myositis. Methods Adults with refractory polymyositis and adults and children with refractory dermatomyositis were enrolled. Entry criteria included muscle weakness and ≥2 additional abnormal core set measures (CSM) for adults. JDM patients required ≥ 3 abnormal CSM with or without muscle weakness. Patients were randomized to either ‘rituximab early’ or ‘rituximab late’ and glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive therapy were allowed at entry. The primary endpoint compared the time to achieve the preliminary International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group definition of improvement (DOI) between the 2 groups. The secondary endpoints were time to achieve ≥20% improvement in muscle strength, and the proportion of early and late rituximab patients achieving DOI at week 8. Results Among 200 randomized patients (76 PM/76 DM/48 JDM), 195 showed no difference in the time to DOI between the rituximab late (n=102) and rituximab early (n=93) groups (p=0.74, log rank) with a median time to DOI of 20.2 weeks and 20.0 weeks respectively. The secondary endpoints also did not significantly differ between the two treatment groups. However, 161 (83%) of randomized patients met the DOI and individual CSM improved in both groups throughout the 44-week trial. Conclusion Although there were no significant differences in the two treatment arms for the primary and secondary endpoints, 83% of refractory adult and juvenile myositis patients met the DOI. The role of B cell depleting therapies in myositis warrants further study with consideration for a different trial design. PMID:23124935

  14. Phase I clinical trial with IL-2-transfected xenogeneic cells administered in subcutaneous metastatic tumours: clinical and immunological findings

    PubMed Central

    Tartour, E; Mehtali, M; Sastre-Garau, X; Joyeux, I; Mathiot, C; Pleau, J M; Squiban, P; Rochlitz, C; Courtney, M; Jantscheff, P; Herrmann, R; Pouillart, P; Fridman, W H; Dorval, T

    2000-01-01

    Various studies have emphasized an immunodepression state observed at the tumour site. To reverse this defect and based upon animal studies, we initiated a phase I clinical trial of gene therapy in which various doses of xenogeneic monkey fibroblasts (Vero cells) genetically engineered to produce human IL-2 were administered intratumorally in 8 patients with metastatic solid tumours. No severe adverse effect was observed in the 8 patients analysed during this clinical trial even in the highest dose (5 ¥ 107 cells) group. This absence of toxicity seems to be associated with rapid elimination of Vero-IL-2 cells from the organism. Indeed, exogenous IL-2 mRNA could no longer be detected in the peripheral whole blood 48 hours after Vero-IL-2 cell administration. In addition, we did not find any expression of exogenous IL-2 mRNA in post-therapeutic lesions removed 29 days after the start of therapy. A major finding of this trial concerns the two histological responses of two treated subcutaneous nodules not associated with an apparent clinical response. The relationship between local treatment and tumour regression was supported by replacement of tumour cells by inflammatory cells in regressing lesions and marked induction of T and natural killer cell derived cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IFNg …) in post-therapeutic lesions analysed 28 days after the start of Vero-IL-2 administration. Gene therapy using xenogeneic cells as vehicle may therefore present certain advantages over other vectors, such as its complete absence of toxicity. Furthermore, the in vivo biological effect of immunostimulatory genes, i.e IL-2-, may be potentiated by the xenogeneic rejection reaction. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076653

  15. Amyloid-β 11C-PiB-PET imaging results from 2 randomized bapineuzumab phase 3 AD trials

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mark E.; Margolin, Richard; Sperling, Reisa; Koeppe, Robert; Mason, Neale S.; Klunk, William E.; Mathis, Chester A.; Salloway, Stephen; Fox, Nick C.; Hill, Derek L.; Les, Andrea S.; Collins, Peter; Gregg, Keith M.; Di, Jianing; Lu, Yuan; Tudor, I. Cristina; Wyman, Bradley T.; Booth, Kevin; Broome, Stephanie; Yuen, Eric; Grundman, Michael; Brashear, H. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of bapineuzumab on brain β-amyloid (Aβ) burden using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB)-PET. Methods: Two phase 3 clinical trials, 1 each in apolipoprotein APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers, were conducted in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease dementia. Bapineuzumab, an anti-Aβ monoclonal antibody, or placebo, was administered by IV infusion every 13 weeks for 78 weeks. PET substudies assessed change in brain fibrillar Aβ over 71 weeks using an 11C-PiB-PET standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) global cortical average (GCA) comprising the average SUVr from 5 cortical regions of interest with cerebellar gray matter as the reference region. Results: A total of 115 carriers and 39 noncarriers were analyzed. The difference (δ) in mean baseline to 71 week change in 11C-PiB-PET GCA between bapineuzumab and placebo was significant in carriers (0.5 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.101; p = 0.004) and in pooled analyses of both carriers and noncarriers (0.5 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.068; p = 0.027; 1.0 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.133; p = 0.028) but not in the noncarrier trial separately. Analyses by individual region of interest and in mild disease yielded findings similar to the main trial results. Conclusions: The 11C-PiB-PET imaging results demonstrated reduction of fibrillar Aβ accumulation in patients with Alzheimer disease treated with bapineuzumab; however, as no clinical benefit was observed, the findings are consistent with the hypotheses that bapineuzumab may not have been initiated early enough in the disease course, the doses were insufficient, or the most critical Aβ species were inadequately targeted. PMID:26208959

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for non-small-cell lung cancer: A phase II trial and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YOKOUCHI, HIROSHI; KANAZAWA, KENYA; ISHIDA, TAKASHI; OIZUMI, SATOSHI; SHINAGAWA, NAOFUMI; SUKOH, NORIAKI; HARADA, MASAO; OGURA, SHIGEAKI; MUNAKATA, MITSURU; DOSAKA-AKITA, HIROTOSHI; ISOBE, HIROSHI; NISHIMURA, MASAHARU

    2014-01-01

    Several preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are efficient for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, two recent phase III clinical trials using COX-2 inhibitors in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Thus, validation and discussion regarding the usefulness of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC are required. We conducted a prospective trial using COX-2 inhibitors for the treatment of 50 NSCLC patients accrued between April, 2005 and July, 2006. Patients with untreated advanced NSCLC received oral meloxicam (150 mg daily), carboplatin (area under the curve = 5 mg/ml × min on day 1) and docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on day 1) every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was response rate. The response and disease control rates were 36.0 and 76.0%, respectively. The time-to-progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 5.7 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.6–6.7] and 13.7 months (95% CI: 11.4–15.9), respectively. The 1-year survival ratio was 56.0%. Grade 3 neuropathy was observed in only 1 patient. We performed tumor immunohistochemistry for COX-2 and p27 and investigated the correlation between their expression and clinical outcome. COX-2 expression in the tumor tended to correlate with a higher response rate (50.0% in the high- and 18.2% in the low-COX-2 group; P=0.092). Based on our results and previous reports, various trial designs, such as the prospective use of COX-2 inhibitors only for patients with COX-2-positive NSCLC, including the exploratory analysis of biomarkers associated with the COX-2 pathway, may be worth further consideration. PMID:25054040

  17. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: FULL SCALE ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR FIELD TRIAL: PHASE I, VERIFICATION TRIAL BURN ON DIOXIN/HERBICIDE ORANGE CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study reports on the results of one of a series of field trials using various remedial action technologies that may be capable of restoring Herbicide Orange (HO)XDioxin contaminated sites. A full-scale field trial using a rotary kiln incinerator capable of pro...

  18. Divided attention can enhance early-phase memory encoding: the attentional boost effect and study trial duration.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Spataro, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Divided attention during encoding typically produces marked reductions in later memory. The attentional boost effect (ABE) is a surprising variation on this phenomenon. In this paradigm, each study stimulus (e.g., a word) is presented along with a target or a distractor (e.g., different colored circles) in a detection task. Later memory is better for stimuli co-occurring with targets. The present experiments indicate that the ABE arises during an early phase of memory encoding that involves initial stimulus perception and comprehension rather than at a later phase entailing controlled, elaborative rehearsal. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the ABE was robust at a short study duration (700 ms) and did not increase with increasing study trial durations (1,500 ms and 4,000 ms). Furthermore, the target condition is boosted to the level of memory performance in a full-attention condition for the short duration but not the long duration. Both results followed from the early-phase account. This account also predicts that for very short study times (limiting the influence of late-phase controlled encoding and thus minimizing the usual negative effect of divided attention), the target condition will produce better memory than will the full-attention condition. Experiment 2 used a study time of 400 ms and found that words presented with targets lead to greater recognition accuracy than do either words presented with distractors or words in the full-attention condition. Consistent with the early-phase account, a divided attention condition actually produced superior memory than did the full-attention condition, a very unusual but theoretically predicted result. PMID:25181494

  19. Treatment Extension of Pegylated Interferon Alpha and Ribavirin Does Not Improve SVR in Patients with Genotypes 2/3 without Rapid Virological Response (OPTEX Trial): A Prospective, Randomized, Two-Arm, Multicentre Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Heidrich, Benjamin; Cordes, Hans-Jörg; Klinker, Hartwig; Möller, Bernd; Naumann, Uwe; Rössle, Martin; Kraus, Michael R.; Böker, Klaus H.; Roggel, Christoph; Schuchmann, Marcus; Stoehr, Albrecht; Trein, Andreas; Hardtke, Svenja; Gonnermann, Andrea; Koch, Armin; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P.; Cornberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Although sofosbuvir has been approved for patients with genotypes 2/3 (G2/3), many parts of the world still consider pegylated Interferon alpha (P) and ribavirin (R) as standard of care for G2/3. Patients with rapid virological response (RVR) show response rates >80%. However, SVR (sustained virological response) in non-RVR patients is not satisfactory. Longer treatment duration may be required but evidence from prospective trials are lacking. A total of 1006 chronic HCV genotype 2/3 patients treated with P/R were recruited into a German HepNet multicenter screening registry. Of those, only 226 patients were still HCV RNA positive at week 4 (non-RVR). Non-RVR patients with ongoing response after 24 weeks P-2b/R qualified for OPTEX, a randomized trial investigating treatment extension of additional 24 weeks (total 48 weeks, Group A) or additional 12 weeks (total 36 weeks, group B) of 1.5 μg/kg P-2b and 800-1400 mg R. Due to the low number of patients without RVR, the number of 150 anticipated study patients was not met and only 99 non-RVR patients (n=50 Group A, n=49 Group B) could be enrolled into the OPTEX trial. Baseline factors did not differ between groups. Sixteen patients had G2 and 83 patients G3. Based on the ITT (intention-to-treat) analysis, 68% [55%; 81%] in Group A and 57% [43%; 71%] in Group B achieved SVR (p= 0.31). The primary endpoint of better SVR rates in Group A compared to a historical control group (SVR 70%) was not met. In conclusion, approximately 23% of G2/3 patients did not achieve RVR in a real world setting. However, subsequent recruitment in a treatment-extension study was difficult. Prolonged therapy beyond 24 weeks did not result in higher SVR compared to a historical control group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803309 PMID:26057627

  20. HUMAN CYTOSOLIC SULFOTRANSFERASE 2B1: ISOFORM EXPRESSION, TISSUE SPECIFICITY AND SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Falany, C.N.; He, D.; Dumas, N.; Frost, A.R.; Falany, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfation is an important Phase II conjugation reaction involved in the synthesis and metabolism of steroids in humans. Two different isoforms (2B1a and 2B1b) are encoded by the sulfotransferase (SULT) 2B1 gene utilizing different start sites of transcription resulting in the incorporation of different first exons. SULT2B1a and SULT2B1b are 350 and 365 amino acids in length, respectively, and the last 342 aa are identical. Message for both SULT2B1 isoforms is present in human tissues although SULT2B1b message is generally more abundant. However, to date only SULT2B1b protein has been detected in human tissues or cell lines. SULT2B1b is localized in the cytosol and/or nuclei of human cells. A unique 3′-extension of SULT2B1b is required for nuclear localization in human BeWo placental choriocarcinoma cells. Nuclear localization is stimulated by forskolin treatment in BeWo cells and serine phosphorylation has been identified in the 3′-extension. SULT2B1b is selective for the sulfation of 3β-hydroxysteroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone, and may also have a role in cholesterol sulfation in human skin. The substrate specificity, nuclear localization, and tissue localization of SULT2B1b suggest a role in regulating the responsiveness of cells to adrenal androgens via their direct inactivation or by preventing their conversion to more potent androgens and estrogens. PMID:17055258

  1. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  2. Efficacy of thalidomide for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a phase II open label clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stommel, Elijah W; Cohen, Jeffrey A; Fadul, Camilo E; Cogbill, Christopher H; Graber, David J; Kingman, Linda; Mackenzie, Todd; Channon Smith, Jacqueline Y; Harris, Brent T

    2009-01-01

    Neuroinflammation through the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We conducted a preliminary phase II trial of thalidomide, which reduces levels of TNF-alpha pre-transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally in vivo and has been shown to prolong disease duration and extend the lifespan of transgenic animal models of ALS. Patients who met diagnostic criteria for ALS received thalidomide at escalating doses to a target dose of 400 mg/day. The primary endpoints in the trial were the ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS) and pulmonary function testing (PFT) curves after nine months of thalidomide treatment that were compared to historical controls. Secondary endpoints were: survival stratified for newly diagnosed and progressive disease, toxicity, quality of life, and serum cytokine measurements. Twenty-three patients were enrolled, but only 18 were evaluable for the primary outcome. There was no improvement in the ALSFRS or PFT compared to historical controls. Thalidomide had several side-effects in our ALS patients. There was no significant shift in cytokine profile after treatment compared to baseline. In conclusion, treatment of ALS with the TNF-alpha inhibitor, thalidomide, does not appear to effectively modulate disease progression and can cause adverse effects. PMID:19922130

  3. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  4. Potential surrogate endpoints for overall survival in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an analysis of a phase III randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Wen-Na; Liang, Shao-Bo; Zong, Jing-Feng; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Tang, Ling-Long; Li, Wen-Fei; Liu, Xu; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Liu, Meng-Zhong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard endpoint in trials of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is overall survival (OS). Using data from a phase III randomized trial, we evaluated whether progression-free survival (PFS), failure-free survival (FFS), distant failure-free survival (D-FFS) or locoregional failure-free survival (LR-FFS) could be reliable surrogate endpoints for OS. Between July 2002 and September 2005, 316 eligible patients with stage III-IVB NPC were randomly assigned to receive either radiotherapy alone or chemoradiotherapy. 2- and 3-year PFS, FFS, D-FFS, and LR-FFS were tested as surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS using Prentice’s four criteria. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the strength of the associations. After a median follow-up time of 5.8 years, 2- and 3-year D-FFS and LR-FFS were not significantly different between treatment arms, in rejection of Prentice’s second criterion. Being consistent with all Prentice’s criteria, 2- and 3-year PFS and FFS were valid surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS; the rank correlation coefficient was highest (0.84) between 3-year PFS and 5-year OS. In conclusion, PFS and FFS at 2 and 3 years may be candidate surrogate endpoints for OS at 5 years; 3-year PFS may be more appropriate for early assessment of long-term survival. PMID:26219568

  5. First-in-Human Phase 1 Trial of Agarose Beads Containing Murine RENCA Cells in Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barry H.; Parikh, Tapan; Andrada, Zoe P.; Fahey, Thomas J.; Berman, Nathaniel; Wiles, Madeline; Nazarian, Angelica; Thomas, Joanne; Arreglado, Anna; Akahoho, Eugene; Wolf, David J.; Levine, Daniel M.; Parker, Thomas S.; Gazda, Lawrence S.; Ocean, Allyson J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Agarose macrobeads containing mouse renal adenocarcinoma cells (RMBs) release factors, suppressing the growth of cancer cells and prolonging survival in spontaneous or induced tumor animals, mediated, in part, by increased levels of myocyte-enhancing factor (MEF2D) via EGFR-and AKT-signaling pathways. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of RMBs in advanced, treatment-resistant metastatic cancers, and then its efficacy (survival), which is the secondary objective. METHODS Thirty-one patients underwent up to four intraperitoneal implantations of RMBs (8 or 16 macrobeads/kg) via laparoscopy in this single-arm trial (FDA BB-IND 10091; NCT 00283075). Serial physical examinations, laboratory testing, and PET-CT imaging were performed before and three months after each implant. RESULTS RMBs were well tolerated at both dose levels (mean 660.9 per implant). AEs were (Grade 1/2) with no treatment-related SAEs. CONCLUSION The data support the safety of RMB therapy in advanced-malignancy patients, and the preliminary evidence for their potential efficacy is encouraging. A Phase 2 efficacy trial is ongoing. PMID:27499645

  6. A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Melodi Javid; Cardona, Diana M; Lazarides, Alexander L; Spasojevic, Ivan; Ferrer, Jorge M; Cahill, Joan; Lee, Chang-Lung; Snuderl, Matija; Blazer, Dan G; Hwang, E Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A; Mosca, Paul J; Mito, Jeffrey K; Cuneo, Kyle C; Larrier, Nicole A; O'Reilly, Erin K; Riedel, Richard F; Eward, William C; Strasfeld, David B; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Lee, W David; Griffith, Linda G; Bawendi, Moungi G; Kirsch, David G; Brigman, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence is a common cause of treatment failure for patients with solid tumors. Intraoperative detection of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed could be used to decrease the risk of a positive surgical margin, reduce rates of reexcision, and tailor adjuvant therapy. We used a protease-activated fluorescent imaging probe, LUM015, to detect cancer in vivo in a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and ex vivo in a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial. In mice, intravenous injection of LUM015 labeled tumor cells, and residual fluorescence within the tumor bed predicted local recurrence. In 15 patients with STS or breast cancer, intravenous injection of LUM015 before surgery was well tolerated. Imaging of resected human tissues showed that fluorescence from tumor was significantly higher than fluorescence from normal tissues. LUM015 biodistribution, pharmacokinetic profiles, and metabolism were similar in mouse and human subjects. Tissue concentrations of LUM015 and its metabolites, including fluorescently labeled lysine, demonstrated that LUM015 is selectively distributed to tumors where it is activated by proteases. Experiments in mice with a constitutively active PEGylated fluorescent imaging probe support a model where tumor-selective probe distribution is a determinant of increased fluorescence in cancer. These co-clinical studies suggest that the tumor specificity of protease-activated imaging probes, such as LUM015, is dependent on both biodistribution and enzyme activity. Our first-in-human data support future clinical trials of LUM015 and other protease-sensitive probes. PMID:26738797

  7. Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles and Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Melanoma Metastases: Proof of Concept before Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Detappe, Alexandre; Lux, François; Appaix, Florence; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Tran, Vu-Long; Plissonneau, Marie; Gehan, Hélène; Lefranc, Florence; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Verry, Camille; Berbeco, Ross; Tillement, Olivier; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles containing high-Z elements are known to boost the efficacy of radiation therapy. Gadolinium (Gd) is particularly attractive because this element is also a positive contrast agent for MRI, which allows for the simultaneous use of imaging to guide the irradiation and to delineate the tumor. In this study, we used the Gd-based nanoparticles, AGuIX®. After intravenous injection into animals bearing B16F10 tumors, some nanoparticles remained inside the tumor cells for more than 24 hours, indicating that a single administration of nanoparticles might be sufficient for several irradiations. Combining AGuIX® with radiation therapy increases tumor cell death, and improves the life spans of animals bearing multiple brain melanoma metastases. These results provide preclinical proof-of-concept for a phase I clinical trial. PMID:26909115

  8. A comparative study of adaptive dose-finding designs for phase I oncology trials of combination therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Wages, Nolan A.; Sato, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the relative performance of competing model-based dose-finding methods for combination phase I trials. In this study, we focused on five model-based dose-finding methods that have been recently developed. We compared the recommendation rates for true maximum-tolerated dose combinations (MTDCs) and over-dose combinations among these methods under 16 scenarios for 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 2 × 4, and 3 × 5 dose combination matrices. We found that performance of the model-based dose-finding methods varied depending on (1) whether the dose combination matrix is square or not; (2) whether the true MTDCs exist within the same group along the diagonals of the dose combination matrix; and (3) the number of true MTDCs. We discuss the details of the operating characteristics and the advantages and disadvantages of the five methods compared. PMID:25974405

  9. Effects of treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor in tumors based on 15 phase II clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Lu, Mingjie; Yao, Mengqian; Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp)90 serves as a chaperone protein that promotes the proper folding of proteins involved in a variety of signal transduction processes involved in cell growth. Hsp90 inhibitors, which inhibit the activity of critical client proteins, have emerged as the accessory therapeutic agents for multiple human cancer types. To better understand the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors in cancer treatment, the present study reviewed 15 published phase II clinical trials to investigate whether Hsp90 inhibitors will benefit patients with cancer. Information of complete response, partial response, stable disease, objective response and objective response rate was collected to evaluate clinical outcomes. Overall, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective against a variety of oncogene-addicted cancers, including those that have developed resistance to specific receptors.

  10. PHASE II AIDS MALIGNANCY CONSORTIUM TRIAL OF TOPICAL HALOFUGINONE IN AIDS-RELATED KAPOSI’S SARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Henry B.; Fingleton, Barbara; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Geyer, Julia T.; Cesarman, Ethel; Parise, Robert A.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Dezube, Bruce J.; Aboulafia, David; Krown, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Using a novel blinded intra-patient vehicle control design, we conducted a phase II study of topically-administered halofuginone, an angiogenesis inhibitor that inhibits collagen type-I and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in patients with AIDS-related Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). Serial KS biopsies assessed treatment effects on angiogenic factors and KSHV-LANA. We observed marked heterogeneity of KSHV-LANA expression. Although the small number of subjects whose response could be evaluated precluded definitive assessment of halofuginone’s efficacy, we observed a significant decrease in type-I collagen only in halofuginone-treated lesions, but no effect on MMP-2. The trial design is applicable to future studies of topical agents. PMID:21068672

  11. Phase III trial comparing two low dose rates in brachytherapy of cervix carcinoma: Report at two years

    SciTech Connect

    Lambin, P.; Gerbaulet, A.; Kramer, A.; Haie-Meder, C.; Malaise, E.P.; Chassagne, D. ); Scalliet, P. )

    1993-02-15

    This Phase III randomized trial examined the effect of two low dose rates (0.73 or 0.38 Gy[center dot]h[sup [minus]1]) on the local control, survival, relapse-free survival, complications, and secondary effects in the treatment of cervical cancers. A total of 204 Stage Ib or II cervical carcinoma patients were included between January 1985 and September 1988. Treatment consisted of uterovaginal [sup 137]Cs irradiation followed by surgery. The two groups were similar for age, tumor stage and medical or surgical history. Their brachytherapy parameters were also similar (60 Gy pear dimensions, dose to critical organs, total kerma, etc....). There were no differences in the short-term effects or therapeutic outcome. However, overall complications and side effects observed after 6 months were significantly more frequent (p < 0.01) in the higher dose rate group. 40 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Randomized phase 1b trial of MOR103, a human antibody to GM-CSF, in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Aliya; Fryze, Waldemar; Kozubski, Wojciech; Wagner, Frank; Aram, Jehan; Tanasescu, Radu; Korolkiewicz, Roman P.; Dirnberger-Hertweck, Maren; Steidl, Stefan; Libretto, Susan E.; Sprenger, Till; Radue, Ernst W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and immunogenicity of the recombinant human monoclonal antibody MOR103 to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) with clinical or MRI activity. Methods: In this 20-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1b dose-escalation trial (registration number NCT01517282), adults with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) received an IV infusion of placebo (n = 6) or MOR103 0.5 (n = 8), 1.0 (n = 8), or 2.0 (n = 9) mg/kg every 2 weeks for 10 weeks. Patients had to have ≤10 gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing brain lesions on T1-weighted MRI at baseline. The primary objective was safety. Results: Most treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were mild to moderate in severity. The most frequent was nasopharyngitis. Between-group differences in TEAE numbers were small. There were no TEAE-related trial discontinuations, infusion-related reactions, or deaths. Nine patients experienced MS exacerbations: 3, 5, 1, and 0 patient(s) in the placebo, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg groups, respectively. A few T1 Gd-enhancing lesions and/or new or enlarging T2 lesions indicative of inflammation were observed in all treatment groups. No clinically significant changes were observed in other clinical assessments or laboratory safety assessments. No anti-MOR103 antibodies were detected. PK evaluations indicated dose linearity with low/no drug accumulation over time. Conclusions: MOR103 was generally well-tolerated in patients with RRMS or SPMS. No evidence of immunogenicity was found. Classification of evidence: This phase 1b study provides Class I evidence that MOR103 has acceptable tolerability in patients with MS. PMID:26185773

  13. A Phase I study of olaparib and irinotecan in patients with colorectal cancer: Canadian Cancer Trials Group IND 187.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric X; Jonker, Derek J; Siu, Lillian L; McKeever, Karyn; Keller, Deborah; Wells, Julie; Hagerman, Linda; Seymour, Lesley

    2016-08-01

    Background Olaparib is an orally available inhibitor of PARP-1. In pre-clinical studies, olaparib was shown to potentiate anti-tumor effects of irinotecan in colon cancer cell lines. This phase I study was conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of olaparib in combination with irinotecan. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced colorectal cancer whose disease progressed after at least one systemic therapy regimen were enrolled. Dose escalation and de-escalation were based on toxicity assessment. Pharmacokinetic samples were collected in Cycle 1 for olaparib, irinotecan and SN-38. Results Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 11 patients on a schedule of continuous olaparib and irinotecan every 3 weeks (Part A) and 14 patients on a schedule of intermittent olaparib and irinotecan every 2 weeks (Part B). Continuous olaparib administration was associated with higher than expected toxicities and was not considered to be tolerable. Intermittent olaparib administration was better tolerated, and the recommended phase 2 doses were olaparib 50 mg p.o twice daily days 1-5 and irinotecan 125 mg/m(2) i.v. every 2 weeks. Common toxicities included fatigue, anorexia, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and abdominal pain. Nine patients had stable disease as the best response, 2 from Part A (3 and 9 months respectively), and 7 from Part B (median duration: 7.4 months; range: 4 to 13 months). There was no pharmacokinetic interaction between olaparib and irinotecan. Conclusions Olaparib can be combined with irinotecan if administered intermittently. Both olaparib and irinotecan required significant dose reductions. The lack of anti-tumor efficacy observed in this trial makes this combination of little interest for further clinical development. Trial Registration ID NCT00535353. PMID:27075016

  14. Phase II trial of temozolomide and reirradiation using conformal 3D-radiotherapy in recurrent brain gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This phase II trial was designed to assess the response rate, survival benefits and toxicity profile of temozolomide, and brain reirradiation using conformal radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of recurrent high grade glioma. Design Open-label phase II trial. Patients Twenty-nine patients had been enrolled in the study between February 2006 and June 2009. Patients had to show unequivocal evidence of tumour recurrence on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after failing conventional RT with or without temozolomide and surgery for initial disease. Histology included recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme. Interventions Patients were treated by temozolomide at a dose of 200 mg/m2/day for chemonaïve patients, and at a dose of 150 mg/m2/day to previously treated patients, for 4-5 cycles. Then, patients underwent reirradiation by conformal RT at a dose of 30-40 Gy by conventional fractionation. Main outcome measures The primary end point of the study was response. The secondary end points included survival benefit. Results All the 29 patients were treated with temozolomide and reirradiation. Two patients achieved complete remission (CR), 4 achieved partial remission (PR), with an overall objective response rate of 20.6%, and further 10 patients had stable disease (SD), with a SD rate of 34.4%. The mean progression free survival (PFS) was 10.1 months, and the mean overall survival (OS) was 11.4 months. Additionally, treatment significantly improved quality of life (QOL). Treatment was tolerated well with mild grade 1, 2 nausea/vomiting in 40% of cycles, and mild grade 1, 2 haematological toxicities (neutropenia/thrombocytoprnia) in 8.6% of cycles. Conclusions Temozolomide and conformal RT had an anti-tumor activity in recurrent high grade glioma, and represented a good treatment hope for patients with recurrent brain glioma. PMID:25333019

  15. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2: HLA-DR(+) NK cell levels correlate with disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Flament, Caroline; Locher, Clara; Desbois, Mélanie; Rey, Annie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Pautier, Patricia; Le Cesne, Axel; Soria, Jean-Charles; Paci, Angelo; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2013-02-01

    We performed a Phase I clinical trial from October 2007 to October 2009, enrolling patients affected by refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of interleukin (IL)-2 combined with low dose cyclophosphamide (CTX) and imatinib mesylate (IM). In a companion paper published in this issue of OncoImmunology, we show that the MTD of IL-2 is 6 MIU/day for 5 consecutive days, and that IL-2 increases the impregnation of both IM and of its main metabolite, CGP74588. Among the secondary objectives, we wanted to determine immunological markers that might be associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and/or overall survival (OS). The combination therapy markedly reduced the absolute counts of B, CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells in a manner that was proportional to IL-2 dose. There was a slight (less than 2-fold) increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) among CD4(+) T cells in response to IM plus IL-2. The natural killer (NK)-cell compartment was activated, exhibiting a significant upregulation of HLA-DR, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD56. The abundance of HLA-DR(+) NK cells after one course of combination therapy positively correlated with both PFS and OS. The IL-2-induced rise of the CD4(+):CD8(+) T-cell ratio calculated after the first cycle of treatment was also positively associated with OS. Overall, the combination of IM and IL-2 promoted the rapid expansion of HLA-DR(+) NK cells and increased the CD4(+):CD8(+) T-cell ratio, both being associated with clinical benefits. This combinatorial regimen warrants further investigation in Phase II clinical trials, possibly in patients affected by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a setting in which T and NK cells may play an important therapeutic role. PMID:23525357

  16. Rift Valley fever MP-12 vaccine Phase 2 clinical trial: Safety, immunogenicity, and genetic characterization of virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; Norris, Sarah L; Brown, Elizabeth S; Ranadive, Manmohan V; Schibly, Barbara A; Bettinger, George E; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Korman, Lawrence; Morrill, John C; Peters, Clarence J

    2016-01-20

    An outbreak or deliberate release of Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus could have serious public health and socioeconomic consequences. A safe RVF vaccine capable of eliciting long-lasting immunity after a single injection is urgently needed. The live attenuated RVF MP-12 vaccine candidate has shown promise in Phase 1 clinical trials; no evidence of reversion to virulence has been identified in numerous animal studies. The objective of this Phase 2 clinical trial was to (a) further examine the safety and immunogenicity of RVF MP-12 in RVF virus-naïve humans and (b) characterize isolates of RVF MP-12 virus recovered from the blood of vaccinated subjects to evaluate the genetic stability of MP-12 attenuation. We found that RVF MP-12 was well tolerated, causing mostly mild reactions that resolved without sequelae. Of 19 subjects, 18 (95%) and 19 (100%) achieved, respectively, 80% and 50% plaque reduction neutralization titers (PRNT80 and PRNT50)≥1:20 by postvaccination day 28. All 18 PRNT80 responders maintained PRNT80 and PRNT50≥1:40 until at least postvaccination month 12. Viremia was undetectable in the plasma of any subject by direct plaque assay techniques. However, 5 of 19 vaccinees were positive for MP-12 isolates in plasma by blind passage of plasma on Vero cells. Vaccine virus was also recovered from buffy coat material from one of those vaccinees and from one additional vaccinee. Through RNA sequencing of MP-12 isolates, we found no reversions of amino acids to those of the parent virulent virus (strain ZH548). Five years after a single dose of RVF MP-12 vaccine, 8 of 9 vaccinees (89%) maintained a PRNT80≥1:20. These findings support the continued development of RVF MP-12 as a countermeasure against RVF virus in humans. PMID:26706271

  17. A Phase II Trial of Arc-Based Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Michael; Best, Lara; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; D'Souza, David; Venkatesan, Varagur; Sexton, Tracy; Ahmad, Belal; Izawa, Jonathan; Rodrigues, George

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and biochemical control of hypofractionated, image-guided (fiducial markers or ultrasound guidance), simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This Phase II prospective clinical trial for T1a-2cNXM0 prostate cancer enrolled 66 patients who received 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Fiducial markers were used for image guidance in 30 patients and daily ultrasound for the remainder. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Acute Phase Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was 34% and 9% for GU vs. 25% and 10% for GI symptoms. One Grade 4 acute GI toxicity occurred in a patient with unrecognized Crohn's disease. Late Grade 2 and 3 toxicity for GU was 14% and 5%, and GI toxicity was 25% and 3%. One late GI Grade 4 toxicity was observed in a patient with significant comorbidities (anticoagulation, vascular disease). Acute GI toxicity {>=}Grade 2 was shown to be a predictor for late toxicity Grade {>=}2 (p < 0.001). The biochemical disease-free survival at 3 years was 95%. Conclusions: Hypofractionated simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy radiotherapy given as 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions demonstrated promising biochemical control rates; however, higher rates of acute Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity and higher late Grade 2 GU and GI toxicity were noted. Ongoing randomized controlled trials should ultimately clarify issues regarding patient selection and the true rate of severe toxicity that can be directly attributed to hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  18. A Phase II Trial of a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Panobinostat in Patients With Low-Grade Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Sam J.; Mulkerin, Daniel L.; Rajguru, Saurabh; Carmichael, Lakeesha; Chen, Herb; Holen, Kyle D.; LoConte, Noelle K.

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors versus carcinoid tumors should be examined separately in clinical trials. Progression-free survival is more clinically relevant as the primary endpoint (rather than response rate) in phase II trials for low-grade neuroendocrine tumors. Background. The most common subtypes of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are pancreatic islet cell tumors and carcinoids, which represent only 2% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have already been shown to suppress tumor growth and induce apoptosis in various malignancies. In NET cells, HDAC inhibitors have resulted in increased Notch1 expression and subsequent inhibition of growth. We present here a phase II study of the novel HDAC inhibitor panobinostat in patients with low-grade NET. Methods. Adult patients with histologically confirmed, metastatic, low-grade NETs and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of ≤2 were treated with oral panobinostat 20 mg once daily three times per week. Treatment was continued until patients experienced unacceptable toxicities or disease progression. The study was stopped at planned interim analysis based on a Simon two-stage design. Results. Fifteen patients were accrued, and 13 were evaluable for response. No responses were seen, but the stable disease rate was 100%. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.9 months, and the median overall survival was 47.3 months. Fatigue (27%), thrombocytopenia (20%), diarrhea (13%), and nausea (13%) were the most common related grade 3 toxicities. There was one grade 4 thrombocytopenia (7%). These results did not meet the prespecified criteria to open the study to full accrual. Conclusion. The HDAC inhibitor panobinostat has a high stable disease rate and reasonable PFS in low-grade NET, but has a low response rate. PMID:27261467

  19. Pioglitazone in early Parkinson's disease: a phase 2, multicentre, double-blind, randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background A systematic assessment of potential disease-modifying compounds for Parkinson's disease concluded that pioglitazone could hold promise for the treatment of patients with this disease. We assessed the effect of pioglitazone on the progression of Parkinson's disease in a multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, futility clinical trial. Methods Participants with the diagnosis of early Parkinson's disease on a stable regimen of 1 mg/day rasagiline or 10 mg/day selegiline were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to 15 mg/day pioglitazone, 45 mg/day pioglitazone, or placebo. Investigators were masked to the treatment assignment. Only the statistical centre and the central pharmacy knew the treatment name associated with the randomisation number. The primary outcome was the change in the total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score between the baseline and 44 weeks, analysed by intention to treat. The primary null hypothesis for each dose group was that the mean change in UPDRS was 3 points less than the mean change in the placebo group. The alternative hypothesis (of futility) was that pioglitazone is not meaningfully different from placebo. We rejected the null if there was significant evidence of futility at the one-sided alpha level of 0.10. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01280123. Findings 210 patients from 35 sites in the USA were enrolled between May 10, 2011, and July 31, 2013. The primary analysis included 72 patients in the 15 mg group, 67 in the 45 mg group, and 71 in the placebo group. The mean total UPDRS change at 44 weeks was 4.42 (95% CI 2.55–6.28) for 15 mg pioglitazone, 5.13 (95% CI 3.17–7.08) for 45 mg pioglitazone, and 6.25 (95% CI 4.35–8.15) for placebo (higher change scores are worse). The mean difference between the 15 mg and placebo groups was −1.83 (80% CI −3.56 to −0.10) and the null hypothesis could not be rejected (p=0.19). The mean difference between the 45 mg and placebo

  20. Two Phase II randomized trials on the CRTh2 antagonist AZD1981 in adults with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kuna, Piotr; Bjermer, Leif; Tornling, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 (Th2) cell (CRTh2) receptor antagonists is being investigated for asthma. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the CRTh2 receptor antagonist, AZD1981 (with/without inhaled corticosteroids [ICSs]), on lung function and asthma control. Patients and methods Adults aged 18–60 years were enrolled in two randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trials (protocol number: D9830C00003 [study 1, n=209] and protocol number: D9830C00004 [study 2, n=510]). In study 1, patients with stable asthma (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 65%−110%) were withdrawn from ICS (<400 µg/d) and randomized to AZD1981 1,000 mg twice daily (bid) or placebo. In study 2, patients with uncontrolled asthma (FEV1: 40%−85%) despite ICS therapy (≥500 µg/d) were randomized to 50 mg, 400 mg, or 1,000 mg bid AZD1981 or placebo. The primary efficacy variable for both trials was the change in morning peak expiratory flow after 4 weeks of treatment. Secondary variables included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-5) scores, FEV1 assessments, safety, and tolerability. In study 2, efficacy was also assessed according to atopic status. Results Following 4 weeks of treatment, there was a nonsignificant increase in morning peak expiratory flow on AZD1981 1,000 mg bid (9.5 L/min vs placebo, P=0.086 [study 1] and 12 L/min vs placebo, P=0.16 [study 2]). In study 2, all doses of AZD1981 provided significant improvements in ACQ-5 scores (0.26–0.3 units vs placebo, P=0.010–0.022); however, there was no dose–response relationship. Improved ACQ-5 scores and FEV1 were observed in the majority of atopic patients treated with AZD1981. AZD1981 was well tolerated across treatment groups. Conclusion Further research may be warranted in atopic patients to fully evaluate the clinical efficacy of AZD1981. PMID:27621597

  1. Characteristics of a cluster-randomized phase IV human papillomavirus vaccination effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Matti; Apter, Dan; Baussano, Iacopo; Eriksson, Tiina; Natunen, Kari; Paavonen, Jorma; Vänskä, Simopekka; Bi, Dan; David, Marie-Pierre; Datta, Sanjoy; Struyf, Frank; Jenkins, David; Pukkala, Eero; Garnett, Geoff; Dubin, Gary

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPV) cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV-16/18 virus-like particle vaccine formulated with an AS04 adjuvant is very efficacious against hrHPV associated precancers but the herd effects of different vaccination scenarios are not known. Our cluster randomized trial (NCT00534638) assesses the overall and herd effects of vaccinating girls vs. girls and boys. In two school-years (2007-2008 and 2008-2009) we invited 80,272 1992-1995 born early adolescents to a CRT in 33 communities a priori stratified by low, intermediate and high HPV-16/18 seroprevalence. In 11 Arm A communities 90% of participating girls and boys were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine, in 11 Arm B communities 90% of girls were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine - boys were assigned to receive hepatitis B-virus (HBV) vaccine, and in 11 Arm C communities all were assigned to receive HBV-vaccine. Prevalence of HPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated girls is studied at age 18.5 years. Recruitment resulted in equal enrolment of four birth cohorts (born 1992-1995) comprising altogether 32,175 (40% response) early adolescents: 20,514 girls (50.5-53.0% response by arm) and 11,661 boys (21.9-31.6%% response by arm). At the age of 15 years, 79.3% of the vaccinees completed a questionnaire. Among them >98% were living at, and during the week-ends 1.3-1.6% stayed outside, the study site communities. Smoking habit and alcohol consumption were similar in the different trial arms, also mean-age of menarche (12.4 years) and 1st ejaculation (12.6 years), and sexual behaviour (among those <25%, who had had sexual debut) did not differ by arm: mean-age at the sexual debut 14.3 and 14.4 in girls and boys, and proportions of those with multiple (≥5) life-time sexual partners (6.5-7.5%) at the age of 15 years. Uniform residential, life-style and sexual behaviour characteristics indicate successful randomization/enrolment of the CRT. Our CRT will verify modelled

  2. Phase III trial of nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin in combination with trastuzumab and paclitaxel in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baselga, J.; Manikhas, A.; Cortés, J.; Llombart, A.; Roman, L.; Semiglazov, V. F.; Byakhov, M.; Lokanatha, D.; Forenza, S.; Goldfarb, R. H.; Matera, J.; Azarnia, N.; Hudis, C. A.; Rozencweig, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin liposomal doxorubicin, (Myocet™; Sopherion Therapeutics, Inc Canada, and Cephalon, Europe) (NPLD; Myocet®) in combination with trastuzumabHerceptin® (Hoffmann-La Roche) has shown promising activity and cardiac safety. We conducted a randomized phase III trial of first-line NPLD plus trastuzumab and paclitaxel (Pharmachemie B.V.) (MTP) versus trastuzumab plus paclitaxel (TP) in patients with human epidermal growth factor 2 receptor (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to NPLD (M, 50 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for six cycles), trastuzumab (T, 4 mg/kg loading dose followed by 2 mg/kg weekly), and paclitaxel (P, 80 mg/m2 weekly) or T + P at the same doses until progression or toxicity. The primary efficacy outcome was progression-free survival (PFS). Results One hundred and eighty-one patients were allocated to receive MTP, and 183 to TP. Median PFS was 16.1 and 14.5 months with MTP and TP, respectively [hazard ratio (HR) 0.84; two-sided P = 0.174]. In patients with estrogen receptor (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative tumors, PFS was 20.7 and 14.0 months, respectively [HR 0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47–0.99]. Median overall survival (OS) was 33.6 and 28.9 months with MTP and TP, respectively (HR 0.79; two-sided P = 0.083). In ER- and PR-negative tumors, OS was 38.2 and 27.9 months, respectively (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42–0.93). The frequency of adverse events was higher with MTP, but there was no significant difference in cardiac toxicity between treatment arms. Conclusion(s) The trial failed to demonstrate a significant clinical improvement with the addition of M to TP regimen. The clinical benefit observed in an exploratory analysis in the ER- and PR-negative population deserves consideration for further clinical trials. Clinical trial number NCT00294996. PMID:24401928

  3. Sunitinib in patients with chemotherapy-refractory thymoma and thymic carcinoma: an open-label phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Berman, Arlene; Tomita, Yusuke; Brzezniak, Christina; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Ling, Alexander; Spittler, Aaron J; Carter, Corey A; Guha, Udayan; Wang, Yisong; Szabo, Eva; Meltzer, Paul; Steinberg, Seth M; Trepel, Jane B; Loehrer, Patrick J; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background No standard treatments are available for advanced thymic epithelial tumours after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. We investigated the activity of sunitinib, an orally administered tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Methods Between May 15, 2012, and Oct 2, 2013, we did an open-label phase 2 trial in patients with histologically confirmed chemotherapy-refractory thymic epithelial tumours. Patients were eligible if they had disease progression after at least one previous regimen of platinum-containing chemotherapy, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of two or lower, measurable disease, and adequate organ function. Patients received 50 mg of sunitinib orally once a day, in 6-week cycles (ie, 4 weeks of treatment followed by 2 weeks without treatment), until tumour progression or unacceptable toxic effects arose. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed best tumour response at any point, which we analysed separately in thymoma and thymic carcinoma cohorts. Patients who had received at least one cycle of treatment and had their disease reassessed were included in the analyses of response. The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621568. Findings 41 patients were enrolled, 25 with thymic carcinoma and 16 with thymoma. One patient with thymic carcinoma was deemed ineligible after enrolment and did not receive protocol treatment. Of patients who received treatment, one individual with thymic carcinoma was not assessable because she died. Median follow-up on trial was 17 months (IQR 14·0–18·4). Of 23 assessable patients with thymic carcinoma, six (26%, 90% CI 12·1–45·3, 95% CI 10·2–48·4) had partial responses, 15 (65%, 95% CI 42·7–83·6) achieved stable disease, and two (9%, 1·1–28·0) had progressive disease. Of 16 patients with thymoma, one (6%, 95% CI 0·2–30·2) had a partial response, 12 (75%, 47·6–92·7) had stable disease, and three (19%, 4·1–45·7) had progressive disease

  4. A First-Time-In-Human Phase I Clinical Trial of Bispecific Antibody-Targeted, Paclitaxel-Packaged Bacterial Minicells

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Mark; McArthur, Grant A.; Pattison, Scott T.; Pattison, Stacey L.; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; Scott, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    paclitaxel, were shown to be safe in patients with advanced solid tumors with modest clinical efficacy observed. Further study in Phase II trials is planned. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000672257 PMID:26659127

  5. Long-term update of the 24954 EORTC phase III trial on larynx preservation.

    PubMed

    Henriques De Figueiredo, B; Fortpied, C; Menis, J; Lefebvre, J L; Barzan, L; de Raucourt, D; Geoffrois, L; Giurgea, L; Hupperets, P; Leemans, C R; Licitra, L; Rolland, F; Tesselaar, M; Vermorken, J B; Grégoire, V

    2016-09-01

    The long-term results of the EORTC 24954 trial comparing sequential versus alternating chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) for patients with locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer are reported. From 1996 to 2004, 450 patients were randomly assigned (1-1) to a sequential arm (SA = induction cisplatin-5fluorouracil followed by a 70Gy-RT for the responders or a total laryngectomy and post-operative RT for the non-responders) and an alternating arm (AA = cisplatin-5fluorouracil alternated with three 2-week courses of 20 Gy-RT for a total dose of 60 Gy). Median follow-up was 10.2 years. Ten-year survival with functional larynx (primary end-point) and overall survival were similar in both arms (18.7% and 33.6% in SA versus 18.3% and 31.6% in AA). Late toxicity was also similar; however, a trend for higher larynx preservation and better laryngeal function was observed in AA. PMID:27494036

  6. Development of a contingency recruitment plan for a phase III chemoprevention trial of cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Loescher, L J; Graham, V E; Aickin, M; Meyskens, F L; Surwit, E A

    1990-01-01

    Development of contingency recruitment plans in cancer chemoprevention research is as important as formulation of the initial plan. We found that requesting recruitment information from our initial CTCD subjects provided a framework for our contingency plan. The revised recruitment plan consisted of: 1) calling and sending letters to community gynecologists in private practice or affiliated with HMO's to explain the study and ask for referrals; 2) continued personal contact by the principal investigator with referring physicians; 3) sending thank you and follow-up letters to every physician who referred patients to the study; 4) soliciting Papanicolaou smear reports from HMO's if physicians of women with abnormal Papanicolaou smears gave permission to pathologists to release this information; 5) utilizing free media such as feature articles on the CTCD in local papers, public service announcements, and television "spots;" 6) continued use of brochures and posters printed for the initial recruitment effort; and 7) continued presentations to local professional physician and nurse groups about the study. Our contingency plan to date has provided us with 100% of our projected accrual. Thus, our recruitment methods have proved to be effective in accruing subjects for this cancer chemoprevention trial. PMID:2202990

  7. Non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer: A multicentric phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Brucker, Janina; Mayer, Christine; Gebauer, Gerhard; Mallmann, Peter; Belau, Antje Kristina; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Eichbaum, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Patients with non-platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer have a poor prognosis. Non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Myocet®) is a promising drug that may be able to improve treatment for such patients. In the current study, patients with recurrent ovarian cancer relapsing within 12 months after primary treatment received non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin at 75 mg/m2 d1q22 and 60 mg/m2 d1q22 after study dose modification, respectively. There were 29 patients enrolled in the trial, and 124 cycles of non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin were administered in total. All 29 patients were evaluable for toxicity. The clinical benefit rate (defined as the proportion of patients with either complete remission or partial remission, or with stable disease for >6 months) was 50%. The predominant non-hematological toxicity was nausea and vomiting (18 patients, grade I/II), whilst no palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia was observed. In 3 patients, a grade III hematological toxicity occurred, and the treatment schedule was consequently modified to 60 mg/m2 d1q22. The findings suggest that non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin administered in a schedule of 60 mg/m2 d1q22 is well-manageable and is associated with tolerable non-hematological toxicities (predominantly nausea). PMID:27446420

  8. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  9. A phase II trial of Reiki for the management of pain in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Olson, Karin; Hanson, John; Michaud, Mary

    2003-11-01

    This trial compared pain, quality of life, and analgesic use in a sample of patients with cancer pain (n=24) who received either standard opioid management plus rest (Arm A) or standard opioid management plus Reiki (Arm B). Participants either rested for 1.5 hr on Days 1 and 4 or received two Reiki treatments (Days 1 and 4) one hour after their first afternoon analgesic dose. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain ratings, blood pressure, heart rate, and respirations were obtained before and after each treatment/rest period. Analgesic use and VAS pain scores were reported for 7 days. Quality of life was assessed on Days 1 and 7. Participants in Arm B experienced improved pain control on Days 1 and 4 following treatment, compared to Arm A, and improved quality of life, but no overall reduction in opioid use. Future research will determine the extent to which the benefits attributed to Reiki in this study may have been due to touch. PMID:14585550

  10. The use of the diaphragm instead of condoms in a phase III diaphragm trial.

    PubMed

    van der Straten, Ariane; Cheng, Helen; Moore, Jie; Kacanek, Deborah; Blanchard, Kelly; De Bruyn, Guy; Ramjee, Gita; Chipato, Tsungai; Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Padian, Nancy

    2009-06-01

    The MIRA trial assessed whether providing diaphragm, lubricant gel, and condoms (intervention) compared with condoms alone (control) could reduce HIV incidence among 5,039 Southern African women. Compared with the control group, the cumulative proportion of last sex acts protected by any method was higher in the intervention group (OR = 1.33; 95% CI 1.18, 1.49); however, only 36.3% of last sex acts were protected by both a male condom and a diaphragm, whereas 36.6% were protected by a diaphragm only. Product substitution (ever deciding to use a diaphragm instead of a condom in the previous 3 months) was reported at every visit by 22.4%, at some visits by 60.7%, and at none of the visits by 16.8% of these women. Women at greater risk for infection through their own or their partner's behavior or who believed the diaphragm protected against HIV were more likely to report product substitution at every visit. PMID:19085099

  11. Microdosing and Other Phase 0 Clinical Trials: Facilitating Translation in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Burt, T; Yoshida, K; Lappin, G; Vuong, L; John, C; de Wildt, S N; Sugiyama, Y; Rowland, M

    2016-04-01

    A number of drivers and developments suggest that microdosing and other phase 0 applications will experience increased utilization in the near-to-medium future. Increasing costs of drug development and ethical concerns about the risks of exposing humans and animals to novel chemical entities are important drivers in favor of these approaches, and can be expected only to increase in their relevance. An increasing body of research supports the validity of extrapolation from the limited drug exposure of phase 0 approaches to the full, therapeutic exposure, with modeling and simulations capable of extrapolating even non-linear scenarios. An increasing number of applications and design options demonstrate the versatility and flexibility these approaches offer to drug developers including the study of PK, bioavailability, DDI, and mechanistic PD effects. PET microdosing allows study of target localization, PK and receptor binding and occupancy, while Intra-Target Microdosing (ITM) allows study of local therapeutic-level acute PD coupled with systemic microdose-level exposure. Applications in vulnerable populations and extreme environments are attractive due to the unique risks of pharmacotherapy and increasing unmet healthcare needs. All phase 0 approaches depend on the validity of extrapolation from the limited-exposure scenario to the full exposure of therapeutic intent, but in the final analysis the potential for controlled human data to reduce uncertainty about drug properties is bound to be a valuable addition to the drug development process. PMID:26918865

  12. Optimal adaptive two-stage designs for phase II cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Englert, Stefan; Kieser, Meinhard

    2013-11-01

    In oncology, single-arm two-stage designs with binary endpoint are widely applied in phase II for the development of cytotoxic cancer therapies. Simon's optimal design with prefixed sample sizes in both stages minimizes the expected sample size under the null hypothesis and is one of the most popular designs. The search algorithms that are currently used to identify phase II designs showing prespecified characteristics are computationally intensive. For this reason, most authors impose restrictions on their search procedure. However, it remains unclear to what extent this approach influences the optimality of the resulting designs. This article describes an extension to fixed sample size phase II designs by allowing the sample size of stage two to depend on the number of responses observed in the first stage. Furthermore, we present a more efficient numerical algorithm that allows for an exhaustive search of designs. Comparisons between designs presented in the literature and the proposed optimal adaptive designs show that while the improvements are generally moderate, notable reductions in the average sample size can be achieved for specific parameter constellations when applying the new method and search strategy. PMID:23868324

  13. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A

    2010-05-27

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE [1]-[4]. This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A [5], magnet 2A [6], and magnet 2B [7]. Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  14. Menstrual cycle phase and carbohydrate ingestion alter immune response following endurance exercise and high intensity time trial performance test under hot conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sex hormones are known to regulate some responses during exercise. Evaluation of the differences in exercise response with regard to menstrual cycle will help understand the menstrual cycle phase specific adaptations to exercise and athletic performance. Methods We investigated the effects of menstrual cycle phase and carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on immune response during endurance exercise at 30°C. Six healthy women completed 4 trials comprising 90 min of cycling at 50% peak aerobic power V˙O2peak and a high intensity time trial performance test (POST). They ingested a placebo- or CHO-containing beverage during the trials, which were performed during both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In all trials, thermoregulatory, cardiorespiratory, and immune responses were measured during exercise and after POST. Results Although the thermoregulatory responses differed between the menstrual cycle phases, the cardiorespiratory responses were not different. After placebo ingestion, leukocyte concentration (cells/μL) at POST (15.9 × 103) in the luteal phase was significantly higher than that in the follicular phase (12.9 × 103). The rise in leukocyte concentration was attenuated upon CHO ingestion, and the difference between menstrual cycle phases disappeared. A significant positive correlation was found between leukocyte concentration and serum free fatty acid concentrations. Interleukin-6, calprotectin, and myeloperoxidase concentrations significantly increased at POST in all trials, but no significant differences were observed between menstrual cycle phase or beverage type. Concentrations of other cytokines did not change during exercise in any of the 4 trials. Menstrual cycle phase and beverage type had no significant effect on the POST outcome. Thus, differences in leukocyte mobilization between menstrual cycle phases could result from the effect of sex hormones on substrate utilization. Conclusions The menstrual cycle

  15. Phase 1 Trial of Bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV in Refractory Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Minal; Wang, Zhaohui; Kumar, Padmasini; Jay, Christopher M; Luo, Xiuquan; Bedell, Cynthia; Mennel, Robert G; Wallraven, Gladice; Brunicardi, Francis Charles; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John; Rao, Donald D

    2015-01-01

    Stathmin1 (STMN1) is a microtubule modulator that is expressed in multiple cancers and correlates with poor survival. We previously demonstrated in vivo safety of bifunctional (bi) shRNA STMN1 bilamellar invaginated vesicle (BIV) and that systemic delivery correlated with antitumor activity. Patients with superficial advanced refractory cancer with no other standard options were entered into trial. Study design involved dose escalation (four patients/cohort) using a modified Fibonacci schema starting at 0.7 mg DNA administered via single intratumoral injection. Biopsy at baseline, 24/48 hours and resection 8 days after injection provided tissue for determination of cleavage product using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), 5′ RLM rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) assay. Serum pharmacokinetics of circulating plasmid was done. Twelve patients were entered into three dose levels (0.7, 1.4, 7.0 mg DNA). No ≥ grade 3 toxic effects to drug were observed. Maximum circulating plasmid was detected at 30 seconds with less than 10% detectable in all subjects at 24 hours. No toxic effects were observed. Predicted cleavage product was detected by both NGS (n = 7/7 patients analyzed, cohorts 1, 2) and RLM RACE (n = 1/1 patients analyzed cohort 3). In conclusion, bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV is well tolerated and detection of mRNA target sequence-specific cleavage product confirmed bi-shRNA BIV mechanism of action. PMID:25619726

  16. Phase 1 Trial of Bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV in Refractory Cancer.

    PubMed

    Barve, Minal; Wang, Zhaohui; Kumar, Padmasini; Jay, Christopher M; Luo, Xiuquan; Bedell, Cynthia; Mennel, Robert G; Wallraven, Gladice; Brunicardi, Francis Charles; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John; Rao, Donald D

    2015-06-01

    Stathmin1 (STMN1) is a microtubule modulator that is expressed in multiple cancers and correlates with poor survival. We previously demonstrated in vivo safety of bifunctional (bi) shRNA STMN1 bilamellar invaginated vesicle (BIV) and that systemic delivery correlated with antitumor activity. Patients with superficial advanced refractory cancer with no other standard options were entered into trial. Study design involved dose escalation (four patients/cohort) using a modified Fibonacci schema starting at 0.7 mg DNA administered via single intratumoral injection. Biopsy at baseline, 24/48 hours and resection 8 days after injection provided tissue for determination of cleavage product using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), 5' RLM rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) assay. Serum pharmacokinetics of circulating plasmid was done. Twelve patients were entered into three dose levels (0.7, 1.4, 7.0 mg DNA). No ≥ grade 3 toxic effects to drug were observed. Maximum circulating plasmid was detected at 30 seconds with less than 10% detectable in all subjects at 24 hours. No toxic effects were observed. Predicted cleavage product was detected by both NGS (n = 7/7 patients analyzed, cohorts 1, 2) and RLM RACE (n = 1/1 patients analyzed cohort 3). In conclusion, bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV is well tolerated and detection of mRNA target sequence-specific cleavage product confirmed bi-shRNA BIV mechanism of action. PMID:25619726

  17. A Phase III Randomized Trial of the Timing of Meloxicam With Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Patil, Nikhilesh; Wallace, Kris; Borg, Jette; Zhou, David; Ma, Clement; Pond, Greg

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is used to reduce prostate edema and urinary symptoms following prostate brachytherapy. We hypothesized that a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor regimen started 1 week prior to seed implant might diminish the inflammatory response, thus reducing edema, retention rates, and symptom severity. Methods and Materials: From March 2004 to February 2008, 316 men consented to an institutional review board-approved randomized study of a 4-week course of meloxicam, 7.5 mg orally twice per day, starting either on the day of implant or 1 week prior to implant. Brachytherapy was performed using iodine-125 seeds and was preplanned and performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopic guidance. Prostate volume obtained by MR imaging at 1 month was compared to baseline prostate volume obtained by TRUS planimetry and expressed as an edema factor. The trial endpoints were prostate edema at 1 month, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire results at 1 and 3 months, and any need for catheterization. Results: Results for 300 men were analyzed. Median age was 61 (range, 45-79 years), and median TRUS prostate volume was 35.7 cc (range, 18.1-69.5 cc). Median IPSS at baseline was 5 (range, 0-24) and was 15 at 1 month, 16 at 3 months, and 10 at 6 months. Catheterization was required for 7% of patients (6.2% day 0 arm vs. 7.9% day -7 arm; p = 0.65). The median edema factor at 1 month was 1.02 (range, 0.73-1.7). 1.01 day 0 arm vs. 1.05 day -7 arm. Baseline prostate volume remained the primary predictor of postimplant urinary retention. Conclusions: Starting meloxicam 1 week prior to brachytherapy compared to starting immediately after the procedure did not reduce 1-month edema, improve IPSSs at 1 or 3 months, or reduce the need for catheterization.

  18. A Phase II Trial of a Combination Herbal Supplement for Men with Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dorff, Tanya B.; Groshen, Susan; Tsao-Wei, Denice D.; Xiong, Shigang; Gross, Mitchell E.; Vogelzang, Nicholas; Quinn, David I.; Pinski, Jacek K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men with biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer are typically observed or treated with androgen deprivation therapy. Non-hormonal, non-toxic treatments to slow the rise of PSA are desirable. We studied a combination herbal supplement, Prostate Health Cocktail (PHC), in prostate cancer cell lines and in a population of men with BCR. Methods PC3, LAPC3, and LNCaP cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of PHC suspension. Men previously treated for prostate cancer with surgery, radiation, or both with rising PSA but no radiographic metastases were treated with 3 capsules of PHC daily; the primary endpoint was 50% PSA decline. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were identified using parylene membrane filters. Results PHC showed a strong dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect in androgen-sensitive and independent cell lines in vitro and suppression of androgen receptor expression. 40 eligible patients were enrolled in the clinical trial. Median baseline PSA was 2.8 ng/mL (1.1-84.1) and 15 men (38%) had a PSA decline on study (1%-55% reduction) ; 25 (62%) had rising PSA on study. The median duration of PSA stability was 6.4 months. Two patients had grade 2/3 transaminitis; the only other grade 2 toxicities were hyperglycemia, hypercalcemia and flatulence. There were no significant changes in testosterone or dihydrotestosterone. CTCs were identified in 19 men (47%). Conclusion Although the primary endpoint was not met, Prostate Health Cocktail was well tolerated and was associated with PSA declines and stabilization in a significant number of patients. This is the first report of detecting CTCs in men with BCR prostate cancer. Randomized studies are needed to better define the effect of PHC in men with BCR. PMID:25245366

  19. Pediatric phase I trial of oral sorafenib and topotecan in refractory or recurrent pediatric solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Reed, Damon R; Mascarenhas, Leo; Manning, Kathleen; Hale, Gregory A; Goldberg, John; Gill, Jonathan; Sandler, Eric; Isakoff, Michael S; Smith, Tiffany; Caracciolo, Jamie; Lush, Richard M; Juan, Tzu-Hua; Lee, Jae K; Neuger, Anthony M; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Targeted kinase inhibitors and camptothecins have shown preclinical and clinical activity in several cancers. This trial evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities of sorafenib and topotecan administered orally in pediatric patients with relapsed solid tumors. Sorafenib was administered twice daily and topotecan once daily on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each 28-day course. The study utilized a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation design. Three dose levels (DL) were evaluated: (1) sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1 mg/m(2) ; (2) sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) ; and (3) sorafenib 200 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) . Pharmacokinetics were ascertained and treatment response assessed. Thirteen patients were enrolled. DL2 was the determined MTD. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia delaying therapy for >7 days was observed in one of six patients on DL2, and grade 4 neutropenia that delayed therapy in two of three patients on DL3. A patient with preexisting cardiac failure controlled with medication developed a transient drop in the left ventricular ejection fraction that improved when sorafenib was withheld. Sorafenib exposure with or without topotecan was comparable, and the concentration-time profiles for topotecan alone and in combination with sorafenib were similar. One objective response was noted in a patient with fibromatosis. We determined MTD to be sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) twice daily orally on days 1-28 combined with topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) once daily on days 1-5 and 8-12. While these doses are 1 DL below the MTD of the agents individually, pharmacokinetic studies suggested adequate drug exposure without drug interactions. The combination had limited activity in the population studied. PMID:26714427

  20. A phase II trial of recombinant tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, N; Childs, B; Larchian, W; Rosado, K; Kelsen, D

    1990-08-15

    Sixteen previously treated (with only one prior regimen) patients with histologically proven metastatic or locally recurrent colorectal carcinoma were treated with recombinant tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) administered by 30-minute i.v. infusions twice daily for 5 consecutive days every other week for 8 weeks. Patients received 100 micrograms/m2 twice daily on day 1 of cycle 1 with escalation to 150 micrograms/m2 twice daily thereafter. Patients were concomitantly treated with indomethacin 25 mg every 6 hours and acetaminophen 650 mg every 4 hours to obviate fever and chills. Toxicities included: nausea/vomiting (69%), headache (25%), chills (69%), pain at tumor sites (63%), hypotension (31%), and hypertension (38%). Hematologic toxicity included leukopenia less than 2000 cells/mm3 (38%) and thrombocytopenia less than 100,000 cells/mm3 (13%). Liver function abnormalities occurred independently of the site or extent of metastatic disease and inconsistently in each treatment cycle. Four patients developed bilirubinemia greater than 2.5 x baseline values (range, 2.5 to 10.3 U/L); five patients had greater than 2.5 x elevations in alkaline phosphatase (range, 624 to 1663 U/L). Two patients developed retinal vein thrombosis in the absence of hemostatic abnormalities. In both instances, this complication occurred several weeks after completion of therapy. No objective responses were noted in 14 evaluable patients (95% confidence interval: 0 to 0.23). Three patients had stable disease for a median duration of 4.5 months. In conclusion, i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule has no demonstrable antitumor efficacy. Twice-daily i.v. administration of this agent is associated with more hepatotoxicity than previously reported in trials using subcutaneous or once daily i.v. administration. Retinal vein thrombosis may be a late complication of i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule. PMID:2386895

  1. Disclosure of competing financial interests and role of sponsors in phase III cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Tuech, Jean-Jacques; Moutel, Grégoire; Pessaux, Patrick; Thoma, Véronique; Schraub, Simon; Herve, Christian

    2005-10-01

    Financial relationships between industry, researchers and academic institutions are becoming increasingly complex, raising concern about sponsors' involvement in the conduct of biomedical research. A review of published randomised trials (RCTs) in cancer research was performed to assess adherence to the 1997 disclosure requirements and to document the nature of the disclosed interests. Source(s) of study support, author-sponsor relationships and the role of the study sponsor were assessed for all RCTs published between 1999 and 2003 in 12 international journals. A total of 655 cancer RCTs were identified. Of these, 516 (78.8%) disclosed the source of sponsorship. The nature of the relationship between the authors and the study sponsor was included in 219 of the 227 industry-sponsored studies. The most commonly cited relationships were (131 studies had multiple relations): grants (93.6%); employment (39.2%); consultant/honorarium (12.7%) and stock ownership and participation in a speaker's bureau (12, 5.5% each). Only 41 (18%) of the 227 industry-sponsored RCTs reported the role of the sponsor. Of these, 20 explicitly stated that the sponsor had no role in the study. Twenty-one papers described the sponsor's role, the degree of sponsor involvement was variable and usually described vaguely. Among these papers, four stated that researchers had full access to all data, one that the researchers had no limits on publication and one that 'the decision to submit the paper for publication was determined by the study sponsor'. In conclusion, no researcher should be expected to produce 'findings' without full access to the data, freedom from interference in analysis and interpretation and liberty to publish all results, however disappointing to the stakeholder they may be. In the meantime, researchers do well to arm themselves with the rules for research partnerships and editors to take on the role of watchdog. PMID:16214044

  2. Mast Cell Stabilizer (Ketotifen) in Fibromyalgia: Phase 1 Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Dennis C.; Hilligoss, Janna; Stump, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Compared to healthy controls, patients with fibromyalgia (FM) have more mast cells in the skin. Whether mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of FM is unclear. We sought to determine the effects of a mast cell stabilizer (ketotifen) on FM symptoms. Methods Fifty-one FM subjects were randomized to daily oral ketotifen 2 mg BID (n=24) for 8 weeks or placebo (N=27). Mean age of subjects was 51.2 years (standard deviation/SD 8.4); 88% were female and 88% were white; 22% were taking concomitant opiates; and mean pressure pain sensitivity (range 0-20) was 10.0 (0.4). At study entry, the weekly average pain intensity was 6.4 (1.1) and the mean score on the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) was 66.8 (14.0). Results We found no statistically significant treatment group differences from baseline in either group for the two primary measures: weekly average pain intensity [ketotifen −1.3 (1.9) vs. placebo −1.5 (1.9), p=0.7]; and FIQR score [−12.1 (19.5) vs. −12.2 (18.1), p=0.9]. No secondary outcome measures (BPI pain intensity, and pressure pain sensitivity) reached statistical significance; results did not differ in the intent-to-treat and completer analyses. Other than transient sedation [6 (28.6%) vs. 1 (4.0%)], ketotifen was well tolerated. Discussion The study results question whether skin mast cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of FM. However, given the role of mast cells in peripheral and central nociception, and the minimal side effects of ketotifen, a randomized clinical trial using increasing doses of ketotifen may be warranted. PMID:25370135

  3. Study protocol for a phase III multicentre, randomised, open-label, blinded-end point trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of immunoglobulin plus cyclosporin A in patients with severe Kawasaki disease (KAICA Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Reiko; Hamada, Hiromichi; Sato, Yasunori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ebata, Ryota; Terauchi, Moe; Terai, Masaru; Hanaoka, Hideki; Hata, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown aetiology that predominantly affects infants and young children. We hypothesise that cyclosporin A (CsA) may be effective in treating KD by regulating the Ca2+/NFAT signalling pathway. This trial compares the current standard therapy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and the combined IVIG+CsA therapy in paediatric patients with severe KD. Methods and analysis This trial is a phase III, multicentre, randomised, open-label, blinded-end point trial that evaluates the efficacy and safety of IVIG+CsA therapy. Patients with severe KD who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive either CsA (5 mg/kg/day for 5 days; Neoral) plus high-dose IVIG (2 g/kg for 24 h and aspirin 30 mg/kg/day), or high-dose IVIG alone (2 g/kg for 24 h and aspirin 30 mg/kg/day). The primary end point is the frequency of occurrence of coronary artery abnormalities during the trial period. An independent end point review committee will be in charge of the trial assessment. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each institution. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, in Japan. The trial is currently on-going and is scheduled to finish in April 2017. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number JMA-IIA00174; Pre-results. PMID:26628527

  4. Comparison of the phase III clinical trial designs of novel oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for the treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quesada, Carlos J; Giugliano, Robert P

    2014-04-01

    Although vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have been the backbone of thromboprophylaxis in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, their limitations have encouraged the development of a new generation of oral anticoagulants. This review compares the different designs and procedures used to conduct four phase III trials that tested dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban versus VKAs. Although pharmacologic characteristics and results of the main trials are briefly discussed, this review mainly focuses on study designs, enrollment criteria, populations studied, quality metrics, and transition strategies between oral anticoagulants. While each of the trials was of high quality, performed independently, and led by independent academic groups, substantial differences exist in terms of drug pharmacology and trial characteristics. Caution is advised when comparing results across trials as practicing clinicians strive to personalize anticoagulation treatments for their individual patients. We believe that the differences in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of the available novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), coupled with substantial heterogeneity in the trial populations and designs and procedures used to conduct the trials, support an important role for each of the NOACs dependent upon the specific clinical scenario faced by the practicing clinician. PMID:24504768

  5. Tensor network trial states for chiral topological phases in two dimensions and a no-go theorem in any dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubail, J.; Read, N.

    2015-11-01

    Trial wave functions that can be represented by summing over locally coupled degrees of freedom are called tensor network states (TNSs); they have seemed difficult to construct for two-dimensional topological phases that possess protected gapless edge excitations. We show it can be done for chiral states of free fermions, using a Gaussian Grassmann integral, yielding px±i py and Chern insulator states, in the sense that the fermionic excitations live in a topologically nontrivial bundle of the required type. We prove that any strictly short-range quadratic parent Hamiltonian for these states is gapless; the proof holds for a class of systems in any dimension of space. The proof also shows, quite generally, that sets of compactly supported Wannier-type functions do not exist for band structures in this class. We construct further examples of TNSs that are analogs of fractional (including non-Abelian) quantum Hall phases; it is not known whether parent Hamiltonians for these are also gapless.

  6. Phase II trial of biweekly docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Atsuko; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Naoki; Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of esophageal cancer patients is still unsatisfactory. Although a docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-Fu (DCF) regimen has been reported, it is often difficult to accomplish because of severe toxicity. Therefore, we developed a new biweekly DCF (Bi-DCF) regimen and previously reported the recommended dose in a phase I dose-escalation study. We then performed a phase II study of Bi-DCF for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Patients with clinical stage II/III were eligible. Patients received 2 courses of chemotherapy: docetaxel 35 mg/m(2) with cisplatin 40 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15 and 400 mg/m(2) 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 and 15-19 every 4 weeks. After completion of the chemotherapy, patients received esophagectomy. The primary endpoint was the completion rate of protocol treatment. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. The completion rate of protocol treatment (completion of two courses of preoperative chemotherapy and R0 surgery) was 100 %. During chemotherapy, the most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities were neutropenia (31.3 %). No treatment-related death was observed, and the incidence of operative morbidity was tolerable. The overall response rate after the chemotherapy was 90.3 %. This Bi-DCF regimen was well tolerated and highly active. This trial was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (No. UMIN 000014625). PMID:26896963

  7. Phase II Trial of Dolastatin-10, a Novel Anti-Tubulin Agent, in Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Balcerzak, S. P.; Kraft, A. S.; Edmonson, J. H.; Okuno, S. H.; Davey, M.; Mclaughlin, S.; Beard, M. T.; Rogatko, A.

    2004-01-01

    Patients:Soft tissue sarcomas are uncommon malignancies with few therapeutic options for recurrent or metastatic disease. Dolastatin-10 (Dol-10) is a pentapeptide anti-microtubule agent that binds to tubulin sites distinct from vinca alkaloids. Based on the novel mechanism of action, limited activity of other anti-microtubular agents, and anti-neoplastic activity in pre-clinical screening of Dol-10, this multi-institutional phase II study was conducted to determine the objective response rate of Dol-10 in recurrent or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas that had not been treated with chemotherapy outside of the adjuvant setting. Methods: Dol-10 was given intravenously at a dose of 400 μg/m2 and repeated every 21 days. Toxicities were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0). Radiographic studies and tumor measurements were repeated every two cycles to assess response [Miller AB, et al. Cancer 1981; 47(1): 207]. Results: Dol-10 was associated with hematological toxicity and with some vascular toxicities. There was no significant gastrointestinal, hepatic or renal toxicity. There was one death on study due to respiratory failure. There were no objective responses in 12 patients treated with Dol-10. Discussion: Based on this phase II trial, further study of Dol-10 on this schedule is not recommended in advanced or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:18521404

  8. Phase II trial of a doxorubicin/docetaxel doublet for locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer: results from national surgical adjuvant breast and bowel project trial BP-57.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roy E; Anderson, Stewart J; Lembersky, Barry C; Brown, Ann; Mamounas, Eleftherios

    2004-08-01

    A phase II trial at 12 institutions using AT (doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 plus docetaxel 60 mg/m2) given every 21 days was conducted. Eighty-nine patients were entered who ranged in age from 25 to 75 years, 41.6% of whom had stage IIIB disease and 58.4% of whom had stage IV disease. Among the patients with stage IV disease, 32.7% had received prior adjuvant chemotherapy. Premedication with dexamethasone (8 mg orally twice per day for 3 days) and prophylactic ciprofloxacin (500 mg orally twice per day on days 5-15) was used. Colony-stimulating growth factors were reserved for secondary prophylaxis after prolonged or febrile neutropenia (FN) or documented severe infection in an earlier cycle. After a cumulative dose of doxorubicin of 480 mg/m2, patients could continue to receive docetaxel (100 mg/m2) alone. Median time on study as of July 6, 2003, was 54 months. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 36 patients (41.9%): 23 developed FN in the absence of previous prophylactic growth factor support and 13 developed it despite previous growth factor support. One patient died from sepsis. Other grade 3/4 adverse events included nausea in 3.5%, vomiting in 4.7%, stomatitis in 8.1%, diarrhea in 5.8%, arthralgia/myalgia in 2.3%, fluid retention in 1.2%, pulmonary embolism in 1.2%, rest dyspnea in 1.2%, neuromotory toxicity in 1.2%, and neurosensory toxicity in 1.2%. Clinical congestive heart failure was seen in 2 patients (2.3%). Sixty-seven patients were evaluable for best response with 6 cycles of therapy. Fourteen patients (20.9%) had a complete response and 30 (44.8%) had a partial response, for an overall response rate of 65.7% in evaluable patients. The median response duration was 25.9 months, and the median time from entry to progression or death was 27.5 months. The median survival time for the 86 patients with endpoint information was 31.1 months. The administration of AT with primary ciprofloxacin and secondary colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis is feasible, and the

  9. Phase II trial of hu14.18-IL2 for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Mark R; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Gadbaw, Brian; Kostlevy, Jordan; Haldeman, Jennifer; Schalch, Heidi; Gan, Jacek; Kim, KyungMann; Eickhoff, Jens; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-12-01

    Phase I testing of the hu14.18-IL2 immunocytokine in melanoma patients showed immune activation, reversible toxicities, and a maximal tolerated dose of 7.5 mg/m(2)/day. In this phase II study, 14 patients with measurable metastatic melanoma were scheduled to receive hu14.18-IL2 at 6 mg/m(2)/day as 4-h intravenous infusions on Days 1, 2, and 3 of each 28 day cycle. Patients with stable disease (SD) or regression following cycle 2 could receive two additional treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate antitumor activity and response duration. Secondary objectives evaluated adverse events and immunologic activation. All patients received two cycles of treatment. One patient had a partial response (PR) [1 PR of 14 patients = response rate of 7.1 %; confidence interval, 0.2-33.9 %], and 4 patients had SD and received cycles 3 and 4. The PR and SD responses lasted 3-4 months. All toxicities were reversible and those resulting in dose reduction included grade 3 hypotension (2 patients) and grade 2 renal insufficiency with oliguria (1 patient). Patients had a peripheral blood lymphocytosis on Day 8 and increased C-reactive protein. While one PR in 14 patients met protocol criteria to proceed to stage 2 and enter 16 additional patients, we suspended stage 2 due to limited availability of hu14.18-IL2 at that time and the brief duration of PR and SD. We conclude that subsequent testing of hu14.18-IL2 should involve melanoma patients with minimal residual disease based on compelling preclinical data and the confirmed immune activation with some antitumor activity in this study. PMID:22678096

  10. Effect of adding mFOLFOX6 after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer: a multicentre, phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Chow, Oliver S; Smith, David D; Marcet, Jorge E; Cataldo, Peter A; Varma, Madhulika G; Kumar, Anjali S; Oommen, Samuel; Coutsoftides, Theodore; Hunt, Steven R; Stamos, Michael J; Ternent, Charles A; Herzig, Daniel O; Fichera, Alessandro; Polite, Blase N; Dietz, David W; Patil, Sujata; Avila, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who achieve a pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation have an improved prognosis. The need for surgery in these patients has been questioned, but the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response is small. We aimed to assess whether adding cycles of mFOLFOX6 between chemoradiation and surgery increased the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response. Methods We did a phase 2, non-randomised trial consisting of four sequential study groups of patients with stage II–III locally advanced rectal cancer at 17 institutions in the USA and Canada. All patients received chemoradiation (fluorouracil 225 mg/m2 per day by continuous infusion throughout radiotherapy, and 45.0 Gy in 25 fractions, 5 days per week for 5 weeks, followed by a minimum boost of 5.4 Gy). Patients in group 1 had total mesorectal excision 6–8 weeks after chemoradiation. Patients in groups 2–4 received two, four, or six cycles of mFOLFOX6, respectively, between chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Each cycle of mFOLFOX6 consisted of racemic leucovorin 200 mg/m2 or 400 mg/m2, according to the discretion of the treating investigator, oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2 in a 2-h infusion, bolus fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 on day 1, and a 46-h infusion of fluorouracil 2400 mg/m2. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved a pathological complete response, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00335816. Findings Between March 24, 2004, and Nov 16, 2012, 292 patients were registered, 259 of whom (60 in group 1, 67 in group 2, 67 in group 3, and 65 in group 4) met criteria for analysis. 11 (18%, 95% CI 10–30) of 60 patients in group 1, 17 (25%, 16–37) of 67 in group 2, 20 (30%, 19–42) of 67 in group 3, and 25 (38%, 27–51) of 65 in group 4 achieved a pathological complete response (p=0.0036). Study group was

  11. Phase II trial of gemcitabine/doxorubicin/paclitaxel administered every other week in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rovira, P; Jaén, A; González, E; Porras, I; Dueñas, M R; Medina, B; Mohedano, N; Fernández, M; Martos, M; Lozano, A

    2000-10-01

    The present trial was designed to determine the efficacy of the combination of gemcitabine/doxorubicin/paclitaxel (GAT) delivered every other week as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. From February 1998 to September 1999, 41 patients were included in this trial. Doses delivered were doxorubicin 30 mg/m2 on day 1 and paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 plus gemcitabine 2500 mg/m2 both given on day 2, every 14 days. Doses were selected from a previous phase I trial conducted at our institution. Eligibility criteria for the phase II trial included histologically confirmed metastatic breast cancer with bidimensionally measurable lesions; no prior therapy for metastatic disease; adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy was allowed if given more than 1 year before and cumulative doses of doxorubicin or epirubicin were less than 200 mg/m2 or 360 mg/m2, respectively; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 2 or less; and adequate hematological, hepatic, and renal function. Prophylactic use of granulocyte colony-simulating factor (G-CSF) was allowed if patients were not fully recovered (absolute neutrophil count greater than 1500/microL) from chemotherapy administration before the next dose. Left ventricular ejection fraction was determined initially, at the end of the study, and every 6 months thereafter. The patients' median age was 55 years (range, 33-68 years), and their median ECOG performance status was 0 (range, 0-1). Twenty-eight patients had received adjuvant therapy, 17 with epirubicin (none with doxorubicin). Metastases were present in the bone (19 patients), lung (19 patients), liver (11 patients), and soft tissues (18 patients). Twenty patients had one metastatic site and 21 had two or more sites. Efficacy was assessed on an intent-to-treat basis. A total of 216 cycles of GAT were given. Twenty-two percent of the courses were delayed or given at reduced doses mostly due to neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. G-CSF was required in

  12. Feasibility of preoperative chemotherapy for locally advanced, operable colon cancer: the pilot phase of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    FOxTROT Collaborative Group

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy and radiotherapy are more effective than similar postoperative treatment for oesophageal, gastric, and rectal cancers, perhaps because of more effective micrometastasis eradication and reduced risk of incomplete excision and tumour cell shedding during surgery. The FOxTROT trial aims to investigate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy for colon cancer. Methods In the pilot stage of this randomised controlled trial, 150 patients with radiologically staged locally advanced (T3 with ≥5 mm invasion beyond the muscularis propria or T4) tumours from 35 UK centres were randomly assigned (2:1) to preoperative (three cycles of OxMdG [oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2, l-folinic acid 175 mg, fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 bolus, then 2400 mg/m2 by 46 h infusion] repeated at 2-weekly intervals followed by surgery and a further nine cycles of OxMdG) or standard postoperative chemotherapy (12 cycles of OxMdG). Patients with KRAS wild-type tumours were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive panitumumab (6 mg/kg; every 2 weeks with the first 6 weeks of chemotherapy) or not. Treatment allocation was through a central randomisation service using a minimised randomisation procedure including age, radiological T and N stage, site of tumour, and presence of defunctioning colostomy as stratification variables. Primary outcome measures of the pilot phase were feasibility, safety, and tolerance of preoperative therapy, and accuracy of radiological staging. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN 87163246. Findings 96% (95 of 99) of patients started and 89% (85 of 95) completed preoperative chemotherapy with grade 3–4 gastrointestinal toxicity in 7% (seven of 94) of patients. All 99 tumours in the preoperative group were resected, with no significant differences in postoperative morbidity between the preoperative and control groups: 14% (14 of 99) versus 12% (six of 51) had

  13. Phase I-II Trial of Cetuximab, Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Radiotherapy as Preoperative Treatment in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Claus Arnold, Dirk; Hipp, Matthias; Liersch, Torsten; Dellas, Kathrin; Iesalnieks, Igors; Hermann, Robert Michael; Lordick, Florian; Hohenberger, Werner; Sauer, Rolf

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and activity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in rectal cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients with rectal cancer (T3-T4 or N+, M1 allowed) entered the trial at five investigator sites; the data from 58 patients were assessable. Cetuximab was given as an initial dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 7 days before the start of RT, and then at 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Capecitabine and oxaliplatin were administered according to an established schedule of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29) and capecitabine (Days 1-14 and 22-35) at three dose levels: 1,000, 1,300, and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d during the Phase I part of the study. The main endpoint of the Phase II was the pathologic complete response rate. Results: Thirteen patients were included in the Phase I part of the study, and the maximal tolerated dose was not reached. Overall, 48 patients were treated at the recommended dose of capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}) and 45 patients (94%) underwent surgery. A pathologic complete response was observed in 4 patients (9%), and moderate (n = 12), minimal (n = 10), and no tumor regression (n = 2) was noted in 24 (53%) of 45 patients. The mean radiation dose intensity, cetuximab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin was 98%, 95%, 94%, and 94%, respectively. The incidence of Grade 3-4 diarrhea was restricted to 19%. Postoperative complications of any grade occurred in 33% of patients. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that cetuximab can be combined safely with capecitabine and oxaliplatin plus RT. The low pathologic complete response rate achieved should stimulate additional preclinical investigations to establish the best sequence of triple combinations.

  14. Arrhythmias Seen in Baseline 24-Hour Holter ECG Recordings in Healthy Normal Volunteers During Phase 1 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Pooja; Karnad, Dilip R; Rohekar, Prashant; Kerkar, Vaibhav; Lokhandwala, Yash Y; Kothari, Snehal

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory agencies encourage sponsors to submit 24-hour ambulatory ECG data for assessing cardiac safety of new drugs, and some arrhythmias, hitherto considered rare, have been observed in some early-phase studies. Interpretation of these observations is difficult given the dearth of published data on the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias seen during 24-hour continuous ECG monitoring in healthy volunteers (HV) from clinical trials. We analyzed drug-free ambulatory ECG recordings from 1273 HV (1000 males, 273 females; age 18-65 years) from 22 phase 1 studies that were analyzed in a core ECG laboratory; all subjects had normal screening ECGs. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as supraventricular premature complexes were observed in 60.8% of healthy volunteers, supraventricular tachycardia in 2.2%, and atrial fibrillation in 0.1%. Ventricular arrhythmias included premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) in 43.4%, >200 PVCs per 24 hours in 3.3%, multifocal PVCs in 5.3%, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 0.7%, and accelerated idioventricular rhythm in 0.3%. Bradyarrhythmias included sinus pause >3 seconds in 0.3%, and second-degree AV block in 2.4%. Complete heart block and torsades de pointes were not seen in any subject. Based on the observed incidence, we estimated the maximum number of healthy subjects in whom these arrhythmias may be seen as a matter of chance in studies with smaller sample sizes if the study drug has no arrhythmogenic effect. Our results and these estimates could help interpret whether cardiac arrhythmias observed in early-phase studies are due to chance or possibly are a drug effect. PMID:26626443

  15. Phase I Trial of a Yeast-Based Therapeutic Cancer Vaccine (GI-6301) Targeting the Transcription Factor Brachyury.

    PubMed

    Heery, Christopher R; Singh, B Harpreet; Rauckhorst, Myrna; Marté, Jennifer L; Donahue, Renee N; Grenga, Italia; Rodell, Timothy C; Dahut, William; Arlen, Philip M; Madan, Ravi A; Schlom, Jeffrey; Gulley, James L

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear transcription factor brachyury has previously been shown to be a strong mediator of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human carcinoma cells and a strong negative prognostic factor in several tumor types. Brachyury is overexpressed in a range of human carcinomas as well as in chordoma, a rare tumor for which there is no standard systemic therapy. Preclinical studies have shown that a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) vaccine encoding brachyury (GI-6301) can activate human T cells in vitro. A phase I dose-escalation (3+3 design) trial enrolled 34 patients at 4 dose levels [3, 3, 16, and 11 patients, respectively, at 4, 16, 40, and 80 yeast units (YU)]. Expansion cohorts were enrolled at 40- and 80-YU dose levels for analysis of immune response and clinical activity. We observed brachyury-specific T-cell immune responses in the majority of evaluable patients despite most having been heavily pretreated. No evidence of autoimmunity or other serious adverse events was observed. Two chordoma patients showed evidence of disease control (one mixed response and one partial response). A patient with colorectal carcinoma, who enrolled on study with a large progressing pelvic mass and rising carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), remains on study for greater than 1 year with stable disease, evidence of decreased tumor density, and decreased serum CEA. This is the first-in-human study to demonstrate the safety and immunogenicity of this therapeutic cancer vaccine and provides the rationale for exploration in phase II studies. A randomized phase II chordoma study is now enrolling patients. PMID:26130065

  16. Phase 3 trial of defibrotide for the treatment of severe veno-occlusive disease and multi-organ failure

    PubMed Central

    Riches, Marcie L.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Brochstein, Joel A.; Mineishi, Shin; Termuhlen, Amanda M.; Arai, Sally; Grupp, Stephan A.; Guinan, Eva C.; Martin, Paul L.; Steinbach, Gideon; Krishnan, Amrita; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Giralt, Sergio; Rodriguez, Tulio; Duerst, Reggie; Doyle, John; Antin, Joseph H.; Smith, Angela; Lehmann, Leslie; Champlin, Richard; Gillio, Alfred; Bajwa, Rajinder; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Massaro, Joseph; Warren, Diane; Miloslavsky, Maja; Hume, Robin L.; Iacobelli, Massimo; Nejadnik, Bijan; Hannah, Alison L.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Untreated hepatic VOD/SOS with multi-organ failure (MOF) is associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide has shown promising efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with MOF in phase 2 studies. This phase 3 study investigated safety and efficacy of defibrotide in patients with established hepatic VOD/SOS and advanced MOF. Patients (n = 102) given defibrotide 25 mg/kg per day were compared with 32 historical controls identified out of 6867 medical charts of HSCT patients by blinded independent reviewers. Baseline characteristics between groups were well balanced. The primary endpoint was survival at day +100 post-HSCT; observed rates equaled 38.2% in the defibrotide group and 25% in the controls (23% estimated difference; 95.1% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-40.8; P = .0109, using a propensity-adjusted analysis). Observed day +100 complete response (CR) rates equaled 25.5% for defibrotide and 12.5% for controls (19% difference using similar methodology; 95.1% CI, 3.5-34.6; P = .0160). Defibrotide was generally well tolerated with manageable toxicity. Related adverse events (AEs) included hemorrhage or hypotension; incidence of common hemorrhagic AEs (including pulmonary alveolar [11.8% and 15.6%] and gastrointestinal bleeding [7.8% and 9.4%]) was similar between the defibrotide and control groups, respectively. Defibrotide was associated with significant improvement in day +100 survival and CR rate. The historical-control methodology offers a novel, meaningful approach for phase 3 evaluation of orphan diseases associated with high mortality. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00358501. PMID:26825712

  17. Phase 3 trial of defibrotide for the treatment of severe veno-occlusive disease and multi-organ failure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul G; Riches, Marcie L; Kernan, Nancy A; Brochstein, Joel A; Mineishi, Shin; Termuhlen, Amanda M; Arai, Sally; Grupp, Stephan A; Guinan, Eva C; Martin, Paul L; Steinbach, Gideon; Krishnan, Amrita; Nemecek, Eneida R; Giralt, Sergio; Rodriguez, Tulio; Duerst, Reggie; Doyle, John; Antin, Joseph H; Smith, Angela; Lehmann, Leslie; Champlin, Richard; Gillio, Alfred; Bajwa, Rajinder; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Massaro, Joseph; Warren, Diane; Miloslavsky, Maja; Hume, Robin L; Iacobelli, Massimo; Nejadnik, Bijan; Hannah, Alison L; Soiffer, Robert J

    2016-03-31

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Untreated hepatic VOD/SOS with multi-organ failure (MOF) is associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide has shown promising efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with MOF in phase 2 studies. This phase 3 study investigated safety and efficacy of defibrotide in patients with established hepatic VOD/SOS and advanced MOF. Patients (n = 102) given defibrotide 25 mg/kg per day were compared with 32 historical controls identified out of 6867 medical charts of HSCT patients by blinded independent reviewers. Baseline characteristics between groups were well balanced. The primary endpoint was survival at day +100 post-HSCT; observed rates equaled 38.2% in the defibrotide group and 25% in the controls (23% estimated difference; 95.1% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-40.8;P= .0109, using a propensity-adjusted analysis). Observed day +100 complete response (CR) rates equaled 25.5% for defibrotide and 12.5% for controls (19% difference using similar methodology; 95.1% CI, 3.5-34.6;P= .0160). Defibrotide was generally well tolerated with manageable toxicity. Related adverse events (AEs) included hemorrhage or hypotension; incidence of common hemorrhagic AEs (including pulmonary alveolar [11.8% and 15.6%] and gastrointestinal bleeding [7.8% and 9.4%]) was similar between the defibrotide and control groups, respectively. Defibrotide was associated with significant improvement in day +100 survival and CR rate. The historical-control methodology offers a novel, meaningful approach for phase 3 evaluation of orphan diseases associated with high mortality. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #. PMID:26825712

  18. A phase II trial of accelerated radiotherapy using weekly stereotactic conformal boost for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme: RTOG 0023

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, Robert; Choucair, Ali; Gillin, Michael; Chakravarti, Arnab; Schultz, Christopher; Souhami, Luis; Chen, Allan; Pham, Huong; Mehta, Minesh

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: This phase II trial was performed to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of dose-intense accelerated radiation therapy using weekly fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) boost for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed GBM with postoperative enhancing tumor plus tumor cavity diameter <60 mm were enrolled. A 50-Gy dose of standard radiation therapy (RT) was given in daily 2-Gy fractions. In addition, patients received four FSRT treatments, once weekly, during Weeks 3 to 6. FSRT dosing of either 5 Gy or 7 Gy per fraction was given for a cumulative dose of 70 or 78 Gy in 29 (25 standard RT + 4 FSRT) treatments over 6 weeks. After the RT course, carmustine (BCNU) at 80 mg/m{sup 2} was given for 3 days, every 8 weeks, for 6 cycles. Results: A total of 76 patients were analyzed. Toxicity included: 3 Grade 4 chemotherapy, 3 acute Grade 4 radiotherapy, and 1 Grade 3 late. The median survival time was 12.5 months. No survival difference is seen when compared with the RTOG historical database. Patients with gross total resection (41%) had a median survival time of 16.6 months vs. 12.0 months for historic controls with gross total resection (p = 0.14). Conclusion: This first, multi-institutional FSRT boost trial for GBM was feasible and well tolerated. There is no significant survival benefit using this dose-intense RT regimen. Subset analysis revealed a trend toward improved outcome for GTR patients suggesting that patients with minimal disease burden may benefit from this form of accelerated RT.

  19. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  20. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  1. Phase I Trial of Maintenance Sorafenib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for FLT3-ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Bin; Li, Shuli; Lane, Andrew A.; Connolly, Christine; Del Rio, Candice; Valles, Betsy; Curtis, Morgan; Ballen, Karen; Cutler, Corey; Dey, Bimalangshu R.; El-Jawahri, Areej; Fathi, Amir T.; Ho, Vincent T.; Joyce, Amy; McAfee, Steven; Rudek, Michelle; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Verselis, Sigitas; Antin, Joseph H.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Levis, Mark; Soiffer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is associated with a high relapse rate for patients with AML even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor which inhibits the FLT3 tyrosine kinase and has shown encouraging activity in FLT3-ITD AML. We conducted a phase I trial of maintenance sorafenib after HSCT in patients with FLT3-ITD AML (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398501). Patients received a variety of conditioning regimens and graft sources. A dose escalation 3+3 cohort design was used to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) with an additional 10 patients treated at the MTD. Sorafenib was initiated between days 45 and 120 after HSCT continued for twelve 28-day cycles. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (status at HSCT: CR1=16, CR2=3, refractory=3). The MTD was established at 400 mg BID with one DLT observed (pericardial effusion). Two patients died of transplant-related causes, both unrelated to sorafenib. Two patients stopped sorafenib after relapse and 5 stopped due to attributable toxicities after the DLT period. Median follow-up for surviving patients is 16.7 months after HSCT (range, 8.1–35.0). There was one case of grade II acute GVHD after starting sorafenib and the 12-month cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 38% (90% CI, 21%–56%). For all patients, one-year progression-free survival (PFS) is 85% (90% CI, 66%–94%) and one-year overall survival (OS) is 95% (90% CI, 79%–99%) after HSCT. For patients in CR1 / CR2 prior to HSCT (n=19), one-year PFS is 95% (90% CI, 76%–99%) and one-year OS is 100% with only one patient who has relapsed. Sorafenib is safe after HSCT for FLT3-ITD AML and merits further investigation for the prevention of relapse. PMID:25239228

  2. Phase I trial of systemic intravenous infusion of interleukin-13-Pseudomonas exotoxin in patients with metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Kumar, Parag; Patel, Dhaval; Aufforth, Rachel; Neychev, Vladimir; Sadowski, Samira; Gara, Sudheer K; Joshi, Bharat H; Cottle-Delisle, Candice; Merkel, Roxanne; Yang, Lily; Miettinen, Markku; Puri, Raj K; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but lethal malignancy without effective current therapy for metastatic disease. IL-13-PE is a recombinant cytotoxin consisting of human interleukin-13 (IL-13) and a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). The main objectives of this Phase I dose-escalation trial were to assess the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of IL-13-PE in patients with metastatic ACC. Eligible patients had confirmed IL-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2) expressions in their tumors. IL-13-PE at dose of 1–2 μg/kg was administered intravenously (IV) on day 1, 3, and 5 in a 4-week cycle. Six patients received 1 μg/kg and two patients received 2 μg/kg of IL-13-PE. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed at 2 μg/kg, at which patients exhibited thrombocytopenia and renal insufficiency without requiring dialysis. PK analysis demonstrated that at MTD, the mean maximum serum concentration (Cmax) of IL-13-PE was 21.0 ng/mL, and the terminal half-life of IL-13-PE was 30–39 min. Two (25%) of the eight patients had baseline neutralizing antibodies against PE. Three (75%) of the remaining four tested patients developed neutralizing antibodies against IL-13-PE within 14–28 days of initial treatment. Of the five patients treated at MTD and assessed for response, one patient had stable disease for 5.5 months before disease progression; the others progressed within 1–2 months. In conclusion, systemic IV administration of IL-13-PE is safe at 1 μg/kg. All tested patients developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies during IL-13-PE treatment. Use of strategies for immunodepletion before IL-13-PE treatment should be considered in future trials. PMID:25767039

  3. Production of clinical-grade plasmid DNA for human Phase I clinical trials and large animal clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Przybylowski, Mark; Bartido, Shirley; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Sadelain, Michel; Rivière, Isabelle

    2007-06-28

    The use of plasmid DNA as vaccines for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases is on the rise. In order to facilitate the manufacture of clinical-grade plasmid DNA for Phase I clinical trials, we developed a process whereby >200 mg plasmid could be produced in a single production run under Good Manufacturing Practices. A dedicated cleanroom (Class 10,000 with Class 100 biosafety cabinet) is utilized for production of the bacterial cell bank, fermentation, harvest/lysis of the biomass, and downstream purification. Fermentation requires three 16-18 h runs (approximately 12 L each) in shaker-flasks, yielding approximately 60 g bacterial paste following batch centrifugation. The biomass is alkaline-lysed, pooled, and the resulting flocculent precipitate is separated by a novel vacuum step, followed by depth-filtration. Downstream processing includes anion-exchange chromatography, utilizing Qiagen silica-based resin, and precipitation with isopropanol. Following precipitation, the DNA is harvested by centrifugation, dried, formulated, and sterile-filtered using a Sartorius Sartobran 150 filter prior to Final-Filling. All processing steps utilize sterilized, single-use components. This process results in a product manufactured according to regulatory guidelines. The plasmid DNA is sterile with >or=95% supercoiled DNA, an A260/A280 ratio>or=1.9, undetectable or extremely low residual endotoxin, RNA, genomic DNA, protein, and antibiotic. Residual solvent levels are negligible. The product yields the predicted profile upon restriction-enzyme digestion, is biologically active upon transfection and remains stable for several years at -20 degrees C. We have therefore developed a reproducible and cost effective process to manufacture clinical-grade plasmid DNA. This process can be adapted by other academic centers for human or large animal clinical trials. PMID:17537555

  4. A phase II trial evaluating the effects and intra-tumoral penetration of bortezomib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Raizer, Jeffrey J; Chandler, James P; Ferrarese, Roberto; Grimm, Sean A; Levy, Robert M; Muro, Kenji; Rosenow, Joshua; Helenowski, Irene; Rademaker, Alfred; Paton, Martin; Bredel, Markus

    2016-08-01

    One resistance mechanism in malignant gliomas (MG) involves nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Bortezomib prevents proteasomal degradation of NF-κB inhibitor α (NFKBIA), an endogenous regulator of NF-κB signaling, thereby limiting the effects of NF-κB on tumor survival and resistance. A presurgical phase II trial of bortezomib in recurrent MG was performed to determine drug concentration in tumor tissue and effects on NFKBIA. Patients were enrolled after signing an IRB approved informed consent. Treatment was bortezomib 1.7 mg/m(2) IV on days 1, 4 and 8 and then surgery on day 8 or 9. Post-operatively, treatment was Temozolomide (TMZ) 75 mg/m(2) PO on days 1-7 and 14-21 and bortezomib 1.7 mg/m(2) on days 7 and 21 [1 cycle was (1) month]. Ten patients were enrolled (8 M and 2 F) with 9 having surgery. Median age and KPS were 50 (42-64) and 90 % (70-100). The median cycles post-operatively was 2 (0-4). The trial was stopped as no patient had a PFS-6. All patients are deceased. Paired plasma and tumor bortezomib concentration measurements revealed higher drug concentrations in tumor than in plasma; NFKBIA protein levels were similar in drug-treated vs. drug-naïve tumor specimens. Nuclear 20S proteasome was less in postoperative samples. Postoperative treatment with TMZ and bortezomib did not show clinical activity. Bortezomib appears to sequester in tumor but pharmacological effects on NFKBIA were not seen, possibly obscured due to downregulation of NFKBIA during tumor progression. Changes in nuclear 20S could be marker of bortezomib effect on tumor. PMID:27300524

  5. Phase I-II clinical trial of hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate in dogs with naturally occurring malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuang; Zhang, Ti; Forrest, W C; Yang, Qiuhong; Groer, Chad; Mohr, Eva; Aires, Daniel J; Axiak-Bechtel, Sandra M; Flesner, Brian K; Henry, Carolyn J; Selting, Kimberly A; Tate, Deborah; Swarz, Jeffrey A; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Forrest, M Laird

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To conduct a phase I-II clinical trial of hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate (HA-Pt) in dogs with naturally occurring malignant tumors. ANIMALS 18 healthy rats, 9 healthy mice, and 16 dogs with cancer. PROCEDURES HA-Pt was prepared and tested by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; DNA-platinum adduct formation and antiproliferation effects of cisplatin and HA-Pt were compared in vitro. Effects of cisplatin (IV) and HA-Pt (SC) in rodents were tested by clinicopathologic assays. In the clinical trial, dogs with cancer received 1 to 4 injections of HA-Pt (10 to 30 mg/m(2), intratumoral or peritumoral, q 3 wk). Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis; CBC, serum BUN and creatinine concentration measurement, and urinalysis were conducted before and 1 week after each treatment. Some dogs underwent hepatic enzyme testing. Tumors were measured before the first treatment and 3 weeks after each treatment to assess response. RESULTS No adverse drug effects were detected in pretrial assessments in rodents. Seven of 16 dogs completed the study; 3 had complete tumor responses, 3 had stable disease, and 1 had progressive disease. Three of 7 dogs with oral and nasal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that completed the study had complete responses. Myelosuppression and cardiotoxicosis were identified in 6 and 2 dogs, respectively; none had nephrotoxicosis. Four of 5 dogs with hepatic enzymes assessed had increased ALT activities, attributed to diaquated cisplatin products in the HA-Pt. Pharmacokinetic data fit a 3-compartment model. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE HA-Pt treatment resulted in positive tumor responses in some dogs, primarily those with SCC. The adverse effect rate was high. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Oral SCC in dogs has characteristics similar to human head and neck SCC; these results could be useful in developing human treatments. PMID:27580113

  6. Phase I trial of motexafin-lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, Diana C. H.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C.; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Miles, Jeremy; Busch, Theresa M.; Shin, Daniel; Kachur, Alex; Tochner, Zelig A.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2004-06-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy are limited. An ongoing Phase I trial of interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu) was initiated in year 2000 for men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Twelve men with biopsy-proven recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled. Pre-treatment evaluation included an MRI of the prostate, bone scan, laboratory studies, cystoscopy, and transrectal ultrasound. Treatment plans were generated based upon the ultrasound findings. PDT dose was escalated by increasing the motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 nm light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 3, 6, or 24 hours prior to 732 nm light delivery. The light dose measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2 for all patients. Light was delivered through optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room and optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Twelve patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I PDT-related genitourinary symptoms were observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter-related. No rectal or other GI PDT-related toxicities were observed. Measurements of motexafin lutetium in prostate tissue demonstrated the presence of photosensitizer at all dose levels. Conclusions: Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT designed to treat comprehensively the entired prostate gland has been well-tolerated at the doses

  7. Metronomic cyclophosphamide therapy in hormone-naive patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrent prostate cancer: a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Fabien; Mouillet, Guillaume; Adotevi, Olivier; Maurina, Tristan; Nguyen, Thierry; Montcuquet, Philippe; Curtit, E; Kleinclauss, F; Pivot, Xavier; Borg, Christophe; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    After curative local therapy, biochemical recurrence is a mode of relapse among patient with prostate cancer (PC). Deferring androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or offering non-hormonal therapies may be an appropriate option for these non-symptomatic patients with no proven metastases. Metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) has shown activity in metastatic PC setting and was chosen to be assessed in biochemical relapse. This prospective single-arm open-label phase II study was conducted to evaluate MC regimen in patients with biochemical recurrent PC. MC was planned to be administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg for 6 months. Primary endpoint was PSA response. Thirty-eight patients were included and treated. Median follow-up was 45.5 months (range 17-100). Among them, 14 patients (37 %) achieved PSA stabilisation and 22 patients (58 %) experienced PSA progression. Response rate was 5 % with one complete response (2.6 %), and 1 partial response with PSA decrease >50 % (2.6 %). The median time until androgen deprivation therapy initiation was around 15 months. The treatment was well tolerated. Neither grade 3-4 toxicity nor serious adverse events were observed. This first prospective clinical trial with MC therapy in patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrence of PC displayed modest efficacy when measured with PSA response rate, without significant toxicity. It might offer a new safe and non-expensive option to delay initiation of ADT. These results would need to be confirmed with larger prospective randomised trials. PMID:27400698

  8. A Multicenter Phase 2 Trial of Pazopanib in Metastatic and Progressive Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: MC057H

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Vera J.; Molina, Julian R.; Smallridge, Robert C.; Maples, William J.; Menefee, Michael E.; Rubin, Joseph; Karlin, Nina; Sideras, Kostandinos; Morris, John C.; McIver, Bryan; Hay, Ian; Fatourechi, Vahab; Burton, Jill K.; Webster, Kevin P.; Bieber, Carolyn; Traynor, Anne M.; Flynn, Patrick J.; Cher Goh, Boon; Isham, Crescent R.; Harris, Pamela; Erlichman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pazopanib is a small molecule inhibitor of kinases principally including vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1, -2, and -3; platelet-derived growth factor receptors-α and -β; and c-Kit. We previously reported a tumor response rate of 49% in patients with advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and 0% in patients with advanced anaplastic thyroid cancer. The present report details results of pazopanib therapy in advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Objective, Design, Setting, Patients, Intervention, and Outcome Measures: Having noted preclinical activity of pazopanib in MTC, patients with advanced MTC who had disease progression within the preceding 6 months were accrued to this multiinstitutional phase II clinical trial to assess tumor response rate (by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors criteria) and safety of pazopanib given orally once daily at 800 mg until disease progression or intolerability. Results: From September 22, 2008, to December 11, 2011, 35 individuals (80% males, median age 60 y) were enrolled. All patients have been followed up until treatment discontinuation or for a minimum of four cycles. Eight patients (23%) are still on the study treatment. The median number of therapy cycles was eight. Five patients attained partial Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors responses (14.3%; 90% confidence interval 5.8%–27.7%), with a median progression-free survival and overall survival of 9.4 and 19.9 months, respectively. Side effects included treatment-requiring (new) hypertension (33%), fatigue (14%), diarrhea (9%), and abnormal liver tests (6%); 3 of 35 patients (8.6%) discontinued therapy due to adverse events. There was one death of a study patient after withdrawal from the trial deemed potentially treatment related. Conclusions: Pazopanib has promising clinical activity in metastatic MTC with overall manageable toxicities. PMID:24606083

  9. Responders vs clinical response: a critical analysis of data from linaclotide phase 3 clinical trials in IBS-C

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, B E; Lembo, A J; MacDougall, J E; Shiff, S J; Kurtz, C B; Currie, M G; Johnston, J M

    2014-01-01

    Background US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) set a rigorous standard for defining patient responders in irritable bowel syndrome-C (IBS-C; i.e., FDA's Responder Endpoint) for regulatory approval. However, this endpoint's utility for health-care practitioners to assess clinical response has not been determined. We analyzed pooled IBS-C linaclotide trial data to evaluate clinically significant responses in linaclotide-treated patients who did not meet the FDA responder definition. Methods Percentages of FDA non-responders reporting improvement in abdominal pain, bowel function and/or global relief measures were determined using pooled data from two linaclotide Phase 3 IBS-C trials. Key Results 1602 IBS-C patients enrolled; 34% of linaclotide-treated and 17% of placebo-treated patients met the FDA Responder Endpoint (p < 0.0001). Among FDA non-responders at week 12, 63% of linaclotide-treated patients reported their abdominal pain was at least somewhat relieved, compared with 48% of placebo-treated patients. For stool frequency, 62% of linaclotide-treated patients reported that they were at least somewhat improved at week 12, compared with 46% of placebo-treated patients. For global IBS symptoms, 65% of linaclotide-treated patients reported at least some IBS-symptom relief, 43% reported adequate relief of IBS symptoms, and 57% reported being satisfied with linaclotide treatment, vs placebo rates of 48%, 34%, and 41% respectively. Conclusions & Inferences Most linaclotide-treated IBS-C patients who were FDA non-responders reported some improvement in abdominal pain and stool frequency, and global relief/satisfaction. In addition to the FDA Responder Endpoint, differing response thresholds and symptom-specific change from baseline should be considered by clinicians for a complete understanding of clinical response to linaclotide and other IBS-C therapies. PMID:24382134

  10. Telecom 2-B and 2-C (TC2B and TC2C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulac, J.; Alvarez, H.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for Telecom 2-B and 2-C (TC2B and TC2C) are summarized. These Telecom missions will provide high-speed data link applications, telephone, and television service between France and overseas territories as a follow-on to TC2A. Mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  11. Phase II trial of doxorubicin/docetaxel/cyclophosphamide for locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer: results from NSABP trial BP-58.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roy E; Anderson, Stewart J; Brown, Ann; Scholnik, Aaron P; Desai, Ajit M; Kardinal, Carl G; Lembersky, Barry C; Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2002-12-01

    Based on the recommended phase II doses for doxorubicin (60 mg/m2) and docetaxel (60 mg/m2) and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's (NSABP) experience with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2), we conducted a phase II trial at 18 institutions using doxorubicin/docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (ATC) given every 21 days, in preparation for a major adjuvant breast cancer study (NSABP B-30), in which ATC would be used. Eligibility requirements included measurable stage IIIB/IV breast cancer, performance status 0-2, normal left ventricular ejection fraction, and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease (nontaxane adjuvant chemotherapy was allowed if completed > 12 months before entry and if the cumulative dose of doxorubicin was =240 mg/m2). Eighty-nine patients were entered who ranged in age from 30-78 years (38.2% < 50 years; 61.8% =50 years). A total of 33.7% of patients had stage IIIB disease, and 66.3% had stage IV disease. Among the stage IV patients, 20.3% had received prior adjuvant chemotherapy. Dexamethasone premedication (8 mg p.o. b.i.d. for 3 days) and prophylactic ciprofloxacin (500 mg p.o. b.i.d. days 5-15) were used. Colony-stimulating growth factors were reserved for secondary prophylaxis after prolonged or febrile neutropenia (FN) or documented severe infection in a prior cycle. After a cumulative dose of doxorubicin 480 mg/m2, patients could continue with docetaxel/cyclophosphamide alone. Eighty-nine patients and 577 courses were evaluable for toxicity. Median time on study as of May 2002 was 36.5 months (range, 28-47 months). Febrile neutropenia occurred in 34 patients (38%); 8 developed FN in the absence of prior prophylactic growth factor support; 26 developed FN despite prior growth factor support (for one patient this information was unavailable). There were no septic deaths. One patient died from pulmonary embolism. Other grade 3/4 adverse events included: nausea (9%), vomiting (7%), stomatitis (6

  12. Holmium-166 radioembolization for the treatment of patients with liver metastases: design of the phase I HEPAR trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intra-arterial radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres ( 90Y-RE) is an increasingly used therapy for patients with unresectable liver malignancies. Over the last decade, radioactive holmium-166 poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres ( 166Ho-PLLA-MS) have been developed as a possible alternative to 90Y-RE. Next to high-energy beta-radiation, 166Ho also emits gamma-radiation, which allows for imaging by gamma scintigraphy. In addition, Ho is a highly paramagnetic element and can therefore be visualized by MRI. These imaging modalities are useful for assessment of the biodistribution, and allow dosimetry through quantitative analysis of the scintigraphic and MR images. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of 166Ho-PLLA-MS radioembolization ( 166Ho-RE) in animals. The aim of this phase I trial is to assess the safety and toxicity profile of 166Ho-RE in patients with liver metastases. Methods The HEPAR study (Holmium Embolization Particles for Arterial Radiotherapy) is a non-randomized, open label, safety study. We aim to include 15 to 24 patients with liver metastases of any origin, who have chemotherapy-refractory disease and who are not amenable to surgical resection. Prior to treatment, in addition to the standard technetium-99m labelled macroaggregated albumin ( 99mTc-MAA) dose, a low radioactive safety dose of 60-mg 166Ho-PLLA-MS will be administered. Patients are treated in 4 cohorts of 3-6 patients, according to a standard dose escalation protocol (20 Gy, 40 Gy, 60 Gy, and 80 Gy, respectively). The primary objective will be to establish the maximum tolerated radiation dose of 166Ho-PLLA-MS. Secondary objectives are to assess tumour response, biodistribution, performance status, quality of life, and to compare the 166Ho-PLLA-MS safety dose and the 99mTc-MAA dose distributions with respect to the ability to accurately predict microsphere distribution. Discussion This will be the first clinical study on 166Ho-RE. Based on preclinical studies

  13. Phase I Trial Using Patupilone (Epothilone B) and Concurrent Radiotherapy for Central Nervous System Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, Shannon; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Curran, Walter J.; Bonanni, Roseann; Axelrod, Rita; Andrews, David; Dicker, Adam P.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Based on preclinical data indicating the radiosensitizing potential of epothilone B, the present study was designed to evaluate the toxicity and response rate of patupilone, an epothilone B, with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of central nervous system malignancies. Methods and Materials: The present Phase I study evaluated the toxicities associated with patupilone combined with RT to establish the maximal tolerated dose. Eligible patients had recurrent gliomas (n = 10) primary (n = 5) or metastatic (n = 17) brain tumors. Dose escalation occurred if no dose-limiting toxicities, defined as any Grade 4-5 toxicity or Grade 3 toxicity requiring hospitalization, occurred during treatment. Results: Of 14 patients, 5 were treated with weekly patupilone at 1.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.5 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1 at 4 mg/m{sup 2}. Of 18 patients, 7 were treated in the 6-mg/m{sup 2} group, 6 in the 8-mg/m{sup 2} group, and 5 in the 10-mg/m{sup 2} group. Primary central nervous system malignancies received RT to a median dose of 60 Gy. Central nervous system metastases received whole brain RT to a median dose of 37.4 Gy, and patients with recurrent gliomas underwent stereotactic RT to a median dose of 37.5 Gy. One dose-limiting toxicity (pneumonia) was observed in group receiving 8-mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks. At the subsequent dose level (10 mg/m{sup 2}), two Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities occurred (renal failure and pulmonary hemorrhage); thus, 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks was the maximal tolerated dose and the recommended Phase II dose. Conclusion: Combined with a variety of radiation doses and fractionation schedules, concurrent patupilone was well tolerated and safe, with a maximal tolerated dose of 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks.

  14. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Trametes versicolor in Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torkelson, Carolyn J.; Sweet, Erin; Martzen, Mark R.; Sasagawa, Masa; Wenner, Cynthia A.; Gay, Juliette; Putiri, Amy; Standish, Leanna J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Orally administered preparations from the Trametes versicolor (Tv) mushroom have been hypothesized to improve immune response in women with breast cancer after standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods. A phase I, two-center, dose escalation study was done to determine the maximum tolerated dose of a Tv preparation when taken daily in divided doses for 6 weeks after recent completion of radiotherapy. Eleven participants were recruited and nine women completed the study. Each cohort was comprised of three participants given one of three doses of Tv (3, 6, or 9 grams). Immune data was collected pre- and postradiation, at 3 on-treatment time points and after a 3-week washout. Results. Nine adverse events were reported (7 mild, 1 moderate, and 1 severe), suggesting that Tv was well tolerated. Immunological results indicated trends in (1) increased lymphocyte counts at 6 and 9 grams/day; (2) increased natural killer cell functional activity at 6 grams/day; (3) dose-related increases in CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells , but not CD4+ T cells or CD16+56+ NK cells. Conclusion. These findings show that up to 9 grams/day of a Tv preparation is safe and tolerable in women with breast cancer in the postprimary treatment setting. This Tv preparation may improve immune status in immunocompromised breast cancer patients following standard primary oncologic treatment. PMID:22701186

  15. Phase I Clinical Trial Assessing Temozolomide and Tamoxifen With Concomitant Radiotherapy for Treatment of High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shilpen; DiBiase, Steven; Meisenberg, Barry; Flannery, Todd; Patel, Ashish; Dhople, Anil; Cheston, Sally; Amin, Pradip

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme is concurrent radiotherapy (RT) and temozolomide. The proliferation of high-grade gliomas might be partly dependent on protein kinase C-mediated pathways. Tamoxifen has been shown in vitro to inhibit protein kinase C through estrogen receptor-independent antineoplastic effects. This Phase I trial was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of tamoxifen when given with temozolomide and concurrent RT to patients with high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 consecutive patients in four cohorts with World Health Organization Grade 3 (n = 2) and 4 (n = 15) gliomas were given tamoxifen twice daily during 6 weeks of concurrent RT and temozolomide. Eligibility included histologic diagnosis, age >18 years old, Karnofsky performance status {>=}60, and no previous brain RT or chemotherapy. The starting dose was 50 mg/m{sup 2} divided twice daily. If no dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) occurred in 3 patients, the dose was escalated in 25-mg/m{sup 2} increments until the MTD was reached. When {>=}2 patients within a cohort experienced a DLT, the MTD had been exceeded. Temozolomide was given with RT at 75 mg/m{sup 2}. A dose of 60 Gy in 2 Gy/d fractions to a partial brain field was delivered. Results: A total of 6 patients in Cohort 4 had received tamoxifen at 125 mg/m{sup 2}. One patient was excluded, and the fourth patient developed Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (DLT). Thus, 3 more patients needed to be enrolled. A deep venous thrombosis (DLT) occurred in the sixth patient. Thus, the MTD was 100 mg/m{sup 2}. Conclusions: The MTD of tamoxifen was 100 mg/m{sup 2} when given concurrently with temozolomide 75 mg/m{sup 2} and RT. Tamoxifen might have a role in the initial treatment of high-grade gliomas and should be studied in future Phase II trials building on the newly established platform of concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  16. Prophylactic nimodipine treatment for cochlear and facial nerve preservation after vestibular schwannoma surgery: a randomized multicenter Phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Christian; Wienke, Andreas; Tatagiba, Marcos; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Ramina, Kristofer F; Ganslandt, Oliver; Bischoff, Barbara; Zenk, Johannes; Engelhorn, Tobias; Matthies, Cordula; Westermaier, Thomas; Antoniadis, Gregor; Pedro, Maria Teresa; Rohde, Veit; von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Kretschmer, Thomas; Kornhuber, Malte; Steighardt, Jörg; Richter, Michael; Barker, Fred G; Strauss, Christian

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT A pilot study of prophylactic nimodipine and hydroxyethyl starch treatment showed a beneficial effect on facial and cochlear nerve preservation following vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. A prospective Phase III trial was undertaken to confirm these results. METHODS An open-label, 2-arm, randomized parallel group and multicenter Phase III trial with blinded expert review was performed and included 112 patients who underwent VS surgery between January 2010 and February 2013 at 7 departments of neurosurgery to investigate the efficacy and safety of the prophylaxis. The surgery was performed after the patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups using online randomization. The treatment group (n = 56) received parenteral nimodipine (1-2 mg/hr) and hydroxyethyl starch (hematocrit 30%-35%) from the day before surgery until the 7th postoperative day. The control group (n = 56) was not treated prophylactically. RESULTS Intent-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effects of the treatment on either preservation of facial nerve function (35 [67.3%] of 52 [treatment group] compared with 34 [72.3%] of 47 [control group]) (p = 0.745) or hearing preservation (11 [23.4%] of 47 [treatment group] compared with 15 [31.2%] of 48 [control group]) (p = 0.530) 12 months after surgery. Since tumor sizes were significantly larger in the treatment group than in the control group, logistic regression analysis was required. The risk for deterioration of facial nerve function was adjusted nearly the same in both groups (OR 1.07 [95% CI 0.34-3.43], p = 0.91). In contrast, the risk for postoperative hearing loss was adjusted 2 times lower in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.49 [95% CI 0.18-1.30], p = 0.15). Apart from dose-dependent hypotension (p < 0.001), no clinically relevant adverse reactions were observed. CONCLUSIONS There were no statistically significant effects of the treatment. Despite the width of the confidence intervals, the

  17. Sodium oxybate therapy provides multidimensional improvement in fibromyalgia: results of an international phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Michael; Bennett, Robert M; Benson, Beverly A; Wang, Y Grace; Lai, Chinglin; Choy, Ernest H

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is characterised by chronic musculoskeletal pain and multiple symptoms including fatigue, multidimensional function impairment, sleep disturbance and tenderness. Along with pain and fatigue, non-restorative sleep is a core symptom of fibromyalgia. Sodium oxybate (SXB) is thought to reduce non-restorative sleep abnormalities. This study evaluated effects of SXB on fibromyalgia-related pain and other symptoms. Methods 573 patients with fibromyalgia according to 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria were enrolled at 108 centres in eight countries. Subjects were randomly assigned to placebo, SXB 4.5 g/night or SXB 6 g/night. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of subjects with ≥30% reduction in pain visual analogue scale from baseline to treatment end. Other efficacy assessments included function, sleep quality, effect of sleep on function, fatigue, tenderness, health-related quality of life and subject's impression of change in overall wellbeing. Results Significant improvements in pain, sleep and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia were seen in SXB treated subjects compared with placebo. The proportion of subjects with ≥30% pain reduction was 42.0% for SXB4.5 g/night (p=0.002) and 51.4% for SXB6 g/night (p<0.001) versus 26.8% for placebo. Quality of sleep (Jenkins sleep scale) improved by 20% for SXB4.5 g/night (p≤0.001) and 25% for SXB6 g/night (p≤0.001) versus 0.5% for placebo. Adverse events with an incidence ≥5% and twice placebo were nausea, dizziness, vomiting, insomnia, anxiety, somnolence, fatigue, muscle spasms and peripheral oedema. Conclusion These results, combined with findings from previous phase 2 and 3 studies, provide supportive evidence that SXB therapy affordsimportant benefits across multiple symptoms in subjects with fibromyalgia. PMID:22294641

  18. Outcomes of patients with advanced cancer and KRAS mutations in phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Said, Rabih; Ye, Yang; Falchook, Gerald Steven; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Zinner, Ralph; Blumenschein, George R.; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David S.; Piha-Paul, Sarina Anne; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Palmer, Gary A.; Aldape, Kenneth; Hess, Kenneth R.; Tsimberidou, Apostolia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background KRAS mutation is common in human cancer. We assessed the clinical factors, including type of KRAS mutation and treatment, of patients with advanced cancer and tumor KRAS mutations and their association with treatment outcomes. Methods Patients referred to the Phase I Clinic for treatment who underwent testing for KRAS mutations were analyzed. Results Of 1,781 patients, 365 (21%) had a KRAS mutation. The G12D mutation was the most common mutation (29%). PIK3CA mutations were found in 24% and 10% of patients with and without KRAS mutations (p<0.0001). Of 223 patients with a KRAS mutation who were evaluable for response, 56 were treated with a MEK inhibitor-containing therapy and 167 with other therapies. The clinical benefit (partial response and stable disease lasting ≥ 6 months) rates were 23% and 9%, respectively, for the MEK inhibitor versus other therapies (p=0.005). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3.3 and 2.2 months, respectively (p=0.09). The respective median overall survival was 8.4 and 7.0 months (p=0.38). Of 66 patients with a KRAS mutation and additional alterations, higher rates of clinical benefit (p=0.04), PFS (p=0.045), and overall survival (p=0.02) were noted in patients treated with MEK inhibitor-containing therapy (n=9) compared to those treated with targeted therapy matched to the additional alterations (n=24) or other therapy (n=33). Conclusions MEK inhibitors in patients with KRAS-mutated advanced cancer were associated with higher clinical benefit rates compared to other therapies. Therapeutic strategies that include MEK inhibitors or novel agents combined with other targeted therapies or chemotherapy need further investigation. PMID:25313136

  19. Impact of Surotomycin on the Gut Microbiota of Healthy Volunteers in a Phase 1 Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Dale, Suzanne E; Chesnel, Laurent; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea has been associated with disruption of the normal intestinal microbiota, particularly theBacteroides fragilisgroup andPrevotellaspecies. Surotomycin is a bactericidal cyclic lipopeptide in development for treatment ofClostridium difficile-associated diarrhea that has selective and potent activity againstC. difficileand other Gram-positive bacteria and a minimal impact on intestinal Gram-negative organisms. The impacts of ascending doses of surotomycin on major organism groups in the gut microbiota of healthy volunteers were evaluated during a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose phase 1 study. Thirty volunteers were randomized into 3 cohorts, using a 4:1 ratio, to receive 250 mg, 500 mg, or 1,000 mg of surotomycin, or placebo, twice daily for 14 days. Stool samples collected at baseline (days 0 and 1) and at the end of treatment (days 13 to 15) were cultured quantitatively. TheB. fragilisgroup, theBacteroides/Prevotellagroup, andEnterobacteriaceaewere also quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. Baseline and end-of-treatment stool samples showed 1- to 2-log10CFU/g reductions in total bacterial counts for most volunteers. Various decreases in clostridial,Lactobacillus-Bifidobacteriumgroup, and enterococcus-streptococcus group counts occurred while patients were receiving surotomycin, whereas the enterobacteria and theB. fragilisgroup persisted at the end of treatment. There was no change in enterococcus MICs of surotomycin, nor was vancomycin-resistantEnterococcusdetected after exposure. Surotomycin at doses of up to 1,000 mg twice daily had only modest disruptive effects on the gut microbiota. The potential sparing of the gut microbiota by surotomycin may decrease the risk of disease recurrence. PMID:26787687

  20. Phase III Trial of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Sorafenib in Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Keith T.; Lee, Sandra J.; Zhao, Fengmin; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Flaherty, Lawrence; Kefford, Richard; Atkins, Michael B.; Leming, Philip; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine whether carboplatin, paclitaxel, and sorafenib (CPS) improve overall survival (OS) compared with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP) in chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients and Methods In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase III study, all patients received carboplatin at area under the [concentration-time] curve 6 and paclitaxel 225 mg/m2 intravenously once every 21 days with random assignment to sorafenib 400 mg orally twice per day on days 2 through 19 every 21 days or placebo. The primary end point was OS, and secondary end points included progression-free survival, objective tumor response, and toxicity. Results In all, 823 patients were enrolled over 34 months. At final analysis, the median OS was 11.3 months (95% CI, 9.8 to 12.2 months) for CP and 11.1 months (95% CI, 10.3 to 12.3 months) for CPS; the difference in the OS distribution was not statistically significant by the stratified log-rank test, stratified on American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, and prior therapy (P = .878). Median progression-free survival was 4.9 months for CPS and 4.2 months for CP (P = .092, stratified log-rank test). Response rate was 20% for CPS and 18% for CP (P = .427). More patients on the CPS arm had grade 3 or higher toxicities (84% v 78%; P = .027), with increased rash, hand-foot syndrome, and thrombocytopenia accounting for most of the difference. Conclusion Sorafenib does not improve OS when given in combination with CP for chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic melanoma. This study establishes benchmark end points for the CP regimen in first-line therapy of metastatic melanoma. PMID:23248256

  1. Phase II trial of irinotecan and metronomic temozolomide in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Reynés, Gaspar; Martínez-Sales, Vicenta; Vila, Virtudes; Balañá, Carmen; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Vaz, María A; Benavides, Manuel; Gallego, Oscar; Palomero, Isabel; Gil-Gil, Miguel; Fleitas, Tania; Reche, Encarnación

    2016-02-01

    This phase II study was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of metronomic temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with irinotecan in glioblastoma (GB) at first relapse. Patients with GB at first relapse received TMZ 50 mg/m/2day divided into three doses, except for a single 100 mg/m2 dose, administered between 3 and 6 h before every irinotecan infusion. Irinotecan was given intravenously at the previously established dose of 100 mg/m2 on days 8 and 22 of 28-day cycles. Treatment was given for a maximum of nine cycles or until progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Vascular endothelial growth factor and its soluble receptor 1, thrombospondin-1, microparticles, and microparticle-dependent procoagulant activity were measured in blood before treatment. The primary objective was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Twenty-seven evaluable patients were enrolled. Six-month PFS was 20.8%. Median PFS was 11.6 weeks (95% confidence interval: 7.5-15.7). Stable disease was the best response for nine (37.5%) patients, with a median duration of 11.2 weeks (4.2-35.85 weeks). No differences in PFS or response were observed among patients who relapsed during or after completion of adjuvant TMZ. Grade 3/4 adverse events included lymphopenia (15%), fatigue, diarrhea and febrile neutropenia (3.7% each), lymphopenia, neutropenia, and nausea/vomiting (11.1% each). One patient died from pneumonia and one patient died from pulmonary thromboembolism. Pretreatment levels of angiogenesis biomarkers, microparticles, and microparticle-related procoagulant activity were elevated in patients compared with healthy volunteers. This regimen is feasible, but failed to improve the results obtained with other second-line therapies in recurrent GB. PMID:26574999

  2. Randomized phase II trial on mitomycin-C/cisplatin +/- KLT in heavily pretreated advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, H Y; Cai, Y; Yang, X M; Wang, Z H; Wang, J L; Zhao, X M; Li, J; Hu, X C

    2008-01-01

    A randomized phase II study using mitomycin (MMC)/cisplatin (DDP) regimen with or without Kanglaite (KLT, a traditional Chinese medicine) as salvage treatment was conducted to exploit KLT's potential effects on patients with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Triweekly regimen consisted of mitomycin (8 mg/m(2)) administered intravenously on day 1, and cisplatin (25 mg/m(2)) intravenously on days 1 to 3. KLT (100 ml) was given intravenously per day on days 1 to 14 every 3 weeks. Between April 2006 and July 2007, 60 patients with a median age of 48 years were randomized into MMC/DDP with or without KLT treatment. In all, the objective response rate (ORR) was 17.5%. There were no significant differences between experimental and control treatments in terms of ORR (14.3% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.730), clinical benefit rates (24.1% vs. 28.6%, p = 0.468), median time to progression (TTP; 3.63 vs. 4.0, p = 0.872), and overall survival (OS; 7.17 vs. not reached, p = 0.120). The median TTP for patients with complete or partial responses was 6.0 months, but only 2.1 months for patients with stable or progressive disease (SD or PD; p = 0.028). While the median OS for patients who obtained clinical benefit from chemotherapy was not reached, that of patients with SD of no more than 6 months or PD was only 7.17 months (p = 0.004). There is no additional benefit when KLT is added to the MMC/DDP doublet in the management of ABC. Patients who obtained clinical benefit from chemotherapy had a longer TTP and OS. PMID:18711764

  3. Phase II trials of erlotinib or gefitinib in patients with recurrent meningioma.

    PubMed

    Norden, Andrew D; Raizer, Jeffrey J; Abrey, Lauren E; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Lassman, Andrew B; Chang, Susan M; Yung, W K Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R; Fine, Howard A; Mehta, Minesh; Deangelis, Lisa M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Robins, H Ian; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D; Lieberman, Frank; Wen, Patrick Y

    2010-01-01

    There are no established treatments for recurrent meningioma when surgical and radiation options are exhausted. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often over-expressed in meningiomas and may promote tumor growth. In open label, single arm phase II studies of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib (NABTC 00-01) and erlotinib (NABTC 01-03) for recurrent malignant gliomas, we included exploratory subsets of recurrent meningioma patients. We have pooled the data and report the results here. Patients with recurrent histologically confirmed meningiomas with no more than 2 previous chemotherapy regimens were treated with gefitinib 500 mg/day or erlotinib 150 mg/day until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Twenty-five eligible patients were enrolled with median age 57 years (range 29-81) and median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 90 (range 60-100). Sixteen patients (64%) received gefitinib and 9 (36%) erlotinib. Eight patients (32%) had benign tumors, 9 (36%) atypical, and 8 (32%) malignant. For benign tumors, the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) was 25%, 12-month PFS (PFS12) 13%, 6-month overall survival (OS6) 63%, and 12-month OS (OS12) 50%. For atypical and malignant tumors, PFS6 was 29%, PFS12 18%, OS6 71%, and OS12 65%. The PFS and OS were not significantly different by histology. There were no objective imaging responses, but 8 patients (32%) maintained stable disease. Although treatment was well-tolerated, neither gefitinib nor erlotinib appear to have significant activity against recurrent meningioma. The role of EGFR inhibitors in meningiomas is unclear. Evaluation of multi-targeted inhibitors and EGFR inhibitors in combination with other targeted molecular agents may be warranted. PMID:19562255

  4. Phase II Trials of Erlotinib or Gefitinib in Patients with Recurrent Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Norden, Andrew D.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Lassman, Andrew B.; Chang, Susan M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Fine, Howard A.; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D.; Lieberman, Frank; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2013-01-01

    There are no established treatments for recurrent meningioma when surgical and radiation options are exhausted. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often over-expressed in meningiomas and may promote tumor growth. In open label, single arm phase II studies of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib (NABTC 00-01) and erlotinib (NABTC 01-03) for recurrent malignant gliomas, we included exploratory subsets of recurrent meningioma patients. We have pooled the data and report the results here. Patients with recurrent histologically confirmed meningiomas with no more than 2 previous chemotherapy regimens were treated with gefitinib 500 mg/day or erlotinib 150 mg/day until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Twenty-five eligible patients were enrolled with median age 57 years (range 29–81) and median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 90 (range 60–100). Sixteen patients (64%) received gefitinib and 9 (36%) erlotinib. Eight patients (32%) had benign tumors, 9 (36%) atypical, and 8 (32%) malignant. For benign tumors, the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) was 25%, 12-month PFS (PFS12) 13%, 6-month overall survival (OS6) 63%, and 12-month OS (OS12) 50%. For atypical and malignant tumors, PFS6 was 29%, PFS12 18%, OS6 71%, and OS12 65%. The PFS and OS were not significantly different by histology. There were no objective imaging responses, but 8 patients (32%) maintained stable disease. Although treatment was well-tolerated, neither gefitinib nor erlotinib appear to have significant activity against recurrent meningioma. The role of EGFR inhibitors in meningiomas is unclear. Evaluation of multi-targeted inhibitors and EGFR inhibitors in combination with other targeted molecular agents may be warranted. PMID:19562255

  5. Multicenter, Phase 3 Trial Comparing Selenium Supplementation With Observation in Gynecologic Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Muecke, Ralph; Schomburg, Lutz; Glatzel, Michael; Berndt-Skorka, Regina; Baaske, Dieter; Reichl, Berthold; Buentzel, Jens; Kundt, Guenter; Prott, Franz J.; Vries, Alexander de; Stoll, Guenther; Kisters, Klaus; Bruns, Frank; Schaefer, Ulrich; Willich, Norman; Micke, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: We assessed whether adjuvant supplementation with selenium improves the selenium status and reduces side effects of patients treated by radiotherapy (RT) for cervical and uterine cancer. Methods and Materials: Whole-blood selenium concentrations were measured in patients with cervical cancer (n = 11) and uterine cancer (n = 70) after surgical treatment, during RT, at the end of RT, and 6 weeks after RT. Patients with initial selenium concentrations of less than 84{mu}g/L were randomized before RT either to receive 500 {mu}g of selenium (in the form of sodium selenite [selenase (registered) , biosyn Arzneimittel GmbH, Fellbach, Germany]) by mouth on the days of RT and 300 {mu}g of selenium on the days without RT or to receive no supplement during RT. The primary endpoint of this multicenter Phase 3 study was to assess the efficiency of selenium supplementation during RT; the secondary endpoint was to decrease radiation-induced diarrhea and other RT-dependent side effects. Results: A total of 81 patients were randomized. We enrolled 39 in the selenium group (SG) and 42 in the control group (CG). Selenium levels did not differ between the SG and CG upon study initiation but were significantly higher in the SG at the end of RT. The actuarial incidence of diarrhea of Grade 2 or higher according to Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2) in the SG was 20.5% compared with 44.5% in the CG (p = 0.04). Other blood parameters, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and self-reported quality of life were not different between the groups. Conclusions: Selenium supplementation during RT is effective in improving blood selenium status in selenium-deficient cervical and uterine cancer patients and reduces the number of episodes and severity of RT-induced diarrhea.

  6. Phase II clinical trial of pasireotide long-acting repeatable in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cives, M; Kunz, P L; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Schell, M J; Campos, T; Nguyen, P T; Nandoskar, P; Khandelwal, V; Strosberg, J R

    2015-01-01

    Pasireotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) is a novel somatostatin analog (SSA) with avid binding affinity to somatostatin receptor subtypes 1, 2, 3 (SSTR1,2,3) and 5 (SSTR5). Results from preclinical studies indicate that pasireotide can inhibit neuroendocrine tumor (NET) growth more robustly than octreotide in vitro. This open-label, phase II study assessed the clinical activity of pasireotide in treatment-naïve patients with metastatic grade 1 or 2 NETs. Patients with metastatic pancreatic and extra-pancreatic NETs were treated with pasireotide LAR (60 mg every 4 weeks). Previous systemic therapy, including octreotide and lanreotide, was not permitted. Tumor assessments were performed every 3 months using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), and safety. Twenty-nine patients were treated with pasireotide LAR (60 mg every 4 weeks) and 28 were evaluable for response. The median PFS was 11 months. The most favorable effect was observed in patients with low hepatic tumor burden, normal baseline chromogranin A, and high tumoral SSTR5 expression. Median OS has not been reached; the 30-month OS rate was 70%. The best radiographic response was partial response in one patient (4%), stable disease in 17 patients (60%), and progressive disease in ten patients (36%). Although grade 3/4 toxicities were rare, pasireotide LAR treatment was associated with a 79% rate of hyperglycemia including 14% grade 3 hyperglycemia. Although pasireotide appears to be an effective antiproliferative agent in the treatment of advanced NETs, the high incidence of hyperglycemia raises concerns regarding its suitability as a first-line systemic agent in unselected patients. SSTR5 expression is a potentially predictive biomarker for response. PMID:25376618

  7. Phase II Trial of Imatinib in AIDS-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma: AIDS Malignancy Consortium Protocol 042

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Henry B.; Krown, Susan E.; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Honda, Kord; Rapisuwon, Suthee; Wang, Zhenghe; Aboulafia, David; Reid, Erin G.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Dezube, Bruce J.; Noy, Ariela

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a disease of multifocal vascular proliferation that requires infection with KS herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8). Activation of the c-kit and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors by autocrine/paracrine mechanisms follows endothelial cell KSHV infection. In a pilot study, imatinib, a c-kit/PDGF-receptor inhibitor, induced partial regression of AIDS-associated KS (AIDS-KS) in five of 10 patients. Patients and Methods This multicenter phase II study was designed to estimate the response rate to imatinib in AIDS-KS. Secondary objectives included investigation of predictors of response and imatinib pharmacokinetics in patients on antiretrovirals. Patients received imatinib 400 mg/day by mouth for up to 12 months with dose escalation up to 600 mg/day at 3 months if their disease was stable. Results Thirty patients were treated at 12 AIDS Malignancy Consortium sites. Ten patients (33.3%) achieved partial response, six (20%) had stable disease, and seven (23.3%) exhibited KS progression. Nine patients completed 52 weeks of imatinib therapy. The median treatment duration was 22.5 weeks. Only five patients (16.7%) discontinued therapy owing to adverse events. Antiretroviral regimens did not significantly alter imatinib metabolism. Activating mutations in PDGF-R and c-kit were not found at baseline or at disease progression. We found no correlation with response with changes in any of the candidate cytokines. Conclusion Imatinib has activity in AIDS-KS. Pharmacokinetic interactions with antiretroviral drugs did not correlate with toxicity. Thirty percent of patients showed long-term clinical benefit and remained on imatinib for the entire year. These results suggest imatinib is well tolerated and may be an alternative therapy for some patients with AIDS-KS. PMID:24378417

  8. Axial Magnetic Anisotropy from Two Systems Fe2B and Co2B with Planar Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufour, Valentin; Lamichhane, Tej; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Jesche, Anton; Goldman, Alan I.; Dennis, Kevin W.; McCallum, R. William; Antropov, Vladimir; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-03-01

    Growth of single crystals of (Fe1-xCox)2B (0 <= x <= 1) and detailed characterization of their magnetic properties will be presented. Despite the fact that both Fe2B and Co2B show a planar anisotropy at room temperature, we observe a uniaxial anisotropy at intermediate doping which makes (Fe,Co)2B a promising system for permanent magnet applications in a system without rare-earth element. Comparison with recent band structure calculations will be presented. The temperature dependence of the anisotropy measured on single crystals from 2 K to 1000 K shows some unusual variations with an increase of the magnetic anisotropy with increasing temperature at some specific substitution. This work is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the US DOE and by the Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Science and Engineering. Ames Laboratory is operated for the US DOE by Iowa State University under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of ricin vaccine, RVEc™, in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; Reisler, Ronald B; Lindsey, Changhong Y; Güereña, Fernando; Rivard, Robert; Clizbe, Denise P; Chambers, Matthew; Norris, Sarah; Smith, Leonard A

    2015-12-16

    Ricin is a potent toxin and potential bioterrorism weapon for which no specific licensed countermeasures are available. We report the safety and immunogenicity of the ricin vaccine RVEc™ in a Phase 1 (N=30) multiple-dose, open-label, non-placebo-controlled, dose-escalating (20, 50, and 100μg), single-center study. Each subject in the 20- and 50-μg dose groups (n=10 for each group) received three injections at 4-week intervals and was observed carefully for untoward effects of the vaccine; blood was drawn at predetermined intervals after each dose for up to 1 year. RVEc™ was safe and well tolerated at the 20- and 50-μg doses. The most common adverse events were pain at the injection site and headache. Of the 10 subjects who received a single 100-μg dose, two developed elevated creatine phosphokinase levels, which resolved without sequelae. No additional doses were administered to subjects in the 100-μg group. Immunogenicity of the vaccine was evaluated by measuring antibody response using the well standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and toxin neutralization assay (TNA). Of the subjects in the 20- and 50-μg dose groups, 100% achieved ELISA anti-ricin IgG titers of 1:500 to 1:121,500 and 50% produced neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies measurable by TNA. Four subjects in the 50-μg group received a single booster dose of RVEc™ 20-21 months after the initial dose. The single booster was safe and well tolerated, resulting in no serious adverse events, and significantly enhanced immunogenicity of the vaccine in human subjects. Each booster recipient developed a robust anamnestic response with ELISA anti-ricin IgG titers of 1:13,500 to 1:121,500 and neutralizing antibody titers of 1:400 to 1:3200. Future studies will attempt to optimize dose, scheduling, and route of administration. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01317667 and NCT01846104). PMID:26546259

  10. CC-chemokine ligand 2 inhibition in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a phase 2 trial of carlumab.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh; Martinez, Fernando J; Brown, Kevin K; Costabel, Ulrich; Cottin, Vincent; Wells, Athol U; Lancaster, Lisa; Gibson, Kevin F; Haddad, Tarik; Agarwal, Prasheen; Mack, Michael; Dasgupta, Bidisha; Nnane, Ivo P; Flavin, Susan K; Barnathan, Elliot S

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of carlumab in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).A phase 2, randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled dose-ranging study was conducted in patients with IPF (n=126). Patients were randomised to carlumab (1 mg·kg(-1), 5 mg·kg(-1), or 15 mg·kg(-1)) or placebo every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was the rate of percentage change in forced vital capacity (FVC). Secondary endpoints were time to disease progression, absolute change in FVC, relative change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score.Due to a pre-planned, unfavourable interim benefit-risk analysis, dosing was suspended. The rate of percentage change in FVC showed no treatment effect (placebo -0.582%, 1 mg·kg(-1) -0.533%, 5 mg·kg(-1) -0.799% and 15 mg·kg(-1) -0.470%; p=0.261). All active treatment groups showed a greater decline in FVC (1 mg·kg(-1) -290 mL, 5 mg·kg(-1) -370 mL and 15 mg·kg(-1) -320 mL) compared with placebo (-130 mL). No effect on disease progression, DLCO, infection rates or mortality was observed. SGRQ scores showed a nonsignificant trend toward worsening with active treatment. Unexpectedly, free CC-chemokine ligand 2 levels were elevated above baseline at both 24 and 52 weeks. A higher proportion of patients with one or more serious adverse events was observed in the 5 mg·kg(-1) group (53.1%) compared with 1 mg·kg(-1) (15.2%), 15 mg·kg(-1) (21.9%) and placebo (46.4%), although no unexpected serious adverse events were noted.Although dosing was stopped prematurely, it is unlikely that carlumab provides benefit to IPF patients. PMID:26493793

  11. Activity Increase Despite Arthritis (AÏDA): design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial evaluating an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis [ISRCTN24554946

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Belcher, John; Lewis, Ruth; Hood, Kerenza; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Hip and knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability, which can be improved by exercise interventions. However, regular exercise is uncommon in this group because the low physical activity level in the general population is probably reduced even further by pain related fear of movement. The best method of encouraging increased activity in this patient group is not known. A booklet has been developed for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. It focuses on changing disadvantageous beliefs and encouraging increased physical activity. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of this new booklet for patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis in influencing illness and treatment beliefs, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive RCT in terms of health status and exercise behaviour. A computerised search of four general medical practice patients' record databases will identify patients older than 50 years of age who have consulted with hip or knee pain in the