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Sample records for phase formation mechanism

  1. Amorphous phase formation in mechanically alloyed iron-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satyajeet

    Bulk metallic glasses have interesting combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and magnetic properties which make them attractive for a variety of applications. Consequently there has been a lot of interest in understanding the structure and properties of these materials. More varied applications can be sought if one understands the reasons for glass formation and the methods to control them. The glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys can be substantially increased by a proper selection of alloying elements and the chemical composition of the alloy. High GFA will enable in obtaining large section thickness of amorphous alloys. Ability to produce glassy alloys in larger section thicknesses enables exploitation of these advanced materials for a variety of different applications. The technique of mechanical alloying (MA) is a powerful non-equilibrium processing technique and is known to produce glassy (or amorphous) alloys in several alloy systems. Metallic amorphous alloys have been produced by MA starting from either blended elemental metal powders or pre-alloyed powders. Subsequently, these amorphous alloy powders could be consolidated to full density in the temperature range between the glass transition and crystallization temperatures, where the amorphous phase has a very low viscosity. This Dissertation focuses on identifying the various Fe-based multicomponent alloy systems that can be amorphized using the MA technique, studying the GFA of alloys with emphasis on improving it, and also on analyzing the effect of extended milling time on the constitution of the amorphous alloy powder produced at earlier times. The Dissertation contains seven chapters, where the lead chapter deals with the background, history and introduction to bulk metallic glasses. The following four chapters are the published/to be published work, where the criterion for predicting glass formation, effect of Niobium addition on glass-forming ability (GFA), lattice contraction on

  2. MECHANISM AND KINETICS OF THE FORMATION OF NOX AND OTHER COMBUSTION POLLUTANTS. PHASE II. MODIFIED COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives Phase II results of a combined experimental/theoretical study to define the mechanisms and kinetics of the formation of NOx and other combustion pollutants. Two experimental devices were used in Phase II. A special flat-flame burner with a controlled-temperature ...

  3. Mechanism of Phase Formation in the Batch Mixtures for Slag-Bearing Glass Ceramics - 12207

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, Sergey V.; Stefanovsky, Olga I.; Malinina, Galina A.

    2012-07-01

    Slag surrogate was produced from chemicals by heating to 900 deg. C and keeping at this temperature for 1 hr. The product obtained was intermixed with either sodium di-silicate (75 wt.% waste loading) or borax (85 wt.% slag loading). The mixtures were heat-treated within a temperature range of 25 to 1300 deg. C. The products were examined by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The products prepared at temperatures of up to 1000 deg. C contained both phase typical of the source slag and intermediate phases as well as phases typical of the materials melted at 1350 deg. C such as nepheline, britholite, magnetite and matrix vitreous phase. Vitrification process in batch mixtures consisting of slag surrogate and either sodium di-silicate or sodium tetraborate runs through formation of intermediate phases mainly silico-phosphates capable to incorporate Sm as trivalent actinides surrogate. Reactions in the batch mixtures are in the whole completed by ∼1000 deg. C but higher temperatures are required to homogenize the products. If in the borate-based system the mechanism is close to simple dissolution of slag constituents in the low viscous borate melt, then in the silicate-based system the mechanism was found to be much complicated and includes re-crystallization during melting with segregation of newly-formed nepheline type phase. (authors)

  4. Phenomenological thermodynamics and the structure formation mechanism of the CuTi₂S₄ rhombohedral phase.

    PubMed

    Talanov, Michail V; Shirokov, Vladimir B; Talanov, Valery M

    2016-04-21

    The theory of structural phase transition in CuTi2S4 is proposed. The symmetry of order parameters, thermodynamics and the mechanism of the atomic structure formation of the rhombohedral Cu-Ti-thiospinel have been studied. The critical order parameter inducing the phase transition has been found. Within the Landau theory of phase transitions, it is shown that the phase state may change from the high-symmetry cubic disordered Fd3[combining macron]m phase to the low-symmetry ordered rhombohedral R3[combining macron]m phase as a result of phase transition of the first order close to the second order. It is shown that the rhombohedral structure of CuTi2S4 is formed as a result of the displacements of all types of atoms and the ordering of Cu-atoms (1 : 1 order type in tetrahedral spinel sites), Ti-atoms (1 : 1 : 6 order type in octahedral spinel sites), and S-atoms (1 : 1 : 3 : 3 order type). The Cu- and Ti-atoms form metal nanoclusters which are named a "bunch" of dimers. The "bunch" of dimers in CuTi2S4 is a new type of self-organization of atoms in frustrated spinel-like structures. It is shown that Ti-atoms also form other types of metal nanoclusters: trimers and tetrahedra. PMID:27035866

  5. Global modeling of SOA: the use of different mechanisms for aqueous-phase formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.; Sillman, S.; Penner, J. E.; Ito, A.

    2014-06-01

    There is growing interest in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through condensed aqueous-phase reactions. In this study, we use a global model (IMPACT) to investigate the potential formation of SOA in the aqueous phase. We compare results from several multiphase process schemes with detailed aqueous-phase reactions to schemes that use a first-order gas-to-particle formation rate based on uptake coefficients. The predicted net global SOA production rate in cloud water ranges from 13.1 Tg yr-1 to 46.8 Tg yr-1 while that in aerosol water ranges from -0.4 Tg yr-1 to 12.6 Tg yr-1. The predicted global burden of SOA formed in the aqueous phase ranges from 0.09 Tg to 0.51 Tg. A sensitivity test to investigate two representations of cloud water content from two global models shows that increasing cloud water by an average factor of 2.7 can increase the net SOA production rate in cloud water by a factor of 4 at low altitudes (below approximately 900 hPa). We also investigated the importance of including dissolved Fe chemistry in cloud water aqueous reactions. Adding these reactions increases the formation rate of aqueous-phase OH by a factor of 2.6 and decreases the amount of global aqueous SOA formed by 31%. None of the mechanisms discussed here is able to provide a best fit for all observations. Rather, the use of an uptake coefficient method for aerosol water and a multi-phase scheme for cloud water provides the best fit in the Northern Hemisphere and the use of multiphase process scheme for aerosol and cloud water provides the best fit in the tropics. The model with Fe chemistry underpredicts oxalate measurements in all regions. Finally, the comparison of oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratios estimated in the model with those estimated from measurements shows that the modeled SOA has a slightly higher O / C ratio than the observed SOA for all cases.

  6. Comparison of Phases Formation Process in Initial and Mechanically Activated Ceramic Batches with Pyrochlore Formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Chizhevskaya, S. V.; Yudintsev, S. V.

    2002-02-25

    Formation of two pyrochlore ceramics with formulations CaZr0.25U0.75Ti2O7 and CaUTi2O7 within the temperature range 1000-1500 C from batches prepared by grinding of oxide powders in a mortar and an activator with hydrostatic yokes AGO-2U as well as soaking of a Ca, Zr, and Ti oxide mixture with uranylnitrate solution was studied. The pyrochlore ceramics are produced through intermediate calcium uranate formation. Phase formation reactions in the batch pre-treated in the AGO-2U unit were completed within the temperature range 1000-1100 C that is lower than in the batches prepared by two other methods.

  7. Liquid nanodroplet formation through phase explosion mechanism in laser-irradiated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzi, Alberto; Gorrini, Federico; Miotello, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Some quantitative aspects of laser-irradiated pure metals, while approaching phase explosion, are still not completely understood. Here, we develop a model that describes the main quantities regulating the liquid-vapor explosive phase transition and the expulsion of liquid nanodroplets that, by solidifying, give rise to nanoparticle formation. The model combines both a thermodynamics description of the explosive phase change and a Monte Carlo simulation of the randomly generated critical vapor bubbles. The calculation is performed on a set of seven metals (Al, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, and Au) which are frequently used in pulsed laser ablation experiments. Our final predictions about the size distribution of the liquid nanodroplets and the number ratio of liquid/vapor ejected atoms are compared, whenever possible, with available molecular dynamics simulations and experimental data.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and formation mechanism of metastable phase VO{sub 2}(A) nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.H.; Xu, H.F.; Wang, Z.Z.; Zhu, K.R.; Li, G.; Jin, Shaowei

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pure phases of VO{sub 2}(B) and VO{sub 2}(A) were prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. • Belt-like particles prepared at 180 °C was indexed as monoclinic VO{sub 2}(B) phase. • Rod-like particles prepared at 230 °C was indexed as tetragonal VO{sub 2}(A) phase. • VO{sub 2}(A) nanorods resulted from VO{sub 2}(B) nanobelts by assembly and crystal adjustment. - Abstract: Pure phase VO{sub 2}(A) nanorods were synthesized via the reduction of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} by oxalic acid during the hydrothermal treatment. Two sets of samples were prepared by varying both system temperature and reaction time under a filling ratio of 0.40 for observing the formation and evolution of VO{sub 2}(A) nanorods. Structures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, respectively. It was found that VO{sub 2}(B) was firstly formed and then transformed into VO{sub 2}(A) as the increasing system temperature or extending reaction time. An assembling and following crystal adjustment was proposed for explanation the formation process of VO{sub 2}(A) from VO{sub 2}(B). For VO{sub 2}(A) nanorods, the phase transition temperature of 169.7 °C was higher than that of the VO{sub 2}(A) bulk, it might be ascribed to the lower crystallinity or nonstoichiometry in VO{sub 2}(A) nanorods. VO{sub 2} nanostructures with controllable phases and properties should find their promising applications in a single VO{sub 2} nanodevice.

  9. Creation and formation mechanism of new carbon phases constructed by amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mingguang; Cui, Wen; Liu, Bingbing

    Our recent effort is focusing on the creation of new hard/superhard carbon phases constructed by disordered carbons or amorphous carbon clusters under high pressure. We showed that the pressure-induced amorphous hard carbon clusters from collapsed fullerenes can be used as building blocks (BBs) for constructing novel carbon structures. This new strategy has been verified by compressing a series of intercalated fullerides, pre-designed by selecting various dopants with special features. We demonstrate that the boundaries of the amorphous BBs are mediated by intercalated dopants and several new superhard materials have been prepared. We also found that the dopant-mediated BBs can be arranged in either ordered or disordered structures, both of which can be hard enough to indent the diamond anvils. The hardening mechanisms of the new phases have also been discussed. For the glassy carbon (GC) constructructed by disordered fullerene-like nanosized fragments, we also found that these disordered fragments can bond and the compressed GC transformed into a transparent superhard phase. Such pressure-induced transformation has been discovered to be driven by a novel mechanism (unpublished). By understanding the mechanisms we can clarify the controversial results on glassy carbon reported recently. The authors would like to thank the financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11474121, 51320105007).

  10. Identification of Abnormal Phase and its Formation Mechanism in Synthesizing Chalcogenide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kegao; Ji, Nianjing; Xu, Yong; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Chalcogenide films can be used in thin-film solar cells due to their high photoelectric conversion efficiencies. It was difficult to identify one abnormal phase with high X-ray diffraction (XRD) intensity and preferred orientation in the samples for preparing chalcogenide films by spin-coating and co-reduction on soda-lime glass (Na2OṡCaOṡ6SiO2) substrates. The raw materials and reductant are metal chlorides and hydrazine hydrate respectively. In order to identify this phase, a series of experiments were done under different conditions. The phases of obtained products were analyzed by XRD and the size and morphology were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the experimental results, first it was proved that the abnormal phase was water-soluble by water immersion experiment, then it was identified as NaCl crystal through XRD, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and SEM. The cubic NaCl crystals have high crystallinity with size lengths of about 0.5-2μm and show a <100> preferred orientation. The reaction mechanism of NaCl crystal was proposed as follows: The NaCl crystal was formed by reaction of Na2O and HCl in a certain experimental conditions.

  11. Study on the Formation and Precipitation Mechanism of Mn5Si3 Phase in the MBA-2 Brass Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang; Jie, Jinchuan; Zhang, Pengchao; Jia, Chunxu; Wang, Tongmin; Li, Tingju

    2016-06-01

    Mn5Si3 is an attractive dispersion in the special brass, owing to its high hardness and high wear resistance. In the present study, synchrotron X-ray radiography and rapid cooling were applied to investigate the formation mechanism of Mn5Si3 phase in the MBA-2 brass alloy. The primary Mn5Si3 phase is proved to exist stably in the alloy melt and nucleate from the melt at temperatures above 1373 K (1100 °C). In addition, the precipitation mechanism of Mn5Si3 phase is addressed systematically by the isothermal heat treatment. The Mn5Si3 particles are observed to precipitate from the matrix at temperatures above 1023 K (750 °C), and a crystallographic orientation relationship is found between the precipitated Mn5Si3 particle and β phase: (110)_{β } //(1overline{1} 00)_{{{{Mn}}5 {{Si}}3 }} and [overline{1} 11]_{β } //[11overline{2} overline{2} ]_{{{{Mn}}5 {{Si}}3 }} . However, the precipitation of Mn5Si3 phase is thermodynamically inhibited at lower temperatures, which can be ascribed to the increase in the Gibbs free energy of formation of Mn5Si3 with decreasing the temperature.

  12. Synthesis and formation mechanism of pinnoite by the phase transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Feng; Dong, Yaping; Peng, Jiaoyu; Wang, Liping; Li, Wu

    2016-06-01

    Pinnoite (MgB2O(OH)6) for the first time was synthesized using the solid-liquid-solid conversion method. The effects of reaction time, pH value and concentrations of magnesium and borate were investigated. Pinnoite was synthesized under the optimum condition of 8 mmol hungtsaoite and 1% boric acid solution at 80 °C. The products were determined using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, TG-DSC and a UV-vis spectrometer. The change processes of the surface morphology of pinnoite were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the formation mechanism of pinnoite was discussed according to the changes in the content of precipitation and pH value.

  13. Phase formation and superconducting properties of mechanically alloyed Nb3(Al1‑x Ge x ) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingyuan; Chen, Yongliang; Xu, Liyuan; Zhang, Yun; Pan, Xifeng; Yan, Guo; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, C. H.; Feng, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Mechanically alloyed Nb3(Al1‑x Ge x ) compounds with nominal composition x = 0%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% were synthesized using high-energy ball milling. The effects of Ge content and sintering temperature on the formation of the Nb3Al superconducting phase at a relatively low temperature without the extremely high-temperature rapid heating, quenching and transformation process were studied. The results revealed that Ge doping in Nb3Al improved the formation of the A15 phase at low temperatures, enhanced the superconducting transition temperature (T c), and refined the grain structure, thus improving the overall superconducting properties. The pinning behavior was also studied for the optimized sample.

  14. The mechanism of 2-furaldehyde formation from D-xylose dehydration in the gas phase. A tandem mass spectrometric study.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of reactions occurring in solution can be investigated also in the gas phase by suited mass spectrometric techniques, which allow to highlight fundamental mechanistic features independent of the influence of the medium and to clarifying controversial hypotheses proposed in solution studies. In this work, we report a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-TSQ/MS) on the dehydration of D-xylose, leading mainly to the formation of 2-furaldehyde (2-FA). It is generally known in carbohydrate chemistry that the thermal acid catalyzed dehydration of pentoses leads to the formation of 2-FA, but several aspects on the solution-phase mechanism are controversial. Here, gaseous reactant ions corresponding to protonated xylose molecules obtained from ESI of a solution containing D-xylose and ammonium acetate as protonating reagent were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the triple stage quadrupole analyzer. The product ion mass spectra of protonated xylose are characterized by the presence of ionic intermediates arising from xylose dehydration, which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. As expected, the xylose triple dehydration leads to the formation of the ion at m/z 97, corresponding to protonated 2-FA. On the basis of mass spectrometric evidences, we demonstrated that in the gas phase, the formation of 2-FA involves protonation at the OH group bound to the C1 atom of the sugar, the first ionic intermediate being characterized by a cyclic structure. Finally, energy resolved product ion mass spectra allowed to obtain information on the energetic features of the D-xylose→2-FA conversion. ᅟ PMID:23690250

  15. Colloidal nanocrystals of orthorhombic Cu2ZnGeS4: phase-controlled synthesis, formation mechanism and photocatalytic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Cong-Min; Regulacio, Michelle D.; Ye, Chen; Lim, Suo Hon; Lua, Shun Kuang; Xu, Qing-Hua; Dong, Zhili; Xu, An-Wu; Han, Ming-Yong

    2015-02-01

    The orthorhombic polymorph of Cu2ZnGeS4 (CZGS) is a metastable wurtzite-derived phase that can only be prepared in the bulk form by extensive heating at high temperatures (>=790 °C) when using the conventional solid-state reaction route. By employing a facile solution-based synthetic strategy, we were able to obtain phase-pure orthorhombic CZGS in nanocrystalline form at a much lower reaction temperature. Prior to this work, the colloidal synthesis of single-phase orthorhombic CZGS on the nanoscale has never been reported. We find that the use of an appropriate combination of coordinating solvents and precursors is crucial to the sole formation of this metastable phase in solution. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our experimental results. Because CZGS consists of environmentally benign metal components, it is regarded as a promising alternative material to the technologically useful yet toxic cadmium-containing semiconductors. The orthorhombic CZGS nanocrystals display strong photon absorption in the visible spectrum and are photocatalytically active in dye degradation under visible-light illumination.The orthorhombic polymorph of Cu2ZnGeS4 (CZGS) is a metastable wurtzite-derived phase that can only be prepared in the bulk form by extensive heating at high temperatures (>=790 °C) when using the conventional solid-state reaction route. By employing a facile solution-based synthetic strategy, we were able to obtain phase-pure orthorhombic CZGS in nanocrystalline form at a much lower reaction temperature. Prior to this work, the colloidal synthesis of single-phase orthorhombic CZGS on the nanoscale has never been reported. We find that the use of an appropriate combination of coordinating solvents and precursors is crucial to the sole formation of this metastable phase in solution. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our experimental results. Because CZGS consists of environmentally benign metal components, it is

  16. Colloidal nanocrystals of orthorhombic Cu2ZnGeS4: phase-controlled synthesis, formation mechanism and photocatalytic behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cong-Min; Regulacio, Michelle D; Ye, Chen; Lim, Suo Hon; Lua, Shun Kuang; Xu, Qing-Hua; Dong, Zhili; Xu, An-Wu; Han, Ming-Yong

    2015-02-21

    The orthorhombic polymorph of Cu2ZnGeS4 (CZGS) is a metastable wurtzite-derived phase that can only be prepared in the bulk form by extensive heating at high temperatures (≥790 °C) when using the conventional solid-state reaction route. By employing a facile solution-based synthetic strategy, we were able to obtain phase-pure orthorhombic CZGS in nanocrystalline form at a much lower reaction temperature. Prior to this work, the colloidal synthesis of single-phase orthorhombic CZGS on the nanoscale has never been reported. We find that the use of an appropriate combination of coordinating solvents and precursors is crucial to the sole formation of this metastable phase in solution. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our experimental results. Because CZGS consists of environmentally benign metal components, it is regarded as a promising alternative material to the technologically useful yet toxic cadmium-containing semiconductors. The orthorhombic CZGS nanocrystals display strong photon absorption in the visible spectrum and are photocatalytically active in dye degradation under visible-light illumination. PMID:25619770

  17. MECHANISMS OF PHASE FORMATION IN THE VITRIFICATION OF HIGH-FERROUS SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB2 HLW SLUDGE SURROGATE - 9300

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2008-08-27

    Phase formation mechanisms associated with the vitrification of high-ferrous Savannah River Site (SRS) Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) high level waste surrogate were studied by infrared spectroscopy (IRS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two mixtures at 50 wt% waste loading with commercially available Frit 320 (Li{sub 2}O - 8 wt %, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 8 wt %, Na{sub 2}O - 12 wt %, SiO{sub 2} - 72 wt %) and batch chemicals (LiOH {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}) to represent the frit formulation were prepared as slurries with a water content of {approx}50 wt%. The mixtures were air-dried at a temperature of 115 C and heat-treated at 500, 700, 900, 1000, 1100, 1200, and 1300 C for 1 hr at each temperature. Infrared spectra and XRD patterns of the products produced at each temperature were recorded. In both mixtures prepared using frit and batch chemicals to represent the frit, phase formation reactions were completed within the temperature range between 900 and 1000 C. However, residual quartz was still present in glass produced from the mixture with batch chemicals even at 1100 C. Although, the phase composition and structure of the glassy products obtained from both mixtures at temperatures over 1000 C were similar, the products obtained from the mixture using actual frit were more homogeneous than those from the mixture with batch chemicals. Thus, the use of frit rather than batch chemicals reduced the temperature range of phase formation and provided for production of higher quality glass.

  18. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Dai, Fuping; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic compound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they seldom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of solute solubility.

  19. Complementary Studies of Phase Formation During Fabrication of Fe0.65Co0.35 Nanoparticles by Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manh, Do Hung; Tung, D. K.; Phong, L. T. H.; Phuc, Nguyen Xuan; Phong, P. T.; Jutimoosik, Jaru; Yimnirun, Rattikorn

    2016-05-01

    Fe-Co nanoparticles were prepared by mechanical alloying in air with various milling times from 0 h to 10 h and annealing temperatures in the range from 773 K to 973 K. The combined use of both conventional x-ray diffraction (XRD) and synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on the phase formation and the oxidation state of the materials. XRD patterns reveal a secondary phase of Fe3O4 that is present in as-milled samples and those annealed in Ar + H2 (5%) at temperatures of up to 600°C. This secondary phase disappeared for annealing temperatures of over 700°C. Meanwhile, analyses of Fe K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra clearly showed that the local structure around Fe of all samples were of a bcc structure and had the oxidation state of +0. Most importantly, the ratio of bcc and hcp structures was also extracted from the Co K-edge XANES and the measured K-weighted EXAFS spectra of the alloyed Fe-Co samples. Moreover, magnetization measurements at room temperature indicated that the saturation magnetization ( M s) increased with increasing milling time and annealing temperature. While the former behavior is assigned to the Fe-Co alloy formation, we believe the effects of reducing the oxidation of the annealed samples to be the major cause of the enhanced M s. The dependence of coercivity ( H c) on milling time and annealing temperature was also investigated and discussed.

  20. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cm-3. The photolysis rate of NO2 is adjustable between 0 and 0.49 min-1. At 298 K under dry conditions, the average wall loss rates of NO, NO2 and O3 were measured to be 1.41 × 10-4 min-1, 1.39 × 10-4 min-1 and 1.31 × 10-4 min-1, respectively, and the particle number wall loss rate was measured to be 0.17 h-1. Auxiliary mechanisms of this chamber are determined and included in the Master Chemical Mechanism to evaluate and model propene-NOx-air irradiation experiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high-quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy Sciences (GIG-CAS), smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase chemistry and secondary aerosol formation.

  1. Diagenetic Microcrystalline Opal Varieties from the Monterey Formation, CA: HRTEM Study of Structures and Phase Transformation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, Sherry L.; Wenk, H.-R.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Microcrystalline opal varieties form as intermediary precipitates during the diagenetic transformation of biogenically precipitated non-crystalline opal (opal-A) to microquartz. With regard to the Monterey Formation of California, X-ray powder diffraction studies have shown that a decrease in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT toward that of cristobalite occurs with increasing diagenesis. The initial timing of opal-CT/quartz formation and the value of the primary opal-CT d-spacing, are influenced by the sediment. lithology. Transmission electron microscopy methods (CTEM/HRTEM) were used to investigate the structure of the diagenetic phases and establish transformation mechanisms between the varieties of microcrystalline opals in charts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation. HRTEM images revealed that the most common fibrous varieties of microcrystalline opals contain varying amounts of structural disorder. Finite lamellar units of cristobalite-and tridymite-type. layer sequences were found to be randomly stacked in a direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Disordered and ordered fibers were found to have coprecipitated within the same radial fiber bundles that formed within the matrix of the Most siliceous samples. HRTEM images, which reveal that the fibers within radial and lepispheric fiber bundles branch non-crystallographically, support an earlier proposal that microspheres in chert grow via a spherulitic growth mechanism. A less common variety of opal-CT was found to be characterized by non-parallel (low-angle) stacking sequences that often contain twinned lamellae. Tabular-shaped crystals of orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) were also identified in the porcelanite samples. A shift in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT has been interpreted as an indication of solid-state ordering g toward a predominantly cristobalite structure, (opal-C). Domains of opal-C were identified as topotactically-oriented overgrowths on discrete Sections of opal-CT fibers and as

  2. Control of Y₂O₃ phase and its nanostructure formation through a very high energy mechanical milling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.K.; Park, E.K.; Park, J.J.; Rhee, C.K.

    2013-05-01

    The formation behavior of Y₂O₃ ceramic particles was studied by employing a very high energy ball milling (milling energy: ~165 kJ/g·hit, milling speed: 1000 rpm). Both the XRD and HRTEM studies revealed that the high impact strain energy generated during the milling caused a drastic phase transition from the original C-type cubic (space group Ia3, a=10.58 Å) to the metastable B-type monoclinic (space group C2/m, a=13.89 Å), finally followed by a partial solid-state amorphization. The cubic phase was difficult to be reduced down to smaller than 10 nm, while the monoclinic phase was stabilized at sizes smaller than 10 nm with a mean crystallite size of 7.57 nm. Consequently, the existence of Y₂O₃ at a nanoscale smaller than 10 nm is possible by forming metastable monoclinic crystals, which are strain-induced. - Graphical abstract: The fig shows the solid-state phase formation of Y₂O₃ by very high energy input into the particles during milling: ordered body-centered cubic phase (space group Ia3, a=10.58 Å) nanocrystalline monoclinic phase (space group C2/m, a=13.89 Å) disordered monoclinic phase partial amorphous phase. The formation of Y₂O₃ smaller than 10 nm was strongly dependent on whether the phase transition from cubic to monoclinic occurred. Highlights: • This paper analyses very high energy milling behavior of coarse Y₂O₃ particles. • A drastic phase transition from cubic to monoclinic occurred with a partial amorphization. • An existence of Y₂O₃ smaller than 10 nm is possible by forming strain-induced monoclinic crystals.

  3. Impacts of aqueous phase radical mechanism of oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) on SOA formation: on the prevailing role of dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, P.; Ervens, B.; Siekmann, F.; Vassalo, L.; Ravier, S.; Clement, J.; Monod, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is now recognized that the aqueous phase photochemistry of organic compounds in cloud droplets and deliquescent aerosol particles lead to the formation of oligomers and thus it might produce a substantial amount of atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) with unique properties. However, the chemical mechanisms leading to these oligomers are still poorly understood, and consequently, their atmospheric impacts are difficult to assess. The goal of this study was to investigate the atmospheric impact of an aqueous phase radical mechanism of oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK: one of the main reaction products of isoprene) on SOA formation. Aqueous phase photooxidation of MVK was investigated in a photoreactor using photolysis of H2O2 as OH radical generator. Electrospray high resolution mass spectrometry analysis of the solutions brought clear evidence for the formation of oligomer systems having a mass range of up to 1800 Da within less than 15 minutes of reaction. Highest oligomer formation rates were obtained under conditions of low dissolved oxygen, highest temperature and highest MVK initial concentrations. A radical mechanism of polymerization is proposed to explain this oligomer formation. Furthermore, we quantified the total amount of carbon present in oligomers, and the initial radical branching ratios. Kinetic parameters of the proposed oligomerization mechanism are constrained by means of a box model that is able to reproduce the temporal evolution of intermediates and products as observed in the laboratory experiments. Additional model simulations for atmospherically-relevant conditions will be presented that show the extent to which these radical processes contribute to SOA formation in the multiphase system as compared to other aqueous phase as well as traditional SOA sources.

  4. Morphology selective preparation and formation mechanism of graphene nanoribbons from graphite by liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2016-02-01

    The paper studied preparation and formation mechanism of free-standing 3D graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) from graphite by pulsed laser ablation in liquid. The method to fabricate freestanding graphene nanoribbons directly was simple and controllable, which does not need other precursor materials and has no byproducts. Prepared graphene nanoribbons are shown composed of up to 14 layers of graphene, spaced about 0.30-0.35 nm and have a length of hundreds of nanometers. Formation mechanism of graphene nanoribbons was proposed based on the interaction between laser and material which can be demonstrated that the exfoliation of GNRs is a carbon plasma collision connecting-graphene segments-graphene sheets-multilayer graphene-graphene nanoribbons process. The high degree of repeatability and particularity found in the obtained GNRs might suggest their unique advantages and potential applications in nano-devices and spin electronics.

  5. Effects of sigma-phase formation on some mechanical properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy (IN-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of sigma phase formation on an extruded and forged nickel base superalloy with the composition of the casting alloy IN-100 was studied. By adding only aluminum and titanium to remelt stock, three compositions were produced which had varying propensities for sigma formation. These compositions were given a four step heat treatment and were stress-ruptured or tensile tested. The very sigma prone composition had a shorter rupture life than the sigma-free or moderately sigma prone compositions when tested at 843 and 885 C. Elongation in room temperature tensile tests was considerably lower for the very sigma prone composition than for the other two wrought compositions after prolonged exposure at 732 or 843 C.

  6. Isoprene and terpene gas-phase mechanisms and their effect on ozone formation over the regional scale

    SciTech Connect

    Stockwell, W.R.; Kuhn, M.; Seefeld, S.; Kirchner, F.

    1997-12-31

    Ozone is produced through the photo-oxidation of nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds. Biogenic emissions are an important source of reactive organic compounds such as isoprene and terpenes. Their reactions contribute to the production of ozone and aerosol particles. The photo-oxidation of isoprene and terpene affect the atmosphere`s nitrogen budget through the formation of nitrates and peroxyacetyl nitrates (PAN). Biogenic compounds also affect hydroperoxide formation rates. The authors have developed new oxidation mechanisms for isoprene, a-pinene and d-limonene based upon recent laboratory results. However, many unknowns remain in the experimental data and it was necessary to complete the a-pinene and d-limonene mechanism by using reactions that were analogous to known reactions for alkenes of lower carbon number. The new mechanism for isoprene, a-pinene and d-limonene was successfully tested against smog chamber runs. The authors will present the new biogenic mechanisms, compare simulations with environmental chamber runs and show results of simulations for typical urban, rural and remote conditions. They will show evaluations of the influence of biogenic emissions on the concentrations of ozone, nitrates, hydroperoxides and peroxynitrates over the regional scale.

  7. Mechanism of GEMS formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R

    2004-03-10

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were examined using 200 keV analytical transmission electron microscopy. The morphologies and crystallography of embedded relict grains reveal that GEMS are pseudomorphs formed by irradiation processing of crystals free-floating in space. Some GEMS retain a compositional and morphological ''memory'' of the crystal from which they formed. Pseudomorphism rules out condensation, annealing, flash heating, or shock melting as alternative mechanisms of GEMS formation. A significant and often dominant fraction of the atoms in GEMS were sputtered deposited from other grains. Therefore, a normal (solar) isotopic composition is not a reliable indicator of whether GEMS formed in the solar system or in presolar interstellar or circumstellar environments.

  8. Formation mechanism of superconducting phase and its three-dimensional architecture in pseudo-single-crystal KxFe2-ySe2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yong; Xing, Qingfeng; Straszheim, Warren E.; Marshman, Jeff; Pedersen, Pal; McLaughlin, Richard; Lograsso, Thomas A.

    2016-02-11

    Here, we report how the superconducting phase forms in pseudo-single-crystal KxFe2-ySe2. In situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation reveals that, as an order-disorder transition occurs, on cooling, most of the high-temperature iron-vacancy-disordered phase gradually changes into the iron-vacancy-ordered phase whereas a small quantity of the high-temperature phase retains its structure and aggregates to the stripes with more iron concentration but less potassium concentration compared to the iron-vacancy-ordered phase. The stripes that are generally recognized as the superconducting phase are actually formed as a remnant of the high-temperature phase with a compositional change after an “imperfect” order-disorder transition. It should bemore » emphasized that the phase separation in pseudo-single-crystal KxFe2-ySe2 is caused by the iron-vacancy order-disorder transition. The shrinkage of the high-temperature phase and the expansion of the newly created iron-vacancy-ordered phase during the phase separation rule out the mechanism of spinodal decomposition proposed in an early report [Wang et al, Phys. Rev. B 91, 064513 (2015)]. Since the formation of the superconducting phase relies on the occurrence of the iron-vacancy order-disorder transition, it is impossible to synthesize a pure superconducting phase by a conventional solid state reaction or melt growth. By focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy, we further demonstrate that the superconducting phase forms a contiguous three-dimensional architecture composed of parallelepipeds that have a coherent orientation relationship with the iron-vacancy-ordered phase.« less

  9. Phase space quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszak, Maciej; Domański, Ziemowit

    2012-02-01

    This paper develops an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics known as the phase space quantum mechanics or deformation quantization. It is shown that the quantization naturally arises as an appropriate deformation of the classical Hamiltonian mechanics. More precisely, the deformation of the point-wise product of observables to an appropriate noncommutative ⋆-product and the deformation of the Poisson bracket to an appropriate Lie bracket are the key elements in introducing the quantization of classical Hamiltonian systems. The formalism of the phase space quantum mechanics is presented in a very systematic way for the case of any smooth Hamiltonian function and for a very wide class of deformations. The considered class of deformations and the corresponding ⋆-products contains as a special case all deformations which can be found in the literature devoted to the subject of the phase space quantum mechanics. Fundamental properties of ⋆-products of observables, associated with the considered deformations are presented as well. Moreover, a space of states containing all admissible states is introduced, where the admissible states are appropriate pseudo-probability distributions defined on the phase space. It is proved that the space of states is endowed with a structure of a Hilbert algebra with respect to the ⋆-multiplication. The most important result of the paper shows that developed formalism is more fundamental than the axiomatic ordinary quantum mechanics which appears in the presented approach as the intrinsic element of the general formalism. The equivalence of two formulations of quantum mechanics is proved by observing that the Wigner-Moyal transform has all properties of the tensor product. This observation allows writing many previous results found in the literature in a transparent way, from which the equivalence of the two formulations of quantum mechanics follows naturally. In addition, examples of a free particle and a simple harmonic

  10. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  11. Mechanistic Studies Of Combustion And Structure Formation During Combustion Synthesis Of Advanced Materials: Phase Separation Mechanism For Bio-Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, A.; Lau, C.; Mukasyan, A.

    2003-01-01

    Among all implant materials, Co-Cr-Mo alloys demonstrate perhaps the most useful balance of resistance to corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with strength and biocompatibility [1]. Currently, these widely used alloys are produced by conventional furnace technology. Owing to high melting points of the main alloy elements (e.g. Tm.p.(Co) 1768 K), high-temperature furnaces and long process times (several hours) are required. Therefore, attempts to develop more efficient and flexible methods for production of such alloys with superior properties are of great interest. The synthesis of materials using combustion phenomena is an advanced approach in powder metallurgy [2]. The process is characterized by unique conditions involving extremely fast heating rates (up to 10(exp 6 K/s), high temperatures (up to 3500 K), and short reaction times (on the order of seconds). As a result, combustion synthesis (CS) offers several attractive advantages over conventional metallurgical processing and alloy development technologies. The foremost is that solely the heat of chemical reaction (instead of an external source) supplies the energy for the synthesis. Also, simple equipment, rather than energy-intensive high-temperature furnaces, is sufficient. This work was devoted to experiments on CS of Co-based alloys by utilizing thermite (metal oxide-reducing metal) reactions, where phase separation subsequently produces materials with tailored compositions and properties. Owing to high reaction exothermicity, the CS process results in a significant increase of temperature (up to 3000 C), which is higher than melting points of all products. Since the products differ in density, phase separation may be a gravitydriven process: the heavy (metallic phase) settles while the light (slag) phase floats. The goal was to determine if buoyancy is indeed the major mechanism that controls phase segregation.

  12. Deformation-phase transformation coupling mechanism of white layer formation in high speed machining of FGH95 Ni-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jin; Liu, zhanqiang; Lv, Shaoyu

    2014-02-01

    Ni-based superalloy represents a significant metal portion of the aircraft critical structural and engine components. When these critical structural components in aerospace industry are manufactured with the objective to reach high reliability levels and excellent service performance, surface integrity is one of the most relevant parameter used for evaluating the quality of finish machined surfaces. In the study of surface integrity, the formation white layer is a very important research topic. The formation of white layer on the Ni-based superalloy machined surface will reduce the machined parts service performance and fatigue life. This paper was conducted to determine the effects of cutting speed on white layer formation in high speed machining of FGH95 Ni-based superalloy. Optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to analyze the elements and microstructures of white layer and bulk materials. The statistical analysis for grain numbers was executed to study the influence of cutting speed on the grain refinement in the machined surface. The investigation results showed that white layer exhibits significantly different microstructures with the bulk materials. It shows densification, no obvious structural features characteristic. The microstructure and phase of Ni-based solid solution changed during cutting process. The increase of cutting speed causes the increase of white layer thickness when the cutting speed is less than 2000 m/min. However, white layer thickness reduces with the cutting speed further increase. The higher the cutting speed, the more serious grains refinement in machined surface. 2-D FEM for machining FGH95 were carried out to simulate the cutting process and obtained the cutting temperature field, cutting strain field and strain rate field. The impact mechanisms of cutting temperature, cutting strain and strain rates on white layer formation were analyzed. At last, deformation-phase transformation

  13. Mechanism and modeling of saw-tooth structure formation in the L1{sub 2}-L1{sub 0} two-phase system

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bouar, Y.; Khachaturyan, A.G.

    2000-05-11

    The strain-accommodating mechanism of formation of the saw-tooth microstructure in the LI{sub 2} + LI{sub 0} two-phase ordered system is proposed. To describe the atomic scale kinetics of ordering and decomposition in this system, the master equation, which explicitly incorporates the effect of the transformation strain, is formulated. It is used to simulate the precipitation of the LI{sub 0} phase from the LI{sub 2} parent phase in the Co-Pt alloy. The computer simulation shows that the decomposition occurs heterogeneously on antiphase boundaries of the LI{sub 2} structure if the composition is near the solubility limit of the LI{sub 2} phase. It eventually produces the saw-tooth microstructure. The decomposition transforms the (010) anti-phase boundary into a layer of the single-variant tetragonal LI{sub 0} phase separating the LI{sub 2} antiphase domains. Later, the strain accommodation transforms this single-variant LI{sub 0} phase layer into the saw-tooth pattern. The simulation results are in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with out TEM images of Co{sub 38.5}Pt{sub 61.5}.

  14. In situ Measurements of Gas- and Particle-Phase Organic Compounds: Insights for SOA Formation Mechanisms and Contributions of SOA to Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Worton, D. R.; Isaacman, G. A.; Weber, R.; Liu, S.; Day, D. A.; Markovic, M. Z.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Russell, L. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    To investigate formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the contribution of SOA to organic aerosols, semi-volatile and intermediate-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs/IVOCs) in both gas and particle phases were measured using a modified Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatograph (TAG) instrument in Bakersfield, CA during the CALifornia at the NEXus between air quality and climate (CALNEX) campaign from 31 May through 27 June, 2010. More than 150 organic compounds were identified, spanning a wide range of volatility and functionality. Quantified compounds included organic tracers for primary and secondary organic sources, such as alkanes, PAHs, acids, hopanes and ketones. Hourly gas/particle partitioning was determined by a denuder difference method where the sample flow alternated every other sample through an active charcoal multi-channel denuder that efficiently removed gas-phase components. Gas/particle partitioning of three SOA tracers (phthalic acid, pinonaldehyde and 6, 10, 14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone) was investigated to understand the formation mechanisms of SOA for different functional group classes in the ambient atmosphere. Comparison with Pankow gas/particle partitioning theory, observed particle-phase phthalic acid and pinonaldehyde, suggests formation by other mechanisms than gas-to-particle condensation. Source attribution is performed using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of speciated particle-phase TAG data along with total submicron organic aerosol (OA) measured by an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). SOA accounts for a major component of OA and the contribution of biogenic SOA to total SOA is comparable to anthropogenic SOA during nights.

  15. CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN ACID RAIN. VOLUME 2. INVESTIGATION OF KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF AQUEOUS-PHASE PEROXIDE FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aqueous-phase reactions of O3 with a number of species have been studied in an effort to identify pathways leading to the production of hydrogen peroxide in solution. The aqueous-phase systems studied included the decomposition of O3 in pure water and the interaction of O3 wi...

  16. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Cr(VI) Formation via the Oxidation of Cr(III) Solid Phases by Chlorine in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Chebeir, Michelle; Liu, Haizhou

    2016-01-19

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI), typically existing as the oxyanion form of CrO4(2-), is being considered for more stringent drinking water standards by regulatory agencies. Cr(VI) can be inadvertently produced via the oxidation of trivalent chromium Cr(III) solids. This study investigated the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr(III) solids oxidation by chlorine in drinking water and associated Cr(VI) formation. Batch experiments were carried out with three Cr(III) solids of environmental relevance, i.e., chromium hydroxide Cr(OH)3(s), chromium oxide Cr2O3(s), and copper chromite Cu2Cr2O5(s). Impacts of water chemical parameters including pH (6.0-8.5) and bromide concentration (0-5 mg/L) were examined. Results showed that the rapid oxidation of Cr(III) solid phases by chlorine was accompanied by Cr(VI) formation and an unexpected production of dissolved oxygen. Analysis of reaction stoichiometry indicated the existence of Cr intermediate species that promoted the autocatalytic decay of chlorine. An increase in pH modestly enhanced Cr(VI) formation due to changes of reactive Cr(III) surface hydroxo species. Bromide, a trace chemical constituent in source waters, exhibited a catalytic effect on Cr(VI) formation due to an electron shuttle mechanism between Cr(III) and chlorine and the bypass of Cr intermediate formation. The kinetics data obtained from this study suggest that the oxidation of Cr(III) solids by chlorine in water distribution systems can contribute to Cr(VI) occurrence in tap water, especially in the presence of a trace level of bromide. PMID:26647114

  17. Three-Dimensional Multiscale Modeling of Stable Intermediate State Formation Mechanism in a Single Active Layer- Phase Change Memory Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, Onur; Cinar, Ibrahim; Karakas, Vedat; Aslan, Ozgur Burak; Gokce, Aisha; Stipe, Barry; Katine, Jordan A.; Aktas, Gulen; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2014-03-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) appears as a potential memory technology with its superior scalability which could be enhanced by a boost in storage density via multiple-bit per cell functionality. Given the large contrast between set and reset states of a PCM cell it is yet unclear whether it is possible to create intermediate logic states reproducibly and controllably in a device with a single active phase change layer. Here we report the results of a 3D finite element model that pinpoints the direct effect of current distribution and the indirect effect of device top contact fabrication induced defects through modification of phase change kinetics (crystallite nucleation and growth rates) on stabilization of intermediate states. A comprehensive picture of the electrical, thermal and phase change dynamics is obtained using a multiphysics approach. Our study shows that homogeneous and heterogeneous phase transition can be induced in the active region such that nonuniform temperature distribution and modification of switching dynamics with various contact shapes and sizes play a major role in the stabilization of a mixed phase state. This work has been supported by the European Commission FP7 Marie Curie IRG grant: PCM-256281 and TUBITAK grant: 113F385.

  18. Comparison of experimental approaches to study selective properties of thick phase-amplitude holograms recorded in materials with diffusion-based formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Vladimir; Klepinina, Mariia; Veniaminov, Andrey; Angervaks, Aleksandr; Shcheulin, Aleksandr; Ryskin, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Volume holographic gratings, both transmission and reflection-type, may be employed as one-dimensional pho- tonic crystals. More complex two- and three-dimensional holographic photonic-crystalline structures can be recorded using several properly organized beams. As compared to colloidal photonic crystals, their holographic counterparts let minimize distortions caused by multiple inner boundaries of the media. Unfortunately, it's still hard to analyze spectral response of holographic structures. This work presents the results of thick holographic gratings analysis based on spectral-angular selectivity contours approximation. The gratings were recorded in an additively colored fluorite crystal and a glassy polymer doped with phenanthrenequinone (PQ-PMMA). The two materials known as promising candidates for 3D diffraction optics including photonic crystals, employ diffusion-based mechanisms of grating formation. The surfaces of spectral-angular selectivity were obtained in a single scan using a white-light LED, rotable table and a matrix spectrometer. The data expressed as 3D plots make apparent visual estimation of the grating phase/amplitude nature, noninearity of recording, etc., and provide sufficient information for numerical analysis. The grating recorded in the crystal was found to be a mixed phase-amplitude one, with different contributions of refractive index and absorbance modulation at different wavelengths, and demonstrated three diffraction orders corresponding to its three spatial harmonics originating from intrinsically nonlinear diffusion-drift recording mechanism. Contrastingly, the grating in the polymeric medium appeared purely phase and linearly recorded.

  19. Suppression of Boride Formation in Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Pairings of Parent Superalloy Materials with Different Compositions and Grain Structures and Resulting Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuer, Susanne; Singer, Robert F.

    2014-07-01

    Two Ni-based superalloys, columnar grained Alloy 247 and single-crystal PWA1483, are joined by transient liquid phase bonding using an amorphous brazing foil containing boron as a melting point depressant. At lower brazing temperatures, two different morphologies of borides develop in both base materials: plate-like and globular ones. Their ratio to each other is temperature dependent. With very high brazing temperatures, the deleterious boride formation in Alloy 247 can be totally avoided, probably because the three-phase-field moves to higher alloying element contents. For the superalloy PWA1483, the formation of borides cannot be completely avoided at high brazing temperatures as incipient melting occurs. During subsequent solidification of these areas, Chinese-script-like borides precipitate. The mechanical properties (tensile tests at room and elevated temperatures and short-term creep rupture tests at elevated temperatures) for brazed samples without boride precipitation are very promising. Tensile strengths and creep times to 1 pct strain are comparable, respectively, higher than the ones of the weaker parent material for all tested temperatures and creep conditions (from 90 to 100 pct rsp. 175 to 250 pct).

  20. Mechanical and kinetic study on gas-phase formation of dinitro-naphthalene from 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zixiao; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-08-01

    Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have received an increasing number of considerations because of their higher mutagens than parent PAHs. In this paper, the formation of dinitro-naphthalene was investigated mechanistically using 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene as precursors with the aid of high-accuracy quantum chemistry calculation. The geometrical parameters, as well as vibrational frequencies, were calculated at the BB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. Water molecule plays an important role in the formation of dinitro-naphthalene. The rate constants were deduced by canonical variational transition-state theory with small curvature tunneling contribution over the temperature range of 273-333 K. Meanwhile, the Arrhenius formulas were fitted for the OH addition of both 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene. The calculated overall rate constants for 1-nitronaphthalene and 2-nitronaphthalene at 298 K and 1 atm are 7.43 × 10(-13) and 7.48 × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The rate constants of NO3 addition to 1-nitronaphthalene and 2-nitronaphthalene by RRKM method at 298 K and 1 atm are 3.55 × 10(-15) and 3.47 × 10(-15) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. This study provides a comprehensive investigation of the formation process of dinitro-naphthalenes, initiated by OH and NO3 radicals and should facilitate to illuminate its atmospheric source. Oxygen may probably be competitive with the second NO2 addition step when the concentration of NO2 is at low level. PMID:27174822

  1. Analysis of interface formation mechanism in GaN double-polarity selective-area growth by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuze, Kenta; Osumi, Noriyuki; Fujita, Yohei; Inoue, Yoku; Nakano, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    The fabrication of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) crystals by selective-area growth on the two asymmetrically polar surfaces of GaN is examined. We attempted the fabrication of GaN-QPM crystals by one-time growth using a carbon mask. For GaN double-polarity selective-area growth (DP-SAG), we investigated the effect of varied nitriding times of the Al2O3 templates patterned with the carbon mask. We optimized the nitriding conditions for the DP-SAG process, and evaluated the substrate fabricated by the optimized DP-SAG process. In addition, we examined the interface formation mechanism of DP-GaN fabricated by GaN DP-SAG process. We determined that it is possible to fabricate DP-GaN with a sharp interface by optimizing the growth conditions.

  2. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the Southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Krechmer, J.; Zhu, L.; Kim, P. S.; Miller, C. C.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Hanisco, T. F.; Wolfe, G. M.; Arkinson, H. L.; Pye, H. O. T.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; McNeill, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for isoprene SOA formation coupled to a detailed gas-phase isoprene oxidation scheme. The mechanism is based on aerosol reactive uptake probabilities (γ) for water-soluble isoprene oxidation products, including sensitivity to aerosol acidity and nucleophile concentrations. We apply this mechanism to simulation of aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations over the Southeast US in summer 2013 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) over the Southeast US are such that the peroxy radicals produced from isoprene oxidation (ISOPO2) react significantly with both NO (high-NOx pathway) and HO2 (low-NOx pathway), leading to different suites of isoprene SOA precursors. We find a mean SOA mass yield of 3.3 % from isoprene oxidation, consistent with the observed relationship of OA and formaldehyde (a product of isoprene oxidation). The yield is mainly contributed by two immediate gas-phase precursors, isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX, 58 % of isoprene SOA) from the low-NOx pathway and glyoxal (28 %) from both low- and high-NOx pathways. This speciation is consistent with observations of IEPOX SOA from SOAS and SEAC4RS. Observations show a strong relationship between IEPOX SOA and sulfate aerosol that we explain as due to the indirect effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume, rather than a direct mechanistic role for sulfate. Isoprene SOA concentrations increase as NOx emissions decrease (favoring the low-NOx pathway for isoprene oxidation), but decrease as SO2 emissions decrease (due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume). The US EPA projects 2013-2025 decreases in anthropogenic emissions of 34 % for NOx (leading to

  3. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Krechmer, J.; Zhu, L.; Kim, P. S.; Miller, C. C.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Hanisco, T. F.; Wolfe, G. M.; Arkinson, H. L.; Pye, H. O. T.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; McNeill, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for isoprene SOA formation coupled to a detailed gas-phase isoprene oxidation scheme. The mechanism is based on aerosol reactive uptake coefficients (γ) for water-soluble isoprene oxidation products, including sensitivity to aerosol acidity and nucleophile concentrations. We apply this mechanism to simulation of aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations over the southeast US in summer 2013 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) over the southeast US are such that the peroxy radicals produced from isoprene oxidation (ISOPO2) react significantly with both NO (high-NOx pathway) and HO2 (low-NOx pathway), leading to different suites of isoprene SOA precursors. We find a mean SOA mass yield of 3.3 % from isoprene oxidation, consistent with the observed relationship of total fine organic aerosol (OA) and formaldehyde (a product of isoprene oxidation). Isoprene SOA production is mainly contributed by two immediate gas-phase precursors, isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX, 58 % of isoprene SOA) from the low-NOx pathway and glyoxal (28 %) from both low- and high-NOx pathways. This speciation is consistent with observations of IEPOX SOA from SOAS and SEAC4RS. Observations show a strong relationship between IEPOX SOA and sulfate aerosol that we explain as due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume. Isoprene SOA concentrations increase as NOx emissions decrease (favoring the low-NOx pathway for isoprene oxidation), but decrease more strongly as SO2 emissions decrease (due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) projects 2013-2025 decreases in anthropogenic emissions of

  4. Impact of solid second phases on deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed salt rocks (Kuh-e-Namak, Dashti, Iran) and rheological stratification of the Hormuz Salt Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, P.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; Schulmann, K.; Rahmati, M.; Lexa, O.; Wollenberg, U.

    2015-05-01

    Viscosity contrasts displayed in flow structures of a mountain namakier (Kuh-e-Namak - Dashti), between 'weak' second phase bearing rock salt and 'strong' pure rock salt types are studied for deformation mechanisms using detailed quantitative microstructural study. While the solid inclusions rich ("dirty") rock salts contain disaggregated siltstone and dolomite interlayers, "clean" salts reveal microscopic hematite and remnants of abundant fluid inclusions in non-recrystallized cores of porphyroclasts. Although the flow in both, the recrystallized "dirty" and "clean" salt types is accommodated by combined mechanisms of pressure-solution creep (PS), grain boundary sliding (GBS), transgranular microcracking and dislocation creep accommodated grain boundary migration (GBM), their viscosity contrasts observed in the field outcrops are explained by: 1) enhanced ductility of "dirty" salts due to increased diffusion rates along the solid inclusion-halite contacts than along halite-halite contacts, and 2) slow rates of intergranular diffusion due to dissolved iron and inhibited dislocation creep due to hematite inclusions for "clean" salt types Rheological contrasts inferred by microstructural analysis between both salt rock classes apply in general for the "dirty" salt forming Lower Hormuz and the "clean" salt forming the Upper Hormuz of the Hormuz Formation and imply strain rate gradients or decoupling along horizons of mobilized salt types of different composition and microstructure.

  5. Phase space quantum mechanics - Direct

    SciTech Connect

    Nasiri, S.; Sobouti, Y.; Taati, F.

    2006-09-15

    Conventional approach to quantum mechanics in phase space (q,p), is to take the operator based quantum mechanics of Schroedinger, or an equivalent, and assign a c-number function in phase space to it. We propose to begin with a higher level of abstraction, in which the independence and the symmetric role of q and p is maintained throughout, and at once arrive at phase space state functions. Upon reduction to the q- or p-space the proposed formalism gives the conventional quantum mechanics, however, with a definite rule for ordering of factors of noncommuting observables. Further conceptual and practical merits of the formalism are demonstrated throughout the text.

  6. Mechanism of polymer nanoparticle formation by nanoprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Li, Tingting; van Keuren, Edward

    Nanoprecipitation method is a simple and convenient way to produce nanoparticles from polymers in solution. The control of nanoparticle size and size distribution plays a pivotal role in the use of nanoprecipitation for drug delivery. We investigated various factors and initial conditions that affect the particle size, such as the initial solute concentration, solvent/non-solvent ratio and the molecular weight of the polymer samples. The results shed light on the mechanisms of particle formation and phase separation which occurs in nanoprecipitation. Spinodal decomposition, which takes place as a result of a quench to a sufficiently high supersaturation, is believed to be the main mechanism that governs the phase separation. In addition, the glass transition of the polymers will also be a key factor that contributes to the thermodynamics and kinetics of the phase separation and the resulting particle size and morphology.

  7. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for...

  8. Possible mechanisms of macrolayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Chappidi, P.R.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The high heat flux nucleate boiling region, also called the vapor mushroom region, has been shown to have a thin liquid layer on the heater surface under the large mushroom-shaped vapor bubbles that grow from the heater surface. The name given to this liquid layer is the macrolayer to differentiate it from the microlayer that exists under the discrete bubbles found at lower heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling region. Typical thicknesses of this macrolayer range from 50 to 500 {mu}m for water on a flat horizontal boiling surface and depend upon the heat flux. Thus, the macrolayer is thicker than the wedge-shaped microlayers, found under discrete bubbles, which range in thickness from 1 to 10 {mu}m. Although the mechanism of microlayer formation and its evaporation is conceptually simple that of the macrolayer is still not understood. This paper critically compares the potential mechanisms proposed for macrolayer formation. These mechanisms include the Helmholtz instability applied to the vapor stem above active nucleation sites, liquid trapped by lateral coalescence of discrete bubbles that initially form during the mushroom bubble's waiting period, and the limitation of liquid resupply at mushroom departure as a result of vapor flow from the active nucleation sites.

  9. Possible mechanisms of macrolayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Chappidi, P.R.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    The high heat flux nucleate boiling region, also called the vapor mushroom region, has been shown to have a thin liquid layer on the heater surface under the large mushroom-shaped vapor bubbles that grow from the heater surface. The name given to this liquid layer is the macrolayer to differentiate it from the microlayer that exists under the discrete bubbles found at lower heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling region. Typical thicknesses of this macrolayer range from 50 to 500 {mu}m for water on a flat horizontal boiling surface and depend upon the heat flux. Thus, the macrolayer is thicker than the wedge-shaped microlayers, found under discrete bubbles, which range in thickness from 1 to 10 {mu}m. Although the mechanism of microlayer formation and its evaporation is conceptually simple that of the macrolayer is still not understood. This paper critically compares the potential mechanisms proposed for macrolayer formation. These mechanisms include the Helmholtz instability applied to the vapor stem above active nucleation sites, liquid trapped by lateral coalescence of discrete bubbles that initially form during the mushroom bubble`s waiting period, and the limitation of liquid resupply at mushroom departure as a result of vapor flow from the active nucleation sites.

  10. Effect of silicon on the phase formation in mechanically activated systems based on Fe(75)C(25): Temperature-induced transformations in mechanosynthesized composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. A.; Chulkina, A. A.; Ul'yanov, A. I.; Elsukov, E. P.

    2012-04-01

    Transformations realized in mechanosynthesized amorphous-nanocrystalline Fe(75)C(25 - x)Si( x) (0 ≤ x ≤ 10 at %) alloys during heating have been studied using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements, X-ray diffraction, and metallography. In contrast to mechanosynthesized alloys consisting of α-Fe, Fe3C, and amorphous phases, the annealed alloys with x > 5 at % were found to exhibit the formation of an additional phase such as Fe5SiC. After heating to 700 and 800°C, the powder particles of alloys contain a large amount of uniformly distributed graphite particles of ˜0.5 μm in size. The formation of particles results from the cementite decomposition, which is accelerated at the expense of partial silicon dissolution in cementite and in the presence of α-Fe nanograins as well.

  11. New phase formation in titanium aluminide during chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaki, Akito; Ojima, Kozo; Taneda, Youji . Dept. of Mathematics and Physics)

    1994-05-01

    A chemical etching technique is widely used for metallographic observation. Because this technique is based on a local corrosion phenomenon on a sample, the etching mechanism, particularly for two-phase alloys, can be understood by electrochemical consideration. This paper describes formation of a new phase in a Ti-45Al (at.%) titanium aluminide during chemical etching, and the experimental results are discussed electrochemically.

  12. Geometrical Phases in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Joy Julius

    In quantum mechanics, the path-dependent geometrical phase associated with a physical system, over and above the familiar dynamical phase, was initially discovered in the context of adiabatically changing environments. Subsequently, Aharonov and Anandan liberated this phase from the original formulation of Berry, which used Hamiltonians, dependent on curves in a classical parameter space, to represent the cyclic variations of the environments. Their purely quantum mechanical treatment, independent of Hamiltonians, instead used the non-trivial topological structure of the projective space of one-dimensional subspaces of an appropriate Hilbert space. The geometrical phase, in their treatment, results from a parallel transport of the time-dependent pure quantum states along a curve in this space, which is endowed with an abelian connection. Unlike Berry, they were able to achieve this without resort to an adiabatic approximation or to a time-independent eigenvalue equation. Prima facie, these two approaches are conceptually quite different. After a review of both approaches, an exposition bridging this apparent conceptual gap is given; by rigorously analyzing a model composite system, it is shown that, in an appropriate correspondence limit, the Berry phase can be recovered as a special case from the Aharonov-Anandan phase. Moreover, the model composite system is used to show that Berry's correction to the traditional Born-Oppenheimer energy spectra indeed brings the spectra closer to the exact results. Then, an experimental arrangement to measure geometrical phases associated with cyclic and non-cyclic variations of quantum states of an entangled composite system is proposed, utilizing the fundamental ideas of the recently opened field of two-particle interferometry. This arrangement not only resolves the controversy regarding the true nature of the phases associated with photon states, but also unequivocally predicts experimentally accessible geometrical phases in a

  13. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Rubie; Seth Andrew Jacobson

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so must the oxygen fugacity of the equilibrating material. The latter can occur if silicon partitions into the core and through the late delivery of oxidized material. Coupled dynamical accretion and multi-stage core formation models predict the evolving mantle and core compositions of all the terrestrial planets simultaneously and also place strong constraints on the bulk compositions and oxidation states of primitive bodies in the protoplanetary disk.

  14. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  15. Quantum-chemical study of the mechanism of formation of the pyridinium ion on an aluminosilicate surface and in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhanpeisov, N.U.; Pel'menshchikov, A.G.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Zhidomirov, G.M.

    1987-08-01

    The possibility of a pyridinium ion forming on the surface of an aluminosilicate is considered in terms of the cluster approximation of the MINDO/3-NV method proposed by the authors. The calculations show that in the first stage of absorption of pyridine on Broensted-acid-site (BAC) aluminosilicates, a hydrogen-bonded complex forms which then transforms to a pyridinium ion. The energy required to transfer a proton from the surface to the pyridine is offset by the formation of a number of C-O ..pi..-bonds. A comparison is drawn between the analogous process of the formation of an ion of pyridinium in the liquid phase, which was investigated using Germer's solvation model taking the interaction of pyridine with an aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid as an example.

  16. Early phases of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, B. J.

    1981-04-01

    Five broad areas of potential star formation in our galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds are presented. The role of gravitational collapse in concentrating matter into eventual stars is examined briefly. The five areas of research are: (1) giant molecular clouds with dimensions of 50 to 100 parsecs and masses equivalent to 100,000 or more suns; (2) the proximity of an H II emission nebula with an embedded or attached cluster of association of O and B stars to a large molecular cloud; (3) the larger so-called globules, notably the roundish and often isolated dark nebulae called Barnard objects, of which 200 or so have been identified within 500 parsecs of the sun; (4) close passage or collisions between interstellar clouds; and (5) supernova explosions. The Large Magellanic Clouds are also examined as an example of an area of potential star formation without the protection of a cosmic dust cloud. Finally, the likelihood that many new stars might possess planets and perhaps even life is discussed.

  17. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  18. Magma ocean: Mechanisms of formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal state of the Earth at the time relevant to formation of a magma ocean was dominated by the great impact that created the Moon. As shown in computer experiments, the iron in the impacting bodies quickly sank to the core of the proto-Earth, while a significant fraction of silicates was pushed far enough out beyond the geosynchronous limit to constitute the main material of the Moon. Most of any atmosphere would have been pushed aside, rather than being expelled in the impact. However, the energy remaining in the material not going to the core or expelled was still sufficient to raise its temperature some 1000's of degrees, enough to vaporize silicates and to generate a strong 'planetary wind': a hydrodynamic expansion carrying with it virtually all volatiles plus appreciable silicates. This expansion was violent and uneven in its most energetic stage, but probably the resulting magma ocean was global. The duration, until cooling, was sufficient for silicates to condense to melt and the duration was probably short. Comparison of the Earth and Venus indicates that the great impact was extraordinarily effective in removing volatiles from the proto-Earth; in particular, the enormous differences in primordial inert gases between the planets demand a catastrophic difference in origin circumstances. On the other hand, the comparison limits the amount of silicates lost by the Earth to a rather minor fraction; most of that expelled in the wind must have condensed soon enough for the silicate to fall back to Earth or be swept up by the proto-Moon. So the Earth was left with a magma ocean. The question is whether sufficient water was retained to constitute a steam atmosphere. Probably not, but unknowns affecting this question are the efficiencies of outgassing in great impacts and in subsequent convective churnings deep in the mantle. During the stage when mantle convection is turbulent, an appreciable fraction of volatiles were also retained at depth, perhaps in

  19. Phase separation and the formation of cellular bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Broedersz, Chase P.; Meir, Yigal; Wingreen, Ned S.

    Cellular bodies in eukaryotic cells spontaneously assemble to form cellular compartments. Among other functions, these bodies carry out essential biochemical reactions. Cellular bodies form micron-sized structures, which, unlike canonical cell organelles, are not surrounded by membranes. A recent in vitro experiment has shown that phase separation of polymers in solution can explain the formation of cellular bodies. We constructed a lattice-polymer model to capture the essential mechanism leading to this phase separation. We used both analytical and numerical tools to predict the phase diagram of a system of two interacting polymers, including the concentration of each polymer type in the condensed and dilute phase.

  20. Formation of phase space holes and clumps.

    PubMed

    Lilley, M K; Nyqvist, R M

    2014-04-18

    It is shown that the formation of phase space holes and clumps in kinetically driven, dissipative systems is not restricted to the near threshold regime, as previously reported and widely believed. Specifically, we observe hole-clump generation from the edges of an unmodulated phase space plateau, created via excitation, phase mixing and subsequent dissipative decay of a linearly unstable bulk plasma mode in the electrostatic bump-on-tail model. This has now allowed us to elucidate the underlying physics of the hole-clump formation process for the first time. Holes and clumps develop from negative energy waves that arise due to the sharp gradients at the interface between the plateau and the nearly unperturbed, ambient distribution and destabilize in the presence of dissipation in the bulk plasma. We confirm this picture by demonstrating that the formation of such nonlinear structures in general does not rely on a "seed" wave, only on the ability of the system to generate a plateau. In addition, we observe repetitive cycles of plateau generation and erosion, the latter due to hole-clump formation and detachment, which appear to be insensitive to initial conditions and can persist for a long time. We present an intuitive discussion of why this continual regeneration occurs. PMID:24785043

  1. Interplay between micelle formation and waterlike phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzelmann, G.; Figueiredo, W.; Girardi, M.

    2010-02-01

    A lattice model for amphiphilic aggregation in the presence of a structured waterlike solvent is studied through Monte Carlo simulations. We investigate the interplay between the micelle formation and the solvent phase transition in two different regions of temperature-density phase diagram of pure water. A second order phase transition between the gaseous (G) and high density liquid (HDL) phases that occurs at very high temperatures, and a first order phase transition between the low density liquid (LDL) and (HDL) phases that takes place at lower temperatures. In both cases, we find the aggregate size distribution curve and the critical micellar concentration as a function of the solvent density across the transitions. We show that micelle formation drives the LDL-HDL first order phase transition to lower solvent densities, while the transition G-HDL is driven to higher densities, which can be explained by the markedly different degrees of micellization in both cases. The diffusion coefficient of surfactants was also calculated in the LDL and HDL phases, changing abruptly its behavior due to the restructuring of waterlike solvent when we cross the first order LDL-HDL phase transition. To understand such behavior, we calculate the solvent density and the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule close to micelles. The curves of the interfacial solvent density and the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in the first hydration signal a local phase change of the interfacial water, clarifying the diffusion mechanism of free surfactants in the solvent.

  2. Phase Formation Behavior in Ultrathin Iron Oxide.

    PubMed

    Jõgi, Indrek; Jacobsson, T Jesper; Fondell, Mattis; Wätjen, Timo; Carlsson, Jan-Otto; Boman, Mats; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-17

    Nanostructured iron oxides, and especially hematite, are interesting for a wide range of applications ranging from gas sensors to renewable solar hydrogen production. A promising method for deposition of low-dimensional films is atomic layer deposition (ALD). Although a potent technique, ALD of ultrathin films is critically sensitive to the substrate and temperature conditions where initial formation of islands and crystallites influences the properties of the films. In this work, deposition at the border of the ALD window forming a hybrid ALD/pulsed CVD (pCVD) deposition is utilized to obtain a deposition less sensitive to the substrate. A thorough analysis of iron oxide phases formation on two different substrates, Si(100) and SiO2, was performed. Films between 3 and 50 nm were deposited and analyzed with diffraction techniques, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and optical spectroscopy. Below 10 nm nominal film thickness, island formation and phase dependent particle crystallization impose constraints for deposition of phase pure iron oxides on non-lattice-matching substrates. Films between 10 and 20 nm thickness on SiO2 could effectively be recrystallized into hematite whereas for the corresponding films on Si(100), no recrystallization occurred. For films thicker than 20 nm, phase pure hematite can be formed directly with ALD/pCVD with very low influence of the substrate on either Si or SiO2. For more lattice matched substrates such as SnO2:F, Raman spectroscopy indicated formation of the hematite phase already for films with 3 nm nominal thickness and clearly for 6 nm films. Analysis of the optical properties corroborated the analysis and showed a quantum confined blue-shift of the absorption edge for the thinnest films. PMID:26506091

  3. OH radical formation from the gas-phase reaction of ozone with terminal alkenes and the relationship between structure and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S.E.; Chung, M.Y.; Hasson, A.S.

    1999-10-14

    The reactions of ozone with alkenes have been shown recently to lead to the direct production of OH radicals in quantities that vary from 7 to 100% depending on the structure of the alkene. OH radicals are the most important oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere, and the OH-alkene reaction is a large source of new OH radicals, important in urban and rural air during both day and night. Evidence for OH formation comes both from low-pressure direct measurements and from tracer experiments at high pressure. With the goal of measuring OH formation yields with good precision, a small-ratio relative rate technique was developed. This method uses small amounts of fast-reacting aromatics and aliphatic ethers to trace OH formation yields. Here, the authors report OH formation yields for a series of terminal alkenes reacting with ozone. Measured OH yields were 0.29 {+-} 0.05, 0.24 {+-} 0.05, 0.18 {+-} 0.04, and 0.10 {+-} 0.03 for 1-butene, 1-pentene, 1-hexene, and 1-octene, respectively. For the methyl-substituted terminal alkenes methyl propene and 2-methyl-1-butene, OH yields were 0.72 {+-} 0.12 and 0.67 {+-} 0.12, respectively. The results are discussed both in terms of their atmospheric implications and the relationship between structure and OH formation.

  4. Phase formation and melt processing of Yb- 123.

    SciTech Connect

    Athur, S. P.; Putman, P.; Balachandran, U.; Salama, K.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Houston

    1998-01-01

    The formation of Yb-123 has been studied at different temperatures in air and in reduced oxygen partial pressure. It is found that the stability and/or the formation kinetics of Yb-123 phase is a major hurdle in manufacturing phase-pure Yb-123 in air. However, under reduced oxygen partial pressure, Yb-123 forms rapidly and more than 90% phase-pure Yb-123 is achieved within three sintering steps. Rods made from this powder were melt-processed in air and showed a T{sub c} of 90 K. Kinetic studies performed by interrupting the growth during the directional solidification of these rods revealed a growth mechanism similar to that of Y-123 and a maximum growth rate of 7.2 mm/h for a stable planar interface. EPMA of the interface showed the liquid to be rich in barium cuprates with a Ba:Cu ratio of 1:3.

  5. On the lag phase in amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of nanoscale amyloid fibrils from normally soluble peptides and proteins is a common form of self-assembly phenomenon that has fundamental connections with biological functions and human diseases. The kinetics of this process has been widely studied and exhibits on a macroscopic level three characteristic stages: a lag phase, a growth phase and a final plateau regime. The question of which molecular events take place during each one of these phases has been a central element in the quest for a mechanism of amyloid formation. In this review, we discuss the nature and molecular origin of the lag-phase in amyloid formation by making use of tools and concepts from physical chemistry, in particular from chemical reaction kinetics. We discuss how, in macroscopic samples, it has become apparent that the lag-phase is not a waiting time for nuclei to form. Rather, multiple parallel processes exist and typically millions of primary nuclei form during the lag phase from monomers in solution. Thus, the lag-time represents a time that is required for the nuclei that are formed early on in the reaction to grow and proliferate in order to reach an aggregate concentration that is readily detected in bulk assays. In many cases, this proliferation takes place through secondary nucleation, where fibrils may present a catalytic surface for the formation of new aggregates. Fibrils may also break (fragmentation) and thereby provide new ends for elongation. Thus, at least two – primary nucleation and elongation – and in many systems at least four – primary nucleation, elongation, secondary nucleation and fragmentation – microscopic processes occur during the lag phase. Moreover, these same processes occur during all three phases of the macroscopic aggregation process, albeit at different rates as governed by rate constants and by the concentration of reacting species at each point in time. PMID:25719972

  6. THE TWO PHASES OF GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Oser, Ludwig; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.; Burkert, Andreas; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2010-12-20

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation appear to show a 'two-phase' character with a rapid early phase at z {approx}> 2 during which 'in situ' stars are formed within the galaxy from infalling cold gas followed by an extended phase since z {approx}< 3 during which 'ex situ' stars are primarily accreted. In the latter phase, massive systems grow considerably in mass and radius by accretion of smaller satellite stellar systems formed at quite early times (z>3) outside of the virial radius of the forming central galaxy. These tentative conclusions are obtained from high-resolution re-simulations of 39 individual galaxies in a full cosmological context with present-day virial halo masses ranging from 7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} h {sup -1} {approx}formation, and energetic feedback from Type II supernova. The importance of stellar accretion increases with galaxy mass and toward lower redshift. In our simulations, lower mass galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}< 9 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} h {sup -1}) accrete about 60% of their present-day stellar mass. High-mass galaxy (M{sub *} {approx}> 1.7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} h {sup -1}) assembly is dominated by accretion and merging with about 80% of the stars added by the present day. In general the simulated galaxies approximately double their mass since z = 1. For massive systems this mass growth is not accompanied by significant star formation. The majority of the in situ created stars are formed at z>2, primarily out of cold gas flows. We recover the observational result of 'archaeological downsizing', where the most massive galaxies harbor the oldest stars. We find that this is not in contradiction with hierarchical structure

  7. Mechanically loaded myotubes affect osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Juffer, Petra; Jaspers, Richard T; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bakker, Astrid D

    2014-03-01

    In response to mechanical loading skeletal muscle produces numerous growth factors and cytokines that enter the circulation. We hypothesized that myotubes produce soluble factors that affect osteoclast formation and aimed to identify which osteoclastogenesis-modulating factors are differentially produced by mechanically stimulated myotubes. C2C12 myotubes were subjected to mechanical loading by cyclic strain for 1 h, and postincubated with or without cyclic strain for 24 h. The effect of cyclic strain on gene expression in myotubes was determined by PCR. Conditioned medium (CM) was collected from cultures of unloaded and loaded myotubes and from MLO-Y4 osteocytes. CM was added to mouse bone marrow cells containing osteoclast precursors, and after 6 days osteoclasts were counted. Compared to unconditioned medium, CM from unloaded osteocytes increased osteoclast formation, while CM from unloaded myotubes decreased osteoclast formation. Cyclic strain strongly enhanced IL-6 expression in myotubes. CM from cyclically strained myotubes increased osteoclast formation compared to CM from unloaded myotubes, but this effect did not occur in the presence of an IL-6 antibody. In conclusion, mechanically loaded myotubes secrete soluble factors, among others IL-6, which affect osteoclast formation. These results suggest that muscle could potentially affect bone homeostasis in vivo via production of growth factors and/or cytokines. PMID:24264813

  8. Nonlinear dynamic theory for photorefractive phase hologram formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D. M.; Shah, R. R.; Rabson, T. A.; Tittle, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic theory is developed for the formation of photorefractive volume phase holograms. A feedback mechanism existing between the photogenerated field and free-electron density, treated explicitly, yields the growth and saturation of the space-charge field in a time scale characterized by the coupling strength between them. The expression for the field reduces in the short-time limit to previous theories and approaches in the long-time limit the internal or photovoltaic field. Additionally, the phase of the space charge field is shown to be time-dependent.

  9. A phase-separation kinetic model for coke formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehe, I.A. . Corporate Research Lab.)

    1993-11-01

    Coke formation during the thermolysis of petroleum residua is postulated to occur by a mechanism that involves the liquid-liquid phase separation of reacted asphaltenes to form a phase that is lean in abstractable hydrogen. This mechanism provides the basis of a model that quantitatively describes the kinetics for the thermolysis of Cold Lake vacuum residuum and its deasphalted oil in an open-tube reactor at 400 C. The previously unreacted asphaltenes were found to be the fraction with the highest rate of thermal reaction but with the least extent of reaction. This not only described the appearance and disappearance of asphaltenes but also quantitatively described the variation in molecular weight and hydrogen content of the asphaltenes with reaction time. Further evidence of the liquid-liquid phase separation was the observation of spherical particles of liquid crystalline coke and the preferential conversion of the most associated asphaltenes to coke.

  10. A phase separation kinetic model for coke formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehe, I.A.

    1993-12-31

    Coke formation during the thermolysis of petroleum residua is postulated to occur by a mechanism that involves the liquid-liquid phase separation of reacted asphaltenes to form a phase that is lean in abstractable hydrogen. This mechanism provides the basis of a model the quantitatively describes the kinetics for the thermolysis of Cold Lake vacuum residuum and its deasphalted oil in an open tube reactor at 400{degrees}C. The previously unreacted asphaltenes were found to be the fraction with the highest rate of thermal reaction but with the least extent of reaction. Further evidence of the liquid-liquid phase separation was the observation of spherical particles of liquid crystalline coke and the preferential conversion of the most associated asphaltenes to coke.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of bone formation in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-07-01

    Spondyloarthritis comprise a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases characterized by its association to HLA-B27 and the presence of arthritis and enthesitis. The pathogenesis involves both an inflammatory process and new bone formation, which eventually lead to ankylosis of the spine. To date, the intrinsic mechanisms of the pathogenic process have not been fully elucidated, and our progress is remarkable in the identification of therapeutic targets to achieve the control of the inflammatory process, yet our ability to inhibit the excessive bone formation is still insufficient. The study of new bone formation in spondyloarthritis has been mostly conducted in animal models of the disease and only few experiments have been done using human biopsies. The deregulation and overexpression of molecules involved in the osteogenesis process have been observed in bone cells, mesenchymal cells, and fibroblasts. The signaling associated to the excessive bone formation is congruent with those involved in the physiological processes of bone remodeling. Bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnt pathways have been found deregulated in this disease; however, the cause for uncontrolled stimulation remains unknown. Mechanical stress appears to play an important role in the pathological osteogenesis process; nevertheless, the association of other important factors, such as the presence of HLA-B27 and environmental factors, remains uncertain. The present review summarizes the experimental findings that describe the signaling pathways involved in the new bone formation process in spondyloarthritis in animal models and in human biopsies. The role of mechanical stress as the trigger of these pathways is also reviewed. PMID:26838262

  12. Histopathology Predicts the Mechanism of Stone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life and these numbers appear to be on the rise. Despite years of scientific research into the mechanisms of stone formation and growth, limited advances have been made until recently. Randall's original observations and thoughts on the mechanisms for kidney stone formation have been validated for idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) but not for most other stone forming groups. Our current studies on selected groups of human stone formers using intraoperative papillary biopsies has shown overwhelming evidence for the presence of Randall's plaque in ICSF and that stone formation and growth are exclusively linked to its availability to urinary ions and proteins. Intense investigation of the plaque-stone junction is needed if we are to understand the factors leading to the overgrowth process on exposed regions of plaque. Such information should allow the development of treatment strategies to block stone formation in ICSF patients. Patients who form brushite stones, or who form apatite stones because of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), or patients with calcium oxalate stones due to obesity bypass procedures, or patients with cystinuria, get plugged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) which leads to total destruction of the lining cells and focal sites of interstitial fibrosis. These stone formers have plaque but at levels equal to or below non-stone formers, which would suggest that they form stones by a different mechanism than do ICSF patients.

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying presynapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Poh Hui; Li, Pengpeng

    2013-01-01

    Synapse formation is a highly regulated process that requires the coordination of many cell biological events. Decades of research have identified a long list of molecular components involved in assembling a functioning synapse. Yet how the various steps, from transporting synaptic components to adhering synaptic partners and assembling the synaptic structure, are regulated and precisely executed during development and maintenance is still unclear. With the improvement of imaging and molecular tools, recent work in vertebrate and invertebrate systems has provided important insight into various aspects of presynaptic development, maintenance, and trans-synaptic signals, thereby increasing our understanding of how extrinsic organizers and intracellular mechanisms contribute to presynapse formation. PMID:24127213

  14. Investigation of formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W.

    2012-08-01

    This work investigates the formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting of mild steel and the transformation conditions between various morphology chips. It is supposed that the modeling material follows the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. In orthogonal cutting process, both the plastic flow and the instability behaviors of chip materials are caused by the plane strain loadings. Therefore, the general instability behaviors of materials in plane strain state are first analyzed with linear perturbation method and a universal instability criterion is established. Based on the analytical results, the formation mechanisms of chips and the transformation conditions between continuous and serrated chips are further studied by instability phase diagram method. The results show that the chip formation strongly depends on the intensity ratios between shear and normal stresses. The ratios of dissipative rates of plastic work done by compression and shear stresses govern the transformation from continuous to serrated chips. These results are verified by the numerical simulations on the orthogonal cutting process.

  15. Mechanisms of foam formation in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Bhargavi; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2015-02-01

    An anaerobic digester (AD) is the most essential step to generate energy in the form of biogas from waste. AD foaming is widespread and leads to deterioration of the AD process and operation. In extreme conditions, AD foaming poses a significant safety risk and considerable economic impacts. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the fundamentals of AD foaming to develop effective strategies that can help minimize the foaming impacts. Several aspects of AD foaming have attracted considerable research attention, however, the focused has been mainly on site specific causes and prevention. Here, the available three-phase foam literature is reviewed with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects of bubble formation in AD: similarities between AD foams and other "desirable" foams, surface rheology, physico-chemical aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) in digesters, dynamics of the gas-phase, pH, alkalinity and certain relationships between these factors are discussed. All of the abovementioned fundamental aspects seem to be involved in AD foam formation. However, the detailed relationship between these uncontrolled and controlled factors, foam formation and its implications for process and operation of AD is still inconclusive. PMID:25487880

  16. The Embedded Phase of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, Floris

    2000-11-01

    This thesis studies the physical and chemical structure of a set of massive young stars which are surrounded by a thick envelope of dust and gas, the earliest known phase of massive star formation. The primary scientific questions addressed are: (i) What is the evolutionary order of the phenomena associated with massive star formation? (ii) What is the physical and chemical structure of the envelopes of massive young stars? How do they compare to those of low-mass stars? Do specific molecules trace different stages? (iii) What are the masses of any circumstellar disks, and on what time scales are they dispersed? To answer these questions, a sample of infrared and submillimeter sources has been selected on high luminosity, close distance, isolated location and high mid-infrared flux. We present observations of these sources with single-dish submillimeter antennas, millimeter interferometers and near-infrared spectroscopy, and also discuss ISO spectra. For the interpretation, we have developed models with a detailed physical structure, combined with chemical differentiation, which is strongly coupled to the temperature. Some of the conclusions are: The envelopes of massive young stars are well described by centrally heated spherical models, with masses of ~ 100-1000 Modot within radii of ~0.1 pc. For a power-law density structure n(r) = n0 (r / r0)-α, we find α = 1.0-1.5 for the younger sources, significantly lower than α ≅ 2 found for the envelopes of low-mass stars at a comparable stage of evolution. This difference may indicate that the support against gravitational collapse in high-mass cores is by nonthermal (e.g., turbulent) pressure, and in low-mass cores by thermal pressure. For the more evolved sources, α = 1.5-2.0 fits the data best. Unlike in low-mass star formation, the near-infrared emission decreases as the envelope warms up, indicates that the hot dust close to the star is destroyed and/or pushed out by stellar radiation or mass loss. The

  17. Mechanisms of scaling in pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Umulis, David M.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms and their constituent tissues and organs vary substantially in size but differ little in morphology; they appear to be scaled versions of a common template or pattern. Such scaling involves adjusting the intrinsic scale of spatial patterns of gene expression that are set up during development to the size of the system. Identifying the mechanisms that regulate scaling of patterns at the tissue, organ and organism level during development is a longstanding challenge in biology, but recent molecular-level data and mathematical modeling have shed light on scaling mechanisms in several systems, including Drosophila and Xenopus. Here, we investigate the underlying principles needed for understanding the mechanisms that can produce scale invariance in spatial pattern formation and discuss examples of systems that scale during development. PMID:24301464

  18. Structural mechanism of the formation of mineral Na-tveitite-a new type of phase with a fluorite-derivative structure-in the NaF-CaF{sub 2}-(Y,Ln)F{sub 3} natural system

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A. M. Otroshchenko, L. P.; Sobolev, B. P.

    2012-03-15

    Relationships between the chemical compositions and structures of the mineral tveitite from the southern Norway pegmatites (with the idealized formula Ca{sub 14}Y{sub 5}F{sub 43}) and Na-tveitite from the Rov mountain (Keivy, Kola Peninsula) Na{sub 2.5}Ca{sub 10}Ln{sub 1.5}Y{sub 5}F{sub 42} are considered. According to the structural mechanism of its formation, Na-tveitite is a nanocomposite crystal based on the crystalline matrix Ca{sub 14}Y{sub 5}F{sub 43} with the ordered arrangement of {l_brace}Ca{sub 8}[CaY{sub 5}]F{sub 69}{r_brace} clusters which contain anionic {l_brace}F{sub 13}{r_brace} cuboctahedra with F{sup 1-} at the center. When Na-tveitite is formed, 29% of these clusters are statistically replaced by Na-'Y' clusters {l_brace}[Na{sub 0.5}(Y,Ln){sub 0.5}]{sub 14}F{sub 64}{r_brace} with {l_brace}F{sub 8}{r_brace} cubes at the center (analogs of matrix fluorite groups {l_brace}Ca{sub 14}F{sub 64}{r_brace}). This replacement gives rise to composition-imperfect (Na, Ca, 'Y') cationic positions and occupancy-deficient F positions, which correspond to {l_brace}F{sub 13}{r_brace} cuboctahedra and the {l_brace}F{sub 8}{r_brace} cubes that replace them. The difference between Na-tveitite and fluorite phases M{sub 1-x}R{sub x}F{sub 2+x} is as follows: its matrix is the structure of the ordered phase (tveitite) into which Na-containing rare earth fragments of fluorite-type structure are incorporated instead of ordered-phase structural blocks (clusters).

  19. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  20. Molecular mechanism of magnet formation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, T; Sakaguchi, T

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic bacteria have an ability to synthesize intracellular ferromagnetic crystalline particles consisting of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) which occur within a specific size range (50-100 nm). Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) can be distinguished by the regular morphology and the presence of an thin organic membrane enveloping crystals from abiologically formed magnetite. The particle is the smallest magnetic crystal that has a regular morphology within the single domain size. Therefore, BMPs have an unfathomable amount of potential value for various technological applications not only scientific interests. However, the molecular and genetic mechanism of magnetite biomineralization is hardly understood although iron oxide formation occurs widely in many higher animals as well as microorganisms. In order to elucidate the molecular and genetic mechanisms of magnetite biomineralization, a magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1, for which gene transfer and transposon mutagenesis techniques had been recently developed, has been used as a model organism. Several findings and information on the BMPs formation process have been obtained within this decade by means of studies with this model organism and its related one. Biomineralization mechanism and potential availability in biotechnology of bacterial magnets have been elucidated through molecular and genetic approach. PMID:16232810

  1. Space Shuttle Pinhole Formation Mechanism Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1998-01-01

    Pinholes have been observed to form on the wing leading edge of the space shuttle after about 10-15 flights. In this report we expand upon previous observations by Christensen (1) that these pinholes often form along cracks and are associated with a locally zinc-rich area. The zinc appears to come from weathering and peeling paint on the launch structure. Three types of experimental examinations are performed to understand this issue further: (A) Detailed microstructural examination of actual shuttle pinholes (B) Mass spectrometric studies of coupons containing, actual shuttle pinholes and (C) Laboratory furnace studies of ZnO/SiC reactions and ZnO/SiC protected carbon/carbon reaction. On basis of these observations we present a detailed mechanism of pinhole formation due to formation of a corrosive ZnO-Na-2-O-SiO2 ternary glass, which flows into existing cracks and enlarges them.

  2. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues. PMID:27162076

  3. String Mechanism for Relativistic Jet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyadechkin, S. A.; Semenov, V. S.; Punsly, B.; Biernat, H. K.

    Here we present our latest studies of relativistic jet formation in the vicinity of a rotating black hole where the reconnection process has been taken into account. In order to simplify the problem, we use Lagrangian formalism and develop a method which enables us to consider a magnetized plasma as a set of magnetic flux tubes [5,6]. Within the limits of the Lagrangian approach, we perform numerical simulations of the flux tube (nonlinear string) behavior which clearly demonstrates the process of relativistic jet formation in the form of outgoing torsional nonlinear aves. It turns out that the jet is produced deep inside the ergosphere where the flux tube takes away spinning energy from the black hole due to the nonlocal Penrose process [2]. This is similar to the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism to some extent [8], however, the string mechanism is essentially time dependent. It is shown that the leading part of the accreting tube gains negative energy and therefore has to stay in the ergosphere forever. Simultaneously, another part of the tube propagates along the spinning axis away from the hole with nearly the speed of light. As a result, the tube is continuously stretching and our mechanism is essentially time dependent. Obviously, such process cannot last infinitely long and we have to take into account the reconnection process. Due to reconnection, the topology of the flux tube is changed and it gives rise to a plasmoid creation which propagates along spin axis of the hole with relativistic speed carrying off the energy and angular momentum away from the black hole.

  4. Molecular mechanism of pore formation by actinoporins.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katarina Crnigoj; Viero, Gabriella; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Macek, Peter; Anderluh, Gregor

    2009-12-15

    Actinoporins are effective pore-forming toxins produced by sea anemones. These extremely potent, basic 20 kDa proteins readily form pores in membranes that contain sphingomyelin. Much has been learned about the molecular basis of their pore-forming mechanism in recent years. Pore formation is a multi-step process that involves recognition of membrane sphingomyelin, firm binding to the membrane accompanied by the transfer of the N-terminal region to the lipid-water interface and finally pore formation after oligomerisation of three to four monomers. The final conductive pathway is formed by amphipathic alpha-helices, hence actinoporins are an important example of so-called alpha-helical pore-forming toxins. Actinoporins have become useful model proteins to study protein-membrane interactions, specific recognition of lipids in the membrane, and protein oligomerisation in the lipid milieu. Recent sequence and structural data of proteins similar to actinoporins indicate that they are not a unique family restricted to sea anemones as was long believed. An AF domain superfamily (abbreviated from actinoporin-like proteins and fungal fruit-body lectins) was defined and shown to contain members from three animal and two plant phyla. On the basis of functional properties of some members we hypothesise that AF domain proteins are peripheral membrane proteins. Finally, ability of actinoporins to form transmembrane pores has been exploited in some novel biomedical applications. PMID:19268680

  5. Pathobiochemical mechanisms during the acute phase response.

    PubMed

    Kleesiek, K; Greiling, H

    1984-01-01

    The acute phase response is characterised by the following sequence of principle phenomena: (1) an early local inflammatory reaction, (2) formation of inflammatory humoral factors inducing a systemic reaction, (3) stimulation of glycoprotein synthesis predominantly in the hepatocytes, and (4) an increase in the plasma concentration of acute phase proteins, when the rate of biosynthesis exceeds the degradation rate. Inflammatory mediators (lysosomal enzymes, oxygen derived radicals, prostaglandins) are mainly released during phagocytosis by granulocytes and macrophages. The signal reaching the hepatocytes is not yet clearly identified. A leukocyte endogenous mediator (LEM) released by macrophages is described. There is evidence that prostaglandins and probably proteinase alpha 2-macroglobulin complexes are also involved. The hepatic acute phase protein synthesis is modulated by hormones (insulin, cortisol, somatotropin). The biochemical events in the hepatocyte include an increase in protein synthesis and the regulatory control of the glycosylation of polypeptide precursors. The secreted glycoproteins serve variously as inhibitors or mediators of the inflammatory processes. PMID:6208159

  6. The free energy of mechanically unstable phases

    PubMed Central

    van de Walle, A.; Hong, Q.; Kadkhodaei, S.; Sun, R.

    2015-01-01

    Phase diagrams provide ‘roadmaps' to the possible states of matter. Their determination traditionally rests on the assumption that all phases, even unstable ones, have well-defined free energies under all conditions. However, this assumption is commonly violated in condensed phases due to mechanical instabilities. This long-standing problem impedes thermodynamic database development, as pragmatic attempts at solving this problem involve delicate extrapolations that are highly nonunique and that lack an underlying theoretical justification. Here we propose an efficient computational solution to this problem that has a simple interpretation, both as a topological partitioning of atomic configuration space and as a minimally constrained physical system. Our natural scheme smoothly extends the free energy of stable phases, without relying on extrapolation, thus enabling a formal assessment of widely used extrapolation schemes. PMID:26130613

  7. Defect Formation beyond Kibble-Zurek Mechanism and Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesler, Paul M.; García-García, Antonio M.; Liu, Hong

    2015-04-01

    We study the dynamic after a smooth quench across a continuous transition from the disordered phase to the ordered phase. Based on scaling ideas, linear response, and the spectrum of unstable modes, we develop a theoretical framework, valid for any second-order phase transition, for the early-time evolution of the condensate in the broken phase. Our analysis unveils a novel period of nonadiabatic evolution after the system passes through the phase transition, where a parametrically large amount of coarsening occurs before a well-defined condensate forms. Our formalism predicts a rate of defect formation parametrically smaller than the Kibble-Zurek prediction and yields a criterion for the breakdown of Kibble-Zurek scaling for sufficiently fast quenches. We numerically test our formalism for a thermal quench in a (2 +1 )-dimensional holographic superfluid. These findings, of direct relevance in a broad range of fields including cold atom, condensed matter, statistical mechanics, and cosmology, are an important step toward a more quantitative understanding of dynamical phase transitions.

  8. Mechanisms of Soldering Formation on Coated Core Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Denouden, Tony; Han, Qingyou

    2012-02-01

    Die soldering is one of the major casting defects during the high-pressure die casting (HPDC) process, causing dimensional inaccuracy of the castings and increased downtimes of the HPDC machine. In this study, we analyzed actually failed core pins to determine the mechanism of soldering and its procedures. The results show that the soldering process starts from a local coating failure, involves a series of intermetallic phase formation from reactions between molten aluminum alloys and the H13 steel pin, and accelerates when an aluminum-rich, face-centered cubic (fcc) phase is formed between the intermetallic phases. It is the formation of the aluminum-rich fcc phase in the reaction region that joins the core pin with the casting, resulting in the sticking of the casting to the core pin. When undercuts are formed on the core pin, the ejection of castings from the die will lead to either a core pin failure or damages to the casting being ejected.

  9. Metastable phases in mechanically alloyed aluminum germanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Yvon, P.J.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1993-03-01

    Aluminum and germanium form a simple eutectic system with no stable intermetallic phase, and limited mutual solubility. We report the formation of a metastable rhombohedral,{gamma}{sub 1} phase by mechanically alloying aluminum and germanium powders. This phase, which appears for compositions between 20 and 50 at. % germanium, has also been observed in rapidly quenched alloys, but there is disagreement as to its composition. By measuring the heat of crystallization as a function of composition, we determined the composition of the {gamma}{sub 1} phase to be Al{sub 70}Ge{sub 30}. We also produced Al{sub 70}Ge{sub 30} by arc melting the pure elements, followed by splat-quenching at a cooling rate in the range of 10{sup 8} K s{sup {minus}1}. This method produced two metastable phases, one of which was found to be the {gamma}{sub 1} phase obtained by mechanical alloying. The other was a monoclinic phase reported earlier in the literature as {gamma}{sub 2}.

  10. Phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms in polymer nanofiber network

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jeng-Ting; Lu, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Shiau-Bin; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Yeh, Jui-Ming

    2015-12-07

    Network formation by nanofiber crosslinking is usually in polymer materials as application in organic semiconductor devices. Electron hopping transport mechanisms depend on polymer morphology in network. Conducting polymers morphology in a random network structure is modeled by a quasi-one-dimensional system coupled of chains or fibers. We observe the varying hopping conduction mechanisms in the polyaniline nanofibers of the random network structure. The average diameter d of the nanofibers is varied from approximately 10 to 100 nm. The different dominant hopping mechanisms including Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping (VRH), Mott VRH, and nearest-neighbor hopping are dependent on temperature range and d in crossover changes. The result of this study is first presented in a phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms based on the theories of the random network model. The hopping conduction mechanism is unlike in normal semiconductor materials.

  11. O2 on ganymede: Spectral characteristics and plasma formation mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Johnson, R.E.; Spencer, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Weak absorption features in the visible reflectance spectrum of Jupiter's satellite Ganymede have been correlated to those observed in the spectrum of molecular oxygen. We examine the spectral characteristics of these absorption features in all phases of O2 and conclude that the molecular oxygen is most likely present at densities similar to the liquid or solid ??-phase. The contribution of O2 to spectral features observed on Ganymede in the near-infrared wavelength region affects the previous estimates of photon pathlength in ice. The concentration of the visible absorption features on the trailing hemisphere of Ganymede suggests an origin due to bombardment by magneto-spheric ions. We derive an approximate O2 formation rate from this mechanism and consider the state of O2 within the surface.

  12. Formation mechanism of diamond nanocrystal from catalysed carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin; Li, Tingju; Dong, Chuang; Zhang, Xingguo; Yao, Shan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dehe; Ji, Shouhua; Jin, Junze

    2004-10-01

    Recently, our group has synthesized nanocrystal n-diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) from catalysed carbon black. Based on the results of XRD, TGA and DTA, a formation mechanism has been proposed to explain the phase transformation from carbon black to diamond nanocrystal. With the increase of temperature and hence the carbon diffusion in iron, the phase sequence is from Fe(OH)3 into Fe2O3, agr-Fe, ggr-Fe, then liquid iron. When the carbon in the liquid iron is saturated, DLC or graphite separates out of the liquid iron. With decrease of temperature, the carbon in ggr-Fe is separated out, and n-diamond nuclei form and grow.

  13. The mechanics of endothelial gap formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Joyjit; Del Gado, Emanuela; Hardin, C. Corey; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    The vascular endothelium is a layer of specialized cells, referred to as endothelial cells (EC) that line the internal surfaces of blood vessels and are largely responsible for regulating the transit of fluids, solutes and immune system cells from the circulation, across the vessel wall, and into the tissues. We investigate the physics of the mechanical events that may proceed and eventually lead to dramatic increase of its permeability, leading to serious illness. In combination with experiments measuring local stresses and gap formation in EC in different conditions, we devise a minimal model based on an amorphous assembly of adhesive particles, subjected to an imposed tension. Numerical simulations of the model show that, as a function of the rate at which the tension is imposed, the system goes from an elastic regime in which small gaps increase in number to a ``plastic'' one, where pre-existing gaps increase in size, and internal stresses display large hetereogeneities and long range correlations. This second regime bears intriguing similarities with the experimental finding in EC monolayers.

  14. Graphite formation in cast iron, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Fiske, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several types of cast irons are directionally solidified aboard the KC-135 aircraft. Also, control samples are run on Earth for comparison. Some of these samples are unusable because of various mechanical problems; the analysis and the interpretation of results on the samples that are run successfully is discussed.

  15. Prevention of chi and sigma phases formation in aged 16-8-2 weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Type 16-8-2 weld filler metal (16 wt-% Cr, 8 wt-% Ni, 2 wt-% Mo, nominally) is commonly used to weld Type 316 stainless steel base metal. Suitable control of composition can prevent formation of embrittling phases. The chi phase can be eliminated by adjusting the molybdenum content. The /delta/-ferrite-/sigma/ phase transformation can be prevented by suitably adjusting the carbon-plus-nitrogen content. The mechanism of this behavior is discussed. 14 refs.

  16. Electrochemical phase formation: classical and atomistic theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Milchev, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The process of electrochemical phase formation at constant thermodynamic supersaturation is considered in terms of classical and atomistic nucleation theories. General theoretical expressions are derived for important thermodynamic and kinetic quantities commenting also upon the correlation between the existing theoretical models and experimental results. Progressive and instantaneous nucleation and growth of multiple clusters of the new phase are briefly considered, too. PMID:27108683

  17. The formation phase of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, Peter; Yorke, Harold W.; Rozyczka, Michal; Tohline, Joel E.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrodynamical calculations of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating protostellar cloud, with radiation transport and without magnetic fields, are presented. The collapse is assumed to start from a centrally condensed sphere of radius 5 x 10 to the 15th cm, a mean density of 4 x 10 to the -15th g/cu cm, a total mass of 1 solar mass, and a total angular momentum of 10 to the 53rd g sq cm per sec. The numerical grid is chosen to resolve the region of disk formation between 1 and 60 AU from the center. Frequency-dependent radiative transfer calculations show how the emergent spectrum of the structure depends upon viewing angle with respect to the rotation axis and how the observed isophotal contours should depend on wavelength and viewing angle. The central part of the protostar, interior to 1 AU, is not resolved numerically but is modeled approximately. At the end of the calculation, this region is found to have a mass of 0.6 solar mass and a ratio of rotational to gravitational energy of about 0.4, sufficiently large to be unstable to nonaxisymmetric perturbations. Although the disk is gravitationally stable according to the local Toomre criterion, the nonaxisymmetric structure in the center is likely to lead to angular momentum transport.

  18. Dynamical phase transitions in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, Ingrid

    2012-02-01

    The nucleus is described as an open many-body quantum system with a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator the eigenvalues of which are complex, in general. The eigenvalues may cross in the complex plane (exceptional points), the phases of the eigenfunctions are not rigid in approaching the crossing points and the widths bifurcate. By varying only one parameter, the eigenvalue trajectories usually avoid crossing and width bifurcation occurs at the critical value of avoided crossing. An analog spectroscopic redistribution takes place for discrete states below the particle decay threshold. By this means, a dynamical phase transition occurs in the many-level system starting at a critical value of the level density. Hence the properties of the low-lying nuclear states (described well by the shell model) and those of highly excited nuclear states (described by random ensembles) differ fundamentally from one another. The statement of Niels Bohr on the collective features of compound nucleus states at high level density is therefore not in contradiction to the shell-model description of nuclear (and atomic) states at low level density. Dynamical phase transitions are observed experimentally in different quantum mechanical systems by varying one or two parameters.

  19. Atomistic Mechanism of Surface-Oxide Formation on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, K.; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M. V.; Scheffler, M.; Stampfl, C.

    2001-03-01

    CO-oxidation catalysis on Ruthenium is a prime example of the pressure and materials gap in the sense, that a very low activity under UHV conditions is contrasted with very high turnover rates at high pressures. A recent experimental study has connected this change in activity with the formation of RuO_2(110) patches on the surface (H. Over et al., Science 287, 1474 (2000)). In order to analyze the atomistic mechanism behind this surface oxide formation, we perform density functional theory calculations for more and more O loaded Ru(0001) surfaces. After a full monolayer coverage on the surface has been reached, O starts to penetrate into the sample. Instead of diffusing further into the bulk, oxygen agglomerates in subsurface islands between the first and second substrate layers. These islands can be characterized as a O-Ru-O trilayer ``floating'' on top of the Ru(0001) substrate. Further O incorporation leads to a successive formation of such O-Ru-O trilayers, which at first remain in a CaF2 type stacking sequence. After a critical thickness has been exceeded, we finally observe a phase transition into the experimentally seen rutile RuO_2(110) structure.

  20. Structure Formation Mechanisms and Electrical Properties of PVD Fluoropolymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchnikov, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of forming fluoropolymer coatings on silicon substrates via condensation from an active gas phase using directed flows of accelerated electrons and ions are studied. It is demonstrated that electrical properties of the resulting fluoropolymer films strongly depend on the technological parameters of the deposition process. Their most optimal properties are reported when condensation takes place at the temperatures within ~373-386 K. It is shown that thermal annealing of the films in vacuum at 430-470 K improves their electrophysical parameters by re-evaporating the low-molecular complexes from the structure and decreasing the concentration of defects and spin-radicals, while annealing in air gives rise to formation of additional polar groups.

  1. Mechanisms for indirect effects from aerosol pollution on mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Vaughan

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol pollution can have various effects on mixed-phase clouds. They can alter coalescence and raindrop-freezing for droplet activation by CCN aerosols. They can alter aggregation of ice crystals and snow formation. This can alter the lifetime of mixed-phase clouds, as well as the reflectivity for solar radiation. Simulations of observed cases of mixed-phase clouds have been performed to examine the mechanisms for effects from aerosol pollution on them. Such mechanisms are discussed in the presentation.

  2. Mechanisms of osteoclast-dependent bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Should we believe that osteoclasts are only involved in bone resorption? What about their contribution to bone formation? In this article I will review evidence that bone formation can be regulated by osteoclasts. Why is this? Likely because in the physiologic condition of bone remodeling, bone resorption and formation are balanced, and there is no better way to control this equilibrium than through a concerted action between the two cell types. Although the influence of osteoblasts on osteoclastic bone resorption is well documented and consolidated over time, what osteoclasts do to regulate osteoblast activity is still matter of intense investigation. The original hypothesis that all is in the osteoblast-seeking factors stored in the bone matrix, released and activated during bone resorption, is now being challenged by several studies, suggesting that osteoclasts are also capable of producing ‘clastokines' that regulate osteoblast performance. Indeed, several of them have been demonstrated to orchestrate osteoclast–osteoblast activities. However, we are probably still at the dawn of a new era, and future work will tell us whether any of these clastokines can be exploited to stimulate bone formation and rebalance bone remodeling in skeletal diseases. PMID:24422142

  3. Quantum mechanics on phase space and teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messamah, Juba; Schroeck, Franklin E.; Hachemane, Mahmoud; Smida, Abdallah; Hamici, Amel H.

    2015-03-01

    The formalism of quantum mechanics on phase space is used to describe the standard protocol of quantum teleportation with continuous variables in order to partially investigate the interplay between this formalism and quantum information. Instead of the Wigner quasi-probability distributions used in the standard protocol, we use positive definite true probability densities which account for unsharp measurements through a proper wave function representing a non-ideal quantum measuring device. This is based on a result of Schroeck and may be taken on any relativistic or nonrelativistic phase space. The obtained formula is similar to a known formula in quantum optics, but contains the effect of the measuring device. It has been applied in three cases. In the first case, the two measuring devices, corresponding to the two entangled parts shared by Alice and Bob, are not entangled and described by two identical Gaussian wave functions with respect to the Heisenberg group. They lead to a probability density identical to the function which is analyzed and compared with the Wigner formalism. A new expression of the teleportation fidelity for a coherent state in terms of the quadrature variances is obtained. In the second case, these two measuring devices are entangled in a two-mode squeezed vacuum state. In the third case, two Gaussian states are combined in an entangled squeezed state. The overall observation is that the state of the measuring devices shared by Alice and Bob influences the fidelity of teleportation through their unsharpness and entanglement.

  4. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  5. Statistical mechanics of soft-boson phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Arun K.; Hill, Christopher T.; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of structure on large (100 Mpc) scales, and limits to anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), have imperiled models of structure formation based solely upon the standard cold dark matter scenario. Novel scenarios, which may be compatible with large scale structure and small CMBR anisotropies, invoke nonlinear fluctuations in the density appearing after recombination, accomplished via the use of late time phase transitions involving ultralow mass scalar bosons. Herein, the statistical mechanics are studied of such phase transitions in several models involving naturally ultralow mass pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (pNGB's). These models can exhibit several interesting effects at high temperature, which is believed to be the most general possibilities for pNGB's.

  6. The phase evolution mechanism in Fe(Se, Te) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jixing; Li, Chengshan; Zhang, Shengnan; Feng, Jianqing; Zhang, Pingxiang; Zhou, Lian

    2016-08-01

    The phase evolution mechanism in Fe(Se, Te) system during sintering was investigated with step-by-step heat treatment process. It was noticed that the diffusion processes between Fe and Se (Te) as well as that between Se and Te were both very important to the formation of superconducting Fe(Se, Te) phase with very uniform chemical composition. During heat treatment, solid solutions of (Se, Te)ss with different chemical composition were formed with the diffusion of Se atoms into Te solids and Te atoms into Se melts, simultaneously. Then with the increasing temperature, Fe atoms diffused into (Se, Te)ss, Fe(Se, Te)2 and Fe(Se, Te) phases were formed in sequence with the increasing Fe content. The chemical composition in melts became more and more uniform with the further increasing of sintering temperature and dwell time. Therefore, it was suggested that in order to achieve Fe(Se, Te) phase with high superconducting properties, it was necessary to enhance the diffusion process during sintering. The critical temperature of the sample, which was sintered at 700 °C for 12 h with slow cooling process and an O2-annealing process for 24 h, was above 14.0 K. This Tc value proved that a good superconducting β phase could be obtained under this sintering condition.

  7. Effect of electron irradiation exposure on phase formation, microstructure and mechanical strength of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} superconductor prepared via co-precipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiju, Zaahidah 'Atiqah; Hamid, Nasri A. Kannan, V.; Abdullah, Yusof

    2015-04-29

    In this work the effect of electron irradiation on the mechanical properties of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (Bi-2212) superconductor was studied by exposing the Bi-2212 superconductor with different doses of electron irradiation. Bi-2212 samples were prepared by using co-precipitation method. Irradiation was performed with irradiation dose of 100 kGray and 200 kGray, respectively. Characterization of the samples was performed by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Instron Universal Testing machine was used to measure the strength of the samples. The XRD patterns for the non-irradiated and irradiated samples show well-defined peaks of which could be indexed on the basis of a Bi-2212 phase structure. XRD patterns also indicate that electron irradiation did not affect the Bi-2212 superconducting phase. SEM micrographs show disorientation in the texture of the microstructure for irradiated samples. Sample exposed to 200 kGray electron irradiation dose shows enhancement of grain size. Their grain growth and texture improved slightly compared to other sample. The results also show that enlargement of grain size resulted in higher mechanical strength.

  8. Omega phase formation in titanium and titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III; Morris, C.E.; Lawson, A.C.

    1992-05-01

    Although the response of titanium alloys to dynamic loading is receiving increased attention in the literature (particularly in the area of shear-band formation), a more limited experimental database exists concerning the detailed structure/property relationships of titanium alloys subjected to shock loading. In this study, preliminary results concerning the influence of alloy chemistry on the property of omega-phase formation and its structure in three titanium alloys are presented. The influence of shock-wave deformation on the phase stability and substructure evolution of high-purity (low-interstitial) titanium, A-70 (3700 ppm oxygen) titanium, and Ti-6Al-4V were probed utilizing real-time velocity interferometry (VISAR) and ``soft`` shock-recovery techniques. VISAR wave profiles of shock-loaded high-purity titanium revealed the omega-phase pressure-induced transition to occur at approximately 10.4 GPa. Wave profile measurements on A-70 Ti shocked to pressures up to 35 GPa and Ti-6Al-4V shocked to pressures up to 25 GPa exhibited no evidence of a three-wave structure indicative of a pressure-induced phase transition. Neutron and X-ray diffractometry and TEM analysis confirmed the presence of retained {omega}-phase in the electrolytic-Ti and the absence of {omega}-phase in the shock-recovered A-70 Ti and Ti-6Al-4V. Suppression of the {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in A-70 Ti, containing a high interstitial oxygen content, is seen to simultaneously correlate with suppression of deformation twinning. Neutron diffraction was used to measure the in-situ bulk lattice constants and volume fraction of the {alpha} and {omega} phases in the recovered high-purity titanium samples that were shock loaded. The influence of alloy content on the kinetics of formation/retention of {omega}-phase and substructure evolution is discussed and contrasted in light of previous literature studies.

  9. A Gas-phase Formation Route to Interstellar Trans-methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Wehres, Nadine; Yang, Zhibo; Thomsen, Ditte L.; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2012-07-01

    The abundance of methyl formate in the interstellar medium has previously been underpredicted by chemical models. Additionally, grain surface chemistry cannot account for the relative abundance of the cis- and trans-conformers of methyl formate, and the trans-conformer is not even formed at detectable abundance on these surfaces. This highlights the importance of studying formation pathways to methyl formate in the gas phase. The rate constant and branching fractions are reported for the gas-phase reaction between protonated methanol and formic acid to form protonated trans-methyl formate and water as well as adduct ion: Rate constants were experimentally determined using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus at 300 K and a pressure of 530 mTorr helium. The results indicate a moderate overall rate constant of (3.19 ± 0.39) × 10-10 cm3 s-1 (± 1σ) and an average branching fraction of 0.05 ± 0.04 for protonated trans-methyl formate and 0.95 ± 0.04 for the adduct ion. These experimental results are reinforced by ab initio calculations at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory to examine the reaction coordinate and complement previous density functional theory calculations. This study underscores the need for continued observational studies of trans-methyl formate and for the exploration of other gas-phase formation routes to complex organic molecules.

  10. A GAS-PHASE FORMATION ROUTE TO INTERSTELLAR TRANS-METHYL FORMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Callie A.; Wehres, Nadine; Yang Zhibo; Thomsen, Ditte L.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P. E-mail: Nadine.Wehres@colorado.edu E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@colorado.edu E-mail: dlt@chem.ku.dk

    2012-07-20

    The abundance of methyl formate in the interstellar medium has previously been underpredicted by chemical models. Additionally, grain surface chemistry cannot account for the relative abundance of the cis- and trans-conformers of methyl formate, and the trans-conformer is not even formed at detectable abundance on these surfaces. This highlights the importance of studying formation pathways to methyl formate in the gas phase. The rate constant and branching fractions are reported for the gas-phase reaction between protonated methanol and formic acid to form protonated trans-methyl formate and water as well as adduct ion: Rate constants were experimentally determined using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus at 300 K and a pressure of 530 mTorr helium. The results indicate a moderate overall rate constant of (3.19 {+-} 0.39) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} ({+-} 1{sigma}) and an average branching fraction of 0.05 {+-} 0.04 for protonated trans-methyl formate and 0.95 {+-} 0.04 for the adduct ion. These experimental results are reinforced by ab initio calculations at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory to examine the reaction coordinate and complement previous density functional theory calculations. This study underscores the need for continued observational studies of trans-methyl formate and for the exploration of other gas-phase formation routes to complex organic molecules.

  11. The Mechanics of Pseudotachylite Formation in Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    2003-12-01

    Geologist James Shand first recognized pseudotachylites near the Vredefort structure in 1916. They appear to be black, glassy veins that often contain broken fragments of country rock. The veins range from millimeters thick to masses many meters in extent. Since this discovery they have puzzled several generations of geologists. Pseudotachylites are evidently due to rapid melting of rock in place and seem to be associated with environments, such as faulting, landslides and impacts, where rock is put into rapid motion. I examine the basic constraints controlling the formation of pseudotachylites in the rapidly sheared rocks in the vicinity of a large meteorite impact. The prevailing opinion among many geologists is that pseudotachylites are formed by friction melting of rock. The principal mystery of pseudotachylite formation is not that friction can cause melting, but that it seems to form thick masses of it. Yet such thick masses ought to preclude melting by reducing the friction between sliding rock masses. I propose that a solution to this conundrum is that the melt produced by sliding on narrow shear zones is extruded into the adjacent country rock, thus keeping the sliding surfaces narrow while thick masses of melt accumulate in pockets opened by slip on faults oriented at large angles to the sliding plane.

  12. Mechanisms of coke formation and fouling in thermal cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, R.K.; Rangwala, H.A.; Hsi, C.

    1995-12-31

    When heavy oil is cracked to produce distillate, coking of the reacting liquid is, in general, preceded by formation of a new, highly viscous liquid phase, rich in coke precursors. Results from pilot-scale experiments using feedstocks from Gudao (China) reported here show that inert-gas stripping of light distillates from the reacting liquid strongly inhibits coking and possibly the partition of precursors into the new phase. Heavy oil, rich in asphaltene, is often reported to have a high coking propensity. This paper provides experimental evidence to show that the asphaltene concentration is not the most critical factor in the coking propensity of heavy oil. Autoclave tests show that the liquid product could contain more than 40% of asphaltene, and yield only 60% of the coke produced by similar tests in which the liquid product contains less than 20% asphaltene. The solubility of asphaltene in the reaction liquid is the most crucial factor affecting coke yield. It controls the coking mechanisms and the fouling tendency of the resulting coke.

  13. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Neeves, Keith B.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena.

  14. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Neeves, Keith B.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena. PMID:26236058

  15. Kinetic Study to Predict Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Daniella Caluscio; Magnabosco, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an improved kinetic study of sigma phase formation during isothermal aging between 973 K and 1223 K (700 °C and 950 °C), based on Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (K-J-M-A) model, established from volume fraction of sigma phase determined in backscattered electron images over polished surfaces of aged samples. The kinetic study shows a change in the main mechanism of sigma formation between 973 K and 1173 K (700 °C and 900 °C), from a nucleation-governed stage to a diffusion-controlled growth-coarsening stage, confirmed by a double inclination in K-J-M-A plots and microstructural observations. A single inclination in K-J-M-A plots was observed for the 1223 K (950 °C) aging temperature, showing that kinetic behavior in this temperature is only related to diffusion-controlled growth of sigma phase. The estimated activation energies for the nucleation of sigma phase are close to the molybdenum diffusion in ferrite, probably the controlling mechanism of sigma phase nucleation. The proposed time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram shows a "double c curve" configuration, probably associated to the presence of chi-phase formed between 973 K and 1073 K (700 °C and 800 °C), which acts as heterogeneous nuclei for sigma phase formation in low aging temperatures.

  16. The stable polyiodides: Experimental and theoretical studies of formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Xue, Yongqiang; Wang, Xueping; Cui, Zixiang; Wang, Leilei

    2014-09-01

    The structures of polyiodides have been extensively studied for long time, but it was rarely involved of the mechanism of polyiodide species formation in preparation. The tetraethylammonium polyiodides were chosen as model chemicals and prepared with different molar ratios of reactants in ethanol solvent, the products were analyzed by titration, Raman spectra and TGA/DTG/DSC analysis, with the increase of the molar ratios of reactants, the iodine contents of the products reached a constant value. Finally, only two stable structures, Et4NI3 (1, space group Cmca) and Et4NI7 (2, space group Cmca), were isolated by recrystallization of slow evaporating solvent(s). The thermal analysis of tetraethylammonium polyiodides showed that all tetraethylammonium polyiodides lost I2 together to become Et4NI3 firstly and then continue to decompose. The decomposition of Et4NI3 was not a simple process which Et4NI3 lost one iodine molecule and then became Et4NI. In addition, the thermodynamical properties of species (I2 and Et4NIx, x = 1, 3, 5, 7) and the molar standard Gibbs free energy changes of reactions (ΔrGmθ), as well as the mechanism of tetraethylammonium polyiodides formation were interpreted by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculations show that the solvent effects have impact on the reactions. Accordingly, a comparative study was carried out on the solid phase synthesis of Et4NI5 at 80 °C and at molten state. Furthermore, the solid synthesis of Et4NI5 was characterized by variable temperature (-25 °C ∼ 150 °C) Raman Spectrometer. The polyiodide components interconversion showed the discrete I5- could be formed in molten state. In short, what species of polyiodides crystallized from reactions in solutions are decided by the synergy between ΔrGm of reactions and Coulombic interactions etc. of polyiodide crystals.

  17. Indolicidin action on membrane permeability: carrier mechanism versus pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Kolodkin, Nikolay I; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2011-01-01

    Indolicidin, a 13-residue cationic peptide with extremely high tryptophan content, exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial as well as hemolytic activity. To gain insight into the mechanism of indolicidin action on membrane permeability, liposome leakage induced by this peptide was studied by using various probes with vesicles of different lipid compositions. In liposomes containing negatively charged lipids, indolicidin induced rather unselective permeabilization. By contrast, the peptide appeared to be selective in provoking leakage of neutral, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes: it effectively induced the release of negatively charged fluorescent dyes, carboxyfluorescein (CF), calcein and sulforhodamine B, but was unable to induce the leakage of a neutral compound, glucose, and that of positively charged doxorubicin. Moreover, organic anions, such as fatty acids, were found to suppress the indolicidin-induced CF leakage of egg PC liposomes. Based on these results, we concluded that indolicidin facilitates the dye release from uncharged lipid vesicles not by formation of membrane pores as it is generally accepted for the majority of antimicrobial peptides but rather via translocation of dye molecules across the membrane in the form of dye-peptide complexes, i.e. indolicidin operates as an organic anion carrier. This conclusion was supported by observing the formation of complexes between indolicidin and pyrenebutyrate in solution. The indolicidin analog having only one arginine was ineffective in pyrenebutyrate binding and CF transport. The mode of action proposed here for indolicidin can be related to that previously postulated for oligoarginine derivatives which are able to carry organic anions across liposomal and bulk phase membranes [Sakai N. & Matile S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125:14348-14356]. The newly identified mechanism of peptide ionophoric activity in uncharged lipid membranes may be involved in hemolytic action of indolicidin via induction of

  18. The fluid mechanics of thrombus formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the growth of thrombi (blood clots) in a stagnation point flow of fresh blood. Thrombus shape, size and structure are shown to depend on local flow conditions. The evolution of a thrombus is described in terms of a physical model that includes platelet diffusion, a platelet aggregation mechanism, and diffusion and convection of the chemical species responsible for aggregation. Diffusion-controlled and convection-controlled regimes are defined by flow parameters and thrombus location, and the characteristic growth pattern in each regime is explained. Quantitative comparisons with an approximate theoretical model are presented, and a more general model is formulated.

  19. Causal mechanisms in airfoil-circulation formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. Y.; Liu, T. S.; Liu, L. Q.; Zou, S. F.; Wu, J. Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we trace the dynamic origin, rather than any kinematic interpretations, of lift in two-dimensional flow to the physical root of airfoil circulation. We show that the key causal process is the vorticity creation by tangent pressure gradient at the airfoil surface via no-slip condition, of which the theoretical basis has been given by Lighthill ["Introduction: Boundary layer theory," in Laminar Boundary Layers, edited by L. Rosenhead (Clarendon Press, 1963), pp. 46-113], which we further elaborate. This mechanism can be clearly revealed in terms of vorticity formulation but is hidden in conventional momentum formulation, and hence has long been missing in the history of one's efforts to understand lift. By a careful numerical simulation of the flow around a NACA-0012 airfoil, and using both Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions, we illustrate the detailed transient process by which the airfoil gains its circulation and demonstrate the dominating role of relevant dynamical causal mechanisms at the boundary. In so doing, we find that the various statements for the establishment of Kutta condition in steady inviscid flow actually correspond to a sequence of events in unsteady viscous flow.

  20. Advective Mechanisms in Tree Island Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S.

    2002-05-01

    Tree islands are important landscape features in the Florida Everglades. Tres islands are formed of peat deposited on the shallow limestone bedrock, and have been stressed as the system has changed in response to anthropogenic activities due to the sensitivity of organic soils to hydrologic cycles. The plume shape aligned with flow direction for typical tree islands is characteristic of advective transport, despite the rather low flow velocities in the system. Hypothesized mechanisms for the plume shape include sediment transport downstream from the head of the island (often anchored by a bedrock rise), or nutrient transport downstream allowing plants to produce more sediments in situ. Understanding mechanisms controlling tree island shape will aid in understanding the response of tree islands to hydrologic management. An integrated system of field, laboratory, and modeling studies is underway, with the first effort aimed at bounding the importance of the simpler sediment transport processes before tackling more-complex nutrient transport processes. The numerical model integrating the field and laboratory efforts is a 3D finite volume model considering water flow in the shallow groundwater/surface-water system together with sediment transport. The model can account for variable vegetative resistance through the flow column, including the important case where a dense mat forms at the surface. Model components specific for this system and associated data requirements are presented.

  1. Stalk Phase Formation: Effects of Dehydration and Saddle Splay Modulus

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Efrat, Avishay; Siegel, David A.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the earliest lipid intermediates forming in the course of membrane fusion is the lipid stalk. Although many aspects of the stalk hypothesis were elaborated theoretically and confirmed by experiments it remained unresolved whether stalk formation is always an energy consuming process or if there are conditions where the stalks are energetically favorable and form spontaneously resulting in an equilibrium stalk phase. Motivated by a recent breakthrough experiments we analyze the physical factors determining the spontaneous stalk formation. We show that this process can be driven by interplay between two factors: the elastic energy of lipid monolayers including a contribution of the saddle splay deformation and the energy of hydration repulsion acting between apposing membranes. We analyze the dependence of stalk formation on the saddle splay (Gaussian) modulus of the lipid monolayers and estimate the values of this modulus based on the experimentally established phase boundary between the lamellar and the stalk phases. We suggest that fusion proteins can induce stalk formation just by bringing the membranes into close contact, and accumulating, at least locally, a sufficiently large energy of the hydration repulsion. PMID:15454446

  2. Simulating the Phases of the Moon Shortly After Its Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordeh, Emil; Hall, Patrick; Cuk, Matija

    2014-04-01

    The leading theory for the origin of the Moon is the giant impact hypothesis, in which the Moon was formed out of the debris left over from the collision of a Marssized body with the Earth. Soon after its formation, the orbit of the Moon may have been very different than it is today. We have simulated the phases of the Moon in a model for its formation wherein the Moon develops a highly elliptical orbit with its major axis tangential to the Earth's orbit. This note describes these simulations and their pedagogical value.

  3. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  4. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation andmore » dynamics in these systems.« less

  5. Dynamic Phases, Pinning, and Pattern Formation for Driven Dislocation Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-01

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems. PMID:25613839

  6. Dynamic Phases, Pinning, and Pattern Formation for Driven Dislocation Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-01

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  7. Physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    This review considers the physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation. The composition of bile and structure of a bile canaliculus, biosynthesis and conjugation of bile acids, bile phospholipids, formation of bile micellar structures, and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids are described. In general, the review focuses on the molecular physiology of the transporting systems of the hepatocyte sinusoidal and apical membranes. Knowledge of physiological and biochemical basis of bile formation has implications for understanding the mechanisms of development of pathological processes, associated with diseases of the liver and biliary tract. PMID:24259965

  8. Solid-state graphene formation via a nickel carbide intermediate phase [Nickel carbide (Ni3C) as an intermediate phase for graphene formation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, W; Zhou, Yunshen; Hou, Wenjia; Guillemet, Thomas; Silvain, Jean-François; Lahaye, Michel; Lebraud, Eric; Xu, Shen; Wang, Xinwei; Cullen, David A; More, Karren Leslie; Lu, Yong Feng

    2015-01-01

    Direct formation of graphene with controlled number of graphitic layers on dielectric surfaces is highly desired for practical applications. Despite significant progress achieved in understanding the formation of graphene on metallic surfaces through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrocarbons, very limited research is available elucidating the graphene formation process via rapid thermal processing (RTP) of solid-state amorphous carbon, through which graphene is formed directly on dielectric surfaces accompanied by autonomous nickel evaporation. It is suggested that a metastable hexagonal nickel carbide (Ni3C) intermediate phase plays a critical role in transforming amorphous carbon to 2D crystalline graphene and contributing to the autonomous Ni evaporation. Temperature resolved carbon and nickel evolution in the RTP process is investigated using Auger electron spectroscopic (AES) depth profiling and glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Formation, migration and decomposition of the hexagonal Ni3C are confirmed to be responsible for the formation of graphene and the evaporation of Ni at 1100 °C. The Ni3C-assisted graphene formation mechanism expands the understanding of Ni-catalyzed graphene formation, and provides insightful guidance for controlled growth of graphene through the solid-state transformation process.

  9. Solid-state graphene formation via a nickel carbide intermediate phase [Nickel carbide (Ni3C) as an intermediate phase for graphene formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, W; Zhou, Yunshen; Hou, Wenjia; Guillemet, Thomas; Silvain, Jean-François; Lahaye, Michel; Lebraud, Eric; Xu, Shen; Wang, Xinwei; Cullen, David A; et al

    2015-01-01

    Direct formation of graphene with controlled number of graphitic layers on dielectric surfaces is highly desired for practical applications. Despite significant progress achieved in understanding the formation of graphene on metallic surfaces through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrocarbons, very limited research is available elucidating the graphene formation process via rapid thermal processing (RTP) of solid-state amorphous carbon, through which graphene is formed directly on dielectric surfaces accompanied by autonomous nickel evaporation. It is suggested that a metastable hexagonal nickel carbide (Ni3C) intermediate phase plays a critical role in transforming amorphous carbon to 2D crystalline graphene and contributing to themore » autonomous Ni evaporation. Temperature resolved carbon and nickel evolution in the RTP process is investigated using Auger electron spectroscopic (AES) depth profiling and glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Formation, migration and decomposition of the hexagonal Ni3C are confirmed to be responsible for the formation of graphene and the evaporation of Ni at 1100 °C. The Ni3C-assisted graphene formation mechanism expands the understanding of Ni-catalyzed graphene formation, and provides insightful guidance for controlled growth of graphene through the solid-state transformation process.« less

  10. A FIB induced boiling mechanism for rapid nanopore formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, K; Freund, J B; Johnson, H T

    2015-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) technology is widely used to fabricate nanopores in solid-state membranes. These nanopores have desirable thermomechanical properties for applications such as high-throughput DNA sequencing. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations of the FIB nanopore formation process, we show that there is a threshold ion delivery rate above which the mechanism underlying nanopore formation changes. At low rates nanopore formation is slow, with the rate proportional to the ion flux and therefore limited by the sputter rate of the target material. However, at higher fluxes nanopores form via a thermally dominated process, consistent with an explosive boiling mechanism. In this case, mass is rapidly rearranged via bubble growth and coalescence, much more quickly than would occur during sputtering. This mechanism has the potential to greatly speed up nanopore formation. PMID:24356374

  11. A FIB induced boiling mechanism for rapid nanopore formation.

    PubMed

    Das, K; Freund, J B; Johnson, H T

    2014-01-24

    Focused ion beam (FIB) technology is widely used to fabricate nanopores in solid-state membranes. These nanopores have desirable thermomechanical properties for applications such as high-throughput DNA sequencing. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations of the FIB nanopore formation process, we show that there is a threshold ion delivery rate above which the mechanism underlying nanopore formation changes. At low rates nanopore formation is slow, with the rate proportional to the ion flux and therefore limited by the sputter rate of the target material. However, at higher fluxes nanopores form via a thermally dominated process, consistent with an explosive boiling mechanism. In this case, mass is rapidly rearranged via bubble growth and coalescence, much more quickly than would occur during sputtering. This mechanism has the potential to greatly speed up nanopore formation. PMID:24356374

  12. Simulating the Phases of the Moon Shortly after Its Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noordeh, Emil; Hall, Patrick; Cuk, Matija

    2014-01-01

    The leading theory for the origin of the Moon is the giant impact hypothesis, in which the Moon was formed out of the debris left over from the collision of a Mars sized body with the Earth. Soon after its formation, the orbit of the Moon may have been very different than it is today. We have simulated the phases of the Moon in a model for its…

  13. Formation of vortex loops (strings) in continuous phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bowick, Mark J; Cacciuto, Angelo; Travesset, Alex

    2002-02-01

    The formation of vortex loops (global cosmic strings) in an O(2) linear sigma model in three spatial dimensions is analyzed numerically. For over-damped Langevin dynamics we find that defect production is suppressed by an interaction between correlated domains that reduces the effective spatial variation of the phase of the order field. The degree of suppression is sensitive to the quench rate. A detailed description of the numerical methods used to analyze the model is also reported. PMID:11863613

  14. Orientation-dependent mechanical behavior and phase transformation of mono-crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiapeng; Ma, Aibin; Jiang, Jinghua; Han, Jing; Han, Ying

    2016-03-01

    We perform a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanoindentation on the (100), (110), and (111) oriented silicon surface to investigate the orientation-dependent mechanical behavior and phase transformation of monocrystalline silicon. The results show both the remarkable anisotropic mechanical behavior and structure phase transformation of monocrystalline silicon. The mechanical behavior of the (110) and (111) oriented surfaces are similar (has a high indentation modulus, low critical indentation depth for the onset of plastic deformation) but quite different from the (100) oriented surface. The mechanical behavior is carefully linked to the phase transformation. The formation of crystalline bct5 phase and β-Si phase is the fundamental phase transformation mechanism for (100) oriented surface. But, a large number of amorphous silicon can be found beneath the indenter for (110) and (111) oriented surface beside the bct5 phase and β-Si phase. The β-Si phase region is relatively small for (110) and (111) oriented surface, even cannot be detected for (111) oriented surface. This result highlights the dominating role of the amorphous transformation in the mechanical behavior of monocrystalline silicon. Additionally, our results indicate that the high pressure phases form a symmetrical, anisotropic pattern on the indented surface for all three oriented surface which is linked to the active {111}<110> slip systems.

  15. Mechanisms and Consequences of Macromolecular Phase Separation.

    PubMed

    Bergeron-Sandoval, Louis-Philippe; Safaee, Nozhat; Michnick, Stephen W

    2016-05-19

    Over a century ago, colloidal phase separation of matter into non-membranous bodies was recognized as a fundamental organizing principal of cell "protoplasm." Recent insights into the molecular properties of such phase-separated bodies present challenges to our understanding of cellular protein interaction networks, as well as opportunities for interpreting and understanding of native and pathological genetic and molecular interactions. Here, we briefly review examples of and discuss physical principles of phase-separated cellular bodies and then reflect on how knowledge of these principles may direct future research on their functions. PMID:27203111

  16. Impact of Gas-Phase Mechanisms on Weather Research Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) Predictions: Mechanism Implementation and Comparative Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase mechanisms provide important oxidant and gaseous precursors for secondary aerosol formation. Different gas-phase mechanisms may lead to different predictions of gases, aerosols, and aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, WRF/Chem-MADRID simulations are cond...

  17. The formation of topological defects in phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Hardy M.

    1989-01-01

    It was argued, and fought through numerical work that the results of non-dynamical Monte Carlo computer simulations cannot be applied to describe the formation of topological defects when the correlation length at the Ginzburg temperature is significantly smaller than the horizon size. To test the current hypothesis that infinite strings at formation are essentially described by Brownian walks of size the correlation length at the Ginzburg temperature, fields at the Ginzburg temperature were equilibrated. Infinite structure do not exist in equilibrium for reasonable definitions of the Ginzburg temperature, and horizons must be included in a proper treatment. A phase transition, from small-scale to large-scale string or domain wall structure, is found to occur very close to the Ginzburg temperature, in agreement with recent work. The formation process of domain walls and global strings were investigated through the breaking of initially ordered states. To mimic conditions in the early Universe, cooling times are chosen so that horizons exist in the sample volume when topological structure formation occurs. The classical fields are evolved in real-time by the numerical solution of Langevin equations of motion on a three dimensional spatial lattice. The results indicate that it is possible for most of the string energy to be in small loops, rather than in long strings, at formation.

  18. Role of Nucleation and Growth in Two-Phase Microstructure Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jong Ho Shin

    2008-05-01

    During the directional solidification of peritectic alloys, a rich variety of two-phase microstructures develop, and the selection process of a specific microstructure is complicated due to the following two considerations. (1) In contrast to many single phase and eutectic microstructures that grow under steady state conditions, two-phase microstructures in a peritectic system often evolve under non-steady-state conditions that can lead to oscillatory microstructures, and (2) the microstructure is often governed by both the nucleation and the competitive growth of the two phases in which repeated nucleation can occur due to the change in the local conditions during growth. In this research, experimental studies in the Sn-Cd system were designed to isolate the effects of nucleation and competitive growth on the dynamics of complex microstructure formation. Experiments were carried out in capillary samples to obtain diffusive growth conditions so that the results can be analyzed quantitatively. At high thermal gradient and low velocity, oscillatory microstructures were observed in which repeated nucleation of the two phases was observed at the wall-solid-liquid junction. Quantitative measurements of nucleation undercooling were obtained for both the primary and the peritectic phase nucleation, and three different ampoule materials were used to examine the effect of different contact angles at the wall on nucleation undercooling. Nucleation undercooling for each phase was found to be very small, and the experimental undercooling values were orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory of nucleation. A new nucleation mechanism is proposed in which the clusters of atoms at the wall ahead of the interface can become a critical nucleus when the cluster encounters the triple junction. Once the nucleation of a new phase occurs, the microstructure is found to be controlled by the relative growth of the two phases that give rise to different

  19. Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Nan; Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.; Nordlund, K.; Shu, Xiaolin; Yu, Yi; Lu, Guang-Hong; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2013-12-15

    We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

  20. Collisionless Weibel shocks: Full formation mechanism and timing

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; Stockem, A.; Narayan, R.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  1. Formation mechanism of robust silver nanoparticle film with superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2010-12-01

    The promising formation mechanism of Ag nanoparticles on a Si wafer displaying superhydrophobicity, generated by means of a facile in situ galvanic cell route, is discussed. The results showed that the promising formation of Ag nanoparticles is based on a microelectrochemical redox reaction in which both the anodic process and the cathodic process occur simultaneously on the silicon substrate surface. This discovery could be of great importance in the design of other metal/semiconductor systems.

  2. Energy phase shift as mechanism for catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Feng, Bobo; Nordén, Bengt

    2012-05-01

    Catalysts are agents that by binding reactant molecules lower the energy barriers to chemical reaction. After reaction the catalyst is regenerated, its unbinding energy recruited from the environment, which is associated with an inevitable loss of energy. We show that combining several catalytic sites to become energetically and temporally phase-shifted relative to each other provides a possibility to sustain the overall reaction by internal 'energy recycling', bypassing the need for thermal activation, and in principle allowing the system to work adiabatically. Using an analytical model for superimposed, phase-shifted potentials of F1-ATP synthase provides a description integrating main characteristics of this rotary enzyme complex.

  3. Closure of supporting cell scar formations requires dynamic actin mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hordichok, Andrew J; Steyger, Peter S

    2007-10-01

    In many vertebrate inner ear sensory epithelia, dying sensory hair cells are extruded, and the apices of surrounding supporting cells converge to re-seal the epithelial barrier between the electrochemically-distinct endolymph and perilymph. These cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dynamic microtubular mechanisms have been proposed for hair cell extrusion; while contractile actomyosin-based mechanisms are required for cellular extrusion and closure in epithelial monolayers. The hypothesis that cytoskeletal mechanisms are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation was tested using bullfrog saccules incubated with gentamicin (6h), and allowed to recover (18h). Explants were then fixed, labeled for actin and cytokeratins, and viewed with confocal microscopy. To block dynamic cytoskeletal processes, disruption agents for microtubules (colchicine, paclitaxel) myosin (Y-27632, ML-9) or actin (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A) were added during treatment and recovery. Microtubule disruption agents had no effect on hair cell extrusion or supporting cell scar formation. Myosin disruption agents appeared to slow down scar formation but not hair cell extrusion. Actin disruption agents blocked scar formation, and largely prevented hair cell extrusion. These data suggest that actin-based cytoskeletal processes are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation in bullfrog saccules. PMID:17716843

  4. Domain wall formation in late-time phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Yun

    1992-01-01

    We examine domain wall formulation in late time phase transitions. We find that in the invisible axion domain wall phenomenon, thermal effects alone are insufficient to drive different parts of the disconnected vacuum manifold. This suggests that domain walls do not form unless either there is some supplemental (but perhaps not unreasonable) dynamics to localize the scalar field responsible for the phase transition to the low temperature maximum (to an extraordinary precision) before the onset of the phase transition, or there is some non-thermal mechanism to produce large fluctuations in the scalar field. The fact that domain wall production is not a robust prediction of late time transitions may suggest future directions in model building.

  5. Relative Navigation Algorithms for Phase 1 of the MMS Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Long, Anne; Carpenter, Russell; Gramling, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    This paper evaluates several navigation approaches for the first phase of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, which consists of a tetrahedral formation of four satellites in highly eccentric Earth orbits of approximately 1.2 by 12 Earth radii at an inclination of 10 degrees. The inter-satellite separation is approximately 10 kilometers near apogees. Navigation approaches were studied using ground station m g e =d two-way Doppler measurements, Global Positioning System (GPS) pseudorange measurements, crosslink range measurements among the members flying in formation, and various combinations of these measurement types. An absolute position accuracy of 10 kilometers or better can be achieved with most of the approaches studied and a relative position accuracy of 100 meters or better can be achieved at apogee in some cases. Among the various approaches studied, the approaches that use a combination of GPS and crosslink measurements were found to be more reliable in terms of absolute and relative navigation accuracies and operational flexibility.

  6. Formation energy in σ-phase Fe-V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslak, J.; Tobola, J.; Dubiel, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Formation energy of the σ-phase in the Fe-V alloy system, ΔE, was computed in the full compositional range of its occurrence (˜34≤x≤˜60) using the electronic band structure calculations by means of the KKR method. ΔE-values were found to strongly depend on the Fe concentration, also its variation with different site occupancies was characteristic of a given lattice site. Calculated magnetic, Smagn, and configuration, Sconf, entropy contributions were used to determine sublattice occupancies for various compositions and temperatures. The results agree well with those obtained from neutron diffraction measurements.

  7. Ethanol formation mechanism from CO + H/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, A.; Katzer, J.R.

    1982-06-24

    The mechanism of ethanol formation from CO + H/sub 2/ was studied by the isotopic tracer method. Enol condensation and CO insertion into surface-bound CH/sub 3/ does not explain the isotopic composition of the ethanol product. A substitute mechanism involving CO insertion into an adsorbed carbene followed by isotopic scrambling in the adsorbed intermediate is proposed. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  8. Gas-phase formation of silicon carbides, oxides, and sulphides from atomic silicon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohme, Diethard K.; Wlodek, Stanislaw; Fox, Arnold

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental study of the kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions in the gas phase between ground-state Si(+)2p and a variety of astrophysical molecules. The aim of this study is to identify the reactions which trigger the formation of chemical bonds between silicon and carbon, oxygen and sulphur, and the chemical pathways which lead to further molecular growth. Such knowledge is valuable in the identification of new extraterrestrial silicon-bearing molecules and for an assessment of the gas-phase transition from atomic silicon to silicon carbide and silicate grain particles in carbon-rich and oxygen-rich astrophysical environments.

  9. PRISMA—A formation flying project in implementation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Staffan; Veldman, Sytze; Bodin, Per

    2009-11-01

    The PRISMA project for autonomous formation flying and rendezvous has passed its critical design review in February-March 2007. The project comprises two satellites which are an in-orbit testbed for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) algorithms and sensors for advanced formation flying and rendezvous. Several experiments involving GNC algorithms, sensors and thrusters will be performed during a 10 month mission with launch planned for the second half of 2009. The project is run by the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) in close cooperation with the German Aerospace Center (DLR), the French Space Agency (CNES) and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Additionally, the project also will demonstrate flight worthiness of two novel motor technologies: one that uses environmentally clean and non-hazardous propellant, and one that consists of a microthruster system based on MEMS technology. The project will demonstrate autonomous formation flying and rendezvous based on several sensors—GPS, RF-based and vision based—with different objectives and in different combinations. The GPS-based onboard navigation system, contributed by DLR, offers relative orbit information in real-time in decimetre range. The RF-based navigation instrument intended for DARWIN, under CNES development, will be tested for the first time on PRISMA, both for instrument performance, but also in closed loop as main sensor for formation flying. Several rendezvous and proximity manoeuvre experiments will be demonstrated using only vision based sensor information coming from the modified star camera provided by DTU. Semi-autonomous operations ranging from 200 km to 1 m separation between the satellites will be demonstrated. With the project now in the verification phase particular attention is given to the specific formation flying and rendezvous functionality on instrument, GNC-software and system level.

  10. A novel mechanical model for phase-separation in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physics of phase-separation between solid and fluid phases as a two-phase mass moves down slope is a long-standing challenge. Here, I propose a fundamentally new mechanism, called 'separation-flux', that leads to strong phase-separation in avalanche and debris flows. This new model extends the general two-phase debris flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) to include a separation-flux mechanism. The new flux separation mechanism is capable of describing and controlling the dynamically evolving phase-separation, segregation, and/or levee formation in a real two-phase, geometrically three-dimensional debris flow motion and deposition. These are often observed phenomena in natural debris flows and industrial processes that involve the transportation of particulate solid-fluid mixture material. The novel separation-flux model includes several dominant physical and mechanical aspects that result in strong phase-separation (segregation). These include pressure gradients, volume fractions of solid and fluid phases and their gradients, shear-rates, flow depth, material friction, viscosity, material densities, boundary structures, gravity and topographic constraints, grain shape, size, etc. Due to the inherent separation mechanism, as the mass moves down slope, more and more solid particles are brought to the front, resulting in a solid-rich and mechanically strong frontal surge head followed by a weak tail largely consisting of the viscous fluid. The primary frontal surge head followed by secondary surge is the consequence of the phase-separation. Such typical and dominant phase-separation phenomena are revealed here for the first time in real two-phase debris flow modeling and simulations. However, these phenomena may depend on the bulk material composition and the applied forces. Reference: Pudasaini, Shiva P. (2012): A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res., 117, F03010, doi: 10.1029/2011JF002186.

  11. Droplets Formation and Merging in Two-Phase Flow Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H. G.; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed. PMID:21731459

  12. Droplets formation and merging in two-phase flow microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed. PMID:21731459

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Floral Boundary Formation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongyang; Huang, Tengbo

    2016-01-01

    Boundary formation is a crucial developmental process in plant organogenesis. Boundaries separate cells with distinct identities and act as organizing centers to control the development of adjacent organs. In flower development, initiation of floral primordia requires the formation of the meristem-to-organ (M–O) boundaries and floral organ development depends on the establishment of organ-to-organ (O–O) boundaries. Studies in this field have revealed a suite of genes and regulatory pathways controlling floral boundary formation. Many of these genes are transcription factors that interact with phytohormone pathways. This review will focus on the functions and interactions of the genes that play important roles in the floral boundaries and discuss the molecular mechanisms that integrate these regulatory pathways to control the floral boundary formation. PMID:26950117

  14. Mechanics of metals with phase changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason C.

    New experimental data is presented on some exotic metals that exhibit phase changes at cryogenic temperatures. The types of phase changes that were detected in the specific heat data range from martensitic (diffusionless) transitions to superconducting transitions. In addition, the charge density wave (CDW) state in uranium metal was detected in the specific heat. Specific-heat measurements were made in zero-magnetic field using an apparatus capable of obtaining temperatures as low as 0.4 K. Calibration performed on this apparatus, using a single-crystal copper sample, show its accuracy to be 0.50 per cent, while the resolution was better than 0.1 per cent. Our measurements demonstrate that similar high precision and accurate specific-heat measurements can be obtained on milligram-scale samples. In Chapters 2 and 3, specific-heat measurements are presented for the B2 (CsCl structure) alloy AuZn and for alpha-uranium (orthorhombic symmetry). The AuZn alloy exhibits a continuous transition at 64.75 K and an entropy of transition of (DeltaStr ) 2.02 J K-1 mol-1. Calculation of the Debye temperature, by extrapolating of the high temperature phase elastic constants to T = 0 K yields a value of 207 K (+/-2 K), in favorable agreement with the calorimetric value of 219 K (+/-0.50 K), despite the intervening martensitic transition. Reported results for single-crystal alpha-U show a low-temperature limiting 19, of 256 K (+/-0.50 K) and four low-temperature anamolies: a superconducting transition below 1 K, an electronic transition at 22 K, and two anamolies at 38 K and at 42 K indicative of the CDW state. In order to continue the study of the actinide series of elements, a program was initiated to first purify and then grow single crystals of plutonium. Accordingly, the focus of Chapters 4 through 6 will be a description of plutonium sample preparation. In this program plutonium metal was purified via zone refining, using a levitated molten zone to minimize the introduction

  15. The Theory of Evaluation with an Emphasis on the Formative Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holleman, I. Thomas, Jr.

    An overview of educational evaluation theory in general, and its formative phase in specific, is presented. Educational evaluation is defined as are its formative and summative phases and its classifications of external and internal evaluation. Each phase and classification are discussed largely in the context of formative evaluation. In addition,…

  16. A directional nucleation-zipping mechanism for triple helix formation

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Patrizia; Arimondo, Paola B.; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Garestier, Thérèse; Hélène, Claude; Sun, Jian-Sheng

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic study of triple helix formation was performed by surface plasmon resonance. Three systems were investigated involving 15mer pyrimidine oligonucleotides as third strands. Rate constants and activation energies were validated by comparison with thermodynamic values calculated from UV-melting analysis. Replacement of a T·A base pair by a C·G pair at either the 5′ or the 3′ end of the target sequence allowed us to assess mismatch effects and to delineate the mechanism of triple helix formation. Our data show that the association rate constant is governed by the sequence of base triplets on the 5′ side of the triplex (referred to as the 5′ side of the target oligopurine strand) and provides evidence that the reaction pathway for triple helix formation in the pyrimidine motif proceeds from the 5′ end to the 3′ end of the triplex according to the nucleation-zipping model. It seems that this is a general feature for all triple helices formation, probably due to the right-handedness of the DNA double helix that provides a stronger base stacking at the 5′ than at the 3′ duplex–triplex junction. Understanding the mechanism of triple helix formation is not only of fundamental interest, but may also help in designing better triple helix-forming oligonucleotides for gene targeting and control of gene expression. PMID:12490709

  17. Fibril Formation and Phase Separation in Aqueous Cellulose Ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Amanda; Schmidt, Peter; McAllister, John; Lott, Joseph; Bates, Frank; Lodge, Timothy

    Aqueous solutions of many cellulose ethers are known to undergo thermoreversible gelation and phase separation upon heating to form turbid hydrogels, but the mechanism and resulting structures have not been well understood. Turbidity, light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are used to show that hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) chains are dissolved in water below 50 °C and undergo phase separation at higher temperatures. At 70 °C, at sufficiently high concentrations in water, HPMC orders into fibrillar structures with a well-defined radius of 18 +/- 2 nm, as characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and SANS. The HPMC fibril structure is independent of concentration and heating rate. However, HPMC fibrils do not form a percolating network as readily as is seen in methylcellulose, resulting in a lower hot-gel modulus, as demonstrated by rheology.

  18. Mechanics of Metals with Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    New experimental data is presented on some exotic metals that exhibit phase changes at cryogenic temperatures. The types of phase changes that were detected in the specific heat data range from martensitic (diffusion less) transitions to superconducting transitions. In addition, the charge density wave (CDW) state in uranium metal was detected in the specific heat. Specific-heat measurements were made in zero-magnetic field using an apparatus capable of obtaining temperatures as low as 0.4 K. Calibration performed on this apparatus, using a single-crystal copper sample, show its accuracy to be 0.50%, while the resolution was better than 0.1%. Our measurements demonstrate that similar high precision and accurate specific-heat measurements can be obtained on milligram-scale samples. In Chapters 2 and 3, specific-heat measurements are presented for the B2 (CsCl structure) alloy AuZn and for {alpha}-uranium (orthorhombic symmetry). The AuZn alloy exhibits a continuous transition at 64.75 K and an entropy of transition of ({Delta}S{sub tr}) 2.02 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1}. Calculation of the Debye temperature, by extrapolating of the high temperature phase elastic constants to T = 0 K yields a value of 207 K ({+-}2 K), in favorable agreement with the calorimetric value of 219 K ({+-}0.50 K), despite the intervening martensitic transition. Reported results for single-crystal {alpha}-U show a low-temperature limiting {Theta}{sub D} of 256 K ({+-}0.50 K) and four low-temperature anomalies: a superconducting transition below 1 K, an electronic transition at 22 K, and two anomalies at 38 K and at 42 K indicative of the CDW state. In order to continue the study of the actinide series of elements, a program was initiated to first purify and then grow single crystals of plutonium. Accordingly, the focus of Chapters 4 through 6 will be a description of plutonium sample preparation. In this program plutonium metal was purified via zone refining, using a levitated molten

  19. Statistical mechanical and quantum mechanical modeling of condensed phase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrosse, Matthew R.

    Understanding adsorption in nanoporous media is vital to improving their use in industrial applications such as fluid storage and separations processes. One major objective of this research is to shed light on an on-going controversy in literature over where gases adsorb on single walled carbon nanotube bundles. Grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using models of carbon nanotube bundles composed of tubes of all the same diameter (homogeneous) and tubes of different diameters (heterogeneous). We used three metrics with which we compared our simulation results to those found in experiments on carbon nanotubes: the specific surface area, the isosteric heat of adsorption, and the adsorption capacity. Simulations of classically behaved fluids Ar, CH4, and Xe indicate that nanotubes prepared by the HiPco process are best described by a heterogeneous bundle model with ˜11% of the nanotubes opened. Ne gas requires additional considerations to describe the quantum effects at the temperatures of interest, which have been implemented by the Feynman-Hibbs approximation. Overall, calculated results from Ne simulations are consistent with those from classical fluids. However, Ne simulations strongly indicate that the small interstitial channels formed by exactly three nanotubes are closed. Combined with previous studies on classically behaved fluids Ar, CH4, and Xe, experimental data including Ne are best matched by hetergeneous bundles with ˜11% open-ended nanotubes. The development of a heterogeneous Co/C/O reactive force field (ReaxFF) potential has also been a major objective of this research. ReaxFF provides a method to describe bond-breaking and bond-forming events that can be applied to large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This many-bodied semi-empirical potential has been trained from ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The training set originally included descriptions of bulk and surface condensed phase cobalt

  20. Homogeneous gas-phase formation of polychlorinated naphthalene from dimerization of 4-chlorophenoxy radicals and cross-condensation of phenoxy radical with 4-chlorophenoxy radical: Mechanism and kinetics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Zhang, Ruiming; Li, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qingzhu

    2015-10-01

    A direct density functional theory (DFT) calculation was performed for the formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) from dimerization of 4-chlorophenoxy radicals (4-CPRs) and cross-condensation of phenoxy radical (PhR) with 4-CPR, respectively. Several energetically feasible formation routes were proposed. The rate constants were computed by the canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution over temperature range of 600-1200 K. This study shows that PCN productions from the dimerization of 4-CPRs just contain DCNs. All the monochlorinated naphthalene (MCN) detected in the experiment from 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) as precursor are formed form the cross-condensation of PhR with 4-CPR.

  1. Metastable bcc phase formation in the Nb-Cr system

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, D.J.; Schwarz, R.B.; Perepezko, J.H.; Plantz, D.H.

    1993-08-01

    Extended metastable bcc solid solutions of Nb-Xat.%Cr (X = 35, 50, 57, 77, 82, and 94) were synthesized by two-anvil splat-quenching. In addition, bcc (Nb-67at.%Cr) was prepared by mechanically alloying mixtures of niobium and chromium powders. The lattice parameters were measured by X-ray diffraction and the Young`s moduli were measured by low-load microindentation. The composition dependence of the lattice parameters and elastic moduli show a positive deviation with respect to a rule of mixtures. During continuous heating at 15C/min., the metastable precursor bcc phases decomposed at temperatures above 750C to uniformly refined microstructures.

  2. Influence of sigma-phase formation on the localized corrosion behavior of a duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhe, K. M.; Kain, V.; Madangopal, K.; Gadiyar, H. S.

    1996-08-01

    Because of their austenitic-ferritic microstructures, duplex stainless steels offer a good combination of mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. However, heat treatments can lower the mechanical strength of these stainless steels as well as render them susceptible to intergranular corrosion (IGC) and pitting corrosion. In this study, a low-carbon (0.02%) duplex stainless steel is subjected to various heat treatments at 450 to 950 °C for 30 min to 10 h. The heat-treated samples then undergo ASTM IGC and pitting corrosion tests, and the results are correlated with the microstructures obtained after each heat treatment. In the absence of Cr23C6 precipitation, σ-phase precipitates render this duplex stainless steel susceptible to IGC and pitting corrosion. Even submicroscopic σ-phase precipitates are deleterious for IGC resistance. Longer-duration heat treatments (at 750 to 850 °C) induce chromium diffusion to replenish the chromium-depleted regions around the σ-phase precipitates and improve IGC resistance; pitting resistance, however, is not fully restored. Various mechanisms of σ-phase formation are discussed to show that regions adjacent to σ-phase are depleted of chromium and molybdenum. The effect of chemical composition (pitting resistance equivalent) on the pitting resistance of various stainless steels is also noted.

  3. Hebbian and neuromodulatory mechanisms interact to trigger associative memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Joshua P.; Diaz-Mataix, Lorenzo; Hamanaka, Hiroki; Ozawa, Takaaki; Ycu, Edgar; Koivumaa, Jenny; Kumar, Ashwani; Hou, Mian; Deisseroth, Karl; Boyden, Edward S.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing hypothesis termed “Hebbian plasticity” suggests that memories are formed through strengthening of synaptic connections between neurons with correlated activity. In contrast, other theories propose that coactivation of Hebbian and neuromodulatory processes produce the synaptic strengthening that underlies memory formation. Using optogenetics we directly tested whether Hebbian plasticity alone is both necessary and sufficient to produce physiological changes mediating actual memory formation in behaving animals. Our previous work with this method suggested that Hebbian mechanisms are sufficient to produce aversive associative learning under artificial conditions involving strong, iterative training. Here we systematically tested whether Hebbian mechanisms are necessary and sufficient to produce associative learning under more moderate training conditions that are similar to those that occur in daily life. We measured neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala, a brain region important for associative memory storage about danger. Our findings provide evidence that Hebbian mechanisms are necessary to produce neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala and behavioral memory formation. However, under these conditions Hebbian mechanisms alone were not sufficient to produce these physiological and behavioral effects unless neuromodulatory systems were coactivated. These results provide insight into how aversive experiences trigger memories and suggest that combined Hebbian and neuromodulatory processes interact to engage associative aversive learning. PMID:25489081

  4. Phase Separation and Pattern Formation in a Binary Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, Jacopo; Zurek, Wojciech H.; Davis, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    The miscibility-immiscibility phase transition in binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can be controlled by a coupling between the two components. Here we propose a new scheme that uses coupling-induced pattern formation to test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) of topological-defect formation in a quantum phase transition. For a binary BEC in a ring trap we find that the number of domains forming the pattern scales as a function of the coupling quench rate with an exponent as predicted by the KZM. For a binary BEC in an elongated harmonic trap we find a different scaling law due to the transition being spatially inhomogeneous. We perform a “quantum simulation” of the harmonically trapped system in a ring trap to verify the scaling exponent.

  5. Phase Separation and Pattern Formation in a Binary Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbatini, Jacopo; Davis, Matthew J.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2011-12-02

    The miscibility-immiscibility phase transition in binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can be controlled by a coupling between the two components. Here we propose a new scheme that uses coupling-induced pattern formation to test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) of topological-defect formation in a quantum phase transition. For a binary BEC in a ring trap we find that the number of domains forming the pattern scales as a function of the coupling quench rate with an exponent as predicted by the KZM. For a binary BEC in an elongated harmonic trap we find a different scaling law due to the transition being spatially inhomogeneous. We perform a ''quantum simulation'' of the harmonically trapped system in a ring trap to verify the scaling exponent.

  6. Correlative theoretical and experimental investigation of the formation of AlYB14 and competing phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunold, Oliver; Chen, Yen-Ting; Music, Denis; Persson, Per O. Å.; Primetzhofer, Daniel; to Baben, Moritz; Achenbach, Jan-Ole; Keuter, Philipp; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2016-02-01

    The phase formation in the boron-rich section of the Al-Y-B system has been explored by a correlative theoretical and experimental research approach. The structure of coatings deposited via high power pulsed magnetron sputtering from a compound target was studied using elastic recoil detection analysis, electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum imaging, as well as X-ray and electron diffraction data. The formation of AlYB14 together with the (Y,Al)B6 impurity phase, containing 1.8 at. % less B than AlYB14, was observed at a growth temperature of 800 °C and hence 600 °C below the bulk synthesis temperature. Based on quantum mechanical calculations, we infer that minute compositional variations within the film may be responsible for the formation of both icosahedrally bonded AlYB14 and cubic (Y,Al)B6 phases. These findings are relevant for synthesis attempts of all boron rich icosahedrally bonded compounds with the space group: Imma that form ternary phases at similar compositions.

  7. Quasi-Hermitian quantum mechanics in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas; Veitia, Andrzej

    2007-10-15

    We investigate quasi-Hermitian quantum mechanics in phase space using standard deformation quantization methods: Groenewold star products and Wigner transforms. We focus on imaginary Liouville theory as a representative example where exact results are easily obtained. We emphasize spatially periodic solutions, compute various distribution functions and phase-space metrics, and explore the relationships between them.

  8. Methylammonium formate as a mobile phase modifier for reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Shau; Danielson, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Although alkylammonium ionic liquids such as ethylammonium nitrate and ethylammonium formate have been used as mobile phase “solvents” for liquid chromatography (LC), we have shown that methylammonium formate (MAF), in part because of its lower viscosity, can be an effective replacement for methanol (MeOH) in reversed-phase LC. Plots of log retention factor versus the fraction of MeOH and MAF in the mobile phase indicate quite comparable solvent strength slope values of 2.50 and 2.05, respectively. Using a polar endcapped C18 column, furazolidone and nitrofurantoin using 20% MAF-80% water could be separated in 22 min but no baseline separation was possible using MeOH as the modifier, even down to 10%. Suppression of silanol peak broadening effects by MAF is important permitting a baseline separation of pyridoxine, thiamine, and nicotinamide using 5% MAF-95% water at 0.7 mL/min. Using 5% MeOH-95% water, severe peak broadening for thiamine is evident. The compatibility of MAF as a mobile phase modifer for LC with mass spectrometry detection of water soluble vitamins is also shown. PMID:18849044

  9. Characterising the acceleration phase of blast wave formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, T. E. Pasley, J.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.

    2014-10-15

    Intensely heated, localised regions in uniform fluids will rapidly expand and generate an outwardly propagating blast wave. The Sedov-Taylor self-similar solution for such blast waves has long been studied and applied to a variety of scenarios. A characteristic time for their formation has also long been identified using dimensional analysis, which by its very nature, can offer several interpretations. We propose that, rather than simply being a characteristic time, it may be interpreted as the definitive time taken for a blast wave resulting from an intense explosion in a uniform media to contain its maximum kinetic energy. A scaling relation for this measure of the acceleration phase, preceding the establishment of the blast wave, is presented and confirmed using a 1D planar hydrodynamic model.

  10. COMPETING MECHANISMS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FORMATION IN CONDITIONS RELEVANT TO THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Baouche, S.; Chehrouri, M.; Chaabouni, H.; Mokrane, H.

    2010-12-20

    The most efficient mechanism of the formation of molecular hydrogen in the current universe is by association of hydrogen atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains. The details of the processes of its formation and release from the grain are of great importance in the physical and chemical evolution of the space environments where it takes place. The main puzzle is still the fate of the 4.5 eV released in H{sub 2} formation and whether it goes into internal energy (rovibrational excitation), translational kinetic energy, or heating of the grain. The modality of the release of this energy affects the dynamics of the ISM and its evolution toward star formation. We present results of the detection of the rovibrational states of the just-formed H{sub 2} as it leaves the surface of a silicate. We find that rovibrationally excited molecules are ejected into the gas phase immediately after formation over a much wider range of grain temperatures than anticipated. Our results can be explained by the presence of two mechanisms of molecule formation that operate in partially overlapping ranges of grain temperature. A preliminary analysis of the relative importance of these two mechanisms is given. These unexpected findings, which will be complemented with experiments on the influence of factors such as silicate morphology, should be of great interest to the astrophysics and astrochemistry communities.

  11. Physical Mechanisms of Pattern Formation in the Early Chick Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel; Glazier, James; Zaitlen, Benji; Chaplain, Mark; Weijer, Cornelis

    2007-03-01

    Gastrulation marks a critical step in early embryogenesis when the first recognizable patterns are laid down. Although the genome maintains ultimate responsibility for this pattern formation, it cannot actually control the organization of individual cells. The robustness of embryogenic pattern formation suggests that a few simple, physical mechanisms are unleashed and that self-organization results. We perform numerical simulations of early chick gastrulation using an agent based method in which individual cells interact via a handful of behaviors including adhesivity, secretion and chemotaxis. Through these simulations we have identified certain behaviors as being important for various stages and morphological events. For instance, experimental results on primitive streak formation are best reproduced by a model in which the Kohler's Sickle secretes a chemo repellant for streak tip cells, and cell polarization appears to be important for initiating polonaise motion during streak elongation.

  12. On mechanisms of reactive metabolite formation from drugs.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Alf; Spjuth, Ola

    2013-04-01

    Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs) cause a broad range of clinically severe conditions of which drug induced liver injury (DILI) in particular is one of the most frequent causes of safety-related drug withdrawals. The underlying cause is almost invariably formation of reactive metabolites (RM) which by attacking macromolecules induc eorgan injuries. Attempts are being made in the pharmaceutical industry to lower the risk of selecting unfit compounds as clinical candidates. Approaches vary but do not seem to be overly successful at the initial design/synthesis stage. We review here the most frequent categories of mechanisms for RM formation and propose that many cases of RMs encountered within early ADME screening can be foreseen by applying chemical and metabolic knowledge. We also mention a web tool, SpotRM, which can be used for efficient look-up and learning about drugs that have recognized IADRs likely caused by RM formation. PMID:23035789

  13. Defect formation mechanism during PECVD of a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiji; Umezu, Ikurou

    1997-07-01

    Defect formation mechanism in a-Si:H during PECVD at substrate temperature below 250 C is considered to be breaking of weak bonds in the Urbach tail. To break weak bonds, an extra energy is necessary. This energy is supplied by the reaction energy of SiH{sub 3} precursor at the growing surface incorporating SiH{sub 2} into the network. The defect density is experimentally shown to be proportional to a product of the energy supply frequency, i.e., SiH{sub 2} density, and the weak bond density which is obtained by the Urbach energy. By analysis using the configurational coordinate diagram the energy level of the broken weak bond is determined to be 0.2 eV above the valence band mobility edge. There is similarity of the defect formation mechanism during deposition to that of the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  14. Characterization and formation mechanism understanding of asperities to be burnished

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Y. J.; Yu, S. K.; Liu, B.

    2006-08-01

    To achieve rigorous glide performance for ultra-low flying height, disk media with asperities that exceed the flying height of the magnetic head must be eliminated. Burnishing process is one of the critical ways to remove such asperities from the disk surface. A successful burnishing process demonstrating improved disk yields and less disk damages depends on an effective burnish head that is designed by the understanding of asperities to be burnished. However, optimization of sputtering process is the most essential to avoid those asperities on the disk surface and strongly relies on the formation mechanism understanding of the asperities. It was attempted to trace and characterize the asperities on specially prepared disks in this work. Experimental studies after aggressive burnishing processes on the disks categorized the asperities and indicated their possible formation mechanisms.

  15. Neural and cellular mechanisms of fear and extinction memory formation.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Caitlin A; Maren, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Over the course of natural history, countless animal species have evolved adaptive behavioral systems to cope with dangerous situations and promote survival. Emotional memories are central to these defense systems because they are rapidly acquired and prepare organisms for future threat. Unfortunately, the persistence and intrusion of memories of fearful experiences are quite common and can lead to pathogenic conditions, such as anxiety and phobias. Over the course of the last 30 years, neuroscientists and psychologists alike have attempted to understand the mechanisms by which the brain encodes and maintains these aversive memories. Of equal interest, though, is the neurobiology of extinction memory formation as this may shape current therapeutic techniques. Here we review the extant literature on the neurobiology of fear and extinction memory formation, with a strong focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. PMID:22230704

  16. Resolving the molecular mechanism of cadherin catch bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manibog, Kristine; Li, Hui; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2014-06-01

    Classical cadherin Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins play key roles in embryogenesis and in maintaining tissue integrity. Cadherins mediate robust adhesion by binding in multiple conformations. One of these adhesive states, called an X-dimer, forms catch bonds that strengthen and become longer lived in the presence of mechanical force. Here we use single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy with an atomic force microscope along with molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations to resolve the molecular mechanisms underlying catch bond formation and the role of Ca2+ ions in this process. Our data suggest that tensile force bends the cadherin extracellular region such that they form long-lived, force-induced hydrogen bonds that lock X-dimers into tighter contact. When Ca2+ concentration is decreased, fewer de novo hydrogen bonds are formed and catch bond formation is eliminated.

  17. Neural and Cellular Mechanisms of Fear and Extinction Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Caitlin A.; Maren, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of natural history, countless animal species have evolved adaptive behavioral systems to cope with dangerous situations and promote survival. Emotional memories are central to these defense systems because they are rapidly acquired and prepare organisms for future threat. Unfortunately, the persistence and intrusion of memories of fearful experiences are quite common and can lead to pathogenic conditions, such as anxiety and phobias. Over the course of the last thirty years, neuroscientists and psychologists alike have attempted to understand the mechanisms by which the brain encodes and maintains these aversive memories. Of equal interest, though, is the neurobiology of extinction memory formation as this may shape current therapeutic techniques. Here we review the extant literature on the neurobiology of fear and extinction memory formation, with a strong focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. PMID:22230704

  18. On the mechanical theory for biological pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentil, D. E.; Murray, J. D.

    1993-02-01

    We investigate the pattern-forming potential of mechanical models in embryology proposed by Oster, Murray and their coworkers. We show that the presence of source terms in the tissue extracellular matrix and cell density equations give rise to spatio-temporal oscillations. An extension of one such model to include ‘biologically realistic long range effects induces the formation of stationary spatial patterns. Previous attempts to solve the full system were in one dimension only. We obtain solutions in one dimension and extend our simulations to two dimensions. We show that a single mechanical model alone is capable of generating complex but regular spatial patterns rather than the requirement of model interaction as suggested by Nagorcka et al. and Shaw and Murray. We discuss some biological applications of the models among which are would healing and formation of dermatoglyphic (fingerprint) patterns.

  19. Formation of Asymmetrical Structured Silica Controlled by a Phase Separation Process and Implication for Biosilicification

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification. PMID:23585878

  20. Formation of asymmetrical structured silica controlled by a phase separation process and implication for biosilicification.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification. PMID:23585878

  1. Formation and phase transitions of methane hydrates under dynamic loadings: Compression rate dependent kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2012-03-01

    We describe high-pressure kinetic studies of the formation and phase transitions of methane hydrates (MH) under dynamic loading conditions, using a dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) coupled with time-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and high-speed microphotography. The time-resolved spectra and dynamic pressure responses exhibit profound compression-rate dependences associated with both the formation and the solid-solid phase transitions of MH-I to II and MH-II to III. Under dynamic loading conditions, MH forms only from super-compressed water and liquid methane in a narrow pressure range between 0.9 and 1.6 GPa at the one-dimensional (1D) growth rate of 42 μm/s. MH-I to II phase transition occurs at the onset of water solidification 0.9 GPa, following a diffusion controlled mechanism. We estimated the activation volume to be -109 ± 29 Å3, primarily associated with relatively slow methane diffusion which follows the rapid interfacial reconstruction, or martensitic displacements of atomic positions and hydrogen bonds, of 51262 water cages in MH-I to 4351263 cages in MH-II. MH-II to III transition, on the other hand, occurs over a broad pressure range between 1.5 and 2.2 GPa, following a reconstructive mechanism from super-compressed MH-II clathrates to a broken ice-filled viscoelastic solid of MH-III. It is found that the profound dynamic effects observed in the MH formation and phase transitions are primarily governed by the stability of water and ice phases at the relevant pressures.

  2. Formation and phase transitions of methane hydrates under dynamic loadings: compression rate dependent kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2012-03-21

    We describe high-pressure kinetic studies of the formation and phase transitions of methane hydrates (MH) under dynamic loading conditions, using a dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) coupled with time-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and high-speed microphotography. The time-resolved spectra and dynamic pressure responses exhibit profound compression-rate dependences associated with both the formation and the solid-solid phase transitions of MH-I to II and MH-II to III. Under dynamic loading conditions, MH forms only from super-compressed water and liquid methane in a narrow pressure range between 0.9 and 1.6 GPa at the one-dimensional (1D) growth rate of 42 μm/s. MH-I to II phase transition occurs at the onset of water solidification 0.9 GPa, following a diffusion controlled mechanism. We estimated the activation volume to be -109±29 Å(3), primarily associated with relatively slow methane diffusion which follows the rapid interfacial reconstruction, or martensitic displacements of atomic positions and hydrogen bonds, of 5(12)6(2) water cages in MH-I to 4(3)5(12)6(3) cages in MH-II. MH-II to III transition, on the other hand, occurs over a broad pressure range between 1.5 and 2.2 GPa, following a reconstructive mechanism from super-compressed MH-II clathrates to a broken ice-filled viscoelastic solid of MH-III. It is found that the profound dynamic effects observed in the MH formation and phase transitions are primarily governed by the stability of water and ice phases at the relevant pressures. PMID:22443783

  3. Vesicle formation and endocytosis: function, machinery, mechanisms, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Parkar, Nihal S; Akpa, Belinda S; Nitsche, Ludwig C; Wedgewood, Lewis E; Place, Aaron T; Sverdlov, Maria S; Chaga, Oleg; Minshall, Richard D

    2009-06-01

    Vesicle formation provides a means of cellular entry for extracellular substances and for recycling of membrane constituents. Mechanisms governing the two primary endocytic pathways (i.e., caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as well as newly emerging vesicular pathways) have become the focus of intense investigation to improve our understanding of nutrient, hormone, and drug delivery, as well as opportunistic invasion of pathogens. In this review of endocytosis, we broadly discuss the structural and signaling proteins that compose the molecular machinery governing endocytic vesicle formation (budding, invagination, and fission from the membrane), with some regard for the specificity observed in certain cell types and species. Important biochemical functions of endocytosis and diseases caused by their disruption also are discussed, along with the structures of key components of endocytic pathways and their known mechanistic contributions. The mechanisms by which principal components of the endocytic machinery are recruited to the plasma membrane, where they interact to induce vesicle formation, are discussed, together with computational approaches used to simulate simplified versions of endocytosis with the hope of clarifying aspects of vesicle formation that may be difficult to determine experimentally. Finally, we pose several unanswered questions intended to stimulate further research interest in the cell biology and modeling of endocytosis. PMID:19113823

  4. Vesicle Formation and Endocytosis: Function, Machinery, Mechanisms, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Parkar, Nihal S.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Wedgewood, Lewis E.; Place, Aaron T.; Sverdlov, Maria S.; Chaga, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Vesicle formation provides a means of cellular entry for extracellular substances and for recycling of membrane constituents. Mechanisms governing the two primary endocytic pathways (i.e., caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as well as newly emerging vesicular pathways) have become the focus of intense investigation to improve our understanding of nutrient, hormone, and drug delivery, as well as opportunistic invasion of pathogens. In this review of endocytosis, we broadly discuss the structural and signaling proteins that compose the molecular machinery governing endocytic vesicle formation (budding, invagination, and fission from the membrane), with some regard for the specificity observed in certain cell types and species. Important biochemical functions of endocytosis and diseases caused by their disruption also are discussed, along with the structures of key components of endocytic pathways and their known mechanistic contributions. The mechanisms by which principal components of the endocytic machinery are recruited to the plasma membrane, where they interact to induce vesicle formation, are discussed, together with computational approaches used to simulate simplified versions of endocytosis with the hope of clarifying aspects of vesicle formation that may be difficult to determine experimentally. Finally, we pose several unanswered questions intended to stimulate further research interest in the cell biology and modeling of endocytosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1301–1312. PMID:19113823

  5. Mechanisms of Bowtie- and Star-Shaped MX2 Nanoisland Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I.; Hu, Zhili; Zhang, Zhuhua; Yakobson, Boris I.

    A large number of experimental studies over the last few years observed the formation of unusual highly symmetric polycrystalline twinned nanoislands of transition metal dichalcogenides, resembling bowties or stars. Here we analyze their morphology in terms of equilibrium and growth shapes. We propose a mechanism for their formation via collision of concurrently growing islands and validate the theory with phase-field simulations. Finally, we use first-principles calculations to propose an explanation of the predominance of high-symmetry polycrystals with 60-degree lattice misorientation angles.

  6. Diffusion mechanism of exchange bias formation in permalloy-manganese nanostructures at thermo-magnetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Blinov, I V; Krinitsina, T P; Matveev, S A; Milyaev, M A; Sedova, P N; Popov, V V; Ustinov, V V

    2012-09-01

    A mechanism of unidirectional exchange anisotropy formation at thermo-magnetic treatment of permalloy-manganese bilayers has been studied. A shift of hysteresis loops appears at annealing beginning from 230 degrees C. The maximal exchange field of 155 Oe is reached after the 250 degrees C annealing for 2 h. As demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy, the exchange bias and the coercivity growth result from an ordered anti-ferromagnetic NiFeMn phase formation due to the diffusion interaction of permalloy and manganese at annealing. PMID:23035517

  7. Accretion phase of star formation in clouds with different metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Nakamura, Teppei

    2015-04-01

    The main accretion phase of star formation is investigated in clouds with different metallicities in the range 0 ≤ Z ≤ Z⊙, resolving the protostellar radius. Starting from a near-equilibrium prestellar cloud, we calculate the cloud evolution up to ˜100 yr after the first protostar forms. Star formation differs considerably between clouds with lower (Z ≤ 10-4 Z⊙) and higher (Z > 10-4 Z⊙) metallicities. Fragmentation frequently occurs and many protostars appear without a stable circumstellar disc in lower-metallicity clouds. In these clouds, although protostars mutually interact and some are ejected from the cloud centre, many remain as a small stellar cluster. In contrast, higher-metallicity clouds produce a single protostar surrounded by a nearly stable rotation-supported disc. In these clouds, although fragmentation occasionally occurs in the disc, the fragments migrate inwards and finally fall on to the central protostar. The difference in cloud evolution is due to different thermal evolutions and mass accretion rates. The thermal evolution of the cloud determines the emergence and lifetime of the first core. The first core develops prior to the formation of a protostar in higher-metallicity clouds, whereas no (obvious) first core appears in lower-metallicity clouds. The first core evolves into a circumstellar disc with a spiral pattern, which effectively transfers the angular momentum outwards and suppresses frequent fragmentation. In lower-metallicity clouds, the higher mass accretion rate increases the disc surface density within a very short time, rendering the disc unstable to self-gravity and inducing vigorous fragmentation.

  8. Importance of Silicon and Mechanisms of Biosilica Formation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Siti Nor Akmar, Abdullah; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Tengoua, F. F.; Nurul Mayzaitul Azwa, Jamaludin; Shabanimofrad, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most prevalent macroelements, performing an essential function in healing plants in response to environmental stresses. The purpose of using Si is to induce resistance to distinct stresses, diseases, and pathogens. Additionally, Si can improve the condition of soils, which contain toxic levels of heavy metals along with other chemical elements. Silicon minimizes toxicity of Fe, Al, and Mn, increases the availability of P, and enhances drought along with salt tolerance in plants through the formation of silicified tissues in plants. However, the concentration of Si depends on the plants genotype and organisms. Hence, the physiological mechanisms and metabolic activities of plants may be affected by Si application. Peptides as well as amino acids can effectively create polysilicic species through interactions with different species of silicate inside solution. The carboxylic acid and the alcohol groups of serine and asparagine tend not to engage in any significant role in polysilicates formation, but the hydroxyl group side chain can be involved in the formation of hydrogen bond with Si(OH)4. The mechanisms and trend of Si absorption are different between plant species. Furthermore, the transportation of Si requires an energy mechanism; thus, low temperatures and metabolic repressors inhibit Si transportation. PMID:25685787

  9. Importance of silicon and mechanisms of biosilica formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, Abdullah; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Tengoua, F F; Nurul Mayzaitul Azwa, Jamaludin; Shabanimofrad, M

    2015-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most prevalent macroelements, performing an essential function in healing plants in response to environmental stresses. The purpose of using Si is to induce resistance to distinct stresses, diseases, and pathogens. Additionally, Si can improve the condition of soils, which contain toxic levels of heavy metals along with other chemical elements. Silicon minimizes toxicity of Fe, Al, and Mn, increases the availability of P, and enhances drought along with salt tolerance in plants through the formation of silicified tissues in plants. However, the concentration of Si depends on the plants genotype and organisms. Hence, the physiological mechanisms and metabolic activities of plants may be affected by Si application. Peptides as well as amino acids can effectively create polysilicic species through interactions with different species of silicate inside solution. The carboxylic acid and the alcohol groups of serine and asparagine tend not to engage in any significant role in polysilicates formation, but the hydroxyl group side chain can be involved in the formation of hydrogen bond with Si(OH)4. The mechanisms and trend of Si absorption are different between plant species. Furthermore, the transportation of Si requires an energy mechanism; thus, low temperatures and metabolic repressors inhibit Si transportation. PMID:25685787

  10. Physical Mechanisms of Glaze Ice Scallop Formations on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Reshotko, Eli

    1998-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to understand the physical mechanisms that lead to the formation of scallops on swept wings. Icing runs were performed on a NACA 0012 swept wing tip at 45 deg, 30 deg, and 15 deg sweep angles. A baseline case was chosen and direct measurements of scallop height and spacing, castings, video data and close-up photographic data were obtained. The results showed the scallops are made of glaze ice feathers that grow from roughness elements that have reached a minimum height and are located beyond a given distance from the attachment line. This distance depends on tunnel conditions and sweep angle, and is the critical parameter in the formation of scallops. It determines if complete scallops, incomplete scallops or no scallops are going to be formed. The mechanisms of growth for complete and incomplete scallops were identified. The effect of velocity, temperature and LWC on scallop formation was studied. The possibility that cross flow instability may be the physical mechanism that triggers the growth of roughness elements into glaze ice feathers is examined.

  11. Formation mechanism of silver nanoparticles stabilized in glassy matrices.

    PubMed

    Simo, Anne; Polte, Jörg; Pfänder, Norbert; Vainio, Ulla; Emmerling, Franziska; Rademann, Klaus

    2012-11-14

    In any given matrix control over the final particle size distribution requires a constitutive understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of the particle evolution. In this contribution we report on the formation mechanism of silver nanoparticles embedded in a soda-lime silicate glass matrix. For the silver ion-exchanged glass it is shown that at temperatures below 410 °C only molecular clusters (diameter <1 nm) are forming which are most likely silver dimers. These clusters grow to nanoparticles (diameter >1 nm) by annealing above this threshold temperature of 410 °C. It is evidenced that the growth and thus the final silver nanoparticle size are determined by matrix-assisted reduction mechanisms. As a consequence, particle growth proceeds after the initial formation of stable clusters by addition of silver monomers which diffuse from the glass matrix. This is in contrast to the widely accepted concept of particle growth in metal-glass systems, in which it is assumed that the nanoparticle formation is predominantly governed by Ostwald ripening processes. PMID:23098252

  12. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF).

  13. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, D James; Kroll, Jay A; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 ((3)B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited (1)B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  14. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  15. Morphogengineering roots: comparing mechanisms of morphogen gradient formation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In developmental biology, there has been a recent focus on the robustness of morphogen gradients as possible providers of positional information. It was shown that functional morphogen gradients present strong biophysical constraints and lack of robustness to noise. Here we explore how the details of the mechanism which underlies the generation of a morphogen gradient can influence those properties. Results We contrast three gradient-generating mechanisms, (i) a source-decay mechanism; and (ii) a unidirectional transport mechanism; and (iii) a so-called reflux-loop mechanism. Focusing on the dynamics of the phytohormone auxin in the root, we show that only the reflux-loop mechanism can generate a gradient that would be adequate to supply functional positional information for the Arabidopsis root, for biophysically reasonable kinetic parameters. Conclusions We argue that traits that differ in spatial and temporal time-scales can impose complex selective pressures on the mechanism of morphogen gradient formation used for the development of the particular organism. PMID:22583698

  16. Structural phase transitions in trigonal Selenium induce the formation of a disordered phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Anirban; Gohil, Smita; Sengupta, Surajit; Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.; Ghosh, Shankar; Ayyub, Pushan

    2015-10-01

    Arguments based on the Mermin-Wagner theorem suggest that the quasi-1D trigonal phase of Se should be unstable against long wavelength perturbations. Consisting of parallel Se-Se chains, this essentially fragile solid undergoes a partial transition to a monoclinic structure (consisting of 8-membered rings) at low temperatures (≈50 K), and to a distorted trigonal phase at moderate pressures (≈3GPa). Experimental investigations on sub-millimeter-sized single crystals provide clear evidence that these transitions occur via a novel and counter-intuitive route. This involves the reversible formation of an intermediate, disordered structure that appears as a minority phase with increasing pressure as well as with decreasing temperature. The formation of the disordered state is indicated by: (a) a ‘Boson-peak’ that appears at low temperatures in the specific heat and resonance Raman data, and (b) a decrease in the intensity of Raman lines over a relatively narrow pressure range. We complement the experimental results with a phenomenological model that illustrates how a first order structural transition may lead to disorder. Interestingly, nanocrystals of trigonal Se do not undergo any structural transition in the parameter space studied; neither do they exhibit signs of disorder, further underlining the role of disorder in this type of structural transition.

  17. Nucleation mechanism for the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition.

    PubMed

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Eshet, Hagai; Kühne, Thomas D; Behler, Jörg; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-09-01

    Graphite and diamond have comparable free energies, yet forming diamond from graphite in the absence of a catalyst requires pressures that are significantly higher than those at equilibrium coexistence. At lower temperatures, the formation of the metastable hexagonal polymorph of diamond is favoured instead of the more stable cubic diamond. These phenomena cannot be explained by the concerted mechanism suggested in previous theoretical studies. Using an ab initio quality neural-network potential, we carried out a large-scale study of the graphite-to-diamond transition assuming that it occurs through nucleation. The nucleation mechanism accounts for the observed phenomenology and reveals its microscopic origins. We demonstrate that the large lattice distortions that accompany the formation of diamond nuclei inhibit the phase transition at low pressure, and direct it towards the hexagonal diamond phase at higher pressure. The proposed nucleation mechanism should improve our understanding of structural transformations in a wide range of carbon-based materials. PMID:21785417

  18. Protein adduct formation as a molecular mechanism in neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lopachin, Richard M; Decaprio, Anthony P

    2005-08-01

    Chemicals that cause nerve injury and neurological deficits are a structurally diverse group. For the majority, the corresponding molecular mechanisms of neurotoxicity are poorly understood. Many toxicants (e.g., hepatotoxicants) of other organ systems and/or their oxidative metabolites have been identified as electrophiles and will react with cellular proteins by covalently binding nucleophilic amino acid residues. Cellular toxicity occurs when adduct formation disrupts protein structure and/or function, which secondarily causes damage to submembrane organelles, metabolic pathways, or cytological processes. Since many neurotoxicants are also electrophiles, the corresponding pathophysiological mechanism might involve protein adduction. In this review, we will summarize the principles of covalent bond formation that govern reactions between xenobiotic electrophiles and biological nucleophiles. Because a neurotoxicant can form adducts with multiple nucleophilic residues on proteins, the challenge is to identify the mechanistically important adduct. In this regard, it is now recognized that despite widespread chemical adduction of tissue proteins, neurotoxicity can be mediated through binding of specific target nucleophiles in key neuronal proteins. Acrylamide and 2,5-hexanedione are prototypical neurotoxicants that presumably act through the formation of protein adducts. To illustrate both the promise and the difficulty of adduct research, these electrophilic chemicals will be discussed with respect to covalent bond formation, suspected protein sites of adduction, and proposed mechanisms of neurotoxicity. The goals of future investigations are to identify and quantify specific protein adducts that play a causal role in the generation of neurotoxicity induced by electrophilic neurotoxicants. This is a challenging but critical objective that will be facilitated by recent advances in proteomic methodologies. PMID:15901921

  19. Numerical analysis of fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Zeniya, Tasuku; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tanaka, Manabu; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Murphy, Anthony B.; Yamamoto, Eri; Yamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2010-11-01

    In order to clarify the fume formation mechanism in arc welding, a quantitative investigation based on the knowledge of interaction among the electrode, arc and weld pool is indispensable. A fume formation model consisting of a heterogeneous condensation model, a homogeneous nucleation model and a coagulation model has been developed and coupled with the GTA or GMA welding model. A series of processes from evaporation of metal vapour to fume formation from the metal vapour was totally investigated by employing this simulation model. The aim of this paper is to visualize the fume formation process and clarify the fume formation mechanism theoretically through a numerical analysis. Furthermore, the reliability of the simulation model was also evaluated through a comparison of the simulation result with the experimental result. As a result, it was found that the size of the secondary particles consisting of small particles with a size of several tens of nanometres reached 300 nm at maximum and the secondary particle was in a U-shaped chain form in helium GTA welding. Furthermore, it was also clarified that most part of the fume was produced in the downstream region of the arc originating from the metal vapour evaporated mainly from the droplet in argon GMA welding. The fume was constituted by particles with a size of several tens of nanometres and had similar characteristics to that of GTA welding. On the other hand, if the metal transfer becomes unstable and the metal vapour near the droplet diffuses directly towards the surroundings of the arc not getting into the plasma flow, the size of the particles reaches several hundred nanometres.

  20. Multilamellar vesicle formation from a planar lamellar phase under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Behrens, Manja A; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Wagner, Norman J; Olsson, Ulf

    2014-07-22

    The formation of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) from the lamellar phase of nonionic surfactant system C12E5/D2O under shear flow is studied by time-resolved small angle neutron and light scattering during shear flow. A novel small angle neutron scattering sample environment enables the tracking of the lamellae alignment in the velocity-velocity gradient (1-2) plane during MLV formation, which was tracked independently using flow small angle light scattering commensurate with rheology. During the lamellar-to-multilamellar vesicle transition, the primary Bragg peak from the lamellar ordering was observed to tilt, and this gradually increased with time, leading to an anisotropic pattern with a primary axis oriented at ∼25° relative to the flow direction. This distorted pattern persists under flow after MLV formation. A critical strain and critical capillary number based on the MLV viscosity are demonstrated for MLV formation, which is shown to be robust for other systems as well. These novel measurements provide fundamentally new information about the flow orientation of lamellae in the plane of flow that cannot be anticipated from the large body of previous literature showing nearly isotropic orientation in the 2,3 and 1,3 planes of flow. These observations are consistent with models for buckling-induced MLV formation but suggest that the instability is three-dimensional, thereby identifying the mechanism of MLV formation in simple shear flow. PMID:24983325

  1. Mantle–slab interaction and redox mechanism of diamond formation

    PubMed Central

    Palyanov, Yuri N.; Bataleva, Yuliya V.; Sokol, Alexander G.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Reutsky, Vadim N.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2013-01-01

    Subduction tectonics imposes an important role in the evolution of the interior of the Earth and its global carbon cycle; however, the mechanism of the mantle–slab interaction remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate the results of high-pressure redox-gradient experiments on the interactions between Mg-Ca-carbonate and metallic iron, modeling the processes at the mantle–slab boundary; thereby, we present mechanisms of diamond formation both ahead of and behind the redox front. It is determined that, at oxidized conditions, a low-temperature Ca-rich carbonate melt is generated. This melt acts as both the carbon source and crystallization medium for diamond, whereas at reduced conditions, diamond crystallizes only from the Fe-C melt. The redox mechanism revealed in this study is used to explain the contrasting heterogeneity of natural diamonds, as seen in the composition of inclusions, carbon isotopic composition, and nitrogen impurity content. PMID:24297876

  2. Mantle-slab interaction and redox mechanism of diamond formation.

    PubMed

    Palyanov, Yuri N; Bataleva, Yuliya V; Sokol, Alexander G; Borzdov, Yuri M; Kupriyanov, Igor N; Reutsky, Vadim N; Sobolev, Nikolai V

    2013-12-17

    Subduction tectonics imposes an important role in the evolution of the interior of the Earth and its global carbon cycle; however, the mechanism of the mantle-slab interaction remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate the results of high-pressure redox-gradient experiments on the interactions between Mg-Ca-carbonate and metallic iron, modeling the processes at the mantle-slab boundary; thereby, we present mechanisms of diamond formation both ahead of and behind the redox front. It is determined that, at oxidized conditions, a low-temperature Ca-rich carbonate melt is generated. This melt acts as both the carbon source and crystallization medium for diamond, whereas at reduced conditions, diamond crystallizes only from the Fe-C melt. The redox mechanism revealed in this study is used to explain the contrasting heterogeneity of natural diamonds, as seen in the composition of inclusions, carbon isotopic composition, and nitrogen impurity content. PMID:24297876

  3. Elucidation of reaction mechanism involved in the formation of LaNiO3 from XRD and TG analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, Dipti V.; Athawale, Anjali A.

    2013-06-01

    The present work is focused on the synthesis and elucidation of reaction mechanism involved in the formation of LaNiO3 with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. LaNiO3 was synthesized by hydrothermal method by heating at 160°C under autogenous pressure for 6h. Pure phase product was obtained after calcining the hydrothermally activated product for 6h at 700°C. The various phases of the product obtained after hydrothermal treatment and calcination followed by the formation of pure phase nanocrystalline lanthanum nickel oxide could be determined from XRD analysis of the samples. The reaction mechanism and phase formation temperature has been interpreted by thermogravimetric analysis of the hydrothermally synthesized product and XRD analysis.

  4. Rheological controls on the terrestrial core formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Gerya, T. V.; Ziethe, R.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Tackley, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge about the terrestrial core formation mechanism is still very limited. The fracturing mechanism was proposed for cold planetary interiors surrounded by an iron layer [Stevenson, 1981], which develops from an overlying magma ocean. In this case the cold central region is displaced by a degree one mode from the centre of the accreting planet and fractured due to the large stresses. In contrast the consideration of short-lived radioactive heating may result in warmer central regions and the preference of higher mode iron diapirism as core formation mechanism [e.g. Rubie et al., 2007; Ziethe and Spohn, 2007]. Until now most numerical models of core formation via diapirism were limited to the simulation of the sinking of a single diapir. We perform 2D cylindrical simulations using the code I2ELVIS applying the newly developed "spherical-Cartesian" methodology [Gerya and Yuen, 2007]. It combines finite differences on a fully staggered rectangular Eulerian grid and Lagrangian marker-in-cell technique for solving momentum, continuity and temperature equations as well as the Poisson equation for gravity potential in a self-gravitating planetary body. In the model the planet is surrounded by a low viscosity, massless fluid ("sticky air") to simulate a free surface [Schmeling et al., 2008]. We apply a temperature- and stress-dependent viscoplastic rheology inside Mars- and Earth-sized planets and include heat release due to radioactive decay, shear and adiabatic heating. As initial condition we use randomly distributed iron diapirs with random sizes in the range 50 to 100 km radius inside the accreting planet, which represent the iron delivered by predifferentiated impactors. A systematic investigation of the diapir behaviour for different activation volumes and Peierls stresses is being performed, and results are being compared to the isotopic time scale of core formation on terrestrial planets. We show that the rheology controls which formation mechanism becomes

  5. Retardation of Abeta fibril formation by phospholipid vesicles depends on membrane phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, Erik; Sparr, Emma; Linse, Sara

    2010-05-19

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that in several amyloid diseases, the fibril formation in vivo and the mechanism of toxicity both involve membrane interactions. We have studied Alzheimer's disease related amyloid beta peptide (Abeta). Recombinant Abeta(M1-40) and Abeta(M1-42) produced in Escherichia coli, allows us to carry out large scale kinetics assays with good statistics. The amyloid formation process is followed in means of thioflavin T fluorescence at relatively low (down to 380 nM) peptide concentration approaching the physiological range. The lipid membranes are introduced in the system as large and small unilamellar vesicles. The aggregation lagtime increases in the presence of lipid vesicles for all situations investigated and the phase behavior of the membrane in the vesicles has a large effect on the aggregation kinetics. By comparing vesicles with different membrane phase behavior we see that the solid gel phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers cause the largest retardation of Abeta fibril formation. The membrane-induced retardation reaches saturation and is present when the vesicles are added during the lag time up to the nucleation point. No significant difference is detected in lag time when increasing amount of negative charge is incorporated into the membrane. PMID:20483329

  6. Mechanisms of amyloid formation revealed by solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Karamanos, Theodoros K.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Thompson, Gary S.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous elongated aggregates involved in more than fifty human diseases. Recent advances in electron microscopy and solid state NMR have allowed the characterization of fibril structures to different extents of refinement. However, structural details about the mechanism of fibril formation remain relatively poorly defined. This is mainly due to the complex, heterogeneous and transient nature of the species responsible for assembly; properties that make them difficult to detect and characterize in structural detail using biophysical techniques. The ability of solution NMR spectroscopy to investigate exchange between multiple protein states, to characterize transient and low-population species, and to study high molecular weight assemblies, render NMR an invaluable technique for studies of amyloid assembly. In this article we review state-of-the-art solution NMR methods for investigations of: (a) protein dynamics that lead to the formation of aggregation-prone species; (b) amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered proteins; and (c) protein–protein interactions on pathway to fibril formation. Together, these topics highlight the power and potential of NMR to provide atomic level information about the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fascinating problems in structural biology. PMID:26282197

  7. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  8. FRAGMENTATION AT THE EARLIEST PHASE OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qizhou; Wang Yang; Pillai, Thushara; Rathborne, Jill

    2009-05-01

    We present 1.3 mm continuum and spectral line images of two massive molecular clumps P1 and P2 in the G28.34+0.06 region with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). While the two clumps contain masses of 1000 and 880 M {sub sun}, respectively, P1 has a luminosity OF <10{sup 2} L {sub sun}, and a lower gas temperature and smaller line width than P2. Thus, P1 appears to be at a much earlier stage of massive star formation than P2. The high-resolution SMA observations reveal two distinctive cores in P2 with masses of 97 and 49 M {sub sun}, respectively. The 4 GHz spectral bandpass captures line emission from CO isotopologues, SO, CH{sub 3}OH, and CH{sub 3}CN, similar to hot molecular cores harboring massive young stars. The P1 clump, on the other hand, is resolved into five cores along the filament with masses from 22 to 64 M {sub sun} and an average projected separation of 0.19 pc. Except {sup 12}CO, no molecular line emission is detected toward the P1 cores at a 1{sigma} rms of 0.1 K. Since strong {sup 12}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are seen with the single-dish telescope at a resolution of 11'', the nondetection of these lines with the SMA indicates a depletion factor up to 10{sup 3}. While the spatial resolution of the SMA is better than the expected Jeans length, the masses in P1 cores are much larger than the thermal Jeans mass, indicating the importance of turbulence and/or magnetic fields in cloud fragmentation. The hierarchical structures in the P1 region provide a glimpse of the initial phase of massive star and cluster formation.

  9. The probabilistic mechanism of formation of block structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. I.

    2012-03-01

    Questions on the formation of block structures are considered. It is shown that the block structure is characteristic of bodies in a wide range of scales from microscopic to astronomic and from the bodies of nonliving nature to living organisms and communities. A scheme of the mechanism of the probabilistic formation of block structures is suggested. The characteristics general for structures of all scales are revealed. Evidence is presented that the hierarchical pattern of element sizes is characteristic of natural structures in which the ratio of linear sizes of elements neighboring by hierarchy is 2-5, while the characteristic scale coefficient is √ N , where N is the total number of elements of which the system is formed. The block-probabilistic approach ensures knowledge of rare catastrophic events, including earthquakes, market crashes, floods, and industrial catastrophes, or creative events such as the formation of hypercomplex systems similar to organisms and communities. The statistics of rare events follows the power distribution (the distribution with a "heavy tail") rather than the exponential one and especially the Poisson distribution, the Gaussian distribution, or the distributions with "light tails" close to them. The expression for the factor of increasing the formation probability of the systems, which is of many orders of magnitude even for the simplest systems, is acquired.

  10. Formation of Intermediate Carbon Phases in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Q.; Foustoukos, D. I.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2005-12-01

    With high dissolved concentrations of methane and other hydrocarbon species revealed at the Rainbow and Logatchev vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it is essential to better understand reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis in hydrothermal systems. Thus, we performed a hydrothermal carbon reduction experiment with 13C labeled carbon source at temperature and pressure conditions that approximate those inferred for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems. Pentlandite, a common alteration mineral phase in subseafloor reaction zones, acted as a potential catalyst. Surface analysis techniques (XPS and ToF-SIMS) were used to characterize intermediate carbon species within this process. Time series dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations indicated thermodynamic equilibrium. Dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations of 13 and 2 mmol/kg, respectively, are approximately equivalent to measured values in Rainbow and Logatchev hydrothermal systems. Isotopically pure 13C methane and other alkane species (C2H6 and C3H8) were observed throughout the experiment, and attained steady state conditions. XPS analysis on mineral product surface indicated carbon enrichment on mineral surface following reaction. The majority of surface carbon involves species containing C-C or C-H bonds, such as alkyl or methylene groups. Alcohol and carboxyl groups in fewer amounts were also observed. ToF-SIMS analysis, which can offer isotope identification with high mass resolution, showed that most of these carbon species were 13C-labeled. Unlike gas phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, no carbide was observed on mineral product surface during the experiment. Therefore, a reaction pathway is proposed for formation of dissolved linear alkane species in hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis, where oxygen-bearing organic compounds are expected to form in aqueous products by way of alcohol and carboxyl groups on mineral catalyst surface.

  11. Mechanism of décollement formation in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2011-12-01

    The mechanism of décollement formation was investigated through a particle-based simulation model assuming homogeneity (e.g. no weak layer or pore fluid). A décollement-like structure appeared as a spontaneously localized shear deformation near the bottom of the sediment when the thickness of the sediment was sufficient to balance the gravitational force and tectonic loading. In contrast, no such décollement-like structure was formed when the sediment was too thin; in this case, the entire prism was deformed because of plate motion. These results are consistent with various observations in real subduction zones. A precise analysis of the stress state evolution during accretion reveals that the formation of a décollement-like structure is controlled by the spatio-temporal distribution of isotropic compression states.

  12. Clarifying the dominant sources and mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Cziczo, Daniel J; Froyd, Karl D; Hoose, Corinna; Jensen, Eric J; Diao, Minghui; Zondlo, Mark A; Smith, Jessica B; Twohy, Cynthia H; Murphy, Daniel M

    2013-06-14

    Formation of cirrus clouds depends on the availability of ice nuclei to begin condensation of atmospheric water vapor. Although it is known that only a small fraction of atmospheric aerosols are efficient ice nuclei, the critical ingredients that make those aerosols so effective have not been established. We have determined in situ the composition of the residual particles within cirrus crystals after the ice was sublimated. Our results demonstrate that mineral dust and metallic particles are the dominant source of residual particles, whereas sulfate and organic particles are underrepresented, and elemental carbon and biological materials are essentially absent. Further, composition analysis combined with relative humidity measurements suggests that heterogeneous freezing was the dominant formation mechanism of these clouds. PMID:23661645

  13. Multiple repressive mechanisms in the hippocampus during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jun; Yu, Nam-Kyung; Choi, Jun-Hyeok; Sim, Su-Eon; Kang, SukJae Joshua; Kwak, Chuljung; Lee, Seung-Woo; Kim, Ji-il; Choi, Dong Il; Kim, V Narry; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2015-10-01

    Memory stabilization after learning requires translational and transcriptional regulations in the brain, yet the temporal molecular changes that occur after learning have not been explored at the genomic scale. We used ribosome profiling and RNA sequencing to quantify the translational status and transcript levels in the mouse hippocampus after contextual fear conditioning. We revealed three types of repressive regulations: translational suppression of ribosomal protein-coding genes in the hippocampus, learning-induced early translational repression of specific genes, and late persistent suppression of a subset of genes via inhibition of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1/ERα) signaling. In behavioral analyses, overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the newly identified genes undergoing rapid translational repression, or activating ESR1 in the hippocampus impaired memory formation. Collectively, this study unveils the yet-unappreciated importance of gene repression mechanisms for memory formation. PMID:26430118

  14. Mechanical phase matching of birefringent non-linear crystals.

    PubMed

    Deyra, Loïc; Balembois, François; Guilbaud, André; Villeval, Philippe; Georges, Patrick

    2014-09-22

    Second-order nonlinear processes such as second harmonic generation or parametric amplification have found numerous applications in the scientific and industrial world, from micromachining to petawatt laser facilities. These nonlinear interactions are mostly carried out in birefringent crystals because of their low cost and the possibility to operate at high powers Phase-matching configurations in birefringent crystals are determined by their refractive indexes. Here, we show that an important mechanical stress can be used to significantly change the phase-matching properties of a birefringent crystal. As an example, we demonstrate the shift of second harmonic non-critical phase matching wavelength of LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal at room temperature from 1200 nm to 1120 nm by applying compressive forces up to 100 MPa. We believe that this mechanical phase matching can be used as an additional degree of freedom to optimize nonlinear optical frequency mixing geometries. PMID:25321800

  15. Formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal composites by a surface-controlled anisotropic phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-Hong; Khoo, Iam Choon; Yu, Chang-Jae; Jung, Min-Sik; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2005-01-10

    We report on formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal (PLC) composites using a surface-controlled phase separation method. The binary nature of the PLC phase gratings is produced by employing a single step photo-ablation through an amplitude photomask which precisely controls the interfacial interactions between the LC and the photopolymer on the alignment layer. A subsequent illumination of the ultraviolet light onto the whole PLC promotes an anisotropic phase separation resulting in the formation of distinct binary patterns for the PLC structure. The electrically tunable diffraction properties of the binary phase gratings are presented.

  16. Mechanical compaction directly modulates the dynamics of bile canaliculi formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Toh, Yi-Chin; Li, Qiushi; Nugraha, Bramasta; Zheng, Baixue; Lu, Thong Beng; Gao, Yi; Ng, Mary Mah Lee; Yu, Hanry

    2013-02-01

    Homeostatic pressure-driven compaction is a ubiquitous mechanical force in multicellular organisms and is proposed to be important in the maintenance of multicellular tissue integrity and function. Previous cell-free biochemical models have demonstrated that there are cross-talks between compaction forces and tissue structural functions, such as cell-cell adhesion. However, its involvement in physiological tissue function has yet to be directly demonstrated. Here, we use the bile canaliculus (BC) as a physiological example of a multicellular functional structure in the liver, and employ a novel 3D microfluidic hepatocyte culture system to provide an unprecedented opportunity to experimentally modulate the compaction states of primary hepatocyte aggregates in a 3D physiological-mimicking environment. Mechanical compaction alters the physical attributes of the hepatocyte aggregates, including cell shape, cell packing density and cell-cell contact area, but does not impair the hepatocytes' remodeling and functional capabilities. Characterization of structural and functional polarity shows that BC formation in compact hepatocyte aggregates is accelerated to as early as 12 hours post-seeding; whereas non-compact control requires 48 hours for functional BC formation. Further dynamic immunofluorescence imaging and gene expression profiling reveal that compaction accelerated BC formation is accompanied by changes in actin cytoskeleton remodeling dynamics and transcriptional levels of hepatic nuclear factor 4α and Annexin A2. Our report not only provides a novel strategy of modeling BC formation for in vitro hepatology research, but also shows a first instance that homeostatic pressure-driven compaction force is directly coupled to the higher-order multicellular functions. PMID:23233209

  17. A mechanical device to study geometric phases and curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Salvador

    2010-04-01

    A simple mechanical device is introduced that can be used to illustrate the parallel transport of a vector along a curved surface and the geometric phase shift that occurs when a vector is carried along a loop on a curved surface. Its connection with the Foucault pendulum and Berry phases is discussed. The experimental results are in close agreement with the theoretical expectations. The experiment is inexpensive and conceptually easy to understand and perform.

  18. Shock-induced formation mechanism of seifertite in shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bläß, Ulrich W.

    2013-05-01

    The Martian meteorites Shergotty, Zagami and Dhofar 378 have been re-investigated in order to elucidate the shock-induced formation of seifertite. The occurrence of orthorhombic seifertite (α-PbO2 structured SiO2) has been confirmed for the mesostasis of Shergotty and Zagami by transmission electron microscopy with lattice parameters of a = 4.05(1) Å, b = 5.05(1) Å and c = 4.45(1) Å. Seifertite crystals are interpreted as shock-induced transformation products occurring together with maskelynite of both plagioclase and alkali-feldspar composition in a largely preserved eutectic crystallisation texture. Shock-induced microstructures in accessory minerals demonstrate that these regions cannot have been completely re-molten. No further features indicating shock-pressures above ~30 GPa are detected. Hence, seifertite must have been formed below its stability field by a fast solid-state process. Significantly higher shock-pressures of Dhofar 378 indicate an inhibition of a potential seifertite crystallisation by resulting high post-shock temperatures. Crystallographic considerations reveal that a direct formation of seifertite from a high-pressure derivate of cristobalite is possible without breaking any silicon-oxygen bonds. Important implications arise from the existence of such a non-equilibrium pathway. Inferring shock-pressures from metastably formed phases appears implausible, and the transition pressure could be even below 30 GPa. Furthermore, the transformation product is determined by the precursor phase. Epitaxial intergrowth with other silica high-pressure polymorphs should be induced by certain features of the precursor, for example, planar defects, or heterogeneous strain conditions. Due to symmetrical considerations, seifertite will get amorphous during a potential back-transformation, which provides an explanation for the formation of numerous amorphous lamellae.

  19. Pore formation mechanism of porous poly(DL-lactic acid) matrix membrane.

    PubMed

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Chitrattha, Sasiprapa

    2016-04-01

    Porous PLA structure has been widely used in cell transplantation, drug carrier and wound dressing. The porous structure can be controlled depending on the choice of the polymer, solvent, nonsolvent and preparation parameters. In this study, the porous PLA matrix membranes were prepared by adding PEG 400 in PLA solution using dichloromethane (DCM) as solvent prior to casting. The influence of other liquids as co-solvent on pore formation and the structural change during membrane formation were evaluated. The co-solvents affected both porous topography and mechanical properties of PLA membrane. The porous matrix were produced when the non-solvent of PLA was used as co-solvent. Cryo-SEM micrographs revealed that PEG 400 still remained in the PLA porous matrix membrane. From the tracking of the structural change during film formation, the PLA-PEG solution changed into porous structure by liquid liquid phase separation and solidification processes, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that PLA-PEG in DCM solution exhibited the two-step of weight loss, the first step occurred from DCM evaporation and the second step occurred from the degradation of PLA-PEG matrix. The liquid-liquid phase separation and solidification started when the amount of DCM was higher than PEG 400 for 2.67 folds and DCM amount was equal to that of PEG 400, respectively. These results could clarify the pore formation mechanism of porous PLA membrane and will be useful for the further investigation and application. PMID:26838905

  20. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  1. Mechanisms of nascent fiber formation during avian skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, K. M.; Schultz, E.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined two putative mechanisms of new fiber formation in postnatal skeletal muscle, namely longitudinal fragmentation of existing fibers and de novo formation. The relative contributions of these two mechanisms to fiber formation in hypertrophying anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle were assessed by quantitative analysis of their nuclear populations. Muscle hypertrophy was induced by wing-weighting for 1 week. All nuclei formed during the weighting period were labeled by continuous infusion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analog, and embryonic-like fibers were identified using an antibody to ventricular-like embryonic (V-EMB) myosin. The number of BrdU-labeled and unlabeled nuclei in V-EMB-positive fibers were counted. Wing-weighting resulted in significant muscle enlargement and the appearance of many V-EMB+ fibers. The majority of V-EMB+ fibers were completely independent of mature fibers and had a nuclear density characteristics of developing fibers. Furthermore, nearly 100% of the nuclei in independent V-EMB+ fibers were labeled. These findings strongly suggest that most V-EMB+ fibers were nascent fibers formed de novo during the weighting period by satellite cell activation and fusion. Nascent fibers were found primarily in the space between fascicles where they formed a complex anastomosing network of fibers running at angles to one another. Although wing-weighting induced an increase in the number of branched fibers, there was no evidence that V-EMB+ fibers were formed by longitudinal fragmentation. The location of newly formed fibers in wing-weighted and regenerating ALD muscle was compared to determine whether satellite cells in the ALD muscle were unusual in that, if stimulated to divide, they would form fibers in the inter- and intrafascicular space. In contrast to wing-weighted muscle, nascent fibers were always found closely associated with necrotic fibers. These results suggest that wing-weighting is not simply another

  2. NO Formation and Consumption Mechanisms in a Plasma Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter; Chaszeyka Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratory Team

    2013-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements have been performed on nitric oxide, oxygen atoms, and nitrogen atoms in low temperature, diffuse plasma filaments of air and air/fuel mixtures. The results have been compared to a one-dimensional numerical model and show that NO is rapidly formed in air as a result of excited species within the plasma and is consumed quickly by the reverse Zel'dovich mechanism. The evolution of the nitric oxide concentration in hydrogen and ethylene fuels is presented and the possibility of additional NO formation channels is discussed.

  3. Mechanism for direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongxian; Yin, Fuxing; Yu, Tao; Wang, Jian-Tao; Liang, Chunyong

    2014-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics with a more reliable reactive LCBOPII potential, we have performed a detailed study on the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition. Our results reveal a new so-called “wave-like buckling and slipping” mechanism, which controls the transformation from hexagonal graphite to cubic diamond. Based on this mechanism, we have explained how polycrystalline cubic diamond is converted from hexagonal graphite, and demonstrated that the initial interlayer distance of compressed hexagonal graphite play a key role to determine the grain size of cubic diamond. These results can broaden our understanding of the high pressure graphite-to-diamond phase transition. PMID:25088720

  4. Quark CP-phase and Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Chuichiro; Matsuda, Masahisa; Matsunaga, Mamoru; Matsuoka, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism, we study quark flavor mixings in the SU (6) × SU (2)R model. The characteristic structure of the CKM matrix is attributed to the hierarchical effective Yukawa couplings due to the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism and also to the state-mixings beyond the MSSM. We elucidate the detailed form of the CKM matrix elements and find interesting relations between the CP violating phase and three mixing angles. Taking the existing data of three mixing angles, we estimate the quark CP-phase at δ = (75 ± 3) °. This result is in accord with observations.

  5. Pessimum effect of externally applied chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation: Proposed mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ekolu, S.O. . E-mail: s.ekolu@utoronto.ca; Thomas, M.D.A.; Hooton, R.D.

    2006-04-15

    Mortars and concretes were subjected to a heat treatment cycle consisting of a pre-set period of 4 h at 23 deg. C followed by accelerated curing at 95 deg. C prior to storage at room temperature in water or limewater, 0.5 M, 2.8 M sodium chloride solutions. It was found that the specimens stored in 0.5 M sodium chloride solution gave a much greater expansion than those stored in limewater or 2.8 M sodium chloride solution. This pessimum influence of chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation deviates from the commonly held view that chlorides mitigate sulphate attack in concretes. The mechanism of the pessimum effect of chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation, and the final products of the associated phase transformations have been proposed. X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis techniques were used to follow phase transformations.

  6. Formation mechanism of the protective layer in a blast furnace hearth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ke-xin; Zhang, Jian-liang; Liu, Zheng-jian; Xu, Meng; Liu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    A variety of techniques, such as chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were applied to characterize the adhesion protective layer formed below the blast furnace taphole level when a certain amount of titanium- bearing burden was used. Samples of the protective layer were extracted to identify the chemical composition, phase assemblage, and distribution. Furthermore, the formation mechanism of the protective layer was determined after clarifying the source of each component. Finally, a technical strategy was proposed for achieving a stable protective layer in the hearth. The results show that the protective layer mainly exists in a bilayer form in the sidewall, namely, a titanium-bearing layer and a graphite layer. Both the layers contain the slag phase whose major crystalline phase is magnesium melilite (Ca2MgSi2O7) and the main source of the slag phase is coke ash. It is clearly determined that solid particles such as graphite, Ti(C,N) and MgAl2O4 play an important role in the formation of the protective layer, and the key factor for promoting the formation of a stable protective layer is reasonable control of the evolution behavior of coke.

  7. BDNF mechanisms in late LTP formation: A synthesis and breakdown.

    PubMed

    Panja, Debabrata; Bramham, Clive R

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling the molecular mechanisms governing long-term synaptic plasticity is a key to understanding how the brain stores information in neural circuits and adapts to a changing environment. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has emerged as a regulator of stable, late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) at excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the adult brain. However, the mechanisms by which BDNF triggers L-LTP are controversial. Here, we distill and discuss the latest advances along three main lines: 1) TrkB receptor-coupled translational control underlying dendritic protein synthesis and L-LTP, 2) Mechanisms for BDNF-induced rescue of L-LTP when protein synthesis is blocked, and 3) BDNF-TrkB regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics in dendritic spines. Finally, we explore the inter-relationships between BDNF-regulated mechanisms, how these mechanisms contribute to different forms of L-LTP in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, and outline outstanding issues for future research. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'. PMID:23831365

  8. Formation of Nonclassical Ordered Phases of A B -Type Multiarm Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Deng, Hanlin; Li, Weihua; Qiu, Feng; Shi, An-Chang

    2016-02-01

    The formation of ordered phases from block copolymers is driven by a delicate balance between the monomer-monomer interaction and chain configurational entropy. The configurational entropy can be regulated by designed chain architecture, resulting in a new entropy-driven mechanism to control the self-assembly of ordered phases from block copolymers. An effective routine to regulate the configurational entropy is to utilize multiarm architecture, in which the entropic contribution to the free energy could be qualitatively controlled by the fraction of bridging configurations. As an illustration of this mechanism, the phase behavior of two A B -type multiarm block copolymers, B0-(Bi-Ai) m and (B1-Ai-B2) m where the minority A blocks form cylindrical or spherical domains, are examined using the self-consistent field theory (SCFT). The SCFT results demonstrate that the packing symmetry of the cylinders or spheres can be controlled by the length of the bridging B blocks. Several nonclassical ordered phases, including a novel square array cylinder with p 4 m m symmetry, are predicted to form from the A B -type multiarm block copolymers.

  9. Cementite Formation from Hematite-Graphite Mixture by Simultaneous Thermal-Mechanical Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafzadeh, Milad; Soleymani, Amir Peyman; Panjepour, Masoud; Shamanian, Morteza

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effect of simultaneous thermal-mechanical activation (STMA) process on carbothermic reduction of hematite and also on iron carbide formation has been investigated. For this purpose, the STMA process was performed for 3 and 6 hours at 973 K (700 °C) and 1073 K (800 °C) on hematite-graphite powder mixtures (with 22 wt pct C) in argon atmosphere. The XRD patterns showed that by performing this process at 973 K (700 °C), the initial hematite reduction led to the formation of wüstite in the presence of graphite. Metallic iron phase was also formed along with wüstite phase at 1073 K (800 °C) for 3 hours, and by increasing the process time to 6 hours, in addition to the metallic iron, iron carbide was also formed. The SEM images and EDS analysis obtained at 1073 K (800 °C)were also indicative of the formation of pearlite structure along with proeutectoid cementite phase and free carbon in the form of graphite in the structure of the samples. According to the results of the image analysis, the percentage of the carbon content was more than 2.22 wt pct in this process lasting for 6 hours at 1073 K (800 °C). Also, DTA results showed that the sample hot milled for 6 hours at 1073 K (800 °C) contained more than 2.1 wt pct carbon. The mechanism of metallic iron and cementite formation from hematite was proposed. Therefore, the STMA process led to an increase in the rate of carbothermic reduction of hematite to metallic iron and reduced its starting temperature relative to the non-simultaneous application of each of the thermal and mechanical activation. Finally, this process can be brought up as a new method for the production of iron carbide from iron oxides.

  10. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  11. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  12. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  13. Sensitivity analysis of a mixed-phase chemical mechanism using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R.C.

    1998-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of a comprehensive mixed-phase chemical mechanism is conducted under a variety of atmospheric conditions. The local sensitivities of gas and aqueous phase species concentrations with respect to a variety of model parameters are calculated using the novel automatic differentiation ADIFOR tool. The main chemical reaction pathways in all phases, interfacial mass transfer processes, and ambient physical parameters that affect tropospheric O{sub 3} formation and O{sub 3}-precursor relations under all modeled conditions are identified and analyzed. The results show that the presence of clouds not only reduces many gas phase species concentrations and the total oxidizing capacity but alters O{sub 3}-precursor relations. Decreases in gas phase concentrations and photochemical formation rates of O{sub 3} can be up to 9{percent} and 100{percent}, respectively, depending on the preexisting atmospheric conditions. The decrease in O{sub 3} formation is primarily caused by the aqueous phase reactions of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} with dissolved HO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} under most cloudy conditions. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of the Formation and Progression of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    KATAOKA, Hiroharu

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, only a little was understood about molecular mechanisms of the development of an intracranial aneurysm (IA). Recent advancements over the last decade in the field of genetics and molecular biology have provided us a wide variety of evidences supporting the notion that chronic inflammation is closely associated with the pathogenesis of IA development. In the field of genetics, large-scale Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified some IA susceptible loci and genes related to cell cycle and endothelial function. Researches in molecular biology using human samples and animal models have revealed the common pathway of the initiation, progression, and rupture of IAs. IA formation begins with endothelial dysfunction followed by pathological remodeling with degenerative changes of vascular walls. Medical treatments inhibiting inflammatory cascades in IA development are likely to prevent IA progression and rupture. Statins and aspirin are expected to suppress IA progression by their anti-inflammatory effects. Decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) inhibiting inflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and Ets-1 are the other promising choice of the prevention of IA development. Further clarification of molecular mechanisms of the formation and progression of IAs will shed light to the pathogenesis of IA development and provide insight into novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IAs. PMID:25761423

  15. Analysis of Europan Cycloid Morphology and Implications for Formation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, S. T.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    Europa's highly fractured crust has been shown to contain features with a range of differing morphologies. Most lineaments on Europa are believed to have initiated as cracks, although the type of cracking (e.g. tensile vs. shear) remains unclear and may vary for different morphologies. Arcuate lineaments, called cycloids or flexi, have been observed in nearly all imaged regions of Europa and have been modeled as tensile fractures that were initiated in response to diurnal variations in tides. Despite this hypothesis about the formation mechanism, there have been no detailed analyses of the variable morphologies of cycloids. We have examined Galileo images of numerous locations on Europa to develop a catalog of the different morphologies of cycloids. This study focuses on variations in morphology along individual cycloid segments and differences in cusp styles between segments, while illustrating how morphologic evidence can help unravel formation mechanisms. In so doing, we present evidence for cycloid cusps forming due to secondary fracturing during strike-slip sliding on pre-existing cycloid segments.

  16. Boron nitride hollow nanospheres: Synthesis, formation mechanism and dielectric property

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, B.; Tang, X.H.; Huang, X.X.; Xia, L.; Zhang, X.D.; Wang, C.J.; Wen, G.W.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • BN hollow nanospheres are fabricated in large scale via a new CVD method. • Morphology and structure are elucidated by complementary analytical techniques. • Formation mechanism is proposed based on experimental observations. • Dielectric properties are investigated in the X-band microwave frequencies. • BN hollow nanospheres show lower dielectric loss than regular BN powders. - Abstract: Boron nitride (BN) hollow nanospheres have been successfully fabricated by pyrolyzing vapors decomposed from ammonia borane (NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 1300 °C. The final products have been extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The BN hollow nanospheres were ranging from 100 to 300 nm in diameter and around 30–100 nm in thickness. The internal structure of the products was found dependent on the reaction temperatures. A possible formation mechanism of the BN hollow nanospheres was proposed on the basis of the experimental observations. Dielectric measurements in the X-band microwave frequencies (8–12 GHz) showed that the dielectric loss of the paraffin filled by the BN hollow nanospheres was lower than that filled by regular BN powders, which indicated that the BN hollow nanospheres could be potentially used as low-density fillers for microwave radomes.

  17. Intermetallic Phase Formation in Explosively Welded Al/Cu Bimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, H.; Soltanieh, M.

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion couples of aluminum and copper were fabricated by explosive welding process. The interface evolution caused by annealing at different temperatures and time durations was investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Annealing in the temperature range of 573 K to 773 K (300 °C to 500 °C) up to 408 hours showed that four types of intermetallic layers have been formed at the interface, namely Al2Cu, AlCu, Al3Cu4, and Al4Cu9. Moreover, it was observed that iron trace in aluminum caused the formation of Fe-bearing intermetallics in Al, which is near the interface of the Al-Cu intermetallic layers. Finally, the activation energies for the growth of Al2Cu, AlCu + Al3Cu4, Al4Cu9, and the total intermetallic layer were calculated to be about 83.3, 112.8, 121.6, and 109.4 kJ/mol, respectively. Considering common welding methods (i.e., explosive welding, cold rolling, and friction welding), although there is a great difference in welding mechanism, it is found that the total activation energy is approximately the same.

  18. Intermetallic Phase Formation in Explosively Welded Al/Cu Bimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, H.; Soltanieh, M.

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion couples of aluminum and copper were fabricated by explosive welding process. The interface evolution caused by annealing at different temperatures and time durations was investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Annealing in the temperature range of 573 K to 773 K (300 °C to 500 °C) up to 408 hours showed that four types of intermetallic layers have been formed at the interface, namely Al2Cu, AlCu, Al3Cu4, and Al4Cu9. Moreover, it was observed that iron trace in aluminum caused the formation of Fe-bearing intermetallics in Al, which is near the interface of the Al-Cu intermetallic layers. Finally, the activation energies for the growth of Al2Cu, AlCu + Al3Cu4, Al4Cu9, and the total intermetallic layer were calculated to be about 83.3, 112.8, 121.6, and 109.4 kJ/mol, respectively. Considering common welding methods ( i.e., explosive welding, cold rolling, and friction welding), although there is a great difference in welding mechanism, it is found that the total activation energy is approximately the same.

  19. The reaction mechanism of formation of chemically synthesized Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B hard magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Deheri, P.K.; Shukla, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2012-02-15

    Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B based magnetic materials exhibit excellent magnetic properties and are widely used in many engineering applications. However, chemical synthesis of this compound is challenging. In this work, the formation mechanism of chemically synthesized Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnetic nanoparticles was studied. Nd, Fe and B precursors were converted to Nd-Fe-B oxide by the sol-gel method, reduction of these oxides by CaH{sub 2} resulted in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles. Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation resulted from two competing reactions: (a) Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation by direct combination of NdH{sub 2}, Fe and B, (b) Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} phase formation from NdH{sub 2} and Fe, followed by Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation by the reaction of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and B. Addition of boron to Nd-Fe-B oxide during reduction resulted in improved magnetic properties. The activation energy for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation was found to be 365 kJ mol{sup -1}. The optimum heat treatment temperature and time for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation were found to be 800 Degree-Sign C and 90 min, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The kinetics, reaction mechanism and morphology of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel followed by reduction-diffusion at 800 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation mechanism of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnetic nanoparticles was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation occurs by two parallel competing reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction of NdH{sub 2}, Fe and B resulted in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase can also be formed by the reaction of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum wt% of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase was obtained at 800 Degree-Sign C and 90 min annealing.

  20. Aqueous phase oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone through photooxidation - Part 2: Development of the chemical mechanism and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Ravier, S.; Clément, J.-L.; Monod, A.

    2014-08-01

    We developed a chemical mechanism based on laboratory experiments that have shown efficient oligomerization from methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) in the bulk aqueous phase. Kinetic data are applied (if known) or fitted to the observed MVK decay and oligomer mass increase. The mechanism is then implemented into a multiphase box model that simulates (i) oligomer formation upon uptake of MVK from the gas phase, and (ii) SOA formation from isoprene, as a precursor of MVK and methacrolein (MACR) in the aqueous and gas phases. Model results show that under atmospheric conditions, the oligomer formation rate strongly depends on the availability of dissolved oxygen. If oxygen is consumed too quickly or its solubility is kinetically or thermodynamically limited, oligomerization is accelerated, in agreement with the laboratory studies. The comparison of predicted oligomer formation shows that for most model assumptions (e.g. depending on the assumed partitioning of MVK and MACR), SOA formation from isoprene in the gas phase exceeds aqueous SOA formation by a factor 3-4. However, at high aerosol liquid water content and potentially high partitioning of oligomer precursors into the aqueous phase, SOA formation in both phases might be equally efficient.

  1. THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF GAS GIANTS ON WIDE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.; Beichman, C. A.

    2009-12-10

    The recent discoveries of massive planets on ultra-wide orbits of HR 8799 and Fomalhaut present a new challenge for planet formation theorists. Our goal is to figure out which of three giant planet formation mechanisms-core accretion (with or without migration), scattering from the inner disk, or gravitational instability-could be responsible for Fomalhaut b, HR 8799 b, c and d, and similar planets discovered in the future. This paper presents the results of numerical experiments comparing the long-period planet formation efficiency of each possible mechanism in model A star, G star, and M star disks. First, a simple core accretion simulation shows that planet cores forming beyond 35 AU cannot reach critical mass, even under the most favorable conditions one can construct. Second, a set of N-body simulations demonstrates that planet-planet scattering does not create stable, wide-orbit systems such as HR 8799. Finally, a linear stability analysis verifies previous work showing that global spiral instabilities naturally arise in high-mass disks. We conclude that massive gas giants on stable orbits with semimajor axes a approx> 35 AU form by gravitational instability in the disk. We recommend that observers examine the planet detection rate as a function of stellar age, controlling for the planets' dimming with time. Any age trend would indicate that planets on wide orbits are transient relics of scattering from the inner disk. If planet detection rate is found to be independent of stellar age, it would confirm our prediction that gravitational instability is the dominant mode of producing detectable planets on wide orbits. We also predict that the occurrence ratio of long-period to short-period gas giants should be highest for M dwarfs due to the inefficiency of core accretion and the expected small fragment mass (approx10 M {sub Jup}) in their disks.

  2. Formation of organic acids from the gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene was studied in static chamber experiments using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. Two isomers of C(7)-diacids and three isomers of C(7)-aldehydic acids were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Possible mechanisms of formation of these acids were investigated using different OH radical scavengers and relative humidities, and were compared to those reported earlier for the ozonolysis of beta-pinene. In addition, branching ratios for some of the individual reaction steps, e.g. the branching ratio between the two hydroperoxide channels of the C(7)-CI, were deduced from the quantitative product yield data. Branching ratios for POZ decomposition and the stabilisation/decomposition of the C(7-)CI were also obtained from measurements of the C(7) primary carbonyl product. PMID:19458821

  3. Auto Mechanics. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This instructor's guide accompanies the self-paced student training modules on auto mechanics, one of which is available separately as CE 032 867. Introductory materials include an introduction to pre-apprenticeship and its three phases of training, a recommended preocedure for conducting pre-apprenticeship training, and a course outline. Teaching…

  4. Simulation of semi-explicit mechanisms of SOA formation from glyoxal in a 3-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Orlando, J. J.; Baidar, S.; Brioude, J.; Fast, J.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hayes, P. L.; Knighton, W. B.; Oetjen, H.; Setyan, A.; Stark, H.; Thalman, R.; Tyndall, G.; Washenfelder, R.; Waxman, E.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-10-01

    New pathways to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) have been postulated recently. Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl, is one of the proposed precursors. It has both anthropogenic and biogenic sources, and readily partitions into the aqueous-phase of cloud droplets and deliquesced aerosols where it undergoes both reversible and irreversible chemistry. In this work we extend the regional scale chemistry transport model WRF-Chem to include a detailed gas-phase chemistry of glyoxal formation as well as a state-of-the-science module describing its partitioning and reactions in the aqueous-phase of aerosols. A comparison of several proposed mechanisms is performed to quantify the relative importance of different formation pathways and their regional variability. The CARES/CalNex campaigns over California in summer 2010 are used as case studies to evaluate the model against observations. In all simulations the LA basin was found to be the hotspot for SOA formation from glyoxal, which contributes between 1% and 15% of the model SOA depending on the mechanism used. Our results indicate that a mechanism based only on a simple uptake coefficient, as frequently employed in global modeling studies, leads to higher SOA contributions from glyoxal compared to a more detailed description that considers aerosol phase state and chemical composition. In the more detailed simulations, surface uptake is found to be the main contributor to SOA mass compared to a volume process and reversible formation. We find that contribution of the latter is limited by the availability of glyoxal in aerosol water, which is in turn controlled by an increase in the Henry's law constant depending on salt concentrations ("salting-in"). A kinetic limitation in this increase prevents substantial partitioning of glyoxal into aerosol water at high salt concentrations. If this limitation is removed, volume pathways contribute >20% of glyoxal SOA mass, and the total mass formed (5.8% of total SOA in the LA

  5. Upwash exploitation and downwash avoidance by flap phasing in ibis formation flight.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Steven J; Hubel, Tatjana Y; Fritz, Johannes; Heese, Stefanie; Trobe, Daniela; Voelkl, Bernhard; Hailes, Stephen; Wilson, Alan M; Usherwood, James R

    2014-01-16

    Many species travel in highly organized groups. The most quoted function of these configurations is to reduce energy expenditure and enhance locomotor performance of individuals in the assemblage. The distinctive V formation of bird flocks has long intrigued researchers and continues to attract both scientific and popular attention. The well-held belief is that such aggregations give an energetic benefit for those birds that are flying behind and to one side of another bird through using the regions of upwash generated by the wings of the preceding bird, although a definitive account of the aerodynamic implications of these formations has remained elusive. Here we show that individuals of northern bald ibises (Geronticus eremita) flying in a V flock position themselves in aerodynamically optimum positions, in that they agree with theoretical aerodynamic predictions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that birds show wingtip path coherence when flying in V positions, flapping spatially in phase and thus enabling upwash capture to be maximized throughout the entire flap cycle. In contrast, when birds fly immediately behind another bird--in a streamwise position--there is no wingtip path coherence; the wing-beats are in spatial anti-phase. This could potentially reduce the adverse effects of downwash for the following bird. These aerodynamic accomplishments were previously not thought possible for birds because of the complex flight dynamics and sensory feedback that would be required to perform such a feat. We conclude that the intricate mechanisms involved in V formation flight indicate awareness of the spatial wake structures of nearby flock-mates, and remarkable ability either to sense or predict it. We suggest that birds in V formation have phasing strategies to cope with the dynamic wakes produced by flapping wings. PMID:24429637

  6. Motionless electromagnetic phase stepping versus mechanical phase stepping in x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a compact source.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-04-21

    X-ray phase contrast imaging based on grating interferometers detects the refractive index distribution of an object without relying on radiation attenuation, thereby having the potential for reduced radiation absorption. These techniques belong to the broader category of optical wavefront measurement, which requires stepping the phase of the interference pattern to obtain a pixel-wise map of the phase distortion of the wavefront. While phase stepping traditionally involves mechanical scanning of a grating or mirror, we developed electromagnetic phase stepping (EPS) for imaging with compact sources to obviate the need for mechanical movement. In EPS a solenoid coil is placed outside the x-ray tube to shift its focal spot with a magnetic field, causing a relative movement between the projection of the sample and the interference pattern in the image. Here we present two embodiments of this method. We verified experimentally that electromagnetic and mechanical phase stepping give the same results and attain the same signal-to-noise ratios under the same radiation dose. We found that the relative changes of interference fringe visibility were within 3.0% when the x-ray focal spot was shifted by up to 1.0 mm in either direction. We conclude that when using x-ray tube sources, EPS is an effective means of phase stepping without the need for mechanical movement. PMID:25803511

  7. Mechanism of YF3 nanoparticle formation in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Lemyre, Jean-Luc; Lamarre, Sébastien; Beaupré, Ariane; Ritcey, Anna M

    2011-10-01

    This article reports an investigation of the mechanism of YF(3) nanoparticle formation in two variants of the reverse microemulsion precipitation method. These two variants involve the addition of F(-), either as a microemulsion or directly as an aqueous solution, to Y(3+) dispersed in nonionic reverse micelles. The two methods yield amorphous and single-crystal nanoparticles, respectively. The kinetics of reagent mixing are studied by (19)F NMR and colorimetric model reactions, and the particle growth is monitored by TEM. Mixing and nucleation are shown to occur within seconds to minutes whereas particle growth continues for 4 to 48 h, depending on the particle type. Moreover, the growth rate remains constant during most of the growth period, indicating that Ostwald ripening is the most probable growth mechanism. The single-emulsion method also produces a minority amorphous population that exhibits significantly different growth kinetics, attributed to a coagulation mechanism. Secondary growth experiments, involving the addition of precursor ions to mature particles, have been conducted to evaluate the relative importance of nucleation and the competitive growth of existing particle populations. The key differences between the two methods reside in the nucleation step. In the case of the classical method, nucleation occurs upon intermicellar collisions and under conditions of comparable concentrations of Y(3+) and F(-). This method generates more numerous stable nuclei and smaller particles. In the single-microemulsion method, nucleation occurs in the presence of excess F(-) through the interaction of Y(3+)-containing micelles with microdroplets of aqueous F(-). These conditions lead to the formation of crystalline particles and a wider size distribution of unstable nuclei. PMID:21842856

  8. Nanoscale self-assembly of starch: Phase relations, formation, and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creek, John A.

    This project has been undertaken to develop a fundamental understanding of the spherulitic self-assembly of starch polymers from aqueous solution, both as a model for starch granule initiation in vivo and as a biologically-inspired material with applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Botanical starches were observed to form semi-crystalline spherulites from aqueous solution when cooled after a high temperature treatment, and the processes resulting in spherulite formation were investigated. Based on the influence of cooling rate on spherulite formation from a botanical starch, liquid-liquid demixing in competition with crystallization was proposed as the mechanism leading to spherulite formation (summarized in a hypothetical phase diagram). Study of amylose and amylopectin self-assembly demonstrated that the linear polymer plays the primary role in forming spherulites. As a result, the roles of degree of polymerization, concentration, and thermal processing conditions on amylose self-assembly were explored. Thermal properties, final system morphology, and crystalline allomorph were characterized. In all cases the experimental findings supported the proposed phase diagram. Finally, the crystalline nanostructure of the spherulites was probed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing a seemingly universal level of structure in crystalline starch materials. This was compared to an existing model of crystallization for synthetic polymers involving a transitional liquid crystalline-like ordering---a comparison that makes sense in light of the known helical structure of starch.

  9. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  10. Formation of tetragonal hydrogen tungsten bronze by reactive mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Urretavizcaya, G. Tonus, F.; Gaudin, E.; Bobet, J.-L.; Castro, F.J.

    2007-10-15

    Hydrogen tungsten bronzes have been synthesized by reactive mechanical alloying monoclinic tungsten (VI) oxide under hydrogen atmosphere. Two milling devices with different energy ranges were used. Regardless of the distinct reaction times, a similar phase evolution was observed with both apparatus. The characterization of the materials was performed by XRD, SEM, DSC and total hydrogen content determination. The final product obtained was a mixture of tetragonal H{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} and H{sub 0.23}WO{sub 3} bronzes. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen tungsten bronzes have been synthesized by reactive mechanical alloying (RMA) monoclinic WO{sub 3} under H{sub 2} atmosphere. By using two milling devices with different energy ranges a similar phase evolution with distinct reaction times was observed. The materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, DSC and total hydrogen content determination. The final product obtained was a mixture of tetragonal H{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} and H{sub 0.23}WO{sub 3} bronzes. Display Omitted.