Science.gov

Sample records for phase change wallboard

  1. Analysis of wallboard containing a phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. J.; Heberle, D. P.

    Phase change materials (PCMs) used on the interior of buildings hold the promise for improved thermal performance by reducing the energy requirements for space conditioning and by improving thermal comfort by reducing temperature swings inside the building. Efforts are underway to develop a gypsum wallboard containing a hydrocarbon PCM. With a phase change temperature in the room temperature range, the PCM wallboard adds substantially to the thermal mass of the building while serving the same architectural function as conventional wallboard. To determine the thermal and economic performance of this PCM wallboard, the Transient Systems Simulation Program (TRNSYS) was modified to accommodate walls that are covered with PCM plasterboard, and to apportion the direct beam solar radiation to interior surfaces of a building. The modified code was used to simulate the performance of conventional and direct-gain passive solar residential-sized buildings with and without PCM wallboard. Space heating energy savings were determined as a function of PCM wallboard characteristics. Thermal comfort improvements in buildings containing the PCM were qualified in terms of energy savings. The report concludes with a present worth economic analysis of these energy savings and arrives at system costs and economic payback based on current costs of PCMs under study for the wallboard application.

  2. Thermal performance of phase change wallboard for residential cooling application

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.; Stetiu, C.

    1997-04-01

    Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand mainly due to very poor load factors in milder climates. Thermal mass can be utilized to reduce the peak-power demand, downsize the cooling systems, and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices have been used in the past to overcome the shortcomings of alternative cooling sources, or to avoid high demand charges. The manufacturing of phase change material (PCM) implemented in gypsum board, plaster or other wall-covering material, would permit the thermal storage to become part of the building structure. PCMs have two important advantages as storage media: they can offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity, and their discharge is almost isothermal. This allows the storage of high amounts of energy without significantly changing the temperature of the room envelope. As heat storage takes place inside the building, where the loads occur, rather than externally, additional transport energy is not required. RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation program based on the finite difference approach, was used to numerically evaluate the latent storage performance of treated wallboard. Extended storage capacity obtained by using double PCM-wallboard is able to keep the room temperatures close to the upper comfort limits without using mechanical cooling. Simulation results for a living room with high internal loads and weather data for Sunnyvale, California, show significant reduction of room air temperature when heat can be stored in PCM-treated wallboards.

  3. Simplified numerical description of latent storage characteristics for phase change wallboard

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.

    1995-05-01

    Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand. Thermal mass can be utilized to reduce the peak-power demand, down-size the cooling systems and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices have been used in the past to overcome the short-comings of alternative cooling sources or to avoid high demand charges. With the advent of phase change material (PCM) implemented in gypsum board, plaster or other wall-covering material, thermal storage can be part of the building structure even for light-weight buildings. PCMs have two important advantages as storage media: they can offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity and their discharge is almost isothermal. This allows to store large amounts of energy without significantly changing the temperature of the sheathing. As heat storage takes place in the building part where the loads occur, rather than externally (e.g., ice or chilled water storage), additional transport energy is not needed. To numerically evaluate the latent storage performance of treated wallboard, RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation model based on the finite difference approach, will be used. RADCOOL has been developed in the SPARK environment in order to be compatible with the new family of simulation tools being developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. As logical statements are difficult to use in SPARK, a continuous function for the specific heat and the enthalpy had to be found. This report covers the development of a simplified description of latent storage characteristics for wallboard treated with phase change material.

  4. Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1991-05-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM, as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. 11 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Wallboard with Latent Heat Storage for Passive Solar Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    2001-05-31

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin [melting point-23 C (73.5 F)] is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM (melting point, melting range, and heat of fusion), as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. The confirmed computer model may now be used in conjunction with a building heating and cooling code to evaluate design parameters and operational characteristics of latent heat storage wallboard for passive solar applications.

  6. Combined experimental and numerical evaluation of a prototype nano-PCM enhanced wallboard

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; LuPh.D., Jue; Soroushian, Parviz; Shrestha, Som S

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, forty-eight (48) percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced building envelopes can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Combined experimental testing and numerical modeling of PCM-enhanced envelope components are two important aspects of the evaluation of their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conductive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. A wall with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards was built and tested in a natural exposure test (NET) facility in a hot-humid climate location. The test wall contained PCM wallboards and regular gypsum wallboard, for a side-by-side annual comparison study. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboard was performed to determine its actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The model was first validated using experimental data, and then used for annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY3) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis evaluating the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced wallboard.

  7. Conventional wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin (Melting Point -- 73.5{degree}F) is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten paraffin. Concentrations of paraffin in the combined product as high as 35{percent} by weight were achieved. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to describe thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions where the PCM melts at a specific melting point. However, agreement between the model and an experimentally produced thermal transient involving impregnated wallboard was only good after the model was modified to allow the paraffin to melt over a temperature range. This was accomplished by replacing the heat of fusion with a triangular heat capacity relationship that mimics the triangular melt curve found through differential scanning calorimetry. When this change was made, agreement between the model and the experimental transient was very good. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Thermal storage in drywall using organic phase-change material

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, M.M.; Feldman, D.; Hawes, D.; Banu, D.

    1987-01-01

    Two mixtures of phase-change material (PCM), 49% butyl stearate with 48% butyl palmitate, and 55% lauric acid with 45% capric acid, diluted 10% with fire retardant, were diffused into 13-mm (0.5-in.) wallboard. No exudation of liquid PCM occurs below 25% by weight. In the wallboard, initial PCM freezing points were 21/sup 0/ and 22/sup 0/C (70/sup 0/ and 72/sup 0/F), respectively, with melting points of 17/sup 0/ and 18/sup 0/C (63/sup 0/ and 64/sup 0/F). For a 4/sup 0/C (7/sup 0/F) temperature swing, thermal storage capacities up to 350 kJ/m/sup 2/ (31 Btu/ft/sup 2/) and 317 kJ/m/sup 2/ (28 Btu/ft/sup 2/), respectively, are available. These are equivalent to about 3.8 cm (1.5 in.) of concrete cycled through 7/sup 0/C (13/sup 0/F). Preliminary tests showed little extra flame spread beyond that of unloaded wallboard. The thermal conductivity of the wallboard increased from 0.19 to 0.22 W/m /sup 0/C (0.11 to 0.13 Btu/h ft /sup 0/F) with liquid PCM. During melting, the effective thermal diffusivity falls from 2.1 x 10/sup -7/ m/sup 2//s (2.3 x 10/sup -6/ ft/sup 2//s) for the unloaded wallboard to 1.4 x 10/sup -7/ m/sup 2//s (1.5 x 10/sup -6/ ft/sup 2//s) with 23.4% butyl stearate-palmitate and to 1.6 x 10/sup -7/ m/sup 2//s (1.7 x 10/sup -6/ ft/sup 2//s) with 28% of the lauric-capric mixture. (The mixture fraction is defined as the ratio of PCM mass to gypsum mass.)

  9. MOISTURE MOVEMENT (WICKING) WITHIN GYPSUM WALLBOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gypsum wallboard with repeated or prolonged exposure to water or excess moisture can lose its structural integrity and provide a growth medium for biological contaminants. Poorly sealed buildings, leaking or failed plumbing systems, or improperly constructed HVAC systems can all ...

  10. Characterizing synthetic gypsum for wallboard manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Henkels, P.J.; Gynor, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    United States Gypsum Company (USGC) has developed specifications and guidelines covering the chemical and physical aspects of synthetic gypsum to help predict end use acceptability in wallboard manufacture. These guidelines are based in part on past experiences with natural and synthetic gypsum. Similarly, most wallboard manufacturers in North America have developed their own guidelines based in part on its unique history and particular experiences with synthetic gypsum. While there are similarities between manufacturers` guidelines, differences do exist. This paper discusses the importance of selected parameters contained in the FGD gypsum guidelines. In most cases, the parameters are equally relevant to other synthetic gypsums and the naturally occurring gypsum mineral as well.

  11. Gypsum Wallboard as a sink for formaldehyde

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its presence in a wide range of consumer products and its adverse health effects. Materials acting as HCHO sinks, such as painted gypsum wallboard, can become emission sources. However, adsorpti...

  12. Desorption of a methamphetamine surrogate from wallboard under remediation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppendieck, Dustin; Morrison, Glenn; Corsi, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Thousands of homes in the United States are found to be contaminated with methamphetamine each year. Buildings used to produce illicit methamphetamine are typically remediated by removing soft furnishings and stained materials, cleaning and sometimes encapsulating surfaces using paint. Methamphetamine that has penetrated into paint films, wood and other permanent materials can be slowly released back into the building air over time, exposing future occupants and re-contaminating furnishings. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of two wallboard remediation techniques for homes contaminated with methamphetamine: 1) enhancing desorption by elevating temperature and relative humidity while ventilating the interior space, and 2) painting over affected wallboard to seal the methamphetamine in place. The emission of a methamphetamine surrogate, N-isopropylbenzylamine (NIBA), from pre-dosed wallboard chambers over 20 days at 32 °C and two values of relative humidity were studied. Emission rates from wallboard after 15 days at 32 °C ranged from 35 to 1400 μg h-1 m-2. Less than 22% of the NIBA was removed from the chambers over three weeks. Results indicate that elevating temperatures during remediation and latex painting of impacted wallboard will not significantly reduce freebase methamphetamine emissions from wallboard. Raising the relative humidity from 27% to 49% increased the emission rates by a factor of 1.4. A steady-state model of a typical home using the emission rates from this study and typical residential building parameters and conditions shows that adult inhalation reference doses for methamphetamine will be reached when approximately 1 g of methamphetamine is present in the wallboard of a house.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF STACHYBOTRYS REGROWTH ON CONTAMINATED WALLBOARD AFTER TREATMENT WITH COMMON SURFACE CLEANERS/DISINFECTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes results of experiments assessing the efficacy of treating mold-contaminated gypsum wallboard with cleaners and/or disinfectants. Although the accepted recommendations for handling Stachybotrys chartarum contaminated gypsum wallboard are removal and replacement...

  14. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Sanderson

    2007-12-31

    This report presents and discusses results from the project 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production', performed at five different full-scale commercial wallboard plants. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study has been to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere at wallboard manufacturing plants when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project has been co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope included seven discrete tasks, each including a test conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different wet FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a base-case test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5,could not be conducted as planned and instead was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3. Subsequently an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced from the Task 5 FGD system, but with an additive expected to impact the stability of mercury, so Task 6 was added to the project. Finally, Task 7 was added to evaluate synthetic gypsum produced at a power plant from an additional

  15. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  16. THE EFFECT OF MERCURY CONTROLS ON WALLBOARD MANUFACTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra Meischen

    2004-07-01

    Pending EPA regulations may mandate 70 to 90% mercury removal efficiency from utility flue gas. A mercury control option is the trapping of oxidized mercury in wet flue gas desulfurization systems (FGD). The potential doubling of mercury in the FGD material and its effect on mercury volatility at temperatures common to wallboard manufacture is a concern that could limit the growing byproduct use of FGD material. Prediction of mercury fate is limited by lack of information on the mercury form in the FGD material. The parts per billion mercury concentrations prevent the identification of mercury compounds by common analytical methods. A sensitive analytical method, cold vapor atomic fluorescence, coupled with leaching and thermodecomposition methods were evaluated for their potential to identify mercury compounds in FGD material. The results of the study suggest that the mercury form is dominated by the calcium sulfate matrix and is probably associated with the sulfate form in the FGD material. Additionally, to determine the effect of high mercury concentration FGD material on wallboard manufacture, a laboratory FGD unit was built to trap the oxidized mercury generated in a simulated flue gas. Although the laboratory prepared FGD material did not contain the mercury concentrations anticipated, further thermal tests determined that mercury begins to evolve from FGD material at 380 to 390 F, consequently dropping the drying temperature should mitigate mercury evolution if necessary. Mercury evolution is also diminished as the weight of the wallboard sample increased. Consequently, mercury evolution may not be a significant problem in wallboard manufacture.

  17. MOLD GROWTH ON GYPSUM WALLBOARD--A RESEARCH SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing occupant exposure to mold growing on damp gypsum wallboard is a research objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Often mold contaminated building materials are not properly removed but instead surface cleaners are used and then paint is applied in an attem...

  18. SORPTION AND REEMISSION OF FORMALDEHYDE BY GYPSUM WALLBOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an analysis of the sorption and desorption of formaldehyde by unpainted wallboard, using a mass transfer model based on the Langmuir sorption isotherm. he sorption and desorption rate constants are determined by short-term experimental data. ong-term so...

  19. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Marshall Sanderson

    2006-06-01

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 5 of the study ''Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,'' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. The FGD process is used to control the sulfur dioxide emissions which would result in acid rain if not controlled. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies developed for power plants involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope includes five discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The five tasks were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to evaluate gypsum produced from an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to a previous task, Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. The

  20. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Sanderson; Gary M. Blythe; Mandi Richardson

    2006-12-01

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 6 of the study 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope now includes six discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to include testing with an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. Subsequent to conducting Task 5 under these revised conditions, an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced at the same FGD system, but with an additive (Degussa Corporation's TMT-15) being used in the FGD system. TMT-15 was expected

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeroen W; Burdette, Kevin E; Inrig, Elizabeth L; Dewitt, Regina; Mistry, Rajesh; Rink, W Jack; Boreham, Douglas R

    2010-09-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d. PMID:20447939

  2. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  3. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  4. Fun with Phase Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, David

    2006-01-01

    A lot of good elementary science involves studying solids, liquids, and gases, and some inquiry-based activities that are easy to set up and do. In this article, the author presents activities pertaining to simple phase change. Using water as the example, these activities introduce upper-grade students to the idea of the arrangement of molecules…

  5. Mitigation of efflorescence of wallboard by means of bio-mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; Qian, Chunxiang

    2015-01-01

    Cement-based material is one of the most versatile and largest amounts of building materials which can not only be used in load-bearing structure but also be used as decoration materials, like brick, wallboard, and tile. However, white calcium carbonate always be found on the surface of wallboard. This phenomenon is generally called efflorescence, which has no damage to wallboard, but has aesthetic impact. In this research, Bacillus mucilaginosus was pre-added to the cement matrix to reduce the efflorescence of wallboard. Image processing, thermogravimetric analysis and permeability test were used to characterize the efflorescence degree of wallboard. The results showed that the bacterium captured atmospheric CO2 by carbonic anhydrase and promoted the CO2to react with Ca(OH)2. This process not only reduced the content of Ca(OH)2 but also improved the compactness of wallboard. In addition, the maximal decrease of efflorescence area of wallboard was gotten when the content of microbial was up to 4% of the mass of cementitious material and the proportion of efflorescence area reduced from 32 ± 3 to 5 ± 1% of the whole area of surface layer. At the same time, the values of compressive and flexural strength were the highest and the surface layer of wallboard was the most compact. The observed reduction of efflorescence was indeed due to the effect of bio-mineralization. This promising method was noted to be cheap, convenient, environment friendly, and which has the potential in various practical applications. PMID:26539182

  6. Phase-change materials handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Handbook describes relationship between phase-change materials and more conventional thermal control techniques and discusses materials' space and terrestrial applications. Material properties of most promising phase-change materials and purposes and uses of metallic filler materials in phase-change material composites are provided.

  7. Phase change materials handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide theory and data needed by the thermal design engineer to bridge the gap between research achievements and actual flight systems, within the limits of the current state of the art of phase change materials (PCM) technology. The relationship between PCM and more conventional thermal control techniques is described and numerous space and terrestrial applications of PCM are discussed. Material properties of the most promising PCMs are provided; the purposes and use of metallic filler materials in PCM composites are presented; and material compatibility considerations relevant to PCM design are included. The engineering considerations of PCM design are described, especially those pertaining to the thermodynamic and heat transfer phenomena peculiar to PCM design. Methods of obtaining data not currently available are presented. The special problems encountered in the space environment are described. Computational tools useful to the designer are discussed. In summary, each aspect of the PCM problem important to the design engineer is covered to the extent allowed by the scope of this effort and the state of the art.

  8. PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    2006-03-01

    Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

  9. Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Game Changing Development is taking on a technologydevelopment and demonstration effort to design, build, and test the next generation of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HXs) on ...

  10. Transition of Bery Phase and Pancharatnam Phase and Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guolan; Pan, Hui; Wang, Zisheng

    2016-07-01

    Berry Phase and time-dependent Pancharatnam phase are investigated for nuclear spin polarization in a liquid by a rotation magnetic field, where two-state mixture effect is exactly included in the geometric phases. We find that when the system of nuclear spin polarization is in the unpolarized state, the transitive phenomena of both Berry phase and Pancharatnam phase are taken place. For the polarized system, in contrast, such a transition is not taken place. It is obvious that the transitions of geometric phase correspond to the phase change of physical system.

  11. A Different Phase Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Lyndsay B.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    This article provides instructions, and a list of supplies for a teacher performed class demonstration showing, change of state. Having students engage in technology-based inquiry activities is an excellent way for teachers to introduce topics that are driven by the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996). Based on Content Standard B, this…

  12. Effects of FGD-gypsum, used-wallboard and calcium sulfate on corn and soybean root growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum production has increased 44 percent from 2007 to 2008. The major use of FGD-gypsum today is in the wallboard industry. Reduction in the construction, however, reduces the demand for wallboard. Agriculture could become the second largest user of FGD-gypsum. F...

  13. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-08-01

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds. PMID:21725305

  14. Stochastic phase-change neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  15. Stochastic phase-change neurons.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals. PMID:27183057

  16. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  17. Phase change material storage heater

    DOEpatents

    Goswami, D. Yogi; Hsieh, Chung K.; Jotshi, Chand K.; Klausner, James F.

    1997-01-01

    A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

  18. Phase Change Fabrics Control Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Originally featured in Spinoff in 1997, Outlast Technologies Inc. (formerly Gateway Technologies Inc.) has built its entire product line on microencapsulated phase change materials, developed in Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Johnson Space Center after initial development for the U.S. Air Force. The Boulder, Colorado-based company acquired the exclusive patent rights and now integrates these materials into textiles or onto finished apparel, providing temperature regulation in bedding materials and a full line of apparel for both ordinary and extreme conditions.

  19. Interim Report on the Examination of Corrosion Damage in Homes Constructed With Imported Wallboard: Examination of Samples Received September 28, 2009.

    PubMed

    Pitchure, D J; Ricker, R E; Williams, M E; Claggett, S A

    2010-01-01

    Since many household systems are fabricated out of metallic materials, changes to the household environment that accelerate corrosion rates will increase the frequency of failures in these systems. Recently, it has been reported that homes constructed with imported wallboard have increased failure rates in appliances, air conditioner heat exchanger coils, and visible corrosion on electrical wiring and other metal components. At the request of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) became involved through the Interagency Agreement CPSC-1-09-0023 to perform metallurgical analyses on samples and corrosion products removed from homes constructed using imported wallboard. This document reports on the analysis of the first group of samples received by NIST from CPSC. The samples received by NIST on September 28, 2009 consisted of copper tubing for supplying natural gas and two air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The examinations performed by NIST consisted of photography, metallurgical cross-sectioning, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Leak tests were also performed on the air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The objective of these examinations was to determine extent and nature of the corrosive attack, the chemical composition of the corrosion product, and the potential chemical reactions or environmental species responsible for accelerated corrosion. A thin black corrosion product was found on samples of the copper tubing. The XRD analysis of this layer indicated that this corrosion product was a copper sulfide phase and the diffraction peaks corresponded with those for the mineral digenite (Cu9S5). Corrosion products were also observed on other types of metals in the air conditioner coils where condensation would frequently wet the metals. The thickness of the corrosion product layer on a copper natural gas supply pipe with a wall thickness of 1

  20. Interim Report on the Examination of Corrosion Damage in Homes Constructed With Imported Wallboard: Examination of Samples Received September 28, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Pitchure, D. J.; Ricker, R. E.; Williams, M. E.; Claggett, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Since many household systems are fabricated out of metallic materials, changes to the household environment that accelerate corrosion rates will increase the frequency of failures in these systems. Recently, it has been reported that homes constructed with imported wallboard have increased failure rates in appliances, air conditioner heat exchanger coils, and visible corrosion on electrical wiring and other metal components. At the request of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) became involved through the Interagency Agreement CPSC-1-09-0023 to perform metallurgical analyses on samples and corrosion products removed from homes constructed using imported wallboard. This document reports on the analysis of the first group of samples received by NIST from CPSC. The samples received by NIST on September 28, 2009 consisted of copper tubing for supplying natural gas and two air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The examinations performed by NIST consisted of photography, metallurgical cross-sectioning, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Leak tests were also performed on the air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The objective of these examinations was to determine extent and nature of the corrosive attack, the chemical composition of the corrosion product, and the potential chemical reactions or environmental species responsible for accelerated corrosion. A thin black corrosion product was found on samples of the copper tubing. The XRD analysis of this layer indicated that this corrosion product was a copper sulfide phase and the diffraction peaks corresponded with those for the mineral digenite (Cu9S5). Corrosion products were also observed on other types of metals in the air conditioner coils where condensation would frequently wet the metals. The thickness of the corrosion product layer on a copper natural gas supply pipe with a wall thickness of 1

  1. The use of epifluorescent microscopy and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine the presence/absence and identification of microorganisms associated with domestic and foreign wallboard samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.

    2011-01-01

    Epifluorescent microscopy and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were utilized to determine the presence, concentration and identification of bacteria, and more specifically sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in subsamples of Chinese and North American wallboard, and wallboard-mine rock. Bacteria were visible in most subsamples, which included wallboard-lining paper from each side of the wallboard, wallboard filler, wallboard tape and fragments of mined wallboard rock via microscopy. Observed bacteria occurred as single or small clusters of cells and no mass aggregates indicating colonization were noted. Universal 16S qPCR was utilized to directly examine samples and detected bacteria at concentrations ranging from 1.4 x 103 to 6.4 x 104 genomic equivalents per mm2 of paper or per gram of wallboard filler or mined rock, in 12 of 41 subsamples. Subsamples were incubated in sulfate reducing broth for ~30 to 60 days (enrichment assay) and then analyzed by universal 16S and SRB qPCR. Enrichment universal 16S qPCR detected bacteria in 32 of 41 subsamples at concentrations ranging from 1.5 x 104 to 4.2 x 107 genomic equivalents per ml of culture broth. Evaluation of enriched subsamples by SRB qPCR demonstrated that SRB were not detectable in most of the samples and if they were detected, detection was not reproducible (an indication of low concentrations, if present). Enrichment universal 16S and SRB qPCR demonstrated that viable bacteria were present in subsamples (as expected given exposure of the samples following manufacture, transport and use) but that SRB were either not present or present at very low numbers. Further, no differences in trends were noted between the various Chinese and North American wallboard samples. In all, the microscopy and qPCR data indicated that the suspected ‘sulfur emissions’ emanating from suspect wallboard samples is not due to microbial activity.

  2. Microbial volatile organic compound emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on gypsum wallboard and ceiling tile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stachybotrys chartarum is a filamentous mold frequently identified among the mycobiota of water-damaged building materials. Growth of S. chartarum on suitable substrates and under favorable environmental conditions leads to the production of secondary metabolites such as mycotoxins and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). The aim of this study was to characterize MVOC emission profiles of seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum, isolated from water-damaged buildings, in order to identify unique MVOCs generated during growth on gypsum wallboard and ceiling tile coupons. Inoculated coupons were incubated and monitored for emissions and growth using a closed glass environmental growth chamber maintained at a constant room temperature. Gas samples were collected from the headspace for three to four weeks using Tenax TA tubes. Results Most of the MVOCs identified were alcohols, ketones, ethers and esters. The data showed that anisole (methoxybenzene) was emitted from all of the S. chartarum strains tested on both types of substrates. Maximum anisole concentration was detected after seven days of incubation. Conclusions MVOCs are suitable markers for fungal identification because they easily diffuse through weak barriers like wallpaper, and could be used for early detection of mold growth in hidden cavities. This study identifies the production of anisole by seven toxigenic strains of Stachybotrys chartarum within a period of one week of growth on gypsum wallboard and ceiling tiles. These data could provide useful information for the future construction of a robust MVOC library for the early detection of this mold. PMID:24308451

  3. Vanadium Dioxide Phase Change Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Mark; Hillman, Christopher; Stupar, Philip; Hacker, Jonathan; Griffith, Zachary; Lee, Kang-Jin

    2015-03-01

    We have built RF switches using vanadium dioxide thin films fabricated within a section of inverted transmission line with integrated on chip heaters to provide local thermal control. On heating the films above the metal insulator transition we obtain record low switch insertion loss of -0.13 dB at 50 GHz and -0.5 dB at 110 GHz. We investigate the device physics of these switches including the effect of a deposited insulator on the VO2 switching characteristics, the self-latching of the devices under high RF powers and the effect of resistance change with temperature on the device linearity. Finally we show how these devices can be integrated with silicon germanium RF circuits to produce a field programmable device where the RF signal routing can be selected under external control. Supported under the DARPA RF-FPGA Program, Contract HR0011-12-C-0092.

  4. Phase changes in liquid face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program predicts boiling (phase change) in liquid face seals. Program determines if and when boiling occurs, and calculates location of boiling interface, pressure and temperature profiles, and load.

  5. Bipolar switching in chalcogenide phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocchini, N.; Laudato, M.; Boniardi, M.; Varesi, E.; Fantini, P.; Lacaita, A. L.; Ielmini, D.

    2016-07-01

    Phase change materials based on chalcogenides are key enabling technologies for optical storage, such as rewritable CD and DVD, and recently also electrical nonvolatile memory, named phase change memory (PCM). In a PCM, the amorphous or crystalline phase affects the material band structure, hence the device resistance. Although phase transformation is extremely fast and repeatable, the amorphous phase suffers structural relaxation and crystallization at relatively low temperatures, which may affect the temperature stability of PCM state. To improve the time/temperature stability of the PCM, novel operation modes of the device should be identified. Here, we present bipolar switching operation of PCM, which is interpreted by ion migration in the solid state induced by elevated temperature and electric field similar to the bipolar switching in metal oxides. The temperature stability of the high resistance state is demonstrated and explained based on the local depletion of chemical species from the electrode region.

  6. Bipolar switching in chalcogenide phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, N; Laudato, M; Boniardi, M; Varesi, E; Fantini, P; Lacaita, A L; Ielmini, D

    2016-01-01

    Phase change materials based on chalcogenides are key enabling technologies for optical storage, such as rewritable CD and DVD, and recently also electrical nonvolatile memory, named phase change memory (PCM). In a PCM, the amorphous or crystalline phase affects the material band structure, hence the device resistance. Although phase transformation is extremely fast and repeatable, the amorphous phase suffers structural relaxation and crystallization at relatively low temperatures, which may affect the temperature stability of PCM state. To improve the time/temperature stability of the PCM, novel operation modes of the device should be identified. Here, we present bipolar switching operation of PCM, which is interpreted by ion migration in the solid state induced by elevated temperature and electric field similar to the bipolar switching in metal oxides. The temperature stability of the high resistance state is demonstrated and explained based on the local depletion of chemical species from the electrode region. PMID:27377822

  7. Bipolar switching in chalcogenide phase change memory

    PubMed Central

    Ciocchini, N.; Laudato, M.; Boniardi, M.; Varesi, E.; Fantini, P.; Lacaita, A. L.; Ielmini, D.

    2016-01-01

    Phase change materials based on chalcogenides are key enabling technologies for optical storage, such as rewritable CD and DVD, and recently also electrical nonvolatile memory, named phase change memory (PCM). In a PCM, the amorphous or crystalline phase affects the material band structure, hence the device resistance. Although phase transformation is extremely fast and repeatable, the amorphous phase suffers structural relaxation and crystallization at relatively low temperatures, which may affect the temperature stability of PCM state. To improve the time/temperature stability of the PCM, novel operation modes of the device should be identified. Here, we present bipolar switching operation of PCM, which is interpreted by ion migration in the solid state induced by elevated temperature and electric field similar to the bipolar switching in metal oxides. The temperature stability of the high resistance state is demonstrated and explained based on the local depletion of chemical species from the electrode region. PMID:27377822

  8. Similarity solutions for phase-change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    A modification of Ivantsov's (1947) similarity solutions is proposed which can describe phase-change processes which are limited by diffusion. The method has application to systems that have n-components and possess cross-diffusion and Soret and Dufour effects, along with convection driven by density discontinuities at the two-phase interface. Local thermal equilibrium is assumed at the interface. It is shown that analytic solutions are possible when the material properties are constant.

  9. Solar heat storage in phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.J.

    1984-02-28

    The objective of this project was to develop a chemical heat storage system that had a phase change with release of latent heat at about 105/sup 0/F. The primary reason this kind on system was sought was that heat storage capacity of commonly used storage systems do not match the heat collection capacity of open air collectors. In addition to the phase change three other factors were considered: the cost of the material, the amount of heat the system would hold per unit volume, and the rate at which the system released sensible and latent heat. One hundred nineteen tests were made on 32 systems. Only data on six of the more promising are presented. In the six systems, borax was used as the major component with other materials used as nucleating agents toraise the temperature of phase change.

  10. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1991-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  11. Five Phases for Managing Change in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowsher, Jack E.

    1989-01-01

    Educators should make learning more work related and companies should make work more learning related. A five-phase system for managing educational change includes (1) unstructured education; (2) inventory of education programs and costs; (3) planning, measurement, and organization; (4) implementation of structured education; and (5) refining…

  12. Phase change thermal energy storage material

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

  13. Locust Dynamics: Behavioral Phase Change and Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Topaz, Chad M.; D'Orsogna, Maria R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Locusts exhibit two interconvertible behavioral phases, solitarious and gregarious. While solitarious individuals are repelled from other locusts, gregarious insects are attracted to conspecifics and can form large aggregations such as marching hopper bands. Numerous biological experiments at the individual level have shown how crowding biases conversion towards the gregarious form. To understand the formation of marching locust hopper bands, we study phase change at the collective level, and in a quantitative framework. Specifically, we construct a partial integrodifferential equation model incorporating the interplay between phase change and spatial movement at the individual level in order to predict the dynamics of hopper band formation at the population level. Stability analysis of our model reveals conditions for an outbreak, characterized by a large scale transition to the gregarious phase. A model reduction enables quantification of the temporal dynamics of each phase, of the proportion of the population that will eventually gregarize, and of the time scale for this to occur. Numerical simulations provide descriptions of the aggregation's structure and reveal transiently traveling clumps of gregarious insects. Our predictions of aggregation and mass gregarization suggest several possible future biological experiments. PMID:22916003

  14. Simulation studies of GST phase change alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyna, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    In order to help drive post-Moore's Law technology development, switching processes involving novel materials, in particular, GeSbTe (GST) alloys are being investigated for use in memory and eFuse applications. An anneal/quench thermal process crystallizes/amorphosizes a GST alloy which then has a low/high resistance and thereby forms a readable/writeable bit; for example, a ``one'' might be the low resistance, conducting crystalline state and a ``zero'' might be the high resistance, glassy state. There are many open questions about the precise nature of the structural transitions and the coupling to electronic structure changes. Computational and experimental studies of the effect of pressure on the GST materials were initiated in order to probe the physics behind the thermal switching process. A new pathway to reversible phase change involving pressure-induced structural metal insulator transitions was discovered. In a binary GS system, a room-temperature, direct, pressure-induced transformation from the high resistance amorphous phase to the low resistance crystalline phase was observed experimentally while the reverse process under tensile load was demonstrated via ab initio MD simulations performed on IBM's Blue Gene/L enabled by massively parallel software. Pressure induced transformations of the ternary material GST-225 (Ge2Sb2Te5) were, also, examined In the talk, the behavior of the two systems will be compared and insight into the nature of the phase change given.

  15. Endurance characteristics of phase change memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruru, Huo; Daolin, Cai; Chen, Bomy; Yifeng, Chen; Yuchan, Wang; Yueqing, Wang; Hongyang, Wei; Qing, Wang; Yangyang, Xia; Dan, Gao; Zhitang, Song

    2016-05-01

    The endurance characteristics of phase change memory are studied. With operational cycles, the resistances of reset and set states gradually change to the opposite direction. What is more, the operational conditions that are needed are also discussed. The failure and the changes are concerned with the compositional change of the phase change material. An abnormal phenomenon that the threshold voltage decreases slightly at first and then increases is observed, which is due to the coaction of interface contact and growing active volume size changing. Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. XDA09020402), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2013CBA01900, 2010CB934300, 2011CBA00607, 2011CB932804), the National Integrate Circuit Research Program of China (No. 2009ZX02023-003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61176122, 61106001, 61261160500, 61376006), and the Science and Technology Council of Shanghai (Nos. 12nm0503701, 13DZ2295700, 12QA1403900, 13ZR1447200, 14ZR1447500).

  16. Phase change thermal energy storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1987-10-27

    A thermal energy storage tank is described comprising a containment vessel arranged for exposure to thermal energy, and a thermal energy storage composition disposed within the vessel and comprising a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70/sup 0/-95/sup 0/F and a latent heat of transformation of greater than about 35 calories/gram. The non-chloride hydrate comprises trimethyol ethane hydrate.

  17. Numerical simulations of phase change in microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Juric, D.; Tryggvason, G.

    1996-12-31

    Direct numerical simulations of liquid-solid and liquid-vapor phase change are conducted under microgravity conditions. The time-dependent governing equations are solved using a two-dimensional finite-difference/front-tracking method. Large interface deformations, topology change, latent heat, surface tension and unequal material properties between the phases are included in the simulations. Results are presented for two specific problems: directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy and the rapid evaporation of a superheated liquid (vapor explosion). For the directional solidification problem, solution of the fully coupled solute and energy equations reveals the evolution of morphologically complex structures such as tip splitting, coarsening and droplet detachment from deep intercellular grooves. A variety of important solute segregation patterns such as necking, coring and banding are also observed. The boiling problem couples the phase change with fluid flow. This requires the solution of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations with interphase mass transfer. The energetic growth of instabilities on planar and circular interfaces during the unstable explosive evaporation of a superheated liquid in microgravity is demonstrated.

  18. Crystallization Properties of Ultrathin Phase Change Films

    SciTech Connect

    Raoux,S.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Kellock, A.

    2008-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of ultrathin phase change films was studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (XRD). Thin films of variable thickness between 1 and 50?nm of the phase change materials Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), N-doped GST, Ge15Sb85, Sb2Te, and Ag- and In-doped Sb2Te were heated in a He atmosphere, and the intensity of the diffracted x-ray peaks was recorded. It was found for all materials that the crystallization temperature increases as the film thickness is reduced below 10?nm. The increase depends on the material and can be as high as 200? C for the thinnest films. The thinnest films that show XRD peaks are 2?nm for GST and N-GST, 1.5?nm for Sb2Te and AgIn-Sb2Te, and 1.3?nm for GeSb. This scaling behavior is very promising for the application of phase change materials to solid-state memory technology.

  19. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  20. Tunable hyperbolic metamaterials utilizing phase change heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Harish N. S.; Menon, Vinod M.; Zhou, You; Ramanathan, Shriram; Narimanov, Evgenii

    2014-03-24

    We present a metal-free tunable anisotropic metamaterial where the iso-frequency surface is tuned from elliptical to hyperbolic dispersion by exploiting the metal-insulator phase transition in the correlated material vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). Using VO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} heterostructures, we demonstrate the transition in the effective dielectric constant parallel to the layers to undergo a sign change from positive to negative as the VO{sub 2} undergoes the phase transition. The possibility to tune the iso-frequency surface in real time using external perturbations such as temperature, voltage, or optical pulses creates new avenues for controlling light-matter interaction.

  1. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-12-06

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

  2. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1995-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  3. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  4. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1994-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  5. Phase-Change Heat-Storage Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, James C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat-storage module accommodates momentary heating or cooling overload in pumped-liquid heat-transfer system. Large heat-storage capacity of module provided by heat of fusion of material that freezes at or near temperature desired to maintain object to be heated or cooled. Module involves relatively small penalties in weight, cost, and size and more than compensates by enabling design of rest of system to handle only average load. Latent heat of fusion of phase-change material provides large heat-storage capacity in small volume.

  6. Phase change based cooling for high burst mode heat loads with temperature regulation above the phase change temperature

    SciTech Connect

    The United States of America as represented by the United States Department of Energy

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for transferring thermal energy from a heat load is disclosed. In particular, use of a phase change material and specific flow designs enables cooling with temperature regulation well above the fusion temperature of the phase change material for medium and high heat loads from devices operated intermittently (in burst mode). Exemplary heat loads include burst mode lasers and laser diodes, flight avionics, and high power space instruments. Thermal energy is transferred from the heat load to liquid phase change material from a phase change material reservoir. The liquid phase change material is split into two flows. Thermal energy is transferred from the first flow via a phase change material heat sink. The second flow bypasses the phase change material heat sink and joins with liquid phase change material exiting from the phase change material heat sink. The combined liquid phase change material is returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. The ratio of bypass flow to flow into the phase change material heat sink can be varied to adjust the temperature of the liquid phase change material returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. Varying the flowrate and temperature of the liquid phase change material presented to the heat load determines the magnitude of thermal energy transferred from the heat load.

  7. Phase Change Material Thermal Power Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    An innovative modification has been made to a previously patented design for the Phase Change Material (PCM) Thermal Generator, which works in water where ocean temperature alternatively melts wax in canisters, or allows the wax to re-solidify, causing high-pressure oil to flow through a hydraulic generator, thus creating electricity to charge a battery that powers the vehicle. In this modification, a similar thermal PCM device has been created that is heated and cooled by the air and solar radiation instead of using ocean temperature differences to change the PCM from solid to liquid. This innovation allows the device to use thermal energy to generate electricity on land, instead of just in the ocean.

  8. On phase change in thermocapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Pedro; Valluri, Prashant; Sefiane, Khellil; Karapetsas, George; Matar, Omar

    2012-11-01

    We present the findings from our 3D direct numerical study of thermocapillary flows undergoing phase change. A liquid-gas model with VOF interface-tracking technique is employed to investigate stable and unstable (hydrothermal waves) scenarios. The spatiotemporal evolution of the local evaporation flux is determined with the assumption that vapour phase just above interface is at a local thermodynamic equilibrium with the liquid phase below. The transient vapour distribution in the gas is also accounted for by means of the solution of an advection-diffusion equation. We calculate the resulting spatially non-uniform flux and illustrate its controlling mechanisms, which involve the Marangoni effect and non-uniform vapour-pressure distribution due to the externally-imposed thermal gradient. We also present the flux's non-linear evolution due to the transient liquid-level reduction and its stabilizing-destabilizing effect on the thermal and physical interface fluctuations. The oscillatory temperature- and vapour-fields in the gas, tightly coupled with advection rolls observed, are also shown. EPSRC DTA.

  9. Metallic resist for phase-change lithography

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bi Jian; Huang, Jun Zhu; Ni, Ri Wen; Yu, Nian Nian; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang Zhi; Li, Zhen; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used photoresists in optical lithography are organic-based resists. The major limitations of such resists include the photon accumulation severely affects the quality of photolithography patterns and the size of the pattern is constrained by the diffraction limit. Phase-change lithography, which uses semiconductor-based resists such as chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 films, was developed to overcome these limitations. Here, instead of chalcogenide, we propose a metallic resist composed of Mg58Cu29Y13 alloy films, which exhibits a considerable difference in etching rate between amorphous and crystalline states. Furthermore, the heat distribution in Mg58Cu29Y13 thin film is better and can be more easily controlled than that in Ge2Sb2Te5 during exposure. We succeeded in fabricating both continuous and discrete patterns on Mg58Cu29Y13 thin films via laser irradiation and wet etching. Our results demonstrate that a metallic resist of Mg58Cu29Y13 is suitable for phase change lithography, and this type of resist has potential due to its outstanding characteristics. PMID:24931505

  10. Metallic resist for phase-change lithography.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bi Jian; Huang, Jun Zhu; Ni, Ri Wen; Yu, Nian Nian; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang Zhi; Li, Zhen; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used photoresists in optical lithography are organic-based resists. The major limitations of such resists include the photon accumulation severely affects the quality of photolithography patterns and the size of the pattern is constrained by the diffraction limit. Phase-change lithography, which uses semiconductor-based resists such as chalcogenide Ge₂Sb₂Te₅ films, was developed to overcome these limitations. Here, instead of chalcogenide, we propose a metallic resist composed of Mg₅₈Cu₂₉Y₁₃ alloy films, which exhibits a considerable difference in etching rate between amorphous and crystalline states. Furthermore, the heat distribution in Mg₅₈Cu₂₉Y₁₃ thin film is better and can be more easily controlled than that in Ge₂Sb₂Te₅ during exposure. We succeeded in fabricating both continuous and discrete patterns on Mg₅₈Cu₂₉Y₁₃ thin films via laser irradiation and wet etching. Our results demonstrate that a metallic resist of Mg₅₈Cu₂₉Y₁₃ is suitable for phase change lithography, and this type of resist has potential due to its outstanding characteristics. PMID:24931505

  11. Material Engineering for Phase Change Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, David M.

    As semiconductor devices continue to scale downward, and portable consumer electronics become more prevalent there is a need to develop memory technology that will scale with devices and use less energy, while maintaining performance. One of the leading prototypical memories that is being investigated is phase change memory. Phase change memory (PCM) is a non-volatile memory composed of 1 transistor and 1 resistor. The resistive structure includes a memory material alloy which can change between amorphous and crystalline states repeatedly using current/voltage pulses of different lengths and magnitudes. The most widely studied PCM materials are chalcogenides - Germanium-Antimony-Tellerium (GST) with Ge2Sb2Te3 and Germanium-Tellerium (GeTe) being some of the most popular stochiometries. As these cells are scaled downward, the current/voltage needed to switch these materials becomes comparable to the voltage needed to sense the cell's state. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors aims to raise the threshold field of these devices from 66.6 V/mum to be at least 375 V/mum for the year 2024. These cells are also prone to resistance drift between states, leading to bit corruption and memory loss. Phase change material properties are known to influence PCM device performance such as crystallization temperature having an effect on data retention and litetime, while resistivity values in the amorphous and crystalline phases have an effect on the current/voltage needed to write/erase the cell. Addition of dopants is also known to modify the phase change material parameters. The materials G2S2T5, GeTe, with dopants - nitrogen, silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide and undoped Gallium-Antimonide (GaSb) are studied for these desired characteristics. Thin films of these compositions are deposited via physical vapor deposition at IBM Watson Research Center. Crystallization temperatures are investigated using time resolved x-ray diffraction at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  12. Phase changes in the BRCA policy domain.

    PubMed

    Modell, Stephen M; King, Susan B; Citrin, Toby; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2014-06-01

    The recent US Supreme Court ruling against gene patenting has been accompanied by the passage at the federal level of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, both events representing a thawing or phase change in policies that will now make preventive techniques, such as BRCA genetic testing to predict risk for familial breast and ovarian cancer, more affordable and accessible. Authors including Yun-Han Huang in this journal have noted the judicial ruling is one step--a significant one--in the process of patent system reform. This commentary links such changes with policy formation and action taken by members of diverse religious communities in the aftermath of the Human Genome Project and continuing in today's genome sequencing area. Religious engagement has acted as a catalyzing force for change in the creation and dissemination of genetic developments. Religious perspectives are needed to solve the new ethical dilemmas posed by population screening for BRCA mutations and the rise of direct-to-consumer and provider marketing of such genetic tests, which have far-reaching consequences at the individual, family, and societal levels. PMID:24599711

  13. Phase change water processing for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdankiewicz, E. M.; Price, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of a vapor compression distillation subsystem (VCDS) for water recovery on the Space Station is analyzed. The self-contained automated system can process waste water at a rate of 32.6 kg/day and requires only 115 W of electric power. The improvements in the mechanical components of VCDS are studied. The operation of VCDS in the normal mode is examined. The VCDS preprototype is evaluated based on water quality, water production rate, and specific energy. The relation between water production rate and fluids pump speed is investigated; it is concluded that a variable speed fluids pump will optimize water production. Components development and testing currently being conducted are described. The properties and operation of the proposed phase change water processing system for the Space Station, based on vapor compression distillation, are examined.

  14. Projected phase-change memory devices

    PubMed Central

    Koelmans, Wabe W.; Sebastian, Abu; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Krebs, Daniel; Dellmann, Laurent; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale memory devices, whose resistance depends on the history of the electric signals applied, could become critical building blocks in new computing paradigms, such as brain-inspired computing and memcomputing. However, there are key challenges to overcome, such as the high programming power required, noise and resistance drift. Here, to address these, we present the concept of a projected memory device, whose distinguishing feature is that the physical mechanism of resistance storage is decoupled from the information-retrieval process. We designed and fabricated projected memory devices based on the phase-change storage mechanism and convincingly demonstrate the concept through detailed experimentation, supported by extensive modelling and finite-element simulations. The projected memory devices exhibit remarkably low drift and excellent noise performance. We also demonstrate active control and customization of the programming characteristics of the device that reliably realize a multitude of resistance states. PMID:26333363

  15. Cooling of Electronics with Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S. K.; Dutta, P.

    2010-10-01

    This paper deals with phase change materials (PCMs), used in conjunction with thermal conductivity enhancer (TCE), as means of thermal management of electronic systems. This work was motivated by the need for short term thermal management of high packing density equipments (such as in avionics). Eicosane is used as PCM, while aluminium pin or plate fins are used as TCE. The test section considered in all cases is 42×42 mm square base with TCE height of 25 mm. An electronic heater producing 4, 6 and 8 W was used to simulate the heat generation of electronic chips. Various volumetric percentages of TCE in the conglomerate of PCM and TCE were considered, namely, 0, 2, 8, 18 and 27%. The case with 8% volumetric percentage of TCE was found to have the best thermal performance. A numerical model was developed to enable interpretation of experimental results and to perform parametric studies.

  16. Projected phase-change memory devices.

    PubMed

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Sebastian, Abu; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Krebs, Daniel; Dellmann, Laurent; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale memory devices, whose resistance depends on the history of the electric signals applied, could become critical building blocks in new computing paradigms, such as brain-inspired computing and memcomputing. However, there are key challenges to overcome, such as the high programming power required, noise and resistance drift. Here, to address these, we present the concept of a projected memory device, whose distinguishing feature is that the physical mechanism of resistance storage is decoupled from the information-retrieval process. We designed and fabricated projected memory devices based on the phase-change storage mechanism and convincingly demonstrate the concept through detailed experimentation, supported by extensive modelling and finite-element simulations. The projected memory devices exhibit remarkably low drift and excellent noise performance. We also demonstrate active control and customization of the programming characteristics of the device that reliably realize a multitude of resistance states. PMID:26333363

  17. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  18. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1993-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garmets, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  19. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1992-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  20. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1992-04-21

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 9 figs.

  1. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1993-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  2. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-10-19

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (pcm) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 10 figures.

  3. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1994-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  4. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-05-18

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the p.c.m. must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less p.c.m. per combined weight of silica and p.c.m. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a p.c.m. material. The silica-p.c.m. mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  5. Mechanics of metals with phase changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason C.

    New experimental data is presented on some exotic metals that exhibit phase changes at cryogenic temperatures. The types of phase changes that were detected in the specific heat data range from martensitic (diffusionless) transitions to superconducting transitions. In addition, the charge density wave (CDW) state in uranium metal was detected in the specific heat. Specific-heat measurements were made in zero-magnetic field using an apparatus capable of obtaining temperatures as low as 0.4 K. Calibration performed on this apparatus, using a single-crystal copper sample, show its accuracy to be 0.50 per cent, while the resolution was better than 0.1 per cent. Our measurements demonstrate that similar high precision and accurate specific-heat measurements can be obtained on milligram-scale samples. In Chapters 2 and 3, specific-heat measurements are presented for the B2 (CsCl structure) alloy AuZn and for alpha-uranium (orthorhombic symmetry). The AuZn alloy exhibits a continuous transition at 64.75 K and an entropy of transition of (DeltaStr ) 2.02 J K-1 mol-1. Calculation of the Debye temperature, by extrapolating of the high temperature phase elastic constants to T = 0 K yields a value of 207 K (+/-2 K), in favorable agreement with the calorimetric value of 219 K (+/-0.50 K), despite the intervening martensitic transition. Reported results for single-crystal alpha-U show a low-temperature limiting 19, of 256 K (+/-0.50 K) and four low-temperature anamolies: a superconducting transition below 1 K, an electronic transition at 22 K, and two anamolies at 38 K and at 42 K indicative of the CDW state. In order to continue the study of the actinide series of elements, a program was initiated to first purify and then grow single crystals of plutonium. Accordingly, the focus of Chapters 4 through 6 will be a description of plutonium sample preparation. In this program plutonium metal was purified via zone refining, using a levitated molten zone to minimize the introduction

  6. Phase change material thermal capacitor clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  7. Mechanics of Metals with Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    New experimental data is presented on some exotic metals that exhibit phase changes at cryogenic temperatures. The types of phase changes that were detected in the specific heat data range from martensitic (diffusion less) transitions to superconducting transitions. In addition, the charge density wave (CDW) state in uranium metal was detected in the specific heat. Specific-heat measurements were made in zero-magnetic field using an apparatus capable of obtaining temperatures as low as 0.4 K. Calibration performed on this apparatus, using a single-crystal copper sample, show its accuracy to be 0.50%, while the resolution was better than 0.1%. Our measurements demonstrate that similar high precision and accurate specific-heat measurements can be obtained on milligram-scale samples. In Chapters 2 and 3, specific-heat measurements are presented for the B2 (CsCl structure) alloy AuZn and for {alpha}-uranium (orthorhombic symmetry). The AuZn alloy exhibits a continuous transition at 64.75 K and an entropy of transition of ({Delta}S{sub tr}) 2.02 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1}. Calculation of the Debye temperature, by extrapolating of the high temperature phase elastic constants to T = 0 K yields a value of 207 K ({+-}2 K), in favorable agreement with the calorimetric value of 219 K ({+-}0.50 K), despite the intervening martensitic transition. Reported results for single-crystal {alpha}-U show a low-temperature limiting {Theta}{sub D} of 256 K ({+-}0.50 K) and four low-temperature anomalies: a superconducting transition below 1 K, an electronic transition at 22 K, and two anomalies at 38 K and at 42 K indicative of the CDW state. In order to continue the study of the actinide series of elements, a program was initiated to first purify and then grow single crystals of plutonium. Accordingly, the focus of Chapters 4 through 6 will be a description of plutonium sample preparation. In this program plutonium metal was purified via zone refining, using a levitated molten

  8. Relaxation oscillations in chalcogenide phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, M.; Karpov, V. G.; Karpov, I. V.

    2010-03-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental study of relaxation oscillations in chalcogenide phase change memory are presented. Extending the previous work, voltage and current oscillations were measured over much longer periods of time and with a broad range of applied voltages, load resistances, and device thicknesses. The effects of various reset voltage levels and material types were also considered. Several types of oscillation patterns were observed; most were continuous through the measurement period while others exhibited few or no oscillations. Also observed were two distinct regimes of oscillations; one of stable amplitudes followed by one of decaying amplitudes. The duration of the stable regime and the total time for oscillation decay were found to be directly proportional to the device thickness. In addition, temporal drift of the threshold voltage was observed which provided a method for measuring the variation in the drift coefficient between different materials. A numerical model was developed to simulate oscillations and extrapolate our results to lower circuit time constants. The physical mechanism of oscillations and their stochastic nature are effectively described in the framework of field-induced nucleation, while the transition from stable to decaying amplitudes is attributed to concomitant thermally induced nucleation.

  9. Reconfigurable Braille display with phase change locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, Cody W.; Lazarus, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Automatically updated signs and displays for sighted people are common in today’s world. However, there is no cheap, low power equivalent available for the blind. This work demonstrates a reconfigurable Braille cell using the solid-to-liquid phase change of a low melting point alloy as a zero holding power locking mechanism. The device is actuated with the alloy in the liquid state, and is then allowed to solidify to lock the Braille dot in the actuated position. A low-cost manufacturing process is developed that includes molding of a rigid silicone to create pneumatic channels, and bonding of a thin membrane of a softer silicone on the surface for actuation. A plug of Field’s metal (melting point 62 °C) is placed in the pneumatic channels below each Braille dot to create the final device. The device is well suited for low duty cycle operation in applications such as signs, and is able to maintain its state indefinitely without additional power input. The display requires a pneumatic pressure of only 24 kPa for actuation, and reconfiguration has been demonstrated in less than a minute and a half.

  10. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  11. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  12. Phase behavior of shape-changing spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. I. C.; Masters, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a simple model for a biaxial nematic liquid crystal. This consists of hard spheroids that can switch shape between prolate (rodlike) and oblate (platelike) subject to an energy penalty Δ ɛ . The spheroids are approximated as hard Gaussian overlap particles and are treated at the level of Onsager's second-virial description. We use both bifurcation analysis and a numerical minimization of the free energy to show that, for additive particle shapes, (i) there is no stable biaxial phase even for Δ ɛ =0 (although there is a metastable biaxial phase in the same density range as the stable uniaxial phase) and (ii) the isotropic-to-nematic transition is into either one of two degenerate uniaxial phases, rod rich or plate rich. We confirm that even a small amount of shape nonadditivity may stabilize the biaxial nematic phase.

  13. Nano composite phase change materials microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qingwen

    MicroPCMs with nano composite structures (NC-MicroPCMs) have been systematically studied. NC-MicroPCMs were fabricated by the in situ polymerization and addition of silver NPs into core-shell structures. A full factorial experiment was designed, including three factors of core/shell, molar ratio of formaldehyde/melamine and NPs addition. 12 MicroPCMs samples were prepared. The encapsulated efficiency is approximately 80% to 90%. The structural/morphological features of the NC-MicroPCMs were evaluated. The size was in a range of 3.4 mu m to 4.0 mu m. The coarse appearance is attributed to NPs and NPs are distributed on the surface, within the shell and core. The NC-MicroPCMs contain new chemical components and molecular groups, due to the formation of chemical bonds after the pretreatment of NPs. Extra X-ray diffraction peaks of silver were found indicating silver nano-particles were formed into an integral structure with the core/shell structure by means of chemical bonds and physical linkages. Extra functionalities were found, including: (1) enhancement of IR radiation properties; (2) depression of super-cooling, and (3) increase of thermal stabilities. The effects of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy) arising from the silver nano-particles were observed. The Raman scattering intensity was magnified more than 100 times. These effects were also exhibited in macroscopic level in the fabric coatings as enhanced IR radiation properties were detected by the "Fabric Infrared Radiation Management Tester" (FRMT). "Degree of Crystallinity" (DOC) was measured and found the three factors have a strong influence on it. DOC is closely related to thermal stability and MicroPCMs with a higher DOC show better temperature resistance. The thermal regulating effects of the MicroPCMs coatings were studied. A "plateau regions" was detected around the temperature of phase change, showing the function of PCMs. Addition of silver nano-particles to the MicroPCMs has a positive

  14. A Phase-Change Composite for Use in Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Ron S.

    1992-06-15

    The objective of this project is to develop composite thermal insulations containing phase-change materials for use in the building envelope. The use of a phase-change insulation composite in the building envelope could result in a significant increase in energy efficiency. PhD Research provided candidate phase-change composites, and ORNL performed analytical and experimental evaluations of their thermal performance. The thermal resistance of the prototype panels was somewhat less than that of commercial products, although their thermal capacity was greater. Using these results, PhD Research has been working to modify the design and to produce practical building elements that incorporate phase-change material.

  15. Biophysical Modeling of Phase Changes in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhaomei; Caprihan, Arvind; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Calhoun, Vince D

    2009-01-01

    In BOLD fMRI, stimulus related phase changes have been repeatedly observed in humans. However, virtually all fMRI processing utilizes the magnitude information only, while ignoring the phase. This results in an unnecessary loss of physiological information and signal-to-noise efficiency. A widely held view is that the BOLD phase change is zero for a voxel containing randomly orientated blood vessels and that phase changes are only due to the presence of large vessels. Based on a previously developed theoretical model, we show through simulations and experimental human BOLD fMRI data that a non-zero phase change can be present in a region with randomly oriented vessels. Using simulations of the model, we first demonstrate that a spatially distributed susceptibility results in a non-zero phase distribution. Next, experimental data in a finger-tapping experiment show consistent bipolar phase distribution across multiple subjects. This model is then used to show that in theory a bipolar phase distribution can also be produced by the model. Finally, we show that the model can produce a bipolar phase pattern consistent with that observed in the experimental data. Understanding of the mechanisms behind the experimentally observed phase changes in BOLD fMRI would be an important step forward and will enable biophysical model based methods for integrating the phase and magnitude information in BOLD fMRI experiments. PMID:19426815

  16. Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-09-12

    A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

  17. Confined Crystals of the Smallest Phase-Change Material

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The demand for high-density memory in tandem with limitations imposed by the minimum feature size of current storage devices has created a need for new materials that can store information in smaller volumes than currently possible. Successfully employed in commercial optical data storage products, phase-change materials, that can reversibly and rapidly change from an amorphous phase to a crystalline phase when subject to heating or cooling have been identified for the development of the next generation electronic memories. There are limitations to the miniaturization of these devices due to current synthesis and theoretical considerations that place a lower limit of 2 nm on the minimum bit size, below which the material does not transform in the structural phase. We show here that by using carbon nanotubes of less than 2 nm diameter as templates phase-change nanowires confined to their smallest conceivable scale are obtained. Contrary to previous experimental evidence and theoretical expectations, the nanowires are found to crystallize at this scale and display amorphous-to-crystalline phase changes, fulfilling an important prerequisite of a memory element. We show evidence for the smallest phase-change material, extending thus the size limit to explore phase-change memory devices at extreme scales. PMID:23984706

  18. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  19. Genetic analysis of phase change in Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, A A; Falkow, S

    1984-01-01

    Avirulent-phase derivatives of Bordetella pertussis (those which have simultaneously lost the ability to synthesize several virulence-associated factors) and the genetic mechanism of the phase change were studied. Increased tolerance to erythromycin was shown to be an avirulent-phase marker. By the use of efficiency of plating on erythromycin, the proportion of avirulent-phase (Vir) variants in a virulent-phase (Vir+) population was determined to be between 10(-3) and 10(-6), depending on the strain. We showed that the phase shift is reversible and detected a complete Vir- to Vir+ to Vir- to cycle. In other experiments, hybridization studies with avirulent-phase mutants obtained by Tn5 mutagenesis suggested that a single region located at a unique site in the B. pertussis chromosome controls the phase change. One of the avirulent Tn5 mutants was used as a recipient in a conjugative cross with a virulent-phase donor. All recombinants which had reacquired the virulence-associated factors also lost Tn5, indicating the loss of Tn5 was required to restore the Vir+ phenotype. The Tn5 avirulent-phase mutants behave as if the insertion interrupted the function of a transacting gene product which is required for the expression of the other virulent-phase genes. A model of the molecular basis of the phase regulation is presented. Images PMID:6317569

  20. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    PubMed Central

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund Jr., Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. This architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements. PMID:25346427

  1. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund Jr., Richard F.

    2014-10-27

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume ofmore » only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. Lastly, this architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements.« less

  2. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    SciTech Connect

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund Jr., Richard F.

    2014-10-27

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. Lastly, this architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements.

  3. Phase Change Material Thermal Power Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An energy producing device, for example a submersible vehicle for descending or ascending to different depths within water or ocean, is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a temperature-responsive material to which a hydraulic fluid is associated. A pressurized storage compartment stores the fluid as soon as the temperature-responsive material changes density. The storage compartment is connected with a hydraulic motor, and a valve allows fluid passage from the storage compartment to the hydraulic motor. An energy storage component, e.g. a battery, is connected with the hydraulic motor and is charged by the hydraulic motor when the hydraulic fluid passes through the hydraulic motor. Upon passage in the hydraulic motor, the fluid is stored in a further storage compartment and is then sent back to the area of the temperature-responsive material.

  4. Phase change material thermal power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An energy producing device, for example a submersible vehicle for descending or ascending to different depths within water or ocean, is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a temperature-responsive material to which a hydraulic fluid is associated. A pressurized storage compartment stores the fluid as soon as the temperature-responsive material changes density. The storage compartment is connected with a hydraulic motor, and a valve allows fluid passage from the storage compartment to the hydraulic motor. An energy storage component, e.g. a battery, is connected with the hydraulic motor and is charged by the hydraulic motor when the hydraulic fluid passes through the hydraulic motor. Upon passage in the hydraulic motor, the fluid is stored in a further storage compartment and is then sent back to the area of the temperature-responsive material.

  5. Frequency, phase, and amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Diener, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation, which are induced by the modulation of the cavity resonant frequency, are considered. The results obtained apply specifically to one of the H-maser cavity autotuning methods which is actually implemented, namely the cavity frequency-switching method. The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes are analyzed theoretically. The phase and the amplitude variations are measured experimentally. It is shown, in particular, that the phase of oscillation is subjected to abrupt jumps at the times of the cavity frequency switching, whose magnitude is specified. The results given can be used for the design of a phase-locked loop (PLL) aimed at minimizing the transfer of the phase modulation to the slaved VCXO.

  6. Aging mechanisms in amorphous phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raty, Jean Yves; Zhang, Wei; Luckas, Jennifer; Chen, Chao; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Bichara, Christophe; Wuttig, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Aging is a ubiquitous phenomenon in glasses. In the case of phase-change materials, it leads to a drift in the electrical resistance, which hinders the development of ultrahigh density storage devices. Here we elucidate the aging process in amorphous GeTe, a prototypical phase-change material, by advanced numerical simulations, photothermal deflection spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy experiments. We show that aging is accompanied by a progressive change of the local chemical order towards the crystalline one. Yet, the glass evolves towards a covalent amorphous network with increasing Peierls distortion, whose structural and electronic properties drift away from those of the resonantly bonded crystal. This behaviour sets phase-change materials apart from conventional glass-forming systems, which display the same local structure and bonding in both phases.

  7. A Gibbs Formulation for Reactive Materials with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott

    2015-11-01

    A large class of applications have pure, condensed phase constituents that come into contact, chemically react and simultaneously undergo phase change. Phase change in a given molecular material has often been considered to be separate from chemical reaction. Continuum modelers of phase change often use a phase field model whereby an indicator function is allowed to change from one value to another in regions of phase change, governed by evolutionary (Ginzburg-Landau) equations, whereas classic chemical kinetics literally count species concentrations and derive kinetics evolution equations based on species mass transport. We argue the latter is fundamental and is the same as the former, if all species, phase or chemical are treated as distinct chemical species. We pose a self-consistent continuum, thermo-mechanical model to account for significant energetic quantities with correct molecular and continuum limits in the mixture. A single stress tensor, and a single temperature is assumed for the mixture with specified Gibbs potentials for all relevant species, and interaction energies. We discuss recent examples of complex reactive material modeling, drawn from thermitic and propellant combustion that use this new model. DSS supported by DTRA, ONR and AFOSR.

  8. A Gibbs Formulation for Reactive Materials with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott

    2015-06-01

    A large class of applications have pure, condensed phase constituents that come into contact, chemically react and simultaneously undergo phase change. Phase change in a given molecular material has often been considered to be separate from chemical reaction. Continuum modelers of phase change often use a phase field model whereby an indicator function is allowed to change from one value to another in regions of phase change, governed by evolutionary (Ginzburg-Landau) equations, whereas classic chemical kinetics literally count species concentrations and derive kinetics evolution equations based on species mass transport. We argue the latter is fundamental and is the same as the former, if all species, phase or chemical are treated as distinct chemical species. We pose a self-consistent continuum, thermo-mechanical model to account for significant energetic quantities with correct molecular and continuum limits in the mixture. A single stress tensor, and a single temperature is assumed for the mixture with specified Gibbs potentials for all relevant species, and interaction energies. We discuss recent examples of complex reactive material modeling, drawn from thermitic and propellant combustion that use this new model. Supported by HDTRA1-10-1-0020 (DTRA), N000014-12-1-0555 (ONR) and FA8651-10-1-0004 (AFRL/RW).

  9. Solid–Liquid Phase Change Driven by Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Ali s. Siahpush

    2012-07-01

    This article presents results of solid-liquid phase change, the Stefan Problem, where melting is driven internal heat generation, in a cylindrical geometry. The comparison between a quasi-static analytical solution for Stefan numbers less than one and numerical solutions shows good agreement. The computational results of phase change with internal heat generation show how convection cells form in the liquid region. A scale analysis of the same problem shows four distinct regions of the melting process.

  10. A latchable thermally activated phase change actuator for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex microfluidic systems often require a high number of individually controllable active components like valves and pumps. In this paper we present the development and optimization of a latchable thermally controlled phase change actuator which uses a solid/liquid phase transition of a phase change medium and the displacement of the liquid phase change medium to change and stabilize the two states of the actuator. Because the phase change is triggered by heat produced with ohmic resistors the used control signal is an electrical signal. In contrast to pneumatically activated membrane valves this concept allows the individual control of several dozen actuators with only two external pressure lines. Within this paper we show the general working principle of the actuator and demonstrate its general function and the scalability of the concept at an example of four actuators. Additionally we present the complete results of our studies to optimize the response behavior of the actuator - the influence of the heating power as well as the used phase change medium on melting and solidifying times.

  11. Phase Change Material Systems for High Temperature Heat Storage.

    PubMed

    Perraudin, David Y S; Binder, Selmar R; Rezaei, Ehsan; Ortonaa, Alberto; Haussener, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, cost effective, and stable high-temperature heat storage material systems are important in applications such as high-temperature industrial processes (metal processing, cement and glass manufacturing, etc.), or electricity storage using advanced adiabatic compressed air energy storage. Incorporating phase change media into heat storage systems provides an advantage of storing and releasing heat at nearly constant temperature, allowing steady and optimized operation of the downstream processes. The choice of, and compatibility of materials and encapsulation for the phase change section is crucial, as these must guarantee good and stable performance and long lifetime at low cost. Detailed knowledge of the material properties and stability, and the coupled heat transfer, phase change, and fluid flow are required to allow for performance and lifetime predictions. We present coupled experimental-numerical techniques allowing prediction of the long-term performance of a phase change material-based high-temperature heat storage system. The experimental investigations focus on determination of material properties (melting temperature, heat of fusion, etc.) and phase change material and encapsulation interaction (stability, interface reactions, etc.). The computational investigations focus on an understanding of the multi-mode heat transfer, fluid flow, and phase change processes in order to design the material system for enhanced performance. The importance of both the experimental and numerical approaches is highlighted and we give an example of how both approaches can be complementarily used for the investigation of long-term performance. PMID:26842330

  12. Mantle plume interaction with an endothermic phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles; Goldman, Peggy

    1995-01-01

    High spatial resolution numerical simulations of mantle plumes impinging from below on the endothermic phase change at 660-km depth are used to investigate the effects of latent heat release on the plume-phase change interaction. Both axisymmetric and planar upflows are considered, and the strong temperature dependence of mantle viscosity is taken into account. For plume strengths considered, a Clapeyron slope of -4 MPa/K prevents plume penetration of the phase change. Plumes readily penetrate the phase change for a Clapeyron slope of -2 MPa/K and arrive in the upper mantle considerably hotter than if they had not traversed the phase change. For the same amount of thermal drive, i.e., the same excess basal temperature, axisymmetric plumes are hotter upon reaching the upper mantle than are planar upwellings. Heating of plumes by their passage through the spinel-perovskite endothermic phase change can have important consequences for the ability of the plume to thermally thin the lithosphere and cause melting and volcanism.

  13. Thermal analysis of metal foam matrix composite phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiange

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, CPCM (Composite Phase Change Material) was manufactured with metal foam matrix used as filling material. The temperature curves were obtained by experiment. The performance of heat transfer was analyzed. The experimental results show that metal foam matrix can improve temperature uniformity in phase change thermal storage material and enhance heat conduction ability. The thermal performance of CPCM is significantly improved. The efficiency of temperature control can be obviously improved by adding metal foam in phase change material. CPCM is in solid-liquid two-phase region when temperature is close to phase change point of paraffin. An approximate plateau appears. The plateau can be considered as the temperature control zone of CPCM. Heat can be transferred from hot source and be uniformly spread in thermal storage material by using metal foam matrix since thermal storage material has the advantage of strong heat storage capacity and disadvantage of poor heat conduction ability. Natural convection promotes the melting of solid-liquid phase change material. Good thermal conductivity of foam metal accelerates heat conduction of solid-liquid phase change material. The interior temperature difference decreases and the whole temperature becomes more uniform. For the same porosity with a metal foam, melting time of solid-liquid phase change material decreases. Heat conduction is enhanced and natural convection is suppressed when pore size of metal foam is smaller. The thermal storage time decreases and heat absorption rate increases when the pore size of metal foam reduces. The research results can be used to guide fabricating the CPCM.

  14. Phase change material in floor tiles for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy Sarah

    Traditional passive solar systems have relied on sensible heat storage for energy savings. Recent research has investigated taking advantage of latent heat storage for additional energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change material into building materials used in traditional passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. This research introduces a new flooring material that incorporates a phase change material ready for commercial manufacture. An agglomerate floor tile containing 20% by mass of encapsulated octadecane has been manufactured. Flexural and compressive strength of 7.4 MPa and 24.5 MPa respectively, were measured for the tile. Peak melting transition temperature was determined to be 27.2°C with a latent heat of 33.9 J/g of tile. Structural and thermal performance of the tile surpassed that of a typical ceramic tile. Each tile was composed of quartz, resin and phase change material. Statistical modeling was performed to analyze the response of flexural and compressive strength on varying amounts of quartz, resin and phase change material. Resulting polynomials described the effect of adding phase change material into the tile. With as little as 10% by mass of phase change material, the strength was reduced to less than 50% of tile without phase change material. It was determined that the maximum phase change material content to attain structural integrity greater than ceramic tile was 20% by mass. The statistical analysis used for this research was based on mixture experiments. A procedure was developed to simplify the selection of data points used in the fit of the polynomials to describe the response of flexural and compressive strengths. Analysis of energy savings using this floor tile containing 20% by mass of phase change material was performed as an addendum to this research. A known static simulation method, SLR (solar load ratio), was adapted to include

  15. Adversary phase change detection using SOMs and text data.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we developed a self-organizing map (SOM) technique for using web-based text analysis to forecast when a group is undergoing a phase change. By 'phase change', we mean that an organization has fundamentally shifted attitudes or behaviors. For instance, when ice melts into water, the characteristics of the substance change. A formerly peaceful group may suddenly adopt violence, or a violent organization may unexpectedly agree to a ceasefire. SOM techniques were used to analyze text obtained from organization postings on the world-wide web. Results suggest it may be possible to forecast phase changes, and determine if an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  16. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kolobov, A.V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-01-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials. PMID:26323962

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change. PMID:27176406

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change.

  19. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-09-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials.

  20. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Knowledge of Observable Moon Phases and Pattern of Change in Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Atwood, Ronald K.; Christopher, John E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe selected content knowledge held by 52 preservice elementary teachers about the observable phases of the moon and the monthly pattern of change in observable phases. Data were obtained from participants in a physics course before and after they received inquiry-based instruction designed to promote…

  1. Atomic structure and pressure-induced phase transformations in a phase-change alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming

    Phase-change materials exist in at least two phases under the ambient condition. One is the amorphous state and another is crystalline phase. These two phases have vastly different physical properties, such as electrical conductivity, optical reflectivity, mass density, thermal conductivity, etc. The distinct physical properties and the fast transformation between amorphous and crystalline phases render these materials the ability to store information. For example, the DVD and the Blue-ray discs take advantage of the optical reflectivity contrast, and the newly developed solid-state memories make use of the large conductivity difference. In addition, both the amorphous and crystalline phases in phase-change memories (PCMs) are very stable at room temperature, and they are easy to be scaled up in the production of devices with large storage density. All these features make phase-change materials the ideal candidates for the next-generation memories. Despite of the fast development of these new memory materials in industry, many fundamental physics problems underlying these interesting materials are still not fully resolved. This thesis is aiming at solving some of the key issues in phase-change materials. Most of phase-change materials are composed of Ge-Sb-Te constituents. Among all these Ge-Sb-Te based materials, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) has the best performance and has been frequently studied as a prototypical phase-change material. The first and foremost issue is the structure of the two functioning phases. In this thesis, we investigate the unique atomic structure and bonding nature of amorphous GST (a-GST) and crystalline GST ( c-GST), using ab initio tools and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Their local structures and bonding scenarios are then analyzed using electronic structure calculations. In order to gain insight into the fast phase transformation mechanism, we also carried out a series of high-pressure experiments on GST. Several new polymorphs and their

  2. Phase change dispersion of plasmonic nano-objects.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xie; Hu, Haifeng; Gao, Yongkang; Ji, Dengxin; Zhang, Nan; Song, Haomin; Liu, Kai; Jiang, Suhua; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase is an inherent and important feature for coherent processes, which, unfortunately, has not been completely understood for surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and matter interactions. Here we propose a practical approach to extract the phase change dispersion during the interaction between free-space light, SPPs and nanogroove/slit based on far-field information only. Numerical simulation and experimental validation were both presented using nanoslit-groove plasmonic interferometers, agreeing well with theoretical near-field analysis. This approach is generally feasible to extract the intrinsic phase dispersion of other plasmonic nanostructures and can reveal more fundamental features of SPP-matter interactions. PMID:26219831

  3. Zero-static-power phase-change optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohsen; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2016-03-15

    This Letter presents an innovative design of an electro-optical modulator using germanium telluride (GeTe) phase change material with an integrated nano-heater. The refractive index and the electrical conductivity of GeTe significantly change as the GeTe goes though the crystallographic phase change. Amorphization and crystallization of GeTe is achieved using the Joule heating method by passing current through an array of metal gratings, where GeTe fills the slits between the metal lines. These metal slits also increase the contrast between the amorphous (on) and crystalline (off) phases of the modulator by having extraordinary transmission and reflection response based on interactions of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with the incoming light. The modulator is designed for 1550 nm wavelength, where GeTe is transparent in the amorphous phase and provides high optical on/off contrast. The metal-insulator-metal (MIM) is designed in such a way to only support SPP excitation when GeTe is crystalline and slit resonance when it is amorphous to increase the modulation index. The modulator is stable in both phases with higher than 12 dB change in transmission with zero static power consumption at room temperature. PMID:26977663

  4. Phase-change Random Access Memory: A Scalable Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Raoux, S.; Burr, G; Breitwisch, M; Rettner, C; Chen, Y; Shelby, R; Salinga, M; Krebs, D; Chen, S; Lung, H

    2008-01-01

    Nonvolatile RAM using resistance contrast in phase-change materials [or phase-change RAM (PCRAM)] is a promising technology for future storage-class memory. However, such a technology can succeed only if it can scale smaller in size, given the increasingly tiny memory cells that are projected for future technology nodes (i.e., generations). We first discuss the critical aspects that may affect the scaling of PCRAM, including materials properties, power consumption during programming and read operations, thermal cross-talk between memory cells, and failure mechanisms. We then discuss experiments that directly address the scaling properties of the phase-change materials themselves, including studies of phase transitions in both nanoparticles and ultrathin films as a function of particle size and film thickness. This work in materials directly motivated the successful creation of a series of prototype PCRAM devices, which have been fabricated and tested at phase-change material cross-sections with extremely small dimensions as low as 3 nm x 20 nm. These device measurements provide a clear demonstration of the excellent scaling potential offered by this technology, and they are also consistent with the scaling behavior predicted by extensive device simulations. Finally, we discuss issues of device integration and cell design, manufacturability, and reliability.

  5. Using adversary text to detect adversary phase changes.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to help develop a research roadmap and small proof ofconcept for addressing key problems and gaps from the perspective of using text analysis methods as a primary tool for detecting when a group is undergoing a phase change. Self- rganizing map (SOM) techniques were used to analyze text data obtained from the tworld-wide web. Statistical studies indicate that it may be possible to predict phase changes, as well as detect whether or not an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  6. Lightweight Phase-Change Material For Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight panels containing phase-change materials developed for use as heat-storage elements of compact, lightweight, advanced solar dynamic power system. During high insolation, heat stored in panels via latent heat of fusion of phase-change material; during low insolation, heat withdrawn from panels. Storage elements consist mainly of porous carbon-fiber structures imbued with germanium. Developed for use aboard space station in orbit around Earth, also adapted to lightweight, compact, portable solar-power systems for use on Earth.

  7. Phase change material for temperature control and material storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Jr., Francis C. (Inventor); Blackwood, James M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A phase change material comprising a mixture of water and deuterium oxide is described, wherein the mole fraction of deuterium oxide is selected so that the mixture has a selected phase change temperature within a range between 0.degree. C. and 4.degree. C. The mixture is placed in a container and used for passive storage and transport of biomaterials and other temperature sensitive materials. Gels, nucleating agents, freezing point depression materials and colorants may be added to enhance the characteristics of the mixture.

  8. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    DOEpatents

    Kloucek, Petr; Reynolds, Daniel R.

    2009-03-24

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  9. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloucek, Petr (Inventor); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  10. Development of PCM wallboard for heating and cooling of residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.

    1989-03-01

    The goals of this project were to find, test, and develop an effective phase change material (PCM) for heating and cooling of residential buildings. Specifications for the PCM included thermal storage of at least 30 cal/gm, congruent melting and freezing, at 25{degrees}C, nontoxic, noncorrosive, nonhygroscopic, low-cost, and commercially available in quantity. The PCM must be able to be incorporated into ordinary building materials (plasterboard, concrete, floor tile) by processes adaptable to commercial manufacture. The goals of the original program have been substantially achieved by identifying a series of linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon PCM that are commercially available from petroleum refining (lower cost, lower {open_quotes}purity{close_quotes}), and from polymerization of ethylene (higher cost, higher {open_quotes}purity{close_quotes}). Four alternate processes have been developed whereby these PCM can be incorporated into plasterboard and concrete building materials. Two of the processes have been successfully demonstrated in the laboratories of the two largest U.S. manufacturers of plasterboard, and collaborative development leading toward commercialization is still ongoing. Problem areas remaining to be resolved include: establishing unequivocably the economic viability of the system, developing environmentally acceptable fire retarding procedures, scale up of the manufacturing processes and evaluating effects of long-term thermocycling. We are scaling up the immersion process to include imbibing and testing 4-ft x 8-ft plasterboard panels. Successful completion is expected to encourage a plasterboard manufacturer to commercialize the technology. Five U.S. patents have been issuedand U.S. and foreign patents are pending. One foreign license has been negotiated. Spin-offs of the technology likely to be commercialized soon in the U.S. include tableware, hot and cold medical wraps, and wraps to prevent the overnight freezing of citrus tree trunks.

  11. Compensating temperature-induced ultrasonic phase and amplitude changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Hay, Thomas R.; Greve, David W.; Junker, Warren R.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2016-04-01

    In ultrasonic structural health monitoring (SHM), environmental and operational conditions, especially temperature, can significantly affect the propagation of ultrasonic waves and thus degrade damage detection. Typically, temperature effects are compensated using optimal baseline selection (OBS) or optimal signal stretch (OSS). The OSS method achieves compensation by adjusting phase shifts caused by temperature, but it does not fully compensate phase shifts and it does not compensate for accompanying signal amplitude changes. In this paper, we develop a new temperature compensation strategy to address both phase shifts and amplitude changes. In this strategy, OSS is first used to compensate some of the phase shifts and to quantify the temperature effects by stretching factors. Based on stretching factors, empirical adjusting factors for a damage indicator are then applied to compensate for the temperature induced remaining phase shifts and amplitude changes. The empirical adjusting factors can be trained from baseline data with temperature variations in the absence of incremental damage. We applied this temperature compensation approach to detect volume loss in a thick wall aluminum tube with multiple damage levels and temperature variations. Our specimen is a thick-walled short tube, with dimensions closely comparable to the outlet region of a frac iron elbow where flow-induced erosion produces the volume loss that governs the service life of that component, and our experimental sequence simulates the erosion process by removing material in small damage steps. Our results show that damage detection is greatly improved when this new temperature compensation strategy, termed modified-OSS, is implemented.

  12. Unusual crystallization behavior in Ga-Sb phase change alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Putero, Magali Coulet, Marie-Vanessa; Ouled-Khachroum, Toufik; Muller, Christophe; Baehtz, Carsten; Raoux, Simone

    2013-12-01

    Combined in situ X-ray scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the crystallization behavior of Sb-rich Ga-Sb alloys. Measurements of the sheet resistance during heating indicated a reduced crystallization temperature with increased Sb content, which was confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction. The electrical contrast increased with increasing Sb content and the resistivities in both the amorphous and crystalline phases decreased. It was found that by tuning the composition between Ga:Sb = 9:91 (in at.%) and Ga:Sb = 45:55, the change in mass density upon crystallization changes from an increase in mass density which is typical for most phase change materials to a decrease in mass density. At the composition of Ga:Sb = 30:70, no mass density change is observed which should be very beneficial for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) applications where a change in mass density during cycling is assumed to cause void formation and PCRAM device failure.

  13. Ultrafast response of phase-change memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenberg, Aaron

    2015-03-01

    We describe recent experiments probing the first steps in the amorphous-to-crystalline transition that underlies the behavior of phase-change materials, examining both electric-field-driven and optically-driven responses in GeSbTe and AgInSbTe alloys. First measurements using femtosecond x-ray pulses at the Linac Coherent Light Source will be described which enable direct snapshots of these transitions and associated intermediate states. We will also describe studies using single-cycle terahertz pulses as an all-optical means of biasing phase-change materials on femtosecond time-scales in order to examine the threshold-switching response on microscopically relevant time-scales. These studies indicate nonlinear scaling with the applied electric field and field-induced crystallization as evidenced by ultrafast optical reflectivity and conductivity measurements, from which a mechanistic understanding of these phase transitions can be obtained.

  14. Method for preparing polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1990-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein. The composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  15. Kodak phase-change media for optical tape applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Preuss, Donald R.; Olin, George R.; Vazan, Fridrich; Pan, Kee-Chuan; Raychaudhuri, Pranab. K.

    1993-01-01

    The SbInSn phase-change write-once optical medium developed by Eastman Kodak Company is particularly suitable for development into the next generation optical tape media. Its performance for optical recording has already been demonstrated in some of the highest performance optical disk systems. Some of the key performance features are presented.

  16. Performance enhancement of hermetic compressor using phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, I. M.; Rady, M. A.; Huzayyin, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The present study is motivated by the need for the research of simple measures for increasing energy efficiency of hermetic compressor. The measure is the application of phase change materials for performance enhancement. The first experimental study should be guide for choice of PCM. It has been performed to investigate the effects of thermostat setting temperature on the performance of hermetic compressor. The effects of thermostat setting temperature with and without load on power consumption have been analyzed. Performance enhancement using phase change materials (PCMs) has been studied by employing a phase change material Rubitherm-42 (RT-42) on the top surface of compressor. Choice of PCM material is based on basic compressor performance measured in the first part of the present study. Experiments have been carried out for different load values and different quantities of PCM. The quantity and phase change characteristic of PCM are essential parameters that determine the percentage of performance enhancement in term of energy consumption. Reduction of energy consumption of about 10% has been achieved in the present study by using PCM. The present study shows that how to reduce the electrical power consumption to enhance compressor heat dissipation method to improve efficiency.

  17. Phase Change Permeation Technology For Environmental Control Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of a phase change permeation membrane (Dutyion [Trademark]) to passively and selectively mobilize water in microgravity to enable improved water recovery from urine/brine for Environment Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and water delivery to plans for potential use in microgravity.

  18. Entropy change and phase transitions in an expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, N.; Masood, T.; Demir, N.

    2015-12-01

    The work compiles a correlated study of a gravitational quasi equilibrium thermodynamic approach for establishing and signifying a unique behavior of the cosmological entropy and phase transitions in an expanding Universe. On the basis of prescribed boundary conditions for the cluster temperature a relation for the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters has been derived. A more productive and signifying approach of the correlation functions used for galaxy clustering phenomena shows a unique behavior of the entropy change where a phenomenon known as the gravitational phase transition occurs. This unique behavior occurs with a symmetry breaking from mild clustering to low clustering and from mild clustering to high clustering which differs from a normal symmetry breaking in material sciences. We also derive results for the specific latent heat associated with the phase transitions of 3.20 T_c and 0.55 T_c for the mildly clustered phase to the low clustered phase and from the mildly clustered phase to the highly clustered phase, respectively.

  19. Biological responses of Raw 264.7 macrophage exposed to two strains of Stachybotrys chartarum spores grown on four different wallboard types.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Harvey, L A; Evans, A L; Byfield, G E; Betancourt, D A; Dean, T R

    2016-06-01

    The many benefits of building "green" have motivated the use of sustainable products in the design and execution of the built environment. However, the use of these natural or recycled materials, some of which have been treated with antimicrobials, provides a growth opportunity for microorganisms with the potential to elicit adverse health effects especially in the presence of an antimicrobial. The focus of this research was to determine the effects of Stachybotrys chartarum (strains Houston and 51-11) grown under different conditions on a macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7) using endpoints, including cytotoxicity, and those associated with immunity specifically inflammation and MHC class II expression. The fungi were grown on four different gypsum products, and macrophages were exposed to whole spores of both strains and fragmented spores of strain 51-11. Whole spores of the Houston strain elicited no cytotoxicity with some level of inflammation, while exposure to whole spores of 51-11 caused variable responses depending on the wallboard type supporting the fungal growth. High concentrations of fragmented 51-11 spores primarily resulted in the apoptosis of macrophage with no inflammation. None of the fungal strains caused elevated levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression on the surface of Raw cells. Mycotoxin levels of 51-11 spores from all of the wallboard types measured  >250 ng/μL of T2 equivalent toxin based on activity. Collectively, the data demonstrated that all of the wallboard types supported growth of fungi with the ability to elicit harmful biological responses with the potential to negatively impact human health. PMID:27097835

  20. Irradiation induced structural change in Mo2Zr intermetallic phase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gan, J.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Eriksson, N.; Sohn, Y. H.; Kirk, M.

    2016-05-14

    The Mo2Zr phase has been identified as a major interaction product at the interface of U-10Mo and Zr. Transmission electron microscopy in-situ irradiation with Kr ions at 200 °C with doses up to 2.0E + 16 ions/cm2 was carried out to investigate the radiation stability of the Mo2Zr. The Mo2Zr undergoes a radiation-induced structural change, from a large cubic (cF24) to a small cubic (cI2), along with an estimated 11.2% volume contraction without changing its composition. The structural change begins at irradiation dose below 1.0E + 14 ions/cm2. Furthermore, the transformed Mo2Zr phase demonstrates exceptional radiation tolerance with the developmentmore » of dislocations without bubble formation.« less

  1. Ultrafast characterization of phase-change material crystallization properties in the melt-quenched amorphous phase.

    PubMed

    Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Fong, Scott W; Lee, Jaeho; Li, Zijian; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Mantegazza, Davide; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E; Wong, H-S Philip

    2014-06-11

    Phase change materials are widely considered for application in nonvolatile memories because of their ability to achieve phase transformation in the nanosecond time scale. However, the knowledge of fast crystallization dynamics in these materials is limited because of the lack of fast and accurate temperature control methods. In this work, we have developed an experimental methodology that enables ultrafast characterization of phase-change dynamics on a more technologically relevant melt-quenched amorphous phase using practical device structures. We have extracted the crystallization growth velocity (U) in a functional capped phase change memory (PCM) device over 8 orders of magnitude (10(-10) < U < 10(-1) m/s) spanning a wide temperature range (415 < T < 580 K). We also observed direct evidence of non-Arrhenius crystallization behavior in programmed PCM devices at very high heating rates (>10(8) K/s), which reveals the extreme fragility of Ge2Sb2Te5 in its supercooled liquid phase. Furthermore, these crystallization properties were studied as a function of device programming cycles, and the results show degradation in the cell retention properties due to elemental segregation. The above experiments are enabled by the use of an on-chip fast heater and thermometer called as microthermal stage (MTS) integrated with a vertical phase change memory (PCM) cell. The temperature at the PCM layer can be controlled up to 600 K using MTS and with a thermal time constant of 800 ns, leading to heating rates ∼10(8) K/s that are close to the typical device operating conditions during PCM programming. The MTS allows us to independently control the electrical and thermal aspects of phase transformation (inseparable in a conventional PCM cell) and extract the temperature dependence of key material properties in real PCM devices. PMID:24798660

  2. Dynamic observation of phase transformation behaviors in indium(III) selenide nanowire based phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Ting, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-09-23

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been extensively investigated for its potential applications in next-generation nonvolatile memory. In this study, indium(III) selenide (In2Se3) was selected due to its high resistivity ratio and lower programming current. Au/In2Se3-nanowire/Au phase change memory devices were fabricated and measured systematically in an in situ transmission electron microscope to perform a RESET/SET process under pulsed and dc voltage swept mode, respectively. During the switching, we observed the dynamic evolution of the phase transformation process. The switching behavior resulted from crystalline/amorphous change and revealed that a long pulse width would induce the amorphous or polycrystalline state by different pulse amplitudes, supporting the improvement of the writing speed, retention, and endurance of PCRAM. PMID:25133955

  3. Understanding phase-change behaviors of carbon-doped Ge₂Sb₂Te₅ for phase-change memory application.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xilin; Xia, Mengjiao; Rao, Feng; Wu, Liangcai; Li, Xianbin; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin; Sun, Hongbo

    2014-08-27

    Phase-change materials are highly promising for next-generation nonvolatile data storage technology. The pronounced effects of C doping on structural and electrical phase-change behaviors of Ge2Sb2Te5 material are investigated at the atomic level by combining experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics. C dopants are found to fundamentally affect the amorphous structure of Ge2Sb2Te5 by altering the local environments of Ge-Te tetrahedral units with stable C-C chains. The incorporated C increases the amorphous stability due to the enhanced covalent nature of the material with larger tetrahedral Ge sites. The four-membered rings with alternating atoms are reduced greatly with carbon addition, leading to sluggish phase transition and confined crystal grains. The lower RESET power is presented in the PCM cells with carbon-doped material, benefiting from its high resistivity and low thermal conductivity. PMID:25090618

  4. Ultrafast phase-change logic device driven by melting processes.

    PubMed

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M; Wang, Wei-Jie; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Zhao, Rong; Chong, Tow-Chong; Elliott, Stephen R

    2014-09-16

    The ultrahigh demand for faster computers is currently tackled by traditional methods such as size scaling (for increasing the number of devices), but this is rapidly becoming almost impossible, due to physical and lithographic limitations. To boost the speed of computers without increasing the number of logic devices, one of the most feasible solutions is to increase the number of operations performed by a device, which is largely impossible to achieve using current silicon-based logic devices. Multiple operations in phase-change-based logic devices have been achieved using crystallization; however, they can achieve mostly speeds of several hundreds of nanoseconds. A difficulty also arises from the trade-off between the speed of crystallization and long-term stability of the amorphous phase. We here instead control the process of melting through premelting disordering effects, while maintaining the superior advantage of phase-change-based logic devices over silicon-based logic devices. A melting speed of just 900 ps was achieved to perform multiple Boolean algebraic operations (e.g., NOR and NOT). Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations and in situ electrical characterization revealed the origin (i.e., bond buckling of atoms) and kinetics (e.g., discontinuouslike behavior) of melting through premelting disordering, which were key to increasing the melting speeds. By a subtle investigation of the well-characterized phase-transition behavior, this simple method provides an elegant solution to boost significantly the speed of phase-change-based in-memory logic devices, thus paving the way for achieving computers that can perform computations approaching terahertz processing rates. PMID:25197044

  5. Nanoscale phase change memory with graphene ribbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam, Ashkan; Xiong, Feng; Cappelli, Andrea; Wang, Ning C.; Carrion, Enrique A.; Hong, Sungduk; Dai, Yuan; Lyons, Austin S.; Chow, Edmond K.; Piccinini, Enrico; Jacoboni, Carlo; Pop, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) devices are known to reduce in power consumption as the bit volume and contact area of their electrodes are scaled down. Here, we demonstrate two types of low-power PCM devices with lateral graphene ribbon electrodes: one in which the graphene is patterned into narrow nanoribbons and the other where the phase change material is patterned into nanoribbons. The sharp graphene "edge" contacts enable switching with threshold voltages as low as ˜3 V, low programming currents (<1 μA SET and <10 μA RESET) and OFF/ON resistance ratios >100. Large-scale fabrication with graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition also enables the study of heterogeneous integration and that of variability for such nanomaterials and devices.

  6. Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids: CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant when compared to state-ofthe- art technology.

  7. Study of large nonlinear change phase in Hibiscus Sabdariffa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Durán, M.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Andrade-Lucio, J. A.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Vázquez-Guevara, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    High intensities electromagnetic energy interacting with organic media gives rise to nonlinear optical effects. Hibiscus Sabdariffa is a flower whose concentrated solution presents interesting nonlinear optical properties. This organic material shows an important self-phase modulation with changes bigger than 2π. We present a diffraction ring patterns study of the Hibiscus Sabdariffa solution. Numerical results of transmittance, with refraction and simultaneous absorption, are shown.

  8. All-dielectric phase-change reconfigurable metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvounis, Artemios; Gholipour, Behrad; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-08-01

    We harness non-volatile, amorphous-crystalline transitions in the chalcogenide phase-change medium germanium antimony telluride (GST) to realize optically-switchable, all-dielectric metamaterials. Nanostructured, subwavelength-thickness films of GST present high-quality resonances that are spectrally shifted by laser-induced structural transitions, providing reflectivity and transmission switching contrast ratios of up to 5:1 (7 dB) at visible/near-infrared wavelengths selected by design.

  9. Microencapsulated Phase-Change Materials For Storage Of Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes research on engineering issues related to storage and transport of heat in slurries containing phase-change materials in microscopic capsules. Specific goal of project to develop lightweight, compact, heat-management systems used safely in inhabited areas of spacecraft. Further development of obvious potential of technology expected to lead to commercialization and use in aircraft, electronic equipment, machinery, industrial processes, and other sytems in which requirements for management of heat compete with severe restrictions on weight or volume.

  10. Forced Ion Migration for Chalcogenide Phase Change Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kristy A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase-change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge2Se3/SnTe, and Ge2Se3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase-change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase-change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more than two data states.

  11. Finite element analysis of phase-change storage media

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbar, M.; Najafi, M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to predict the cooling curve for the storage tank of a clathrate (crystalline compounds made of gaseous refrigerant and water) thermal energy storage system using finite element analysis. The analysis involve modeling of a storage medium which changes its phase from liquid to solid within the storage tank. The solidification of the storage medium takes place during the storage tank`s heat extraction simulation process (charging process). The storage media in this study are Refrigerant 134a (R134a) clathrate and Refrigerant 12 (R12) clathrate. The enthalpy based standard approach is utilized to overcome the phase change discontinuities. The governing equations count for the phase change, two dimensional conduction, and convection modes. The cooling of the storage medium is simulated as energy loss from the storage tank contents. A set of algebraic discretized equations are obtained from the governing equations through the method of finite element formulation. These algebraic equations are solved using the common purpose computational fluid dynamics analysis package (FIDAP, 1991) to obtain the temperature distribution and consequently the cooling curve for the storage tank. The results for R12 clathrate are in good agreement with the experimental results obtained by Najafi and Schaetzle (1991). For R134a clathrate the results obtained follow a pattern similar to those of experimental work on R12 clathrate. The work of this study provides the necessary background for conducting experimental studies on R134a clathrate thermal energy storage system.

  12. Forced ion migration for chalcogenide phase change memory device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kristy A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase-change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnTe, and Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase-change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase-change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more than two data states.

  13. Experimental measurements within a phase change metallurgical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C.; Désilets, M.; Soucy, G.

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of solidification front evolution is essential for the optimization and control of many important metallurgical processes. However, this measurement is tedious, imprecise, and time consuming. More generally, industry needs reliable instruments for the thermal characterization of phase change reactors. This paper enables researchers with means and instruments to study the thermal behavior of processes involving the transformation of phase change materials up to 1000 °C. In this work, an original experimental setup is described to analyze the behavior of two high temperature phase change materials: zinc and molten salts. In particular, it is possible to evaluate the 2D solid solidification front evolution with time. The measurements done with zinc show the presence of two thermal regimes. A solidification rate of 20 mm h-1 is measured with two different approaches: thermocouples and a mechanical probe. Finally, an infrared camera is also used to make the link between the external thermal behavior and the solidification front evolution inside the reactor. When implemented within an inverse numerical method, the use of this instrument as a new external sensor looks promising.

  14. Forced ion migration for chalcogenide phase change memory device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kristy A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnTe, and Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more that two data states.

  15. Non-equilibrium model of two-phase porous media flow with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Fu, X.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    The efficient simulation of multi-phase multi-component flow through geologic porous media is challenging and computationally intensive, yet quantitative modeling of these processes is essential in engineering and the geosciences. Multiphase flow with phase change and complex phase behavior arises in numerous applications, including enhanced oil recovery, steam injection in groundwater remediation, geologic CO2 storage and enhanced geothermal energy systems. A challenge of multiphase compositional simulation is that the number of existing phases varies with position and time, and thus the number of state variables in the saturation-based conservation laws is a function of space and time. The tasks of phase-state identification and determination of the composition of the different phases are performed assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we investigate a thermodynamically consistent formulation for non-isothermal two-phase flow, in systems where the hypothesis of instantaneous local equilibrium does not hold. Non-equilibrium effects are important in coarse-scale simulations where the assumption of complete mixing in each gridblock is not realistic. We apply our model to steam injection in water-saturated porous media.

  16. Speed Measurement and Motion Analysis of Chang'E-3 Rover Based on Differential Phase Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C.; Liu, Q. H.; Zheng, X.; He, Q. B.; Wu, Y. J.

    2015-07-01

    On 2013 December 14, the Chang'E-3 made a successful soft landing on the lunar surface, and then carried out the tasks of separating the lander and the rover, and taking the photos of each other. With the same beam VLBI (Very long baseline interferometry) technique to observe the signals transmitted by the lander and the rover simultaneously, the differential phase delay between them is calculated, which can reflect a minor change of the rover's position on a scale of a few centimeters. Based on the high sensitivity of differential phase delay, the rover's speeds during 5 movements are obtained with an average of 0.056 m/s. The relationship between the rover's shake in moving process, and lunar terrain is analyzed by using the spectrum of the residual of the differential phase delay after the first-order polynomial fitting.

  17. Speed Measurement and Motion Analysis of Chang'E-3 Rover Based on Differential Phase Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Pan; Qing-hui, Liu; Xin, Zheng; Qing-bao, He; Ya-jun, Wu

    2016-04-01

    On 14th December 2013, the Chang'E-3 made a successful soft landing on the lunar surface, and then carried out the tasks of separating the lander and the rover, and taking pictures of each other. With the same beam VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) technique to observe the signals transmitted by the lander and the rover simultaneously, the differential phase delay between them is calculated, which can reflect the minor changes of the rover's position on a scale of a few centimeters. Based on the high sensitivity of differential phase delay, the rover's speeds during 5 movements are obtained with an average of 0.056 m/s. The relationship between the rover's shake in the moving process and the lunar terrain is analyzed by using the spectrum of the residual of the differential phase delay after the first-order polynomial fitting.

  18. Microencapsulated Phase Change Composite Materials for Energy Efficient Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Alexander

    This study aims to elucidate how phase change material (PCM)-composite materials can be leveraged to reduce the energy consumption of buildings and to provide cost savings to ratepayers. Phase change materials (PCMs) can store thermal energy in the form of latent heat when subjected to temperatures exceeding their melting point by undergoing a phase transition from solid to liquid state. Reversibly, PCMs can release this thermal energy when the system temperature falls below their solidification point. The goal in implementing composite PCM walls is to significantly reduce and time-shift the maximum thermal load on the building in order to reduce and smooth out the electricity demand for heating and cooling. This Ph.D. thesis aims to develop a set of thermal design methods and tools for exploring the use of PCM-composite building envelopes and for providing design rules for their practical implementation. First, detailed numerical simulations were used to show that the effective thermal conductivity of core-shell-matrix composites depended only on the volume fraction and thermal conductivity of the constituent materials. The effective medium approximation reported by Felske (2004) was in very good agreement with numerical predictions of the effective thermal conductivity. Second, a carefully validated transient thermal model was used to simulate microencapsulated PCM-composite walls subjected to diurnal or annual outdoor temperature and solar radiation flux. It was established that adding microencapsulated PCM to concrete walls both substantially reduced and delayed the thermal load on the building. Several design rules were established, most notably, (i) increasing the volume fraction of microencapsulated PCM within the wall increases the energy savings but at the potential expense of mechanical properties [1], (ii) the phase change temperature leading to the maximum energy and cost savings should equal the desired indoor temperature regardless of the climate

  19. Oral Hygiene Behaviour Change During the Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Shamani, Saeed; Jansson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the frequency of smoking cessation and the use of proximal tooth cleaning routines after a nonsurgical periodontal treatment phase in a Specialist clinic of Periodontology and to evaluate if these behaviour changes had any influence on the periodontal healing results. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective longitudinal study on a randomly selected population of 100 patients referred for periodontal treatment. The variables were registered from the dental records and the radiographs. Forty-six individuals declared that they were smokers at baseline and one individual of those quitted smoking during the nonsurgical treatment period. The percentage of individuals who performed proximal tooth cleaning daily was significantly increased from 56% to 72% during the treatment period. The patients practising proximal tooth cleaning daily had significantly lower Plaque index before as well as after the nonsurgical periodontal treatment phase compared to those without the routine. The subjects who did not perform tooth cleaning daily before the treatment and who did not introduce this routine had significantly deeper periodontal pockets compared to those who performed inter-dental cleaning daily before treatment or who had adopted the routine during the treatment phase. However, there were no significant differences according to number of deepened periodontal pockets after nonsurgical treatment irrespective of proximal cleaning routines. In the future, motivational interviewing may be a more effective method to achieve a behaviour change if an extended education of dental hygienists within this area will be implemented. PMID:23284591

  20. Low-energy phase change memory with graphene confined layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengqiu; Ma, Jun; Ge, Xiaoming; Rao, Feng; Ding, Keyuan; Lv, Shilong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2016-06-01

    How to reduce the Reset operation energy is the key scientific and technological problem in the field of phase change memory (PCM). Here, we show in the Ge2Sb2Te5 based PCM cell, inserting an additional graphene monolayer in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer can remarkably decrease both the Reset current and energy. Because of the small out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of such monolayer graphene, the Set resistance and the heat dissipation towards top TiN electrode of the modified PCM cell are significantly increased and decreased, respectively. The mushroom-typed larger active phase transition volume thus can be confined inside the underlying thinner GST layer, resulting in the lower power consumption.

  1. Aluminum Foam-Phase Change Material Composites as Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-04-07

    The effects of geometric parameters of open-cell aluminum foams on the performance of aluminum foam-phase change material (PCM) composites as heat sinks are investigated by experiments. Three types of open-cell aluminum 6061 foams with similar relative densities and different cell sizes are used. Paraffin is selected as the PCM due to its excellent thermal stability and ease of handling. The experimental results show that the performance of the heat sink is significantly affected by the surface area density of the aluminum foam. In general, as the surface area density of the foam increases, the performance of the heat sink is improved regardless of the current phase of the PCM.

  2. Phase-Change Modelling in Severe Nuclear Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Christopher; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Matar, Omar; Moatamedi, Moji; Tehrani, Ali; Jones, Alan; Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes progress on a consistent approach for multi-phase flow modelling with phase-change. Although, the developed methods are general purpose the applications presented here cover core melt phenomena at the lower vessel head. These include corium pool formation, coolability and solidification. With respect to external cooling, comparison with the LIVE experiments (from Karlsruhe) is undertaken. Preliminary re-flooding simulation results are also presented. These include water injection into porous media (debris bed) and boiling. Numerical simulations follow IRSN's PEARL experimental programme on quenching/re-flooding. The authors wish to thank Prof. Timothy Haste of IRSN. Dr. D. Pavlidis is funded by EPSRC Consortium ``Computational Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Plants,'' Grant Number EP/I003010/1.

  3. New phase-change thermal energy storage materials for buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Christensen, C.B.; Burrows, R.W.

    1985-10-01

    A new class of phase-change thermal energy storage materials is under development at SERI. These materials are unusual in two ways. They reversibly absorb large amounts of heat during a solid-state, crystal transformation more than 70/sup 0/C below their melting temperatures, and their solid-state transformation temperatures may be adjusted over a range from 7/sup 0/C to 188/sup 0/C by varying the ratios of binary mixtures of the components. Because these storage materials remain solid throughout the range of their service temperatures, unique opportunities exist for incorporating them into building materials. Composites have been made with ordinary, porous construction materials such as wood, gypsum board, and lightweight concrete as the matrix and with the solid-state phase change materials (SS PCM) filling the void space. The thermal storage capacities of such composites are thereby increased by more than 100% without changing the basic nature and workability of the matrix, construction material. Parametric analyses have been conducted to determine what combination of properties would be optimum for certain solar and energy conserving building applications including Trombe wall, direct gain, and distributed cool storage (combined with night ventilation).

  4. Engineering the Phase Front of Light with Phase-Change Material Based Planar lenses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiguo; Li, Xiong; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I.; Luo, Xiangang; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid planar lens is proposed to engineer the far-field focusing patterns. It consists of an array of slits which are filled with phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). By varying the crystallization level of GST from 0% to 90%, the Fabry-Pérot resonance supported inside each slit can be spectrally shifted across the working wavelength at 1.55 µm, which results in a transmitted electromagnetic phase modulation as large as 0.56π. Based on this geometrically fixed platform, different phase fronts can be constructed spatially on the lens plane by assigning the designed GST crystallization levels to the corresponding slits, achieving various far-field focusing patterns. The present work offers a promising route to realize tunable nanophotonic components, which can be used in optical circuits and imaging applications. PMID:25726864

  5. Engineering the Phase Front of Light with Phase-Change Material Based Planar lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiguo; Li, Xiong; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I.; Luo, Xiangang; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.

    2015-03-01

    A novel hybrid planar lens is proposed to engineer the far-field focusing patterns. It consists of an array of slits which are filled with phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). By varying the crystallization level of GST from 0% to 90%, the Fabry-Pérot resonance supported inside each slit can be spectrally shifted across the working wavelength at 1.55 µm, which results in a transmitted electromagnetic phase modulation as large as 0.56π. Based on this geometrically fixed platform, different phase fronts can be constructed spatially on the lens plane by assigning the designed GST crystallization levels to the corresponding slits, achieving various far-field focusing patterns. The present work offers a promising route to realize tunable nanophotonic components, which can be used in optical circuits and imaging applications.

  6. Engineering the phase front of light with phase-change material based planar lenses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiguo; Li, Xiong; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I; Luo, Xiangang; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid planar lens is proposed to engineer the far-field focusing patterns. It consists of an array of slits which are filled with phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). By varying the crystallization level of GST from 0% to 90%, the Fabry-Pérot resonance supported inside each slit can be spectrally shifted across the working wavelength at 1.55 µm, which results in a transmitted electromagnetic phase modulation as large as 0.56π. Based on this geometrically fixed platform, different phase fronts can be constructed spatially on the lens plane by assigning the designed GST crystallization levels to the corresponding slits, achieving various far-field focusing patterns. The present work offers a promising route to realize tunable nanophotonic components, which can be used in optical circuits and imaging applications. PMID:25726864

  7. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  8. Three-dimensional nanomechanical mapping of amorphous and crystalline phase transitions in phase-change materials.

    PubMed

    Grishin, Ilja; Huey, Bryan D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-13

    The nanostructure of micrometer-sized domains (bits) in phase-change materials (PCM) that undergo switching between amorphous and crystalline phases plays a key role in the performance of optical PCM-based memories. Here, we explore the dynamics of such phase transitions by mapping PCM nanostructures in three dimensions with nanoscale resolution by combining precision Ar ion beam cross-sectional polishing and nanomechanical ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) mapping. Surface and bulk phase changes of laser written submicrometer to micrometer sized amorphous-to-crystalline (SET) and crystalline-to-amorphous (RESET) bits in chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 PCM are observed with 10-20 nm lateral and 4 nm depth resolution. UFM mapping shows that the Young's moduli of crystalline SET bits exceed the moduli of amorphous areas by 11 ± 2%, with crystalline content extending from a few nanometers to 50 nm in depth depending on the energy of the switching pulses. The RESET bits written with 50 ps pulses reveal shallower depth penetration and show 30-50 nm lateral and few nanometer vertical wavelike topography that is anticorrelated with the elastic modulus distribution. Reverse switching of amorphous RESET bits results in the full recovery of subsurface nanomechanical properties accompanied with only partial topography recovery, resulting in surface corrugations attributed to quenching. This precision sectioning and nanomechanical mapping approach could be applicable to a wide range of amorphous, nanocrystalline, and glass-forming materials for 3D nanomechanical mapping of amorphous-crystalline transitions. PMID:24111915

  9. Polymerase chain reaction with phase change as intrinsic thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Yonezawa, Eri; Kuo, Long-Sheng; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2013-04-01

    This research demonstrated that without any external temperature controller, the capillary convective polymerase chain reaction (ccPCR) powered by a candle can operate with the help of phase change. The candle ccPCR system productively amplified hepatitis B virus 122 base-pairs DNA fragment. The detection sensitivity can achieve at an initial DNA concentration to 5 copies per reaction. The results also show that the candle ccPCR system can operate functionally even the ambient temperature varies from 7 °C to 45 °C. These features imply that the candle ccPCR system can provide robust medical detection services.

  10. Covert thermal barcodes based on phase change nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Binh; Liu, Helin; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2014-01-01

    An unmet need is to develop covert barcodes that can be used to track-trace objects, and authenticate documents. This paper describes a new nanoparticle-based covert barcode system, in which a selected panel of solid-to-liquid phase change nanoparticles with discrete and sharp melting peaks is added in a variety of objects such as explosive derivative, drug, polymer, and ink. This method has high labeling capacity owing to the small sizes of nanoparticles, sharp melting peaks, and large scan range of thermal analysis. The thermal barcode can enhance forensic investigation by its technical readiness, structural covertness, and robustness. PMID:24901064

  11. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  12. Phase change thermal storage for a solar total energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. E.; Cohen, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is being conducted on a one-tenth scale model of a high-temperature (584 K) phase-change thermal energy storage system for installation in a solar total energy test facility at Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A. The thermal storage medium is anhydrous sodium hydroxide with 8% sodium nitrate. The program will produce data on the dynamic response of the system to repeated cycles of charging and discharging simulating those of the test facility. Data will be correlated with a mathematical model which will then be used in the design of the full-scale system.

  13. Covert thermal barcodes based on phase change nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Binh; Liu, Helin; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2014-06-01

    An unmet need is to develop covert barcodes that can be used to track-trace objects, and authenticate documents. This paper describes a new nanoparticle-based covert barcode system, in which a selected panel of solid-to-liquid phase change nanoparticles with discrete and sharp melting peaks is added in a variety of objects such as explosive derivative, drug, polymer, and ink. This method has high labeling capacity owing to the small sizes of nanoparticles, sharp melting peaks, and large scan range of thermal analysis. The thermal barcode can enhance forensic investigation by its technical readiness, structural covertness, and robustness.

  14. Rewriting magnetic phase change memory by laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerwilke, John; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Cheng, Shu Fan; Edelstein, Alan S.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic phase change memory (MAG PCM) consists of bits with different magnetic permeability values. The bits are read by measuring their effect on a magnetic probe field. Previously low permeability crystalline bits had been written in high permeability amorphous films of Metglas via laser heating. Here data is presented showing that by applying short laser pulses with the appropriate power to previously crystallized regions they can first be vitrified and then again crystallized. Thus, MAG PCM is rewriteable. Technical issues in processing the bits are discussed and results on thermal modeling are presented.

  15. Analysis of Lipoplex Structure and Lipid Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2012-07-18

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers.

  16. Controllable Thermal Rectification Realized in Binary Phase Change Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-03-01

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management.

  17. Controllable Thermal Rectification Realized in Binary Phase Change Composites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management. PMID:25748640

  18. Controllable thermal rectification realized in binary phase change composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management. PMID:25748640

  19. Analysis of lipoplex structure and lipid phase changes.

    PubMed

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2010-01-01

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers. PMID:20013412

  20. Subscale Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental heat rejection devices are required in many spacecraft as the radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demand. One means of obtaining additional heat rejection is through the use of phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HX's). PCM HX's utilize phase change to store energy in unfavorable thermal environments (melting) and reject the energy in favorable environments (freezing). Traditionally, wax has been used as a PCM on spacecraft. However, water is an attractive alternative because it is capable of storing about 40% more energy per unit mass due to its higher latent heat of fusion. The significant problem in using water as a PCM is its expansion while freezing, leading to structural integrity concerns when housed in an enclosed heat exchanger volume. Significant investigation and development has taken place over the past five years to understand and overcome the problems associated with water PCM HX's. This paper reports on the final efforts by Johnson Space Center's Thermal Systems Branch to develop a water based PCM HX. The test article developed and reported on is a subscale version of the full-scale water-based PCM HX's constructed by Mezzo Technologies. The subscale unit was designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation and previous full-scale water PCM HX development. Design modifications to the subscale unit included use of urethane bladder, decreased aspect ratio, perforated protection sheet, and use of additional mid-plates. Testing of the subscale unit was successful and 150 cycles were completed without fail.

  1. Preliminary Trade Study of Phase Change Heat Sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly; Leimkeuhler, Thomas; Quinn, Gregory; Golliher, Eric

    2006-01-01

    For short durations, phase change based heat rejection systems are a very effective way of removing heat from spacecraft. Future NASA vehicles, such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), will require non-radiative heat rejection systems during at least a portion of the planned mission, just as their predecessors have. While existing technologies are available to modify, such as Apollo era sublimators, or the Space Shuttle Flash Evaporator System (FES), several new technologies are under development or investigation to progress beyond these existing heat rejection systems. Examples include the Multi-Fluid Evaporator developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, improvements upon the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator originally developed for the X-38 program, and a Compact Flash Evaporator System (CFES). Other possibilities evaluate new ways of operating existing designs. The new developments are targeted at increasing operating life, expanding the environments in which the system can operate, improving the mass and volume characteristics, or some combination of these or other improvements. This paper captures the process and results of a preliminary trade study performed at Johnson Space Center to compare the various existing and proposed phase change based heat rejection systems for the CEV. Because the new systems are still in development, and the information on existing systems is extrapolation, this trade study is not meant to suggest a final decision for future vehicles. The results of this early trade study are targeted to aid the development efforts for the new technologies by identifying issues that could reduce the chances of selection for the CEV.

  2. The Study of the Thermoelectric Properties of Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ming; Abdi, Mohammed; Noimande, Zibusisu; Mbamalu, Godwin; Alameeri, Dheyaa; Datta, Timir

    We study thermoelectric property that is electrical phenomena occurring in conjunction with the flow of heat of phase-change materials (PCM) in particular GeSbTe (GST225). From given sets of material parameters, COMSOL Multiphysics heat-transfer module is used to compute maps of temperature and voltage distribution in the PCM samples. These results are used to design an apparatus including the variable temperature sample holder set up. An Arbitrary/ Function generator and a circuit setup is also designed to control the alternation of heaters embedded on the sample holder in order to ensure sequential back and forward flow of heat current from both sides of the sample. Accurate values of potential differences and temperature distribution profiles are obtained in order to compute the Seebeck coefficient of the sample. The results of elemental analysis and imaging studies such as XRD, UV-VIS, EDEX and SEM of the sample are obtained. Factors affecting the thermoelectric properties of phase change memory are also discussed. NNSA/ DOD Consortium for Materials and Energy Studies.

  3. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  4. Integrating Phase-Change Materials into Automotive Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein Altstedde, Mirko; Rinderknecht, Frank; Friedrich, Horst

    2014-06-01

    Because the heat emitted by conventional combustion-engine vehicles during operation has highly transient properties, automotive thermoelectric generators (TEG) are intended for a particular operating state (design point). This, however, leads to two problems. First, whenever the combustion engine runs at low load, the maximum operating temperature cannot be properly utilised; second, a combustion engine at high load requires partial diversion of exhaust gas away from the TEG to protect the thermoelectric modules. An attractive means of stabilising dynamic exhaust behaviour (thereby keeping the TEG operating status at the design point for as long as possible) is use of latent heat storage, also known as phase-change materials (PCM). By positioning PCM between module and exhaust heat conduit, and choosing a material with a phase-change temperature matching the module's optimum operating temperature, it can be used as heat storage. This paper presents results obtained during examination of the effect of integration of latent heat storage on the potential of automotive TEG to convert exhaust heat. The research resulted in the development of a concept based on the initial integration idea, followed by proof of concept by use of a specially created prototype. In addition, the potential amount of energy obtained by use of a PCM-equipped TEG was calculated. The simulations indicated a significant increase in electrical energy was obtained in the selected test cycle.

  5. Thermal conductivity enhancement for phase change storage media

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, L.C.; Zhong, J.K.; Beam, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal energy storage can be used as either a heat source or heat sink for spacecraft energy conversion and heat rejection systems. One major issue that needed to be addressed is that most phase-change materials (PCMs) with high energy storage density have an unacceptably low thermal conductivity. Two enhancement techniques are proposed in this paper. The baseline case utilizes LiH encapsulated in smaller containers of various shapes contained in a bigger cylindrical container filled with Li. The second enhancement technique focuses on a metal/phase-change material (M/PCM) composite. Specifically, 5% Ni is added uniformly to LiH so that the mixture has the same volume as the baseline storage unit. The enhancement techniques are analyzed numerically and their effectiveness is assessed for both constant surface heat flux and constant surface temperature conditions. Results shown include the amount of PCM melted as a function of time and the maximum temperature within the storage units. The M/PCM composite gives the best enhancement in thermal conductivity.

  6. Characterization of Encapsulated Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weihuan

    Solar energy is receiving a lot of attentions at present since it is a kind of clean, renewable and sustainable energy. A major limitation however is that it is available for only about 2,000 hours a year in many places. One way to improve this situation is to use thermal energy storage (TES) system for the off hours. A novel method to store solar energy for large scale energy usage is using high melting temperature encapsulated phase change materials (EPCMs). The present work is a study of thermal energy storage systems with phase change materials (PCMs). It is hoped that this work is to help understand the storage capability and heat transfer processes in the EPCM capsules in order to help design large EPCM based thermoclines. A calorimeter system was built to test the energy stored in EPCM capsules and examine the storage capabilities and potential for storage deterioration in EPCM capsules to determine the types of EPCMs suitable for TES. To accomplish this, the heat transfer performances of the EPCMs are studied in detail. Factors which could affect the heat transfer performance including the properties of materials, the sizes of capsules, the types of heat transfer fluids, the gravity effect of solid PCM, the buoyancy-driven convection in the molten PCM, void space inside the capsule are given attention. Understanding these characteristics for heat transfer process could help build the EPCM based thermoclines to make energy storage economical for solar energy and other applications.

  7. Phase change energy storage for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, F. P.; Taylor, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a transient computer simulation that was developed to study phase change energy storage techniques for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic (SD) power systems. Such SD systems may be used in future growth SSF configurations. Two solar dynamic options are considered in this paper: Brayton and Rankine. Model elements consist of a single node receiver and concentrator, and takes into account overall heat engine efficiency and power distribution characteristics. The simulation not only computes the energy stored in the receiver phase change material (PCM), but also the amount of the PCM required for various combinations of load demands and power system mission constraints. For a solar dynamic power system in low earth orbit, the amount of stored PCM energy is calculated by balancing the solar energy input and the energy consumed by the loads corrected by an overall system efficiency. The model assumes an average 75 kW SD power system load profile which is connected to user loads via dedicated power distribution channels. The model then calculates the stored energy in the receiver and subsequently estimates the quantity of PCM necessary to meet peaking and contingency requirements. The model can also be used to conduct trade studies on the performance of SD power systems using different storage materials.

  8. Metallic phase change material thermal storage for Dish Stirling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Andraka, C. E.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Hernandez-Sanchez, B. A.; Coker, E. N.

    2015-06-05

    Dish-Stirling systems provide high-efficiency solar-only electrical generation and currently hold the world record at 31.25%. This high efficiency results in a system with a high possibility of meeting the DOE SunShot goal of $0.06/kWh. However, current dish-Stirling systems do not incorporate thermal storage. For the next generation of non-intermittent and cost-competitive solar power plants, we propose adding a thermal energy storage system that combines latent (phase-change) energy transport and latent energy storage in order to match the isothermal input requirements of Stirling engines while also maximizing the exergetic efficiency of the entire system. This paper reports current findings in themore » area of selection, synthesis and evaluation of a suitable high performance metallic phase change material (PCM) as well as potential interactions with containment alloy materials. The metallic PCM's, while more expensive than salts, have been identified as having substantial performance advantages primarily due to high thermal conductivity, leading to high exergetic efficiency. Systems modeling has indicated, based on high dish Stirling system performance, an allowable cost of the PCM storage system that is substantially higher than SunShot goals for storage cost on tower systems. Several PCM's are identified with suitable melting temperature, cost, and performance.« less

  9. Metallic phase change material thermal storage for Dish Stirling

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C. E.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Hernandez-Sanchez, B. A.; Coker, E. N.

    2015-06-05

    Dish-Stirling systems provide high-efficiency solar-only electrical generation and currently hold the world record at 31.25%. This high efficiency results in a system with a high possibility of meeting the DOE SunShot goal of $0.06/kWh. However, current dish-Stirling systems do not incorporate thermal storage. For the next generation of non-intermittent and cost-competitive solar power plants, we propose adding a thermal energy storage system that combines latent (phase-change) energy transport and latent energy storage in order to match the isothermal input requirements of Stirling engines while also maximizing the exergetic efficiency of the entire system. This paper reports current findings in the area of selection, synthesis and evaluation of a suitable high performance metallic phase change material (PCM) as well as potential interactions with containment alloy materials. The metallic PCM's, while more expensive than salts, have been identified as having substantial performance advantages primarily due to high thermal conductivity, leading to high exergetic efficiency. Systems modeling has indicated, based on high dish Stirling system performance, an allowable cost of the PCM storage system that is substantially higher than SunShot goals for storage cost on tower systems. Several PCM's are identified with suitable melting temperature, cost, and performance.

  10. Oxygen incorporation into GST phase-change memory matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchak, R.; Choi, Y. G.; Kozyukhin, S.; Chigirinsky, Yu.; Kovalskiy, A.; Xiong-Skiba, P.; Trimble, J.; Pafchek, R.; Jain, H.

    2015-03-01

    Structural changes in amorphous and crystallized GST-225 films induced by the reaction with oxygen are studied at different depth scales. The mechanism of interaction of the very top surface layers with oxygen is studied with low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) technique, while the modifications of chemistry in the underlying surface layers are investigated with high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes averaged through the overall film thickness are characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The oxygen exposure leads to a depletion of GST-225 film surfaces in Te and formation of the antimony and germanium oxides. The antimony oxide complexes are found throughout the whole thickness of the films after their prolonged storage in air, whereas no evidence for formation of pure GeO2 phase is found in the volume of the films through Raman spectroscopy. A tendency to form Ge-rich phase within the ∼10 nm surface layer is additionally observed by LEIS profiling during crystallization of GST-225 film at 300 °C in oxygen atmosphere.

  11. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures. PMID:26068587

  12. Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Songgang

    2013-05-15

    The primary purpose of this project is to develop and validate an innovative, scalable phase change salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinia’s family of free-piston Stirling engines (FPSE). This TES technology is also appropriate for Rankine and Brayton power converters. Solar TES systems based on latent heat of fusion rather than molten salt temperature differences, have many advantages that include up to an order of magnitude higher energy storage density, much higher temperature operation, and elimination of pumped loops for most of Infinia’s design options. DOE has funded four different concepts for solar phase change TES, including one other Infinia awarded project using heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the salt. The unique innovation in this project is an integrated TES/pool boiler heat transfer system that is the simplest approach identified to date and arguably has the best potential for minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The Phase 1 objectives are to design, build and test a 1-hour TES proof-of-concept lab demonstrator integrated with an Infinia 3 kW Stirling engine, and to conduct a preliminary design of a 12-hour TES on-sun prototype.

  13. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn

    2002-10-28

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray microtomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. Pilot multi-phase experiments have been performed, proving the ability to detect two phases in certain large fractures. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the

  14. Consideration of a Phase Change Model Based on Apparent Phase Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwada, S.; Iga, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that cavity volume is underestimated and there is a discrepancy between predicted and measured breakdown characteristics for the numerical simulation of unsteady cavitation around a hydrofoil at high angle of attack. Therefore, in this study, in order to predict the cavity volume with high accuracy, the phenomena that gas phase increases even at a pressure higher than saturated vapour pressure which is known as aeration is modelled, and applied to phase change term. It was assumed that the precipitation of dissolved air is promoted by mechanical stimulation such as Reynolds stress in unsteady flow. The effectivity of the proposed model is discussed through the comparison among some kinds of components of the pressure variation.

  15. Surface topographical changes measured by phase-locked interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    An electronic optical laser interferometer capable of resolving depth differences of as low as 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed to examine surface profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. Topological chemical reactivity was determined by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than virgin ones but that bearing surfaces exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. The reactivity of stainless steel plates, heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures, were examined later at ambient temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed Arrhenius-type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. The contact area of the plate of a ball/plate sliding elastohydrodynamic contact run on trimethylopropane triheptanoate with or without additives was optically profiled periodically. As scuffing was approached, the change of profile within the contact region changed much more rapidly by the acid probe and assumed a constant high value after scuffing. A nonetching metallurgical phase was found in the scuff mark, which was apparently responsible for the high reactivity.

  16. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  17. Optimized Structures for Low-Profile Phase Change Thermal Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharratt, Stephen Andrew

    Thin, low-profile phase change thermal spreaders can provide cooling solutions for some of today's most pressing heat flux dissipation issues. These thermal issues are only expected to increase as future electronic circuitry requirements lead to denser and potentially 3D chip packaging. Phase change based heat spreaders, such as heat pipes or vapor chambers, can provide a practical solution for effectively dissipating large heat fluxes. This thesis reports a comprehensive study of state-of-the-art capillary pumped wick structures using computational modeling, micro wick fabrication, and experimental analysis. Modeling efforts focus on predicting the shape of the liquid meniscus inside a complicated 3D wick structure. It is shown that this liquid shape can drastically affect the wick's thermal resistance. In addition, knowledge of the liquid meniscus shape allows for the computation of key parameters such as permeability and capillary pressure which are necessary for predicting the maximum heat flux. After the model is validated by comparison to experimental results, the wick structure is optimized so as to decrease overall wick thermal resistance and increase the maximum capillary limited heat flux before dryout. The optimized structures are then fabricated out of both silicon and copper using both traditional and novel micro-fabrication techniques. The wicks are made super-hydrophilic using chemical and thermal oxidation schemes. A sintered monolayer of Cu particles is fabricated and analyzed as well. The fabricated wick structures are experimentally tested for their heat transfer performance inside a well controlled copper vacuum chamber. Heat fluxes as high as 170 W/cm2 are realized for Cu wicks with structure heights of 100 μm. The structures optimized for both minimized thermal resistance and high liquid supply ability perform much better than their non-optimized counterparts. The super-hydrophilic oxidation scheme is found to drastically increase the maximum

  18. Thermophysical Properties and Phase Changes in the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Sayyadul

    2015-11-01

    The correlation between phase changes within the upper mantle and the thermophysical properties of the minerals therein has been investigated by using the thermoelastic and thermodynamic equations. The depth dependence data of seismic velocities of Jeffreys-Bullen and density within the upper mantle are used as inputs in the analysis. The material characteristic properties like Debye temperature,Θ _D, adiabatic compressibility, κ S, Grüneisen parameter, ξ and the specific heat capacity, C_{{P}} computed as a function of depth show clearly two discontinuities at average depths of 414 km and 645 km which are in fair agreement with the presently accepted depths 410 km and 670 km from the preliminary reference earth model data.

  19. Plastic phase change material and articles made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Abhari, Ramin

    2016-04-19

    The present invention generally relates to a method for manufacturing phase change material (PCM) pellets. The method includes providing a melt composition, including paraffin and a polymer. The paraffin has a melt point of between about 10.degree. C. and about 50.degree. C., and more preferably between about 18.degree. C. and about 28.degree. C. In one embodiment, the melt composition includes various additives, such as a flame retardant. The method further includes forming the melt composition into PCM pellets. The method further may include the step of cooling the melt to increase the melt viscosity before pelletizing. Further, PCM compounds are provided having an organic PCM and a polymer. Methods are provided to convert the PCM compounds into various form-stable PCMs. A method of coating the PCMs is included to provide PCMs with substantially no paraffin seepage and with ignition resistance properties.

  20. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  1. Enhancing the performance of BICPV systems using phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Sellami, Nazmi; Tahir, Asif; Reddy, K. S.; Mallick, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    Building Integrated Concentrated Photovoltaic (BICPV) systems have three main benefits for integration into built environments, namely, (i) generating electricity at the point of use (ii) allowing light efficacy within the building envelope and (iii) providing thermal management. In this work, to maintain solar cell operating temperature and improve its performance, a phase change material (PCM) container has been designed, developed and integrated with the BICPV system. Using highly collimated continuous light source, an indoor experiment was performed. The absolute electrical power conversion efficiency for the module without PCM cooling resulted in 7.82% while using PCM increased it to 9.07%, thus showing a relative increase by 15.9% as compared to a non- PCM system. A maximum temperature reduction of 5.2°C was also observed when the BICPV module was integrated with PCM containment as compared to the BICPV system without any PCM containment.

  2. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  3. Diffusion and phase change characterization by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koslin, M. E.; White, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature diffusion of trace elements in metals and alloys was investigated. Measurements were made by high sensitivity mass spectrometry in which individual atoms were detected, and quantitative data was obtained for zircaloy-2, 304 stainless steel, and tantalum. Additionally, a mass spectrometer was also an analytical tool for determining an allotropic phase change for stainless steel at 955 C, and a phase transition region between 772 C and 1072 C existing for zircaloy-2. Diffusion rates were measured in thin (0.001" (0.0025 cm) and 0.0005" (0.0013 cm)) ribbons which were designed as high temperature thermal ion sources, with the alkali metals as naturally occurring impurities. In the temperature and pressure regime where diffusion measurements were made, the solute atoms evaporated from the ribbon filaments when the impurities diffused to the surface, with a fraction of these impurity atoms ionized according to the Langmuir-Saha relation. The techniques developed can be applied to many other alloys important to space vehicles and supersonic transports; and, with appropriate modifications, to the diffusion of impurities in composites.

  4. Thermal transport in phase-change materials from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, Gabriele C.; Donadio, Davide; Caravati, Sebastiano; Behler, Jörg; Bernasconi, Marco

    2012-09-01

    We computed the thermal conductivity (κ) of amorphous GeTe by means of classical molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics simulations. GeTe is a phase change material of interest for applications in nonvolatile memories. An interatomic potential with close-to-ab initio accuracy was used as generated by fitting a huge ab initio database with a neural network method. It turns out that the majority of heat carriers are nonpropagating vibrations (diffusons), the small percentage of propagating modes giving a negligible contribution to the total value of κ. This result is in contrast with the properties of other amorphous semiconductors such as Si for which nonpropagating and propagating vibrations account for about one half of the value of κ each. This outcome suggests that the value of κ measured for the bulk amorphous phase can be used to model the thermal transport of GeTe and possibly of other materials in the same class also in nanoscaled memory devices. Actually, the contribution from propagating modes, which may endure ballistic transport at the scale of 10-20 nm, is negligible.

  5. Heat transfer in vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dessouky, H.T.; Bouhamra, W.S.; Ettouney, H.M.; Akbar, M.

    1999-05-01

    Convection effects on heat transfer are analyzed in low temperature and vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems. This is performed by detailed temperature measurements in the phase change material (PCM) in eighteen locations forming a grid of six radial and three axial positions. The system constitutes a double pipe configuration, where commercial grade paraffin wax is stored in the annular space between the two pipes and water flows inside the inner pipe. Vertical alignment of the system allowed for reverse of the flow direction of the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which is water. Therefore, the PCM is heated from the bottom for HTF flow from bottom to top and from the top as the HTF flow direction is reversed. For the former case, natural convection affects the melting process. Collected data are used to study variations in the transient temperature distribution at axial and radial positions as well as for the two-dimensional temperature field. The data are used to calculate the PCM heat transfer coefficient and to develop correlations for the melting Fourier number. Results indicate that the PCM heat transfer coefficient is higher for the case of PCM heating from bottom to top. Nusselt number correlations are developed as a function of Rayleigh, Stefan, and Fourier numbers for the HTF flow from bottom to top and as a function of Stefan and Fourier numbers for HTF flow from top to bottom. The enhancement ratio for heat transfer caused by natural convection increases and then levels off as the inlet temperature of the HTF is increased.

  6. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studies, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  7. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarad; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi

    2002-04-20

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in

  8. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studied, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  9. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  10. Unstructured finite element simulations of compressible phase change phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad; Scientific Computation Research Center (Scorec) Team

    2015-11-01

    Modeling interactions between compressible gas flow and multiple combusting solid objects, which may undergo large deformations, is a problem with several challenging aspects that include, compressible turbulent flows, shocks, strong interfacial fluxes, discontinuous fields and large topological changes. We have developed and implemented a mathematically consistent, computational framework for simulating such problems. Within our framework the fluid is modeled by solving the compressible Navier Stokes equations with a stabilized finite element method. Turbulence is modeled using large eddy simulation, while shocks are captured using discontinuity capturing methods. The solid is modeled as a hyperelastic material, and its deformation is determined by writing the constitutive relation in a rate form. Appropriate jump conditions are derived from conservations laws applied to an evolving interface, and are implemented using discontinuous functions at the interface. The mesh is updated using the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) approach, and is refined and adapted during the simulation. In this talk we will present this framework and will demonstrate its capabilities by solving canonical phase change problems. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant # W911NF-14-1-0301.

  11. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  12. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  13. Interhemispheric Anti-phased Climate Changes During the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Auler, A. S.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.; Ito, E.; Solheid, M.

    2005-12-01

    We have obtained a high-resolution oxygen isotopic record of cave calcite from Gruta Do Padre (PAD), central Brazil. The chronology was determined by 20 U-Th ages from 2 stalagmites. Tests for equilibrium conditions show that oxygen isotopic variations are primarily caused by climate change. We interpreted the PAD record, spanning the last 16 thousand years, in terms of meteoric precipitation changes at this low-latitude location. The oxygen isotopic profile shows clear abrupt millennial-scale variations with amplitudes as large as 3 per mil. Using independent age scales, we compare the record to contemporaneous records from caves in eastern China and high latitude ice cores. During the last deglaciation, PAD calcite δ18O anti-correlates remarkably with δ18O in the Hulu Cave (Wang et al., 2001, Science), indicating that precipitation histories at the two sites are anti-phased, similar to our previous observations from southern Brazil speleothems. As Greenland temperature has been shown to correlate with Hulu precipitation, PAD precipitation anti-correlates with Greenland temperature. The timing of the main transition at PAD is synchronous within error with the Hulu and Greenland records. For instance, the rapid PAD transitions into a dry "Bolling-Allerod", and the beginning and the end of a wet "Younger Dryas", occur at about 14620±60 yr B.P., 12750±60 yr B.P., and 11600±100 yr B.P., respectively. Such anti-correlations support the bipolar see-saw mechanism through the last glacial-interglacial transition. However, the millennial-scale climate variability probably involves both ocean thermohaline and atmospheric circulation changes.

  14. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  15. Radiation and phase change of lithium fluoride in an annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Kurt O.

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model is developed to evaluate the effect of radiation on the phase change of lithium-fluoride (LiF) in an annular canister under gravitational and microgravitational conditions. Specified heat flux at the outer wall of the canister models focused solar flux; adiabatic and convective conditions are considered for the inner wall. A two-band radiation model is used for the combined-mode heat transfer within the canister, and LiF optical properties relate metal surface properties in vacuum to those in LiF. For axial gravitational conditions, the liquid LiF remains in contact with the two bounding walls, whereas a void gap is used at the outer wall to model possible microgravitational conditions. For the adiabatic cases, exact integrals are obtained for the time required for complete melting of the LiF. Melting was found to occur primarily from the outer wall in the 1-g model, whereas it occurred primarily from the inner wall in the mu-g model. For the convective cases, partially melted steady-state conditions and fully melted conditions are determined to depend on the source flux level, with radiation extending the melting times.

  16. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Poynot, Joe; Giglio, Tony; Ungar, Gene K.

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demands. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HX's do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation to a full-scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Two units, Units A and B, were constructed and differed only in their midplate design. Both units failed multiple times during testing. This report highlights learning outcomes from these tests and are applied to a final sub-scale PCM HX which is slated to be tested on the ISS in early 2017.

  17. Applications of fibrous substrates containing insolubilized phase change polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigo, Tyrone L.; Bruno, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Incorporation of polyethylene glycols into fibrous substrates produces several improved functional properties when they are insolubilized by crosslinking with a methylolamide resin or by polyacetal formation by their reaction with glyoxal. The range of molecular weights of polyols that may be insolubilized is broad as are the curing conditions (0.25-10 min at 80-200C). Most representative fiber types and blends (natural and synthetic) and all types of fabric constructions (woven, nonwoven and knit) have been modified by incorporation of the bound polyols. The most novel property is the thermal adaptability of the modified substrates to many climatic conditions. This adaptability is due to the high latent heat of the crosslinked polyols that function as phase change materials, the hydrophilic nature of the crosslinked polymer and its enhanced thermal conductivity. Other enhanced properties imparted to fabrics include flex and flat abrasion, antimicrobial activity, reduced static charge, resistance to oily soils, resiliency, wind resistance and reduced lint loss. Applications commercialized in the U.S. and Japan include sportswear and skiwear. Several examples of electric sets of properties useful for specific end uses are given. In addition, other uses are biomedical horticultural, aerospace, indoor insulation, automotive interiors and components and packaging material.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Liquid-Vapor Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esmaeeli, Asghar; Arpaci, Vedat S.

    2001-01-01

    We implemented a two- and three-dimensional finite difference/front tracking technique to solve liquid-vapor phase change problems. The mathematical and the numerical features of the method were explained in great detail in our previous reports, Briefly, we used a single formula representation which incorporated jump conditions into the governing equations. The interfacial terms were distributed as singular terms using delta functions so that the governing equations would be the same as conventional conservation equations away from the interface and in the vicinity of the interface they would provide correct jump conditions. We used a fixed staggered grid to discretize these equations and an unstructured grid to explicitly track the front. While in two dimensions the front was simply a connection of small line segments, in three dimensions it was represented by a connection of small triangular elements. The equations were written in conservative forms and during the course of computations we used regriding to control the size of the elements of the unstructured grid. Moreover, we implemented a coalescence in two dimensions which allowed the merging of different fronts or two segments of the same front when they were sufficiently close. We used our code to study thermocapillary migration of bubbles, burst of bubbles at a free surface, buoyancy-driven interactions of bubbles, evaporation of drops, rapid evaporation of an interface, planar solidification of an undercooled melt, dendritic solidification, and a host of other problems cited in the reference.

  19. Electrical conduction in chalcogenide glasses of phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, M.; Simon, M.; Karpov, I. V.; Karpov, V. G.

    2012-10-01

    Amorphous chalcogenides have been extensively studied over the last half century due to their application in rewritable optical data storage and in non-volatile phase change memory devices. Yet, the nature of the observed non-ohmic conduction in these glasses is still under debate. In this review, we consolidate and expand the current state of knowledge related to dc conduction in these materials. An overview of the pertinent experimental data is followed by a review of the physics of localized states that are peculiar to chalcogenide glasses. We then describe and evaluate twelve relevant transport mechanisms with conductivities that depend exponentially on the electric field. The discussed mechanisms include various forms of Poole-Frenkel ionization, Schottky emission, hopping conduction, field-induced delocalization of tail states, space-charge-limited current, field emission, percolation band conduction, and transport through crystalline inclusions. Most of the candidates provide more or less satisfactory fits of the observed non-linear IV data. Our analysis calls upon additional studies that would enable one to discriminate between the various alternative models.

  20. Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Ribik B.; Atwell, Matt; Cheek, Ann; Agarwal, Muskan; Hong, Steven; Patel, Aashini,; Nguyen, Lisa; Posada, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft’s radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a “topper” to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. Studies conducted in this paper investigate utilizing water’s high latent heat of formation as a PCM, as opposed to traditional waxes, and corresponding complications surrounding freezing water in an enclosed volume. Work highlighted in this study is primarily visual and includes understanding ice formation, freeze front propagation, and the solidification process of water/ice. Various test coupons were constructed of copper to emulate the interstitial pin configuration (to aid in conduction) of the proposed water PCM HX design. Construction of a prototypic HX was also completed in which a flexible bladder material and interstitial pin configurations were tested. Additionally, a microgravity flight was conducted where three copper test articles were frozen continuously during microgravity and 2-g periods and individual water droplets were frozen during microgravity.

  1. Pelletization and roll encapsulation of phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the criteria of high latent heats of fusion, low cost, and ease of pelletization, seven phase change materials (PCMs) with melting points in the ranges suitable for absorption cooling, active heating, and passive space conditioning applications have been pressed into pellets about 12 mm in diameter and then encapsulated with organic coating materials by a roll coating process. Capsules of four of the seven PCM candidates have shown retention of integrity in various aqueous heat exchange fluids in accelerated thermal cycling tests ranging between 1500 to 2900 heating and cooling cycles. Capsules of PCMs melting near room temperature have also shown good stability in laboratory air environment. The objective of this effort is to develop reliable and cost effective PCMs for use in: (i) active heat exchange packed-bed assemblies of simple design that are capable of providing heat exchange efficiency and storage capacity superior to those of conventional heat storage systems, and (ii) passive heat storage systems consisting of building products incorporating thermal energy storage (TES) materials. The feasibility of this approach is supported by a favorable cost analysis.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  3. University of South Florida- Phase Change Materials (PCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Yogi; Stefanakos, Lee

    2014-03-07

    USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night--when the sun is not out--to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF's PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  4. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott; Poynot, Joe

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research and experimentation to the full scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Design and construction of these HX's led to successful testing of both PCM HX's.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  6. The use of lipids as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are substances capable of absorbing and releasing large 2 amounts of thermal energy (heat or cold) as latent heat over constant temperature as they 3 undergo a change in state of matter (phase transition), commonly, between solid and 4 liquid phases. Since the late 194...

  7. Performance of Thermal Insulation Containing Microencapsulated Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Yarbrough, David; Syed, Azam M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is dynamic thermal performance microencapsulated phase change material (PCM) blended with loose-fill cellulose insulation. Dynamic hot-box testing and heat-flux measurements have been made for loose-fill cellulose insulation with and without uniformly distributed microencapsulated PCM. The heat flux measurements were made with a heat-flow-meter (HFM) apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 518. Data were obtained for 1.6 lb{sub m}/ft{sup 3} cellulose insulation containing 0 to 40 wt% PCM. Heat-flux data resulting from a rapid increase in the temperature on one side of a test specimen initially at uniform temperature were analyzed to access the effect of PCM on total heat flow. The heat flux was affected by the PCM for about 100 minutes after the temperature increase. The total heat flow during this initial period decreased linearly with PCM content from 6.5 Btu/ft{sup 2} at 0% PCM to 0.89 Btu/ft{sup 2} for 40 wt% PCM. The cellulose insulation with PCM discharged heat faster than the untreated cellulose when the hot-side temperature of the test specimen was reduced. In addition, hot-box apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 1363 was utilized for dynamic hot-box testing of a wood stud wall assembly containing PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. Experimental data obtained for wood-frame wall cavities containing cellulose insulation with PCM was compared with results obtained from cavities containing only cellulose insulation.

  8. Early post parturient changes in milk acute phase proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Funmilola C; Waterston, Mary; Hastie, Peter; Haining, Hayley; Eckersall, P David

    2016-08-01

    The periparturient period is one of the most critical periods in the productive life of a dairy cow, and is the period when dairy cows are most susceptible to developing new intramammary infections (IMI) leading to mastitis. Acute phase proteins (APP) such as haptoglobin (Hp), mammary associated serum amyloid A3 (M-SAA3) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been detected in milk during mastitis but their presence in colostrum and milk in the immediate postpartum period has had limited investigation. The hypothesis was tested that APP are a constituent of colostrum and milk during this period. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to determine each APP's concentration in colostrum and milk collected daily from the first to tenth day following calving in 22 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. Haptoglobin was assessed in individual quarters and composite milk samples while M-SAA3 and CRP concentration were determined in composite milk samples. Change in Hp in relation to the high abundance proteins during the transition from colostrum to milk were evaluated by 1 and 2 dimension electrophoresis and western blot. In 80% of the cows all APPs were detected in colostrum on the first day following parturition at moderately high levels but gradually decreased to minimal values in the milk by the 6th day after calving. The remaining cows (20%) showed different patterns in the daily milk APP concentrations and when an elevated level is detected could reflect the presence of IMI. Demonstration that APP are present in colostrum and milk following parturition but fall to low levels within 4 days means that elevated APP after this time could be biomarkers of post parturient mastitis allowing early intervention to reduce disease on dairy farms. PMID:27600971

  9. A design handbook for phase change thermal control and energy storage devices. [selected paraffins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Griggs, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Comprehensive survey is given of the thermal aspects of phase change material devices. Fundamental mechanisms of heat transfer within the phase change device are discussed. Performance in zero-g and one-g fields are examined as it relates to such a device. Computer models for phase change materials, with metal fillers, undergoing conductive and convective processes are detailed. Using these models, extensive parametric data are presented for a hypothetical configuration with a rectangular phase change housing, using straight fins as the filler, and paraffin as the phase change material. These data are generated over a range of realistic sizes, material properties, and thermal boundary conditions. A number of illustrative examples are given to demonstrate use of the parametric data. Also, a complete listing of phase change material property data are reproduced herein as an aid to the reader.

  10. Finite element simulations involving simultaneous multiple interface fronts in phase change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, Tianhong; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper describes the simulation of phase change problems involving simultaneous multiple interface fronts employing the finite element method. Much of the past investigations employing finite elements have been restricted to primarily a single phase change situation. The existence of more than one phase, that is, the presence of multiple phase fronts poses certain challenges and further complications. However, the results provide a very interesting thermal behavior for this class of problems. In this paper, attention is focused on fixed grid methods and the trapezoidal family of one-step methods using the enthalpy formulations. Illustrative examples which handle simultaneous multiple fronts in phase change problems are presented.

  11. Emission energy control of semiconductor quantum dots using phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Shohei; Sato, Yu; Yamamura, Ariyoshi; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have paid much attention as it is a promising candidate for quantum, optical devices, such as quantum computer and quantum dot laser. We propose a local emission energy control method of semiconductor quantum dots using applying strain by volume expansion of phase change material. Phase change material can change its phase crystalline to amorphous, and the volume expand by its phase change. This method can control energy shift direction and amount by amorphous religion and depth. Using this method, we matched emission energy of two InAs/InP quantum dots. This achievement can connect to observing superradiance phenomenon and quantum dot coupling effect.

  12. The Ramsey phase-change hypothesis. [for development of earth core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Ramsey's (1948, 1949, 1950, 1954) arguments for the phase-change interpretation of the nature of the terrestrial core are summarized. Some of the successes of the phase-change theory in accounting for hitherto unexplained properties of earth's interior are discussed. Evidence in favor of the phase-change theory is reviewed, and calculations are examined which indicate that the liquid-core material is far more compressible at any relevant pressure than is the mantle material. Implications of the phase-change theory for Venus, Mars, Mercury, and the moon are considered.

  13. Onset of Convection in Two Liquid Layers with Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, G B; Coriell, S R; Gurski, K F; Cotrell, D L

    2006-09-14

    We perform linear stability calculations for horizontal fluid bilayers that can undergo a phase transformation, taking into account both buoyancy effects and thermocapillary effects in the presence of a vertical temperature gradient. We compare the familiar case of the stability of two immiscible fluids in a bilayer geometry with the less-studied case that the two fluids represent different phases of a single-component material, e.g., the water-steam system. The two cases differ in their interfacial boundary conditions: the condition that the interface is a material surface is replaced by the continuity of mass flux across the interface, together with an assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium that in the linearized equations represents the Clausius-Clapeyron relation relating the interfacial temperature and pressures. For the two-phase case, we find that the entropy difference between the phases plays a crucial role in determining the stability of the system. For small values of the entropy difference between the phases, the two-phase system can be linearly unstable to either heating from above or below. The instability is due to the Marangoni effect in combination with the effects of buoyancy (for heating from below). For larger values of the entropy difference the two-phase system is unstable only for heating from below, and the Marangoni effect is masked by effects of the entropy difference. To help understand the mechanisms driving the instability on heating from below we have performed both long-wavelength and short-wavelength analyses of the two-phase system. The short-wavelength analysis shows that the instability is driven by a coupling between the flow normal to the interface and the latent heat generation at the interface. The mechanism for the large wavelength instability is more complicated, and the detailed form of the expansion is found to depend on the Crispation and Bond numbers as well as the entropy difference. The two-phase system allows a

  14. Phase Change Heat Transfer Device for Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2010-10-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to approx.1300 K) and industrial scale power transport (=50MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a thermal device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization/condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e., without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) of vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  15. Phases and phase changes in clusters of tert-butyl thiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovick, James W.; Bartell, Lawrence S.

    1997-09-01

    Clusters of tert-butyl thiol (TBT) were generated by condensation of vapor in supersonic flow under various expansion conditions, and their structures were examined during their free flight by electron diffraction. The system had been selected because of its similarity to tert-butyl chloride (TBC), a much more thoroughly studied material with an interesting solid-state chemistry. The warmest crystalline phase of TBT observed for the clusters (diameter, ≈ 130 Å) was the known high-temperature cubic phase I with a lattice constant of 8.609(5) Å at ≈ 160 K. A second phase into which phase I nucleated at a rate of ≈ 10 28 m -3 s -1 at about 157 K was also observed, as well as a third phase generated under conditions of very cold flow. All of the phases gave the rapidly damped, diffuse diffraction patterns characteristic of submicroscopic, poorly ordered, plastically crystalline materials. Patterns were far less distinct than those of TBC, and the structures of the colder two phases could not be determined. From the rapid nucleation rate of phase I into the second phase, it could be inferred that a major translational rearrangement of the molecules could not have been involved.

  16. Carbon-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change material: A candidate for high-density phase change memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xilin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Rao, Feng; Zhu, Min; Peng, Cheng; Yao, Dongning; Song, Sannian; Liu, Bo; Feng, Songlin

    2012-10-01

    Carbon-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 material is proposed for high-density phase-change memories. The carbon doping effects on electrical and structural properties of Ge2Sb2Te5 are studied by in situ resistance and x-ray diffraction measurements as well as optical spectroscopy. C atoms are found to significantly enhance the thermal stability of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 by increasing the degree of disorder of the amorphous phase. The reversible electrical switching capability of the phase-change memory cells is improved in terms of power consumption with carbon addition. The endurance of ˜2.1 × 104 cycles suggests that C-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 film will be a potential phase-change material for high-density storage application.

  17. Antimony bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobela, David C.; Taylor, P. Craig; Kuhns, Phillip; Reyes, Arneil; Edwards, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The amorphous phase in some technologically important Ge-Sb-Te systems is still not well understood despite many models that exist to explain it. Using nuclear magnetic resonance, we demonstrate that Sb bonding in these systems follows the 8-Nrule for chemical bonding in amorphous solids. We find that the Sb atoms preferentially bond to three atoms in a pyramidal configuration analogous to the sites occurring in Sb-S or Sb-Se systems. The data we present should be used as a guide for structural modeling of the amorphous phase.

  18. Microstructure characterization of multi-phase composites and utilization of phase change materials and recycled rubbers in cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshgin, Pania

    2011-12-01

    This research focuses on two important subjects: (1) Characterization of heterogeneous microstructure of multi-phase composites and the effect of microstructural features on effective properties of the material. (2) Utilizations of phase change materials and recycled rubber particles from waste tires to improve thermal properties of insulation materials used in building envelopes. Spatial pattern of multi-phase and multidimensional internal structures of most composite materials are highly random. Quantitative description of the spatial distribution should be developed based on proper statistical models, which characterize the morphological features. For a composite material with multi-phases, the volume fraction of the phases as well as the morphological parameters of the phases have very strong influences on the effective property of the composite. These morphological parameters depend on the microstructure of each phase. This study intends to include the effect of higher order morphological details of the microstructure in the composite models. The higher order statistics, called two-point correlation functions characterize various behaviors of the composite at any two points in a stochastic field. Specifically, correlation functions of mosaic patterns are used in the study for characterizing transport properties of composite materials. One of the most effective methods to improve energy efficiency of buildings is to enhance thermal properties of insulation materials. The idea of using phase change materials and recycled rubber particles such as scrap tires in insulation materials for building envelopes has been studied.

  19. Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    Gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesion when it undergoes a solid-liquid phase transition. The robustness of gallium is notable as it exhibits strong performance on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces, under both dry and wet conditions. Gallium may therefore find numerous applications in transfer printing, robotics, electronic packaging, and biomedicine. PMID:27146217

  20. Ultrafast phase-change logic device driven by melting processes

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Wang, Wei-Jie; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Zhao, Rong; Chong, Tow-Chong; Elliott, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The ultrahigh demand for faster computers is currently tackled by traditional methods such as size scaling (for increasing the number of devices), but this is rapidly becoming almost impossible, due to physical and lithographic limitations. To boost the speed of computers without increasing the number of logic devices, one of the most feasible solutions is to increase the number of operations performed by a device, which is largely impossible to achieve using current silicon-based logic devices. Multiple operations in phase-change–based logic devices have been achieved using crystallization; however, they can achieve mostly speeds of several hundreds of nanoseconds. A difficulty also arises from the trade-off between the speed of crystallization and long-term stability of the amorphous phase. We here instead control the process of melting through premelting disordering effects, while maintaining the superior advantage of phase-change–based logic devices over silicon-based logic devices. A melting speed of just 900 ps was achieved to perform multiple Boolean algebraic operations (e.g., NOR and NOT). Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations and in situ electrical characterization revealed the origin (i.e., bond buckling of atoms) and kinetics (e.g., discontinuouslike behavior) of melting through premelting disordering, which were key to increasing the melting speeds. By a subtle investigation of the well-characterized phase-transition behavior, this simple method provides an elegant solution to boost significantly the speed of phase-change–based in-memory logic devices, thus paving the way for achieving computers that can perform computations approaching terahertz processing rates. PMID:25197044

  1. High speed, high temperature electrical characterization of phase change materials: metastable phases, crystallization dynamics, and resistance drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirisaglik, Faruk; Bakan, Gokhan; Jurado, Zoila; Muneer, Sadid; Akbulut, Mustafa; Rarey, Jonathan; Sullivan, Lindsay; Wennberg, Maren; King, Adrienne; Zhang, Lingyi; Nowak, Rebecca; Lam, Chung; Silva, Helena; Gokirmak, Ali

    2015-10-01

    During the fast switching in Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change memory devices, both the amorphous and fcc crystalline phases remain metastable beyond the fcc and hexagonal transition temperatures respectively. In this work, the metastable electrical properties together with crystallization times and resistance drift behaviour of GST are studied using a high-speed, device-level characterization technique in the temperature range of 300 K to 675 K.During the fast switching in Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change memory devices, both the amorphous and fcc crystalline phases remain metastable beyond the fcc and hexagonal transition temperatures respectively. In this work, the metastable electrical properties together with crystallization times and resistance drift behaviour of GST are studied using a high-speed, device-level characterization technique in the temperature range of 300 K to 675 K. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05512a

  2. Inducing chalcogenide phase change with ultra-narrow carbon nanotube heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Feng; Liao, Albert; Pop, Eric

    2009-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) heaters with sub-5 nm diameter induce highly localized phase change in Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) chalcogenide. A significant reduction in resistance of test structures is measured as the GST near the CNT heater crystallizes. Effective GST heating occurs at currents as low as 25 μA, significantly lower than in conventional phase change memory with metal electrodes (0.1-0.5 mA). Atomic force microscopy reveals nucleation sites associated with phase change in GST around the CNT heater. Finite element simulations confirm electrical characteristics consistent with the experiments, and reveal the current and phase distribution in GST.

  3. Phase change materials. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the use of phase change materials in thermal energy storage systems and energy utilization. Phase change compositions used in solar energy building heating and cooling systems are discussed, as well as methods used in the preparation of thermal storage materials. (Contains a minimum of 194 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Program For Finite-Element Analyses Of Phase-Change Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    PHASTRAN analyzes heat-transfer and flow behaviors of materials undergoing phase changes. Many phase changes operate over range of accelerations or effective gravitational fields. To analyze such thermal systems, it is necessary to obtain simultaneous solutions for equations of conservation of energy, momentum, and mass, and for equation of state. Written in APL2.

  5. High speed, high temperature electrical characterization of phase change materials: metastable phases, crystallization dynamics, and resistance drift.

    PubMed

    Dirisaglik, Faruk; Bakan, Gokhan; Jurado, Zoila; Muneer, Sadid; Akbulut, Mustafa; Rarey, Jonathan; Sullivan, Lindsay; Wennberg, Maren; King, Adrienne; Zhang, Lingyi; Nowak, Rebecca; Lam, Chung; Silva, Helena; Gokirmak, Ali

    2015-10-28

    During the fast switching in Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change memory devices, both the amorphous and fcc crystalline phases remain metastable beyond the fcc and hexagonal transition temperatures respectively. In this work, the metastable electrical properties together with crystallization times and resistance drift behaviour of GST are studied using a high-speed, device-level characterization technique in the temperature range of 300 K to 675 K. PMID:26415716

  6. Evidence for electronic gap-driven metal-semiconductor transition in phase-change materials

    PubMed Central

    Shakhvorostov, Dmitry; Nistor, Razvan A.; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Martyna, Glenn J.; Newns, Dennis M.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Liu, Xiao-hu; Hughes, Zak E.; Paul, Sujata; Cabral, Cyril; Raoux, Simone; Shrekenhamer, David B.; Basov, Dimitri N.; Song, Young; Müser, Martin H.

    2009-01-01

    Phase-change materials are functionally important materials that can be thermally interconverted between metallic (crystalline) and semiconducting (amorphous) phases on a very short time scale. Although the interconversion appears to involve a change in local atomic coordination numbers, the electronic basis for this process is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that in a nearly vacancy-free binary GeSb system where we can drive the phase change both thermally and, as we discover, by pressure, the transformation into the amorphous phase is electronic in origin. Correlations between conductivity, total system energy, and local atomic coordination revealed by experiments and long time ab initio simulations show that the structural reorganization into the amorphous state is driven by opening of an energy gap in the electronic density of states. The electronic driving force behind the phase change has the potential to change the interconversion paradigm in this material class. PMID:19549858

  7. Thermal effect of Ge2Sb2Te5 in phase change memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Tao; Liu, Bo; Song, Zhi-Tang; Ren, Kun; Zhu, Min; Xu, Jia; Ren, Jia-Dong; Feng, Gao-Ming; Ren, Wan-Chun; Tong, Hao

    2014-08-01

    In the fabrication of phase change random access memory (PRAM) devices, high temperature thermal processes are inevitable. We investigate the thermal stability of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) which is a prototypical phase change material. After high temperature process, voids of phase change material exist at the interface between Ge2Sb2Te5 and substrate in the initial open memory cell. This lower region of Ge2Sb2Te5 is found to be a Te-rich phase change layer. Phase change memory devices are fabricated in different process conditions and examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray. It is found that hot-chuck process, nitrogen-doping process, and lower temperature inter-metal dielectric (IMD) deposition process can ease the thermal impact of line-GST PRAM cell.

  8. Impact of Compound Hydrate Dynamics on Phase Boundary Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Compound hydrate reactions are affected by the local concentration of hydrate forming materials (HFM). The relationship between HFM composition and the phase boundary is as significant as temperature and pressure. Selective uptake and sequestration of preferred hydrate formers (PF) has wide ranging implications for the state and potential use of natural hydrate formation, including impact on climate. Rising mineralizing fluids of hydrate formers (such as those that occur on Earth and are postulated to exist elsewhere in the solar system) will sequester PF before methane, resulting in a positive relationship between depth and BTU content as ethane and propane are removed before methane. In industrial settings the role of preferred formers can separate gases. When depressurizing gas hydrate to release the stored gas, the hydrate initial composition will set the decomposition phase boundary because the supporting solution takes on the composition of the hydrate phase. In other settings where hydrate is formed, transported, and then dissociated, similar effects can control the process. The behavior of compound hydrate systems can primarily fit into three categories: 1) In classically closed systems, all the material that can form hydrate is isolated, such as in a sealed laboratory vessel. In such systems, formation and decomposition are reversible processes with observed hysteresis related to mass or heat transfer limitations, or the order and magnitude in which individual hydrate forming gases are taken up from the mixture and subsequently released. 2) Kinetically closed systems are exposed to a solution mass flow across a hydrate mass. These systems can have multiple P-T phase boundaries based on the local conditions at each face of the hydrate mass. A portion of hydrate that is exposed to fresh mineralizing solution will contain more preferred hydrate formers than another portion that is exposed to a partially depleted solution. Examples of kinetically closed

  9. AIR QUALITY AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE (PHASE 1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicted changes in the global climate over the coming decades could alter weather patterns and, thus, impact land use, source emissions, and tropospheric air quality. The United States has a series of standards for criteria air pollutants and other air pollutants in place to s...

  10. Direct Observation of Amorphous to Crystalline Phase Transitions in Nano-Particle Arrays of Phase Change Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Raoux,S.; Rettner, C.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Kellock, A.; Topuria, T.; Rice, P.; Miller, D.

    2007-01-01

    We have used time-resolved x-ray diffraction to study the amorphous-crystalline phase transition in 20-80?nm particles of the phase change materials Ge2Sb2Te5, nitrogen-doped Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge15Sb85, Sb2Te, and Sb2Te doped with Ag and In. We find that all samples undergo the phase transition with crystallization temperatures close to those of similarly prepared blanket films of the same materials with the exception of Sb2Te that shows the transition at a temperature that is about 40? C higher than that of blanket films. Some of the nanoparticles show a difference in crystallographic texture compared to thick films. Large area arrays of these nanoparticles were fabricated using electron-beam lithography, keeping the sample temperatures well below the crystallization temperatures so as to produce particles that were entirely in the amorphous phase. The observation that particles with diameters as small as 20?nm can still undergo this phase transition indicates that phase change solid-state memory technology should scale to these dimensions.

  11. Space observations of cold-cloud phase change

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Sang; Lindzen, Richard S.; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Kim, Jinwon

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the vertically resolved cloud measurements from the cloud-aerosol lidar with orthogonal polarization instrument on Aqua satellite from June 2006 through May 2007 to estimate the extent to which the mixed cloud-phase composition can vary according to the ambient temperature, an important concern for the uncertainty in calculating cloud radiative effects. At -20 °C, the global average fraction of supercooled clouds in the total cloud population is found to be about 50% in the data period. Between -10 and -40 °C, the fraction is smaller at lower temperatures. However, there are appreciable regional and temporal deviations from the global mean (>  ± 20%) at the isotherm. In the analysis with coincident dust aerosol data from the same instrument, it appears that the variation in the supercooled cloud fraction is negatively correlated with the frequencies of dust aerosols at the -20 °C isotherm. This result suggests a possibility that dust particles lifted to the cold cloud layer effectively glaciate supercooled clouds. Observations of radiative flux from the clouds and earth’s radiant energy system instrument aboard Terra satellite, as well as radiative transfer model simulations, show that the 20% variation in the supercooled cloud fraction is quantitatively important in cloud radiative effects, especially in shortwave, which are 10 - 20 W m-2 for regions of mixed-phase clouds affected by dust. In particular, our results demonstrate that dust, by glaciating supercooled water, can decrease albedo, thus compensating for the increase in albedo due to the dust aerosols themselves. This has important implications for the determination of climate sensitivity. PMID:20534562

  12. Enabling Universal Memory by Overcoming the Contradictory Speed and Stability Nature of Phase-Change Materials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijie; Loke, Desmond; Shi, Luping; Zhao, Rong; Yang, Hongxin; Law, Leong-Tat; Ng, Lung-Tat; Lim, Kian-Guan; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Chong, Tow-Chong; Lacaita, Andrea L.

    2012-01-01

    The quest for universal memory is driving the rapid development of memories with superior all-round capabilities in non-volatility, high speed, high endurance and low power. Phase-change materials are highly promising in this respect. However, their contradictory speed and stability properties present a key challenge towards this ambition. We reveal that as the device size decreases, the phase-change mechanism changes from the material inherent crystallization mechanism (either nucleation- or growth-dominated), to the hetero-crystallization mechanism, which resulted in a significant increase in PCRAM speeds. Reducing the grain size can further increase the speed of phase-change. Such grain size effect on speed becomes increasingly significant at smaller device sizes. Together with the nano-thermal and electrical effects, fast phase-change, good stability and high endurance can be achieved. These findings lead to a feasible solution to achieve a universal memory. PMID:22496956

  13. Oxygen Tuned Local Structure and Phase-Change Performance of Germanium Telluride.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xilin; Du, Yonghua; Behera, Jitendra K; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Simpson, Robert E

    2016-08-10

    The effect of oxygen on the local structure of Ge atoms in GeTe-O materials has been investigated. Oxygen leads to a significant modification to the vibrational modes of Ge octahedra, which results from a decrease in its coordination. We find that a defective octahedral Ge network is the crucial fingerprint for rapid and reversible structural transitions in GeTe-based phase change materials. The appearance of oxide Raman modes confirms phase separation into GeO and TeO at high level O doping. Counterintuitively, despite the increase in crystallization temperature of oxygen doped GeTe-O phase change materials, when GeTe-O materials are used in electrical phase change memory cells, the electrical switching energy is lower than the pure GeTe material. This switching energy reduction is ascribed to the smaller change in volume, and therefore smaller enthalpy change, for the oxygen doped GeTe materials. PMID:27430363

  14. Thermal modeling with solid/liquid phase change of the thermal energy storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    1991-01-01

    A thermal model which simulates combined conduction and phase change characteristics of thermal energy storage (TES) materials is presented. Both the model and results are presented for the purpose of benchmarking the conduction and phase change capabilities of recently developed and unvalidated microgravity TES computer programs. Specifically, operation of TES-1 is simulated. A two-dimensional SINDA85 model of the TES experiment in cylindrical coordinates was constructed. The phase change model accounts for latent heat stored in, or released from, a node undergoing melting and freezing.

  15. Automated baseline change detection -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Byler, E.

    1997-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust.

  16. Microgravity experiments on phase change of self-rewetting fluids.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshiyuki; Iwasaki, Akira; Tanaka, Kotaro

    2004-11-01

    A series of microgravity experiments on self-rewetting fluids has been conducted at the 10-second drop shaft of the Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). In all the experiments, 1.5 wt% of 1-butanol aqueous solution were employed as a self-rewetting fluid. The objective of the first experiment was to observe the boiling behavior of two-dimensional adjacent dual vapor bubbles with the aid of a two-wavelength interferometer and tracer particles. A significant difference was observed between a self-rewetting fluid and a normal fluid (CFC-113 in this experiment) in bubble interaction and flow developed along vapor/bubble interface. The second experiment focused on the flow at the bubble/heater contact area and around the three-phase interline, visualized with tracer particles. Differing behavior among three fluids, 1-butanol aqueous solution, CFC-113, and ethanol aqueous solution, was observed. The last microgravity experiment was a demonstration of wickless heat pipes containing three different fluids as a working fluid, 1-butanol aqueous solution, water, and ethanol aqueous solution. The temperature variation of working fluid in the heat pipe was monitored, and the liquid flow returning from the condensation region to the evaporation region was visualized by tracer particles. In addition to microgravity experiments, the performance of conventional heat pipes with 1-butanol aqueous solution was evaluated on the ground, and compared with water heat pipes. Our preliminary results are presented. PMID:15644361

  17. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Critical Flow with the Phase Change in the Nozzle Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Two-phase critical flow in the nozzle tube is analyzed numerically by the best estimate code TRACE and the CFD code FLUENT, and the performance of the mass flow rate estimation by the numerical codes is discussed. For the best estimate analysis by the TRACE code, the critical flow option is turned on. The mixture model is used with the cavitation model and the evaporation-condensation model for the numerical simulation by the FLUENT code. Two test cases of the two-phase critical flow are analyzed. One case is the critical flashing flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle (Super Moby Dick experiment), and the other case is the break nozzle flow for a steam generator tube rupture experiment of pressurized water reactors at Large Scale Test Facility of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The calculation results of the mass flow rates by the numerical simulations show good agreements with the experimental results.

  18. Thermally induced phase transitions and morphological changes in organoclays.

    PubMed

    Gelfer, M; Burger, C; Fadeev, A; Sics, I; Chu, B; Hsiao, B S; Heintz, A; Kojo, K; Hsu, S L; Si, M; Rafailovich, M

    2004-04-27

    Thermal transitions and morphological changes in Cloisite organoclays were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and in situ simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) over the temperature range of 30-260 degrees C. On the basis of DSC and FTIR results, the surfactant component in organoclays was found to undergo a melting-like order-disorder transition between 35 and 50 degrees C. The transition temperatures of the DSC peaks (Ttr) in the organoclays varied slightly with the surfactant content; however, they were significantly lower than the melting temperature of the free surfactant (dimethyldihydrotallowammonium chloride; Tm = 70 degrees C). FTIR results indicated that within the vicinity of Ttr, the gauche content increased significantly in the conformation of surfactant molecules, while WAXD results did not show any change in three-dimensional ordering. Multiple scattering peaks were observed in SAXS profiles. In the SAXS data acquired below Ttr, the second scattering peak was found to occur at an angle lower than twice that of the first peak position (i.e., nonequidistant scattering maxima). In the data acquired above Ttr, the second peak was found to shift toward the equidistant position (the most drastic shift was seen in the system with the highest surfactant content). Using a novel SAXS modeling technique, we suggest that the appearance of nonequidistant SAXS maxima could result from a bimodal layer thickness distribution of the organic layers in organoclays. The occurrence of the equidistant scattering profile above Ttr could be explained by the conversion of the bimodal distribution to the unimodal distribution, indicating a redistribution of the surfactant that is nonbounded to the clay surface. At temperatures above 190 degrees C, the scattering maxima gradually broadened and became nonequidistant again but

  19. An optoelectronic framework enabled by low-dimensional phase-change films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Peiman; Wright, C. David; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2014-07-01

    The development of materials whose refractive index can be optically transformed as desired, such as chalcogenide-based phase-change materials, has revolutionized the media and data storage industries by providing inexpensive, high-speed, portable and reliable platforms able to store vast quantities of data. Phase-change materials switch between two solid states--amorphous and crystalline--in response to a stimulus, such as heat, with an associated change in the physical properties of the material, including optical absorption, electrical conductance and Young's modulus. The initial applications of these materials (particularly the germanium antimony tellurium alloy Ge2Sb2Te5) exploited the reversible change in their optical properties in rewritable optical data storage technologies. More recently, the change in their electrical conductivity has also been extensively studied in the development of non-volatile phase-change memories. Here we show that by combining the optical and electronic property modulation of such materials, display and data visualization applications that go beyond data storage can be created. Using extremely thin phase-change materials and transparent conductors, we demonstrate electrically induced stable colour changes in both reflective and semi-transparent modes. Further, we show how a pixelated approach can be used in displays on both rigid and flexible films. This optoelectronic framework using low-dimensional phase-change materials has many likely applications, such as ultrafast, entirely solid-state displays with nanometre-scale pixels, semi-transparent `smart' glasses, `smart' contact lenses and artificial retina devices.

  20. Complex interfaces in "phase-change" contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Capece, Sabrina; Domenici, Fabio; Brasili, Francesco; Oddo, Letizia; Cerroni, Barbara; Bedini, Angelico; Bordi, Federico; Chiessi, Ester; Paradossi, Gaio

    2016-03-28

    In this paper we report on the study of the interface of hybrid shell droplets encapsulating decafluoropentane (DFP), which exhibit interesting potentialities for ultrasound (US) imaging. The fabrication of the droplets is based on the deposition of a dextran methacrylate layer onto the surface of surfactants. The droplets have been stabilized against coalescence by UV curing, introducing crosslinks in the polymer layer and transforming the shell into an elastomeric membrane with a thickness of about 300 nm with viscoelastic behaviour. US irradiation induces the evaporation of the DFP core of the droplets transforming the particles into microbubbles (MBs). The presence of a robust crosslinked polymer shell introduces an unusual stability of the droplets also during the core phase transition and allows the recovery of the initial droplet state after a few minutes from switching off US. The interfacial tension of the droplets has been investigated by two approaches, the pendant drop method and an indirect method, based on the determination of the liquid ↔ gas transition point of DFP confined in the droplet core. The re-condensation process has been followed by capturing images of single MBs by confocal microscopy. The time evolution of MB relaxation to droplets was analysed in terms of a modified Church model to account for the structural complexity of the MB shell, i.e. a crosslinked polymer layer over a layer of surfactants. In this way the microrheology parameters of the shell were determined. In a previous paper (Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 5763-5765) we showed that these systems could be used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). In this work we substantiate this view assessing some key features offered by the viscoelastic nature of the droplet shell. PMID:26931337

  1. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices. PMID:20527779

  2. Phase change references for in-flight recalibration of orbital thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topham, T. S.; Latvakoski, H.; Watson, M.

    2013-09-01

    Several critical questions need to be answered to determine the potential utility of phase change materials as long-term orbital references: How accurate and repeatable will phase change reference implementations be after incorporating necessary design trade-offs to accommodate launch and the space environment? How can the temperature of phase transitions be transferred to something useful for calibration such as a black body. How, if at all, will the microgravity environment affect the phase transitions? To help answer some of these questions, three experiments will be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments will test melts and freezes of three different phase change materials in various containment apparatus. This paper addresses the current status of the ISS experiments, as well as results from ground testing of several concepts for space application of PCM recalibration systems in the CORSAIR (Calibration Observations of Radiance Spectra in the far Infrared) black body.

  3. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks. PMID:24663836

  4. Ethylene-associated phase change from juvenile to mature phenotype of daylily (Hemerocallis) in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. L.; Kelly, K.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    Hemerocallis plantlets maintained in vitro for extended periods of time in tightly closed culture vessels frequently show a phenotype, albeit on a miniaturized scale, typical of more mature, field-grown plants. The positive relationship of elevated ethylene in the headspace of such vessels to the phase shift from juvenile to mature form is established. Rigorous restriction in air exchange with the external environment by means of silicone grease seals hastens the phase change and improves uniformity of response. Although some plantlets may take longer to accumulate enough ethylene in sealed jars to undergo change, added ethylene and ethylene-releasing agents promote it. Ethylene adsorbants (e.g. mercuric perchlorate) block the shift of juvenile to mature form. Critical ambient ethylene level for the shift is ca 1 microliter l-1. Levels up to 1000 microliters l-1 do not hasten the response but are not toxic. The phase change is fully reversible when air exchange permits ethylene to drop below 1 microliter l-1. At least 1 microliter l-1 ethylene is required to sustain the mature phenotype. The ethylene synthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) prevents the phase change, while the ethylene biosynthesis intermediate 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC) improves it. KOH, as a CO2 absorbent, does not prevent the phase change. Histology sections demonstrate subtle changes in the form of shoot tips of plantlets undergoing phase change.

  5. Finite element developments for two dimensional multiple-interface phase change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, Tianhong; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1992-01-01

    Finite element developments for multiple phase change problems in two-dimensional models are presented for the first time. The enthalpy method is used to simulate latent heat release in conjunction with fixed grid techniques. An unconditionally stable implicit method is used for the time integration. The effects of boundary conditions and the different phase regions on the multiple phase front developments are examined for numerous examples. Discussions and conclusions are appropriately addressed.

  6. Advection Scheme for Phase-changing Porous Media Flow of Fluids with Large Density Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan; Padrino, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Many flows in a porous media involve phase changes between fluids with a large density ratio. For instance, in the water-steam phase change the density ratio is about 1000. These phase changes can be results of physical changes, or chemical reactions, such as fuel combustion in a porous media. Based on the mass conservation, the velocity ratio between the fluids is of the same order of the density ratio. As the result the controlling Courant number for the time step in a numerical simulation is determined by the high velocity and low density phase, leading to small time steps. In this work we introduce a numerical approximation to increase the time step by taking advantage of the large density ratio. We provide analytical error estimation for this approximate numerical scheme. Numerical examples show that using this approximation about 40-fold speedup can be achieved at the cost of a few percent error. Work partially supported by LDRD project of LANL.

  7. Radiation Heat Transfer Modeling Improved for Phase-Change, Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Jacqmin, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Spacecraft solar dynamic power systems typically use high-temperature phase-change materials to efficiently store thermal energy for heat engine operation in orbital eclipse periods. Lithium fluoride salts are particularly well suited for this application because of their high heat of fusion, long-term stability, and appropriate melting point. Considerable attention has been focused on the development of thermal energy storage (TES) canisters that employ either pure lithium fluoride (LiF), with a melting point of 1121 K, or eutectic composition lithium-fluoride/calcium-difluoride (LiF-20CaF2), with a 1040 K melting point, as the phase-change material. Primary goals of TES canister development include maximizing the phase-change material melt fraction, minimizing the canister mass per unit of energy storage, and maximizing the phase-change material thermal charge/discharge rates within the limits posed by the container structure.

  8. Preparation of CMC-modified melamine resin spherical nano-phase change energy storage materials.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Zhanhua; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-01-30

    A novel carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified melamine-formaldehyde (MF) phase change capsule with excellent encapsulation was prepared by in situ polymerization. Effects of CMC on the properties of the capsules were studied by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the CMC-modified capsules had an average diameter of about 50nm and good uniformity. The phase change enthalpy of the capsules was increased and the cracking ratio decreased by incorporating a suitable amount of CMC. The optimum phase change enthalpy of the nanocapsules was 83.46J/g, and their paraffin content was 63.1%. The heat resistance of the capsule shells decreased after CMC modification. In addition, the nanocapsule cracking ratio of the nanocapsules was 11.0%, which is highly attractive for their application as nano phase change materials. PMID:24299752

  9. Some aspects of the computer simulation of conduction heat transfer and phase change processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. D.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of phase change processes in materials are discussd including computer modeling, validation of results and sensitivity. In addition, the possible incorporation of cognitive activities in computational heat transfer is examined.

  10. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  11. Aluminum-Centered Tetrahedron-Octahedron Transition in Advancing Al-Sb-Te Phase Change Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-01-01

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology. PMID:25709082

  12. Aluminum-centered tetrahedron-octahedron transition in advancing Al-Sb-Te phase change properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-01-01

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology. PMID:25709082

  13. Aluminum-Centered Tetrahedron-Octahedron Transition in Advancing Al-Sb-Te Phase Change Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-02-01

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology.

  14. Photoassisted amorphization of the phase-change memory alloy Ge2Sb2Te5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fons, P.; Osawa, H.; Kolobov, A. V.; Fukaya, T.; Suzuki, M.; Uruga, T.; Kawamura, N.; Tanida, H.; Tominaga, J.

    2010-07-01

    Subnanosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption measurements have been used to probe dynamical changes in the local structure about Ge atoms in the phase-change alloy Ge2Sb2Te5 during the optical recording (amorphization) process using an optical pump and x-ray probe technique to examine the reversible phase transition from the metastable crystalline phase to the amorphous phase. We provide unambiguous evidence that the amorphization process does not proceed via the molten state but is a photoassisted process. We argue that the transition to the amorphous phase is a consequence of photoassisted destabilization of the resonant bonding present in the crystalline phase. This observation challenges the currently existing paradigm of the phase-change process which implicitly assumes the existence of the molten phase as a prerequisite for the creation of the amorphous phase. Implications from this finding are discussed, including the possibility to use the polarization of light as an extra coordinate for data recording.

  15. MRI phase changes in multiple sclerosis vs neuromyelitis optica lesions at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Sinnecker, Tim; Schumacher, Sophie; Mueller, Katharina; Pache, Florence; Dusek, Petr; Harms, Lutz; Ruprecht, Klemens; Nytrova, Petra; Chawla, Sanjeev; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kister, Ilya; Ge, Yulin; Wuerfel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize paramagnetic MRI phase signal abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) vs multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in a cross-sectional study. Methods: Ten patients with NMOSD and 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS underwent 7-tesla brain MRI including supratentorial T2*-weighted imaging and supratentorial susceptibility weighted imaging. Next, we analyzed intra- and perilesional paramagnetic phase changes on susceptibility weighted imaging filtered magnetic resonance phase images. Results: We frequently observed paramagnetic rim-like (75 of 232 lesions, 32%) or nodular (32 of 232 lesions, 14%) phase changes in MS lesions, but only rarely in NMOSD lesions (rim-like phase changes: 2 of 112 lesions, 2%, p < 0.001; nodular phase changes: 2 of 112 lesions, 2%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Rim-like or nodular paramagnetic MRI phase changes are characteristic for MS lesions and not frequently detectable in NMOSD. Future prospective studies should ask whether these imaging findings can be used as a biomarker to distinguish between NMOSD- and MS-related brain lesions. PMID:27489865

  16. Phase change materials. (Latest citations from the US patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the use of phase change materials in thermal energy storage systems and energy utilization. Phase change compositions used in solar energy building heating and cooling systems are discussed, as well as methods used in the preparation of thermal storage materials. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Quasi-stationary phase change heat transfer on a fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz; Stokowiec, Katarzyna

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents heat transfer research basing on a long fin with a circular cross-section. Its basis is welded to the pipe where the hot liquid paraffin, having a temperature of 70°C at the inflow, is pumped. The analyzed element is a recurrent part of a refrigeration's condenser, which is immersed in a paraffin. The temperature of the inflowing liquid is higher than the temperature of the melting process for paraffin, which allows the paraffin to liquify. The temperature at the basis of the rib changes and it is assumed that the heat transfer is quasi-stationary. On this basis the estimation of the mean value of heat transfer coefficient was conducted. The unsteady thermal field of the investigated system was registered with an infrared camera V50 produced by a Polish company Vigo System. This device is equipped with a microbolometric detector with 384 × 288 elements and the single pixel size 25 × 25 μm. Their thermal resolution is lower than 70 mK at a temperature of 30 °C. The camera operates at 7,5 ÷ 14 μm long-wave infrared radiation range. For a typical lens 35 mm the special resolution is 0.7 mrad. The result of the calculations is mean heat transfer coefficient for the considered time series. It is equal to 50 W m -2 K-1 and 47 W m -2 K-1 on the left and right side of the fin, respectively. The distance between the experimental data and the curve approximating the temperature distribution was assessed with the standard deviation, Sd = 0.04 K.

  18. Spectral changes induced by a phase modulator acting as a time lens

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, B. W.; Donaldson, W. R.; Agrawal, G. P.

    2015-07-06

    We show both numerically and experimentally that a phase modulator, acting as a time lens in the Fourier-lens configuration, can induce spectral broadening, narrowing, or shifts, depending on the phase of the modulator cycle. These spectral effects depend on the maximum phase shift that can be imposed by the modulator. In our numerical simulations, pulse spectrum could be compressed by a factor of 8 for a 30 rad phase shift. Experimentally, spectral shifts over a 1.35 nm range and spectral narrowing and broadening by a factor of 2 were demonstrated using a lithium niobate phase modulator with a maximum phase shift of 16 rad at a 10 GHz modulation frequency. All spectral changes were accomplished without employing optical nonlinear effects such as self- or cross-phase modulation.

  19. Understanding rapid changes in phase partitioning between cloud liquid and ice in an Arctic stratiform mixed-phase cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalesse, Heike; de Boer, Gijs; Solomon, Amy; Oue, Mariko; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Zhang, Damao; Shupe, Matthew; Luke, Edward; Protat, Alain

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, a region particularly sensitive to climate change, mixed-phase clouds occur as persistent single or multiple stratiform layers. For many climate models, the correct partitioning of hydrometeor phase (liquid vs. ice) remains a challenge. However, this phase partitioning plays an important role for precipitation processes and the radiation budget. To better understand the partitioning of phase in Arctic clouds, observations using a combination of surface-based remote sensors are useful. In this study, the focus is on a persistent low-level single-layer stratiform Arctic mixed-phase cloud observed during March 11-12, 2013 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) permanent site in Barrow, Alaska. This case is of particular interest due to two significant shifts in observed precipitation intensity over a 36 hour period. For the first 12 hours of this case, the observed liquid portion of the cloud cover featured a stable cloud top height with a gradually descending liquid cloud base and continuous ice precipitation. Then the ice precipitation intensity significantly decreased. A second decrease in ice precipitation intensity was observed a few hours later coinciding with the advection of a cirrus over the site. Through analysis of the data collected by extensive ground-based remote-sensing and in-situ observing systems as well as Nested Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulations and ECMWF radiation scheme simulations, we try to shed light on the processes responsible for these rapid changes in precipitation rates. A variety of parameters such as the evolution of the internal dynamics and microphysics of the low-level mixed-phase cloud and the influence of the cirrus cloud are evaluated.

  20. Refraction-Assisted Solar Thermoelectric Generator based on Phase-Change Lens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kim, Min-Ki; Jo, Sung-Eun; Joo, Chulmin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs), which are used for various applications, (particularly small size electronic devices), have optical concentration systems for high energy conversion efficiency. In this study, a refraction-assisted STEG (R-STEG) is designed based on phase-change materials. As the phase-change material (PCM) changes phase from solid to liquid, its refractive index and transmittance also change, resulting in changes in the refraction of the sunlight transmitted through it, and concentration of solar energy in the phase-change lens. This innovative design facilitates double focusing the solar energy through the optical lens and a phase-change lens. This mechanism resulted in the peak energy conversion efficiencies of the R-STEG being 60% and 86% higher than those of the typical STEG at solar intensities of 1 kW m(-2) and 1.5 kW m(-2), respectively. In addition, the energy stored in PCM can help to generate steady electrical energy when the solar energy was removed. This work presents significant progress regarding the optical characteristic of PCM and optical concentration systems of STEGs. PMID:27283350

  1. Refraction-Assisted Solar Thermoelectric Generator based on Phase-Change Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kim, Min-Ki; Jo, Sung-Eun; Joo, Chulmin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs), which are used for various applications, (particularly small size electronic devices), have optical concentration systems for high energy conversion efficiency. In this study, a refraction-assisted STEG (R-STEG) is designed based on phase-change materials. As the phase-change material (PCM) changes phase from solid to liquid, its refractive index and transmittance also change, resulting in changes in the refraction of the sunlight transmitted through it, and concentration of solar energy in the phase-change lens. This innovative design facilitates double focusing the solar energy through the optical lens and a phase-change lens. This mechanism resulted in the peak energy conversion efficiencies of the R-STEG being 60% and 86% higher than those of the typical STEG at solar intensities of 1 kW m‑2 and 1.5 kW m‑2, respectively. In addition, the energy stored in PCM can help to generate steady electrical energy when the solar energy was removed. This work presents significant progress regarding the optical characteristic of PCM and optical concentration systems of STEGs.

  2. Refraction-Assisted Solar Thermoelectric Generator based on Phase-Change Lens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kim, Min-Ki; Jo, Sung-Eun; Joo, Chulmin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs), which are used for various applications, (particularly small size electronic devices), have optical concentration systems for high energy conversion efficiency. In this study, a refraction-assisted STEG (R-STEG) is designed based on phase-change materials. As the phase-change material (PCM) changes phase from solid to liquid, its refractive index and transmittance also change, resulting in changes in the refraction of the sunlight transmitted through it, and concentration of solar energy in the phase-change lens. This innovative design facilitates double focusing the solar energy through the optical lens and a phase-change lens. This mechanism resulted in the peak energy conversion efficiencies of the R-STEG being 60% and 86% higher than those of the typical STEG at solar intensities of 1 kW m−2 and 1.5 kW m−2, respectively. In addition, the energy stored in PCM can help to generate steady electrical energy when the solar energy was removed. This work presents significant progress regarding the optical characteristic of PCM and optical concentration systems of STEGs. PMID:27283350

  3. Crystallization and Phase Changes in Paracetamol from the Amorphous Solid to the Liquid Phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For the case of paracetamol, we show how terahertz time-domain spectroscopy can be used to characterize the solid and liquid phase dynamics. Heating of supercooled amorphous paracetamol from 295 K in a covered sample under vacuum leads to its crystallization at 330 K. First, form III is formed followed by the transformation of form III to form II at 375 K, to form I at 405 K, and finally melting is observed around 455 K. We discuss the difference between the featureless spectra of the supercooled liquid and its liquid melt. Lastly, we studied the onset of crystallization from the supercooled liquid in detail and quantified its kinetics based on the Avrami–Erofeev model. We determined an effective rate constant of k = 0.056 min–1 with a corresponding onset of crystallization at T = 329.5 K for a heating rate of 0.4 K min–1. PMID:24579729

  4. Crystallization and phase changes in paracetamol from the amorphous solid to the liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Sibik, Juraj; Sargent, Michael J; Franklin, Miriam; Zeitler, J Axel

    2014-04-01

    For the case of paracetamol, we show how terahertz time-domain spectroscopy can be used to characterize the solid and liquid phase dynamics. Heating of supercooled amorphous paracetamol from 295 K in a covered sample under vacuum leads to its crystallization at 330 K. First, form III is formed followed by the transformation of form III to form II at 375 K, to form I at 405 K, and finally melting is observed around 455 K. We discuss the difference between the featureless spectra of the supercooled liquid and its liquid melt. Lastly, we studied the onset of crystallization from the supercooled liquid in detail and quantified its kinetics based on the Avrami-Erofeev model. We determined an effective rate constant of k = 0.056 min(-1) with a corresponding onset of crystallization at T = 329.5 K for a heating rate of 0.4 K min(-1). PMID:24579729

  5. Extended lattice Boltzmann method for numerical simulation of thermal phase change in two-phase fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a method based on the multiphase lattice Boltzmann framework is presented which is applicable to liquid-vapor phase-change phenomena. Both liquid and vapor phases are assumed to be incompressible. For phase changes occurring at the phase interface, the divergence-free condition of the velocity field is no longer satisfied due to the gas volume generated by vaporization or fluid volume generated by condensation. Thus, we extend a previous model by a suitable equation to account for the finite divergence of the velocity field within the interface region. Furthermore, the convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is extended to take into account vaporization effects. In a first step, a D1Q3 LB model is constructed and validated against the analytical solution of a one-dimensional Stefan problem for different density ratios. Finally the model is extended to two dimensions (D2Q9) to simulate droplet evaporation. We demonstrate that the results obtained by this approach are in good agreement with theory.

  6. First 3-Way Lunar Radio Phase Ranging and Doppler Experiment in Chang'E-3 Lander Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PING, J.; Meng, Q.; Tang, G.; Jian, N.; Wang, Z.; Li, W.; Chen, C.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Lu, Y.; Yu, Q.; Mao, Y.; Miao, C.; Lei, Y.; Shu, F.; Cao, J.

    2014-04-01

    Radio science experiments have been involved in all of the Chinese lunar missions with different research objectives. In Chang'E-3 landing mission, a 3-way open loop lunar radio phase ranging and Doppler technique was suggested and tested. This technique is modified and updated from early multi-channel oneway Doppler deep space tracking technique developed for Chinese Mars mission Yinghuo-1. In the 1st preliminary experiments, we obtained 1sps continuous phase ranging data before and after the successful landing period, with a resolution of 0.5 millimeter or better. This method, called Lunar Radio Phase Ranging (LRPR) can be a new space geodetic technique to measure the station position, earth tide and rotation, lunar orbit, tide and liberation, by means of independent observation, or to work together with Lunar Laser Ranging. Also, it can be used in future Mars mission.

  7. Nucleation of a new phase on a surface that is changing irreversibly with time.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Nucleation of a new phase almost always starts at a surface. This surface is almost always assumed not to change with time. However, surfaces can roughen, partially dissolve, and change chemically with time. Each of these irreversible changes will change the nucleation rate at the surface, resulting in a time-dependent nucleation rate. Here we use a simple model to show that partial surface dissolution can qualitatively change the nucleation process in a way that is testable in experiment. The changing surface means that the nucleation rate is increasing with time. There is an initial period during which no nucleation occurs, followed by relatively rapid nucleation. PMID:25353480

  8. An experimental and theoretical evaluation of increased thermal diffusivity phase change devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. P.; Golden, J. O.; Stermole, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    This study was to experimentally evaluate and mathematically model the performance of phase change thermal control devices containing high thermal conductivity metal matrices. Three aluminum honeycomb filters were evaluated at five different heat flux levels using n-oct-adecane as the test material. The system was mathematically modeled by approximating the partial differential equations with a three-dimensional implicit alternating direction technique. The mathematical model predicts the system quite well. All of the phase change times are predicted. The heating of solid phase is predicted exactly while there is some variation between theoretical and experimental results in the liquid phase. This variation in the liquid phase could be accounted for by the fact that there are some heat losses in the cell and there could be some convection in the experimental system.

  9. In vitro and in vivo Phase Changes of the Mouse Circadian Clock by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Yu; Yokota, Aya; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yamada, Shunya; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are governed by an endogenous circadian clock system, including the molecular clock works in each cell and tissue. Adaptation of the circadian clock to different environmental stimuli such as light, food, and stress is essential for homeostasis maintenance. However, the influence of oxidative stress on the circadian clock phase is not fully understood in vitro and in vivo. Here, we examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress on the PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythm in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in mouse peripheral tissues in vivo. The circadian clock phase changed with the dose of H2O2 and time of day in vitro; similar phase changes were observed in vivo in the circadian clocks of the peripheral tissues. In addition, mice treated with hemin-induced oxidative stress also showed phase changes of peripheral clocks, similarly as H2O2 treatment. Thus, oxidative stress can entrain circadian clock systems.

  10. Morphology and polymorphic phase changes of calcium carbonate micro/nanocrystals using fruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Ankamwar, Balaprasad

    2011-05-01

    This study reveals the morphology and polymorphic phase changes of calcium carbonate crystals into a mixture of calcite and aragonite micro/nanocrystals of interesting morphology at room temperature by a simple reaction with fruit extracts of Tamarindus indica and Emblica officinalis respectively by mixing CaCO3 solutions with their corresponding extracts. The control experiments were carried out to establish the plausible role of tartaric acid from Tamarindus indica and ascorbic acid from Emblica officinalis in this regard. The quantitative determination of CaCO3 phases was done based on the use of intensities obtained from corresponding XRD spectrum. The molar % of aragonite was found to be more in case of TA and AA rather than TI and EO respectively, however the calcite was observed to be the predominant phase in all four reactions. Interestingly, the TI changes the rhombohedral morphology of calcite to elongated rods, whereas EO induces a great polymorphic phase change. PMID:21780397

  11. Phase Change Nanodots Patterning using a Self-Assembled Polymer Lithography and Crystallization Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Raoux, S; Krebs, D; Krupp, L; Topuria, T; Caldwell, M; Milliron, D; Kellock, A; Rice, P; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Crystallization behavior of scalable phase change materials can be studied on nanoscale structures. In this paper, high density ordered phase change nanodot arrays were fabricated using the lift-off technique on a self-assembled diblock copolymer template, polystyrene-poly(methyl-methacrylate). The size of the nanodots was less than 15 nm in diameter with 40 nm spacing. This method is quite flexible regarding the patterned materials and can be used on different substrates. The crystallization behavior of small scale phase change nanodot arrays was studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which showed the phase transition for different materials such as Ge15Sb85, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ag and In doped Sb2Te. The transition temperatures of these nanodot samples were also compared with their corresponding blanket thin films, and it was found that the nanodots had higher crystallization temperatures and crystallized over a broader temperature range.

  12. One-Dimensional Phase-Change Nanomaterials for Information Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuhui; Yu, Bin; Ng, Garrick; Meyyappan, M.

    The electrically operated phase-change random access memory (PRAM) features faster write/read, improved endurance, and much simpler fabrication as compared with the traditional transistor-based nonvolatile semiconductor memories. Low-dimensional phase-change materials in nanoscale dimensions offer advantages over their bulk or thin-film counterparts in several aspects such as reduced programmable volume and reduced thermal energies in phase transition. These features contribute to low-power operation, excellent scalability, and fast write/erase time. In this chapter, we present a general bottom-up synthesis approach and systematic material analysis study of one-dimensional chalcogenide-based phase-change materials including germanium telluride (GeTe), and indium selenide (In2Se3) nanowires that are targeted for nonvolatile resistive switching data storage. The phase-change nanowires have been synthesized via thermal evaporation method under vaporliquid—solid (VLS) mechanism. The morphology, composition, and crystal structure of the synthesized nanowires were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The as-synthesized nanowires are structurally uniform with single crystalline structures. The one-dimensional phase-change chalcogenide nanowires exhibit significantly reduced melting points, low activation energy, and excellent morphology, making them promising nanomaterials for data storage devices with very low energy consumption and excellent scalability.

  13. Materials research for passive solar systems: solid-state phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Webb, J.D.; Burrows, R.W.; McFadden, J.D.O.; Christensen, C.

    1985-03-01

    A set of solid-state phase-change materials is being evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 4/), pentaglycerinve (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 3/), and neopentyl glycol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 2/). Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature betweeen 25/sup 0/C and 188/sup 0/C, and have latent heats of transformation between 20 and 70 cal/g. Transformation temperatures, specific heats, and latent heats of transformation have been measured for a number of these materials. Limited cyclic experiments suggest that the solid solutions are stable. These phase-change materials exhibit large amounts of undercooling; however, the addition of certain nucleating agents as particulate dispersions in the solid phase-change material greatly reduces this effect. Computer simulations suggest that the use of an optimized solid-state phase-change material in a Trombe wall could provide better performance than a concrete Trombe wall four times thicker and nine times heavier. Nevertheless, a higher cost of the phase-change materials (approx. =$0.70 per pound) is likely to limit their applicability in passive solar systems unless their performance can be significantly improved through further research.

  14. An Automatic Phase-Change Detection Technique for Colloidal Hard Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth; Rogers, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of monodisperse spheres are used as physical models of thermodynamic phase transitions and as precursors to photonic band gap materials. However, current image analysis techniques are not able to distinguish between densely packed phases within conventional microscope images, which are mainly characterized by degrees of randomness or order with similar grayscale value properties. Current techniques for identifying the phase boundaries involve manually identifying the phase transitions, which is very tedious and time consuming. We have developed an intelligent machine vision technique that automatically identifies colloidal phase boundaries. The algorithm utilizes intelligent image processing techniques that accurately identify and track phase changes vertically or horizontally for a sequence of colloidal hard sphere suspension images. This technique is readily adaptable to any imaging application where regions of interest are distinguished from the background by differing patterns of motion over time.

  15. Adversary phase change detection using S.O.M. and text data.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2010-09-01

    In this work, we developed a self-organizing map (SOM) technique for using web-based text analysis to forecast when a group is undergoing a phase change. By 'phase change', we mean that an organization has fundamentally shifted attitudes or behaviors. For instance, when ice melts into water, the characteristics of the substance change. A formerly peaceful group may suddenly adopt violence, or a violent organization may unexpectedly agree to a ceasefire. SOM techniques were used to analyze text obtained from organization postings on the world-wide web. Results suggest it may be possible to forecast phase changes, and determine if an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  16. Ultrafast optical manipulation of atomic motion in multilayer Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, K.; Tominaga, J.; Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Hase, M.

    2013-03-01

    Phase change random access memory devices have evolved dramatically with the recent development of superlattice structure of Ge-Sb-Te material (GST-SL) in terms of its low power consumption. The phase change in GST-SL is mainly characterized by the displacement of Ge atoms. Here we examine a new phase change method, that is the manipulation of Ge-Te bonds using linearly-polarized femtosecond near-infrared optical pulses. As a result, we found that the p-polarized pump pulse is more effective in inducing the reversible and irreversible displacement of Ge atoms along [111] direction in the local structure. This structural change would be induced by the anisotropic carrier-phonon interaction along the [111] direction created by the p-polarized pulse.

  17. Adversary phase change detection using S.O.M. and text data.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we developed a self-organizing map (SOM) technique for using web-based text analysis to forecast when a group is undergoing a phase change. By 'phase change', we mean that an organization has fundamentally shifted attitudes or behaviors. For instance, when ice melts into water, the characteristics of the substance change. A formerly peaceful group may suddenly adopt violence, or a violent organization may unexpectedly agree to a ceasefire. SOM techniques were used to analyze text obtained from organization postings on the world-wide web. Results suggest it may be possible to forecast phase changes, and determine if an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  18. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties.

  19. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng

    2016-05-19

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionicmore » and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. As a result, this different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties.« less

  20. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties. PMID:27193531

  1. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J

    2016-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties. PMID:27193531

  2. Modeling of a Two-Phase Jet Pump with Phase Change, Shocks and Temperature-Dependent Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the primary motivations behind this work is the attempt to understand the physics of a two-phase jet pump which constitutes part of a flow boiling test facility at NASA-Marshall. The flow boiling apparatus is intended to provide data necessary to design highly efficient two-phase thermal control systems for aerospace applications. The facility will also be capable of testing alternative refrigerants and evaluate their performance using various heat exchangers with enhanced surfaces. The test facility is also intended for use in evaluating single-phase performance of systems currently using CFC refrigerants. Literature dealing with jet pumps is abundant and covers a very wide array of application areas. Example application areas include vacuum pumps which are used in the food industry, power station work, and the chemical industry; ejector systems which have applications in the aircraft industry as cabin ventilators and for purposes of jet thrust augmentation; jet pumps which are used in the oil industry for oil well pumping; and steam-jet ejector refrigeration, to just name a few. Examples of work relevant to this investigation includes those of Fairuzov and Bredikhin (1995). While past researchers have been able to model the two-phase flow jet pump using the one-dimensional assumption with no shock waves and no phase change, there is no research known to the author apart from that of Anand (1992) who was able to account for condensation shocks. Thus, one of the objectives of this work is to model the dynamics of fluid interaction between a two-phase primary fluid and a subcooled liquid secondary fluid which is being injected employing atomizing spray injectors. The model developed accounts for phase transformations due to expansion, compression, and mixing. It also accounts for shock waves developing in the different parts of the jet pump as well as temperature and pressure dependencies of the fluid properties for both the primary two-phase mixture and the

  3. Preparation and characterization of novel anion phase change heat storage materials.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Lil, Qingshan; Sun, Jing; Di, Youbo; Zhao, Zhou; Yu, Wei'an; Qu, Yuan; Jiao, TiFeng; Wang, Guowei; Xing, Guangzhong

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, polyurethane phase change material was successfully prepared with TDI with BDO for hard segments and PEG for soft segments. Moreover, based on this the solid-solid phase change material, A-PCM1030 which can release anions was prepared with the successful addition of anion additives A1030 for the first time. Then the test of the above material was conducted utilizing FT-IR, DSC, TEM, WAXD and Air Ion Detector. The Results indicated that the polyurethane phase change material possesses excellent thermal stability since there was no appearance of liquid leakage and phase separation after 50 times warming-cooling thermal cycles. It also presented reversibility on absorbing and releasing heat. In addition, adding a little A1030 can increase the thermal stability and reduce phase transition temperatures, as well as reduce the undercooling of the polyurethane phase change material. In addition, the anion test results suggested that the supreme amount of anion released by A-PCM1030 could reach 2510 anions/cm3 under dynamic conditions, which is beneficial for human health. PMID:24245138

  4. Visualising phase change in a brushite-based calcium phosphate ceramic.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, A; Williams, R L; Cox, S C; Grover, L M

    2016-01-01

    The resorption of brushite-based bone cements has been shown to be highly unpredictable, with strong dependence on a number of conditions. One of the major factors is phase transformation, with change to more stable phases such as hydroxyapatite affecting the rate of resorption. Despite its importance, the analysis of phase transformation has been largely undertaken using methods that only detect crystalline composition and give no information on the spatial distribution of the phases. In this study confocal Raman microscopy was used to map cross-sections of brushite cylinders aged in Phosphate Buffered Saline, Foetal Bovine Serum, Dulbecco's - Minimum Essential Medium (with and without serum). Image maps showed the importance of ageing medium on the phase composition throughout the ceramic structure. When aged without serum, there was dissolution of the brushite phase concomitant to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) around the periphery of the sample. The deposition of OCP was detectable within five days and reduced the rate of brushite dissolution from the material. The use of serum, even at a concentration of 10vol% prevented phase transformation. This paper demonstrates the value of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring phase change in biocements; it also demonstrates the problems with assessing material degradation in non-serum containing media. PMID:27604149

  5. Visualising phase change in a brushite-based calcium phosphate ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Bannerman, A.; Williams, R. L.; Cox, S. C.; Grover, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The resorption of brushite-based bone cements has been shown to be highly unpredictable, with strong dependence on a number of conditions. One of the major factors is phase transformation, with change to more stable phases such as hydroxyapatite affecting the rate of resorption. Despite its importance, the analysis of phase transformation has been largely undertaken using methods that only detect crystalline composition and give no information on the spatial distribution of the phases. In this study confocal Raman microscopy was used to map cross-sections of brushite cylinders aged in Phosphate Buffered Saline, Foetal Bovine Serum, Dulbecco’s – Minimum Essential Medium (with and without serum). Image maps showed the importance of ageing medium on the phase composition throughout the ceramic structure. When aged without serum, there was dissolution of the brushite phase concomitant to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) around the periphery of the sample. The deposition of OCP was detectable within five days and reduced the rate of brushite dissolution from the material. The use of serum, even at a concentration of 10vol% prevented phase transformation. This paper demonstrates the value of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring phase change in biocements; it also demonstrates the problems with assessing material degradation in non-serum containing media. PMID:27604149

  6. Effect of water-ice phase change on thermal performance of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kočí, Václav; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The effect of water ice-phase change on thermal performance of integrated building material is investigated in this paper. As a characteristic construction, simple external wall made of aerated autoclaved concrete was assumed which was exposed to dynamic climatic condition of Šerák, Czech Republic. The computational modelling of hygrothermal performance was carried out using computer codes HEMOT and SIFEL that work on the basis of finite element method. The effect of phase change was taken into account by fixed-domain method, when experimentally determined effective specific heat capacity was used as a material parameter. It comprises also the effect of heat consumption and heat release that accompany the water-ice phase change. Comparing to the results with specific heat capacity, the effect of phase change on thermal performance could be quantified. The results showed that temperature fields can differ more than 6 °C. Additionally, the amount energy transported through the wall may be higher up to 4 %. This confirmed, that the effect water-ice phase change should be included in all the relevant energy calculations.

  7. An optoelectronic framework enabled by low-dimensional phase-change films.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Peiman; Wright, C David; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2014-07-10

    The development of materials whose refractive index can be optically transformed as desired, such as chalcogenide-based phase-change materials, has revolutionized the media and data storage industries by providing inexpensive, high-speed, portable and reliable platforms able to store vast quantities of data. Phase-change materials switch between two solid states--amorphous and crystalline--in response to a stimulus, such as heat, with an associated change in the physical properties of the material, including optical absorption, electrical conductance and Young's modulus. The initial applications of these materials (particularly the germanium antimony tellurium alloy Ge2Sb2Te5) exploited the reversible change in their optical properties in rewritable optical data storage technologies. More recently, the change in their electrical conductivity has also been extensively studied in the development of non-volatile phase-change memories. Here we show that by combining the optical and electronic property modulation of such materials, display and data visualization applications that go beyond data storage can be created. Using extremely thin phase-change materials and transparent conductors, we demonstrate electrically induced stable colour changes in both reflective and semi-transparent modes. Further, we show how a pixelated approach can be used in displays on both rigid and flexible films. This optoelectronic framework using low-dimensional phase-change materials has many likely applications, such as ultrafast, entirely solid-state displays with nanometre-scale pixels, semi-transparent 'smart' glasses, 'smart' contact lenses and artificial retina devices. PMID:25008527

  8. How important is the {103} plane of stable Ge2 Sb2 Te5 for phase-change memory?

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zheng, W T; Kim, J-G; Cui, X Q; Li, L; Qi, J G; Kim, Y-J; Song, S A

    2015-07-01

    Closely correlating with {200} plane of cubic phase, {103} plane of hexagonal phase of Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) plays a crucial role in achieving fast phase change process as well as formation of modulation structures, dislocations and twins in Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5). The behaviors of {103} plane of hexagonal phase render the phase-change memory process as a nanoscale shape memory. PMID:25809085

  9. Pressure-induced shape change of phospholipid vesicles: implication of compression and phase transition.

    PubMed

    Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Baddóuj, K; Gervais, P

    2005-04-01

    A microscopic study has allowed the analysis of modifications of various shapes acquired by phospholipid vesicles during a hydrostatic pressure treatment of up to 300 MPa. Giant vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine / phosphatidylserine (DMPC/PS) prepared at 40 degrees C mainly presented a shape change resembling budding during pressure release. This comportment was reinforced by the incorporation of 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) or by higher temperature (60 degrees C) processing. The thermotropic main phase transition (L alpha to P beta') of the different vesicles prepared was determined under pressure through a spectrofluorimetric study of 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene (Laurdan) incorporated into the vesicles' bilayer. This analysis was performed by microfluorescence observation of single vesicles. The phase transition was found to begin at about 80 MPa and 120 MPa for DMPC/PS vesicles at, respectively, 40 degrees C and 60 degrees C. At 60 degrees C the liquid-to-gel transition phase was not complete within 250 MPa. Addition of DMPE at 40 degrees C does not significantly shift the onset boundary of the phase transition but extends the transition region. At 40 degrees C, the gel phase was obtained at, respectively, 110 MPa and 160 MPa for DMPC/PS and DMPC/PS/DOPE vesicles. In comparing volume data obtained from image analysis and Laurdan signal, we assume the shape change is a consequence of the difference between lateral compressibility of the membrane and bulk water. The phase transition contributes to the membrane compression but seems not necessary to induce shape change of vesicles. The high compressibility of the L alpha phase at 60 degrees C allows induction on DMPC/PS vesicles of a morphological transition without phase change. PMID:16245032

  10. Morphological analysis of GeTe in inline phase change switches

    SciTech Connect

    King, Matthew R.; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Salmon, Mike; Gu, Jitty; Wagner, Brian P.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Nichols, Doyle T.; Young, Robert M.; Borodulin, Pavel

    2015-09-07

    Crystallization and amorphization phenomena in indirectly heated phase change material-based devices were investigated. Scanning transmission electron microscopy was utilized to explore GeTe phase transition processes in the context of the unique inline phase change switch (IPCS) architecture. A monolithically integrated thin film heating element successfully converted GeTe to ON and OFF states. Device cycling prompted the formation of an active area which sustains the majority of structural changes during pulsing. A transition region on both sides of the active area consisting of polycrystalline GeTe and small nuclei (<15 nm) in an amorphous matrix was also observed. The switching mechanism, determined by variations in pulsing parameters, was shown to be predominantly growth-driven. A preliminary model for crystallization and amorphization in IPCS devices is presented.

  11. Hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes the applicability of hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis formulations for nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change. The methodology is based on application of transform approaches and classical Galerkin schemes with finite element formulations to maintain the modeling versatility and numerical features for computational analysis. In addition, in conjunction with the above, the effects due to latent heat are modeled using enthalpy formulations to enable a physically realistic approximation to be dealt computationally for materials exhibiting phase change within a narrow band of temperatures. Pertinent details of the approach and computational scheme adapted are described in technical detail. Numerical test cases of comparative nature are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed formulations for numerical modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change.

  12. Study on Solidification of Phase Change Material in Fractal Porous Metal Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Wu, Liangyu; Chen, Yongping

    2015-02-01

    The Sierpinski fractal is introduced to construct the porous metal foam. Based on this fractal description, an unsteady heat transfer model accompanied with solidification phase change in fractal porous metal foam embedded with phase change material (PCM) is developed and numerically analyzed. The heat transfer processes associated with solidification of PCM embedded in fractal structure is investigated and compared with that in single-pore structure. The results indicate that, for the solidification of phase change material in fractal porous metal foam, the PCM is dispersedly distributed in metal foam and the existence of porous metal matrix provides a fast heat flow channel both horizontally and vertically, which induces the enhancement of interstitial heat transfer between the solid matrix and PCM. The solidification performance of the PCM, which is represented by liquid fraction and solidification time, in fractal structure is superior to that in single-pore structure.

  13. Morphological analysis of GeTe in inline phase change switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Matthew R.; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Salmon, Mike; Gu, Jitty; Wagner, Brian P.; Jones, Evan B.; Borodulin, Pavel; Howell, Robert S.; Nichols, Doyle T.; Young, Robert M.

    2015-09-01

    Crystallization and amorphization phenomena in indirectly heated phase change material-based devices were investigated. Scanning transmission electron microscopy was utilized to explore GeTe phase transition processes in the context of the unique inline phase change switch (IPCS) architecture. A monolithically integrated thin film heating element successfully converted GeTe to ON and OFF states. Device cycling prompted the formation of an active area which sustains the majority of structural changes during pulsing. A transition region on both sides of the active area consisting of polycrystalline GeTe and small nuclei (<15 nm) in an amorphous matrix was also observed. The switching mechanism, determined by variations in pulsing parameters, was shown to be predominantly growth-driven. A preliminary model for crystallization and amorphization in IPCS devices is presented.

  14. The Oxidation Behaviour of Diamond Like Carbon for Phase-Change Probe Memory Application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Cihui; Wen, Jing; Yang, Guowei

    2015-06-01

    Phase-change probe memory, as a promising candidate for next-generation storage device, usually requires a capping layer to protect phase-change media from wear and corrosion. Diamond-like carbon film has been commonly used for capping layer due to its high mechanical hardness and easiness for tailoring physical properties. However, the possibility for such carbon thin film to react to surrounding oxygen when subjected to Joule heating during the recording process of phase-change probe memory is rarely investigated before from both experimental and simulation point of view. Therefore, a novel carbon oxidation model was developed to mimic the chemical reaction of carbon film to the surrounding oxygen in terms of the degradation of layer thickness. Results obtained from this model are in a good agreement with the experimental counterpart, indicating the physical reality of this proposed model. PMID:26369065

  15. Transient analysis of a thermal storage unit involving a phase change material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, E. I.; Pitts, D. R.; Humphries, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The transient response of a single cell of a typical phase change material type thermal capacitor has been modeled using numerical conductive heat transfer techniques. The cell consists of a base plate, an insulated top, and two vertical walls (fins) forming a two-dimensional cavity filled with a phase change material. Both explicit and implicit numerical formulations are outlined. A mixed explicit-implicit scheme which treats the fin implicity while treating the phase change material explicitly is discussed. A band algorithmic scheme is used to reduce computer storage requirements for the implicit approach while retaining a relatively fine grid. All formulations are presented in dimensionless form thereby enabling application to geometrically similar problems. Typical parametric results are graphically presented for the case of melting with constant heat input to the base of the cell.

  16. Change in Photosystem II Photochemistry During Algal Growth Phases of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah

    2016-06-01

    Sensitivity of photosynthetic processes towards environmental stress is used as a bioanalytical tool to evaluate the responses of aquatic plants to a changing environment. In this paper, change of biomass density, chlorophyll a fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters during growth phases of two microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus were studied. The photosynthetic growth behaviour changed significantly with cell age and algae species. During the exponential phase of growth, the photosynthesis capacity reached its maximum and decreased in ageing algal culture during stationary phase. In conclusion, the chlorophyll a fluorescence OJIP method and the derived fluorescence parameters would be an accurate method for obtaining information on maximum photosynthetic capacities and monitoring algal cell growth. This will contribute to more understanding, for example, of toxic actions of pollutants in microalgae test. PMID:26868257

  17. Quantitative phase evaluation of dynamic changes on cell membrane during laser microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingfeng; Mohanty, Samarendra; Liu, Gangjun; Genc, Suzanne; Chen, Zhongping; Berns, Michael W

    2008-01-01

    The ability to inject exogenous material as well as to alter subcellular structures in a minimally invasive manner using a laser microbeam has been useful for cell biologists to study the structure-function relationship in complex biological systems. We describe a quantitative phase laser microsurgery system, which takes advantage of the combination of laser microirradiation and short-coherence interference microscopy. Using this method, quantitative phase images and the dynamic changes of phase during the process of laser microsurgery of red blood cells (RBCs) can be evaluated in real time. This system would enable absolute quantitation of localized alteration/damage to transparent phase objects, such as the cell membrane or intracellular structures, being exposed to the laser microbeam. Such quantitation was not possible using conventional phase-contrast microscopy. PMID:19021378

  18. Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer and phase changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juric, D.; Tryggvason, G.; Han, J.

    1997-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer, and phase changes are presented. The simulations are made possible by a recently developed finite difference/front tracking method based on the one-field formulation of the governing equations where a single set of conservation equations is written for all the phases involved. The conservation equations are solved on a fixed rectangular grid, but the phase boundaries are kept sharp by tracking them explicitly by a moving grid of lower dimension. The method is discussed and applications to boiling heat transfer and the solidification of drops colliding with a wall are shown.

  19. Dynamic switching characteristic dependence on sidewall angle for phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, X. M.; Miao, X. S.; Sun, J. J.; Cheng, X. M.; Tong, H.; Li, Y.; Yang, D. H.; Huang, J. D.; Liu, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the volume-minimized model of phase change memory (PCM) cell with Ge 2Sb 2Te 5 (GST) material has been established to study the dynamic switching (set-to-reset) characteristic dependence on the sidewall angle. Joule heating volume, threshold current, dynamic resistance and phase transition rate of PCM cells by current pulse are all calculated. The results show that the threshold current increases with decreasing the sidewall angle and is significantly impacted by the feature size and aspect ratio. The PCM cell of 90° sidewall angle exhibits the smallest Joule heating volume, the highest RESET resistance and the fastest phase transition property.

  20. Electronic Structure and Spin Configuration Trends of Single Transition Metal Impurity in Phase Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Pei, J.; Shi, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    Fe doped phase change material GexSbyTez has shown experimentally the ability to alter its magnetic properties by phase change. This engineered spin degree of freedom into the phase change material offers the possibility of logic devices or spintronic devices where they may enable fast manipulation of ferromagnetism by a phase change mechanism. The electronic structures and spin configurations of isolated transition metal dopant in phase change material (iTM-PCM) is important to understand the interaction between localized metal d states and the unique delocalized host states of phase change material. Identifying an impurity center that has, in isolation, a nonvanishing magnetic moment is the first step to study the collective magnetic ordering, which originates from the interaction among close enough individual impurities. Theoretical description of iTM-PCM is challenging. In this work, we use a screened exchange hybrid functional to study the single 3d transition metal impurity in crystalline GeTe and GeSb2Te4. By curing the problem of local density functional (LDA) such as over-delocalization of the 3d states, we find that Fe on the Ge/Sb site has its majority d states fully occupied while its minority d states are empty, which is different from the previously predicted electronic configuration by LDA. From early transition metal Cr to heavier Ni, the majority 3d states are gradually populated until fully occupied and then the minority 3d states begin to be filled. Interpretive orbital interaction pictures are presented for understanding the local and total magnetic moments.

  1. Changes Caused by Fruit Extracts in the Lipid Phase of Biological and Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pruchnik, Hanna; Oszmiański, Jan; Sarapuk, Janusz; Kleszczyńska, Halina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine changes incurred by polyphenolic compounds from selected fruits in the lipid phase of the erythrocyte membrane, in liposomes formed of erythrocyte lipids and phosphatidylcholine liposomes. In particular, the effect of extracts from apple, chokeberry, and strawberry on the red blood cell morphology, on packing order in the lipid hydrophilic phase, on fluidity of the hydrophobic phase, as well as on the temperature of phase transition in DPPC liposomes was studied. In the erythrocyte population, the proportions of echinocytes increased due to incorporation of polyphenolic compounds. Fluorimetry with a laurdan probe indicated increased packing density in the hydrophilic phase of the membrane in presence of polyphenolic extracts, the highest effect being observed for the apple extract. Using the fluorescence probes DPH and TMA-DPH, no effect was noted inside the hydrophobic phase of the membrane, as the lipid bilayer fluidity was not modified. The polyphenolic extracts slightly lowered the phase transition temperature of phosphatidylcholine liposomes. The studies have shown that the phenolic compounds contained in the extracts incorporate into the outer region of the erythrocyte membrane, affecting its shape and lipid packing order, which is reflected in the increasing number of echinocytes. The compounds also penetrate the outer part of the external lipid layer of liposomes formed of natural and DPPC lipids, changing its packing order. PMID:21423329

  2. Phase changes of filled ice Ih methane hydrate under low temperature and high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takehiko; Hirai, Hisako; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohtake, Michika; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Satoshi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2013-09-01

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed with filled ice Ih structure of methane hydrate under 2.0-77.0 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ X-ray diffractometry revealed distinct changes in the compressibility of the axial ratios of the host framework with pressure. Raman spectroscopy showed a split in the C-H vibration modes of the guest methane molecules, which was previously explained by the orientational ordering of the guest molecules. The pressure and temperature conditions at the split of the vibration modes agreed well with those of the compressibility change. The results indicate the following: (i) the orientational ordering of the guest methane molecules from an orientationally disordered state occurred at high pressures and low temperatures; and (ii) this guest ordering led to anisotropic contraction in the host framework. Such guest orientational ordering and subsequent anisotropic contraction of the host framework were similar to that reported previously for filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate. Since phases with different guest-ordering manners were regarded as different phases, existing regions of the guest disordered-phase and the guest ordered-phase were roughly estimated by the X-ray study. In addition, above the pressure of the guest-ordered phase, another high-pressure phase developed in the low-temperature region. The deuterated-water host samples were also examined, and the influence of isotopic effects on guest ordering and phase transformation was observed.

  3. Changes in functioning of mesolimbic incentive processing circuits during the premenstrual phase.

    PubMed

    Ossewaarde, Lindsey; van Wingen, Guido A; Kooijman, Sabine C; Bäckström, Torbjörn; Fernández, Guillén; Hermans, Erno J

    2011-10-01

    The premenstrual phase of the menstrual cycle is associated with marked changes in normal and abnormal motivated behaviors. Animal studies suggest that such effects may result from actions of gonadal hormones on the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system. We therefore investigated premenstrual changes in reward-related neural activity in terminal regions of the DA system in humans. Twenty-eight healthy young women underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging on 2 days during the menstrual cycle, once during the late follicular phase and once during the premenstrual phase, in counterbalanced order. Using a modified version of the monetary incentive delay task, we assessed responsiveness of the ventral striatum to reward anticipation. Our results show enhanced ventral striatal responses during the premenstrual as compared to the follicular phase. Moreover, this effect was most pronounced in women reporting more premenstrual symptoms. These findings provide support for the notion that changes in functioning of mesolimbic incentive processing circuits may underlie premenstrual changes in motivated behaviors. Notably, increases in reward-cue responsiveness have previously been associated with DA withdrawal states. Our findings therefore suggest that the sharp decline of gonadal hormone levels in the premenstrual phase may trigger a similar withdrawal-like state. PMID:20817665

  4. One order of magnitude faster phase change at reduced power in Ti-Sb-Te

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Xia, Mengjiao; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Ji, Xinglong; Lv, Shilong; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin; Sun, Hongbo; Zhang, Shengbai

    2014-01-01

    To date, slow Set operation speed and high Reset operation power remain to be important limitations for substituting dynamic random access memory by phase change memory. Here, we demonstrate phase change memory cell based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 alloy, showing one order of magnitude faster Set operation speed and as low as one-fifth Reset operation power, compared with Ge2Sb2Te5-based phase change memory cell at the same size. The enhancements may be rooted in the common presence of titanium-centred octahedral motifs in both amorphous and crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 phases. The essentially unchanged local structures around the titanium atoms may be responsible for the significantly improved performance, as these structures could act as nucleation centres to facilitate a swift, low-energy order-disorder transition for the rest of the Sb-centred octahedrons. Our study may provide an alternative to the development of high-speed, low-power dynamic random access memory-like phase change memory technology. PMID:25001009

  5. One order of magnitude faster phase change at reduced power in Ti-Sb-Te.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Xia, Mengjiao; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Ji, Xinglong; Lv, Shilong; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin; Sun, Hongbo; Zhang, Shengbai

    2014-01-01

    To date, slow Set operation speed and high Reset operation power remain to be important limitations for substituting dynamic random access memory by phase change memory. Here, we demonstrate phase change memory cell based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 alloy, showing one order of magnitude faster Set operation speed and as low as one-fifth Reset operation power, compared with Ge2Sb2Te5-based phase change memory cell at the same size. The enhancements may be rooted in the common presence of titanium-centred octahedral motifs in both amorphous and crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 phases. The essentially unchanged local structures around the titanium atoms may be responsible for the significantly improved performance, as these structures could act as nucleation centres to facilitate a swift, low-energy order-disorder transition for the rest of the Sb-centred octahedrons. Our study may provide an alternative to the development of high-speed, low-power dynamic random access memory-like phase change memory technology. PMID:25001009

  6. A computational framework for mapping the timing of vegetative phase change.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Jiang, Libo; Zhu, Sheng; Zhou, Chunguo; Ye, Meixia; Mao, Ke; Sun, Lidan; Su, Xiaohua; Pan, Huixin; Zhang, Shougong; Huang, Minren; Wu, Rongling

    2016-07-01

    Phase change plays a prominent role in determining the form of growth and development. Although considerable attention has been focused on identifying the regulatory control mechanisms of phase change, a detailed understanding of the genetic architecture of this phenomenon is still lacking. We address this issue by deriving a computational model. The model is founded on the framework of functional mapping aimed at characterizing the interplay between quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and development through biologically meaningful mathematical equations. A multiphasic growth equation was implemented into functional mapping, which, via a series of hypothesis tests, allows the quantification of how QTLs regulate the timing and pattern of vegetative phase transition between independently regulated, temporally coordinated processes. The model was applied to analyze stem radial growth data of an interspecific hybrid family derived from two Populus species during the first 24 yr of ontogeny. Several key QTLs related to phase change have been characterized, most of which were observed to be in the adjacent regions of candidate genes. The identification of phase transition QTLs, whose expression is regulated by endogenous and environmental signals, may enhance our understanding of the evolution of development in changing environments. PMID:26958803

  7. Near-field phase-change recording using a GaN laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishima, Koichiro; Ichimura, Isao; Yamamoto, Kenji; Osato, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Yuji; Iida, Atsushi; Saito, Kimihiro

    2000-09-01

    We developed a 1.5-Numerical-Aperture optical setup using a GaN blue-violet laser diode. We used a 1.0 mm-diameter super-hemispherical solid immersion lens, and optimized a phase-change disk structure including the cover layer by the method of MTF simulation. The disk surface was polished by tape burnishing technique. An eye-pattern of (1-7)-coded data at the linear density of 80 nm/bit was demonstrated on the phase-change disk below a 50 nm gap height, which was realized through our air-gap servo mechanism.

  8. Superlattice-like film for high data retention and high speed phase change random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le; Song, Sannian; Zhang, Zhonghua; Chen, Liangliang; Song, Zhitang; Lv, Shilong; Liu, Bo; Guo, Tianqi

    2016-06-01

    Superlattice-like film (SLF) was formed alternately by Ti0.43Sb2Te3 (TST) and TiN, and TST is employed as phase change layers and TiN is employed as isolation layers of TST film. Comparing with single TST film with the same thickness, SLF owns higher data retention, higher phase change speed (5 ns) and endurance up to 1 × 105 cycles, and its power consumption of reset operation is significantly decreased by 65.2%. Two-dimensional thermal transient simulation of reset operation indicates that SLF-based device owns higher heating efficiency than 30-nm-thick TST-based device.

  9. Modeling of liquid-vapor phase change using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Das, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    A model has been proposed based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics to describe gas liquid phase change. Pseudo particles of zero mass are initially placed to locate the interface. Mass generated due to phase change is assigned to the pseudo particles and their positions are updated at intervals to track the mobility of the interface. The developed algorithm has been used to simulate vapor formation around solid spheres both in the absence of gravity and in the normal gravitational field. Finally, bubble growth over a hot horizontal surface due to boiling has been simulated. Simulated results showed good matching with the reported literature.

  10. Structural and phase changes in carbides of the high-speed steel upon heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaus, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on structural and phase changes in carbides of the tungsten-molybdenum high-speed steel has been studied. The results of metallographic analysis and energy dispersive microanalysis have been discussed. It has been shown that an increase in austenitizing temperature from 1180 to 1260°C causes structural transformations in carbide particles of eutectic origin crushed upon hot plastic deformation, which are related to their dissolution and coalescence, and changes in the phase composition of the carbides themselves.

  11. Review of development survey of phase change material models in building applications.

    PubMed

    Akeiber, Hussein J; Wahid, Mazlan A; Hussen, Hasanen M; Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th

    2014-01-01

    The application of phase change materials (PCMs) in green buildings has been increasing rapidly. PCM applications in green buildings include several development models. This paper briefly surveys the recent research and development activities of PCM technology in building applications. Firstly, a basic description of phase change and their principles is provided; the classification and applications of PCMs are also included. Secondly, PCM models in buildings are reviewed and discussed according to the wall, roof, floor, and cooling systems. Finally, conclusions are presented based on the collected data. PMID:25313367

  12. Review of Development Survey of Phase Change Material Models in Building Applications

    PubMed Central

    Akeiber, Hussein J.; Wahid, Mazlan A.; Hussen, Hasanen M.; Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th.

    2014-01-01

    The application of phase change materials (PCMs) in green buildings has been increasing rapidly. PCM applications in green buildings include several development models. This paper briefly surveys the recent research and development activities of PCM technology in building applications. Firstly, a basic description of phase change and their principles is provided; the classification and applications of PCMs are also included. Secondly, PCM models in buildings are reviewed and discussed according to the wall, roof, floor, and cooling systems. Finally, conclusions are presented based on the collected data. PMID:25313367

  13. MICRO- AND NANOSCALE MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR PHASE CHANGE HEAT TRANSFER ON PLANAR AND STRUCTURED SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Buongiorno, J; Cahill, DG; Hidrovo, CH; Moghaddam, S; Schmidt, AJ; Shi, L

    2014-07-23

    In this opinion piece, we discuss recent advances in experimental methods for characterizing phase change heat transfer. We begin with a survey of techniques for high-resolution measurements of temperature and heat flux at the solid surface and in the working fluid. Next, we focus on diagnostic tools for boiling heat transfer and describe techniques for visualizing the temperature and velocity fields, as well as measurements at the single bubble level. Finally, we discuss techniques to probe the kinetics of vapor formation within a few molecular layers of the interface. We conclude with our outlook for future progress in experimental methods for phase change heat transfer.

  14. Investigation of phase-change coatings for variable thermal control of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, W. C.; Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a spacecraft coating system that could vary the ratio of its solar absorptance to thermal emittance to adjust automatically for changes in the thermal balance of a spacecraft. This study resulted in a new concept called the phase-change effect which uses the change that occurs in the optical properties of many materials during the phase transition from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. A series of two-component model coatings was developed which, when placed on a highly reflecting substrate, exhibited a sharp decrease in solar absorptance within a narrow temperature range. A variable thermal control coating can have a significant amount of temperature regulation with the phase-change effect. Data are presented on several crystallite-polymer formulations, their physical and optical properties, and associated phase-change temperatures. Aspects pertaining to their use in a space environment and an example of the degree of thermal regulation attainable with these coatings is also given.

  15. Parametric Analysis of Cyclic Phase Change and Energy Storage in Solar Heat Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Carsie A., III; Glakpe, Emmanuel K.; Cannon, Joseph N.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    A parametric study on cyclic melting and freezing of an encapsulated phase change material (PCM), integrated into a solar heat receiver, has been performed. The cyclic nature of the present melt/freeze problem is relevant to latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems used to power solar Brayton engines in microgravity environments. Specifically, a physical and numerical model of the solar heat receiver component of NASA Lewis Research Center's Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project was developed. Multi-conjugate effects such as the convective fluid flow of a low-Prandtl-number fluid, coupled with thermal conduction in the phase change material, containment tube and working fluid conduit were accounted for in the model. A single-band thermal radiation model was also included to quantify reradiative energy exchange inside the receiver and losses through the aperture. The eutectic LiF-CaF2 was used as the phase change material (PCM) and a mixture of He/Xe was used as the working fluid coolant. A modified version of the computer code HOTTube was used to generate results in the two-phase regime. Results indicate that parametric changes in receiver gas inlet temperature and receiver heat input effects higher sensitivity to changes in receiver gas exit temperatures.

  16. Systemic and renal hemodynamic changes in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle mimic early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, A B; Zamudio, S; Woodmansee, W; Merouani, A; Osorio, F; Johnson, A; Moore, L G; Dahms, T; Coffin, C; Abraham, W T; Schrier, R W

    1997-11-01

    Blood pressure decreases during early pregnancy in association with a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and increases in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate. These early changes suggest a potential association with corpora lutea function. To determine whether peripheral vasodilation occurs following ovulation, we studied 16 healthy women in the midfollicular and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure in the midluteal phase of the cycle (midfollicular of 81.7 +/- 2.0 vs. midluteal of 75.4 +/- 2.3 mmHg, P < 0.005) was found in association with a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and an increase in cardiac output. Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate increased. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration increased significantly in the luteal phase accompanied by a decrease in atrial natriuretic peptide concentration. Serum sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate concentrations and osmolarity also declined significantly in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Urinary adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) excretion increased in the luteal compared with the follicular phase, whereas no changes in urinary cGMP or NO2/NO3 excretion were found. Thus peripheral vasodilation occurs in the luteal phase of the normal menstrual cycle in association with an increase in renal plasma flow and filtration. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis is found in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. These changes are accompanied by an increase in urinary cAMP excretion indicating potential vasodilating mediators responsible for the observed hemodynamic changes. PMID:9374841

  17. Transport phenomena during solid-liquid phase change in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.; Plumb, O.A.

    1995-12-31

    Transport phenomena in porous media with phase change has been studied in a wide variety of both environmental and engineering systems during the past several decades. Examples of applications of interest include the freezing and melting of soils, thermal energy storage, and post accident analysis of nuclear reactors. The present study focuses on the solid-liquid phase change occurring during the melting of a packed bed. Particular attention is paid to the redistribution of mass. The results are applicable to the manufacture of powder based composites, ceramic-metal or certain metal-metal combinations. Due to the process used in producing ceramics and advanced alloys, many of the raw materials utilized in advanced composites are powders. The objective of the present study is to develop a general model for solid-liquid phase change which results from the application of heat to a porous structure. The system of interest is a packed bed which contains melting and non melting components. A one-dimensional phase change process is examined in this study. The macroscopic energy equation and continuity equations for both the liquid and solid phases are solved numerically and experiments are conducted to confirm the numerical results. The non melting particles used in the experiments are spherical glass beads. Salol (benzoic acid 2-hydroxyphenylester) is chosen as the phase change material because of its low melting temperature and available thermophysical properties. During the melting process, redistribution of the mass of salol was monitored utilizing gamma attenuation and compared with the numerical results. The effects of varying the particle diameter and the geometric melting model from constant volume to constant porosity are discussed.

  18. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  19. Strongly Nonlinear Optical Glass Fibers from Noncentrosymmetric Phase-Change Chalcogenide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, In; Jang, Joon I.; Malliakas, Christos D.; Ketterson, John B.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2010-08-27

    We report that the one-dimensional polar selenophosphate compounds APSe{sub 6} (A = K, Rb), which show crystal-glass phase-change behavior, exhibit strong second harmonic generation (SHG) response in both crystal and glassy forms. The crystalline materials are type-I phase-matchable with SHG coefficients {chi}{sup (2)} of 151.3 and 149.4 pm V{sup -1} for K{sup +} and Rb{sup +} salts, respectively, which is the highest among phase-matchable nonlinear optical (NLO) materials with band gaps over 1.0 eV. The glass of APSe{sub 6} exhibits comparable SHG intensities to the top infrared NLO material AgGaSe{sub 2} without any poling treatments. APSe{sub 6} exhibit excellent mid-IR transparency. We demonstrate that starting from noncentrosymmetric phase-change materials such as APSe{sub 6} (A = K, Rb), we can obtain optical glass fibers with strong, intrinsic, and temporally stable second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) response. The as-prepared glass fibers exhibit SHG and difference frequency generation (DFG) responses over a wide range of wavelengths. Raman spectroscopy and pair distribution function (PDF) analyses provide further understanding of the local structure in amorphous state of KPSe{sub 6} bulk glass and glass fiber. We propose that this approach can be widely applied to prepare permanent NLO glass from materials that undergo a phase-change process.

  20. High thermal stability Sb3Te-TiN2 material for phase change memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xinglong; Wu, Liangcai; Zhou, Wangyang; Zhu, Min; Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cao, Liangliang; Feng, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    For phase change memory (PCM) applications, it has been widely accepted that δ phase Sb-Te has fast operation speed and good phase stability. However, the fast growth crystallization mechanism will cause poor amorphous phase stability and overlarge grain size. We introduce TiN2 into δ phase Sb-Te (Sb3Te) to enhance the amorphous thermal stability and refine the grain size. With TiN2 incorporating, the temperature for 10-year data retention increases from 79 °C to 124 °C. And the grain size decreases to dozens of nanometers scale. Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results, we knew that nitrogen atoms bond with titanium, forming disorder region at the grain boundary of Sb3Te-TiN2 (STTN). Thus, STTN has a quite different crystallization mechanism from Sb3Te. Furthermore, PCM device based on STTN can realize reversible phase change under 20 ns electrical pulse.

  1. Strongly tunable circular dichroism in gammadion chiral phase-change metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tun; Zhang, Lei; Simpson, Robert E; Wei, Chenwei; Cryan, Martin J

    2013-11-18

    A metal/phase-change material/metal tri-layer planar chiral metamaterial in the shape of a gammadion is numerically modelled. The chiral metamaterial is integrated with Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change material (PCM) to accomplish a wide tuning range of the circular dichroism (CD) in the mid-infrared wavelength regime. A photothermal model is used to study the temporal variation of the temperature of the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer and to show the potential for fast switching the phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 under a low incident light intensity of 0.016mW/μm2. PMID:24514301

  2. The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Vergés, Adriana; Steinberg, Peter D; Hay, Mark E; Poore, Alistair G B; Campbell, Alexandra H; Ballesteros, Enric; Heck, Kenneth L; Booth, David J; Coleman, Melinda A; Feary, David A; Figueira, Will; Langlois, Tim; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mizerek, Toni; Mumby, Peter J; Nakamura, Yohei; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Gupta, Alex Sen; Smale, Dan A; Tomas, Fiona; Wernberg, Thomas; Wilson, Shaun K

    2014-08-22

    Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to 'barrens' when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs. PMID:25009065

  3. Thermally induced phase changes, lateral heterogeneity of the mantle, continental roots, and deep slab anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1987-01-01

    Factors which influence the lateral heterogeneity in density and seismic velocity with depth in the upper earth mantle are discussed. It is emphasized that most of the increases in density and seismic velocity with depth are caused by pressure-induced solid-solid phase changes in the high-density high-velocity phases of mineral assemblage, due to variations in temperature. In particular, the ilmenite form of MgSiO3 and the gamma-spinel form of Mg2SiO4 have broad stability fields in cold mantle and are not stable in hotter mantle. It is emphasized that the density and velocity anomalies associated with temperature-induced phase changes in mineral assemblage must be taken into account in the thermal models of the slabs; when these effects are accounted for, the geoid and seismic anomalies associated with subducted slabs are consistent with slab confinement to the upper mantle and with layered models of mantle convection.

  4. Nanostructured thin film-based near-infrared tunable perfect absorber using phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change thermochromic material can provide a large level of absorption tunability in the near-infrared region. Vanadium dioxide was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. Absorption level of the resonance wavelength in the near-IR region was tuned from the perfect absorption level to a low level (17%) with a high positive dynamic range of near-infrared absorption intensity tunability (83%). Due to the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the resonance at the near-infrared region is being turned on and turned off actively and reversibly under the thermal bias, thereby rendering these nanostructures suitable for infrared camouflage, emitters, and sensors.

  5. The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts

    PubMed Central

    Vergés, Adriana; Steinberg, Peter D.; Hay, Mark E.; Poore, Alistair G. B.; Campbell, Alexandra H.; Ballesteros, Enric; Heck, Kenneth L.; Booth, David J.; Coleman, Melinda A.; Feary, David A.; Figueira, Will; Langlois, Tim; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Mizerek, Toni; Mumby, Peter J.; Nakamura, Yohei; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Gupta, Alex Sen; Smale, Dan A.; Tomas, Fiona; Wernberg, Thomas; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2014-01-01

    Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to ‘barrens’ when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs. PMID:25009065

  6. Performance equations of a collector cum storage system using phase change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, N.K. ); Buddhi, D. )

    1992-01-01

    A thermal analysis has been developed for a collector cum system for quasi-steady-state conditions using phase change materials. Performance equations of the Hottel-Whillier-Bliss type for flat-plate collector cum storage system have been obtained. Calculations have been performed for a wide range of parameters to investigate the applicability of the developed mathematical model.

  7. Heat transfer and Rheological behavior of nanoparticle compound microencapsulated phase change material suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Lin, G. P.; Ding, Y. L.

    2010-03-01

    Addition of microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) have been used for enhance the heat transfer of fluids because of the large latent heat during the phase change period of particles. However low thermal conductivity of phase change material diminishes the heat transfer performance of the fluid partially. In the past decade, significant enhancements of nanofluids on the enhancement of thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer were observed in comparison with the base fluids. To improve the thermal conductivity of MPCM suspensions, the additive nanoparticles were used to formulate a novel thermal fluid—nanoparticle compound microencapsulated phase change material suspensions were formulated. The rheology measurements shows that such suspensions are Newtonian fluids at the shear rate of 5-500s-1 and the shear viscosities depend strongly on temperature. Experimental investigations were conducted on the laminar convective heat transfer characteristic of the nanoparticle compound MPCM suspensions in a vertical circular tube with 0.5% TiO2 nanoparticles and various MPCM mass concentrations ranging from 5%-20%. The results exhibit that the convective heat transfer performance of nanoparticle compound MPCM suspensions are significantly improved in comparison of the MPCM suspensions and this enhancement increases with the increasing of the MPCM concentration, the modified Nusselt number can be improved by 27.0% for MPCM concentration of 20 wt%.

  8. Antioxidant-Based Phase-Change Thermal Interface Materials with High Thermal Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Yasuhiro; Chung, D. D. L.

    2008-04-01

    This work provides phase-change thermal interface materials (TIMs) with high thermal stability and high heat of fusion. They are based on antioxidants mainly in the form of hydrocarbons with linear segments. The thermal stability is superior to paraffin wax and four commercial phase-change materials (PCMs). The use of 98.0 wt.% thiopropionate antioxidant (SUMILIZER TP-D) with 2.0 wt.% sterically half-hindered phenolic antioxidant (GA80) as the matrix and the use of 16 vol.% boron nitride particles as the solid component give a PCM with a 100°C lifetime indicator of 5.3 years, in contrast to 0.95 year or less for the commercial PCMs. The heat of fusion is much higher than those of commercial PCMs; the values for antioxidants with nonbranched molecular structures exceed that of wax; the value for one with a branched structure is slightly below that of wax. The phase-change properties are degraded by heating at 150°C much less than those of the commercial PCMs. The stability of the heat of fusion upon phase-change cycling is also superior. The viscosity is essentially unaffected by heating at 150°C. Commercial PCMs give slightly lower values of the thermal contact conductance for the case of rough (12 μm) mating surfaces, in spite of the lower values of the bond-line thickness.

  9. Scalability of Phase Change Materials in Non-Volatile Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Biyun Li

    This dissertation presents a study of the scaling limit of Phase Change Materials (PCM) for non-volatile memory device application. The approach is to obtain isolated true nano size Phase Change Materials through controllable deposition of PCM onto a template - nano pitted substrate. The fabrication of nano pitted substrate started from a di-block copolymer (DBC) film in hexagonal nano arrangement coated on thin SiO2 on Si (100) substrate. Then the DBC pattern was transferred to SiO2 - Si substrate by anisotropic dry oxide etch. Subsequently, a wet KOH etch with high crystallographic selectivity changed the circular pattern into an inverted pyramidal pit substrate. Thus, the dimension of the pits are controlled by the hole size of DBC, and the density of the pits are controlled by the interspacing between holes. Characterization tools such as SEM and TEM are intensively used to analyze the morphology, crystallographic, atomic ratio and phase transformation of the PCM. The dissertation discusses the critical fabrication tricks to produce high yield nano pitted substrate, illustrating the size effect of phase change materials upon crystallization and melting as well as the scaling limit of PCM. A proposal is also discussed for extending the study to device fabrication level and branch out the nano pitted substrate for the study of other materials in size and pressure effect.

  10. A theoretical model of phase changes of a klystron due to variation of operating parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupiszewski, A.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model for phase changes of the VA-876 CW klystron amplifier output is presented and variations of several operating parameters are considered. The theoretical approach to the problem is based upon a gridded gap modeling with inclusion of a second order correction term so that actual gap geometry is reflected in the formulation. Physical measurements are contrasted to theoretical calculations.

  11. Functional differentiation of the sugar beet root system as indicator of developmental phase change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developmental phase transition in the plant root system has not been well characterized. In this study we compared the dynamics of sucrose accumulation with gene expression changes analyzed with cDNA-AFLP in the tap root system of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) during the first nine weeks after emerg...

  12. Analysis of thermal energy storage material with change-of-phase volumetric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom proposed hybrid power system includes photovoltaic arrays with nickel hydrogen batteries for energy storage and solar dynamic collectors driving Brayton heat engines with change-of-phase Thermal Energy Storage (TES) devices. A TES device is comprised of multiple metallic, annular canisters which contain a eutectic composition LiF-CaF2 Phase Change Material (PCM) that melts at 1040 K. A moderately sophisticated LiF-CaF2 PCM computer model is being developed in three stages considering 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D canister geometries, respectively. The 1-D model results indicate that the void has a marked effect on the phase change process due to PCM displacement and dynamic void heat transfer resistance. Equally influential are the effects of different boundary conditions and liquid PCM natural convection. For the second stage, successful numerical techniques used in the 1-D phase change model are extended to a 2-D (r,z) PCM containment canister model. A prototypical PCM containment canister is analyzed and the results are discussed.

  13. Optimal design variable considerations in the use of phase change materials in indirect evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilakapaty, Ankit Paul

    The demand for sustainable, energy efficient and cost effective heating and cooling solutions is exponentially increasing with the rapid advancement of computation and information technology. Use of latent heat storage materials also known as phase change materials (PCMs) for load leveling is an innovative solution to the data center cooling demands. These materials are commercially available in the form of microcapsules dispersed in water, referred to as the microencapsulated phase change slurries and have higher heat capacity than water. The composition and physical properties of phase change slurries play significant role in energy efficiency of the cooling systems designed implementing these PCM slurries. Objective of this project is to study the effect of PCM particle size, shape and volumetric concentration on overall heat transfer potential of the cooling systems designed with PCM slurries as the heat transfer fluid (HTF). In this study uniform volume heat source model is developed for the simulation of heat transfer potential using phase change materials in the form of bulk temperature difference in a fully developed flow through a circular duct. Results indicate the heat transfer potential increases with PCM volumetric concentration with gradually diminishing returns. Also, spherical PCM particles offer greater heat transfer potential when compared to cylindrical particles. Results of this project will aid in efficient design of cooling systems based on PCM slurries.

  14. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material.

    PubMed

    Tokuç, Ayça; Başaran, Tahsin; Yesügey, S Cengiz

    2015-12-01

    The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM) layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid-liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91-104. PMID:26629490

  15. Helping Clients Move toward Constructive Change: A Three-Phase Integrated Counseling Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Barbara; Mac Millan, Pamela

    1999-01-01

    This article presents a three-phase integrated counseling model that draws from object relations and attachment theory for assessment and uses cognitive behavioral techniques to promote constructive client change. A case vignette is presented to illustrate implementation of the model. (Author)

  16. Color Depth Modulation and Resolution in Phase-Change Material Nanodisplays.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Carlos; Hosseini, Peiman; Taylor, Robert A; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2016-06-01

    The demonstration of non-volatile color-depth modulation in novel phase change nanodisplays allowing for continuous "grayscale" images with ultrahigh resolution and low dimensionality is described. These results hold promise for a new generation of bistable, ultrahigh-resolution, and flexible display technologies, while allowing for other potential applications in nanophotonics and optoelectronics. PMID:27028767

  17. Replacement of Ablators with Phase-Change Material for Thermal Protection of STS Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K.; Stuckey, Irvin; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the research and development program to develop new Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials for aerospace applications at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), an experimental study was conducted on a new concept for a non-ablative TPS material. Potential loss of TPS material and ablation by-products from the External Tank (ET) or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) during Shuttle flight with the related Orbiter tile damage necessitates development of a non-ablative thermal protection system. The new Thermal Management Coating (TMC) consists of phase-change material encapsulated in micro spheres and a two-part resin system to adhere the coating to the structure material. The TMC uses a phase-change material to dissipate the heat produced during supersonic flight rather than an ablative material. This new material absorbs energy as it goes through a phase change during the heating portion of the flight profile and then the energy is slowly released as the phase-change material cools and returns to its solid state inside the micro spheres. The coating was subjected to different test conditions simulating design flight environments at the NASA/MSFC Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF) to study its performance.

  18. Non-Toxic, Non-Flammable, -80 C Phase Change Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to develop a non-toxic, non-flammable, -80 C phase change material (PCM) to be used in NASA's ICEPAC capsules for biological sample preservation in flight to and from Earth orbit. A temperature of about -68 C or lower is a critical temperature for maintaining stable cell, tissue, and cell fragment storage.

  19. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material

    PubMed Central

    Tokuç, Ayça; Başaran, Tahsin; Yesügey, S. Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM) layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid–liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91–104. PMID:26629490

  20. A physics based reduced order aging model for lithium-ion cells with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhire, Priya; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Khandelwal, Ashish; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Yeo, Taejung; Doo, Seokgwang

    2014-12-01

    The electrochemical model has the potential to provide a robust and accurate battery management system, but is not the preferred choice as it involves solving non-linear, coupled partial differential equations. In the present work, a model order reduction of the complete electrochemical model for a lithium ion cell with phase change electrodes is carried out. The phase change phenomenon is described using a simple, concentration-dependent diffusivity derived from mixture rules. This reduced order model (ROM) is validated with experimental data from literature. The applicability of the model to capture the atypical behavior of the phase change electrode system is demonstrated. Using the cell response from ROM, charge-discharge asymmetry and path dependence in a lithium iron phosphate (LFP) cell are explored in detail. In addition, side reaction kinetics and solid electrolyte interphase formation are included in the ROM framework to enhance its capability to predict cell aging. The model is used to investigate capacity losses occurring in a phase change electrode cell. Insights from these results are used to suggest cell operating guidelines for maximizing utilization.

  1. Crystal-amorphous transformation via defect-templating in phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukala, Pavan

    Phase-change materials (PCM) such as GeTe and Ge-Sb-Te alloys are potential candidates for non-volatile memory applications, because they can reversibly and rapidly transform between a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase with medium-range order. Traditionally, crystal-amorphous transformation in these materials has been carried out via melt-quench pathway, where the crystalline phase is heated beyond its melting point by the rising edge of an electric pulse, and the melt phase is quenched by the falling edge into a glassy phase. Formation of an intermediate melt phase in this transformation pathway requires usage of large switching current densities, resulting in energy wastage, and device degradation issues. Furthermore, melt-quench pathway is a brute force strategy of amorphizing PCM, and does not utilize the peculiar structural properties in crystalline phase. It will be beneficial from a device perspective that crystal-amorphous transformation is carried out via subtler solid-state pathways. Single-crystalline nanowire phase-change memory, owing to its lateral geometry and large volumes of active material, offers a platform to construct a crystal-amorphous transformation pathway via gradually increasing disorder in the crystalline phase, and study it. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy on GeTe and Ge2Sb2Te5 systems, we showed that the application of an electric pulse (heat-shock) creates dislocations in the PCM that migrate with the hole-wind force, and interact with the already existing ferroelectric boundaries in case of GeTe, changing their nature. We adapted novel tools such as optical second harmonic generation polarimety to carefully study these defect interactions. These defects accumulate at a region of local inhomogeneity, and upon addition of defects beyond a critical limit to that region via electrical pulsing, an amorphous phase "nucleates". We also studied the effect of defect dynamics on carrier transport using temperature

  2. An immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method for solid-liquid phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongzong; Wu, Huiying

    2014-11-01

    In this work, an immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method (IB-TLBM) is proposed to simulate solid-liquid phase change problems. To treat the velocity and temperature boundary conditions on the solid-liquid interface, immersed boundary method (IBM) is adopted, in which the solid-liquid interface is represented as a sharp interface rather than a diffusive interface and is tracked explicitly by Lagrangian grid. The surface forces along the immersed boundary, including the “momentum force” for velocity boundary condition and the “energy force” for temperature boundary condition, are calculated by the direct-forcing scheme. The moving velocity of solid-liquid interface induced by phase change is calculated by the amount of latent heat absorbed or released in a time step directly, with no need to compute temperature gradients in solid and liquid phases separately. The temperature on the solid-liquid interface is specified as the melting temperature, which means phase change happens at a constant temperature. As the solid-liquid interface evolves with time, the identification of phase of Eulerian points and the rearrangement of Lagrangian points are also considered. With regard to the velocity and temperature fields, passive scalar thermal lattice Boltzmann method (TLBM) with multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision schemes is adopted. Numerical examples, including conduction-induced melting in a semi-infinite space and melting in a square cavity, are carried out to verify the present method and good results are obtained. As a further application, melting in a circular cylinder with considering the motion of solid phase is simulated successfully by the present method; numerical results show that the motion of solid phase accelerates the melting process obviously.

  3. Te-centric view of the phase change mechanism in Ge-Sb-Te alloys.

    PubMed

    Sen, S; Edwards, T G; Cho, J-Y; Joo, Y-C

    2012-05-11

    The short-range structure of amorphous and fcc Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change alloys is investigated using 125Te NMR spectroscopy. Both amorphous and fcc structures consist solely of heteropolar Ge/Sb-Te bonds that may enable rapid displacive phase transformation without the need for extensive atomic rearrangement. The vacancy distribution is random in microcrystalline fcc phases while significant clustering is observed in their nanocrystalline counterparts that may result in the formation of tetrahedrally coordinated Ge atoms in the latter. This structural commonality may further facilitate the kinetics of transformation between amorphous and nanocrystalline fcc phases, a situation relevant for high-density memory storage. PMID:23003059

  4. Silica phase changes: Diagenetic agent for oil entrapment, Lost Hills field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Julander, D.R.; Szymanski, D.L. )

    1991-02-01

    The siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target at Lost Hills. Silica phase changes have influenced the distribution and entrapment of hydrocarbons. With increasing temperature, opal A phase diatomite is converted to opal CT and finally quartz phase rock. All phases are low in permeability. The opal A diatomite is characteristically high in oil saturation and productive saturation. Productivity from this phase is dependent on structural position and fieldwide variations in oil viscosity and biodegradation. The deeper chert reservoir coincides with the opal CT to quartz phase transition. Porosity is again reduced in this transition, but saturations in the quartz phase rocks increase. Tests in the chert reservoir indicate a single, low-permeability system, suggesting the importance of matric contribution. resistivity and porosity in the diatomite, and resistivity and velocity in the chert, are the physical properties which best reflect saturation. Methods exploiting these properties (FMS, BHTV, borehole, and surface shear wave studies) should be helpful in further characterizing the reservoirs and identifying future pay.

  5. Ab Initio Molecular-Dynamics Simulation of Neuromorphic Computing in Phase-Change Memory Materials.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Jonathan M; Loke, Desmond; Lee, Taehoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2015-07-01

    We present an in silico study of the neuromorphic-computing behavior of the prototypical phase-change material, Ge2Sb2Te5, using ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. Stepwise changes in structural order in response to temperature pulses of varying length and duration are observed, and a good reproduction of the spike-timing-dependent plasticity observed in nanoelectronic synapses is demonstrated. Short above-melting pulses lead to instantaneous loss of structural and chemical order, followed by delayed partial recovery upon structural relaxation. We also investigate the link between structural order and electrical and optical properties. These results pave the way toward a first-principles understanding of phase-change physics beyond binary switching. PMID:26040531

  6. Design of practicable phase-change metadevices for near-infrared absorber and modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Santiago García-Cuevas; Nash, Geoffrey R; Hayat, Hasan; Cryan, Martin J; Klemm, Maciej; Bhaskaran, Harish; Wright, C David

    2016-06-13

    Phase-change chalcogenide alloys, such as Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), have very different optical properties in their amorphous and crystalline phases. The fact that such alloys can be switched, optically or electrically, between such phases rapidly and repeatedly means that they have much potential for applications as tunable photonic devices. Here we incorporate chalcogenide phase-change films into a metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial electromagnetic absorber structure and design absorbers and modulators for operation at technologically important near-infrared wavelengths, specifically 1550 nm. Our design not only exhibits excellent performance (e.g. a modulation depth of ~77% and an extinction ratio of ~20 dB) but also includes a suitable means for protecting the GST layer from environmental oxidation and is well-suited, as confirmed by electro-thermal and phase-transformation simulations, to in situ electrical switching. We also present a systematic study of design optimization, including the effects of expected manufacturing tolerances on device performance and, by means of a sensitivity analysis, identify the most critical design parameters. PMID:27410372

  7. Misleading changes of the signal intensity on opposed-phase MRI after injection of contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Hoefer, H.; Spielmann, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of opposed-phase imaging on the interpretation of MR contrast studies is highlighted. A model calculation is performed. It demonstrates the change of signal intensity of an average tumor before and after application of Gd-DTPA on an in-phase and an opposed-phase image, depending on the percentage of fat within the voxels. The effect is then demonstrated, using a small cotton stick soaked with water or a solution of contrast agent representing a tumor before and after i.v. application of Gd-DTPA. If an average enhancing tumor, which is surrounded by fat, occupies less than 50-60% of the slice thickness, it becomes undetectable on opposed-phase images. The reason is that due to signal cancellation on the the opposed image, no signal change or even signal decrease results, while signal increase is visible on the in-phase image. In those areas of the body where significant partial volume of a tumor with fat may occur (such as for breast tumors growing along ducts, which are surrounded by fat), severe errors can result. Therefore we explicitly warn from using opposed-image sequences for MR contrast studies. 14 ref.s, 4 figs.

  8. Changes in protein structure monitored by use of gas‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, Helen S.; Ault, James R.; Pringle, Steven D.; Brown, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein conformation by solution‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to MS is well documented. This involves monitoring the exchange of backbone amide protons with deuterium and provides details concerning the protein's tertiary structure. However, undesired back‐exchange during post‐HDX analyses can be difficult to control. Here, gas‐phase HDX‐MS, during which labile hydrogens on amino acid side chains are exchanged in sub‐millisecond time scales, has been employed to probe changes within protein structures. Addition of the solvent 2,2,2‐trifluoroethanol to a protein in solution can affect the structure of the protein, resulting in an increase in secondary and/or tertiary structure which is detected using circular dichroism. Using a Synapt G2‐S ESI‐mass spectrometer modified to allow deuterated ammonia into the transfer ion guide (situated between the ion mobility cell and the TOF analyser), gas‐phase HDX‐MS is shown to reflect minor structural changes experienced by the proteins β‐lactoglobulin and ubiquitin, as observed by the reduction in the level of deuterium incorporation. Additionally, the use of gas‐phase HDX‐MS to distinguish between co‐populated proteins conformers within a solution is demonstrated with the disordered protein calmodulin; the gas‐phase HDX‐MS results correspond directly with complementary data obtained by use of ion mobility spectrometry‐MS. PMID:25603979

  9. Detection and quantification of pipe damage from change in time of flight and phase.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel K; Kundu, Tribikram

    2015-09-01

    The use of ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection in pipes is continuously increasing. Generally longitudinal (axial symmetric) modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers in transmission mode for this purpose. In most studies the change in the received signal strength with the extent of damage has been investigated while in this study the change in the phase and the time-of-flight (TOF) of the propagating wave modes with the damage size is investigated. The cross-correlation technique is used to record the small changes in the TOF as the damage size varies in steel pipes. Dispersion curves are calculated to carefully identify the propagating wave modes. Differential TOF is recorded and compared for different propagating wave modes. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that unlike the recorded signal strength the TOF and the phase are not affected by the bonding condition between the transducer and the pipe. Therefore, if the pipe is not damaged but the transducer-pipe bonding is deteriorated then although the received signal strength is altered the TOF and phase remain same avoiding the false positive alarms of damage. PMID:26096882

  10. Relative permittivity behavior and temperature changes in linoleic acid during the phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kościesza, R.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Tefelski, D. B.; Kos, A.; Ejchart, W.

    2008-07-01

    In our earlier works several fatty liquids (edible oils and unsaturated fatty acids) which exhibit existence of a new phase induced by high pressure were presented. Conclusion of those experiments is that C=C bonds existence in these liquids plays a dominant role in a new phase occurrence. Relative permittivity in pure acids investigated till now seems to behave in specific way. That is why we decided to investigate linoleic acid (C18H32O2) under high pressure. In our experiment such quantities as: electric capacity, pressure and temperature were recorded. The experimental setup gives us also a possibility to conduct optical investigations. We observed a transmitted and scattered beams of close infrared light (λ = 800nm) in directions 0° and 90° towards the incident beam. Due to the rapid grow of temperature and the rapid change of transmitted and scattered beams we may say that observed phenomenon is a first order phase transition and a proof for the significant change of liquid structure. This paper contains time dependencies of permittivity, temperature, transmitted and scattered light intensity and also permittivity vs. pressure changes during the phase transition in linoleic acid and first of all measured data analysis which lets us explain the transition reasons.

  11. Highly scalable non-volatile and ultra-low-power phase-change nanowire memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Ho; Jung, Yeonwoong; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2007-10-01

    The search for a universal memory storage device that combines rapid read and write speeds, high storage density and non-volatility is driving the exploration of new materials in nanostructured form. Phase-change materials, which can be reversibly switched between amorphous and crystalline states, are promising in this respect, but top-down processing of these materials into nanostructures often damages their useful properties. Self-assembled nanowire-based phase-change material memory devices offer an attractive solution owing to their sub-lithographic sizes and unique geometry, coupled with the facile etch-free processes with which they can be fabricated. Here, we explore the effects of nanoscaling on the memory-storage capability of self-assembled Ge2Sb2Te5 nanowires, an important phase-change material. Our measurements of write-current amplitude, switching speed, endurance and data retention time in these devices show that such nanowires are promising building blocks for non-volatile scalable memory and may represent the ultimate size limit in exploring current-induced phase transition in nanoscale systems. PMID:18654387

  12. Relation between bandgap and resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Rütten, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Albert, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Memory based on phase change materials is currently the most promising candidate for bridging the gap in access time between memory and storage in traditional memory hierarchy. However, multilevel storage is still hindered by the so-called resistance drift commonly related to structural relaxation of the amorphous phase. Here, we present the temporal evolution of infrared spectra measured on amorphous thin films of the three phase change materials Ag4In3Sb67Te26, GeTe and the most popular Ge2Sb2Te5. A widening of the bandgap upon annealing accompanied by a decrease of the optical dielectric constant ε∞ is observed for all three materials. Quantitative comparison with experimental data for the apparent activation energy of conduction reveals that the temporal evolution of bandgap and activation energy can be decoupled. The case of Ag4In3Sb67Te26, where the increase of activation energy is significantly smaller than the bandgap widening, demonstrates the possibility to identify new phase change materials with reduced resistance drift. PMID:26621533

  13. Relation between bandgap and resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rütten, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Albert, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Memory based on phase change materials is currently the most promising candidate for bridging the gap in access time between memory and storage in traditional memory hierarchy. However, multilevel storage is still hindered by the so-called resistance drift commonly related to structural relaxation of the amorphous phase. Here, we present the temporal evolution of infrared spectra measured on amorphous thin films of the three phase change materials Ag4In3Sb67Te26, GeTe and the most popular Ge2Sb2Te5. A widening of the bandgap upon annealing accompanied by a decrease of the optical dielectric constant ε∞ is observed for all three materials. Quantitative comparison with experimental data for the apparent activation energy of conduction reveals that the temporal evolution of bandgap and activation energy can be decoupled. The case of Ag4In3Sb67Te26, where the increase of activation energy is significantly smaller than the bandgap widening, demonstrates the possibility to identify new phase change materials with reduced resistance drift.

  14. A candidate Zr-doped Sb2Te alloy for phase change memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yonghui; Cheng, Yan; Zhu, Min; Ji, Xinglong; Wang, Qing; Song, Sannian; Song, Zhitang; Liu, Weili; Feng, Songlin

    2016-02-01

    Here, Zr-doped Sb2Te alloy is proposed for phase change memory (PCM). Zr-doping enhances the crystallization temperature and thermal stability of Sb2Te alloy effectively. Crystalline Zr2(Sb2Te)98 film is manifested as a single phase without phase separation and the growth of crystal grain is dramatically suppressed. The density change of Zr2(Sb2Te)98 material between amorphous and crystalline is ˜2.65 ± 0.03%, which is much smaller than that of Ge2Sb2Te5 (6.5%). Phase change memory cells based on Zr2(Sb2Te)98 material can be reversibly switched by applying 40-400 ns width voltage pulses, and the reset current is relatively small when comparing with the prototypical Ge2Sb2Sb5 material. The resistance ON-OFF ratio of about 1.3 orders of magnitude is enough for figuring "0" and "1" out. Besides, endurance up to 4.1 × 104 cycles makes Zr-doped Sb2Te alloy a potential candidate for PCM.

  15. Modeling Cyclic Phase Change and Energy Storage in Solar Heat Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Carsie A., III; Glakpe, Emmanuel K.; Cannon, Joseph N.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical results pertaining to cyclic melting and freezing of an encapsulated phase change material (PCM), integrated into a solar heat receiver, have been reported. The cyclic nature of the present melt/freeze problem is relevant to latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems used to power solar Brayton engines in microgravity environments. Specifically, a physical and numerical model of the solar heat receiver component of NASA Lewis Research Center's Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project was developed and results compared with available experimental data. Multi-conjugate effects such as the convective fluid flow of a low-Prandtl-number fluid, coupled with thermal conduction in the phase change material, containment tube and working fluid conduit were accounted for in the model. A single-band thermal radiation model was also included to quantify reradiative energy exchange inside the receiver and losses through the aperture. The eutectic LiF-CaF2 was used as the phase change material (PCM) and a mixture of He/Xe was used as the working fluid coolant. A modified version of the computer code HOTTube was used to generate results for comparisons with GTD data for both the subcooled and two-phase regimes. While qualitative trends were in close agreement for the balanced orbit modes, excellent quantitative agreement was observed for steady-state modes.

  16. Thermal conductivity measurements in phase change materials under freezing in presence of nanoinclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angayarkanni, S. A.; Philip, John

    2015-09-01

    We study the thermal properties and internal microstructures of n-hexadecane alkane containing nanoinclusions of copper nanowire, multi walled carbon nanotube, and graphene nanoplatelets of different volume fractions. Just below the freezing point, a large thermal contrast is observed in all the three systems. The thermal conductivity decreases with temperature below the freezing temperature and stabilizes at ˜10 °C below the freezing point. More than 100% of thermal conductivity enhancement is observed with 0.01 wt. % of nanofillers during the liquid to solid phase change. It is speculated that the reduction in the interfacial thermal resistance and the internal stress generated during the first order phase transition, due to the presence of nanoinclusions at grain boundaries of alkane crystals, led to the observed increase in the thermal conductivity. We found that an optimal nanoparticle loading with the space filling agglomerates in a phase change alkane can provide an extremely large thermal conductivity. Though the thermal conductivity enhancement at higher particle loading was independent of the bulk thermal conductivity of dispersed nanomaterials, an anomalously large thermal contrast is observed at a very low concentration in copper nanowire suspension. These results provide new approaches to achieve large thermal storage in organic phase change materials.

  17. Absorption intensity tunability in the near infrared region using phase-change nanostructure (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Abdurrahman; Saraydemir, Safak; Barut, Bilal; Kocer, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change material (PCM) can provide large level of absorption intensity tunability in the near-infrared region. Germanium Antimonide Tellurite (Ge2Sb1Te4-GST) was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The structure is composed of a periodic grating-type array of 200 nm thick Au buried with 100 nm-thick GST layer from the top of the Au layer. The period of the gratings is 2 μm and in each period, GST width is 0.5 μm. GST was selected as the active PCM because its optical properties undergo a substantial change during a structural transition from the amorphous to the crystalline phase. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. It was shown that absorption intensity in the near-infrared region was tuned from the near-perfect to the near-zero level by switching the PCM from its amorphous to crystalline states. The distributions of the electric field and absorbed power at the resonant wavelengths with respect to different phases of the GST were investigated to further explain the physical origin of the absorption tuning. This study provides a path toward the realization of tunable infrared absorbers for the applications, such as selective infrared emitters, infrared camouflage, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  18. Relation between bandgap and resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials

    PubMed Central

    Rütten, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Albert, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Memory based on phase change materials is currently the most promising candidate for bridging the gap in access time between memory and storage in traditional memory hierarchy. However, multilevel storage is still hindered by the so-called resistance drift commonly related to structural relaxation of the amorphous phase. Here, we present the temporal evolution of infrared spectra measured on amorphous thin films of the three phase change materials Ag4In3Sb67Te26, GeTe and the most popular Ge2Sb2Te5. A widening of the bandgap upon annealing accompanied by a decrease of the optical dielectric constant ε∞ is observed for all three materials. Quantitative comparison with experimental data for the apparent activation energy of conduction reveals that the temporal evolution of bandgap and activation energy can be decoupled. The case of Ag4In3Sb67Te26, where the increase of activation energy is significantly smaller than the bandgap widening, demonstrates the possibility to identify new phase change materials with reduced resistance drift. PMID:26621533

  19. Phase changes of filled ice Ih methane hydrate under low temperature and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takehiko; Hirai, Hisako; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohtake, Michika; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Satoshi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2013-09-14

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed with filled ice Ih structure of methane hydrate under 2.0-77.0 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ X-ray diffractometry revealed distinct changes in the compressibility of the axial ratios of the host framework with pressure. Raman spectroscopy showed a split in the C-H vibration modes of the guest methane molecules, which was previously explained by the orientational ordering of the guest molecules. The pressure and temperature conditions at the split of the vibration modes agreed well with those of the compressibility change. The results indicate the following: (i) the orientational ordering of the guest methane molecules from an orientationally disordered state occurred at high pressures and low temperatures; and (ii) this guest ordering led to anisotropic contraction in the host framework. Such guest orientational ordering and subsequent anisotropic contraction of the host framework were similar to that reported previously for filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate. Since phases with different guest-ordering manners were regarded as different phases, existing regions of the guest disordered-phase and the guest ordered-phase were roughly estimated by the X-ray study. In addition, above the pressure of the guest-ordered phase, another high-pressure phase developed in the low-temperature region. The deuterated-water host samples were also examined, and the influence of isotopic effects on guest ordering and phase transformation was observed. PMID:24050356

  20. Phase Transition of Methane Gas Hydrate and Response of Marine Gas Hydrate Systems to Environmental Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2003-12-01

    Gas hydrates, which contain mostly methane as the gas component in marine sediment, are stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those found along continental margins and permafrost regions. Its stability is mostly controlled by in-situ pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid. Environmentally introduced changes in pressure and temperature can affect the stability of gas hydrate in marine sediment. While certain changes may enhance the process of gas hydrate formation, we are much more interested in the resultant dissociation processes, which may contribute to sub-marine slope instability, seafloor sediment failure, formation of mud volcanoes and pock marks, potential vulnerability of engineering structures, and the risk to drilling and production. We have been developing models to quantify phase transition processes of marine gas hydrates and to investigate the response of marine gas hydrate systems to environmental changes. Methane gas hydrate system is considered as a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) system. Pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid constrain the stability of gas hydrate and affect phase transition processes via their effects on methane solubility and fluid density and enthalpy. Compared to the great quantity of studies on its stability in the literature, in-depth research on phase transition of gas hydrate is surprisingly much less. A method, which employs pressure, enthalpy, salinity and methane content as independent variables, is developed to calculate phase transition processes of the three-component four-phase system. Temperature, an intensive thermodynamic parameter, is found not sufficient in describing phase transition of gas hydrate. The extensive thermodynamic parameter enthalpy, on the other hand, is found to be sufficient both in calculation of the phase transition processes and in modeling marine gas hydrate systems. Processes

  1. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials

    PubMed Central

    Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A. O.; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W.; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials. PMID:25740351

  2. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A O; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials. PMID:25740351

  3. New structural picture of the Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, X Q; Li, X B; Zhang, L; Cheng, Y Q; Yan, Z G; Xu, M; Han, X D; Zhang, S B; Zhang, Z; Ma, E

    2011-01-14

    Using electron microscopy and diffraction techniques, as well as first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that as much as 35% of the total Ge atoms in the cubic phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 locate in tetrahedral environments. The Ge-vacancy interactions play a crucial stabilizing role, leading to Ge-vacancy pairs and the sharing of vacancies that clusters tetrahedral Ge into domains. The Ge2Sb2Te5 structure with coexisting octahedral and tetrahedral Ge produces optical and structural properties in good agreement with experimental data and explains the property contrast as well as the rapid transformation in this phase-change alloy. PMID:21405239

  4. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A. O.; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W.; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials.

  5. Far-infrared spectral studies of phase changes in water ice induced by proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the FIR spectrum of crystalline and amorphous water ice as a function of temperature are reported. The dramatic differences between the spectra of these ices in the FIR are used to examine the effect of proton irradiation on the stability of the crystalline and amorphous ice phases from 13 to 77 K. In particular, the spectra near 13 K show interconversion between the amorphous and crystalline ice phases beginning at doses near 2 eV/molecule and continuing cyclically with increased dose. The results are used to estimate the stability of irradiated ices in astronomical environments.

  6. Phase change in terahertz waves emitted from differently doped graphite: The role of carrier drift

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, Muhammad; Yim, Jong-Hyuk; Jho, Young-Dahl; Kim, Changyoung; Wook Lee, Sang

    2013-11-11

    We investigate characteristics of THz waves radiated from differently doped graphite samples excited by femtosecond laser pulses. Between n-type single-crystalline graphite and p-type polycrystalline graphite films, we observe the phase reversal of THz waves regardless of excitation energy variations around K-valley. In addition, variations in other parameters such as excitation fluence and azimuthal angle produce no changes in the phase of THz waves, which correlate well with the opposite dipole polarization between differently doped samples rather than unidirectional diffusive transport.

  7. Structural transformation of Sb-based high-speed phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Yamada, Noboru; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kifune, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    The crystal structure of a phase-change recording material (the compound Ag(3.4)In(3.7)Sb(76.4)Te(16.5)) enclosed in a vacuum capillary tube was investigated at various temperatures in a heating process using a large Debye-Scherrer camera installed in BL02B2 at SPring-8. The amorphous phase of this material turns into a crystalline phase at around 416 K; this crystalline phase has an A7-type structure with atoms of Ag, In, Sb or Te randomly occupying the 6c site in the space group. This structure was maintained up to around 545 K as a single phase, although thermal expansion of the crystal lattice was observed. However, above this temperature, phase separation into AgInTe(2) and Sb-Te transpired. The first fragment, AgInTe(2), reliably maintained its crystal structure up to the melting temperature. On the other hand, the atomic configuration of the Sb-Te gradually varied with increasing temperature. This gradual structural transformation can be described as a continuous growth of the modulation period γ. PMID:23165592

  8. Phase change cells and the verification of gallium as a thermal calibration reference in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latvikoski, Harri; Bingham, Gail E.; Topham, T. S.; Podolski, Igor

    2015-09-01

    The validation of models of global climate change and accurate measurement of the atmosphere and surface temperatures require that orbital sensors have low drift rates, and are monitored or regularly recalibrated by accepted standards. Phase change materials (PCM), such as those that make up the ITS-90 standard, are the basis for international commerce and have been suggested for monitoring and recalibration of orbital temperature sensors. Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) and its partners have been developing miniaturized phase change reference technologies that could be deployed on an orbital blackbody for nearly a decade. A significant part of this effort has been the exploration of the behavior of gallium (Ga) and its eutectics, gallium-tin (GaSn) and gallium-indium (GaIn) in conditions expected to be encountered in this application. In this paper, these behaviors are detailed and an example of a hardware design that could be used as an infrared blackbody calibration monitor is presented. To determine if and how microgravity will affect the behavior of Ga, the authors conducted an experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared the observed phase change temperature with earth-based measurements. This paper also provides a brief description of the experiment hardware, microgravity considerations, and the pre-flight, flight and post-flight data analysis.

  9. Unique melting behavior in phase-change materials for rewritable data storage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhimei; Zhou, Jian; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2007-02-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a technologically very important phase-change material for rewritable optical and electrical storage because it can be switched rapidly back and forth between amorphous and crystalline states for millions of cycles by appropriate pulsed heating. However, an understanding of this complicated phenomenon has not yet been achieved. Here, by ab initio molecular dynamics, we unravel the reversible phase transition process of GST. The melting of rocksalt-structured GST is unique in that it forms two-dimensional linear or tangled clusters while keeping order in the perpendicular direction. It is this specific character that results in the fast and reversible phase transition between amorphous and crystalline and hence rewritable data storage. PMID:17358874

  10. Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Michael J.; Zalden, Peter; Chen, Frank; Weems, Ben; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Xiong, Feng; Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Pop, Eric; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2014-06-23

    The time-resolved ultrafast electric field-driven response of crystalline and amorphous GeSbTe films has been measured all-optically, pumping with single-cycle terahertz pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Utilizing the near-band-gap transmission as a probe of the electronic and structural response below the switching threshold, we observe a field-induced heating of the carrier system and resolve the picosecond-time-scale energy relaxation processes and their dependence on the sample annealing condition in the crystalline phase. In the amorphous phase, an instantaneous electroabsorption response is observed, quadratic in the terahertz field, followed by field-driven lattice heating, with Ohmic behavior up to 200 kV/cm.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Three-Dimensional Fluid Flow with Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esmaeeli, Asghar; Arpaci, Vedat

    1999-01-01

    We present a numerical method to compute phase change dynamics of three-dimensional deformable bubbles. The full Navier-Stokes and energy equations are solved for both phases by a front tracking/finite difference technique. The fluid boundary is explicitly tracked by discrete points that are connected by triangular elements to form a front that is used to keep the stratification of material properties sharp and to calculate the interfacial source terms. Two simulations are presented to show robustness of the method in handling complex phase boundaries. In the first case, growth of a vapor bubble in zero gravity is studied where large volume increase of the bubble is managed by adaptively increasing the front resolution. In the second case, growth of a bubble under high gravity is studied where indentation at the rear of the bubble results in a region of large curvature which challenges the front tracking in three dimensions.

  12. Phase-change material-based nanoantennas with tunable radiation patterns.

    PubMed

    Alaee, R; Albooyeh, M; Tretyakov, S; Rockstuhl, C

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel switchable plasmonic dipole nanoantenna operating at mid-infrared frequencies that exploits phase-change materials. We show that the induced dipole moments of a nanoantenna, where a germanium antimony telluride (Ge3Sb2Te6 or GST for short) nanopatch acts as a spacer between two coupled metallic nanopatches, can be controlled in a disruptive sense. By switching GST between its crystalline and amorphous phases, the nanoantenna can exhibit either an electric or a balanced magneto-electric dipole-like radiation. While the former radiation pattern is omnidirectional, the latter is directive. Based on this property exciting switching devices can be perceived, such as a metasurface whose functionality can be switched between an absorber and a reflector. The switching between stable amorphous and crystalline phases occurs on timescales of nanoseconds and can be achieved by an electrical or optical pulse. PMID:27607982

  13. Heat transfer enhancement for thermal energy storage using metal foams embedded within phase change materials (PCMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.Y.; Lu, W.; Tian, Y.

    2010-08-15

    In this paper the experimental investigation on the solid/liquid phase change (melting and solidification) processes have been carried out. Paraffin wax RT58 is used as phase change material (PCM), in which metal foams are embedded to enhance the heat transfer. During the melting process, the test samples are electrically heated on the bottom surface with a constant heat flux. The PCM with metal foams has been heated from the solid state to the pure liquid phase. The temperature differences between the heated wall and PCM have been analysed to examine the effects of heat flux and metal foam structure (pore size and relative density). Compared to the results of the pure PCM sample, the effect of metal foam on solid/liquid phase change heat transfer is very significant, particularly at the solid zone of PCMs. When the PCM starts melting, natural convection can improve the heat transfer performance, thereby reducing the temperature difference between the wall and PCM. The addition of metal foam can increase the overall heat transfer rate by 3-10 times (depending on the metal foam structures and materials) during the melting process (two-phase zone) and the pure liquid zone. The tests for investigating the solidification process under different cooling conditions (e.g. natural convection and forced convection) have been carried out. The results show that the use of metal foams can make the sample solidified much faster than pure PCM samples, evidenced by the solidification time being reduced by more than half. In addition, a two-dimensional numerical analysis has been carried out for heat transfer enhancement in PCMs by using metal foams, and the prediction results agree reasonably well with the experimental data. (author)

  14. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Gas Taylor Flows incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.; Walsh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the heat transfer characteristics associated with liquid-gas Taylor flows in mini channels incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM). Taylor flows have been shown to result in heat transfer enhancements due to the fluid recirculation experienced within liquid slugs which is attributable to the alternating liquid slug and gas bubble flow structure. Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) also offer significant potential with increased thermal capacity due to the latent heat required to cause phase change. The primary aim of this work was to examine the overall heat transfer potential associated with combining these two novel liquid cooling technologies. By investigating the local heat transfer characteristics, the augmentation/degradation over single phase liquid cooling was quantified while examining the effects of dimensionless variables, including Reynolds number, liquid slug length and gas void fraction. An experimental test facility was developed which had a heated test section and allowed MPCM-air Taylor flows to be subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. Infrared thermography was used to record high resolution experimental wall temperature measurements and determine local heat transfer coefficients from the thermal entrance point. 30.2% mass particle concentration of the MPCM suspension fluid was examined as it provided the maximum latent heat for absorption. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in experimental wall temperatures associated with MPCM-air Taylor flows when compared with the Graetz solution for conventional single phase coolants. Total enhancement in the thermally developed region is observed to be a combination of the individual contributions due to recirculation within the liquid slugs and also absorption of latent heat. Overall, the study highlights the potential heat transfer enhancements that are attainable within heat exchange devices employing MPCM

  15. Initial Droplet Size Impacts pH-Induced Structural Changes in Phase-Separated Polymer Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Thongkaew, Chutima; Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of pH change on the morphology of whey protein isolate (WPI)-pectin dispersions obtained from phase-separated systems after mild shear was studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mixing speed on the initial particle size of biopolymer complexes and their structure morphology after sequentially changing the pH. Therefore, solutions of WPI and pectin were combined at pH 6.1, allowed to phase separate and were then mildly homogenized at 50, 100, and 150 rpm, respectively, to form a dispersion containing differently sized WPI droplets in a surrounding pectin-rich phase. Each dispersion was then subjected to a pH change, such as 6.1 to 5.2 and 3.2, by slowly adding hydrochloric acid. The systems morphology, size, appearance, rheology, and storage stability was then characterized by optical microscopy, static light scattering, visual inspections, and steady shear rheometry to gain insights into the structural rearrangements. Results indicated substantial changes in the structure of the dispersion when the pH was changed. Formation of core-shell structures from the WPI droplets was observed at an intermediate pH. There, initial droplet size was found to affect structures formed, that is, core-shell type particles would only form if droplets were large (>1.5 μm) prior to pH change. Insights gained may be of importance to food manufacturers intending to create new structures from mixtures of proteins and carbohydrates. PMID:27061600

  16. Flexible one diode-one phase change memory array enabled by block copolymer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Mun, Beom Ho; You, Byoung Kuk; Yang, Se Ryeun; Yoo, Hyeon Gyun; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Woon Ik; Yin, You; Byun, Myunghwan; Jung, Yeon Sik; Lee, Keon Jae

    2015-04-28

    Flexible memory is the fundamental component for data processing, storage, and radio frequency communication in flexible electronic systems. Among several emerging memory technologies, phase-change random-access memory (PRAM) is one of the strongest candidate for next-generation nonvolatile memories due to its remarkable merits of large cycling endurance, high speed, and excellent scalability. Although there are a few approaches for flexible phase-change memory (PCM), high reset current is the biggest obstacle for the practical operation of flexible PCM devices. In this paper, we report a flexible PCM realized by incorporating nanoinsulators derived from a Si-containing block copolymer (BCP) to significantly lower the operating current of the flexible memory formed on plastic substrate. The reduction of thermal stress by BCP nanostructures enables the reliable operation of flexible PCM devices integrated with ultrathin flexible diodes during more than 100 switching cycles and 1000 bending cycles. PMID:25826001

  17. Study on WSb3Te material for phase-change memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yun; Zhou, Xilin; Han, Peigao; Song, Zhitang; Wu, Liangcai; Zhu, Chengqiu; Guo, Wenjing; Xu, Ling; Ma, Zhongyuan; Song, Lianke

    2015-11-01

    The phase-change performance of WxSb3Te material were systemically investigated by in situ resistance-temperature measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering, adhesive strength test and transmission electron microscope (TEM) in this paper. Experimental results show that the thermal stability of Sb3Te was increased significantly with W doping. XRD and TEM results prove that the incorporation of W plays a role in suppressing the crystallization of Sb3Te films, causing smaller grain size. Furthermore, the adhesive strength between W electrode and phase-change material was increased obviously by W addition and a relatively rapid SET/RESET operation of 10 ns is realized with large sensing margin.

  18. High thermal stable and fast switching Ni-Ge-Te alloy for phase change memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangliang; Wu, Liangcai; Zhu, Wenqing; Ji, Xinglong; Zheng, Yonghui; Song, Zhitang; Rao, Feng; Song, Sannian; Ma, Zhongyuan; Xu, Ling

    2015-12-01

    Ni-Ge-Te phase change material is proposed and investigated for phase change memory (PCM) applications. With Ni addition, the crystallization temperature, the data retention ability, and the crystallization speed are remarkably improved. The Ni-Ge-Te material has a high crystallization temperature (250 °C) and good data retention ability (149 °C). A reversible switching between SET and RESET state can be achieved by an electrical pulse as short as 6 ns. Up to ˜3 × 104 SET/RESET cycles are obtained with a resistance ratio of about two orders of magnitude. All of these demonstrate that Ni-Ge-Te alloy is a promising material for high speed and high temperature PCM applications.

  19. Dynamic control of light emission faster than the lifetime limit using VO2 phase-change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueff, Sébastien; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, You; Wong, Franklin J.; Kurvits, Jonathan A.; Ramanathan, Shriram; Zia, Rashid

    2015-10-01

    Modulation is a cornerstone of optical communication, and as such, governs the overall speed of data transmission. Currently, the two main strategies for modulating light are direct modulation of the excited emitter population (for example, using semiconductor lasers) and external optical modulation (for example, using Mach-Zehnder interferometers or ring resonators). However, recent advances in nanophotonics offer an alternative approach to control spontaneous emission through modifications to the local density of optical states. Here, by leveraging the phase-change of a vanadium dioxide nanolayer, we demonstrate broadband all-optical direct modulation of 1.5 μm emission from trivalent erbium ions more than three orders of magnitude faster than their excited state lifetime. This proof-of-concept demonstration shows how integration with phase-change materials can transform widespread phosphorescent materials into high-speed optical sources that can be integrated in monolithic nanoscale devices for both free-space and on-chip communication.

  20. Toward the ultimate limit of phase change in Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5).

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Krbal, M; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Tominaga, J; Uruga, T; Tanida, H

    2010-02-10

    The limit to which the phase change memory material Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) can be scaled toward the smallest possible memory cell is investigated using structural and optical methodologies. The encapsulation material surrounding the Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) has an increasingly dominant effect on the material's ability to change phase, and a profound increase in the crystallization temperature is observed when the Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) layer is less than 6 nm thick. We have found that the increased crystallization temperature originates from compressive stress exerted from the encapsulation material. By minimizing the stress, we have maintained the bulk crystallization temperature in Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) films just 2 nm thick. PMID:20041706

  1. Electronic Transport properties of SET and REST states of interfacial phase-change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hisao; Tominaga, Junji; Asai, Yoshihiro; Rungger, Ivan; Narayan, Awadhesh; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    The phase change memory (PCM) is one of most promising nonvolatile information storage technologies. Recently, the superlattice structure of GeTe/Sb2Te3 is proposed as PCM to reduce the restive switching energy. This PCM is called interfacial PCM (iPCM) and it is considered that SET and RESET states are realized only by the flip-flop transition of Ge atoms in crystal phase because of small loss of entropy. Furthermore, the GeTe is sandwiched by Sb2Te3 topological insulator. In this study, we performed the first principles electric transport calculations including spin-orbit interactions. We presents the mechanism of resistive switch by the transition of Ge atoms as well as the volume change effect and the role of spin-orbit interaction to resistance ration of SET and RESE states.

  2. Dynamic control of light emission faster than the lifetime limit using VO2 phase-change.

    PubMed

    Cueff, Sébastien; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, You; Wong, Franklin J; Kurvits, Jonathan A; Ramanathan, Shriram; Zia, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Modulation is a cornerstone of optical communication, and as such, governs the overall speed of data transmission. Currently, the two main strategies for modulating light are direct modulation of the excited emitter population (for example, using semiconductor lasers) and external optical modulation (for example, using Mach-Zehnder interferometers or ring resonators). However, recent advances in nanophotonics offer an alternative approach to control spontaneous emission through modifications to the local density of optical states. Here, by leveraging the phase-change of a vanadium dioxide nanolayer, we demonstrate broadband all-optical direct modulation of 1.5 μm emission from trivalent erbium ions more than three orders of magnitude faster than their excited state lifetime. This proof-of-concept demonstration shows how integration with phase-change materials can transform widespread phosphorescent materials into high-speed optical sources that can be integrated in monolithic nanoscale devices for both free-space and on-chip communication. PMID:26489436

  3. Energy-Efficient Phase-Change Memory with Graphene as a Thermal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chiyui; Fong, Scott W; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Seunghyun; Sood, Aditya; Neumann, Christopher M; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E; Pop, Eric; Wong, H-S Philip

    2015-10-14

    Phase-change memory (PCM) is an important class of data storage, yet lowering the programming current of individual devices is known to be a significant challenge. Here we improve the energy-efficiency of PCM by placing a graphene layer at the interface between the phase-change material, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), and the bottom electrode (W) heater. Graphene-PCM (G-PCM) devices have ∼40% lower RESET current compared to control devices without the graphene. This is attributed to the graphene as an added interfacial thermal resistance which helps confine the generated heat inside the active PCM volume. The G-PCM achieves programming up to 10(5) cycles, and the graphene could further enhance the PCM endurance by limiting atomic migration or material segregation at the bottom electrode interface. PMID:26308280

  4. An experimental investigation of convection in a fluid that exhibits phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Convection flows were systematically observed in a layer of fluid between two isothermal horizontal boundaries. The working fluid was a nematic liquid crystal, which exhibits a liquid-liquid phase change at which latent heat is released and the density changed. In addition to ordinary Rayleigh-Benard convection when either phase is present alone, there exist two types of convective motions initiated by the unstable density difference. When a thin layer of heavy fluid is present near the top boundary, hexagons with downgoing centers exist with no imposed thermal gradient. When a thin layer of light fluid is brought on near the lower boundary, the hexagons have upshooting centers. In both cases, the motions are kept going once they are initiated by the instability due to release of latent heat. Relation of the results to applicable theories is discussed.

  5. Pr-based metallic glass films used as resist for phase-change lithography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Teng; Li, Zhen; He, Qiang; Miao, Xiangshui

    2016-03-21

    Metallic glass film of Pr60Al10Ni10Cu20 is proposed to be used as a resist of phase-change lithography (PCL). PCL is a mask-less lithography technology by using laser-direct-writing to create the intended nanopatterns. Thermal distribution in the PrAlNiCu film after exposure is calculated by finite element method (FEM). Thin films are exposed by continuous-wave laser and selective etched by nitric-acid solution, and the patterns are discerned by optical and atomic force microscope. The etching rate of as-deposited PrAlNiCu is thus nearly five times of the crystalline film. These results indicate that PrAlNiCu metallic glass film is a promising resist for phase-change lithography. PMID:27136773

  6. Characterization of a lime-pozzolan plaster containing phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Černý, Robert

    2015-03-10

    A PCM (Phase Change Material) modified lime-pozzolan plaster for improvement of thermal energy storage of building envelopes is studied in the paper. The investigated plaster is composed of lime hydrate, pozzolan admixture based on metakaolin and mudstone, silica sand, water and paraffin wax encapsulated in polymer capsule. The reference plaster without PCM application is studied as well. The analyzed materials are characterized by bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive strength and pore size distribution. The temperature of phase change, heat of fusion and crystallization are studied using DSC (Difference Scanning Calorimetry) analysis performed in air atmosphere. In order to get information on materials hygrothermal performance, determination of thermal and hygric properties is done in laboratory conditions. Experimental data reveal a substantial improvement of heat storage capacity of PCM-modified plaster as compared to the reference material without PCM.

  7. The effect of Ta interface on the crystallization of amorphous phase change material thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, G. E.; Noé, P. Marra, M.; Sabbione, C.; Fillot, F.; Bernier, N.; Ferrand, J.; Maîtrejean, S.; Hippert, F.

    2014-06-02

    The crystallization of amorphous GeTe and Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase change material films, with thickness between 10 and 100 nm, sandwiched between either Ta or SiO{sub 2} layers, was investigated by optical reflectivity. Ta cladding layers were found to increase the crystallization temperature, even for films as thick as 100 nm. X-Ray diffraction investigations of crystallized GeTe films showed a very weak texture in Ta cladded films, in contrast with the strong texture observed for SiO{sub 2} cladding layers. This study shows that crystallization mechanism of phase change materials can be highly impacted by interface effects, even for relatively thick films.

  8. Quantification of unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zheyan; Hu, Hui

    2009-05-01

    We report progress made in our recent effort to develop and implement a novel, lifetime-based molecular tagging thermometry (MTT) technique to quantify unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets pertinent to wind turbine icing phenomena. The lifetime-based MTT technique was used to achieve temporally and spatially resolved temperature distribution measurements within small, convectively cooled water droplets to quantify unsteady heat transfer within the small water droplets in the course of convective cooling process. The transient behavior of phase changing process within small icing water droplets was also revealed clearly by using the MTT technique. Such measurements are highly desirable to elucidate underlying physics to improve our understanding about important microphysical phenomena pertinent to ice formation and accreting process as water droplets impinging onto wind turbine blades. PMID:19485525

  9. Lateral conduction effects on heat-transfer data obtained with the phase-change paint technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maise, G.; Rossi, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized tool, CAPE, (Conduction Analysis Program using Eigenvalues) has been developed to account for lateral heat conduction in wind tunnel models in the data reduction of the phase-change paint technique. The tool also accounts for the effects of finite thickness (thin wings) and surface curvature. A special reduction procedure using just one time of melt is also possible on leading edges. A novel iterative numerical scheme was used, with discretized spatial coordinates but analytic integration in time, to solve the inverse conduction problem involved in the data reduction. A yes-no chart is provided which tells the test engineer when various corrections are large enough so that CAPE should be used. The accuracy of the phase-change paint technique in the presence of finite thickness and lateral conduction is also investigated.

  10. Engineering of chalcogenide materials for embedded applications of Phase Change Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliani, Paola; Palumbo, Elisabetta; Borghi, Massimo; Dalla Libera, Giovanna; Annunziata, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Phase Change Memory technology can be a real breakthrough for process cost saving and performances for embedded applications. The feasibility at 90 nm technology node has been solidly proven in an industrial environment and the added value of this solution demonstrated. Nevertheless, for specific applications some improvement in High Temperature Data Retention (HTDR) characteristics is needed. In this work we present the engineering of chalcogenide materials in order to increase the stability of RESET state as a function of temperature. This goal has been achieved by exploring Ge-rich compounds in the Ge-Sb-Te ternary diagram. In particular, an optimized GexSbyTez Phase Change material, able to guarantee code integrity of the memory content after soldering thermal profile and data retention in extended temperature range has been obtained. Extrapolation of data retention at 10 years for temperatures higher than 150 °C cell-level has been demonstrated, thus enabling automotive applications.

  11. Age-dependent change in executive function and gamma 40 Hz phase synchrony.

    PubMed

    Paul, Robert H; Clark, C Richard; Lawrence, Jeffrey; Goldberg, Elkhonon; Williams, Leanne M; Cooper, Nicholas; Cohen, Ronald A; Brickman, Adam M; Gordon, Evian

    2005-03-01

    Decline in cognitive function is well recognized, yet few neurophysiological correlates of age-related cognitive decline have been identified. In this study we examined the impact of age on neurocognitive function and Gamma phase synchrony among 550 normal subjects (aged 11-70). Gamma phase synchrony was acquired to targets in the auditory oddball paradigm. The two tasks of executive function were switching of attention and an electronic maze. Subjects were divided into four age groups, which were balanced for sex. We hypothesized that reduced cognitive performance among older healthy individuals would be associated with age-related changes in gamma phase synchrony. Results showed a significant decrease in executive function in the oldest (51-70 years) age group. ANOVAs of age-by-frontal Gamma synchrony also showed a significant effect of age on Gamma phase synchrony in the left frontal region that corresponded modestly to the age effect found on executive task performance, with reduced performance associated with increased gamma synchrony. The results indicate that age-related changes in cognitive function evident among elderly individuals may in part be related to decreased ability to integrate information and this may be reflected as a compensatory increase in gamma synchrony in frontal regions of the brain. PMID:16035141

  12. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  13. Measurement of crystal growth velocity in a melt-quenched phase-change material

    PubMed Central

    Salinga, Martin; Carria, Egidio; Kaldenbach, Andreas; Bornhöfft, Manuel; Benke, Julia; Mayer, Joachim; Wuttig, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Phase-change materials are the basis for next-generation memory devices and reconfigurable electronics, but fundamental understanding of the unconventional kinetics of their phase transitions has been hindered by challenges in the experimental quantification. Here we obtain deeper understanding based on the temperature dependence of the crystal growth velocity of the phase-change material AgInSbTe, as derived from laser-based time-resolved reflectivity measurements. We observe a strict Arrhenius behaviour for the growth velocity over eight orders of magnitude (from ~10 nm s−1 to ~1 m s−1). This can be attributed to the formation of a glass at elevated temperatures because of rapid quenching of the melt. Further, the temperature dependence of the viscosity is derived, which reveals that the supercooled liquid phase must have an extremely high fragility (>100). Finally, the new experimental evidence leads to an interpretation, which comprehensively explains existing data from various different experiments reported in literature. PMID:23986035

  14. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-10-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices.

  15. In-situ crystallization of GeTe\\GaSb phase change memory stacked films

    SciTech Connect

    Velea, A.; Borca, C. N.; Grolimund, D.; Socol, G.; Galca, A. C.; Popescu, M.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2014-12-21

    Single and double layer phase change memory structures based on GeTe and GaSb thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Their crystallization behavior was studied using in-situ synchrotron techniques. Electrical resistance vs. temperature investigations, using the four points probe method, showed transition temperatures of 138 °C and 198 °C for GeTe and GaSb single films, respectively. It was found that after GeTe crystallization in the stacked films, Ga atoms from the GaSb layer diffused in the vacancies of the GeTe crystalline structure. Therefore, the crystallization temperature of the Sb-rich GaSb layer is decreased by more than 30 °C. Furthermore, at 210 °C, the antimony excess from GaSb films crystallizes as a secondary phase. At higher annealing temperatures, the crystalline Sb phase increased on the expense of GaSb crystalline phase which was reduced. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Ga and Ge K-edges revealed changes in their local atomic environments as a function of the annealing temperature. Simulations unveil a tetrahedral configuration in the amorphous state and octahedral configuration in the crystalline state for Ge atoms, while Ga is four-fold coordinated in both as-deposited and annealed samples.

  16. Numerical solution for melting of unfixed rectangular phase-change material under low-gravity environment

    SciTech Connect

    Asako, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Faghri, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Charmchi, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Bahrami, P.A. )

    1994-02-01

    An enthalpy method is employed to solve transport processes associated with melting of an unfixed rectangular phase change material (PCM) in a low-gravitational environment. This method permits the phase-change problems to be solved within fixed numerical grids, hence eliminating the need for coordinate transformation. The PCM, initially at its melting temperature, is placed inside a rectangular enclosure. The lower surface of the container is then exposed to a uniform temperature higher than the PCM melting temperature. The difference in densities of solid and liquid causes a force imbalance on the solid phase exceeds that of the liquid, the solid continually moves downward as melting progresses and hence generates a flow field within the liquid. The problem is formulated as a one-domain problem with the possibility of melting from all the PCM surfaces, and no approximation is made about the liquid film thickness under the melt. The governing equations are discretized by using a control-volume-based finite difference scheme with a new iterative method to correct for the downward solid-phase velocity. This will also speed up the convergence of the numerical procedure. The results are presented in the form of a parametric study of the effects of Archimedes number, Stefan number, Prandtl number, and the geometric parameters on the melt thickness, the downward solid velocity, the elevation of the top surface, and the volume of the solid PCM. They show that in a low-gravitational environment, the melting rate is very slow.

  17. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M Q; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  18. Understanding the early cycling evolution behaviors for phase change memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuchan; Chen, Yifeng; Cai, Daolin; Cheng, Yan; Chen, Xiaogang; Wang, Yueqing; Xia, Mengjiao; Zhou, Mi; Li, Gezi; Zhang, Yiyun; Gao, Dan; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Gaoming

    2014-11-01

    The RESET current of T-shaped phase change memory cells with 35 nm heating electrodes has been studied to understand the behavior of early cycling evolution. Results show that the RESET current has been significantly reduced after the early cycling evolution (1st RESET) operation. Compared the transmission electron microscope images, it is found that the hexagonal Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) crystal grains are changed into the grains with face centered cubic structure after the early cycling evolution operation, which is taken as the major reason for the reduced RESET current, confirmed by a two-dimensional finite analysis and ab initio calculations.

  19. Role of Activation Energy in Resistance Drift of Amorphous Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Dellen, Christian; Salinga, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The time evolution of the resistance of amorphous thin films of the phase change materials Ge2Sb2Te5, GeTe and AgIn-Sb2Te is measured during annealing at T=80°C. The annealing process is interrupted by several fast temperature dips to determine the changing temperature dependence of the resistance. This procedure enables us to identify to what extent the resistance increase over time can be traced back to an increase in activation energy EA or to a rise of the prefactor R*. We observe that, depending on the material, the dominating contribution to the increase in resistance during annealing can be either a change in activation energy (Ge2Sb2Te5) or a change in prefactor (AgIn-Sb2Te). In the case of GeTe, both contribute about equally. We conclude that any phenomenological model for the resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials that is based on the increase of one parameter alone (e.g. the activation energy) cannot claim general validity.

  20. Super energy saver heat pump with dynamic hybrid phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Ally, Moonis Raza [Oak Ridge, TN; Tomlinson, John Jager [Knoxville, TN; Rice, Clifford Keith [Clinton, TN

    2010-07-20

    A heat pump has a refrigerant loop, a compressor in fluid communication with the refrigerant loop, at least one indoor heat exchanger in fluid communication with the refrigerant loop, and at least one outdoor heat exchanger in fluid communication with the refrigerant loop. The at least one outdoor heat exchanger has a phase change material in thermal communication with the refrigerant loop and in fluid communication with an outdoor environment. Other systems, devices, and methods are described.

  1. Beam quality changes of radially and azimuthally polarized fields propagating through quartic phase plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Herrero, R.; Piquero, G.; Mejías, P. M.

    2008-02-01

    In terms of the so-called irradiance moments of a light field, the beam quality change, Δ Q, of radially and azimuthally polarized beams caused by propagation through a quartic phase plate (as occurs, for example, in strongly pumped laser rods used in high-power solid-state lasers) is studied. Analytical expressions for Δ Q are given, and a comparison between the scalar and vectorial regimes is also shown. The results are applied to several cases of interest.

  2. Observed phase changes and the random sequential packing model for elections in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yoshiaki; Ueda, Sumie

    2000-08-01

    In Japan the nomination of candidates by some political parties in each constituency seems to have been often performed like car-parking in a street, which explains the territory making behaviour for each candidate. The car-parking model is a one-dimensional sequential packing model. We apply this model to the election data for the House of Councillors and the House of Representatives. We observe phase changes for the election data of the House of Councillors.

  3. Threshold switching uniformity in In2Se3 nanowire-based phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Du, Gang; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2015-05-01

    The uniformity of threshold voltage and threshold current in the In2Se3 nanowire-based phase change memory (PCM) devices is investigated. Based on the trap-limited transport model, amorphous layer thickness, trap density, and trap depth are considered to clarify their influences upon the threshold voltage and threshold current through simulations. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00604).

  4. Phase changes in nickel clusters from an embedded-atom potential

    SciTech Connect

    Guevenc, Z.B.; Jellinek, J. ); Voter, A.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The meltinglike behavior of Ni{sub n}, n=12,13,14,19 clusters is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The cohesion in clusters is modelled by an embedded-atom potential incorporating many-body effects. The features of the phase change transition derived are compared to those obtained earlier from pairwise interactions and a different many-body (Gupta-like) potential. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Fabrication of phase-change Ge2Sb2Te5 nano-rings.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng Hung; Tseng, Ming Lun; Shiue, Chiun Da; Chen, Shuan Wei; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Mansuripur, Masud; Tsai, Din Ping

    2011-06-20

    Phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 rings with nanometer-scale thickness have been fabricated using the photo-thermal effect of a focused laser beam followed by differential chemical etching. Laser irradiation conditions and etching process parameters are varied to control the geometric characteristics of the rings. We demonstrate the possibility of arranging the rings in specific geometric patterns, and also their release from the original substrate. PMID:21716507

  6. Fast nanoscale heat-flux modulation with phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zwol, P. J.; Joulain, K.; Ben Abdallah, P.; Greffet, J. J.; Chevrier, J.

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a concept for electrically controlled heat-flux modulation. A flux contrast larger than 10 dB is expected with switching time on the order of tens of nanoseconds. Heat-flux modulation is based on the interplay between radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale and phase-change materials. Such large contrasts are not obtainable in solids, or in far field. As such, this opens up new horizons for temperature modulation and actuation at the nanoscale.

  7. Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-03-01

    A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

  8. Phase changes in selected Lennard-Jones X13-nYn clusters.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Dubravko; Predescu, Cristian; Doll, J D; Freeman, David L

    2004-07-01

    Detailed studies of the thermodynamic properties of selected binary Lennard-Jones clusters of the type X13-nYn (where n=1, 2, 3) are presented. The total energy, heat capacity, and first derivative of the heat capacity as a function of temperature are calculated by using the classical and path integral Monte Carlo methods combined with the parallel tempering technique. A modification in the phase change phenomena from the presence of impurity atoms and quantum effects is investigated. PMID:15260616

  9. A fixed grid numerical methodology for phase change problems involving a moving heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, C.; Samonds, M.; Singhal, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical method for solving phase change problems involving a moving heat source is presented and illustrated by a two-dimensional example. The method uses a fixed grid and does not require the implementation of the Stefan condition at the solid-liquid interface; the procedure can thus be easily implemented using existing fixed grid codes. The problem considered as an example involves natural convection flow in the molten metal during tungsten inert gas welding.

  10. Two dopamine receptors play different roles in phase change of the migratory locust

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojiao; Ma, Zongyuan; Kang, Le

    2015-01-01

    The migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, shows remarkable phenotypic plasticity at behavioral, physiological, and morphological levels in response to fluctuation in population density. Our previous studies demonstrated that dopamine (DA) and the genes in the dopamine metabolic pathway mediate phase change in Locusta. However, the functions of different dopamine receptors in modulating locust phase change have not been fully explored. In the present study, DA concentration in the brain increased during crowding and decreased during isolation. The expression level of dopamine receptor 1 (Dop1) increased from 1 to 4 h of crowding, but remained unchanged during isolation. Injection of Dop1 agonist SKF38393 into the brains of solitary locusts promoted gregarization, induced conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion. RNAi knockdown of Dop1 and injection of antagonist SCH23390 in gregarious locusts induced solitary behavior, promoted the shift to repulsion-response and reduced locomotion. By contrast, the expression level of dopamine receptor 2 (Dop2) gradually increased during isolation, but remained stable during crowding. During the isolation of gregarious locusts, injection of Dop2 antagonist S(–)-sulpiride or RNAi knockdown of Dop2 inhibited solitarization, maintained conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion; by comparison, the isolated controls displayed conspecific repulsion-response and weaker motility. Activation of Dop2 in solitary locusts through injection of agonist, R(-)-TNPA, did not affect their behavioral state. Thus, DA-Dop1 signaling in the brain of Locusta induced the gregariousness, whereas DA-Dop2 signaling mediated the solitariness. Our study demonstrated that Dop1 and Dop2 modulated locust phase change in two different directions. Further investigation of Locusta Dop1 and Dop2 functions in modulating phase change will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying phenotypic plasticity in locusts

  11. VOF Method for Simulation of Multiphase Incompressible Flows with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. P.; Ni, M. J.; Ma, H. Y.

    2011-09-01

    A volume-of-fluid method for simulation of incompressible multiphase flows with phase change is studied. We have simulated a series of processes of the vapor bubble deformation in a three-dimensional film boiling using volume of fluid (VOF) method, which include the generation, detachment and rising deformation of the bubble. Our numerical results show that the VOF method is a useful method to handle complex deformation of the liquid-vapor interface during film boiling.

  12. Change dynamics of RBC morphology after injection glucose for diabetes by diffraction phase microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaykova, N. A.; Kalyanov, A. L.; Lychagov, V. V.; Ryabukho, V. P.; Malinova, L. I.

    2013-11-01

    Experimental setup of diffraction phase microscope (DPM) with double low-coherence lighting system is presented in the paper. Algorithm of interference picture processing and optical thickness, height, volume and mean cells volume (MCV) of RBC calculating is shown. We demonstrate results of experiments with blood smears and ability of the method to calculate 3D model of the biological cells shape. Investigation change dynamics of RBC morphology after injection glucose for diabetes by DPM is shown in the paper.

  13. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Yabashi, Makina; Wall, Simon; Brewe, Dale; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms the existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. This newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies. PMID:26868451

  14. Characteristics of phase-change materials containing oxide nano-additives for thermal storage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors report the production of nanocomposite-enhanced phase-change materials (NEPCMs) using the direct-synthesis method by mixing paraffin with alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), silica (SiO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO) as the experimental samples. Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and ZnO were dispersed into three concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 wt.%. Through heat conduction and differential scanning calorimeter experiments to evaluate the effects of varying concentrations of the nano-additives on the heat conduction performance and thermal storage characteristics of NEPCMs, their feasibility for use in thermal storage was determined. The experimental results demonstrate that TiO2 is more effective than the other additives in enhancing both the heat conduction and thermal storage performance of paraffin for most of the experimental parameters. Furthermore, TiO2 reduces the melting onset temperature and increases the solidification onset temperature of paraffin. This allows the phase-change heat to be applicable to a wider temperature range, and the highest decreased ratio of phase-change heat is only 0.46%, compared to that of paraffin. Therefore, this study demonstrates that TiO2, added to paraffin to form NEPCMs, has significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of paraffin. PMID:23127224

  15. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  16. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Yabashi, Makina; Wall, Simon; Brewe, Dale; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms the existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. This newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies.

  17. Topological insulating in GeTe/Sb2Te3 phase-change superlattice.

    PubMed

    Sa, Baisheng; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Zhimei; Tominaga, Junji; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2012-08-31

    GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattice phase-change memory devices demonstrated greatly improved performance over that of Ge2Sb2Te5, a prototype record media for phase-change random access memory. In this work, we show that this type of GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattice exhibits topological insulating behavior on the basis of ab initio calculations. The analysis of the band structures and parities as well as Z2 topological invariants unravels the topological insulating nature in these artificial materials. Furthermore, the topological insulating character remains in the GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattice under small compressive strains, whereas it is not observed as more Sb2Te3 building blocks introduced in the superlattice. The present results show that multifunctional data storages may be achieved in the GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattice. Such kinds of artificial materials can be used in phase-change random access memory, spintronics, and quantum computing. PMID:23002870

  18. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Yabashi, Makina; Wall, Simon; Brewe, Dale; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms the existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. This newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies. PMID:26868451

  19. Novel device structure for phase change memory toward low-current operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eunha; Kang, Nam Soo; Yang, Hyung-Jun; Sutou, Yuji; Song, Yun-Heub

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel device architecture for low set and reset currents in phase change random access memory (PCRAM). In this structure, the sidewall of phase-change film is contacted with the vertical heating layer. In particular, to realize a small contact area of under 50 nm2 for low reset current, this structure includes stacked layers consisting of extremely thin phase change material (PCM) and conduction films, the fabrication method of which is proposed. We estimated set and reset currents for the proposed structure by the device simulation method. Here, we confirmed that a contact area of 30 nm2 in this structure, where Ge2Sb2Te5 is used as PCM, provides a reset current of 13.5 µA and a set current of 4 µA, which are promising for the scaling down of PCM. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the thinner PCM in this structure provides less thermal disturbance to the neighboring cell. From the results, we expect this structure to be a promising candidate for a high-density nonvolatile memory architecture with PCM.

  20. A second-law study on packed bed energy storage systems utilizing phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, G.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Thermal modeling of packed bed, thermal energy storage systems has traditionally been limited to first-law considerations. The exceptions include a few second-law studies of sensible heat storage systems and the latent heat storage systems. The cited second-law studies treat the storage and removal processes essentially as batch heating and cooling. The approximation effectively ignores the significant temperature gradient, especially in the axial direction, in the storage medium over a substantial portion of both the storage and removal processes. The results presented in this paper are for a more comprehensive model of the packed bed storage system utilizing encapsulated phase-change materials. The fundamental equations for the system are similar to those of Schumann, except that a transient conduction equation is included for intraparticle conduction in each pellet. The equations are solved numerically, and the media temperatures obtained are used for the determination of the exergy (or availability) disposition in complete storage-removal cycles. One major conclusion of the study from both the first-law and second-law perspectives is that the principal advantage in the use of phase-change storage material is the enhanced storage capacity, compared with the same size of packed bed utilizing a sensible heat storage material. Thermodynamically, however, it does not appear that the system employing phase-change storage material will always, or necessarily, be superior to that using a sensible heat-storage material. The latter conclusion is reached only on the basis of the second-law evaluation.

  1. Phase Change Material Trade Study: A Comparison Between Wax and Water for Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Hodgson, Ed; Stephan, Ryan A,

    2011-01-01

    Phase change material heat sinks have been recognized as an important tool in optimizing thermal control systems for space exploration vehicles and habitats that must deal with widely varying thermal loads and environments. In order to better focus technology investment in this arena, NASA has supported a trade study with the objective of identifying where the best potential pay-off can be found among identified aqueous and paraffin wax phase change materials and phase change material heat sink design approaches. The study used a representative exploration mission with well understood parameters to support the trade. Additional sensitivity studies were performed to ensure the applicability of study results across varying systems and destinations. Results from the study indicate that replacing a wax PCM heat sink with a water ice PCM heat sink has the potential to decrease the equivalent system mass of the mission s vehicle through a combination of a smaller heat sink and a slight 5% increase in radiator size or the addition of a lightweight heat pump. An evaluation of existing and emerging PCM heat sink technologies indicates that further mass savings should be achievable through continued development of those technologies. The largest mass savings may be realized by eliminating the melting and freezing pressure of wax and water, respectively.

  2. Analyzing the texture changes in the quantitative phase maps of adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roitshtain, Darina; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Gefen, Amit; Shaked, Natan T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new analysis tool for studying texture changes in the quantitative phase maps of live cells acquired by wide-field interferometry. The sensitivity of wide-field interferometry systems to small changes in refractive index enables visualizing cells and inner cell organelles without the using fluorescent dyes or other cell-invasive approaches, which may affect the measurement and require external labeling. Our label-free texture-analysis tool is based directly on the optical path delay profile of the sample and does not necessitate decoupling refractive index and thickness in the cell quantitative phase profile; thus, relevant parameters can be calculated using a single-frame acquisition. Our experimental system includes low-coherence wide-field interferometer, combined with simultaneous florescence microscopy system for validation. We used this system and analysis tool for studying lipid droplets formation in adipocytes. The latter demonstration is relevant for various cellular functions such as lipid metabolism, protein storage and degradation to viral replication. These processes are functionally linked to several physiological and pathological conditions, including obesity and metabolic diseases. Quantification of these biological phenomena based on the texture changes in the cell phase map has a potential as a new cellular diagnosis tool.

  3. Automatic on-chip RNA-DNA hybridization assay with integrated phase change microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Xuan; Jiang, Hai; Wang, Junsheng; Chen, Shu; Cao, Honghe; Li, Dongqing

    2012-07-01

    An RNA-DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip integrated with electrothermally actuated phase change microvalves for detecting pathogenic bacteria is presented in this paper. In order to realize the sequential loading and washing processes required in such an assay, gravity-based pressure-driven flow and phase-change microvalves were used in the microfluidic chip. Paraffin wax was used as the phase change material in the valves and thin film heaters were used to electrothermally actuate microvalves. Light absorption measured by a photodetector to determine the concentrations of the samples. The automatic control of the complete assay was implemented by a self-coded LabVIEW program. To examine the performance of this chip, Salmonella was used as a sample pathogen. Significantly, reduction in reagent/sample consumption (up to 20 folds) was achieved by this on-chip assay, compared with using the commercial test kit following the same protocol in conventional labs. The experimental results show that the quantitative detection can be obtained in approximately 26 min, and the detection limit is as low as 103 CFU ml-1. This RNA-DNA hybridization assay microfluidic chip shows an excellent potential in the development of a portable device for point-of-testing applications.

  4. Threshold-voltage modulated phase change heterojunction for application of high density memory

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Baihan; Tong, Hao Qian, Hang; Miao, Xiangshui

    2015-09-28

    Phase change random access memory is one of the most important candidates for the next generation non-volatile memory technology. However, the ability to reduce its memory size is compromised by the fundamental limitations inherent in the CMOS technology. While 0T1R configuration without any additional access transistor shows great advantages in improving the storage density, the leakage current and small operation window limit its application in large-scale arrays. In this work, phase change heterojunction based on GeTe and n-Si is fabricated to address those problems. The relationship between threshold voltage and doping concentration is investigated, and energy band diagrams and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements are provided to explain the results. The threshold voltage is modulated to provide a large operational window based on this relationship. The switching performance of the heterojunction is also tested, showing a good reverse characteristic, which could effectively decrease the leakage current. Furthermore, a reliable read-write-erase function is achieved during the tests. Phase change heterojunction is proposed for high-density memory, showing some notable advantages, such as modulated threshold voltage, large operational window, and low leakage current.

  5. A study of the liquid-vapor phase change of mercury based on irreversible thermodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adt, R. R., Jr.; Hatsopoulos, G. N.; Bornhorst, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The object of this work is to determine the transport coefficients which appear in linear irreversible-thermodynamic rate equations of a phase change. An experiment which involves the steady-state evaporation of mercury was performed to measure the principal transport coefficient appearing in the mass-rate equation and the coupling transport coefficient appearing in both the mass-rate equation and the energy-rate equation. The principal transport coefficient sigma, usually termed the 'condensation' or 'evaporation' coefficient, is found to be approximately 0.9, which is higher than that measured previously in condensation-of-mercury experiments. The experimental value of the coupling coefficient K does not agree with the value predicted from Schrage's kinetic analysis of the phase change. A modified kinetic analysis in which the Onsager reciprocal law and the conservation laws are invoked is presented which removes this discrepancy but which shows that the use of Schrage's equation for predicting mass rates of phase change is a good approximation.

  6. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; et al

    2016-02-12

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms themore » existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. Furthermore, this newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies.« less

  7. Phase Change Material Trade Study: A Comparison Between Wax and Water for Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Hodgson, Ed; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Phase change material heat sinks have been recognized as an important tool in optimizing thermal control systems for space exploration vehicles and habitats that must deal with widely varying thermal loads and environments. In order to better focus technology investment in this arena, NASA has supported a trade study with the objective of identifying where the best potential pay-off can be found among identified aqueous and paraffin wax phase change materials and phase change material heat sink design approaches. The study used a representative exploration mission with well understood parameters to support the trade. Additional sensitivity studies were performed to ensure the applicability of study results across varying systems and destinations. Results from the study indicate that a water ice PCM heat sink has the potential to decrease the equivalent system mass of the mission s vehicle through a combination of a smaller heat sink and a slight 5% increase in radiator size or the addition of a lightweight heat pump. An evaluation of existing and emerging PCM heat sink technologies indicates that further significant mass savings should be achievable through continued development of those technologies. The largest mass savings may be realized by managing the location of the liquid and the solid in the heat sink to eliminate the melting and freezing pressure of wax and water, respectively, while also accommodating the high structural loads expected on future manned launch vehicles.

  8. Nanomechanical morphology of amorphous, transition, and crystalline domains in phase change memory thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, J. L.; Grishin, I.; Huey, B. D.; Kolosov, O. V.

    2014-09-01

    In the search for phase change materials (PCM) that may rival traditional random access memory, a complete understanding of the amorphous to crystalline phase transition is required. For the well-known Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) and GeTe (GT) chalcogenides, which display nucleation and growth dominated crystallization kinetics, respectively, this work explores the nanomechanical morphology of amorphous and crystalline phases in 50 nm thin films. Subjecting these PCM specimens to a lateral thermal gradient spanning the crystallization temperature allows for a detailed morphological investigation. Surface and depth-dependent analyses of the resulting amorphous, transition and crystalline regions are achieved with shallow angle cross-sections, uniquely implemented with beam exit Ar ion polishing. To resolve the distinct phases, ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) with simultaneous topography is implemented revealing a relative stiffness contrast between the amorphous and crystalline phases of 14% for the free film surface and 20% for the cross-sectioned surface. Nucleation is observed to occur preferentially at the PCM-substrate and free film interface for both GST and GT, while fine subsurface structures are found to be sputtering direction dependent. Combining surface and cross-section nanomechanical mapping in this manner allows 3D analysis of microstructure and defects with nanoscale lateral and depth resolution, applicable to a wide range of materials characterization studies where the detection of subtle variations in elastic modulus or stiffness are required.

  9. Phase change measurement, and speed of sound and attenuation determination, from underwater acoustic panel tests.

    PubMed

    Piquette, Jean C; Paolero, Anthony E

    2003-03-01

    A technique for measuring the change in phase produced by the insertion of a panel between a projector and receiver is described. Presented also is a procedure for determining the phase speed and attenuation of the panel material. Although the methods were developed over the frequency decade 10-100 kHz, they are not limited to that band. It was observed that a "settling time" of approximately 20 min is required to obtain reproducible phase measurements if the experiment is disturbed even slightly. For example, rotating the panel 10 degrees, then immediately returning to the original position, causes the observed phases to differ by up to 10 deg from those obtained prior to the disturbance. These differences are distributed randomly across frequency. Temperature stabilization within the medium as well as the material is also required before measurements can take place. After the stated 20 min settling time, however, the phases return to the values obtained prior to rotation, or after temperature stabilization, to within +/- 1/2 deg. The sound speed and attenuation determination technique employs least-squares fitting of a causal model to the measurements. Four (or fewer) adjusted parameters accommodate the measurements over the stated frequency decade, even for samples that exhibit significant dispersion. The sound speed is typically determined to an accuracy of +/- 30 m/s, as judged from a propagation-of-error calculation. This model assumes single-layered panels. PMID:12656386

  10. Microstructural change during (liquid phase sintering) of W-Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.K.; Eun, K.Y. ); Kang, S.L

    1989-05-01

    The changes of bulk density and microstructures during heating and liquid phase sintering of 98W-1Ni-1Fe compacts prepared from 1 and 5 {mu}m W powders have been observed in order to characterize the densification behavior. The compact prepared from a fine (1 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1200{degrees}C in the solid state during heating, attaining about 95 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature of 1460{degrees}C. The compact prepared from a coarse (5 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1400{degrees}C in the solid state, attaining about 87 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature. Thus, the skeleton of grains is already formed prior to liquid formation. During the isothermal liquid phase sintering, substantial grain growth occurs, and the liquid flows into both open and closed pores, filling them sequentially from the regions with small cross-sections. The grains subsequently grow into the liquid pockets which have been formed at the pore sites. The sequential pore filling by first liquid thus is shown to be the dominant densification process during the liquid phase sintering of this alloy.

  11. Refractive index modulation of Sb70Te30 phase-change thin films by multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Kai; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Minghui; Wu, Yiqun

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the controllable effective refractive index modulation of Sb70Te30 phase-change thin films between amorphous and crystalline states was achieved experimentally by multiple femtosecond laser pulses. The modulation mechanism was analyzed comprehensively by a spectral ellipsometer measurement, surface morphology observation, and two-temperature model calculations. We numerically demonstrate the application of the optically modulated refractive index of the phase-change thin films in a precisely adjustable color display. These results may provide further insights into ultrafast phase-transition mechanics and are useful in the design of programmable photonic and opto-electrical devices based on phase-change memory materials.

  12. Multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity: Fundamental research and strategic research for exploration of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is preparing to undertake science-driven exploration missions. The NASA Exploration Team's vision is a cascade of stepping stones. The stepping-stone will build the technical capabilities needed for each step with multi-use technologies and capabilities. An Agency-wide technology investment and development program is necessary to implement the vision. The NASA Exploration Team has identified a number of areas where significant advances are needed to overcome all engineering and medical barriers to the expansion of human space exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Closed-loop life support systems and advanced propulsion and power technologies are among the areas requiring significant advances from the current state-of-the-art. Studies conducted by the National Academy of Science's National Research Council and Workshops organized by NASA have shown that multiphase flow and phase change play a crucial role in many of these advanced technology concepts. Lack of understanding of multiphase flow, phase change, and interfacial phenomena in the microgravity environment has been a major hurdle. An understanding of multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity is, therefore, critical to advancing many technologies needed. Recognizing this, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) has initiated a strategic research thrust to augment the ongoing fundamental research in fluid physics and transport phenomena discipline with research especially aimed at understanding key multiphase flow related issues in propulsion, power, thermal control, and closed-loop advanced life support systems. A plan for integrated theoretical and experimental research that has the highest probability of providing data, predictive tools, and models needed by the systems developers to incorporate highly promising multiphase-based technologies is currently in preparation. This plan is being developed with inputs from scientific community, NASA mission planners and industry personnel

  13. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-03-01

    The realization of a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. This study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure.

  14. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic.

    PubMed

    Bennett, S P; Wong, A T; Glavic, A; Herklotz, A; Urban, C; Valmianski, I; Biegalski, M D; Christen, H M; Ward, T Z; Lauter, V

    2016-01-01

    The realization of a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. This study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure. PMID:26940159

  15. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-01-01

    The realization of a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. This study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure. PMID:26940159

  16. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-03-04

    We realize that a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized and by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate.more » These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. In our study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure.« less

  17. Phase-transition thresholds and vaporization phenomena for ultrasound phase-change nanoemulsions assessed via high-speed optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paul S; Matsunaga, Terry O; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonically activated phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) based on perfluorocarbon droplets have been proposed for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic clinical applications. When generated at the nanoscale, droplets may be small enough to exit the vascular space and then be induced to vaporize with high spatial and temporal specificity by externally-applied ultrasound. The use of acoustical techniques for optimizing ultrasound parameters for given applications can be a significant challenge for nanoscale PCCAs due to the contributions of larger outlier droplets. Similarly, optical techniques can be a challenge due to the sub-micron size of nanodroplet agents and resolution limits of optical microscopy. In this study, an optical method for determining activation thresholds of nanoscale emulsions based on the in vitro distribution of bubbles resulting from vaporization of PCCAs after single, short (<10 cycles) ultrasound pulses is evaluated. Through ultra-high-speed microscopy it is shown that the bubbles produced early in the pulse from vaporized droplets are strongly affected by subsequent cycles of the vaporization pulse, and these effects increase with pulse length. Results show that decafluorobutane nanoemulsions with peak diameters on the order of 200 nm can be optimally vaporized with short pulses using pressures amenable to clinical diagnostic ultrasound machines. PMID:23760161

  18. Phase-transition thresholds and vaporization phenomena for ultrasound phase-change nanoemulsions assessed via high speed optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonically activated phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) based on perfluorocarbon droplets have been proposed for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic clinical applications. When generated at the nanoscale, droplets may be small enough to exit the vascular space and then be induced to vaporize with high spatial and temporal specificity by externally-applied ultrasound. The use of acoustical techniques for optimizing ultrasound parameters for given applications can be a significant challenge for nanoscale PCCAs due to the contributions of larger outlier droplets. Similarly, optical techniques can be a challenge due to the sub-micron size of nanodroplet agents and resolution limits of optical microscopy. In this study, an optical method for determining activation thresholds of nanoscale emulsions based on the in vitro distribution of bubbles resulting from vaporization of PCCAs after single, short (<10 cycles) ultrasound pulses is evaluated. Through ultra-high-speed microscopy it is shown that the bubbles produced early in the pulse from vaporized droplets are strongly affected by subsequent cycles of the vaporization pulse, and these effects increase with pulse length. Results show that decafluorobutane nanoemulsions with peak diameters on the order of 200 nm can be optimally vaporized with short pulses using pressures amenable to clinical diagnostic ultrasound machines. PMID:23760161

  19. Shocking H2O Ice: The Role of Phase Changes during Impact Crater Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, S. T.; Senft, L. E.; Seifter, A.; Obst, A. W.

    2008-12-01

    New experimental data and cratering calculations illustrate the complex response of H2O ice to shock compression. We present peak and post-shock temperature measurements from shocked H2O ice. In experiments with shock pressures between 8 and 14 GPa, initially ~150 K ice is compressed to a supercritical state. In the time frame of the experiment, the supercritical H2O releases to the saturation vapor curve and does not achieve full decompression. Further decompression requires a significant volume expansion. In general, the time scale of expansion will depend on the internal energy and the surrounding conditions (e.g., confined or unconfined). The temperature data validate a new 5-Phase hydrocode equation of state model for H2O, which includes ice Ih, VI, VII, liquid, and vapor. Using the 5-Phase EOS, we model impact cratering onto icy satellites. After passage of the impact-generated shock wave, material beneath the growing transient crater has a layered composition: vapor, liquid, high- pressure phases (ices VII and VI), and ice Ih. The high pressure phases cannot fully decompress without a large volume increase. Thus, these phases initially unload to the pressure along the phase boundary; this pressurized region affects the excavation flow field. The changes in crater excavation lead to differences in crater size and amount of ejecta compared to excavation in a homogeneous target. The differences are significant for large craters (e.g., complex craters on Ganymede and Callisto). The modified excavation flow field also concentrates highly shocked material in the crater floor. In cases where a large, hot plug is buried during crater collapse, explosions occur as the material cools by transforming to vapor, producing features similar to central pits observed on Ganymede, Callisto, and Mars. The behavior of shocked H2O ice during decompression should lead to a variety of features that depend on the ambient conditions specific to each icy planetary body.

  20. The Mechanics of Deep Earthquakes: An Experimental Investigation of Slab Phase Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santangeli, J. R.; Dobson, D. P.; Hunt, S. A.; Meredith, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of deep earthquakes have remained a puzzle for researchers since 1928 when they were first accurately identified by Kiyoo Wadati1 in Japan. Deep earthquakes show a split distribution, with peaks centered around ~370-420km and ~520-550km. As these events are limited to subducting slabs, it is accepted that they may be due to phase changes in metastable slab material. Indeed, conditions at ~350km depth are nominally appropriate for the olivine - wadsleyite transition, consistent with the anticrack mechanism previously observed in (Mg,Fe)2SiO42. The additional peak around 520km suggests that there is another siesmogenic phase change; candidates include Ca-garnet -> Ca-perovskite, wadsleyite -> ringwoodite and enstatite -> majorite or ilmenite. Importantly, for large scale seismogenesis to occur candidate phase changes must be susceptible to a runaway mechanism. Typically this involves the release of heat during exothermic reactions, which acts to increase reaction and nucleation rates. It is worth noting that the post-spinel reaction (sp -> pv + fp) marks the cessation of deep earthquakes; possibly as a result of being endothermic. This research aims to identify which of these candidates could be responsible for seismogenesis. We use high-pressure split cylinder multi-anvil experiments with acoustic emission detection. Low-pressure analogue materials have been used to allow greater cell sizes and thus sample volumes to enable accurate location of AE to within the sample. The candidate phase is annealed below its phase boundary, and then taken through the boundary by further compression. Acoustic emissions, if generated, are observed in real time and later processed to ensure they emanate from within the sample volume. Initial results indicate that the pryroxene -> ilmenite transition in MgGeO3 is seismogenic, with several orders of magnitude increase in the energy of AE concurrent with the phase boundary. References:1) Wadati, K. (1928) Shallow and deep

  1. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2015-01-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  2. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2014-09-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  3. Fast Tuning of Double Fano Resonance Using A Phase-Change Metamaterial Under Low Power Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chenwei; Simpson, Robert E.; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we numerically demonstrate an all-optical tunable Fano resonance in a fishnet metamaterial(MM) based on a metal/phase-change material(PCM)/metal multilayer. We show that the displacement of the elliptical nanoholes from their centers can split the single Fano resonance (FR) into a double FR, exhibiting higher quality factors. The tri-layer fishnet MMs with broken symmetry accomplishes a wide tuning range in the mid-infrared(M-IR) regime by switching between the amorphous and crystalline states of the PCM (Ge2Sb2Te5). A photothermal model is used to study the temporal variation of the temperature of the Ge2Sb2Te5 film to show the potential for switching the phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 by optical heating. Generation of the tunable double FR in this asymmetric structure presents clear advantages as it possesses a fast tuning time of 0.36 ns, a low pump light intensity of 9.6 μW/μm2, and a large tunable wavelength range between 2124 nm and 3028 nm. The optically fast tuning of double FRs using phase change metamaterials(PCMMs) may have potential applications in active multiple-wavelength nanodevices in the M-IR region. PMID:24662968

  4. Numerical study of achiral phase-change metamaterials for ultrafast tuning of giant circular conversion dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chenwei; Mao, Libang

    2015-01-01

    Control of the polarization of light is highly desirable for detection of material’s chirality since biomolecules have vibrational modes in the optical region. Here, we report an ultrafast tuning of pronounced circular conversion dichroism (CCD) in the mid-infrared (M-IR) region, using an achiral phase change metamaterial (PCMM). Our structure consists of an array of Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) dielectric layer, where the Au square patches occupy the sites of a rectangular lattice. The extrinsically giant 2D chirality appears provided that the rectangular array of the Au squares is illuminated at an oblique incidence, and accomplishes a wide tunable wavelength range between 2664 and 3912 nm in the M-IR regime by switching between the amorphous and crystalline states of the Ge2Sb2Te5. A photothermal model is investigated to study the temporal variation of the temperature of the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer, and shows the advantage of fast transiting the phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 of 3.2 ns under an ultralow incident light intensity of 1.9 μW/μm2. Our design is straightforward to fabricate and will be a promising candidate for controlling electromagnetic (EM) wave in the optical region. PMID:26423517

  5. Fast tuning of double Fano resonance using a phase-change metamaterial under low power intensity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chenwei; Simpson, Robert E; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we numerically demonstrate an all-optical tunable Fano resonance in a fishnet metamaterial(MM) based on a metal/phase-change material(PCM)/metal multilayer. We show that the displacement of the elliptical nanoholes from their centers can split the single Fano resonance (FR) into a double FR, exhibiting higher quality factors. The tri-layer fishnet MMs with broken symmetry accomplishes a wide tuning range in the mid-infrared(M-IR) regime by switching between the amorphous and crystalline states of the PCM (Ge2Sb2Te5). A photothermal model is used to study the temporal variation of the temperature of the Ge2Sb2Te5 film to show the potential for switching the phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 by optical heating. Generation of the tunable double FR in this asymmetric structure presents clear advantages as it possesses a fast tuning time of 0.36 ns, a low pump light intensity of 9.6 μW/μm(2), and a large tunable wavelength range between 2124 nm and 3028 nm. The optically fast tuning of double FRs using phase change metamaterials(PCMMs) may have potential applications in active multiple-wavelength nanodevices in the M-IR region. PMID:24662968

  6. Direct observation of titanium-centered octahedra in titanium-antimony-tellurium phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Xiaosong; Xia, Mengjiao; Li, Wei; Ding, Keyuan; Feng, Xuefei; Zhu, Min; Feng, Songlin

    2015-11-01

    Phase-change memory based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material has one order of magnitude faster Set speed and as low as one-fifth of the Reset energy compared with the conventional Ge2Sb2Te5 based device. However, the phase-transition mechanism of the Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material remains inconclusive due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here we report a direct atom-by-atom chemical identification of titanium-centered octahedra in crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material with a state-of-the-art atomic mapping technology. Further, by using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density function theory simulations, we identify in amorphous Ti0.4Sb2Te3 the titanium atoms preferably maintain the octahedral configuration. Our work may pave the way to more thorough understanding and tailoring of the nature of the Ti-Sb-Te material, for promoting the development of dynamic random access memory-like phase-change memory as an emerging storage-class memory to reform current memory hierarchy.

  7. Numerical study of achiral phase-change metamaterials for ultrafast tuning of giant circular conversion dichroism.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chenwei; Mao, Libang

    2015-01-01

    Control of the polarization of light is highly desirable for detection of material's chirality since biomolecules have vibrational modes in the optical region. Here, we report an ultrafast tuning of pronounced circular conversion dichroism (CCD) in the mid-infrared (M-IR) region, using an achiral phase change metamaterial (PCMM). Our structure consists of an array of Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) dielectric layer, where the Au square patches occupy the sites of a rectangular lattice. The extrinsically giant 2D chirality appears provided that the rectangular array of the Au squares is illuminated at an oblique incidence, and accomplishes a wide tunable wavelength range between 2664 and 3912 nm in the M-IR regime by switching between the amorphous and crystalline states of the Ge2Sb2Te5. A photothermal model is investigated to study the temporal variation of the temperature of the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer, and shows the advantage of fast transiting the phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 of 3.2 ns under an ultralow incident light intensity of 1.9 μW/μm(2). Our design is straightforward to fabricate and will be a promising candidate for controlling electromagnetic (EM) wave in the optical region. PMID:26423517

  8. Reversibility and stability of ZnO-Sb₂Te₃ nanocomposite films for phase change memory applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoxiang; Chen, Yimin; Shen, Xiang; Li, Junjian; Wang, Rongping; Lu, Yegang; Dai, Shixun; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua

    2014-06-11

    (ZnO)x(Sb2Te3)1-x materials with different ZnO contents have been systemically studied with an aim of finding the most suitable composition for phase change memory applications. It was found that ZnO-doping could improve thermal stability and electrical behavior of Sb2Te3 film. Sb2Te3-rich nanocrystals, surrounded by ZnO-rich amorphous phases, were observed in annealed ZnO-doped Sb2Te3 composite films, and the segregated domains exhibited a relatively uniform distribution. The ZnO-doped Sb2Te3 composite films, especially with 5.2 at% ZnO concentration were found to have higher crystallization temperature, higher crystalline resistance, and faster crystallization speed in comparison with Ge2Sb2Te5. A reversible repetitive optical switching behavior can be observed in (ZnO)5.2(Sb2Te3)94.8, confirming that the ZnO doping is responsible for a fast switching and the compound is stable with cycling. Therefore, it is promising for the applications in phase change memory devices. PMID:24802948

  9. Broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber using a phase-change metamaterial at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chen-wei; Simpson, Robert E; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    We report a broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber with wide-angle near unity absorbance in the visible regime. Our structure is composed of an array of thin Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) layer. It shows that the near perfect absorbance is flat and broad over a wide-angle incidence up to 80° for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization due to a high imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of Ge2Sb2Te5. The electric field, magnetic field and current distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical origin of the absorbance. Moreover, we carried out numerical simulations to investigate the temporal variation of temperature in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer and to show that the temperature of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 can be raised from room temperature to > 433 K (amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition temperature) in just 0.37 ns with a low light intensity of 95 nW/μm(2), owing to the enhanced broadband light absorbance through strong plasmonic resonances in the absorber. The proposed phase-change metamaterial provides a simple way to realize a broadband perfect absorber in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions and is important for a number of applications including thermally controlled photonic devices, solar energy conversion and optical data storage. PMID:24492415

  10. Numerical study of achiral phase-change metamaterials for ultrafast tuning of giant circular conversion dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chenwei; Mao, Libang

    2015-10-01

    Control of the polarization of light is highly desirable for detection of material’s chirality since biomolecules have vibrational modes in the optical region. Here, we report an ultrafast tuning of pronounced circular conversion dichroism (CCD) in the mid-infrared (M-IR) region, using an achiral phase change metamaterial (PCMM). Our structure consists of an array of Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) dielectric layer, where the Au square patches occupy the sites of a rectangular lattice. The extrinsically giant 2D chirality appears provided that the rectangular array of the Au squares is illuminated at an oblique incidence, and accomplishes a wide tunable wavelength range between 2664 and 3912 nm in the M-IR regime by switching between the amorphous and crystalline states of the Ge2Sb2Te5. A photothermal model is investigated to study the temporal variation of the temperature of the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer, and shows the advantage of fast transiting the phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 of 3.2 ns under an ultralow incident light intensity of 1.9 μW/μm2. Our design is straightforward to fabricate and will be a promising candidate for controlling electromagnetic (EM) wave in the optical region.

  11. Direct observation of titanium-centered octahedra in titanium-antimony-tellurium phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Xiaosong; Xia, Mengjiao; Li, Wei; Ding, Keyuan; Feng, Xuefei; Zhu, Min; Feng, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    Phase-change memory based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material has one order of magnitude faster Set speed and as low as one-fifth of the Reset energy compared with the conventional Ge2Sb2Te5 based device. However, the phase-transition mechanism of the Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material remains inconclusive due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here we report a direct atom-by-atom chemical identification of titanium-centered octahedra in crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material with a state-of-the-art atomic mapping technology. Further, by using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density function theory simulations, we identify in amorphous Ti0.4Sb2Te3 the titanium atoms preferably maintain the octahedral configuration. Our work may pave the way to more thorough understanding and tailoring of the nature of the Ti-Sb-Te material, for promoting the development of dynamic random access memory-like phase-change memory as an emerging storage-class memory to reform current memory hierarchy. PMID:26610374

  12. Broadband Polarization-Independent Perfect Absorber Using a Phase-Change Metamaterial at Visible Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tun; Wei, Chen-wei; Simpson, Robert E.; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber with wide-angle near unity absorbance in the visible regime. Our structure is composed of an array of thin Au squares separated from a continuous Au film by a phase change material (Ge2Sb2Te5) layer. It shows that the near perfect absorbance is flat and broad over a wide-angle incidence up to 80° for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization due to a high imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of Ge2Sb2Te5. The electric field, magnetic field and current distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical origin of the absorbance. Moreover, we carried out numerical simulations to investigate the temporal variation of temperature in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer and to show that the temperature of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 can be raised from room temperature to > 433 K (amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition temperature) in just 0.37 ns with a low light intensity of 95 nW/μm2, owing to the enhanced broadband light absorbance through strong plasmonic resonances in the absorber. The proposed phase-change metamaterial provides a simple way to realize a broadband perfect absorber in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions and is important for a number of applications including thermally controlled photonic devices, solar energy conversion and optical data storage. PMID:24492415

  13. Towards a drift-free multi-level Phase Change Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinar, Ibrahim; Ozdemir, Servet; Cogulu, Egecan; Gokce, Aisha; Stipe, Barry; Katine, Jordan; Aktas, Gulen; Ozatay, Ozhan

    For ultra-high density data storage applications, Phase Change Memory (PCM) is considered a potentially disruptive technology. Yet, the long-term reliability of the logic levels corresponding to the resistance states of a PCM device is an important issue for a stable device operation since the resistance levels drift uncontrollably in time. The underlying mechanism for the resistance drift is considered as the structural relaxation and spontaneous crystallization at elevated temperatures. We fabricated a nanoscale single active layer-phase change memory cell with three resistance levels corresponding to crystalline, amorphous and intermediate states by controlling the current injection site geometry. For the intermediate state and the reset state, the activation energies and the trap distances have been found to be 0.021 eV and 0.235 eV, 1.31 nm and 7.56 nm, respectively. We attribute the ultra-low and weakly temperature dependent drift coefficient of the intermediate state (ν = 0.0016) as opposed to that of the reset state (ν = 0.077) as being due to the dominant contribution of the interfacial defects in electrical transport in the case of the mixed phase. Our results indicate that the engineering of interfacial defects will enable a drift-free multi-level PCM device design.

  14. Direct observation of titanium-centered octahedra in titanium–antimony–tellurium phase-change material

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Xiaosong; Xia, Mengjiao; Li, Wei; Ding, Keyuan; Feng, Xuefei; Zhu, Min; Feng, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    Phase-change memory based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material has one order of magnitude faster Set speed and as low as one-fifth of the Reset energy compared with the conventional Ge2Sb2Te5 based device. However, the phase-transition mechanism of the Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material remains inconclusive due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here we report a direct atom-by-atom chemical identification of titanium-centered octahedra in crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material with a state-of-the-art atomic mapping technology. Further, by using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density function theory simulations, we identify in amorphous Ti0.4Sb2Te3 the titanium atoms preferably maintain the octahedral configuration. Our work may pave the way to more thorough understanding and tailoring of the nature of the Ti–Sb–Te material, for promoting the development of dynamic random access memory-like phase-change memory as an emerging storage-class memory to reform current memory hierarchy. PMID:26610374

  15. Evidence for segregation of Te in ``phase-change" thin chalcogenide Ge-Sb-Te films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, C., Jr.; Krusin-Elbaum, L..; Chen, K. N.; Copel, M.; Bruley, J.; Deline, V. R.

    2007-03-01

    The novel chalcogenide phase-change materials are promising candidates for new technologies such as nonvolatile memories and programmable switches in 3D integration and planar logic. They are typically thin Ge-Sb-Te (GST) films, where a thermally induced amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation can be fast and reversible, with the corresponding large swing in resistance values between the two stable structural states. Here we report on the structural evolution of GST films during thermal cycling and demonstrate using high-resolution (0.5 nm focused probe STEM) scans that Te segregates to the grain boundaries at fairly low temperatures. We show that diffusion of Te along grain boundaries results in its pileup at the free surface and interaction with Ti in adhesion layers in device- compatible stacks. This is consistent with impeded grain growth and with post-crystallization stress release. This motion may impact the ultimate life-cycle of phase-change based devices and should guide the optimal GST material design.

  16. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  17. The effect of thermoelectric contributions in switching dynamics and resistance drift of Phase Change Memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogulu, Egecan; Cinar, Ibrahim; Gokce, Aisha; Stipe, Barry; Katine, Jordan; Aktas, Gulen; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2015-03-01

    Phase Change Memory (PCM) is a promising non-volatile data storage technology that allows for multiple-bit-per-cell operation due to its high contrast in the resistance levels between 0 and 1 logic states. To visualize the complex nature and the stability of the switching dynamics in PCM devices with or without an intermediate resistance state, 3D finite element simulations were carried out in cells with a single Ge2Sb2Te5(GST) layer incorporating temperature and phase dependent thermal and electrical conductivities as well as thermoelectric effects. We compare our results with the experimental data and with our previous simulations to understand the influence of the thermo-electric effect on the phase switching. In addition, we integrated drift equations into our multiphysics simulation to get a complete picture of structural relaxation in time in amorphous and mixed phases of the GST. We compare our results with experimental resistance drift measurements to calculate a decay rate for defect concentration. Our results yield a complete picture of switching dynamics and post-switching resistance drift phenomena on the microscopic scale. TUBITAK fund 113F385, Bogazici Uni. Research Fund, 12B03M1, and European Union FP7 Marie Curie International Re-integration Grant PCM-256281.

  18. Tuning Eu3+ emission in europium sesquioxide films by changing the crystalline phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariscal, A.; Quesada, A.; Camps, I.; Palomares, F. J.; Fernández, J. F.; Serna, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report the growth of europium sesquioxide (Eu2O3) thin films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in vacuum at room temperature from a pure Eu2O3 ceramic bulk target. The films were deposited in different configurations formed by adding capping and/or buffer layers of amorphous aluminum oxide (a-Al2O3). The optical properties, refractive index and extinction coefficient of the as deposited Eu2O3 layers were obtained. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were done to assess its chemical composition. Post-deposition annealing was performed at 500 °C and 850 °C in air in order to achieve the formation of crystalline films and to accomplish photoluminescence emission. According to the analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, cubic and monoclinic phases were formed. It is found that the relative amount of the phases is related to the different film configurations, showing that the control over the crystallization phase can be realized by adequately designing the structures. All the films showed photoluminescence emission peaks (under excitation at 355 nm) that are attributed to the intra 4f-transitions of Eu3+ ions. The emission spectral shape depends on the crystalline phase of the Eu2O3 layer. Specifically, changes in the hypersensitive 5D0 → 7F2 emission confirm the strong influence of the crystal field effect on the Eu3+ energy levels.

  19. Structural transformations in amorphous ↔ crystalline phase change of Ga-Sb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T. G.; Sen, S.; Hung, I.; Gan, Z.; Kalkan, B.; Raoux, S.

    2013-12-21

    Ga-Sb alloys with compositions ranging between ∼12 and 50 at. % Ga are promising materials for phase change random access memory applications. The short-range structures of two such alloys with compositions Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86} and Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} are investigated, in their amorphous and crystalline states, using {sup 71}Ga and {sup 121}Sb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The Ga and Sb atoms are fourfold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 46}Sb{sub 54} with nearly 40% of the constituent atoms being involved in Ga-Ga and Sb-Sb homopolar bonding. This necessitates extensive bond switching and elimination of homopolar bonds during crystallization. On the other hand, Ga and Sb atoms are all threefold coordinated in the as-deposited amorphous Ga{sub 14}Sb{sub 86}. Crystallization of this material involves phase separation of GaSb domains in Sb matrix and a concomitant increase in the Ga coordination number from 3 to 4. Results from crystallization kinetics experiments suggest that the melt-quenching results in the elimination of structural “defects” such as the homopolar bonds and threefold coordinated Ga atoms in the amorphous phases of these alloys, thereby rendering them structurally more similar to the corresponding crystalline states compared to the as-deposited amorphous phases.

  20. Crystalline phase change in steel alloys due to high speed impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slewa, Muna

    The effect of hypervelocity projectile impact on the crystalline grain structure near the target impact location of A36 steel has been studied. A36 steel is a mostly single phase body centered cubic material (BCC). Impact velocities ranged from 3.54 to 6.70 km/sec. Target materials were studied before and after impact to determine if these impact conditions result in a phase change of the A36. Scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scatter diffraction, and x-ray diffraction methods were used to investigate deformation, lattice defects, twinning, and phase transformation. A limited number of impacted targets made from 304L and HY100 steels were also examined. These alloys contain the BCC crystalline phase along with face centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal closed pack (HCP) structures. Grain size near impact is compacted near impact site. Also twinning was present closer to the impact area, and gradually dissipated away further from the impact zone. While increasing impact momentum increased the HCP percentage.

  1. The effect of partial crystallization on phase-change optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kenric P.

    2001-08-01

    The degree of partial crystallization of phase change materials for rewritable optical data storage is shown to affect the subsequent formation of amorphous marks. Experiments with Ge2Sb2.5Te5 (GST) and AgInSbTe (AIST) phase-change materials demonstrate the difference between nucleation-dominated and growth- dominated processes in the uniformity of crystalline states and in the subsequent formation of amorphous marks. For the GST material, experimental measurements along with thermal and optical modeling show that the reduced reflectivity and increased absorption of the partially crystalline state increases the final amorphous mark size. An 8% decrease in reflectivity and a 11% increase in mark diameter is measured between the amorphous marks formed in the fully crystallized, high reflectivity (R = 43%) state and partially crystallized, low reflectivity (R = 30%) state. In contrast, the AIST material, which is growth-dominated, does not crystallize uniformly at reflectivity levels below full crystallization. This is shown to result in a mixture of amorphous and crystalline regions rather than a partially crystalline state. Further, the final amorphous mark size does not have the inverse relation with initial reflectivity measured and modeled for the GST material. Novel reflectivity measurements and images of amorphous state marks are completed by combining Photon Tunneling Microscopy (PTM) with technology for microscope testing of optical disks. Reflectivity measurements of amorphous marks between 200 nm and 500 nm are made with a 680-nm laser diode to a first-surface GST phase-change disk. A two-laser static tester provides measurements of the change in reflectivity during the write process. The effect of air gap on the coupling of propagating and evanescent waves is measured. A PTM with an effective numerical aperture of 1.4 and blue illumination at 435.8 nm is used to image amorphous marks with a resolution of 190 nm. The reflectivity measurements and images are

  2. Gas-phase organics in environmental tobacco smoke. 1. Effects of smoking rate, ventilation, and furnishing level on emission factors.

    PubMed

    Singer, Brett C; Hodgson, Alfred T; Guevarra, Karla S; Hawley, Elisabeth L; Nazaroff, William W

    2002-03-01

    We measured the emissions of 26 gas-phase organic compounds in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a model room that simulates realistic conditions in residences and offices. Exposure-relevant emission factors (EREFs), which include the effects of sorption and re-emission over a 24-h period, were calculated by mass balance from measured compound concentrations and chamber ventilation rates in a 50-m3 room constructed and furnished with typical materials. Experiments were conducted at three smoking rates (5, 10, and 20 cigarettes day(-1)), three ventilation rates (0.3, 0.6, and 2 h(-1)), and three furnishing levels (wallboard with aluminum flooring, wallboard with carpet, and full furnishings). Smoking rate did not affect EREFs, suggesting that sorption was linearly related to gas-phase concentration. Furnishing level and ventilation rate in the model room had little effect on EREFs of several ETS compounds including 1,3-butadiene, acrolein, acrylonitrile, benzene, toluene, and styrene. However, sorptive losses at low ventilation with full furnishings reduced EREFs for the ETS tracers nicotine and 3-ethenylpyridine by as much as 90 and 65% as compared to high ventilation, wallboard/aluminum experiments. Likewise, sorptive losses were 40-70% for phenol, cresols, naphthalene, and methylnaphthalenes. Sorption persisted for many compounds; for example, almost all of the sorbed nicotine and most of the sorbed cresol remained sorbed 3 days after smoking. EREFs can be used in models and with ETS tracer-based methods to refine and improve estimates of exposures to ETS constituents. PMID:11918006

  3. Streamflow changes in Alaska between the cool phase (1947-1976) and the warm phase (1977-2006) of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation: The influence of glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.

    2009-01-01

    Streamflow data from 35 stations in and near Alaska were analyzed for changes between the cool phase (1947-1976) and the warm phase (1977-2006) of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Winter, spring, and summer flow changes and maximum annual flow changes were different for glaciated basins (more than 10% glacier-covered area) than for nonglaciated basins, showing the influence of glaciers on historical streamflowchanges. Mean February flows, for example, increased for the median of available stations by 45% for glaciated basins and by 17% for nonglaciated ones.

  4. Metal - Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a fundamental advance in the fabrication of GST with out-of-plane stacking of ordered vacancy layers by means of three distinct methods: Molecular Beam Epitaxy, thermal annealing and application of femtosecond laser pulses. We assess the degree of vacancy ordering and explicitly correlate it with the MIT. We further tune the ordering in a controlled fashion attaining a large range of resistivity. Employing ordered GST might allow the realization of cells with larger programming windows. PMID:27033314

  5. Low-temperature sintering and phase changes in chromite interconnect materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, L.A.; Armstrong, T.R.; McCready, D.E.; Coffey, G.W.; Maupin, G.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    Sintering shrinkage curves and phase changes were compared for calcium-substituted lanthanum chromates with either slight Asite enrichment or depletion. Of the former type, La[sub 0.7]Ca[sub 0.31],CrO[sub 3] that was synthesized by the glycine-nitrate method sintered to high density in air at 1250C, exhibiting two rapid-shrinkage events. Weight loss measurements corroborated XRD data showing that, prior to densiflcation, over half the Ca resided in non-perovskite phases, including CaCrO[sub 4]. In the La[sub 0.7]Ca[sub 0.31]CrO[sub 3], densification was closely associated with re-dissolution of the Ca into the perovskite.

  6. Low-temperature sintering and phase changes in chromite interconnect materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, L.A.; Armstrong, T.R.; McCready, D.E.; Coffey, G.W.; Maupin, G.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    Sintering shrinkage curves and phase changes were compared for calcium-substituted lanthanum chromates with either slight Asite enrichment or depletion. Of the former type, La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.31},CrO{sub 3} that was synthesized by the glycine-nitrate method sintered to high density in air at 1250C, exhibiting two rapid-shrinkage events. Weight loss measurements corroborated XRD data showing that, prior to densiflcation, over half the Ca resided in non-perovskite phases, including CaCrO{sub 4}. In the La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.31}CrO{sub 3}, densification was closely associated with re-dissolution of the Ca into the perovskite.

  7. Thermally efficient and highly scalable In2Se3 nanowire phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bo; Kang, Daegun; Kim, Jungsik; Meyyappan, M.; Lee, Jeong-Soo

    2013-04-01

    The electrical characteristics of nonvolatile In2Se3 nanowire phase change memory are reported. Size-dependent memory switching behavior was observed in nanowires of varying diameters and the reduction in set/reset threshold voltage was as low as 3.45 V/6.25 V for a 60 nm nanowire, which is promising for highly scalable nanowire memory applications. Also, size-dependent thermal resistance of In2Se3 nanowire memory cells was estimated with values as high as 5.86×1013 and 1.04×106 K/W for a 60 nm nanowire memory cell in amorphous and crystalline phases, respectively. Such high thermal resistances are beneficial for improvement of thermal efficiency and thus reduction in programming power consumption based on Fourier's law. The evaluation of thermal resistance provides an avenue to develop thermally efficient memory cell architecture.

  8. Diffused interface ghost fluid method for incompressible multiphase, phase change simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moon Soo; Riaz, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Sharp interface methods for simulating multiphase flow often suffer from unstable pressure and velocity fluctuations for problems involving mass transfer. An improved sharp interface method is developed for multiphase flow with phase change using both sharp and diffused interfacial properties. The approach is based on defining continuous, phase averaged velocity and density fields within a diffused interfacial region while using the sharp treatment for the implementation of the jumps in the pressure and the temperature gradient. The method implements interface advection with diffused and stable velocity field but can represent accurate movement of the sharp interface. Two-dimensional film boiling problems are solved on a horizontal surface to demonstrate the performance of the new approach.

  9. Investigations on phase change characteristics of Ti-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shuai; Wei, Shenjin; Yi, Xinyu; Wang, Jun; Liu, Chaochao; Li, Jing; Yang, Tieying

    2015-12-01

    Ab initio calculations and experiments are both adopted to study the effects of Ti dopant on the phase change characteristics of Ge2Sb2Te5. The original and Ti-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 films were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The optical and structural properties were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry and grazing incidence diffraction methods. According to the calculation results of the density of states and optical band gap, the Ti-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 has a less narrow band gap than the original one. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental results shows that Ti dopant restrains the phase transition from amorphous to cubic and eliminates that from cubic to hexagonal. Besides, the reflectivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 decreases after doping the Ti element.

  10. Metal - Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a fundamental advance in the fabrication of GST with out-of-plane stacking of ordered vacancy layers by means of three distinct methods: Molecular Beam Epitaxy, thermal annealing and application of femtosecond laser pulses. We assess the degree of vacancy ordering and explicitly correlate it with the MIT. We further tune the ordering in a controlled fashion attaining a large range of resistivity. Employing ordered GST might allow the realization of cells with larger programming windows. PMID:27033314

  11. Hybrid phase-change plasmonic crystals for active tuning of lattice resonances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y G; Kao, T S; Ng, B; Li, X; Luo, X G; Luk'yanchuk, B; Maier, S A; Hong, M H

    2013-06-01

    Tunable lattice resonances are demonstrated in a hybrid plasmonic crystal incorporating the phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) as a 20-nm-thick layer sandwiched between a gold nanodisk array and a quartz substrate. Non-volatile tuning of lattice resonances over a range Δλ of about 500 nm (1.89 µm to 2.27 µm) is achieved experimentally via intermediate phase states of the GST layer. This work demonstrates the efficacy and ease of resonance tuning via GST in the near infrared, suggesting the possibility to design broadband non-volatile tunable devices for optical modulation, switching, sensing and nonlinear optical devices. PMID:23736622

  12. Phase Change Nanodot Arrays Fabricated Using a Self-Assembly Diblock Copolymer Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Wong, H.; Raoux, S.; Cha, J.; Rettner, C.; Krupp, L.; Topuria, T.; Milliron, D.; Rice, P.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Self-assembling diblock copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly-4-vinylpyridine (PS-b-P4VP), was used as the template for fabricating phase change nanostructures. The high density GeSb nanodots were formed by etching into an amorphous GeSb thin film using silica hard mask which was patterned on top of polymer. The nanodot arrays are 15 nm in diameter with 30 nm spacing. This is smaller than most structures obtained by e-beam lithography. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies showed that the phase transition occurred at 235 {sup o}C, which is 5 {sup o}C lower than blanket GeSb film but higher than that of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (150 {sup o}C). GeSb showed good temperature stability for fabrication of small memory devices.

  13. A comparison of phase change phenomena in CTH with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.; McIntosh, R.L.; Patterson, B.C.

    1993-12-31

    An estimate of the current state of the predictive capabilities of hydrocodes for impacts where phase changes may be important was made by simulating a series of experiments where zinc spheres impact thin zinc plates at 4 velocities. The experimental data was taken from Mullin, et al. and consisted of radiographs of the debris cloud and estimates of the momentum in the debris cloud along the velocity vector. The velocities ranged from 3.30 to 6.79 km/s indicating that the debris consists of solid/molten fragments to predominantly vapor phase material as the velocity increases. The simulations reveal that the CTH hydro can accurately predict the debris structure and momentum transfer for this class of impacts.

  14. Mantle phase changes and deep-earthquake faulting in subducting lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Inclined zones of earthquakes are the primary expression of lithosphere subduction. A distinct deep population of subduction-zone earthquakes occurs at depths of 350 to 690 kilometers. At those depths ordinary brittle fracture and frictional sliding, the faulting processes of shallow earthquakes, are not expected. A fresh understanding of these deep earthquakes comes from developments in several areas of experimental and theoretical geophysics, including the discovery and characterization of transformational faulting, a shear instability connected with localized phase transformations under nonhydrostatic stress. These developments support the hypothesis that deep earthquakes represent transformational faulting in a wedge of olivine-rich peridotite that is likely to persist metastably in coldest plate interiors to depths as great as 690 km. Predictions based on this deep structure of mantle phase changes are consistent with the global depth distribution of deep earthquakes, the maximum depths of earthquakes in individual subductions zones, and key source characteristics of deep events.

  15. High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Starace, A.; Turchi, C.; Ortega, J.

    2011-08-01

    To store thermal energy, sensible and latent heat storage materials are widely used. Latent heat thermal energy storage (TES) systems using phase change materials (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation. Molten salt PCM candidates for cascaded PCMs were evaluated for the temperatures near 320 degrees C, 350 degrees C, and 380 degrees C. These temperatures were selected to fill the 300 degrees C to 400 degrees C operating range typical for parabolic trough systems, that is, as one might employ in three-PCM cascaded thermal storage. Based on the results, the best candidate for temperatures near 320 degrees C was the molten salt KNO3-4.5wt%KCl. For the 350 degrees C and 380 degrees C temperatures, the evaluated molten salts are not good candidates because of the corrosiveness and the high vapor pressure of the chlorides.

  16. Mantle phase changes and deep-earthquake faulting in subducting lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Kirby, S H; Durham, W B; Stern, L A

    1991-04-12

    Inclined zones of earthquakes are the primary expression of lithosphere subduction. A distinct deep population of subduction-zone earthquakes occurs at depths of 350 to 690 kilometers. At those depths ordinary brittle fracture and frictional sliding, the faulting processes of shallow earthquakes, are not expected. A fresh understanding of these deep earthquakes comes from developments in several areas of experimental and theoretical geophysics, including the discovery and characterization of transformational faulting, a shear instability connected with localized phase transformations under nonhydrostatic stress. These developments support the hypothesis that deep earthquakes represent transformational faulting in a wedge of olivine-rich peridotite that is likely to persist metastably in coldest plate interiors to depths as great as 690 km. Predictions based on this deep structure of mantle phase changes are consistent with the global depth distribution of deep earthquakes, the maximum depths of earthquakes in individual subductions zones, and key source characteristics of deep events. PMID:17769266

  17. Metal - Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-04-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a fundamental advance in the fabrication of GST with out-of-plane stacking of ordered vacancy layers by means of three distinct methods: Molecular Beam Epitaxy, thermal annealing and application of femtosecond laser pulses. We assess the degree of vacancy ordering and explicitly correlate it with the MIT. We further tune the ordering in a controlled fashion attaining a large range of resistivity. Employing ordered GST might allow the realization of cells with larger programming windows.

  18. Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  19. How fragility makes phase-change data storage robust: insights from ab initio simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Ronneberger, Ider; Zalden, Peter; Xu, Ming; Salinga, Martin; Wuttig, Matthias; Mazzarello, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change materials are technologically important due to their manifold applications in data storage. Here we report on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of crystallization of the phase change material Ag4In3Sb67Te26 (AIST). We show that, at high temperature, the observed crystal growth mechanisms and crystallization speed are in good agreement with experimental data. We provide an in-depth understanding of the crystallization mechanisms at the atomic level. At temperatures below 550 K, the computed growth velocities are much higher than those obtained from time-resolved reflectivity measurements, due to large deviations in the diffusion coefficients. As a consequence of the high fragility of AIST, experimental diffusivities display a dramatic increase in activation energies and prefactors at temperatures below 550 K. This property is essential to ensure fast crystallization at high temperature and a stable amorphous state at low temperature. On the other hand, no such change in the temperature dependence of the diffusivity is observed in our simulations, down to 450 K. We also attribute this different behavior to the fragility of the system, in combination with the very fast quenching times employed in the simulations. PMID:25284316

  20. Numerical and Experimental Analysis on Inorganic Phase Change Material Usage in Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuvel, S.; Saravanasankar, S.; Sudhakarapandian, R.; Muthukannan, M.

    2014-12-01

    This work demonstrates the significance of Phase Change Material (PCM) in the construction of working sheds and product storage magazines in fireworks industries to maintain less temperature variation by passive cooling. The inorganic PCM, namely Calcium Chloride Hexahydrate (CCH) is selected in this study. First, the performance of two models with inbuilt CCH was analysed, using computational fluid dynamics. A significant change in the variation of inner wall temperature was observed, particularly during the working hours. This is mainly due to passive cooling, where the heat transfer from the surroundings to the room is partially used for the phase change from solid to liquid. The experiment was carried out by constructing two models, one with PCM packed in hollow brick walls and roof, and the other one as a conventional construction. The experimental results show that the temperature of the room got significantly reduced up to 7 °C. The experimental analysis results had good agreement with the numerical analysis results, and this reveals the advantage of the PCM in the fireworks industry construction.