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Sample records for phenol red mucosal

  1. Comparison of the 13C-urea breath test and the endoscopic phenol red mucosal pH test in the quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection loading

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Seok; Jang, Se Na; Kim, Jin-Soo; Son, Hye Suk; Kim, Hyung-Keun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Han, Sok-Won; Choi, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Hae Kyung; Chang, Eun Deok

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims The 13C-urea breath test (UBT) is a semiquantitative test for measuring Helicobacter pylori infection loading. H. pylori produces ammonia, which elevates the pH of the gastric mucosa and is detectable via endoscopy using a phenol red indicator. We evaluated whether this test could be used to diagnose H. pylori infection and whether phenol red staining was correlated with 13C-UBT results. Methods One hundred and twenty-three patients participated. The UBT was performed after ingestion of a capsule containing urea. A change in 13C-UBT >2‰ was selected as the cutoff value for diagnosing infection. After spraying evenly with a 0.1% phenol red solution, the pH of the gastric mucosal surface was measured using an antimony electrode through the biopsy channel. Results The pH of stained mucosa (6.9±0.4) was significantly higher than that of unstained mucosa (1.9±0.8; p<0.001), and the H. pylori detection rate confirmed via histology was higher in stained versus unstained mucosa (p<0.01). Extensive mucosal staining resulted in a higher detection rate (p<0.001). The UBT produced results were very similar to those obtained via histological detection in stained mucosa (p<0.001). The extent of staining, expressed as a staining score, was positively correlated with the change in 13C-UBT (r=0.426, p<0.001). A significant correlation was also observed between the histologically determined H. pylori density and 13C-UBT results (r=0.674, p<0.001). Conclusions H. pylori infection elevates gastric mucosal surface pH, and endoscopic phenol red staining may be an alternative method for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. PMID:18787366

  2. Narcotic effects on phenol red disposition in mice.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, A

    1981-01-01

    Morphine administration reduces phenol red clearance in mice. Increasing subcutaneous morphine doses from 10 to 40 mg/kg caused a progressive increase in plasma phenol red concentrations and reduced dye elimination in urine. Intravenous phenol red given at 50 to 200 mg/kg was cleared from plasma at 24 to 30 microliters/min/kg b. wt. At these dosages of dye plasma clearance of phenol red was reduced at least 33% by morphine pretreatment (20 mg/kg s.c.). Lowered dye clearance by morphine was reflected in smaller apparent volumes of phenol red distribution. The morphine effect on the elimination constant (kel) of phenol red was variable. The narcotic caused a rise in kel at the lowest phenol red dose and lowered this constant at the high phenol red dose. Like morphine, hydromorphone and methadone had an antidiuretic effect in mice and reduced renal elimination of phenol red. Naloxone had no effect on phenol red disposition but reversed completely the effect of morphine. This finding shows that the effect of the narcotic was not due to competition or displacement from transport sites. Morphine did not cause a change in urine pH. Since the urine did not become more acidic after morphine, back diffusion of undissociated due is not likely as the cause of its reduced renal elimination. Reduced renal elimination of phenol red by narcotics is probably due to reduced renal blood flow and glomerular filtration as shown by lowered p-aminohippurate and iothalamate clearance in mice. PMID:7452511

  3. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  4. Evaluation of the phenol red thread tear test in falconiformes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen P; Barbon, Alberto Rodriguez; Forbes, Neil A

    2015-03-01

    Falconiformes are active searchers and hunters that require visual precision to catch their prey and survive in the wild. Despite this, ocular disease is likely to be underdiagnosed in these species, at least in part because of limited proven diagnostic methods and lack of published scientific data. Tear film deficiency is recognized as an important ocular surface disease in dogs but has not been well evaluated in birds. To evaluate the phenol red thread (PRT) tear test as an alternative method to the Schirmer tear test (STT) for determining tear production in Falconiformes, we assessed the PRT tear test twice for each eye in 21 birds from the genus Falco. The mean PRT test values for the right (OD) and left (OS) eyes were OD=30.2±4.6 mm/15 s and OS=29.1±3.7 mm/15 s, with an overall PRT test value for both eyes (OU) of 30.6±4.2 mm/15 s. Good reproducibility was seen with the PRT test as shown by the strong positive correlation between the first and second tests in the birds. The PRT test method provides repeatable results that are easy to obtain, easy to read, and achieved under the same conditions as the STT. PMID:25867663

  5. Phenolic and Chromatic Properties of Beibinghong Red Ice Wine during and after Vinification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Chen; Li, Si-Yu; He, Fei; Yuan, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Tao; Reeves, Malcolm J; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The phenolic and chromatic characteristics of a special red ice wine made from a Vitis amurensis × V. vinifera hybrid cultivar Beibinghong were studied. Results from two different vintages (2013 and 2014) showed that during vinification, the phenolic acid content increased, while the level of flavonoids (flavonols, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins) reduced by a variable extent. The color intensity and red % decreased together with a decrease in anthocyanin content. This was accompanied by an increase in hue as well as yellow %. The final phenolic content was found to be between 119.54 and 180.93 mg/L, with anthocyanins as the predominant phenolic group (92.06%-93.03%), of which 3,5-O-diglucosidic anthocyanins made up 53.55%-79.04%. Phenolic acids were the primary non-anthocyanin phenolics at about 6.64%-7.5%. The phenolic contents and color parameters of Beibinghong dry red wine and several V. vinifera dry red wines of superior color quality were also used in an attempt to clarify the relationship between phenolics and color in the Beibinghong red ice wine. By using Pearson correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA), it was found that 3,5-O-diglucosidic anthocyanins and protocatechuic acid were the only characteristic phenolics that differentiated Beibinghong wines from the other selected red wines from more traditional varieties. They were also the main phenolics to be positively correlated with the hue and yellow % of the wine at the early stages leading into maturation. Their presence might, therefore, explain the relatively high hue and yellow % of Beibinghong ice wine. PMID:27104511

  6. Phenolic profiles of red clover (Trifolium pratense) selected for decreased postharvest browning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In red clover hay, browning, due to phenolics reacting with amino acids, is associated with higher protein content and greater nutritional value for ruminants. However, because browning is generally associated with poor forage quality, red clover of the “Kenland” variety was selected over eight br...

  7. Volatile phenols depletion in red wine using molecular imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rafaela; Dopico-García, Sonia; Andrade, Paula B; Valentão, Patrícia; López-Vilariño, José M; González-Rodríguez, Victoria; Cela-Pérez, Concepción; Silva, Luís R

    2015-12-01

    Wines can be modified by microorganisms during the ageing process, by producing off-flavours like volatile phenols (VP), leading to their deterioration, with great economic losses. The development of methods to recover wines affected by unwanted VP became an important target. Molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) are synthetic materials with artificially-generated recognition sites for selective extraction of organic compounds from different matrices. In this work, two MIPs to remove unwanted VP from wines were developed and their effects were evaluated. Volatile compounds were determined by GC-FID and GC-IT/MS and phenolic compounds (non-coloured and anthocyanins) by HPLC-DAD. The treatment with MIP-4EG and MIP-4EP significantly reduced the content of 4-ethylguaiacol and 4-ethylphenol, respectively. Nevertheless, the changes observed in wine non-coloured and coloured phenolics and sensorial analysis indicate that their specificity and selectivity regarding off-flavours still needs to be improved. PMID:26604347

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer by the endoscopic phenol red test

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, K; Tatsuta, M; Iishi, H; Baba, M; Ishiguro, S

    1998-01-01

    Background—An endoscopic procedure that uses a pH indicator called phenol red to assess Helicobacter pylori infected gastric mucosa has recently been developed. This test makes it possible to take biopsy specimens from H pylori infected areas. 
Aim—This test was applied to patients with early gastric cancers to clarify the role of H pylori in gastric carcinogenesis. 
Subjects—Sixty five patients with early gastric cancer (50 with differentiated adenocarcinoma and 15 with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma). 
Methods—Patients with early gastric cancer underwent the endoscopic phenol red test before their operation. In this test, areas infected with H pylori can be observed as "coloured" areas where phenol red was turned from yellow to red. 
Results—H pylori infection was significantly (p<0.001) more frequent in patients with differentiated adenocarcinomas than in those with undifferentiated adenocarcinomas. Differentiated adenocarcinomas were usually located in areas of mucosa infected with H pylori, but undifferentiated adenocarcinomas were frequently located in non-infected areas. 
Conclusion—H pylori may be a strong risk factor for differentiated early gastric cancer. 

 Keywords: endoscopic phenol red test; Helicobacter pylori; gastric cancer; differentiated adenocarcinoma; high risk factor PMID:9505880

  9. Extraction of phenolics and changes in antioxidant activity of red wines during vinification.

    PubMed

    Burns, J; Gardner, P T; Matthews, D; Duthie, G G; Lean, M E; Crozier, A

    2001-12-01

    The moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages has been associated with protection against the development of coronary heart disease. Although alcohol itself can help prevent coronary heart disease through a number of mechanisms, red wine appears to offer protection above and beyond that attributable to alcohol alone. Red wine is a complex fluid containing grape, yeast, and wood-derived phenolic compounds, the majority of which have been recognized as potent antioxidants. The aim of this study was to investigate the major phenolic contributors to the antioxidant activity of wine. To this end, four wines were followed during the first 7-9 days of vinification. Individual phenolic compounds were quantified by HPLC, and antioxidant activity was determined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The extraction of the phenolics was found to be influenced by vinification procedure, grape quality, and grape variety. Although fermenting wines reached a total phenolic content comparable to that of a bottled wine after 9 days of vinification, the antioxidant activity was significantly lower than that of a finished wine. This suggests that the larger polyphenolic complexes and condensation products that appear during aging make a sizable contribution to the overall antioxidant activity of red wines. PMID:11743766

  10. Stoichiometric and kinetic studies of phenolic antioxidants from Andean purple corn and red-fleshed sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Casals, Bolívar A; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2003-05-21

    Stoichiometric and kinetic values of phenolics against DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) were determined for Andean purple corn (Zea mays L.) and red sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Both crops had higher antioxidant capacity and antiradical kinetics than blueberries and higher or similar anthocyanin and phenolic contents. The second-order rate constant (k(2)) was 1.56, 1.12, 0.57, and 0.26 (mg antiradical/mL)(-1) s(-1) for red sweetpotato, Trolox, purple corn, and blueberry, respectively. On the molar basis of active hydroxyl groups, k(2)' showed the same order as for k(2). Corn cob and sweetpotato endodermis contributed the most in phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity. Both crops studied can be considered as excellent novel sources of natural antioxidants for the functional food and dietary supplement markets. PMID:12744660

  11. Estrogen and phenol red free medium for osteoblast culture: study of the mineralization ability.

    PubMed

    de Faria, A N; Zancanela, D C; Ramos, A P; Torqueti, M R; Ciancaglini, P

    2016-08-01

    To design an estrogen and phenol red free medium for cell culture and check its effectiveness and safety on osteoblast growth it is necessary to maintain the estrogen receptors free for tests. For this purpose, we tested some modifications of the traditional culture media: estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum; estrogen charcoal stripped fetal bovine serum and phenol red free α-MEM. The aim of this work is to examine the effects of its depletion in the proliferation, differentiation, and toxicity of mesenchymal stromal cells differentiated into osteoblasts to obtain an effective interference free culture medium for in vitro studies, focused on non-previously studied estrogen receptors. We performed viability tests using the following techniques: MTT, alkaline phosphatase specific activity, formation of mineralized matrix by Alizarin technique and analysis of SEM/EDX of mineralized nodules. The results showed that the culture media with estrogen free α-MEM + phenol red free α-MEM did not impact viability, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of the osteoblasts culture compared to control. In addition, its nodules possess Ca/P ratio similar to hydroxyapatite nodules on the 14th and 21st day. In conclusion, the modified culture medium with phenol red free α-MEM with estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum can be safely used in experiments where the estrogen receptors need to be free. PMID:25634598

  12. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wine made from grapes treated with different fungicides.

    PubMed

    Mulero, J; Martínez, G; Oliva, J; Cermeño, S; Cayuela, J M; Zafrilla, P; Martínez-Cachá, A; Barba, A

    2015-08-01

    The effect of treating grapes with six fungicides, applied under critical agricultural practices (CAP) on levels of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wines of Monastrell variety was studied. Vinifications were performed through addition of active dry yeast (ADY). Measurement of phenolic compounds was made with HPLC-DAD. Determination of antioxidant activity was through reaction of the wine sample with the DPPH radical. The wine prepared from grapes treated with quinoxyfen shows a greater increase of phenolic compounds than the control wine. In contrast, the wine obtained from grapes treated with trifloxystrobin showed lower total concentration of phenolic compounds, including stilbenes, whilst treatments with kresoxim-methyl, fluquinconazole, and famoxadone slightly reduced their content. Hence, the use of these last four fungicides could cause a decrease in possible health benefits to consumers. Antioxidant activity hardly varied in the assays with quinoxyfen, fluquinconazole and famoxadone, and decreased in the other wines. PMID:25766797

  13. Changes in phenolic compounds, colour and antioxidant activity in industrial red myrtle liqueurs during storage.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Vincenzo; Piga, Antonio; Del Caro, Alessandra; Fenu, Paolo A M; Agabbio, Mario

    2003-12-01

    The results of a study on the evolution of phenolic compounds, colour and antioxidant activity in two industrial red myrtle liqueurs during storage in bottles under different bottle headspace (constant or increasing) and exposure to light are reported. In the year of the study, the phenolic compounds showed considerable changes even in the liqueurs stored with constant headspace. The anthocyanins in particular, both free and combined, tended to decrease. As expected, the same phenomena were observed in an accelerated form in the product stored in bottles with increasing headspace. The colour, evaluated according to the classic spectrophotometric parameters of intensity and hue, showed marked variability, especially in samples in which headspace was progressively increased. The two liqueurs showed antioxidant capacity values, expressed as mM of Trolox, comparable to those of red wine. They significantly decreased during storage in the bottles with increasing headspace, while values remained almost constant in the others. PMID:14727776

  14. Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Expression Profiles of Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis-Related Genes in Developing Grains of White, Purple, and Red Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dongyun; Li, Yaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chenyang; Qin, Haixia; Ding, Huina; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols in whole grain wheat have potential health benefits, but little is known about the expression patterns of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of phenolic acid compounds in different-colored wheat grains. We found that purple wheat varieties had the highest total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity. Among phenolic acid compounds, bound ferulic acid, vanillic, and caffeic acid levels were significantly higher in purple wheat than in white and red wheat, while total soluble phenolic acid, soluble ferulic acid, and vanillic acid levels were significantly higher in purple and red wheat than in white wheat. Ferulic acid and syringic acid levels peaked at 14 days after anthesis (DAA), whereas p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid levels peaked at 7 DAA, and vanillic acid levels gradually increased during grain filling and peaked near ripeness (35 DAA). Nine phenolic acid biosynthesis pathway genes (TaPAL1, TaPAL2, TaC3H1, TaC3H2, TaC4H, Ta4CL1, Ta4CL2, TaCOMT1, and TaCOMT2) exhibited three distinct expression patterns during grain filling, which may be related to the different phenolic acids levels. White wheat had higher phenolic acid contents and relatively high gene expression at the early stage, while purple wheat had the highest phenolic acid contents and gene expression levels at later stages. These results suggest that the expression of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes may be closely related to phenolic acids accumulation. PMID:27148345

  15. Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Expression Profiles of Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis-Related Genes in Developing Grains of White, Purple, and Red Wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongyun; Li, Yaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chenyang; Qin, Haixia; Ding, Huina; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols in whole grain wheat have potential health benefits, but little is known about the expression patterns of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of phenolic acid compounds in different-colored wheat grains. We found that purple wheat varieties had the highest total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity. Among phenolic acid compounds, bound ferulic acid, vanillic, and caffeic acid levels were significantly higher in purple wheat than in white and red wheat, while total soluble phenolic acid, soluble ferulic acid, and vanillic acid levels were significantly higher in purple and red wheat than in white wheat. Ferulic acid and syringic acid levels peaked at 14 days after anthesis (DAA), whereas p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid levels peaked at 7 DAA, and vanillic acid levels gradually increased during grain filling and peaked near ripeness (35 DAA). Nine phenolic acid biosynthesis pathway genes (TaPAL1, TaPAL2, TaC3H1, TaC3H2, TaC4H, Ta4CL1, Ta4CL2, TaCOMT1, and TaCOMT2) exhibited three distinct expression patterns during grain filling, which may be related to the different phenolic acids levels. White wheat had higher phenolic acid contents and relatively high gene expression at the early stage, while purple wheat had the highest phenolic acid contents and gene expression levels at later stages. These results suggest that the expression of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes may be closely related to phenolic acids accumulation. PMID:27148345

  16. Betalain, Acid Ascorbic, Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Properties of Purple, Red, Yellow and White Cactus Pears

    PubMed Central

    Sumaya-Martínez, María Teresa; Cruz-Jaime, Sandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; García-Paredes, Juan Diego; Cariño-Cortés, Raquel; Cruz-Cansino, Nelly; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Martinez-Cardenas, Leonardo; Alanís-García, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Commercialization of cactus pears based on their antioxidant properties can generate competitive advantages, and these can turn into business opportunities and the development of new products and a high-value ingredient for the food industry. This work evaluated the antioxidant activities (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging, protection against oxidation of a β-carotene-linoleic acid emulsion, and iron (II) chelation), the content of total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, betacyanin, betaxanthin and the stability of betacyanin pigments in presence of Cu (II)-dependent hydroxyl radicals (OH•), in 18 cultivars of purple, red, yellow and white cactus pear from six Mexican states. Our results indicated that the antiradical activities from yellow and white cactus pear cultivars were not significantly different (p < 0.05) and were lower than the average antiradical activities in red and purple cultivars. The red cactus pear from the state of Zacatecas showed the highest antioxidant activity. The free radical scavenging activity for red cactus pears was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) to the concentration of total phenolic compounds (R2 = 0.90) and ascorbic acid (R2 = 0.86). All 18 cultivars of cactus pears studied showed significant chelating activity of ferrous ions. The red and purple cactus pears showed a great stability when exposed to OH•. PMID:22072899

  17. Betalain, Acid ascorbic, phenolic contents and antioxidant properties of purple, red, yellow and white cactus pears.

    PubMed

    Sumaya-Martínez, María Teresa; Cruz-Jaime, Sandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; García-Paredes, Juan Diego; Cariño-Cortés, Raquel; Cruz-Cansino, Nelly; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Martinez-Cardenas, Leonardo; Alanís-García, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Commercialization of cactus pears based on their antioxidant properties can generate competitive advantages, and these can turn into business opportunities and the development of new products and a high-value ingredient for the food industry. This work evaluated the antioxidant activities (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging, protection against oxidation of a β-carotene-linoleic acid emulsion, and iron (II) chelation), the content of total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, betacyanin, betaxanthin and the stability of betacyanin pigments in presence of Cu (II)-dependent hydroxyl radicals (OH•), in 18 cultivars of purple, red, yellow and white cactus pear from six Mexican states. Our results indicated that the antiradical activities from yellow and white cactus pear cultivars were not significantly different (p < 0.05) and were lower than the average antiradical activities in red and purple cultivars. The red cactus pear from the state of Zacatecas showed the highest antioxidant activity. The free radical scavenging activity for red cactus pears was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) to the concentration of total phenolic compounds (R(2) = 0.90) and ascorbic acid (R(2) = 0.86). All 18 cultivars of cactus pears studied showed significant chelating activity of ferrous ions. The red and purple cactus pears showed a great stability when exposed to OH•. PMID:22072899

  18. Phenolic profiles and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene expression of red clover (Trifolium pratense) selected for decreased postharvest browning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a legume forage abundant in phenolic compounds. It tends to brown when cut for hay, due to oxidation of phenolic compounds catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and subsequent binding to proteins. Selecting for a greener hay may provide information about the re...

  19. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590362

  20. Polyphenols content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to conventional red wines.

    PubMed

    Garaguso, Ivana; Nardini, Mirella

    2015-07-15

    Wine exerts beneficial effects on human health when it is drunk with moderation. Nevertheless, wine may also contain components negatively affecting human health. Among these, sulfites may induce adverse effects after ingestion. We examined total polyphenols and flavonoids content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of eight organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to those of eight conventional red wines. Polyphenols and flavonoids content were slightly higher in organic wines in respect to conventional wines, however differences did not reach statistical significance. The phenolic acids profile was quite similar in both groups of wines. Antioxidant activity was higher in organic wines compared to conventional wines, although differences were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition are comparable to conventional red wines with regard to the total polyphenols and flavonoids content, the phenolics profile and the antioxidant activity. PMID:25722174

  1. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus).

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  2. Phenolic compounds from red wine and coffee are associated with specific intestinal microorganisms in allergic subjects.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Adriana; Hevia, Arancha; López, Patricia; Suárez, Ana; Diaz, Carmen; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; González, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The dietary modulation of gut microbiota, suggested to be involved in allergy processes, has recently attracted much interest. While several studies have addressed the use of fibres to modify intestinal microbial populations, information about other components, such as phenolic compounds, is scarce. The aim of this work was to identify the dietary components able to influence the microbiota in 23 subjects suffering from rhinitis and allergic asthma, and 22 age- and sex-matched controls. The food intake was recorded by means of an annual food frequency questionnaire. Dietary fibre tables were obtained from Marlett et al., and the Phenol-Explorer database was used to assess the phenolic compound intake. The quantification of microbial groups was performed using an Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based analysis. The results showed a direct association between the intake of red wine, a source of stilbenes, and the relative abundance of Bacteroides, and between the intake of coffee, rich in phenolic acids, and the abundance of Clostridium, Lactococcus and Lactobacillus genera. Despite epidemiological analyses not establishing causality, these results support the association between polyphenol-rich beverages and faecal microbiota in allergic patients. PMID:26437130

  3. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  4. Determination of contents and antioxidant activity of free and bound phenolics compounds and in vitro digestibility of commercial black and red rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Sumczynski, Daniela; Kotásková, Eva; Družbíková, Helena; Mlček, Jiří

    2016-11-15

    Black and red rices (Oryza sativa L.) were analysed for total flavonoids and phenolics and the HPLC profile including both free and bound phenolic fractions. Moreover, antioxidant activity and in vitro digestibility was determined. Content of flavonoids and polyphenols as well as antioxidant activity was higher in free phenolic fractions. Bound flavonoids in black rices were not significant contributors to antioxidant activity. The main free phenolics in black rices were ferulic, protocatechuic and trans-p-coumaric acids, while the major free phenolics in red rices were catechin, protocatechuic and caffeic acids. The main bound phenolics in black rices were ferulic and vanillic acids and quercetin, in red rice types, they were ferulic, syringic, trans-p-coumaric acids and quercetin. Newly, the presence of m-coumaric acid in red rices was detected. Steam cooked rices showed very high levels of organic matter digestibility, whereas red rices were significantly more digestible than black rices (p<0.05). PMID:27283641

  5. Phenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenol ; CASRN 108 - 95 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  6. Identification of flavonoid and phenolic antioxidants in black currants, blueberries, raspberries, red currants, and cranberries.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gina; Degeneve, Alexandra; Mullen, William; Crozier, Alan

    2010-04-14

    The antioxidant capacity (AOC) of black currant, blueberry, raspberry, red currant, and cranberry extracts was determined using the FRAP assay. In addition, the vitamin C content of the berries was determined and phenolic and polyphenolic compounds in the extracts were analyze by reversed-phase HPLC-PDA-MS(3) and by reversed-phase HPLC-PDA with an online antioxidant detection system. A complex spectrum of anthocyanins was the major contributor to the AOC of black currants and blueberries, whereas the lower AOC of red currants and cranberries was due mainly to a reduced anthocyanin content. Raspberries also had a lower anthocyanin content than black currants and blueberries, but there was only a slight decline in the AOC because of the presence of the ellagitannins sanguin H-6 and lambertianin C, which were responsible for 58% of the HPLC-AOC of the berries. Vitamin C was responsible for 18-23% of the HPLC-AOC of black currants, red currants, and cranberries and for 11% of that of raspberries but did not contribute to the AOC of the blueberry extract that was examined. Seven percent of the HPLC-AOC of the cranberry extract was attributable to procyanidin dimers. However, the contribution of polymeric proanthocyanidins to the AOC of the five berries was not determined as when analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC these high molecular weight flavan-3-ols are either retained by the column or eluted as a broad unresolved band. PMID:20000747

  7. Temporary reduction of radiation does not permanently reduce flavonoid glycosides and phenolic acids in red lettuce.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christine; Kläring, Hans-Peter; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2013-11-01

    Applying transparent daytime screens in greenhouses in cool seasons reduces the amount of energy needed for heating, but also the solar radiation available for crops. This can reduce yield and product quality of leafy vegetables because of constrained photosynthesis and altered biosynthesis. To study this, we cultivated five-week old red leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) for four weeks in growth chambers under a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 225 and 410 μmol m(-2) s(-1), respectively. Some plants were exchanged between radiation intensities after two weeks. We investigated the concentration of five flavonoid glycosides, three caffeic acid derivatives, reducing sugars as well as plant growth. Remarkably, no significant influence of radiation intensity on the concentration of phenolic acids or anthocyanin glycosides was observed. In contrast, quercetin and luteolin glycoside concentration was between 14 and 34% lower in plants growing under lower compared to higher PPFD. Already after two weeks of cultivation, plants grown under lower PPFD contained less quercetin and luteolin glycosides but they completely compensated if subsequently transferred to higher PPFD until harvest. Hence, marketable lettuce heads which experienced temporary shading followed by an unshaded phase did not contain lower concentrations of flavonoid glycosides or phenolic acids. Also, there was no reduction of head mass in this variant. Our results suggest that saving energy in early growth stages is feasible without losses in yield or health promoting phenolic substances. In addition, there was a close correlation between the concentration of reducing sugars and some flavonoid glycosides, indicating a close metabolic connection between their biosynthesis and the availability of carbohydrates. PMID:23735845

  8. Measurement of Tear Production Using the Phenol Red Thread Test in the Common Mynah ( Acridotheres tristis ).

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi; Ansari Mood, Manely; Khorram, Hamid; Selk Ghaffari, Masoud; Williams, David L

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate tear production in the common mynah ( Acridotheres tristis ) using the phenol red thread test (PRTT) and to make a comparison of measurements with the PRTT placed in the fornices of lower and upper eyelids, tear production of both eyes in 22 healthy adult captive mynah birds was evaluated. After positioning of threads in the fornices of upper and lower eyelids, the PRTT values of the birds were 17.5 ± 3.1 mm/15 s and 19.2 ± 2.5 mm/15 s, respectively. A significant difference was found between PRTT values for upper eyelids and lower eyelids (P = 0.01). This study provides novel data for normal reference ranges of PRTT values in healthy common mynah birds and shows that a difference is found depending on where the PRTT thread is placed. PMID:26115216

  9. The phenolic chemistry and spectrochemistry of red sweet wine-making and oak-aging.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-González, M; Cancho-Grande, B; Simal-Gándara, J; Teixeira, N; Mateus, N; De Freitas, V

    2014-01-01

    A natural sweet wine (NSW) was made with dried grapes from Vitis vinifera L. cv Garnacha Tintorera. A fortified sweet wine (FSW) was also obtained: the maceration-alcoholic fermentation of Garnacha Tintorera must was stopped by addition of ethanol 96% (v/v). UV/Vis spectrophotometry and HPLC/DAD-ESI/MS were applied to determine, respectively, the evolution of colour and phenolic compounds in Garnacha Tintorera based-sweet wines during aging. In sweet wines, aging decreased a(∗) (red/green), colour saturation and lightness and increased b(∗) (yellow/blue), and hue angle. Most of the phenolic compounds determined, such as anthocyanins, esters of hydroxycinnamic acids, flavan-3-ols monomers, oligomers and polymers decreased in both sweet wines during aging. On the contrary, hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids and vitisins increased after one year of aging. Despite that both terminal and extension subunit compositions show very small changes, mean degree of polymerisation of proanthocyanidins decline slightly as aging progressed in both sweet wines. PMID:24444970

  10. Effect of steam-cooking and parboiling on phenolics and antioxidant capacities of red and purple rice cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red and purple rice cultivars contain high concentrations of phenolics, such as proanthocyanidins and anthocyanins, respectively. We investigated the effect of cooking processes on these antioxidants and antioxidant capacities of pigmented and common light-brown bran rice. The cooking processes incl...

  11. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  12. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreatingmore » the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.« less

  13. Identification of phenolic compounds in red wine extract samples and zebrafish embryos by HPLC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Boix, Nuria; Piqué, Ester; Gómez-Catalan, Jesús; Medina-Remon, Alexander; Sasot, Gemma; Mercader-Martí, Mercè; Llobet, Juan M; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M

    2015-08-15

    The zebrafish embryo is a highly interesting biological model with applications in different scientific fields, such as biomedicine, pharmacology and toxicology. In this study, we used liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap-mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) to identify the polyphenol compounds in a red wine extract and zebrafish embryos. Phenolic compounds and anthocyanin metabolites were determined in zebrafish embryos previously exposed to the red wine extract. Compounds were identified by injection in a high-resolution system (LTQ-Orbitrap) using accurate mass measurements in MS, MS(2) and MS(3) modes. To our knowledge, this research constitutes the first comprehensive identification of phenolic compounds in zebrafish by HPLC coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:25794733

  14. Interferences in automated phenol red method for determination of bromide in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basel, C.L.; Defreese, J.D.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    The phenol red method for the determination of bromide in water has been automated by segmented flow analysis. Samples can be analyzed at a rate of 20 samples/h with a method detection limit, defined, as the concentration giving a signal about three times the standard deviation of replicate anaiyte determinations in reagent water, of 10 ??g/L. Samples studied include oil-field brines, halite solution brines, ground-waters contaminated with these brines, and fresh groundwaters. Chloride and bicarbonate cause significant positive interferences at levels as low as 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively. Ammonia gives a negative interference that is important at levels as low as 0.05 mg/L. An ionic strength buffer is used to suppress a positive ionic strength interference, correction curves are used to compensate for the chloride interference, the bicarbonate interference is minimized by acidification, and the ammonia interference is eliminated by its removal by ion exchange. Reaction product studies are used to suggest a plausible mode of chloride interference. ?? 1982 American Chemical Society.

  15. Phenolic Contents and Compositions in Skins of Red Wine Grape Cultivars among Various Genetic Backgrounds and Originations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyze and compare the phenolic characteristics of red wine grapes with diverse genetic backgrounds, skin phenolics among 21 different cultivars belonging to Vitis vinifera L., East Asian and North American Vitis species and hybrids, as well as 2 varieties of muscadine grapes were estimated by HPLC-MS/MS. There were 45 anthocyanins, 28 flavonols, 8 flavan-3-ols, 9 cinnamic acids, 5 benzoic acids, 5 ellagic acids and 2 stilbenes detected in all the samples. Total contents of each phenolic type varied significantly among the different grape cultivars investigated. There was also a large variability in the phenolic compositions of different grape groups. The differences in anthocyanin composition were obvious between V. vinifera and non-V. vinifera grapes and also between the grapes originating from Eurasia and North America. Quercetin-3-glucuronide and quercetin-3-glucoside were marker flavonol compounds for Euvitis grape skins. Flavan-3-ol monomers were dominant in the skins of muscadine and non-V. amurensis East Asian grapes, whereas polymers were more common in V. vinifera and North American grapes. The muscadine grapes were very rich in flavonols, flavan-3-ols and ellagic acids. Via principal component analysis, these grape cultivars were clustered into three groups according to their characteristic phenolic content and composition. PMID:22489164

  16. Effects of pH, sample size, and solvent partitioning on recovery of soluble phenolic acids and isoflavonoids in red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several extraction parameters were tested to determine optimal conditions for extracting phenolics from red clover (Trifolium pratense L. cv. Kenland). HPLC-UV profiles were compared before and after partitioning a methanolic extract of soluble phenolics with ethyl acetate-ether (1:1, v/v). The e...

  17. Phenolic Compounds and Bioactivity of Healthy and Infected Grapevine Leaf Extracts from Red Varieties Merlot and Vranac (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Anđelković, Marko; Radovanović, Blaga; Anđelković, Ana Milenkovic; Radovanović, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the phenolic composition, radical scavenging activity, and antimicrobial activity of grapevine leaf extracts from two red grape varieties, Vranac and Merlot (Vitis vinifera L.). The extracts were prepared from healthy grapevine leaves and those infected by Plasmopara viticola (downy mildew). The phenolic composition of the grapevine leaf extracts was determined using spectrophotometric assays and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The radical scavenging activity of grapevine leaf extracts was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay, and their antimicrobial activity was determined by microwell dilution tests. The total phenolic content was higher in healthy grapevine leaf extracts than in infected grapevine leaf extracts. The RP-HPLC analysis detected significant amounts of flavonols, phenolic acids, and flavan-3-ols, and small amounts of stilbenes in the grapevine leaf extracts. Compared with the infected grapevine leaf extracts, the healthy grapevine leaf extracts were richer in flavonols, phenolic acids, and flavan-3-ols, but had lower stilbenes contents. All extracts showed strong free radical scavenging activity, which was strongly correlated with the total phenolic content (R(2) = 0.978). The extracts showed a stronger antimicrobial activity towards Gram-positive bacterial strains than towards Gram-negative bacterial strains and yeast. The phenolic compounds in grapevine leaves were responsible for their strong radical scavenging and antimicrobial activities. Together, these results demonstrate that grapevine leaves have high nutritional value and can be used as a fresh food and to prepare extracts that can be used as additives in food and medicines. PMID:26174183

  18. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of phenolic rich extracts from white and red common beans.

    PubMed

    García-Lafuente, Ana; Moro, Carlos; Manchón, Noelia; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia; Villares, Ana; Guillamón, Eva; Rostagno, Mauricio; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura

    2014-10-15

    According to epidemiological evidence, diets rich in fruits and vegetables can reduce the incidence of several chronic diseases that share an inflammatory component. These protective effects are attributed, in part, to the occurrence of different antioxidant components, mainly phenolic compounds. Our aim was to characterise phenolic composition, and to determine antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of phenolic rich extracts obtained from two kinds of common beans, white kidney beans (WKB) and round purple beans (RPB). Phenolic acids were the predominant component in WKB extracts, whereas RPB extracts presented higher concentrations of phenolic compounds, mainly catechin derivatives, proanthocyanidins and catechin glucoside. In addition, RPB extracts showed higher antioxidant capacity and higher anti-inflammatory activity by the reduction of NO production and cytokine mRNA expression of LPS stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that common bean extracts may be used as a source of anti-inflammatory agents as well as a dietary complement for health promotion. PMID:24837943

  19. Fabrication of a Multi-Walled Nanotube (MWNT) Ionic Liquid Electrode and Its Application for Sensing Phenolics in Red Wines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyo-Il; Kang, Hee-Young; Lee, Jae-Chan; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2009-01-01

    A multi-walled nanotube (MWNT) ionic liquid was prepared by the immobilization of 1-butylimidazole bromide onto an epoxy group on a poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted MWNT, which was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate onto MWNT in an aqueous solution. Subsequently, a MWNT ionic liquid electrode was fabricated by hand-casting MWNT ionic liquid, tyrosinase, and chitosan solution as a binder on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass. The sensing ranges of the MWNT ionic liquid electrode with immobilized tyrosinase was in the range of 0.01-0.08 mM in a phosphate buffer solution. The optimal conditions such as pH, temperature, and effects of different phenolic compounds were determined. The total phenolic compounds of three commercial red wines were also determined on the tyrosinase-immobilized biosensor. PMID:22399973

  20. Color Change of Phenol Red by Integrated Smart Phone Camera as a Tool for the Determination of Neurotoxic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Kostelnik, Adam; Cegan, Alexander; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The use of a cell phone as a detection system is easy, simple and does not require trained personnel, which is in contrast to standard laboratory instruments. This paper deals with immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in a gelatin matrix, and phenol red, as an indicator of AChE activity, is used in order to establish a method that is easily compatible with a camera device. AChE splits acetylcholine into choline and acetic acid, which changes the pH of a medium, resulting in a phenol red color change. The coloration changed in presence of an AChE inhibitor. Measurements were performed on 3D-printed, tube-shaped holder, and digital photography, with subsequent analysis of red-green-blue (RGB), served for assay purposes. Calibration of AChE inhibitors, tacrine and galantamine, was performed, with limit of detection equal to 1.1 nM and 1.28 µM, respectively. Interferences were also measured, resulting in a proof-of-method stability. The method was further successfully validated for the standard Ellman's assay, and verified on murine plasma samples spiked with inhibitors. PMID:27618041

  1. Comparison of the gravimetric, phenol red, and 14C-PEG-3350 methods to determine water absorption in the rat single-pass intestinal perfusion model.

    PubMed

    Sutton, S C; Rinaldi, M T; Vukovinsky, K E

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the gravimetric method provided an accurate measure of water flux correction and to compare the gravimetric method with methods that employ nonabsorbed markers (eg, phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350). Phenol red,14C-PEG-3350, and 4-[2-[[2-(6-amino-3-pyridinyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amino]ethoxy]-, methyl ester, (R)-benzene acetic acid (Compound I) were co-perfused in situ through the jejunum of 9 anesthetized rats (single-pass intestinal perfusion [SPIP]). Water absorption was determined from the phenol red,14C-PEG-3350, and gravimetric methods. The absorption rate constant (ka) for Compound I was calculated. Both phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350 were appreciably absorbed, underestimating the extent of water flux in the SPIP model. The average +/- SD water flux microg/h/cm) for the 3 methods were 68.9 +/- 28.2 (gravimetric), 26.8 +/- 49.2 (phenol red), and 34.9 +/- 21.9 (14C-PEG-3350). The (average +/- SD) ka for Compound I (uncorrected for water flux) was 0.024 +/- 0.005 min(-1). For the corrected, gravimetric method, the average +/- SD was 0.031 +/- 0.001 min(-1). The gravimetric method for correcting water flux was as accurate as the 2 "nonabsorbed" marker methods. PMID:11741276

  2. Extraction optimization for antioxidant phenolic compounds in red grape jam using ultrasound with a response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Lucíula Lemos Lima; Prado, Marcelo Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    Optimization of the extraction methodology for antioxidant phenolic compounds in red grape jam was performed with an ultrasound-assisted system. The antioxidant phenolic compounds were extracted and analyzed by determining the total phenolic content (Folin Ciocalteu), as well as by employing free radical DPPH() and the beta-carotene/linoleic acid system. To optimize the parameters of solvent concentration, time and extraction temperature, the experiments were carried out using the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) method. Using response surface methodology (RSM), the best combinations achieved were with 60% ethanol and water for 20min at 50°C. The optimized parameters for this method were compared to an extraction method that has been commonly noted in the literature, which used to be the standard method, and the results were expressed in the milligram equivalent of quercetin per gram of jam (mg E.Q/g Jam). With the new method, the antioxidant potential measured by DPPH(ⁱ) was 70% higher than that obtained with the standard extraction method, and the antioxidant potential measured using the beta-carotene/linoleic acid system was 65% higher. In addition, a significant decrease in the total analysis time was achieved (from 10h to 30min), when compared to the standard method. PMID:22512996

  3. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  4. Antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of three red seaweeds (Division: Rhodophyta) harvested from the Gulf of Mannar of Peninsular India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Joseph, Deepu; Praveen, Nammunayathuputhenkotta Krishnankartha

    2015-04-01

    The antioxidant activities of methanol extract and its solvent fractions (n-hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate) of three red seaweeds (Hypnea musciformis, H. valentiae, and Jania rubens) collected from the Gulf of Mannar of South eastern coast of India were evaluated, using different in vitro systems, viz., DPPH, ABTS, HO radical scavenging activities, H2O2 scavenging ability, Fe(2+) ion chelating ability and reducing potential. Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content of the extracts/fractions, and the results were expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g of the seaweed extracts/fractions. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) inhibition assay was employed to assess the ability of the seaweed extracts/fractions to inhibit lipid oxidation. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fractions of H. musciformis exhibited significantly higher total phenolic content (205.5 mg GAE/g), DPPH· scavenging activity (IC50 0.6 mg/mL), ABTS(.+) scavenging activity (IC50 0.51 μg/mL), Fe(2+) chelating ability (IC50 0.70 mg/mL), H2O2 scavenging activity (IC50 0.39 mg/mL), reducing ability (Abs700 nm 1.46) and lipid peroxidation inhibitory ability (2.71 MDAEC/kg) (P < 0.05) compared to its n-hexane, DCM fractions, crude MeOH extract and MeOH extracts/fractions of H. valentiae and J. rubens. DCM fraction of J. rubens showed significantly higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (IC50 0.55 mg/mL) compared with H. musciformis and H. valentiae (P < 0.05). This study indicated the potential use of red seaweeds, in particular, H. musciformis as candidate species to be used as food supplement for increasing the shelf-life of food industry, and candidates in combating carcinogenesis and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25829573

  5. Hypotheses on the effects of enological tannins and total red wine phenolic compounds on Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Chasseriaud, Laura; Krieger-Weber, Sibylle; Déléris-Bou, Magali; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre Louis; Claisse, Olivier; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline

    2015-12-01

    Lot of articles report on the impact of polyphenols on wine lactic acid bacteria, but it is clear that the results still remain confusing, because the system is complicated both in term of chemical composition and of diversity of strains. In addition, red wines polyphenols are multiple, complex and reactive molecules. Moreover, the final composition of wine varies according to grape variety and to extraction during winemaking. Therefore it is nearly impossible to deduce their effects on bacteria from experiments in oversimplified conditions. In the present work, effect of tannins preparations, currently considered as possible technological adjuvants, was assessed on growth and malolactic fermentation for two malolactic starters. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory medium and in a white wine. Likewise, impact of total polyphenolic extracts obtained from different grape variety red wines was evaluated in the white wine as culture medium. As expected growth and activity of both strains were affected whatever the additions. Results suggest some interpretations to the observed impacts on bacterial populations. Influence of tannins should be, at least partly, due to redox potential change. Results on wine extracts show the need for investigating the bacterial metabolism of some galloylated molecules. Indeed, they should play on bacterial physiology and probably affect the sensory qualities of wines. PMID:26338126

  6. An organic dye-polymer (phenol red-poly (vinyl alcohol)) composite architecture towards tunable -optical and -saturable absorption characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Sreeja; Illyaskutty, Navas; Sreedhanya, S.; Philip, Reji; Muneera, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that blending an organic dye (guest/filler), with a vinyl polymer (host template), is an inexpensive and simple approach for the fabrication of multifunctional photonic materials which could display an enhancement in the desirable properties of the constituent materials and, at the same time provide novel synergistic properties for the guest-host system. A new guest-host nanocomposite system comprising Phenol Red dye and poly (vinyl alcohol) as guest and host template, respectively, which exhibits tunable optical characteristics and saturable absorption behavior, is introduced. The dependence of local electronic environment provided by the polymer template and the interactions of the polymer molecules with the encapsulated guest molecules on the observed optical/nonlinear absorption behavior is discussed. An understanding of the tunability of the optical/ photophysical processes, with respect to the filler content, as discussed herein could help in the design of improved optical materials for several photonic device applications like organic light emitting diodes and saturable absorbers.

  7. Adenosine reagent-free detection by co-immobilization of adenosine deaminase and phenol red on an optical biostrip.

    PubMed

    Bartzoka, Foteini; Venetsanou, Katerina; Clonis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine detection in human serum is important because this ribonucleoside has established clinical applications, modulating many physiological processes. Furthermore, a simple and cheap detection method is useful in adenosine production processes. Adenosine can be determined enzymatically using either S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and (3) [H]-adenosine, or adenosine kinase combined with GTP and luciferase, or an amperometric biosensor carrying adenosine deaminase (ADA), purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase. We developed a simple and cheap method relying on a transparent biostrip bearing ADA and the indicator phenol red (PR), co-immobilized to polyacrylamide, itself chemically adhered to a derivatized glass strip. The ADA-catalyzed conversion of adenosine to inosine and ammonia leads to a local pH alteration, changing the absorbance maximum of PR (from 425 to 567 nm), which is measured optically. The biostrip shows an analytical range 0.05-1.5 mM adenosine and is reusable when stored at 4 °C. When the biostrip was tested with serum, spiked with adenosine (70 and 100 μM), and filtered for protein and adenosine phosphates depletion, it showed good adenosine recovery. In summary, we show the proof-of-concept that adenosine can be determined reagent-free, at moderate sensitivity on an easy to construct, cheap, and reusable biostrip, based on commercially available molecular entities. PMID:25293641

  8. Effect of synthesis conditions on the photocatalytic property of multiferroic BiFeO3 towards the degradation of phenol red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanalakshmi, Radhalayam; Muneeswaran, M.; Giridharan, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    Multiferroic BiFeO3 has been synthesized through hydrothermal route under different reaction conditions. From the basic characterization such as of X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), the synthesized Nps were found to having rhombohedral structure with R3c space group. Photodegradation studies of toxic dye phenol red have been investigated under visible light irradiation. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis has been carried out to identify the magnetic properties and recycle ability photocatalysts.

  9. Antioxidant Activity and Total Phenolic and Flavonoid Content of Various Solvent Extracts from In Vivo and In Vitro Grown Trifolium pratense L. (Red Clover)

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Banisalam, Behrooz

    2015-01-01

    In the present study the extracts of in vivo and in vitro grown plants as well as callus tissue of red clover were tested for their antioxidant activities, using different extraction solvent and different antioxidant assays. The total flavonoid and phenolic contents as well as extraction yield of the extracts were also investigated to determine their correlation with the antioxidant activity of the extracts. Among all the tested extracts the highest amounts of total phenolic and total flavonoids content were found in methanol extract of in vivo grown plants. The antioxidant activity of tested samples followed the order in vivo plant extract > callus extract > in vitro extract. The highest reducing power, 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging, and chelating power were found in methanol extracts of in vivo grown red clover, while the chloroform fraction of in vivo grown plants showed the highest 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging and hydrogen peroxide scavenging compared to the other tested extracts. A significant correlation was found between the antioxidant activity of extracts and their total phenolic and total flavonoid content. According to the findings, the extract of in vitro culture of red clover especially the callus tissue possesses a comparable antioxidant activity to the in vivo cultured plants' extract. PMID:26064936

  10. Design and fabrication of optical chemical sensor for detection of nitroaromatic explosives based on fluorescence quenching of phenol red immobilized poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ali Reza; Ghazanchayi, Behnam

    2016-04-01

    The present study developed a new optical chemical sensor for detection of nitroaromatic explosives in liquid phase. The method is based on the fluorescence quenching of phenol red as fluorophore in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane in the presence of nitroaromatic explosives as quenchers, e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 4-nitrotoluene (4-NT), 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and nitrobenzene (NB). For chemical immobilization of phenol red in PVA, phenol red reacted with formaldehyde to produce hydroxymethyl groups and then attached to PVA membrane through the hydroxymethyl groups. The optical sensor showed strong quenching of nitroaromatic explosives. A Stern-Volmer graph for each explosive was constructed and showed that the range of concentration from 5.0 × 10(-6) to 2.5 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) was linear for each explosive and sensitivity varied as TNB >TNT>2,4-DNT>NB>4-NT. The response time of the sensor was within 1 min. The proposed sensor showed good reversibility and reproducibility. PMID:26838395

  11. Influence of Conventional and Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction on Phenolic Contents, Betacyanin Contents, and Antioxidant Capacity of Red Dragon Fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus)

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Nurul Shazini; Ismail, Patimah; Rahmat, Asmah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of extraction methods on antioxidant capacities of red dragon fruit peel and flesh. Antioxidant capacities were measured using ethylenebenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). Total phenolic content (TPC) was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent while quantitative determination of total flavonoid content (TFC) was conducted using aluminium trichloride colorimetric method. Betacyanin content (BC) was measured by spectrophotometer. Red dragon fruit was extracted using conventional (CV) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UE) technique to determine the most efficient way of extracting its antioxidant components. Results indicated that UE increased TFC, reduced the extraction yield, BC, and TPC, but exhibited the strongest scavenging activity for the peel of red dragon fruit. In contrast, UE reduced BC, TFC, and scavenging activity but increased the yield for the flesh. Nonetheless, UE slightly increases TPC in flesh. Scavenging activity and reducing power were highly correlated with phenolic and flavonoid compounds. Conversely, the scavenging activity and reducing power were weakly correlated with betacyanin content. This work gives scientific evidences for the consideration of the type of extraction techniques for the peel and flesh of red dragon fruit in applied research and food industry. PMID:25379555

  12. The content of phenolic compounds in leaf tissues of white (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) and red horse chestnut (Aesculus carea H.) colonized by the horse chestnut leaf miner (Cameraria ohridella Deschka & Dimić).

    PubMed

    Oszmiański, Jan; Kalisz, Stanisław; Aneta, Wojdyło

    2014-01-01

    Normally, plant phenolics are secondary metabolites involved in the defense mechanisms of plants against fungal pathogens. Therefore, in this study we attempted to quantify and characterize phenolic compounds in leaves of white and red horse chestnut with leaf miner larvae before and after Cameraria ohridella attack. A total of 17 phenolic compounds belonging to the hydroxycinnamic acid, flavan-3-ols and flavonol groups were identified and quantified in white and red horse chestnut leaf extracts. Significantly decreased concentrations of some phenolic compounds, especially of flavan-3-ols, were observed in infected leaves compared to the non-infected ones. Additionally, a higher content of polyphenolic compounds especially (-)-epicatechin and procyanidins in leaves of red-flowering than in white-flowering horse chestnut may explain their greater resistance to C. ohridella insects. PMID:25225723

  13. Determination of technological maturity of grapes and total phenolic compounds of grape skins in red and white cultivars during ripening by near infrared hyperspectral image: a preliminary approach.

    PubMed

    Nogales-Bueno, Julio; Hernández-Hierro, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Pulido, Francisco José; Heredia, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral images of intact grapes during ripening were recorded using a near infrared hyperspectral imaging system (900-1700 nm). Spectral data have been correlated with grape skin total phenolic concentration, sugar concentration, titratable acidity and pH by modified partial least squares regression (MPLS) using a number of spectral pre-treatments and different sets of calibration. The obtained results (RSQ and SEP, respectively) for the global model of red and white grape samples were: 0.89 and 1.23 mg g(-1) of grape skin for total phenolic concentration, 0.99 and 1.37 °Brix for sugar concentration, 0.98 and 3.88 g L(-1) for titratable acidity and for pH 0.94 and 0.12. Moreover, separate calibration models for red and white grape samples were also developed. The obtained results present a good potential for a fast and reasonably inexpensive screening of these parameters in intact grapes and therefore, for a fast control of technological and phenolic maturity. PMID:24444979

  14. Co-pigmentation of pelargonidin derivatives in strawberry and red radish model solutions by the addition of phenolic fractions from mango peels.

    PubMed

    Müller-Maatsch, Judith; Bechtold, Lena; Schweiggert, Ralf M; Carle, Reinhold

    2016-12-15

    Pelargonidin-based colors suffer from notorious instability. A phenolic mango peel extract and defined phenolic fractions thereof were shown to effectively modulate the visible absorption of anthocyanins from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) and red radish (Raphanus sativus L.) by intermolecular co-pigmentation. Consistently, non-acylated pelargonidin derivatives from strawberry exerted significantly greater hyper- and bathochromic spectral shifts than their acylated counterparts from red radish. The addition of low molecular-weight co-pigments such as gallic acid and monogalloyl glucoses to strawberry anthocyanins led to strong hyperchromic shifts from 30% to 48%, while gallotannins (>six galloyl units) exerted smaller co-pigmentation effects (36±2%; Δλmax 13nm), possibly due to steric hindrances. In contrast, penta- and hexa-O-galloyl-glucose induced greatest and most stable co-pigmentation effects (53±2%; Δλmax 13nm). Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms and the responsible compounds, phenolic mango peel extracts might represent suitable color enhancers for coloring foodstuff, particularly for those containing non-acylated pelargonidin derivatives. PMID:27451227

  15. Fabrication of a Microbial Biosensor Based on QD-MWNT Supports by a One-Step Radiation Reaction and Detection of Phenolic Compounds in Red Wines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Kwen, Hai-Doo; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-01-01

    An Acaligense sp.-immobilized biosensor was fabricated based on QD-MWNT composites as an electron transfer mediator and a microbe immobilization support by a one-step radiation reaction and used for sensing phenolic compounds in commercial red wines. First, a quantum dot-modified multi-wall carbon nanotube (QD-MWNT) composite was prepared in the presence of MWNT by a one-step radiation reaction in an aqueous solution at room temperature. The successful preparation of the QD-MWNT composite was confirmed by XPS, TEM, and elemental analysis. Second, the microbial biosensor was fabricated by immobilization of Acaligense sp. on the surface of the composite thin film of a glassy carbon (GC) electrode, which was prepared by a hand casting method with a mixture of the previously obtained composite and Nafion solution. The sensing ranges of the microbial biosensor based on CdS-MWNT and Cu2S-MWNT supports were 0.5–5.0 mM and 0.7–10 mM for phenol in a phosphate buffer solution, respectively. Total concentration of phenolic compounds contained in commercial red wines was also determined using the prepared microbial immobilized biosensor. PMID:22319395

  16. Comparative analysis of Tunisian wild Crataegus azarolus (yellow azarole) and Crataegus monogyna (red azarole) leaf, fruit, and traditionally derived syrup: phenolic profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the aqueous-acetone extracts.

    PubMed

    Belkhir, Manel; Rebai, Olfa; Dhaouadi, Karima; Congiu, Francesca; Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Amri, Mohamed; Fattouch, Sami

    2013-10-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the yellow and red azarole phenolic extracts prepared from leaf, fruit peel/pulp, and syrup were comparatively investigated. The yellow azarole was found significantly richer in polyphenols than the red-fruit species. Hyperoside was the main phenolic in both yellow and red azarole leaves and only in yellow fruits, whereas procyanidin B2 was the major compound in red fruits. Yellow azarole leaf and fruit peel extracts exhibited the strongest antioxidant activities using DPPH (≈168 and 79 μmol TEAC/g fw, respectively) and FRAP (≈378 and 161 μmol Fe(2+)/g fw, respectively) assays. The highest antibacterial activities were recorded for the yellow azarole leaf and fruit peel extracts, especially against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis . The low phenolic content of the syrups contrasted with their significant antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials, which were correlated to their hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) (furan derivative amounts) content. PMID:24070066

  17. Mucosal immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Mestecky, Jiri

    2005-08-01

    Due to their vast surface area, the mucosal surfaces of the body represent a major site of potential attack by invading pathogens. The secretions that bathe mucosal surfaces contain significant levels of immunoglobulins (Igs), which play key roles in immune defense of these surfaces. IgA is the predominant antibody class in many external secretions and has many functional attributes, both direct and indirect, that serve to prevent infective agents such as bacteria and viruses from breaching the mucosal barrier. This review details current understanding of the structural and functional characteristics of IgA, including interaction with specific receptors (such as Fc(alpha)RI, Fc(alpha)/microR, and CD71) and presents examples of the means by which certain pathogens circumvent the protective properties of this important Ig. PMID:16048542

  18. Effect of five enological practices and of the general phenolic composition on fermentation-related aroma compounds in Mencia young red wines.

    PubMed

    Añón, Ana; López, Jorge F; Hernando, Diego; Orriols, Ignacio; Revilla, Eugenio; Losada, Manuel M

    2014-04-01

    The effects of five technological procedures and of the contents of total anthocyanins and condensed tannins on 19 fermentation-related aroma compounds of young red Mencia wines were studied. Multifactor ANOVA revealed that levels of those volatiles changed significantly over the length of storage in bottles and, to a lesser extent, due to other technological factors considered; total anthocyanins and condensed tannins also changed significantly as a result of the five practices assayed. Five aroma compounds possessed an odour activity value >1 in all wines, and another four in some wines. Linear correlation among volatile compounds and general phenolic composition revealed that total anthocyanins were highly related to 14 different aroma compounds. Multifactor ANOVA, considering the content of total anthocyanins as a sixth random factor, revealed that this parameter affected significantly the contents of ethyl lactate, ethyl isovalerate, 1-pentanol and ethyl octanoate. Thus, the aroma of young red Mencia wines may be affected by levels of total anthocyanins. PMID:24262556

  19. Effects of elevated CO2 on grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.): volatile composition, phenolic content, and in vitro antioxidant activity of red wine.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Berta; Falco, Virgílio; Moutinho-Pereira, José; Bacelar, Eunice; Peixoto, Francisco; Correia, Carlos

    2009-01-14

    The impact of elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on the quality of berries, must, and red wine (with special reference to volatile composition, phenolic content, and antioxidant activity) made from Touriga Franca, a native grape variety of Vitis vinifera L. for Port and Douro wine manufacturing grown in the Demarcated Region of Douro, was investigated during 2005 and 2006. Grapevines were grown either in open-top chambers (OTC) with ambient (365 +/- 10 ppm) or elevated (500 +/-16 ppm) [CO2] or in an outside plot. In general, the increase of [CO2] did not affect berry characteristics, especially the total anthocyan and tannin concentrations. However, the total anthocyan and polyphenol concentrations of the red wine were inhibited under elevated [CO2]. The antioxidant capacity of the wines was determined by DPPH, ABTS, and TBARS assays and, despite the low concentrations of phenolics, the elevated [CO2] did not significantly change the total antioxidant capacity of the red wines. Thirty-five volatile compounds belonging to seven chemical groups were identified: C6 alcohols, higher alcohols, esters, terpenols, carbonyl compounds, acids, volatile phenols, and C13 norisoprenoids. Generally, the same volatile compounds were present in all of the wines, but the relative levels varied among the treatments. The effect of elevated [CO2] was significant because it was detected as an increase in ethyl 2-methylbutyrate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, butyric acid, and isovaleric acid concentrations and a decrease in ethyl acetate concentration when compared to wines produced in ambient [CO2] in 2005. In elevated [CO2], wines from 2006 had lower methionol, 1-octanol, and 4-ethylguaiacol and higher ethyl lactate and linalool concentrations. The increase in [CO2] did not significantly affect C6 alcohols, citronellol, carbonyl compounds, and beta-damascenone concentrations. This study showed that the predicted rise in [CO2] did not produce negative

  20. Identification of Phenolic Compounds in Red and Green Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Hulls (Exo- and Mesocarp) by HPLC-DAD-ESI-(HR)-MS(n).

    PubMed

    Erşan, Sevcan; Güçlü Üstündağ, Özlem; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2016-07-01

    Phenolic constituents of the nonlignified red and green pistachio hulls (exo- and mesocarp) were assessed by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) as well as by HR-MS. A total of 66 compounds was identified in the respective aqueous methanolic extracts. Among them, gallic acid, monogalloyl glucoside, monogalloyl quinic acid, penta-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose, hexagalloyl hexose, quercetin 3-O-galactoside, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, and (17:1)-, (13:0)-, and (13:1)-anacardic acids were detected at highest signal intensity. The main difference between red and green hulls was the presence of anthocyanins in the former ones. Differently galloylated hydrolyzable tannins, anthocyanins, and minor anacardic acids were identified for the first time. Pistachio hulls were thus shown to be a source of structurally diverse and potentially bioactive phenolic compounds. They therefore represent a valuable byproduct of pistachio processing having potential for further utilization as raw material for the recovery of pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and chemical products. PMID:27292533

  1. Phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity of yellow and purple-red Ecuadorian cultivars of tree tomato (Solanum betaceum Cav.).

    PubMed

    Espin, Susana; Gonzalez-Manzano, Susana; Taco, Verónica; Poveda, Cristina; Ayuda-Durán, Begoña; Gonzalez-Paramas, Ana M; Santos-Buelga, Celestino

    2016-03-01

    Tree tomato fruits from the yellow giant, giant purple and New Zealand purple cultivars, cultivated in Ecuador were analysed for their phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity. Twelve hydroxycinnamoyl derivatives and four anthocyanins (in the purple cultivars) were detected and identified. The hydroxycinnamoyl derivatives mostly derived from caffeic acid, being 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid and rosmarinic acid the majority compounds. Furthermore, various rosmarinic acid glucosides, caffeoyl glucoside, feruloyl glucoside and two ferulic acid dehydrodimers were tentatively identified. The presence of rosmarinic acid is particularly relevant as it constituted a majority phenolic compound in the four studied tree tomato cultivars and it had not been reported previously in this fruit. In the purple cultivars main anthocyanins were pelargonidin 3-O-rutinoside and delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside. The New Zealand purple cultivar was by far the richest sample in both hydroxycinnamates (421.6mg/100g dry pulp) and anthocyanins (168.9mg/100g dry pulp). Antioxidant capacity, as determined by FRAP, ABTS and ORAC assays, followed the same pattern as phenolic contents, with the New Zealand purple cultivar being the one with the highest and the yellow giant cultivar with the lowest values. PMID:26471655

  2. Identification of phenolic constituents in red chicory salads (Cichorium intybus) by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carazzone, Chiara; Mascherpa, Dora; Gazzani, Gabriella; Papetti, Adele

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic acids and flavonoids extracted from several types of Cichorium intybus var. silvestre salads ("Chioggia", "Treviso", "Treviso tardivo", and "Verona") were characterised by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry. Among the 64 compounds detected, several hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including 8 mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids, 3 tartaric acid derivatives, 31 flavonol and 2 flavone glycosides, as well as 10 anthocyanins were characterised based on UV spectra and MS(n) fragmentation patterns. Furthermore, several isomers of caffeic acid derivatives were distinguished for the first time by their specific mass spectral data. This is the first study reporting the glycosylation type and position of mono- and diglycosylated flavonoids in red salads. PMID:23411215

  3. Effect of different aging techniques on the polysaccharide and phenolic composition and sensory characteristics of Syrah red wines fermented using different yeast strains.

    PubMed

    del Barrio-Galán, Rubén; Medel-Marabolí, Marcela; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2015-07-15

    The effect of high levels of the polysaccharide Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain (HPS) and another conventional yeast strain (FERM) on the polysaccharide and phenolic composition of Syrah red wines during alcoholic fermentation and subsequent aging on lees, with or without oak wood chips, and on inactive dry yeast was investigated. The HPS yeast released higher amounts of polysaccharides during alcoholic fermentation than FERM yeast (485 g L(-1) and 403 g L(-1), respectively) and after the aging period (516 g L(-1) and 500 g L(-1), respectively). The different aging techniques increased the polysaccharide concentration; the concentration was dependent on the aging technique applied. The interaction of the polysaccharides with the phenolic compounds depended on the yeast strain, aging technique, aging period and compound analysed. The HPS wines exhibited better sensory characteristics than the FERM wines after alcoholic fermentation; however, during the aging period, it was difficult to determine which technique produced the best wine due to the interactions of aging technique, aging period and sensory attribute evaluated. PMID:25722146

  4. Concentrations of oligomers and polymers of proanthocyanidins in red and purple rice bran and their relationships to total phenolics, flavonoids, antioxidant capacity and whole grain color.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hsuan; McClung, Anna M; Bergman, Christine J

    2016-10-01

    Proanthocyanidins, a flavonoids subgroup, are proposed to have chronic disease modulation properties. With the eventual goal of enhancing rice phytonutrient concentrations, we investigated the genotypic variation of the concentrations of individual oligomers and polymers of proanthocyanidins in red and purple rice brans. A 4.3-fold variation in total proanthocyanidins (sum of oligomers and polymers) in the extractable fraction was found and the concentration was highly correlated with total phenolics, total flavonoids and antiradical capacity. Variation in the proportion of oligomers and polymers existed, with monomers to trimers, 4-6mers, 7-10mers and polymers accounting for 7, 18, 26.5 and 48.7%, respectively, of the total. The redness value a(∗) of whole grain rice measured in CIE L(∗)a(∗)b(∗) color space was negatively and positively correlated with extractable and non-extractable proanthocyanidins, respectively. The variation found indicates it is possible to select rice with bran containing high levels of total proanthocyanidins and specific degree of polymerization profiles. PMID:27132851

  5. Oral mucositis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation ...

  6. Antimutagenic dietary phenolics as antigenotoxic substances in urothelium of smokers.

    PubMed

    Malaveille, C; Hautefeuille, A; Pignatelli, B; Talaska, G; Vineis, P; Bartsch, H

    1998-06-18

    Human urine is known to contain substances that strongly inhibit bacterial mutagenicity of aromatic and heterocyclic amines in vitro. The biological relevance of these anti-mutagens was examined by comparing levels of tobacco-related DNA adducts in exfoliated urothelial cells from smokers with the anti-mutagenic activity in corresponding 24-h urine samples. An inverse relationship was found between the inhibition of PhIP-mutagenicity by urine extracts in vitro and two DNA adduct measurements: the level of the putatively identified ABP-dG adduct and the total level of all tobacco-smoke-related carcinogen adducts including those probably derived from PhIP. These substances appear to be dietary phenolics and/or their metabolites because (i) the anti-mutagenic activity of urine extracts (n=18) was linearly related to their content in phenolics; (ii) the concentration ranges of these substances in urine extracts were similar to those of various plant phenols (e.g., quercetin, isorhamnetin) for which an inhibitory effect on the liver S9-mediated mutagenicity of PhIP was obtained; (iii) treatment of urines with beta-glucuronidase and arylsulfatase enhanced both anti-mutagenicity and the levels of phenolics in urinary extracts; (iv) urinary extracts inhibited non-competitively the liver S9-mediated mutagenicity of PhIP as did quercetin, used as a model phenolics. Onion, lettuce, apples and red wine are important sources of dietary flavonoids which are probably responsible for the anti-mutagenicity associated with foods and beverages. After HPLC fractionation of urinary extracts, the distribution profile of anti-mutagenic activity corresponded roughly to that of onion and wine extract combined. Overall, our study strongly suggests that smokers ingesting dietary phenolics, probably flavonoids, are partially protected against the harmful effects by tobacco carcinogens within their bladder mucosal cells. PMID:9675288

  7. Mucosal dendritic cells shape mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key modulators that shape the immune system. In mucosal tissues, DCs act as surveillance systems to sense infection and also function as professional antigen-presenting cells that stimulate the differentiation of naive T and B cells. On the basis of their molecular expression, DCs can be divided into several subsets with unique functions. In this review, we focus on intestinal DC subsets and their function in bridging the innate signaling and adaptive immune systems to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal immune environment. We also review the current strategies for manipulating mucosal DCs for the development of efficient mucosal vaccines to protect against infectious diseases. PMID:24626170

  8. Bran data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and profiles of proanthocyanidins and whole grain physical traits of 32 red and purple rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hsuan; McClung, Anna M; Bergman, Christine J

    2016-09-01

    Phytochemicals in red and purple bran rice have potential health benefit to humans. We determined the phytochemicals in brans of 32 red and purple global rice varieties. The description of the origin and physical traits of the whole grain (color, length, width, thickness and 100-kernel weight) of this germplasm collection are provided along with data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity and total proanthocyanidin contents. The contents and proportions of individual oligomers, from degree of polymerization of monomers to 14-mers, and polymers in bran of these 32 rice varieties are presented (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.04.004) [1]. PMID:27257615

  9. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  10. Assessment of the chemical changes during storage of phenol-formaldehyde resins pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry, inverse gas chromatography and Fourier transform infra red methods.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, B; Voelkel, A; Zięba-Palus, J; Lachowicz, T

    2014-09-12

    The chemical changes occurring in the phenol-formaldehyde resins (resol and novolac type) during their storage were investigated. In this paper the FT-IR, py-GCMS and inverse gas chromatography methods were applied for assessment of the changes occurring during storage of the phenolic resins. We have found that during storage some examined resins occurred partial curing. The results from all techniques applied are consistent. Py-GCMS is useful technique for screening the storage processes but IGC seems to be most sensitive one. PMID:25092596

  11. Molecular mechanisms involved in the inhibition of MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells by phenolic acids from the red-flesh peach BY00P6653

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wide variety of fruits and vegetables extracts have been shown to protect against cancer cell growth in vitro. Increasing evidence suggests that phenolics compounds found in fruits and vegetables may have anticancer properties. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-proliferative...

  12. Gasoline-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.L.; Swanson, B.Z. Jr.; Lutins, N.D.

    1980-02-01

    Gasoline-induced mucositis may become more common because of fuel shortages or increased fuel cost. Dentists should, therefore, consider this oral irritant in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

  13. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  14. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  15. Mucosal delivery of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, G; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1999-09-01

    Oral delivery represents one of the most pursued approaches for large-scale human vaccination. Due to the different characteristics of mucosal immune response, as compared with systemic response, oral immunization requires particular methods of antigen preparation and selective strategies of adjuvanticity. In this paper, we describe the preparation and use of genetically detoxified bacterial toxins as mucosal adjuvants and envisage the possibility of their future exploitation for human oral vaccines. PMID:10525451

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on phenol content, antioxidant activity and biological activity of black maca and red maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii walp).

    PubMed

    Zevallos-Concha, A; Nuñez, D; Gasco, M; Vasquez, C; Quispe, M; Gonzales, G F

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on UV spectrum on maca, total content of polyphenols, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activities and in vivo biological activities of red and black maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii). Adult mice of the strain Swiss aged 3 months and weighing 30-35 g in average were used to determine biological activities. Daily sperm production, effect on testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia and forced swimming test were used to determine the effect of irradiation on biological activities of maca extracts. Irradiation did not show differences in UV spectrum but improves the amount of total polyphenols in red maca as well as in black maca extracts. In both cases, black maca extract has more content of polyphenols than red maca extract (p < 0.01). Gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant capacity (p < 0.05). No difference was observed in daily sperm production when irradiated and nonirradiated maca extract were administered to mice (p > 0.05). Black maca extract but not red maca extract has more swimming endurance capacity in the forced swimming test. Irradiation of black maca extract increased the swimming time to exhaustion (p < 0.05). This is not observed with red maca extract (p > 0.05). Testosterone enanthate (TE) increased significantly the ventral prostate weight. Administration of red maca extract in animals treated with TE prevented the increase in prostate weight. Irradiation did not modify effect of red maca extract on prostate weight (p > 0.05). In conclusion, irradiation does not alter the biological activities of both black maca and red maca extracts. It prevents the presence of microorganisms in the extracts of black or red maca, but the biological activities were maintained. PMID:26633045

  17. RUMINAL MICRO-ORGANISMS DO NOT ADAPT TO INCREASE UTILIZATION OF POLY-PHENOL OXIDASE PROTECTED RED CLOVER PROTEIN AND GLYCEROL-BASED LIPID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), reduces the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis within red clover fed to ruminants with subsequent increases in the efficiency of N utilization and the level of beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids in their products (meat and milk). It has also been reported t...

  18. Pervaporation of phenols

    DOEpatents

    Boddeker, K.W.

    1989-02-21

    Aqueous phenolic solutions are separated by pervaporation to yield a phenol-depleted retentate and a phenol-enriched permeate. The separation effect is enhanced by phase segregation into two immiscible phases, phenol in water'' (approximately 10% phenol), and water in phenol'' (approximately 70% phenol). Membranes capable of enriching phenols by pervaporation include elastomeric polymers and anion exchange membranes, membrane selection and process design being guided by pervaporation performance and chemical stability towards phenolic solutions. Single- and multiple-stage processes are disclosed, both for the enrichment of phenols and for purification of water from phenolic contamination. 8 figs.

  19. Pervaporation of phenols

    DOEpatents

    Boddeker, Karl W.

    1989-01-01

    Aqueous phenolic solutions are separated by pervaporation to yield a phenol-depleted retentate and a phenol-enriched permeate. The separation effect is enhanced by phase segregation into two immiscible phases, "phenol in water" (approximately 10% phenol), and "water in phenol" (approximately 70% phenol). Membranes capable of enriching phenols by pervaporation include elastomeric polymers and anion exchange membranes, membrane selection and process design being guided by pervaporation performance and chemical stability towards phenolic solutions. Single- and multiple-stage procresses are disclosed, both for the enrichment of phenols and for purification of water from phenolic contamination.

  20. Simplified method for the screening of technological maturity of red grape and total phenolic compounds of red grape skin: application of the characteristic vector method to near-infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Nogales-Bueno, Julio; Ayala, Fernando; Hernández-Hierro, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Pulido, Francisco José; Echávarri, José Federico; Heredia, Francisco José

    2015-05-01

    Characteristic vector analysis has been applied to near-infrared spectra to extract the main spectral information from hyperspectral images. For this purpose, 3, 6, 9, and 12 characteristic vectors have been used to reconstruct the spectra, and root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) have been calculated to measure the differences between characteristic vector reconstructed spectra (CVRS) and hyperspectral imaging spectra (HIS). RMSE values obtained were 0.0049, 0.0018, 0.0012, and 0.0012 [log(1/R) units] for spectra allocated into the validation set, for 3, 6, 9, and 12 characteristic vectors, respectively. After that, calibration models have been developed and validated using the different groups of CVRS to predict skin total phenolic concentration, sugar concentration, titratable acidity, and pH by modified partial least-squares (MPLS) regression. The obtained results have been compared to those previously obtained from HIS. The models developed from the CVRS reconstructed from 12 characteristic vectors present similar values of coefficients of determination (RSQ) and standard errors of prediction (SEP) than the models developed from HIS. RSQ and SEP were 0.84 and 1.13 mg g(-1) of skin grape (expressed as gallic acid equivalents), 0.93 and 2.26 °Brix, 0.97 and 3.87 g L(-1) (expressed as tartaric acid equivalents), and 0.91 and 0.14 for skin total phenolic concentration, sugar concentration, titratable acidity, and pH, respectively, for the models developed from the CVRS reconstructed from 12 characteristic vectors. PMID:25897561

  1. Berry phenolics and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Kähkönen, M P; Hopia, A I; Heinonen, M

    2001-08-01

    Phenolic profiles of a total of 26 berry samples, together with 2 apple samples, were analyzed without hydrolysis of glycosides with HPLC. The phenolic contents among different berry genera varied considerably. Anthocyanins were the main phenolic constituents in bilberry, bog-whortleberry, and cranberry, but in cowberries, belonging also to the family Ericaceae genus Vaccinium, flavanols and procyanidins predominated. In the family Rosaceae genus Rubus (cloudberry and red raspberry), the main phenolics found were ellagitannins, and in genus Fragaria (strawberry), ellagitannins were the second largest group after anthocyanins. However, phenolic acids were dominant in rowanberries (genus Sorbus) and anthocyanins in chokeberry (genus Aronia). In the family Grossulariaceae genus Ribes (currants and gooseberry), anthocyanins predominated, as well as in crowberries (family Empetraceae genus Empetrum). In apples, hydroxycinnamic acids were the main phenolic subgroup. Extraction methods for berries and apples were studied to produce phenolic extracts with high antioxidant activity. Evaluation of antioxidant activity was performed by autoxidazing methyl linoleate (40 degrees C, in the dark). The extraction method affected remarkably both the phenolic composition and the antioxidant activity, but with statistical analysis the observed activity could not be well explained with the contents of individual phenolic subgroups. PMID:11513713

  2. Experience with registered mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Guido; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Lang, Alois B; Viret, Jean-François

    2003-01-30

    Most pathogens gain access to their host through mucosal surfaces. It is therefore desirable to develop vaccination strategies that lead to mucosal immune responses. Ideally, a vaccine should be administered mucosally in order to elicit mucosal protection. Several attenuated live viral and bacterial pathogens are registered as oral vaccines for human use, including the oral polio vaccine (Sabin) as well as attenuated strains of Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. These attenuated bacterial live vaccines-S. typhi Ty21a as well as V. cholerae CVD 103-HgR-are employed as vaccines against typhoid and cholera, respectively. In this manuscript, we review the immune responses that are induced by these vaccines, with a focus on mucosal immunity. PMID:12531339

  3. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties. PMID:21741878

  4. The molecular immunology of mucositis: implications for evidence-based research in alternative and complementary palliative treatments.

    PubMed

    Chiappelli, Francesco

    2005-12-01

    The terms 'mucositis' and 'stomatitis' are often used interchangeably. Mucositis, however, pertains to pharyngeal-esophago-gastrointestinal inflammation that manifests as red, burn-like sores or ulcerations throughout the mouth. Stomatitis is an inflammation of the oral tissues proper, which can present with or without sores, and is made worse by poor dental hygiene. Mucositis is observed in a variety of immunosuppressed patients, but is most often consequential to cancer therapy. It appears as early as the third day of intervention, and is usually established by Day 7 of treatment. Mucositis increases mortality and morbidity and contributes to rising health care costs. The precise immune components involved in the etiology of mucositis are unclear, but evidence-based research (EBR) data has shown that applications of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor prevent the onset or the exacerbation of oropharyngeal mucositis. The molecular implications of this observation are discussed from the perspective of future developments of complementary and alternative treatments for this condition. It must be emphasized that this article is meant to be neither a review on mucositis and the various treatments for it, nor a discussion paper on its underlying molecular immunology. It is a statement of the implications of EBR for CAM-based interventions for mucositis. It explores and discusses the specific domain of molecular immunology in the context of mucositis and its direct implications for EBR research in CAM-based treatments for mucositis. PMID:16322806

  5. Dietary phenolics as anti-mutagens and inhibitors of tobacco-related DNA adduction in the urothelium of smokers.

    PubMed

    Malaveille, C; Hautefeuille, A; Pignatelli, B; Talaska, G; Vineis, P; Bartsch, H

    1996-10-01

    -mutagenic substances and phenolics; more lipophilic phenolics displayed the highest specific inhibitory activity. This suggests that enzymatic conversion of dietary flavonoids into their more lipophilic and anti-mutagenic O-methylcatechol derivatives, as noted for quercetin, may occur in vivo in man. Onion, lettuce, apples and red wine are important sources of dietary flavonoids which are probably responsible for the anti-mutagenicity associated with foods and beverages. After HPLC fractionation of urinary extracts, the distribution profile of anti-mutagenic activity corresponded roughly to that of onion and wine extract combined. Our study strongly suggests that smokers ingesting dietary phenolics, probably flavonoids, are partially protected against the harmful effects by tobacco carcinogens within their bladder mucosal cells. This protective effect of dietary phenolics against the cancer of the bladder (and possibly other sites) should be verified and explored as a part of a chemoprevention strategy. PMID:8895488

  6. Phenol removal pretreatment process

    DOEpatents

    Hames, Bonnie R.

    2004-04-13

    A process for removing phenols from an aqueous solution is provided, which comprises the steps of contacting a mixture comprising the solution and a metal oxide, forming a phenol metal oxide complex, and removing the complex from the mixture.

  7. Intestinal mucosal tolerance and impact of gut microbiota to mucosal tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Kozarov, Emil; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers are very sensitive to pathogenic infection, thereby assuming the capacity of the mucosal immune system to induce protective immunity to harmful antigens and tolerance against harmless substances. This review provides current information about mechanisms of induction of mucosal tolerance and about impact of gut microbiota to mucosal tolerance. PMID:25628617

  8. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  9. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  10. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  11. Bran data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and profiles of proanthocyanidins and whole grain physical traits of 32 red and purple rice varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemicals in red and purple bran rice have potential health benefit to humans. We determined the phytochemicals in brans of 32 red and purple global rice varieties. The description of the origin and physical traits of the whole grain (color, length, width, thickness and 100-kernel weight) of th...

  12. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal adjuvant candidates when compared with other substances that can be used as mucosal adjuvants. The strategy of a DNA-based mucosal adjuvant facilitates the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells, and thus is an effective and safe approach. It would also provide great flexibility for the development of effective vaccines for various mucosal pathogens. PMID:19722892

  13. Mucosal vaccination: lung versus nose.

    PubMed

    Vujanic, Ana; Sutton, Philip; Snibson, Kenneth J; Yen, Hung-Hsun; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2012-07-15

    The induction of potent mucosal immune responses able to prevent the establishment of infection at the onset of mucosal pathogen colonisation represents a desirable but challenging goal for vaccine development. Here we compare nasal vaccine delivery with intra-pulmonary vaccination using a sheep lymphatic cannulation model. Our results demonstrate that nasal delivery of a non-infective ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine does not induce primary immune responses in the lymph draining the nasal lymph nodes, suggesting that local immune responses in the lymph nodes draining the nasal cavity are relatively weak. However, this mode of delivery can boost existing immunity in the nasal lymph. Using the same adjuvant we were able to induce very potent immune responses in both blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), following intra-pulmonary delivery of ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine, even when very small doses of antigen were employed. Lung delivery could also induce comparable immune responses against other recombinant antigens mixed with ISCOMATRIX(®) adjuvant and could therefore become a method of choice for the induction of immunity to mucosal pathogens infecting the lower respiratory tract. PMID:21492942

  14. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  15. Mucosal Immunology of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Berin, M. Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in IgE sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors such as dietary factors and microbiota in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy. PMID:23660362

  16. Phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in algal food products.

    PubMed

    Machu, Ludmila; Misurcova, Ladislava; Ambrozova, Jarmila Vavra; Orsavova, Jana; Mlcek, Jiri; Sochor, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate total phenolic content using Folin-Ciocalteu's method, to assess nine phenols by HPLC, to determine antioxidant capacity of the water soluble compounds (ACW) by a photochemiluminescence method, and to calculate the correlation coefficients in commercial algal food products from brown (Laminaria japonica, Eisenia bicyclis, Hizikia fusiformis, Undaria pinnatifida) and red (Porphyra tenera, Palmaria palmata) seaweed, green freshwater algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa), and cyanobacteria (Spirulina platensis). HPLC analysis showed that the most abundant phenolic compound was epicatechin. From spectrophotometry and ACW determination it was evident that brown seaweed Eisenia bicyclis was the sample with the highest phenolic and ACW values (193 mg·g-1 GAE; 7.53 µmol AA·g-1, respectively). A linear relationship existed between ACW and phenolic contents (r = 0.99). Some algal products seem to be promising functional foods rich in polyphenols. PMID:25587787

  17. Herpetiform genital lesions in a heifer with mucosal disease.

    PubMed

    Fabis, J J; Szkudlarek, L; Risatti, G R; Sura, R; Garmendia, A E; Van Kruiningen, H J

    2008-03-01

    A 14-month-old heifer with a 17-day history of unresponsive bloody diarrhea was necropsied. There were focal, pink-red erosions of the nares and hard palate; ulcers and fissures of the tongue; and multiple ulcerative lesions of the alimentary canal. Interdigital skin of both rear limbs was ulcerated and bleeding; and the margins of the vulva contained punctiform red ulcers. The gross lesions were consistent with mucosal disease. Histopathology and laboratory testing ruled out rinderpest, foot-and-mouth disease, and vesicular stomatitis, and identified bovine virus diarrhea virus to be the cause of this disease. Lesions of the vulva similar to those seen in some stages of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis were negative for bovine herpesvirus-1 and tested positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by immunohistochemistry. PMID:18424837

  18. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  19. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  20. Bromination of Phenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  1. REVIEW OF CHLORINATED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorinated phenols are a group of 19 isomers composed of phenol with substituted chlorines. These chemicals are readily soluble in organic solvents but only slightly soluble in water, except for the chlorophenate salts. Chlorophenols with less than 3 chlorines are not used e...

  2. Lipid encapsulated phenolics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds have numerous health benefits when included in the human diet and have emerged as a functional food and feed additive. Current sources of phenolics include commodity grains such as corn, oat, and wheat but may also be obtained as a co-product from agricultural residues and other l...

  3. Botanical phenolics and brain health

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Albert Y.; Wang, Qun; Simonyi, Agnes; Sun, Grace Y.

    2009-01-01

    The high demand for molecular oxygen, the enrichment of polyunsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids and the relatively low abundance of antioxidant defense enzymes are factors rendering cells in the central nervous system (CNS) particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain has been implicated as a common underlying factor for the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. While ROS are generated by enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions in the mitochondria and cytoplasm under normal conditions, excessive production under pathological conditions is associated with activation of Ca2+-dependent enzymes including proteases, phospholipases, nucleases, and alterations of signaling pathways which subsequently lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, release of inflammatory factors and apoptosis. In recent years, there is considerable interest to investigate anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic compounds from different botanical sources. In this review, we describe oxidative mechanisms associated with AD, PD, and stroke, and evaluate neuroprotective effects of phenolic compounds, such as resveratrol from grape and red wine, curcumin from turmeric, apocynin from Picrorhiza kurroa, and epi-gallocatechin from green tea. The main goal is to provide a better understanding of the mode of action of these compounds and assess their use as therapeutics to ameliorate age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19191039

  4. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  5. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  6. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  7. Respiratory mucosal permeability in asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, R.K.; Kennedy, S.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.; Pare, P.D.

    1983-09-01

    The permeability of respiratory mucosa to technetium-labeled diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) was measured in 10 clinically stable chronic asthmatics and the results were compared with those in 9 nonasthmatic control subjects. Nonspecific bronchial reactivity was measured using methacholine, and the PC20 was calculated. The intrapulmonary distribution and dose of the inhaled /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was determined by a gamma camera and the half-life of the aerosolized label in the lung was calculated. The accumulation of radioactivity in the blood was monitored and a permeability index was calculated at 10, 25, and 60 min after aerosolization. Despite marked differences in airway reactivity, no differences in either parameter of permeability could be detected between the asthmatics and the control group. It is concluded that clinically stable asthmatics do not demonstrate increase mucosal permeability to small solutes when compared with normal subjects.

  8. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  9. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  10. Palliation of radiation-related mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, B.R.; Spektor, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oral mucositis associated with head and neck radiotherapy can substantially hinder completion of cancer therapy. Alleviation of this often severe stomatitis can provide enhanced patient comfort and facilitate appropriate care. A double-blind format was used in a pilot project to measure, against a control rinse, the effectiveness of an oral rinse consisting of hydrocortisone, nystatin, tetracycline, and diphenhydramine in controlling radiation-related mucositis. A combination of clinical evaluation and patient responses to a questionnaire was used to judge the results of the topical medications. Patients using the experimental medication developed less mucositis than did patients in the control group.

  11. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, C.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms.

  12. Phenolic compound in beans as protection against mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Telles, Annie Campello; Kupski, Larine; Furlong, Eliana Badiale

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic compounds, their inhibitory activity against fungal amylase and the occurrence of aflatoxins were determined in edible beans. The free, conjugated and bounded phenolic compounds and their phenolic acid profiles were determined in ten bean varieties. A method for aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2 determination and confirmation by LC-MS/MS was validated. The red and carioca beans presented the highest total phenolic content (1.8 and 1.2mg.g(-1), respectively); the fradinho and white beans the lowest (0.18 and 0.19mg.g(-1), respectively). In the free and conjugated forms, chlorogenic acid was present in 60% of the samples, while in the bounded phenolic, ferulic acid was in 90% of the samples. The phenolic extracts were able to inhibit fungal amylase, and the PCA analysis confirmed that the relation between the chlorogenic and gallic acids is important to this effect. The absence of aflatoxins in samples confirm the protector effects of these phenolic compounds. PMID:27507478

  13. Characterisation of phenolics, betanins and antioxidant activities in seeds of three Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genotypes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Li, Xihong; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Peter X; Liu, Ronghua; Tsao, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is known for its exceptional nutritional value and potential health benefits. The present study identified the composition of different forms of extractable phenolics and betacyanins of quinoa cultivars in white, red and black, and how they contribute to antioxidant activities. Results showed that at least 23 phenolic compounds were found in either free or conjugated forms (liberated by alkaline and/or acid hydrolysis); the majority of which were phenolic acids, mainly vanillic acid, ferulic acid and their derivatives as well as main flavonoids quercetin, kaempferol and their glycosides. Betacyanins, mainly betanin and isobetanin, were confirmed for the first time to be the pigments of the red and black quinoa seeds, instead of anthocyanins. Darker quinoa seeds had higher phenolic concentration and antioxidant activity. Findings of these phenolics, along with betacyanins in this study add new knowledge to the functional components of quinoa seeds of different cultivar background. PMID:25053071

  14. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  15. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions. PMID:27168245

  16. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization.

    PubMed

    McCall, Ingrid C; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W; Parkos, Charles A

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains. PMID:19679145

  17. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains. PMID:19679145

  18. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  19. Localized Pemphigus Vegetans without Mucosal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Jain, VK; Jindal, N; Imchen, S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is a rare variant of pemphigus vulgaris. A 62-year-old woman presented with erythematous moist vegetative plaque on the left breast and left groin. There was no mucosal involvement. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence findings were suggestive of pemphigus vegetans. She showed excellent response to oral steroids. Literature is scarcely available on the limited involvement with pemphigus vegetans without mucosal involvement. PMID:24700958

  20. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to worry about. ...

  1. Red Clover

    MedlinePlus

    ... 17):2057–2071. Red clover. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July 22, 2009. Red clover ( Trifolium pratense ). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturalstandard.com on July ...

  2. Intestinal inflammation and mucosal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Romero-Calvo, Isabel; Mascaraque, Cristina; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier function is the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. The central element is the epithelial layer, which physically separates the lumen and the internal milieu and is in charge of vectorial transport of ions, nutrients, and other substances. The secretion of mucus-forming mucins, sIgA, and antimicrobial peptides reinforces the mucosal barrier on the extraepithelial side, while a variety of immune cells contributes to mucosal defense in the inner side. Thus, the mucosal barrier is of physical, biochemical, and immune nature. In addition, the microbiota may be viewed as part of this system because of the mutual influence occurring between the host and the luminal microorganisms. Alteration of the mucosal barrier function with accompanying increased permeability and/or bacterial translocation has been linked with a variety of conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic and environmental factors may converge to evoke a defective function of the barrier, which in turn may lead to overt inflammation of the intestine as a result of an exacerbated immune reaction toward the microbiota. According to this hypothesis, inflammatory bowel disease may be both precipitated and treated by either stimulation or downregulation of the different elements of the mucosal barrier, with the outcome depending on timing, the cell type affected, and other factors. In this review, we cover briefly the elements of the barrier and their involvement in functional defects and the resulting phenotype. PMID:25222662

  3. Role of bombesin on gut mucosal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K U; Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the effects of exogenous bombesin (BBS) on gut mucosal growth in chow-fed rats and the mucosal regeneration after gut atrophy brought about by feeding an elemental diet and after intestinal injury produced by methotrexate (MTX). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Bombesin is one of many gastrointestinal peptides implicated in the regulation of gut mucosal growth. Although BBS is known to stimulate growth of normal pancreatic tissue, the trophic effect of BBS on gut mucosa is less clear and its exact role in gut mucosal regeneration and repair is not known. METHODS: Rats were fed a regular chow diet (control) or an elemental diet plus either saline or BBS (10 micrograms/kg). In another experiment, rats fed a chow diet and treated with saline or BBS were given MTX (20 micrograms/kg) or a single intraperitoneal injection. In all experiments, small and large bowel mucosa and pancreas were removed and analyzed for BBS-mediated proliferation. RESULTS: Bombesin produced significant mucosal proliferation of the small bowel at day 14, but not at day 7, in rats fed regular chow. In contrast, BBS treatment for 7 days produced significant proliferation in both the atrophic and injured gut mucosa of rats given elemental diet or MTX. CONCLUSIONS: Bombesin may be an important enterotrophic factor for normal mucosal proliferation and may be clinically beneficial as an agent to restore or maintain gut mucosa during periods of atrophy or injury. PMID:7618976

  4. Mucosal Immunology of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in the immunology, pathogenesis, and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continue to reveal clues to the mechanisms involved in the progressive immunodeficiency attributed to infection but more importantly have shed light on the correlates of immunity to infection and disease progression. HIV selectively infects, eliminates, and/or dysregulates several key cells of the human immune system, thwarting multiple arms of the host immune response, and inflicting severe damage to mucosal barriers, resulting in tissue infiltration of ‘symbiotic’ intestinal bacteria and viruses that essentially become opportunistic infections promoting systemic immune activation. This leads to activation and recruitment or more target cells for perpetuating HIV infection, resulting in persistent, high level viral replication in lymphoid tissues, rapid evolution of resistant strains, and continued evasion of immune responses. However, vaccine studies and studies of spontaneous controllers are finally providing correlates of immunity from protection and disease progression, including virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, binding antibodies, innate immune responses, and generation of antibodies with potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity. Emerging correlates of immunity indicate that prevention of HIV infection may be possible through effective vaccine strategies that protect and stimulate key regulatory cells and immune responses in susceptible hosts. Further, immune therapies specifically directed towards boosting specific aspects of the immune system may eventually lead to a cure for HIV-infected patients. PMID:23772612

  5. Red clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is an important forage legume grown on approximately 4 million hectares worldwide. An estimated 2.8 million kg of red clover seed per year was produced worldwide in 2005-2007. This amount of seed would be enough to maintain approximately 4 million hectares of red...

  6. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  7. Antioxidant activity of some foods containing phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, S; El, S N; Taş, A A

    2001-11-01

    This study was designed to determine the total phenols (TP) and total antioxidant activity (TAA) of some liquid and solid plant foods that are commonly consumed in Turkey. Total phenols were analysed according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method and antioxidant activities of these compounds in aqueous phase were assessed by measuring their direct ABTS.- radical scavenging abilities. Total phenols varied from 68 to 4162 mg/l for liquid foods and from 735 to 3994 mg/kg for solid foods. TAA of liquid and solid foods ranged between 0.61-6.78 mM and 0.63-8.62 mM, respectively. Total antioxidant activities of foods were well correlated with total phenols (r2 = 0.95). According to content of total phenols per serving, liquid foods were in the order of black tea > instant coffee > coke > red wine > violet carrot juice > apricot nectar > Turkish coffee > grape molasses > sage > white wine > linden flower, and solid foods were in the order of red grape > raisins > tarhana > dried black plum > dried apricot > grape > fresh paprika > fresh black plum > Urtica sp. > cherry > fresh apricot > paprika pickle > paprika paste. PMID:11570016

  8. THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF PHENOLICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a series of anaerobic microbial acclimation and treatment performance tests with synthetic phenolic substrates. The research is a feasibility level assessment of substituting anaerobic biodegradation of phenolics for solvent extraction. The tests showe...

  9. Bound Phenolics of Quinoa Seeds Released by Acid, Alkaline, and Enzymatic Treatments and Their Antioxidant and α-Glucosidase and Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Effects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xihong; Chen, Peter X; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Ronghua; Tsao, Rong

    2016-03-01

    Unextractable phenolics from plant foods and their role in health benefits have become increasingly important. Meal residues of three quinoa seeds free of fat and extractable phenolics were subjected to acid, alkaline, and enzymatic hydrolyses. The total and individual phenolic compounds released were analyzed, and 19 phenolics, predominantly phenolic acids and several flavonoids, were identified. The concentration of bound phenolics was highest in black quinoa followed by red and white, regardless of the hydrolysis method. Higher phenolic contents also showed stronger antioxidant activities and inhibition of α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase activities. Carbohydrases, that is, pectinase, xylanase and feruloyl esterase, which effectively liberated bound phenolics are known to be secreted by colonic bacteria, suggesting potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects by these compounds in the large intestine during colonic fermentation. These results can also be applied to treat foods high in bound phenolics to enhance bioaccessibility. PMID:26853559

  10. [Immunoglobulin for prevention of radiogenic mucositis].

    PubMed

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Thilmann, C; Saran, F; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1995-07-01

    Among various therapies administered during radiation-induced mucositis, treatment with immunoglobulin has proven clinically successful. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic applications of immunoglobulin was investigated from January 1992 through August 1993. Forty-two patients with histologically-proven head and neck cancer were given postoperative radiation treatment. In cases with macroscopic tumor residues or inoperability, combined radio-chemotherapy was given. This included 51.3 Gy at 1.9 Gy 5x/week, boosted to 10-26 Gy at 2 Gy 5x/week and carboplatin 60 mg/m2 at days 1-5 and 29-33. Panthenol (4x10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day) were given to 20 patients as prophylactic treatment for mucositis. Twenty-two subsequent patients also received intramuscular 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin (1x/week). According to the Seegenschmiedt/Sauer classification the extent of mucositis was determined 3x/week. Comparison of the distribution of maximal mucositis revealed a slightly more severe mucosal reaction in the control group (n.s.). Analysis of the mean degree of mucositis in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (p = 0.031) related to the whole collective and patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy while no effect of immunoglobulin was found in patients treated by radiation alone. In the immunoglobulin-treated-group, the time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption was prolonged 5 days (37.5 +/- 13.1 vs. 42.7 +/- 13.3 days), but this difference was not significant. Although prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seemed to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis, this effect was less significant when compared to the immunoglobulin given in a therapeutic manner. PMID:7672999

  11. Phenol and phenolics from lignocellulosic biomass by catalytic microwave pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Wang, Lu; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Zhang, Qin; Tang, Juming; Ruan, Roger

    2011-07-01

    Catalytic microwave pyrolysis of biomass using activated carbon was investigated to determine the effects of pyrolytic conditions on the yields of phenol and phenolics. The high concentrations of phenol (38.9%) and phenolics (66.9%) were obtained at the temperature of 589 K, catalyst-to-biomass ratio of 3:1 and retention time of 8 min. The increase of phenol and its derivatives compared to pyrolysis without catalysts has a close relationship with the decomposition of lignin under the performance of activated carbon. The concentration of esters was also increased using activated carbon as a catalyst. The high content of phenols obtained in this study can be used either directly as fuel after upgrading or as feedstock of biobased phenols for chemical industry.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  13. [Direct and indirect mucosal wave imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Krasnodębska, Paulina; Szkiełkowska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    The vocal folds play a key role in the process of phonation. Cyclical movements of the vocal folds model a space called glottis, what leads to voice formation. The space contains surface between the vocal folds and the inner surface of the arytenoid cartilages. The best indicator of the vocal folds vibratory function is the mucosal wave. The presence and size of the mucosal wave is widely recognized as an indicator of tension and plasticity of vocal folds. It is also essential in the process of creating a proper, resonant voice. In the article, current knowledge of mucosal wave imaging techniques is given. Imaging can be carried out directly and indirectly. Among the direct methods, the following are distinguished: laryngostroboscopy, laryngovideostroboscopy, videokymography and high-speed digital imaging. Indirect methods include: electroglottography, photoglottography and ultrasonography. PMID:27137829

  14. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  15. Toughening of phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongbin

    2003-06-01

    Phenolic foam has excellent FST performance with relatively low cost, and thus is an attractive material for many applications. However, it is extremely brittle and fragile, precluding it from load-bearing applications. In order to make it tougher and more viable for structural purposes, an effective approach has been proposed and investigated in this study. Composite phenolic foam with short fiber reinforcements resulted in significant improvement in mechanical performance while retaining FST properties comparable to conventional phenolic foam. For example, composite phenolic foam with aramid fibers exhibited a seven-fold increase in peel resistance together with a five-fold reduction in friability. In shear tests, aramid composite foam endured prolonged loading to high levels of strain, indicating the potential for use in structural applications. On the other hand, glass fiber-reinforced phenolic foam produced substantial improvement in the stiffness and strength relative to the unreinforced counterpart. In particular, the Young's modulus of the glass fiber composite foam was increased by as much as 100% relative to the plain phenolic foam in the foam rise direction. In addition, different mechanical behavior was observed for aramid and glass fiber-reinforced foams. In an attempt to understand the mechanical behavior of composite foam, a novel NDT technique, micro-CT, was used to acquire information on fiber length distribution (FLD) and fiber orientation distribution (FOD). Results from micro-CT measurements were compared with theoretical distribution models, achieving various degrees of agreement. Despite some limitations of current micro-CT technology, the realistic observation and measurement of cellular morphology and fiber distribution within composite foams portend future advances in modeling of reinforced polymer foam. To explain the discrepancy observed in shear stiffness between traditional shear test results and those by the short sandwich beam test, a

  16. Oral mucosal diseases: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal diseases encompass several common conditions that affect the general population. Some of these disorders present with signs and symptoms that are pathognomonic for the condition, whereas others present with similar features that can make clinical diagnosis difficult to achieve. It is important for physicians to have a clear understanding of these disorders to provide appropriate care to patients. This article reviews clinical aspects of common oral mucosal disorders, including candidiasis, herpes simplex viral infections, aphthous stomatitis, lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, and mucous membrane pemphigoid. PMID:25443679

  17. Oral mucositis in myelosuppressive cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J B; Schubert, M M

    1999-09-01

    Because the etiology of mucositis is multifactorial , approaches to prevention and management have also been multifactorial. Effective prevention and management of mucositis will reduce the pain and suffering experienced during cancer treatment. Oropharyngeal pain in cancer patients frequently requires systemic analgesics, adjunctive medications, physical therapy, and psychologic therapy in addition to oral care and topical treatments. Good oral hygiene reduces the severity of oral mucositis and does not increase the risk of bacteremia. Current approaches to management include frequent oral rinsing with saline or bicarbonate rinses, maintaining excellent oral hygiene, and using topical anesthetics and analgesics. Cryotherapy is a potential adjunctive approach in some cases. There are a number of approaches that appear to represent viable candidates for further study. Biologic response modifiers offer the potential for prevention and for acceleration of healing. Various cytokines will enter clinical trials in the near future; these offer the potential for reduction of epithelial cell sensitivity to the toxic effects of cancer therapy or for stimulation of repair of the damaged tissue. Other approaches include the use of medications to reduce exposure of the oral mucosa to chemotherapeutic drugs that are secreted in saliva. Antimicrobial approaches have met with conflicting results, little effect being seen with chlorhexidine and systemic antimicrobials in the prevention of mucositis in radiation patients. In patients with BMT and patients with leukemia, chlorhexidine may not be effective in preventing mucositis, although there may be reduction in oral colonization by Candida. Initial studies of topical antimicrobials that affect the gram-negative oral flora have shown reductions in ulcerative mucositis during radiation therapy but have not been assessed in leukemia/BMT. Among other approaches that require further study are low-energy lasers and anti

  18. Indirect electroanalytical detection of phenols.

    PubMed

    Kolliopoulos, Athanasios V; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2015-05-01

    A novel indirect electrochemical protocol for the electroanalytical detection of phenols is presented for the first time. This methodology is demonstrated with the indirect determination of the target analytes phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol through an electrochemically adapted optical protocol. This electrochemical adaptation allows the determination of the above mentioned phenols without the use of any oxidising agents, as is the case in the optical method, where pyrazoline compounds (mediators) chemically react with the target phenols forming a quinoneimine product which is electrochemically active providing an indirect analytical signal to measure the target phenol(s). A range of commercially available pyrazoline substitution products, namely 4-dimethylaminoantipyrine, antipyrine, 3-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2-pyrazolin-5-one, 3-amino-1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-Pyrazolin-5-one, 4-amino-1,2-dimethyl-3-pentadecyl-3-pyrazolin-5-one hydrochloride, 3-amino-1-(2-amino-4-methylsulfonylphenyl)-2-pyrazolin-5-one hydrochloride and 4-aminoantipyrine are evaluated as mediators for the indirect detection of phenols. The indirect electrochemical detection of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol through the use of 4-aminoantipyrine as a mediator are successfully determined in drinking water samples at analytically useful levels. Finally, the comparison of the direct (no mediator) and the proposed indirect determination (with 4-aminoantipyrine) towards the analytical detection of the target phenols in drinking water is presented. The limitation of the proposed electroanalytical protocol is quantified for all the four target phenols. PMID:25771897

  19. Studies on phenolation of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, D.K.; Mishra, S.

    2000-05-01

    Phenols, cresols, di- and trihydric phenols, {beta}-naphthol, chloro- and nitrophenols, aromatic ethers, and so forth, can be used to phenolate coals and lignites in the presence of acid catalysts. This reaction can also be catalyzed by light. The use of various phenols, catalysts, and promoters has been studied for the phenolation of various coals and lignites. Various reaction conditions have been optimized. Several Lewis acids, including inexpensive compounds, have been reported to act as catalysts for this reaction. Various bituminous coals and Neyveli lignite have been used for this reaction. Phenols recovered as hazardous wastes may be used for this reaction. Phenolation of low-grade coals may increase their volatile matter content and calorific values. Thus, the phenolation process may serve twin purposes, that is, it may help in the utilization of phenols from hazardous industrial wastes and at the same time the low-grade coals may be upgraded. However, further research work on the application of this reaction may be required before considering its use in waste treatment or utilization. Organorefining of phenolated coals may afford cleaner coal in high yields.

  20. Plasma Cell Mucositis of Oro- and Hypopharynx: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, Mark; Lieder, Anja; Issing, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To raise awareness of plasma cell mucositis as a rare differential diagnosis for oral mucosal ulceration and its macroscopic similarity to malignancy. Method. We report a patient who presented with oral features suggestive of malignancy. A biopsy revealed plasma cell mucositis. Results. The patient successfully had a full excision of one lesion and a spontaneous resolution of the other. Conclusion. With the increasing incidence of oral mucosal pathology, physicians should be aware of this differential diagnosis. PMID:22953106

  1. Vascular basis of mucosal color

    PubMed Central

    Kleinheinz, Johannes; Büchter, André; Fillies, Thomas; Joos, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Background Besides the color of the teeth the color of the alveolar gingiva plays a crucial role in esthetic rehabilitation in dento-alveolar treatment. Whereas nowadays the color of the teeth can be determined exactly and individually, the specific influence of the red color of the gingiva on treatment has not been assessed yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vascularization as the basis for gingival esthetics. Methods Standardized photographs of defined areas of the alveolar gingiva in operated and non-operated patients were taken and assigned to groups with same characteristics after color comparisons. In addition, histologic and immunohistologic analyses of gingival specimens were performed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vessels and vascularization. Finally, colors and number of vessels were correlated. Results Our results demonstrated three different constellations of colors of the alveolar gingiva in healthy patients. The operated patients could not be grouped because of disparate depiction. There was a clear correlation between color and vessel number in the alveolar gingiva. Conclusion Our investigations revealed the connections between vascularization and gingival color. Recommendations for specific change or even selection of colors based on the results cannot be given, but the importance of vascularly based incision lines was demonstrated. PMID:16270929

  2. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  3. New frontiers in mucosal health in aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic decline in sequencing costs brought about by a shift in the last 5-10 years to massively parallel sequencing platforms has far-reaching consequences for the study of mucosal health in aquaculture. Transcriptome sequencing and gene expression profiling (RNA-seq) offer a rapid approach t...

  4. CpG DNA as mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-09-01

    We have previously found synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs to be a potent adjuvant to protein administered by intramuscular injection or intranasal inhalation to BALB/c mice. Herein we have further evaluated the potential of CpG ODN as a mucosal adjuvant to purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) when administered alone or with cholera toxin (CT). CpG ODN and CT both augmented systemic (humoral and cellular) and mucosal immune responses against HBsAg, and these could be further enhanced with higher doses of adjuvant or boosting. Overall, antibody isotypes with CT alone were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) whereas they were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG ODN alone or in combination with CT. Results from this study indicate that stimulatory CpG ODN are promising new adjuvants for mucosal vaccination strategies, whether used alone or in combination with other mucosal adjuvants. PMID:10506647

  5. Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics--a Finnish perspective.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2007-06-01

    In Finland, berries are part of the traditional diet significantly contributing to the intake of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. Compositional data on phenolic compounds in berries has been rapidly accumulating and included in the national food composition database. Among the different bioactive substances in berries, phenolic compounds including flavonoids, tannins, and phenolic acids have received considerable interest due to their effects in food and health. A great amount of in vitro evidence exists showing that berry phenolics are powerful antioxidants. However, the antioxidant effect of berry phenolics is strongly dependent on the choice of berry raw material, as the antioxidant activity differs between the different phenolic constituents, including anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins. In foods, the antioxidant effect is also influenced by the structure of food. Tannin-containing berries exhibit antimicrobial properties against pathogenic bacteria, thus offering many new applications for food industry. Much of the interest in berry phenolics has focused on cranberries and both cultivated and wild blueberries, although also other berries including black currants, cloudberries, lingonberries, and red raspberries possess promising bioactivities that may have relevance to human health. Antioxidant activity of berry phenolics, in addition to other mechanisms, may contribute to human health, but the possible relationship remains yet to be scientifically substantiated. PMID:17492800

  6. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  7. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  8. Mucosal vaccines: non toxic derivatives of LT and CT as mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Pizza, M; Giuliani, M M; Fontana, M R; Monaci, E; Douce, G; Dougan, G; Mills, K H; Rappuoli, R; Del Giudice, G

    2001-03-21

    Most vaccines are still delivered by injection. Mucosal vaccination would increase compliance and decrease the risk of spread of infectious diseases due to contaminated syringes. However, most vaccines are unable to induce immune responses when administered mucosally, and require the use of strong adjuvant on effective delivery systems. Cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT) are powerful mucosal adjuvants when co-administered with soluble antigens. However, their use in humans is hampered by their extremely high toxicity. During the past few years, site-directed mutagenesis has permitted the generation of LT and CT mutants fully non toxic or with dramatically reduced toxicity, which still retain their strong adjuvanticity at the mucosal level. Among these mutants, are LTK63 (serine-to-lysine substitution at position 63 in the A subunit) and LTR72 (alanine-to-arginine substitution at position 72 in the A subunit). The first is fully non toxic, whereas the latter retains some residual enzymatic activity. Both of them are extremely active as mucosal adjuvants, being able to induce very high titers of antibodies specific for the antigen with which they are co-administered. Both mutants have now been tested as mucosal adjuvants in different animal species using a wide variety of antigens. Interestingly, mucosal delivery (nasal or oral) of antigens together with LTK63 or LTR72 mutants also conferred protection against challenge in appropriate animal models (e.g. tetanus, Helicobacter pylori, pertussis, pneumococci, influenza, etc). In conclusion, these LTK63 and LTR72 mutants are safe adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines at the mucosal level, and will be tested soon in humans. PMID:11257389

  9. Red Capes, Red Herrings, and Red Flags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.

    The argument that the personality structures obtained from retrospective ratings reflect semantic similarity structures has been as provocative as a red cape in the bull ring. High congruence between those two kinds of structures seems well established. What is less clear is how and why those structures differ from that for immediate judgments of…

  10. Phenolic profile evolution of different ready-to-eat baby-leaf vegetables during storage.

    PubMed

    Santos, J; Oliveira, M B P P; Ibáñez, E; Herrero, M

    2014-01-31

    Ready-to-eat baby-leaf vegetables market has been growing and offering to consumers convenient, healthy and appealing products, which may contain interesting bioactive compounds. In this work, the composition and the evolution of the phenolic compounds from different baby-leaf vegetables during refrigerated storage was studied. The phenolic compounds were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and the phenolic profile of each sample was analyzed and quantified by using LC-MS and LC-DAD methods, respectively, at the beginning and at the end of a 10-day storage period. The baby-leaf vegetables studied included green lettuce, ruby red lettuce, swiss chard, spinach, pea shoots, watercress, garden cress, mizuna, red mustard, wild rocket and spearmint samples and a total of 203 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified and quantified. The main naturally phenolic compounds identified correspond to glycosylated flavonoids, with exception of green lettuce and spearmint leaves which had a higher content of hydroxycinnamic acids. Quantification of the main compounds showed a 10-fold higher content of total phenolic content of ruby red lettuce (483mgg(-1)) in relation to the other samples, being the lowest values found in the garden cress (12.8mgg(-1)) and wild rocket leaves (8.1mgg(-1)). The total phenolic content only showed a significant change (p<0.05) after storage in the green lettuce (+17.5%), mizuna (+7.8%), red mustard (-23.7%) and spearmint (-13.8%) leaves. Within the different classes of phenolic compounds monitored, the flavonols showed more stable contents than the hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids, although the behavior of each compound varied strongly among samples. PMID:24438834

  11. HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS analysis of phenolic compounds during ripening in exocarp and mesocarp of tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-López, Armando; Yahia, Elhadi

    2013-12-01

    Identification of phenolic compounds was done by means of liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) using the electrospray ionization interface (ESI). Quantification of phenolic compounds was carried out by using HPLC with diode array detector (DAD) in exocarp and mesocarp of tomato fruit at 6 different ripeness stages (mature-green, breakers, turning, pink, light-red, and red). Several phenolic compounds were identified including chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and rutin and some combined phenolic acids were tentatively identified, mainly glycosides, such as caffeoyl hexose I, caffeoyl hexose II, caffeoylquinic acid isomer, dicaffeoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl hexose I, p-coumaroyl hexose II, feruloyl hexose I, feruloyl hexose II, siringyl hexose, and caffeoyl deoxyhexose hexose. Fruit exocarp had higher quantities of total soluble phenolics (TSP) compared to mesocarp. During ripening, TSP increased in both exocarp and mesocarp, mainly in exocarp. While rutin increased, chlorogenic acid decreased in both tissues: exocarp and mesocarp. PMID:24171765

  12. Phenolic constituents, furans, and total antioxidant status of distilled spirits.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D M; Hoffman, B; Yang, J; Soleas, G J

    1999-10-01

    The concentrations of 11 phenols and 5 furans were measured in 12 categories of distilled spirits by HPLC methodology, together with the total antioxidant status (TAS) of the same beverages. Ellagic acid was the phenol present in highest concentration in all beverages. Moderate amounts of syringaldehyde, syringic acid, and gallic acid, as well as lesser amounts of vanillin and vanillic acid, were measurable in most samples of whiskey, brandy, and rum but were largely undetectable in gin, vodka, liqueurs, and miscellaneous spirits. 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural was the predominant furan in the former three beverages, notably cognac, with 2-furaldehyde the next highest, but these were undetectable in most of the latter beverages. Highest TAS values were given by armagnac, cognac, and bourbon whiskey, all three of which tended toward the highest concentrations of phenols. Negative TAS values were exhibited by rum, vodka, gin, and miscellaneous spirits in line with the low or undetectable phenol concentrations in these beverages. Wood aging is the most likely source of phenols and furans in distilled spirits. Those beverages exposed to this treatment contain significant antioxidant activity, which is between the ranges for white and red wines, with the potential to augment the antiatherosclerotic functions attributable to the ethanol that they contain. PMID:10552753

  13. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them. PMID:26384312

  14. Identification of Natural Antimicrobial Substances in Red Muscadine Juice against Enterobacter sakazakii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) juices with natural organic, phenolic acids and polyphenol compounds were tested against Cronobacter sakazakii. The concentration of total phenolic compounds of commercial baby juices ranged from 176.7 to 347.7 mg/mL. Commercial baby juices showed poor antim...

  15. Mucosal immunity: its role in defense and allergy.

    PubMed

    Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Tucková, Ludmila; Lodinová-Zádniková, Rája; Stepánková, Renata; Cukrowska, Bozena; Funda, David P; Striz, Ilja; Kozáková, Hana; Trebichavský, Ilja; Sokol, Dan; Reháková, Zuzana; Sinkora, Jirí; Fundová, Petra; Horáková, Dana; Jelínková, Lenka; Sánchez, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    The interface between the organism and the outside world, which is the site of exchange of nutrients, export of products and waste components, must be selectively permeable and at the same time, it must constitute a barrier equipped with local defense mechanisms against environmental threats (e.g. invading pathogens). The boundaries with the environment (mucosal and skin surfaces) are therefore covered with special epithelial layers which support this barrier function. The immune system, associated with mucosal surfaces covering the largest area of the body (200-300 m(2)), evolved mechanisms discriminating between harmless antigens and commensal microorganisms and dangerous pathogens. The innate mucosal immune system, represented by epithelial and other mucosal cells and their products, is able to recognize the conserved pathogenic patterns on microbes by pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, CD14 and others. As documented in experimental gnotobiotic models, highly protective colonization of mucosal surfaces by commensals has an important stimulatory effect on postnatal development of immune responses, metabolic processes (e.g. nutrition) and other host activities; these local and systemic immune responses are later replaced by inhibition, i.e. by induction of mucosal (oral) tolerance. Characteristic features of mucosal immunity distinguishing it from systemic immunity are: strongly developed mechanisms of innate defense, the existence of characteristic populations of unique types of lymphocytes, colonization of the mucosal and exocrine glands by cells originating from the mucosal organized tissues ('common mucosal system') and preferential induction of inhibition of the responses to nondangerous antigens (mucosal tolerance). Many chronic diseases, including allergy, may occur as a result of genetically based or environmentally induced changes in mechanisms regulating mucosal immunity and tolerance; this leads to impaired mucosal barrier

  16. Oral mucosal color changes as a clinical biomarker for cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Latini, Giuseppe; De Felice, Claudio; Barducci, Alessandro; Chitano, Giovanna; Pignatelli, Antonietta; Grimaldi, Luca; Tramacere, Francesco; Laurini, Ricardo; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2012-07-01

    Screening is a key tool for early cancer detection/prevention and potentially saves lives. Oral mucosal vascular aberrations and color changes have been reported in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients, possibly reflecting a subclinical extracellular matrix abnormality implicated in the general process of cancer development. Reasoning that physicochemical changes of a tissue should affect its optical properties, we investigated the diagnostic ability of oral mucosal color to identify patients with several types of cancer. A total of 67 patients with several histologically proven malignancies at different stages were enrolled along with a group of 60 healthy controls of comparable age and sex ratio. Oral mucosal color was measured in selected areas, and then univariate, cluster, and principal component analyses were carried out. Lower red and green and higher blue values were significantly associated with evidence of cancer (all P<0.0001), and efficiently discriminated patients from controls. The blue color coordinate showed significantly higher sensitivity and specificity (96.66±2.77 and 97.16±3.46%, respectively) compared with the red and green coordinates. Likewise, the second principal component coordinate of the red-green clusters discriminated patients from controls with 98.2% sensitivity and 95% specificity (cut-off criterion≤0.4547; P=0.0001). The scatterplots of the chrominances revealed the formation of two well separated clusters, separating cancer patients from controls with a 99.4% probability of correct classification. These findings highlight the ability of oral color to encode clinically relevant biophysical information. In the near future, this low-cost and noninvasive method may become a useful tool for early cancer detection. PMID:22634938

  17. Total phenol content of guava fruit and development of an in vitro regeneration protocol amenable to genetic improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total soluble phenolics in two white (‘Allahabad Safeda’ and ‘Lucknow-49’), two pink (‘Beaumont’ and ‘Gushiken Sweet’), and three red fleshed (‘Ka Hua Kola’, ‘Ruby Supreme’ and ‘Red Fleshed’) guava (Psidium guajava. L.) fruits were assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. ‘Allahabad Safeda’ and...

  18. Review of chlorinated phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Exon, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    The chlorinated phenols are a group of 19 isomers composed of phenol with substituted chlorines. These chemicals are readily soluble in organic solvents but only slightly soluble in water, except for the chlorophenate salts. Chlorophenols with less than 3 chlorines are not used extensively except in the production of higher chlorophenols and chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides. Pentachlorophenol and some tetrachlorophenols are used worldwide, primarily as wood preservatives or fungicides. Residues of chlorophenols have been found worldwide in soil, water and air samples, in food products, and in human and animal tissues and body fluids. Environmental contamination with these chemicals occurs from industrial effluents, agricultural runoff, breakdown of chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides and hexachlorobenzene, and from spontaneous formation following chlorination of water for disinfection and deodorization. The acute toxicity of these chemicals is relatively low and little is known concerning their chronic effects. Chlorophenols have not been shown conclusively to be mutagens, teratogens or carcinogens. However, these compounds may act as promotors or cocarcinogens and the immune system is particularly sensitive to their toxic effects. Transplacental exposure to chlorophenols may result in embryotoxicity and abortion. The major mode of toxic action is as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The toxicity of chlorophenols decreases with decreasing chlorination. These chemicals are mild hepatotoxins and are stored mainly in hepatic and renal tissues.

  19. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project focused on the development of an analytical method for the analysis of phenols in drinking water. The need for this project is associated with the recently published Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). The following phenolic compounds are listed on the current CCL, a...

  20. Association constants and enthalpies of formation of heteroassociates of anions of cresol red and thymol blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    The tendency of anions of sulfophthaleine dyes to heteroassociation was studied in aqueous solutions of phenol red, cresol red, thymol blue, and non-substituted phenol red. It was spectrophotometrically determined that single (HAn-) and doubly charged anions (An2-) of sulfophthaleines can form stable heteroassociates of the composition Ct+ · HAn- and (Ct+)2 · An2- with cations (Ct+) of polymethine dyes, pinacyanol, and quinaldine red. The values of enthalpy formation of ions of dyes and heteroassociates were calculated semi-empirically and compared with experimentally determined values of the equilibrium association constants.

  1. Mucosal malignant melanoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Norhafizah, M; Mustafa, W M B W; Sabariah, A R; Shiran, M S; Pathmanathan, R

    2010-09-01

    Mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM) is an aggressive tumour occurring in the upper respiratory tract. It is rare compared to malignant melanoma of the skin. We report a case of a 53-year-old man with left paranasal swelling. A biopsy showed high-grade spindle cell tumour. Subsequently a subtotal maxillectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a hypercellular tumour composed of mixed spindle and epitheloid cells with very occasional intracytoplasmic melanin pigment. The malignant cells were immunopositive for vimentin, S-100 protein and HMB-45. It was diagnosed as mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM). This article illustrates a rare case of MMM where the diagnosis may be missed or delayed without proper histopathological examination that include meticulous search for melanin pigment and appropriate immunohistochemical stains to confirm the diagnosis. Malignant melanoma can mimic many other types of high-grade malignancy and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in many of these instances. PMID:21939172

  2. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. PMID:26826375

  3. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  5. The microbiome and regulation of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Andrew J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a mucosal surface constantly exposed to foreign antigens and microbes, and is protected by a vast array of immunologically active structures and cells. Epithelial cells directly participate in immunological surveillance and direction of host responses in the gut and can express numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR9, and nucleotide oligomerization domain 2, as well as produce chemotactic factors for both myeloid and lymphoid cells following inflammatory stimulation. Within the epithelium and in the underlying lamina propria resides a population of innate lymphoid cells that, following stimulation, can become activated and produce effector cytokines and exert both protective and pathogenic roles during inflammation. Lamina propria dendritic cells play a large role in determining whether the response to a particular antigen will be inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. It is becoming clear that the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome, as a whole community, exerts a profound influence on mucosal immune regulation. The microbiome produces short-chain fatty acids, polysaccharide A, α-galactosylceramide and tryptophan metabolites, which can induce interleukin-22, Reg3γ, IgA and interleukin-17 responses. However, much of what is known about microbiome-host immune interactions has come from the study of single bacterial members of the gastrointestinal microbiome and their impact on intestinal mucosal immunity. Additionally, evidence continues to accumulate that alterations of the intestinal microbiome can impact not only gastrointestinal immunity but also immune regulation at distal mucosal sites. PMID:24329495

  6. Topical cocaine for relief of mucosal pain.

    PubMed

    Newport, Kristina; Coyne, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Painful mucosal lesions negatively affect quality of life. When located in the oral cavity, they can cause pain that interferes with speech and swallowing. Acute pain from intra-oral lesions is difficult to treat with conventional methods such as systemic opioids or viscous lidocaine. These cases exemplify a safe, fast and effective method for treating painful mouth lesions that are not responsive to standard treatments. Mr. D and Mr. G had from painful oral lesions caused by squamous cell carcinoma. Severe pain interfered with their ability to speak and swallow, resulting in poor nutrition and dehydration. 4% liquid cocaine, self-applied topically to the open mouth sores, resulted in relief within minutes in both cases. Repeated dosing every six hours allowed both patients to restart oral nutrition without any reported side effects. Topical cocaine has not been described for repeated dosing for oral or other mucosal pain. Potential side effects of mucosal administration include gingival recession and erythematous lesions. If the recommended topical doses are exceeded, liquid cocaine may be absorbed systemically causing a stimulant response or addiction. When used appropriately, however, this intervention can result in a dramatic improvement in quality of life and functional status. PMID:20504138

  7. Collaborative studies in mucosal immunology in Goroka.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative program between the Papua New Guinea (PNG) Institute of Medical Research and the Hunter Mucosal Group has completed studies relevant to protection of the airways against bacterial infection. Specifically, these studies addressed the mucosal capacity to produce local immunoglobulins and the capacity of the airways to respond to an oral vaccine containing inactivated nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The mucosal IgA response to NTHi antigens was blunted in both children and adults in PNG compared with that found in Australian children and adults, whose airways are colonized only intermittently. Despite this, when oral NTHi is given to Papua New Guinean adults with chronic airways disease, it is followed by a significant (50%) reduction in incidence of acute bronchitic episodes, and a 3-log reduction in density of colonization, which persisted about 10 months. The implications of these key findings are discussed with respect to both mechanism and wider control of pathology emanating from abnormal airways colonization in a PNG environment. PMID:23163182

  8. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  9. Effect of Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice on indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Valcheva-Kuzmanova, S; Marazova, K; Krasnaliev, I; Galunska, B; Borisova, P; Belcheva, A

    2005-04-01

    Aronia melanocarpa fruits are rich in phenolic substances-mainly flavonoids from the anthocyanin subclass. The anthocyanins are water-soluble plant pigments with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, hepatoprotective, gastroprotective and other activities. We studied the effect of A. melanocarpa fruit juice (AMFJ) on indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats and its possible relation to the oxidative status. AMFJ (5, 10 and 20 ml kg(-1)) was applied orally as a pretreatment 1 h before the subcutaneous administration of indomethacin (30 mg kg(-1)). Gastric ulcer formation was estimated morphometrically and histopathologically 4h after the indomethacin administration. Malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat plasma and gastric mucosa and also reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in gastric mucosa were determined and used as biochemical markers of the oxidative status. AMFJ-pretreatment diminished the number and area of indomethacin-induced gastric lesions. Histopathological examination of rat stomachs demonstrated that AMFJ induced an increase in gastric mucus production and a reduction of the depth and severity of indomethacin-induced mucosal lesions. AMFJ dose-dependently reduced the elevated indomethacin plasma and gastric MDA levels and at the doses of 10 and 20 ml kg(-1) they were not significantly different from the control values. Neither indomethacin-treatment, nor AMFJ-pretreatment had a significant influence on GSH and GSSG gastric mucosal levels. These results demonstrated that indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage was accompanied by the development of oxidative stress, evidenced by the accumulation of MDA. AMFJ-pretreatment decreased the gastric lesions caused by indomethacin. It could be suggested that this effect of AMFJ was probably due to the increased mucus production and interference with oxidative stress development as evidenced by the decreased plasma and gastric mucosal MDA. PMID:15945278

  10. Chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants: Sunrise on the ocean.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yufei; Fan, Qingze; Hao, Dongxia; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    Mucosal vaccination, which is shown to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses, serves as a non-invasive and convenient alternative to parenteral administration, with stronger capability in combatting diseases at the site of entry. The exploration of potent mucosal adjuvants is emerging as a significant area, based on the continued necessity to amplify the immune responses to a wide array of antigens that are poorly immunogenic at the mucosal sites. As one of the inspirations from the ocean, chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants have been developed with unique advantages, such as, ability of mucosal adhesion, distinct trait of opening the junctions to allow the paracellular transport of antigen, good tolerability and biocompatibility, which guaranteed the great potential in capitalizing on their application in human clinical trials. In this review, the state of art of chitosan and its derivatives as mucosal adjuvants, including thermo-sensitive chitosan system as mucosal adjuvant that were newly developed by author's group, was described, as well as the clinical application perspective. After a brief introduction of mucosal adjuvants, chitosan and its derivatives as robust immune potentiator were discussed in detail and depth, in regard to the metabolism, safety profile, mode of actions and preclinical and clinical applications, which may shed light on the massive clinical application of chitosan as mucosal adjuvant. PMID:26271831

  11. Chemopreventive effects of free and bound phenolics associated to steep waters (nejayote) obtained after nixtamalization of different maize types.

    PubMed

    Rojas-García, Carlos; García-Lara, Silverio; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2012-03-01

    Free and bound phenolics extracts from nejayote solids were obtained after optimally lime-cooking blue, normal white, red, normal yellow, high-carotenoid and quality protein maize types. The extraction yield ranged from 4.47 to 10.05%. Bound phenolics extracts had higher content of total phenolics, antioxidant activity and ferulic acid compared to the free phenolics extracts. In general, free phenolics extracts were less cytotoxic than the bound phenolics counterparts. Bound phenolics extracts had higher induction of quinone reductase (QR) and particularly the normal yellow nejayote exerted the highest chemopreventive index tested in Hepa1c1c7 cells. When tested for monofunctional phase 2 induction capacity in BPrc1 cells, the bound phenolics extracts of blue, normal white and quality protein nejayotes were better inducers than the normal yellow counterpart. Particularly, the free phenolics extract of the white maize nejayote induced BPrc1 cells QR and exerted a higher chemopreventive index compared to the bound phenolics extract. Therefore, the nejayote of the normal white maize was the best source of monofunctional phase 2 enzyme inducers. PMID:22311197

  12. Toluidine blue color perception in identification of oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Güneri, Pelin; Epstein, Joel B; Ergün, Selin; Boyacioğlu, Hayal

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study is to examine observer agreement on the rank of the color tones after toluidine blue staining of a mucosal lesion. Cohort study with repeated measures is the design of the study. Twenty observers ranked and scored 8 specified areas on the color images of a lesion before and after toluidine blue application in two sessions. Inter and intra-observer variations were analyzed with Cohen's kappa. The L* (the black-white axis), a* (red-green axis), and b* (yellow-blue axis) values were measured and set as the gold standards. Intra and inter-observer agreements were к = 0.86 and к = 0.854. All color parameters were effective on the color ranking order (pL* = 0.00, pa* = 0.007, pb* = 0.00), although L* and b* were more effective on the ranking of the samples than a*. Areas that appeared pale blue visually had a significant blue component, but the observers were confused with the effect of whiteness of the area in clinical decision making. PMID:20336473

  13. Bioactive Constituents of Brazilian Red Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Trusheva, Boryana; Popova, Milena; Bankova, Vassya; Simova, Svetlana; Marcucci, Maria Cristina; Miorin, Patricia Laguna; da Rocha Pasin, Flavia; Tsvetkova, Iva

    2006-01-01

    In a new propolis type, red Brazilian propolis, 14 compounds were identified (six of them new for propolis), among them simple phenolics, triterepenoids, isoflavonoids, prenylated benzophenones and a naphthoquinone epoxide (isolated for the first time from a natural source). Three of the major components demonstrated significant antimicrobial activity, and two (obtained as inseparable mixture) possessed radical scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). PMID:16786055

  14. Roles of M cells in infection and mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system plays a crucial part in the control of infection. Exposure of humans and animals to potential pathogens generally occurs through mucosal surfaces, thus, strategies that target the mucosa seem rational and efficient vaccination measures. Vaccination through the mucosal immune system can induce effective systemic immune responses simultaneously with mucosal immunity compared with parenteral vaccination. M cells are capable of transporting luminal antigens to the underlying lymphoid tissues and can be exploited by pathogens as an entry portal to invade the host. Therefore, targeting M-cell-specific molecules might enhance antigen entry, initiate the immune response, and induce protection against mucosal pathogens. Here, we outline our understanding of the distribution and function of M cells, and summarize the advances in mucosal vaccine strategies that target M cells. PMID:25483705

  15. Mucosal vaccines: novel advances in technology and delivery.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    Mucosal vaccines are considered the most suitable type of vaccines to combat emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases because of their ability to induce both mucosal and systemic immunity. Considerable advances have been made toward the development of mucosal vaccines against influenza virus and rotavirus. Many additional mucosal vaccines are in development, including vaccines against cholera, typhoid, traveler's diarrhea and respiratory infections. In addition to oral and nasal vaccines, transcutaneous (or skin patch) and sublingual immunizations are now part of a new generation of mucosal vaccines. Furthermore, a rice-based oral vaccine (MucoRice) has been receiving global attention as a new form of cold chain-free vaccine, because it is stable at room temperature for a prolonged period. This review describes recent developments in mucosal vaccines with promising preclinical and clinical results. PMID:19627189

  16. Antibodies and Their Receptors: Different Potential Roles in Mucosal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Rachel E.; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years it has become increasingly apparent that mucosal antibodies are not only restricted to the IgM and IgA isotypes, but that also other isotypes and particularly IgG can be found in significant quantities at some mucosal surfaces, such as in the genital tract. Their role is more complex than traditionally believed with, among other things, the discovery of novel function of mucosal immunoglobulin receptors. A thorough knowledge in the source and function and mucosal immunoglobulins is particularly important in development of vaccines providing mucosal immunity, and also in the current climate of microbicide development, to combat major world health issues such as HIV. We present here a comprehensive review of human antibody mediated mucosal immunity. PMID:23882268

  17. Electropolymerization treatment of phenol wastewater and the reclamation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Liyin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; He, Jun; Wei, Gang

    2012-11-01

    Electrochemical treatment of phenol wastewater was carried out with stainless steel anodes, and phenol removal was achieved through the electropolymerization process. The effects of phenol concentration and bath voltage were discussed. The original chemical oxygen demand (COD) value was approximately 500 mg/L. After electropolymerization treatment, phenol concentration was 0.087 mmol/ L with a removal efficiency of 95.6%, and COD was 68 mg/L with a removal efficiency of 86.5%. During treatment, the average current efficiency was 60.36% and power consumption was 27.62 kJ/kg (6.96 kWh/ton). The electropolymerization reaction was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry, and the polyphenol product was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. PMID:23356018

  18. Phenol Analysis -- Some Analytical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkey, R. J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of potable water supplies with halogenated phenols in concentrations of 2-10 parts per billion (ppb) produces objectionable tastes and odors capable of influencing consumer acceptability. Routine analysis by the distillation/ 4-aminoantipyrine method is limited by lack of sensitivity and subject to interference by aryl amines. This has been overcome by developing a continuous liquid-liquid extraction system to selectively isolate phenols and eliminate major interfering substances. Stable reagents have been formulated to reduce blank color and extend sensitivity. Equipment suitable for analysis of phenols at the 1 ppb level or less in 20 minutes is described.

  19. Concurrent Mucosal Melanoma and Angiofibroma of the Nose

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Hyung; Ha, Jin Bu; Lee, Junguee; Lee, Joohyung

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma rarely develops in the paranasal sinuses, and generally has a poor prognosis. However, mucosal melanoma can masquerade both clinically and histopathologically as a benign lesion, rendering accurate early diagnosis difficult. On the other hand, angiofibroma, a benign tumor, is more easily diagnosed than a mucosal melanoma, because the former exhibits specific histopathological features. No cases of concurrent angiofibroma and mucosal melanoma have been reported to date. We describe such a case below. PMID:27095516

  20. Determination of Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenols of Wine and Spices: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Lugemwa, Fulgentius Nelson; Snyder, Amanda L; Shaikh, Koonj

    2013-01-01

    Thirty eight bottles of red wine (Carbanet Sauvignon) were randomly selected based on vintage, region, price, and age (number of months in a barrel). The total phenolic content of each wine was determined using Folin-Ciocalteau assay. The radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Apart from a few bottles that exhibited above average radical scavenging activity and phenolic content, there was no good correlation of those two quantities with region, price or vintage. The average phenolic amount was 2874 mg/L. The lowest phenolic content was found to be 1648 mg/L for an eight dollar wine. Wine with the highest amount of phenol of 4495 mg/L was a 2007, nine dollar bottle from South America. High amount of phenols did not translate into high radical scavenging activity. Barrel-aging did not increase the amount of phenols or the radical scavenging activity of wine. In order to discover new and potent sources of antioxidants from plants, the following spices were studied: ginger, cilantro, cumin, anise, linden, eucalyptus, marjoram, oregano, sage, thyme and rosemary. Whole spices were crushed and extracted for 96 h at room temperature using a combination of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 4.5:4.5:1 (v/v/v). The radical scavenging activity of extracts was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The total phenolic content of each spice was also determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay. Eucalyptus was found to be the most potent antioxidant with an LC50 of 324.1 mg of phenol/L, followed by marjoram with an LC50 of 407.5 mg of phenol/L, and rosemary with an LC50 of 414.0 mg/L. The least potent antioxidants were ginger and cilantro with LC50 of 7604 mg/L of phenol and 7876 mg of phenol/L, respectively. PMID:26784340

  1. Determination of Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenols of Wine and Spices: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Lugemwa, Fulgentius Nelson; Snyder, Amanda L.; Shaikh, Koonj

    2013-01-01

    Thirty eight bottles of red wine (Carbanet Sauvignon) were randomly selected based on vintage, region, price, and age (number of months in a barrel). The total phenolic content of each wine was determined using Folin-Ciocalteau assay. The radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Apart from a few bottles that exhibited above average radical scavenging activity and phenolic content, there was no good correlation of those two quantities with region, price or vintage. The average phenolic amount was 2874 mg/L. The lowest phenolic content was found to be 1648 mg/L for an eight dollar wine. Wine with the highest amount of phenol of 4495 mg/L was a 2007, nine dollar bottle from South America. High amount of phenols did not translate into high radical scavenging activity. Barrel-aging did not increase the amount of phenols or the radical scavenging activity of wine. In order to discover new and potent sources of antioxidants from plants, the following spices were studied: ginger, cilantro, cumin, anise, linden, eucalyptus, marjoram, oregano, sage, thyme and rosemary. Whole spices were crushed and extracted for 96 h at room temperature using a combination of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 4.5:4.5:1 (v/v/v). The radical scavenging activity of extracts was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The total phenolic content of each spice was also determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay. Eucalyptus was found to be the most potent antioxidant with an LC50 of 324.1 mg of phenol/L, followed by marjoram with an LC50 of 407.5 mg of phenol/L, and rosemary with an LC50 of 414.0 mg/L. The least potent antioxidants were ginger and cilantro with LC50 of 7604 mg/L of phenol and 7876 mg of phenol/L, respectively. PMID:26784340

  2. Genotypic variation in phenolic acids, vitamin E and fatty acids in whole grain rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lilei; Li, Guanglei; Li, Mei; Xu, Feifei; Beta, Trust; Bao, Jinsong

    2016-04-15

    The genetic diversity of phenolic content (PC), individual phenolic acids, vitamin E isomers (VE) and fatty acids (FA) in the whole grain rice were investigated. The most abundant phenolic acid was ferulic acid ranging from 155.6 to 271.1 μg/g and comprising approximately 40-57% of total phenolic acid (TPA). The predominant tocopherols (T) and tocotrienols (T3) were α-T (6.43-12.67 μg/g) and γ-T3 (12.88-32.75 μg/g). The unsaturated fractions of FAs accounted for 74-81% of the total FAs in rice. Most of the phytochemicals among phenolics and VEs showed significant differences between white and red rice, with red rice demonstrating significantly higher levels. However, white rice had higher content of oleic, linolenic, eicosenoic and total fatty acids than red rice. The wide genetic diversity in whole grain rice allows food processors to have a good selection for producing rice products, and breeders to have new rice lines that can be bred for high nutrient levels. PMID:26617016

  3. Microbiota and their role in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoecke, B; De Ryck, T; Stringer, A; Van de Wiele, T; Keefe, D

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis in patients undergoing cancer therapy is a significant problem. Its prevalence ranges between 20 and 100%, depending on treatment type and protocols and patient-based variables. Mucositis is self-limiting when uncomplicated by infection. Unfortunately, the incidence of developing a local or systemic infection during the course of the treatment is very high. At this stage, it is unclear which role oral microbiota play in the onset, duration, and severity of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, there is growing interest in this underexplored topic, and new studies are being undertaken to unravel their impact on the pathogenesis of mucositis. PMID:24456144

  4. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  5. Topical protection of human esophageal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Woodland, P; Batista-Lima, F; Lee, C; Preston, S L; Dettmar, P; Sifrim, D

    2015-06-15

    Patients with nonerosive reflux disease exhibit impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which may underlie enhanced reflux perception. In vitro topical application of an alginate solution can protect mucosal biopsies against acid-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). We aimed to confirm this finding in a second model using 3D cell cultures and to assess prolonged protection in a biopsy model. We assessed the protective effect of a topically applied alginate solution 1 h after application. 3D cell cultures were grown by using an air-liquid interface and were studied in Ussing chambers. The apical surface was "protected" with 200 μl of either alginate or viscous control or was unprotected. The tissue was exposed to pH 3 + bile acid solution for 30 min and TER change was calculated. Distal esophageal mucosal biopsies were taken from 12 patients and studied in Ussing chambers. The biopsies were coated with either alginate or viscous control solution. The biopsies were then bathed in pH 7.4 solution for 1 h. The luminal chamber solution was replaced with pH 2 solution for 30 min. Percentage changes in TER were recorded. In five biopsies fluorescein-labeled alginate solution was used to allow immunohistological localization of the alginate after 1 h. In the cell culture model, alginate solution protected tissue against acid-induced change in TER. In biopsies, 60 min after protection with alginate solution, the acidic exposure caused a -8.3 ± 2.2% change in TER compared with -25.1 ± 4.5% change after protection with the viscous control (P < 0.05). Labeled alginate could be seen coating the luminal surface in all cases. In vitro, alginate solutions can adhere to the esophageal mucosa for up to 1 h and exert a topical protectant effect. Durable topical protectants can be further explored as first-line/add-on therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25907692

  6. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  7. Research controversies in management of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Biron, P; Sebban, C; Gourmet, R; Chvetzoff, G; Philip, I; Blay, J Y

    2000-01-01

    The management of mucositis is the subject of many controversies, and the optimal treatment is still not known. Several evaluation scoring systems have been described, but no one of these is appropriate to all clinical situations: a simple scale such as that devised by the WHO can be used routinely, and more sophisticated ones can be implemented by trained experimenters working in research. We have considered the impact of each of the treatments currently available on each stage of mucositis. In attempts at prevention, self-care, in the sense of oral hygiene, must remain atraumatic. It is probably advisable to differentiate patients with good previous oral care, in whom tooth brushing is beneficial, from others, in whom the risk of hemorrhage and infection excludes any brushing. Before the dosage of chemotherapy is reduced, the curative or palliative intent of the strategy must be carefully evaluated. In the vascular phase protection of the proliferating cells is attempted by means of vasoconstriction (cryotherapy), cytoprotection (prostaglandin E2 and other antioxidants) or epithelial cell-inhibiting factors such as TGF-B3. Treatments applied in the epithelial phase are directed at increasing the cell proliferation to accelerate epithelial restoration by sucralfate and several growth factors: hematopoietic GF, which has demonstrated a direct effect on the mucosa (GM-CSF), or epithelial growth factors such as keratinocyte GF. In the ulcerative and bacteriological phase attempts are made to attenuate sepsis by means of antiseptics (chlorhexidine), amphotericin B and antiviral agents or antibiotic lozenges. In the healing phase application of the low-energy helium-neon laser has demonstrably been followed by a later time of onset, less pronounced peak severity and shorter duration of oral mucositis. After cancer treatment, oral hygiene, inhibition of oral flora, and pain relief are the main goals. Physiopathogen-specific treatment is the next step, with the emphasis

  8. Gastric Mucosal Protection by Aegle Marmelos Against Gastric Mucosal Damage: Role of Enterochromaffin Cell and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Dutta, Shubha R.; Guha, Debjani

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) released from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in gastric mucosa inhibits gastric acidity by increasing the gastric mucus secretion. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos (AM) ripe fruit pulp (250 mg/kg body weight) on mean ulcer index (MUI), EC cells, 5-HT content, and adherent mucosal thickness of ulcerated gastric tissue in adult albino rats. Material and Methods: Ulceration was induced by using aspirin (500 mg/kg, p.o.), cerebellar nodular lesion and applying cold-restraint stress. Results: In all cases increased MUI in gastric tissue along with decreased EC cell count was observed with concomitant decrease of 5-HT content and adherent mucosal thickness (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with AM for 14 days decreased MUI, increased EC cell count, and 5-HT content as well as adherent mucosal thickness in all ulcerated group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AM produces gastric mucosal protection mediated by increased EC cell count and 5-HT levels. PMID:25672237

  9. Phenolic glucosides from Hasseltia floribunda.

    PubMed

    Dagvadorj, Enkhmaa; Shaker, Kamel H; Windsor, Donald; Schneider, Bernd; Boland, Wilhelm

    2010-11-01

    The leaves of Hasseltia floribunda were examined for their chemical constituents. Twelve phenolic glucosides, namely three hydroxycyclohexenyl acyl glucosides, four acylated salicortin derivatives, and five coumaroyl salicin derivatives, were isolated along with eight known phenolic glycosides, six known flavones, and two known sesquiterpenoid cyclohexenone derivatives. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by NMR spectroscopic and HRMS spectrometric methods and by comparing analytical data with those of related structures. PMID:20822782

  10. Evaluation of a suspicious oral mucosal lesion.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Michele; Poh, Catherine F; Hovan, Allan J; Ng, Samson; Rosin, Miriam P

    2008-04-01

    Dentists who encounter a change in the oral mucosa of a patient must decide whether the abnormality requires further investigation. In this paper, we describe a systematic approach to the assessment of oral mucosal conditions that are thought likely to be premalignant or an early cancer. These steps, which include a comprehensive history, step-by-step clinical examination (including use of adjunctive visual tools), diagnostic testing and formulation of diagnosis, are routinely used in clinics affiliated with the British Columbia Oral Cancer Prevention Program (BC OCPP) and are recommended for consideration by dentists for use in daily practice. PMID:18387268

  11. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  12. Mucosal Lesions in an Allergy Practice.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, John J; Bruce, Alison J; Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of mucosal disease with an allergic pathogenesis are challenging. Oral allergy is often a hypersensitivity reaction with variable symptoms and physical exam findings. Clinical diagnosis requires a history of prior allergen exposure, a delay from exposure to clinical findings, and improvement following allergen removal. The past decades have seen great contributions to the field of oral allergy. The aim of this review is to provide an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of oral dermatologic disease with a focus on diseases with an investigated allergic pathogenesis. PMID:26922434

  13. Mucosal Imprinting of Vaccine-Induced CD8+ T Cells Is Crucial to Inhibit the Growth of Mucosal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Federico; Bureau, Michel-Francis; Freyburger, Ludovic; Clement, Olivier; Marcheteau, Elie; Gey, Alain; Fraisse, Guillaume; Bouguin, Cécilia; Merillon, Nathalie; Dransart, Estelle; Tran, Thi; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Autret, Gwennhael; Thiebaud, Marine; Suleman, Muhammad; Riffault, Sabine; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Launay, Odile; Danel, Claire; Taieb, Julien; Richardson, Jennifer; Zitvogel, Laurence; Fridman, Wolf H.; Johannes, Ludger; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although many human cancers are located in mucosal sites, most cancer vaccines are tested against subcutaneous tumors in preclinical models. We therefore wondered whether mucosa-specific homing instructions to the immune system might influence mucosal tumor outgrowth. We showed that the growth of orthotopic head and neck or lung cancers was inhibited when a cancer vaccine was delivered by the intranasal mucosal route but not the intramuscular route. This antitumor effect was dependent on CD8+ T cells. Indeed, only intranasal vaccination elicited mucosal-specific CD8+ T cells expressing the mucosal integrin CD49a. Blockade of CD49a decreased intratumoral CD8+ T cell infiltration and the efficacy of cancer vaccine on mucosal tumor. We then showed that after intranasal vaccination, dendritic cells from lung parenchyma, but not those from spleen, induced the expression of CD49a on cocultured specific CD8+ T cells. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from human mucosal lung cancer also expressed CD49a, which supports the relevance and possible extrapolation of these results in humans. We thus identified a link between the route of vaccination and the induction of a mucosal homing program on induced CD8+ T cells that controlled their trafficking. Immunization route directly affected the efficacy of the cancer vaccine to control mucosal tumors. PMID:23408053

  14. Light and temperature effects on phenolics in dark-skinned grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade we refined our understanding of the effects of solar radiation and temperature on the accumulation of phenolic compounds in grapes in the field, particularly dark-skinned cultivars used for red wine. The work was precipitated by nearly universal prescriptive advice a decade pr...

  15. Phenolic compounds and the colour of oranges subjected to a combination treatment of waxing and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaid, M.; Lacroix, M.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boubekri, C.

    2000-03-01

    The effects of waxing, irradiation dose and storage on phenolics and colour of irradiated oranges were investigated. Mature oranges ( Maroc late) waxed or unwaxed were treated with 0, 1 or 2 kGy radiation and stored up to 9 weeks at 20°C and 40-50% r.h. Colour of the oranges, total phenols and flavones in the peel were measured. Phenolic compounds increased with irradiation dose and storage time. Hue angle, value and chroma of the orange colour were more affected by waxing and storage time than the irradiation treatment. Changes in the phenolic compounds were linked with changes in the redness and saturation of the orange colour. Irradiation stimulated synthesis of flavones; waxing controlled changes induced by irradiation.

  16. Antioxidant phenolics and flavonoids in common Indian foods.

    PubMed

    Nair, S; Nagar, R; Gupta, R

    1998-08-01

    To determine antioxidant phenolics and flavonoids in commonly consumed Indian foods we chemically analysed 85 food-stuffs comprising of cereals, pulses, nuts, oilseeds, vegetables, fruits and beverages. Total phenolics were measured biochemically and flavonoids were measured as a sum of quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin and pelargonidin. High flavonoid content (> 100 mg/100 gm) was present in tea, coffee, apple, guava, terminalia bark, fenugreek seeds, mustard seeds, cinnamon, red chili powder, cloves and turmeric. Medium levels (50-100 mg) were found in Indian gooseberry, omum, cumin, cardamom, betel leaf and brandy. Small but significant amounts were also present in food-items of large consumption such as kidney beans, soyabeans, grapes, ginger, coriander powder, bajra and brinjal. PMID:11229280

  17. Influence of copigmentation and phenolic composition on wine color.

    PubMed

    Heras-Roger, J; Alonso-Alonso, O; Gallo-Montesdeoca, A; Díaz-Romero, C; Darias-Martín, J

    2016-06-01

    Chromatic characteristics and their relationships with copigmentation and phenolic composition were studied in 160 bottled red wines. Free anthocyanins, copigmented anthocyanins and polymeric pigments contributing to color were calculated according to Boulton protocol and related to main changes produced in wine visible spectra after destroying any copigmented anthocyanins effect. Color differences between copigmented and non copigmented wines were quantified and related with ageing, cultivar and phenolic profile. Phenomenon of co-pigmentation visually increases the colour at 420, 520 and 620 nm for most of wines. Copigmented wines showed a mean value of 8.26 CIELab units higher than non copigmented (ΔEab(c-nc)), being this shift deeper for young wines than for aged wines. Copigmentation mostly changed hue and decreased L, a* and b* values therefore resulted into purplish and darker wine. Visual variations in color caused by copigmentation was related to particularly anthocyanins and copigments (mostly flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids). PMID:27478209

  18. The revisited levels of free and bound phenolics in rice: Effects of the extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gabriela Hörnke; Ferreira, Cristiano Dietrich; Vivian, Patrícia Gomes; Monks, Jander Luis Fernandes; Elias, Moacir Cardoso; Vanier, Nathan Levien; de Oliveira, Maurício

    2016-10-01

    The effects of the type of solvolytic solution and number of extraction steps on the recovery of free phenolics, anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins from different rice samples were evaluated. Moreover, bound phenolic acids were determined as a function of enzymatic and/or alkaline hydrolysis treatment of the rice residue obtained after the extraction of free phenolics. The Acetone/Water (70:30 v/v) was the most effective solvolytic solution for extracting free phenolics from pigmented rice, as well as anthocyanins from black and wild rice, and proanthocyanidins from red rice. The application of three extraction steps increased the recovery of free phenolics up to 10%. The adoption of an enzymatic treatment, with α-amylase in order to reduce the paste viscosity of the residue, increased the extractability of bound phenolics. α-Amylase at 37°C during 15min followed by an alkaline hydrolysis at 37°C was the best treatment for the recovery of bound phenolics. PMID:27132831

  19. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors. PMID:23958351

  20. Gastrointestinal mucosal barrier function and diseases.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal barrier plays an essential role in the separation of the inside of the body from the outside environment. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most important component for construction of a constitutive barrier of epithelial cells, and they regulate the permeability of the barrier by tightly sealing the cell-cell junctions. TJ proteins are represented by claudins, occludin, junctional adhesion molecules, and scaffold protein zonula occludens. Among these TJ proteins, claudins are the major components of TJs and are responsible for the barrier and the polarity of the epithelial cells. Gastrointestinal diseases including reflux esophagitis, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and cancers may be regulated by these molecules, and disruption of their functions leads to chronic inflammatory conditions and chronic or progressive disease. Therefore, regulation of the barrier function of epithelial cells by regulating the expression and localization of TJ proteins is a potential new target for the treatment of these diseases. Treatment strategies for these diseases might thus be largely altered if symptom generation and/or immune dysfunction could be regulated through improvement of mucosal barrier function. Since TJ proteins may also modify tumor infiltration and metastasis, other important goals include finding a good TJ biomarker of cancer progression and patient prognosis, and developing TJ protein-targeted therapies that can modify patient prognosis. This review summarizes current understanding of gastrointestinal barrier function, TJ protein expression, and the mechanisms underlying epithelial barrier dysregulation in gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27048502

  1. Canine oral mucosal mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J W; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L; Berlato, D; Murphy, S; Grant, I A

    2016-03-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common cutaneous tumours of dogs, however rarely they can arise from the oral mucosa. This subset of MCT is reported to demonstrate a more aggressive clinical course than those tumours on the haired skin and the authors hypothesised that dogs with oral, mucosal MCT would have a high incidence of local lymph node metastasis at presentation and that this would be a negative prognostic factor. An additional hypothesis was that mitotic index (MI) would be prognostic. This retrospective study examines 33 dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa. The results suggest that oral mucosal MCTs in the dog have a high incidence of lymph node metastasis at diagnosis (55%) which results in a poor prognosis. MI and nodal metastasis is highly prognostic. Loco-regional progression is common in these patients and dogs with adequate local control of their tumour had an improved outcome. Despite a more aggressive clinical course, treatment can result in protracted survivals, even when metastasis is present. PMID:24215587

  2. Iron bioavailability to piglets from red and white common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenols in foods may chelate dietary Fe and lower its bioavailability. Concentrations of phenols are substantially higher in red beans than in white beans. The aim of this study was to compare iron bioavailabilities from red and white beans in a piglet hemoglobin repletion model. Fe deficient cr...

  3. OCT visualization of acute radiation mucositis: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia; Maslennikova, Anna; Terentieva, Anna; Fomina, Yulia; Khomutinnikova, Nina; Balalaeva, Irina; Vyseltseva, Yulia; Larin, Roman; Kornoukhova, Natalia; Shakhov, Andrey; Shakhova, Natalia; Gelikonov, Grigory; Kamensky, Vladislav; Feldchtein, Felix

    2005-08-01

    We present pilot results in optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualization of normal mucosa radiation damage. 15 patients undergoing radiation treatment of head and neck cancer were enrolled. OCT was used to monitor the mucositis development during and after treatment. OCT can see stages of radiation mucositis development, including hidden ones, before any clinical manifestations.

  4. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-01

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  5. Effects of mucosal loading on vocal fold vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chao; Jiang, Jack J.

    2009-06-01

    A chain model was proposed in this study to examine the effects of mucosal loading on vocal fold vibration. Mucosal loading was defined as the loading caused by the interaction between the vocal folds and the surrounding tissue. In the proposed model, the vocal folds and the surrounding tissue were represented by a series of oscillators connected by a coupling spring. The lumped masses, springs, and dampers of the oscillators modeled the tissue properties of mass, stiffness, and viscosity, respectively. The coupling spring exemplified the tissue interactions. By numerically solving this chain model, the effects of mucosal loading on the phonation threshold pressure, phonation instability pressure, and energy distribution in a voice production system were studied. It was found that when mucosal loading is small, phonation threshold pressure increases with the damping constant Rr, the mass constant Rm, and the coupling constant Rμ of mucosal loading but decreases with the stiffness constant Rk. Phonation instability pressure is also related to mucosal loading. It was found that phonation instability pressure increases with the coupling constant Rμ but decreases with the stiffness constant Rk of mucosal loading. Therefore, it was concluded that mucosal loading directly affects voice production.

  6. Mucosal Correlates of Protection in HIV-1-Exposed Seronegative Persons

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ruizhong; Smith, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to HIV-1 infection in HIV-1-exposed seronegative (HESN) persons offers a promising opportunity to identify mechanisms of “natural” protection. Unique features of the mucosa in particular may contribute to this protection. Here we highlight several key issues pertaining to the mucosal correlates of protection in HESN persons, including humoral immune responses, mechanisms of mucosal HIV-1-neutralization, immune cell activation, and role of the microbiota in mucosal responses. We also discuss mucosal model systems that can be used to investigate the mechanisms of resistance in HESN subjects. A clear understanding of the mucosal correlates of protection against HIV-1 in HESN persons will provide critical new insights for the development of effective vaccine and microbicide strategies for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24428610

  7. Autologous Transplantation of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets Cultured on an Amniotic Membrane Substrate for Intraoral Mucosal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-01-01

    The human amniotic membrane (AM) is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2–3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects. PMID:25915046

  8. Removal of phenolic compounds in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Nam-Koong, W.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this research was an evaluation of the removal rates of phenolic compounds in soil. Seventeen phenolic compounds with similar structure were chosen. Relative toxicity of phenolic compounds also was determined by the Microtox{sup TM} System to evaluate the relationship between the toxicity of the phenolic compounds and removal rate. The amount of ATP in the soil was measured by a Lumac/3M biocounter to evaluate any effect of phenolic compounds on the soil microbial activity. Preferential removal of phenolic compounds occurred in mixtures. The presence of phenol and/or o-cresol reduced the removal rate of 2,4-dichlorophenol. Reapplications of the phenolic compounds did not change the removal rate of the compounds. There was good correlation between the relative toxicity of phenolic compounds and zero order removal rates. The less toxic phenolic compounds were removed more rapidly. No lag phase was observed for the removal of phenolic compounds when the compounds were applied to soil below the toxic level. Phenolic compounds had a significant effect on soil microbial activity based on ATP measurement. The increase in soil ATP was related to a rapid removal of phenol. A gradual decrease in soil ATP was observed with the removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  9. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  10. Head and neck mucosal melanoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Silvia V; Fernandes, Juliana D; Hsieh, Ricardo; Coutinho-Camillo, Claudia M; Bologna, Sheyla; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M S

    2014-07-01

    Head and neck mucosal melanoma (MM) is an aggressive and rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin. To date, few retrospective series and case reports have been reported on MM. This article reviews the current evidence on head and neck MM and the molecular pathways that mediate the pathogenesis of this disease. Head and neck MM accounts for 0.7%-3.8% of all melanomas and involve (in decreasing order of frequency) the sinonasal cavity, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and upper esophagus. Although many studies have examined MM of the head and neck and the underlying molecular pathways, individual genetic and molecular alterations were less investigated. Further studies are needed to complement existing data and to increase our understanding of melanocytes tumorigenesis. PMID:24423929

  11. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2015-12-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic Csbnd H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the spectral influences

  12. Topical and mucosal liposomes for vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal (and in minor extent transcutanous) stimulation can induce local or distant mucosa secretory IgA. Liposomes and other vesicles as mucosal and transcutaneous adjuvants are attractive alternatives to parenteral vaccination. Liposomes can be massively produced under good manufacturing practices and stored for long periods, at high antigen/vesicle mass ratios. However, their uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APC) at the inductive sites remains as a major challenge. As neurotoxicity is a major concern in intranasal delivery, complexes between archaeosomes and calcium as well as cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding for antigenic proteins could safely elicit secretory and systemic antigen-specific immune responses. Oral bilosomes generate intense immune responses that remain to be tested against challenge, but the admixing with toxins or derivatives is mandatory to reduce the amount of antigen. Most of the current experimental designs, however, underestimate the mucus blanket 100- to 1000-fold thicker than a 100-nm diameter liposome, which has first to be penetrated to access the underlying M cells. Overall, designing mucoadhesive chemoenzymatic resistant liposomes, or selectively targeted to M cells, has produced less relevant results than tailoring the liposomes to make them mucus penetrating. Opposing, the nearly 10 µm thickness stratum corneum interposed between liposomes and underlying APC can be surpassed by ultradeformable liposomes (UDL), with lipid matrices that penetrate up to the limit with the viable epidermis. UDL made of phospholipids and detergents, proved to be better transfection agents than conventional liposomes and niosomes, without the toxicity of ethosomes, in the absence of classical immunomodulators. PMID:21360692

  13. Infection and mucosal injury in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Wingard, J R

    2001-01-01

    The oral and gastrointestinal mucosa acts as an important mechanical barrier that prevents local or systemic invasion by microorganisms. Cytotoxic chemotherapy-induced mucosal injury (MI) of oral cavity and intestinal epithelium occurs in many patients treated for malignancy. Compromise of the mucosal barrier can contribute to local invasion by colonizing microorganisms and, subsequently, to systemic infection. Historically, gram-negative bacteremia has been the most problematic bacterial infection in neutropenic patients, but its incidence has reduced over time because of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. There has been a shift in the type of infecting organisms responsible for bacteremia in these patients, from predominantly gram-negative organisms to gram-positive cocci. The viridans group of streptococci is composed of the most frequent bacterial pathogens associated with MI. When speciated, oral colonizers such as Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sangulis II are the most frequently identified pathogens. Other systemic infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Candida species have also been associated with MI after cancer treatment. Infection can also exacerbate MI after cancer treatment. The best recognized example is herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Latent virus is frequently reactivated in HSV-seropositive patients; this reactivation leads to stomatitis, which can be indistinguishable from MI caused by cytoreductive therapies. Antiviral prophylaxis or treatment can control the virus-induced MI and bring about overall amelioration of MI. Recognition of this infectious cause of MI is important in order for clinicians to anticipate and minimize oral toxicity and to facilitate optimal delivery of the antineoplastic regimen. PMID:11694563

  14. Degradation Of Carbon/Phenolic Composites By NaOH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. M.; Semmel, M. L.; Goldberg, B. E.; Clinton, Raymond G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of sodium hydroxide contamination level on physical and chemical properties of phenolic resin and carbon/phenolic composites described in report. NaOH degrades both carbon and phenolic components of carbon/phenolic laminates.

  15. Modulation of Phenol Oxidation in Cofacial Dyads

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bon Jun; Huynh, Michael; Halbach, Robert L.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation of two phenols on a xanthene backbone is akin to the tyrosine dyad (Y730 and Y731) of ribonucleotide reductase. X-ray crystallography reveals that the two phenol moieties are cofacially disposed at 4.35 Å. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) reveals that phenol oxidation is modulated within the dyad, which exhibits a splitting of one-electron waves with the second oxidation of the phenol dyad occurring at larger positive potential than that of a typical phenol. In contrast, a single phenol appended to a xanthene exhibits a two-electron (ECE) process, consistent with reported oxidation pathways of phenols in acetonitrile. The perturbation of the phenol potential by stacking is reminiscent of a similar effect for guanines stacked within DNA base pairs. PMID:26305909

  16. Dental students' ability to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad A; Joseph, Bobby K; Sundaram, Devipriya B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of dental students in the screening clinic of the Kuwait University Dental Center to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions. Clinical examinations performed by dental students between January 2009 and February 2011 were included. All their findings regarding the oral mucosal lesions and dental carious lesions detected were recorded, after which the patients were re-examined by faculty examiners. The students rated their own ability to detect mucosal and carious lesions before each examination. Among the 341 patients screened, 375 oral mucosal lesions were found by the faculty examiners. Of those, the students detected 178 (47.5%). Out of the 375 lesions, including the ones they failed to detect, the students diagnosed 272 (72.5%) correctly. The students were more likely (p≤0.01) to correctly diagnose a mucosal lesion when they themselves had detected it (n=169/178) than when they failed to detect it and had it subsequently pointed out by the faculty examiners (n=103/197). The students were more competent in detecting carious lesions (p≤0.001) than in detecting mucosal lesions. A significantly higher proportion of students who felt confident in detecting mucosal lesions were actually more competent in detecting the lesions than those who were not confident (p≤0.001). Further educational strategies are needed to motivate Kuwait University dental students to develop the knowledge, skills, and judgment necessary to integrate a complete intraoral examination into their routine practice. PMID:25640618

  17. Oral Mucosal Lesions in Indians From Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; e Ribeiro, Livia Silva Figueiredo; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ≥19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (≥35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.76, P = 0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 0.96–4.71, P = 0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population. PMID:25501053

  18. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer’s patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases. PMID:26460320

  19. Modeling mucosal candidiasis in larval zebrafish by swimbladder injection.

    PubMed

    Gratacap, Remi L; Bergeron, Audrey C; Wheeler, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  20. Modeling Mucosal Candidiasis in Larval Zebrafish by Swimbladder Injection

    PubMed Central

    Gratacap, Remi L.; Bergeron, Audrey C.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  1. Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neurath, Markus F; Travis, Simon P L

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies have identified mucosal healing on endoscopy as a key prognostic parameter in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), thus highlighting the role of endoscopy for monitoring of disease activity in IBD. In fact, mucosal healing has emerged as a key treatment goal in IBD that predicts sustained clinical remission and resection-free survival of patients. The structural basis of mucosal healing is an intact barrier function of the gut epithelium that prevents translocation of commensal bacteria into the mucosa and submucosa with subsequent immune cell activation. Thus, mucosal healing should be considered as an initial event in the suppression of inflammation of deeper layers of the bowel wall, rather than as a sign of complete healing of gut inflammation. In this systematic review, the clinical studies on mucosal healing are summarised and the effects of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs such as 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, azathioprine, ciclosporin and anti-TNF antibodies (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, infliximab) on mucosal healing are discussed. Finally, the implications of mucosal healing for subsequent clinical management in patients with IBD are highlighted. PMID:22842618

  2. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  7. Red chicory (Cichorium intybus L. cultivar) as a potential source of antioxidant anthocyanins for intestinal health.

    PubMed

    D'evoli, Laura; Morroni, Fabiana; Lombardi-Boccia, Ginevra; Lucarini, Massimo; Hrelia, Patrizia; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Tarozzi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Fruit- and vegetable-derived foods have become a very significant source of nutraceutical phytochemicals. Among vegetables, red chicory (Cichorium Intybus L. cultivar) has gained attention for its content of phenolic compounds, such as the anthocyanins. In this study, we evaluated the nutraceutical effects, in terms of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiproliferative activities, of extracts of the whole leaf or only the red part of the leaf of Treviso red chicory (a typical Italian red leafy plant) in various intestinal models, such as Caco-2 cells, differentiated in normal intestinal epithelia and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. The results show that the whole leaf of red chicory can represent a good source of phytochemicals in terms of total phenolics and anthocyanins as well as the ability of these phytochemicals to exert antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in differentiated Caco-2 cells and antiproliferative effects in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, compared to red chicory whole leaf extracts, the red part of leaf extracts had a significantly higher content of both total phenolics and anthocyanins. The same extracts effectively corresponded to an increase of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiproliferative activities. Taken together, these findings suggest that the red part of the leaf of Treviso red chicory with a high content of antioxidant anthocyanins could be interesting for development of new food supplements to improve intestinal health. PMID:24069504

  8. Nutraceuticals and amyloid neurodegenerative diseases: a focus on natural phenols.

    PubMed

    Rigacci, Stefania; Stefani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A common molecular feature of amyloid neurodegenerative diseases is the unfolding/misfolding of specific proteins/peptides which consequently become prone to aggregate into toxic assemblies and deposits that are the key histopathological trait of these pathologies. Apart from the rare early-onset familiar forms, these neurodegenerative diseases are age-associated disorders whose symptoms appear in aged people after long incubation periods. This makes the therapeutic approach particularly compelling and boosts the search for both early diagnostic tools and preventive approaches. In this last respect, natural compounds commonly present in foods and beverages are considered promising molecules, at least on the bench side. The so-called 'nutraceutical approach' suggests life-long healthy diets, particularly focusing on food molecules that are candidates to enter clinical trials as such or following a targeted molecular engineering. Natural phenols abundant in 'healthy' foods such as extra virgin olive oil, red wine, green tea, red berries and spices, appear particularly promising. PMID:25418871

  9. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for mucosal delivery of RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Alina; Olesen, Morten Jarlstad; Howard, Kenneth A

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) gene silencing by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) offers a potent and highly specific therapeutic strategy; however, enabling technologies that overcome extracellular and intracellular barriers are required. Polycation-based nanoparticles (termed polyplexes) composed of the polysaccharide chitosan have been used to facilitate delivery of siRNA across mucosal surfaces following local administration. This chapter describes the mucosal barriers that need to be addressed in order to design an effective mucosal delivery strategy and the utilization of the mucoadhesive properties of chitosan. Focus is given to preparation methods and the preclinical application of chitosan nanoparticles for respiratory and oral delivery of siRNA. PMID:25409611

  10. Tolerance of gastric mucosal flap to postoperative irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Devineni, V.R.; Hayden, R.; Fredrickson, J.; Sicard, G. )

    1991-05-01

    When malignant lesions of the oral cavity, base of tongue, and oropharynx are treated with radical resection, adequate reconstruction is required. The free gastric mucosal flap with microvascular transfer is being used with increasing frequency at Washington University Medical Center. Because of the advanced nature of the primary lesions, most patients also require postoperative radiation therapy. In this paper the tolerance of the gastric mucosal flap to postoperative radiation therapy is reviewed. The changes resulting from radiation therapy in the mucosal flap were found to be acceptable, and no major complications were encountered.

  11. Mucosal disease of cattle: a late sequel to fetal infection.

    PubMed

    Roeder, P L; Drew, T W

    1984-03-31

    The introduction of a heifer which was persistently infected with bovine virus diarrhoea-mucosal disease virus into groups of pregnant cattle resulted in abortion, neonatal death, persistent infection and, subsequently, mucosal disease in the surviving progeny. Cattle affected with mucosal disease were invariably seronegative at the time of investigation and subsequent cases occurred only in calves previously identified as seronegative and persistently infected. The detection of virus antigen by immunofluorescent staining of cells obtained from the nasopharynx was shown to be an efficient and rapid method for identifying persistently infected cattle, correlating perfectly with virus isolation. PMID:6328725

  12. Oxidative transformation of phenols in aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, L; Sannino, F; Rao, M A; Bollag, J M

    2003-07-01

    The transformation by an oxidoreductase (a laccase from Rhus vernificera) of a mixture of four phenols (catechol, methylcatechol, m-tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol) that simulates a typical wastewater derived from an olive oil factory was investigated. Results achieved in this study confirm that laccase-mediated transformation of phenols depends on the nature and the initial concentration of the involved phenol, the time course of the reaction, and mainly, on the complexity of the phenolic incubation mixture. Actually, the four phenols each have a completely different response to enzyme action both in terms of quantitative and kinetic transformation. For example, after 24-h incubation, methylcatechol was completely removed, whereas 30% of untransformed hydroxytyrosol and catechol and more than 65% of m-tyrosol were still present in the reaction mixture. A reduction of enzyme activity occurred for all phenols after enzymatic oxidation. No correspondence between phenol transformation and disappearance of enzymatic activity was observed, thus suggesting that different mechanisms are probably involved in the laccase-mediated transformation of the four phenols. The behavior of phenols became more complex when an increasing number of phenols was present in the reaction mixture, and even more so when different concentrations of phenols were used. Competitive effects may arise when more than one phenol is present in the reaction solution and interacts with the enzyme. PMID:14509708

  13. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5763 - Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols... Substances § 721.5763 Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... phenols (P-94-1042) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5763 - Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols... Substances § 721.5763 Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... phenols (P-94-1042) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5763 - Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols... Substances § 721.5763 Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... phenols (P-94-1042) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5763 - Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols... Substances § 721.5763 Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... phenols (P-94-1042) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5763 - Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols... Substances § 721.5763 Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... phenols (P-94-1042) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  3. Optimization of extraction conditions of total phenolics, antioxidant activities, and anthocyanin of oregano, thyme, terebinth, and pomegranate.

    PubMed

    Rababah, Taha M; Banat, Fawzi; Rababah, Anfal; Ereifej, Khalil; Yang, Wade

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the total phenolic extracts and antioxidant activity and anthocyanins of varieties of the investigated plants. These plants include oregano, thyme, terebinth, and pomegranate. The optimum extraction conditions including temperature and solvent of the extraction process itself were investigated. Total phenolic and anthocyanin extracts were examined according to Folin-Ciocalteu assay and Rabino and Mancinelli method, respectively. The effect of different extracting solvents and temperatures on extracts of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins were studied. Plant samples were evaluated for their antioxidant chemical activity by 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazl assay, to determine their potential as a source of natural antioxidant. Results showed that all tested plants exhibited appreciable amounts of phenolic compounds. The methanolic extract (60 °C) of sour pomegranate peel contained the highest phenolic extract (4952.4 mg/100 g of dry weight). Terebinth green seed had the lowest phenolic extract (599.4 mg/100 g of dry weight). Anthocyanins ranged between 3.5 (terebinth red seed) and 0.2 mg/100 g of dry material (thyme). Significant effect of different extracting solvents and temperatures on total phenolics and anthocyanin extracts were found. The methanol and 60 °C of extraction conditions found to be the best for extracting phenolic compounds. The distilled water and 60 °C extraction conditions found to be the best for extracting anthocyanin. PMID:21535529

  4. The untapped capacity of phenolics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    My research focuses on understanding the dynamics of plant primary and secondary metabolites. Though plant metabolites, including phenolics, make up only a small portion of the compounds found in a fruit or its final product, they are crucial for their contribution towards appearance (color), taste ...

  5. Lignin phenols derivatives in lichens.

    PubMed

    Zavarzina, A G; Romankevich, E A; Peresypkin, V I; Ulyantzev, A S; Belyaev, N A; Zavarzin, A A

    2015-01-01

    Lignin monophenols have been measured in the cupric oxide oxidation products from lichens of different systematic groups. It is shown for the first time that syringyl structures in most lichens strongly dominate over vanillyl and p-hydroxyl ones (S/V 7-583, S/P 3-30). This distinguishes lichens from algae and mosses (p-hydroxyl phenols are dominant) and from higher plants (S/V ratios are from 0 in gymnosperms to 1.1-5.2 in angiosperms). Molecular ratios of phenols as well as the ratios of acids to aldehydes in lichens were different from lignin of higher plants, suggesting contribution of non-lignin phenols in CuO oxidation products. The contents of syringyl and vanillyl phenols in some lichen species were comparable to non-woody tissues of higher plants. Results of the study suggest that lichens can be important source of aromatic structures in soils and hydrosphere, particularly in the regions were lichens are abundant. PMID:26728733

  6. Phenolic acid composition of sprouted wheats by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and their antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pham Van; Hatcher, David W; Barker, Wendy

    2011-06-15

    The phenolic acid profiles of flours from two Canadian wheat classes, Canadian Western Red Spring (CWRS) and Canadian Western Amber Durum (CWAD), were investigated using two different extraction mediums and analysed on an ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) system at different degrees of sprout damage. A sound (non-sprouted) control sample as well as two different sprouted sub-samples, derived from different germination protocols of the control, were prepared for both the CWAD and CWRS. Free phenolic acids were extracted from the ground whole wheat meal using three repetitive 80% ethanol extractions. Bound phenolic compounds were subsequently released from the residue by alkaline hydrolysis followed by triplicate extraction with diethyl ether:ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v). Twelve phenolic acid standards were clearly resolved and quantified using a short 5min elution gradient. Seven phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic, caffeic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic and sinapic) were detected in the CWRS and CWAD alcoholic and alkaline extracts. Syringic acid was the main compound in the free phenolic alcoholic extracts of the wheat meal representing 77.0% and 75.3% of the total amount of detected free phenolic compounds for CWRS and CWAD, respectively. However, the major released phenolic compound detected in the alkaline hydrolysed extracts was ferulic acid accounting for 72.3% and 71.0% for CWRS and CWAD respectively total bound phenolics. During germination, syringic acid levels rose as the length of germination time increased, resulting in the increase in total phenolic compound and antioxidant activity of the sprouted wheat flours. There was an increase in total phenolic compounds and the antioxidant activity of the alcoholic extracts from the CWRS and CWAD wheat flours as the germination time was extended. As a result, the sprouted wheats exhibits better nutritional properties than un-germinated wheat and could be used to improve the nutrition value in

  7. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  8. Phenolic compounds and bioactivities of pigmented rice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Dan; Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin

    2013-01-01

    The pigmented rice has been consumed in China, Japan, and Korea for a long time. It has been used for strengthening kidney function, treating anemia, promoting blood circulation, removing blood stasis, treating diabetes, and ameliorating sight in traditional Chinese medicine. The extracts from pigmented rice are used as natural food colorants in bread, ice cream, and liquor as well as functional food. The pigmented rice is mainly black, red, and dark purple rice, and contains a variety of flavones, tannin, phenolics, sterols, tocols, γ-oryzanols, amino acids, and essential oils. Anthocyanins are thought as major functional components of pigmented rice. Several anthocyanins have been isolated and identified from the pigmented rice, including cyanidin 3-glucoside, cyanidin 3-galactoside, cyanidin 3-rutinoside, cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside, malvidin 3-galactoside, peonidin 3-glucoside, and pelargonidin 3,5-diglucoside. This review provides up-to-date coverage of pigmented rice in regard to bioactive constituents, extraction and analytical methods, and bioactivities. Special attention is paid to the bioactivities including antioxidant and free radical scavenging, antitumor, antiatherosclerosis, hypoglycemic, and antiallergic activities. PMID:23216001

  9. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  10. Biological Activity of Vegetal Extracts Containing Phenols on Plant Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ertani, Andrea; Pizzeghello, Diego; Francioso, Ornella; Tinti, Anna; Nardi, Serenella

    2016-01-01

    The influence of vegetal extracts derived from red grape, blueberry fruits and hawthorn leaves on Zea mays L. plant growth and the activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, was investigated in laboratory experiments. The extracts were characterized using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies in order to obtain a pattern of the main functional groups. In addition, phenols content was determined by HPLC, whereas the content of indoleacetic acid and isopentenyladenosine hormones was determined by ELISA test and the auxin and gibberellin-like activities by plant-bioassays. The treated maize revealed increased root and leaf biomass, chlorophyll and sugars content with respect to untreated plants. Hawthorn, red grape skin and blueberry at 1.0 mL/L induced high p-coumaric content values, whilst hawthorn also showed high amounts of gallic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids. PAL activity induced by hawthorn at 1.0 mL/L had the highest values (11.1-fold UNT) and was strongly and linearly related with the sum of leaf phenols. Our results suggest that these vegetal extracts contain more than one group of plant-promoting substances. PMID:26867189

  11. Polymeric penetration enhancers promote humoral immune responses to mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Mann, Jamie F S; Rogers, Paul; Shattock, Robin J

    2014-06-10

    Protective mucosal immune responses are thought best induced by trans-mucosal vaccination, providing greater potential to generate potent local immune responses than conventional parenteral vaccination. However, poor trans-mucosal permeability of large macromolecular antigens limits bioavailability to local inductive immune cells. This study explores the utility of polymeric penetration enhancers to promote trans-mucosal bioavailability of insulin, as a biomarker of mucosal absorption, and two vaccine candidates: recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (CN54gp140) and tetanus toxoid (TT). Responses to vaccinating antigens were assessed by measurement of serum and the vaginal humoral responses. Polyethyleneimine (PEI), Dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD) and Chitosan enhanced the bioavailability of insulin following intranasal (IN), sublingual (SL), intravaginal (I.Vag) and intrarectal (IR) administration. The same penetration enhancers also increased antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses to the model vaccine antigens in serum and vaginal secretions following IN and SL application. Co-delivery of both antigens with PEI or Chitosan showed the highest increase in systemic IgG and IgA responses following IN or SL administration. However the highest IgA titres in vaginal secretions were achieved after IN immunisations with PEI and Chitosan. None of the penetration enhancers were able to increase antibody responses to gp140 after I.Vag immunisations, while in contrast PEI and Chitosan were able to induce TT-specific systemic IgG levels following I.Vag administration. In summary, we present supporting data that suggest appropriate co-formulation of vaccine antigens with excipients known to influence mucosal barrier functions can increase the bioavailability of mucosally applied antigens promoting the induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses. PMID:24657807

  12. Use of Transparent Film Dressing for Dermoscopy of Mucosal Lesions.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jennifer; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-01-01

    Genital and mucosal nevi are not uncommonly encountered in children. These type of nevi highlight challenges in performing a thorough dermoscopic examination. Contact dermoscopy can provide additional information about a nevus that non-contact dermoscopy cannot. We propose applying a sterile transparent film dressing over the dermatoscope to act as a waterproof barrier that is also impermeable to bacteria and viruses. This provides a sanitary way to evaluate nevi in genital skin as well as on other mucosal surfaces. PMID:26250593

  13. Inhibition of enzymatic cellulolysis by phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Tejirian, Ani; Xu, Feng

    2011-03-01

    Phenolics derived from lignin and other plant components can pose significant inhibition on enzymatic conversion of cellulosic biomass materials to useful chemicals. Understanding the mechanism of such inhibition is of importance for the development of viable biomass conversion technologies. In native plant cell wall, most of the phenolics and derivatives are found in polymeric lignin. When biomass feedstocks are pretreated (prior to enzymatic hydrolysis), simple or oligomeric phenolics and derivatives are often generated from lignin modification/degradation, which can inhibit biomass-converting enzymes. To further understand how such phenolic substances may affect cellulase reaction, we carried out a comparative study on a series of simple and oligomeric phenolics representing or mimicking the composition of lignin or its degradation products. Consistent to previous studies, we observed that oligomeric phenolics could exert more inhibition on enzymatic cellulolysis than simple phenolics. Oligomeric phenolics could inactivate cellulases by reversibly complexing them. Simple and oligomeric phenolics could also inhibit enzymatic cellulolysis by adsorbing onto cellulose. Individual cellulases showed different susceptibility toward these inhibitions. Polyethylene glycol and tannase could respectively bind and degrade the studied oligomeric phenolics, and by doing so mitigate the oligomeric phenolic's inhibition on cellulolysis. PMID:22112906

  14. Bound phenolics in foods, a review.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Estrada, Beatriz A; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O

    2014-01-01

    Among phytochemicals, phenolic compounds have been extensively researched due to their diverse health benefits. Phenolic compounds occur mostly as soluble conjugates and insoluble forms, covalently bound to sugar moieties or cell wall structural components. Absorption mechanisms for bound phenolic compounds in the gastrointestinal tract greatly depend on the liberation of sugar moieties. Food processes such as fermentation, malting, thermoplastic extrusion or enzymatic, alkaline and acid hydrolyses occasionally assisted with microwave or ultrasound have potential to release phenolics associated to cell walls. Different kinds of wet chemistry methodologies to release and detect bound phenolic have been developed. These include harsh heat treatments, chemical modifications or biocatalysis. New protocols for processing and determining phenolics in food matrices must be devised in order to release bound phenolics and for quality control in the growing functional food industry. PMID:24444905

  15. Measurement of phenol concentrations using hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Allen, B.F.; Scott, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    A major pollutant found in coal conversion wastewaters is phenol. Its removal by methods such as gravity separation, steam stripping, solvent extraction, biotreatment, and carbon adsorption must be monitored in order to determine that the water has been made safe for release back into the environment. Monitoring phenol concentrations in aqueous waste solutions is usually by the aminoantipyrine method. Other methods described for phenol determination include the use of enzyme electrodes based on immobilized tyrosinase and immobilized phenol hydroxylase. The authors present preliminary data upon which a new assay for phenols could be based. It concerns the peroxidatic activity of hemoglobin. When phenol, hemoglobin, and hydrogen peroxide are incubated together, there is an increase in absorbance at 260 nm which is proportional to the concentration of phenol. 5 references, 2 figures.

  16. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  17. Inside the brachycephalic nose: intranasal mucosal contact points.

    PubMed

    Schuenemann, Riccarda; Oechtering, Gerhard U

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of intranasal mucosal contact points in brachycephalic and normocephalic dogs. In total, 82 brachycephalic dogs (42 pugs and 40 French bulldogs) were evaluated by rhinoscopy for their intranasal mucosal contact and 25 normocephalic dogs were evaluated as a control group. Of those, 162 brachycephalic nasal cavities were evaluable and 140 had contact between intranasal structures (87%). Intraconchal and septoconchal mucosal contact points were the most commonly detected sites of contact. French bulldogs had a significantly higher prevalence of mucosal contact and had 3 mean contact points compared with 1.7 mean contact points per nasal cavity in pugs. Septal deviations were present in 62% of brachycephalic dogs. In the control group, mucosal contact points were present in only 7 of 50 nasal cavities (14%), and septal deviations occurred in 16% of those cases. Contact point average was 0.1 in large and 0.3 in small normocephalic dogs. Intranasal mucosal contact was identified as a common and previously unreported problem in brachycephalic dogs. Numerous contact points reduce the lumen of the intranasal passageways and indicate potential intranasal obstruction. Affected dogs might benefit from removal of obstructing conchae, potentially using laser-assisted turbinectomy. PMID:24659729

  18. Cancer therapy and oral mucositis. An appraisal of drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Verdi, C J

    1993-09-01

    Oral mucositis as a consequence of cytotoxic therapy is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients. Cancer therapy-induced tissue damage leading to mucositis can occur through either direct or indirect stomatotoxicity. Once mucositis has occurred, treatment consists of measures to palliate symptoms. The prevention of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis is less standardised. Numerous drugs have been used as prophylactic agents to prevent chemo- and radiotherapy-induced mucositis. Controlled trials have shown some degree of prophylactic efficacy for sucralfate, chlorhexidine and benzydamine. Positive but non-placebo-controlled trials requiring more study have been conducted with dinoprostone (prostaglandin E2), silver nitrate, beta-carotene, pentoxifylline and lozenges containing polymixin B, tobramycin and amphotericin B. Current studies have shown a lack of efficacy with allopurinol and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Nonpharmacological methods such as oral cryotherapy and helium-neon laser treatments have shown some promise. At the present time no agent has been shown to be uniformly efficacious and can be accepted as standard therapy. Additional studies combining several agents or incorporating nonpharmacological manoeuvres for mucositis prevention are needed. PMID:8240724

  19. Mucosal immunoregulation: transcription factors as possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Doganci, Aysefa; Neurath, Markus F; Finotto, Susetta

    2005-10-01

    Much progress has been recently made with regard to our understanding of the mucosal immune system in health and disease. In particular, it has been shown that uncontrolled mucosal immune responses driven by lymphocytes or non-lymphoid cells may lead to immunological diseases such as allergy, hypersensitivity and inflammation. Thus, a more detailed understanding of mucosal immune regulation and decision making at mucosal surfaces is essential for a better understanding of mucosal immune responses in health and disease. Antigen presenting cells and T lymphocytes play a key role in controlling mucosal immune responses. To deal with this key task, T helper cells differentiate into functionally distinct subsets: TH1 (CD4+ T Helper cells), TH2, TH3, Tr1, and CD4+CD25+ T (Treg) cells. This review summarizes the role of antigen presenting cells, eosinophils, mast cells and T-cell subsets in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation and intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, we discuss novel immunological treatment modalities for allergic inflammation (e.g. allergic asthma) and chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)) such as the control of the expression of transcription factors to redirect pathological immune responses. PMID:16248825

  20. Successful endoscopic submucosal dissection for mucosal cancer of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masahiro; Makino, Atsushi; Wada, Masahiro; Kabeshima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Shito, Masaya; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Omori, Tai

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of mucosal duodenal cancer in a 62-year-old woman, which was successfully removed en bloc by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The patient underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at our hospital, which revealed an elevated flat mucosal lesion (type IIa) measuring 10 mm in diameter in the second portion of the duodenum. Histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen revealed features suggestive of a tubulovillous adenoma with severe atypia. As the findings suggested that the lesion had an adenocarcinoma component but was confined to the mucosal layer, we decided to carry out ESD and successfully removed the tumor in one piece. The resected tumor was 20 x 15 mm in size. Histopathological examination revealed that the lesion was a well-differentiated mucosal adenocarcinoma with no lymphovascular invasion. Mucosal duodenal cancer is extremely rare, and ESD of a lesion in the duodenum requires a high level of skill. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report of successful ESD carried out in a case of mucosal duodenal cancer. PMID:20078665

  1. Novel strategies using DNA for the induction of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces are the primary sites for transmission of most infectious diseases. However, most conventional vaccines are administered parenterally [e.g., by intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) injection] and induce systemic but rarely mucosal immunity. Novel vaccination strategies capable of inducing both systemic and mucosal immune responses could greatly reduce infection and morbidity worldwide. One of the most exciting advances in vaccine technology in recent years has been the development of DNA vaccines, through which the antigen is synthesized in vivo after direct introduction of its encoding sequences. The vast majority of DNA vaccines have been delivered parenterally; however, in recent years a number of studies have reported successful mucosal immunization with DNA vaccines. The induction of strong immune responses following the introduction of DNA appears to be partly due to the potent adjuvant effect of unmethylated immunostimulatory CpG motifs present in the DNA backbone. Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing such immunostimulatory CpG motifs are potent adjuvants systemically and mucosally in mice, and have synergistic action with other adjuvants, such as alum and cholera toxin (CT). This article highlights the recent advances in vaccination strategies using DNA delivered to mucosal surfaces either as an antigen-encoding plasmid or as an adjuvant. PMID:10530431

  2. Clotrimazole nanoparticle gel for mucosal administration.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Ravani, Laura; Contado, Catia; Costenaro, Andrea; Drechsler, Markus; Rossi, Damiano; Menegatti, Enea; Grandini, Alessandro; Cortesi, Rita

    2013-01-01

    In this study a formulation suitable to be applied on oral and/or vaginal mucosa has been developed for the treatment of fungal infections. The aim of the research is a comparison between clotrimazole (CLO) containing semisolid formulations based on monoolein aqueous dispersion (MAD) or nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC). MAD and NLC have been characterized in terms of morphology and dimensional distribution by cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). CLO was encapsulated with high entrapment efficiency both in MAD and in NLC, according to Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF) combined with HPLC. CLO recovery in MAD and NLC has been investigated by time. In order to obtain formulations with suitable viscosity for mucosal application, MAD was diluted with a carbomer gel, while NLC was directly viscosized by the addition of poloxamer 407 in the dispersion. The rheological properties of MAD and NLC after viscosizing have been investigated. Franz cell has been employed to study CLO diffusion from the different vehicles, evidencing diffusion rates from MAD and NLC superimposable to that obtained using Canesten(®). An anticandidal activity study demonstrated that both CLO-MAD and CLO-NLC were more active against Candida albicans with respect to the pure drug. PMID:25428089

  3. Mucosal effects of tenofovir 1% gel.

    PubMed

    Hladik, Florian; Burgener, Adam; Ballweber, Lamar; Gottardo, Raphael; Vojtech, Lucia; Fourati, Slim; Dai, James Y; Cameron, Mark J; Strobl, Johanna; Hughes, Sean M; Hoesley, Craig; Andrew, Philip; Johnson, Sherri; Piper, Jeanna; Friend, David R; Ball, T Blake; Cranston, Ross D; Mayer, Kenneth H; McElrath, M Juliana; McGowan, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir gel is being evaluated for vaginal and rectal pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV transmission. Because this is a new prevention strategy, we broadly assessed its effects on the mucosa. In MTN-007, a phase-1, randomized, double-blinded rectal microbicide trial, we used systems genomics/proteomics to determine the effect of tenofovir 1% gel, nonoxynol-9 2% gel, placebo gel or no treatment on rectal biopsies (15 subjects/arm). We also treated primary vaginal epithelial cells from four healthy women with tenofovir in vitro. After seven days of administration, tenofovir 1% gel had broad-ranging effects on the rectal mucosa, which were more pronounced than, but different from, those of the detergent nonoxynol-9. Tenofovir suppressed anti-inflammatory mediators, increased T cell densities, caused mitochondrial dysfunction, altered regulatory pathways of cell differentiation and survival, and stimulated epithelial cell proliferation. The breadth of mucosal changes induced by tenofovir indicates that its safety over longer-term topical use should be carefully monitored. PMID:25647729

  4. Mucosal effects of tenofovir 1% gel

    PubMed Central

    Hladik, Florian; Burgener, Adam; Ballweber, Lamar; Gottardo, Raphael; Vojtech, Lucia; Fourati, Slim; Dai, James Y; Cameron, Mark J; Strobl, Johanna; Hughes, Sean M; Hoesley, Craig; Andrew, Philip; Johnson, Sherri; Piper, Jeanna; Friend, David R; Ball, T Blake; Cranston, Ross D; Mayer, Kenneth H; McElrath, M Juliana; McGowan, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir gel is being evaluated for vaginal and rectal pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV transmission. Because this is a new prevention strategy, we broadly assessed its effects on the mucosa. In MTN-007, a phase-1, randomized, double-blinded rectal microbicide trial, we used systems genomics/proteomics to determine the effect of tenofovir 1% gel, nonoxynol-9 2% gel, placebo gel or no treatment on rectal biopsies (15 subjects/arm). We also treated primary vaginal epithelial cells from four healthy women with tenofovir in vitro. After seven days of administration, tenofovir 1% gel had broad-ranging effects on the rectal mucosa, which were more pronounced than, but different from, those of the detergent nonoxynol-9. Tenofovir suppressed anti-inflammatory mediators, increased T cell densities, caused mitochondrial dysfunction, altered regulatory pathways of cell differentiation and survival, and stimulated epithelial cell proliferation. The breadth of mucosal changes induced by tenofovir indicates that its safety over longer-term topical use should be carefully monitored. Clinical trial registration: NCT01232803. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04525.001 PMID:25647729

  5. Reflectance confocal microscopy for mucosal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, E; Labeille, B; Cambazard, F; Thuret, G; Gain, P; Perrot, J L

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive, real-time microscopic imaging using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been demonstrated to be a useful tool for the evaluation of skin diseases and in particular for skin neoplasms. Recently, the RCM devices dedicated to the skin have also been applied to perform "virtual biopsies" of the oral, genital and ocular mucosa. In fact, mucosa is a sensitive area where non invasive imaging techniques are of high interest in order to spare biopsies and excisions. Mucosa is particularly suitable for RCM because of its thin or absent cornified layer and its thin epithelium that allows a deeper penetration of the laser with the consequent possibility of exploring deeper tissue levels. Besides, being useful for the diagnosis, RCM may be helpful to identify the area to be biopsied in case of large or multifocal lesions and may be regarded as a complementary technique for non invasive assessment of treatment efficacy. The RCM features of healthy mucosa are described and a revision of the literature of the mucosal diseases that can be diagnosed by RCM has been performed. PMID:26099354

  6. Mucosal immune responses following intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaph, C; Cooper, P J; Harris, N L

    2014-01-01

    In most natural environments, the large majority of mammals harbour parasitic helminths that often live as adults within the intestine for prolonged periods (1–2 years) 1. Although these organisms have been eradicated to a large extent within westernized human populations, those living within rural areas of developing countries continue to suffer from high infection rates. Indeed, recent estimates indicate that approximately 2·5 billion people worldwide, mainly children, currently suffer from infection with intestinal helminths (also known as geohelminths and soil-transmitted helminths) 2. Paradoxically, the eradication of helminths is thought to contribute to the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergy observed in developed countries. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of host–helminth interactions at the mucosal surface that result in parasite expulsion or permit the establishment of chronic infections with luminal dwelling adult worms. We will also provide insight into the adaptive immune mechanisms that provide immune protection against re-infection with helminth larvae, a process that is likely to be key to the future development of successful vaccination strategies. Lastly, the contribution of helminths to immune modulation and particularly to the treatment of allergy and inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed. PMID:25201407

  7. Mucosal Inflammatory Response to Salmonella typhimurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; McCormick, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium consists of a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a barrier against food antigens and the resident microbiota within the lumen. This delicately balanced organ functions in a highly sophisticated manner to uphold the fidelity of the intestinal epithelium and to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms. On the luminal side, this barrier is fortified by a thick mucus layer, and on the serosal side exists the lamina propria containing a resident population of immune cells. Pathogens that are able to breach this barrier disrupt the healthy epithelial lining by interfering with the regulatory mechanisms that govern the normal balance of intestinal architecture and function. This disruption results in a coordinated innate immune response deployed to eliminate the intruder that includes the release of antimicrobial peptides, activation of pattern-recognition receptors, and recruitment of a variety of immune cells. In the case of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection, induction of an inflammatory response has been linked to its virulence mechanism, the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS secretes protein effectors that exploit the host’s cell biology to facilitate bacterial entry and intracellular survival, and to modulate the host immune response. As the role of the intestinal epithelium in initiating an immune response has been increasingly realized, this review will highlight recent research that details progress made in understanding mechanisms underlying the mucosal inflammatory response to Salmonella infection, and how such inflammatory responses impact pathogenic fitness of this organism. PMID:25071772

  8. Innate signals in mucosal immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Puga, Irene; Cols, Montserrat; Cerutti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The intestinal mucosa contains large communities of commensal bacteria that process otherwise indigestible food components, synthesize essential vitamins, stimulate the maturation of the immune system, and form an ecologic niche that prevents the growth of pathogenic species. Conversely, the intestine provides the commensals with a stable habitat rich in energy derived from the ingested food. A delicate homeostatic balance maintains this mutualistic relationship without triggering a destructive inflammatory response. Commensals orchestrate intestinal homeostasis by entertaining an intimate dialogue with epithelial cells and immune cells lodged in the mucosa. Such a dialogue generates finely tuned signaling programs that ensure a state of hyporesponsiveness against noninvasive commensals and a state of active readiness against invasive pathogens. In this dialogue epithelial cells function as "interpreters" that continuously translate microbial messages to "instruct" immune cells as to the antigenic composition of the intestinal lumen. This education process initiates sophisticated defensive strategies that comprise massive production of IgA, a noninflammatory mucosal antibody class that generates immunity while preserving homeostasis. PMID:21050939

  9. Soluble and bound phenolic compounds in different Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Montilla, Elyana; Hillebrand, Silke; Antezana, Amalia; Winterhalter, Peter

    2011-07-13

    In nine Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) varieties the content of phenolic compounds as well as the anthocyanin composition has been determined. The phenotypes under investigation included four red and five blue varieties (Kulli, Ayzuma, Paru, Tuimuru, Oke, Huaca Songo, Colorado, Huillcaparu, and Checchi). In purple corn, phenolic compounds were highly concentrated in cell walls. Thus, simultaneous determination of soluble and bound-form phenolics is essential for analysis, extraction, and quantification. The present study reports the determination of soluble and insoluble-bound fraction of phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) in Bolivian purple corn varieties. Enzymatic, thermal, and alkaline hydrolyses were used to obtain the cell wall-linked phenolic compounds. Ferulic acid values ranged from 132.9 to 298.4 mg/100 g, and p-coumaric acid contents varied between 251.8 and 607.5 mg/100 g dry weight (DW), respectively, and were identified as the main nonanthocyanin phenolics. The total content of phenolic compounds ranged from 311.0 to 817.6 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 g DW, and the percentage contribution of bound to total phenolics varied from 62.1 to 86.6%. The total monomeric anthocyanin content ranged from 1.9 to 71.7 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents/100 g DW. Anthocyanin profiles are almost the same among the different samples. Differences are observed only in the relative percentage of each anthocyanin. Cyanidin-3-glucoside and its malonated derivative were detected as major anthocyanins. Several dimalonylated monoglucosides of cyanidin, peonidin, and pelargonidin were present as minor constituents. PMID:21639140

  10. Comparison of Systemic and Mucosal Immunization with Helper-Dependent Adenoviruses for Vaccination against Mucosal Challenge with SHIV

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, Bharti P.; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J.; Hanley, Patrick W.; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination. PMID:23844034

  11. Factors affecting the separation and bioactivity of red clover (Trifolium pratense) extracts assayed against Clostridium sticklandii, a ruminal hyper ammonia-producing bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense) is rich in phenolic compounds. Both the crude phenolic extract and biochanin A, an isoflavonoid component of the extract, suppress growth of Clostridium sticklandii, a bovine, Gram positive, ruminal hyper-ammonia producing bacterium (HAB). The purpose of this study ...

  12. Vibrational analysis of phenol/(methanol)1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhards, M.; Beckmann, K.; Kleinermanns, K.

    1994-09-01

    Ab initio calculations at the Hartree-Fock 4-31G* level were performed in order to calculate binding energies and vibrational frequencies of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster and two deuterated isotopomers ( d-phenol/CH3OD, d-phenol-CD3OD). The minimum energy structure is trans-linear, as for the phenol/H2O-cluster. The calculated frequencies of phenol and methanol as well as the intramolecular frequencies of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster are assigned to experimental values. The calculated intermolecular frequencies of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster are compared with the available experimental frequencies of the S 0 (and S 1)-state of the phenol/methanol-cluster and the similar p-cresol/methanol-cluster. Assignments are suggested for the σ and p 1-mode. In order to clarify the assignment of the low frequency vibration at 22 cm-1 anharmonic corrections for the β2-mode of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster are calculated. These calculations show only slight anharmonicity compared with the β2-mode calculations carried out for the phenol/H2O-cluster.

  13. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  14. Analysis of a whole diet in terms of phenolic content and antioxidant capacity: effects of a simulated gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Koehnlein, Eloá Angélica; Koehnlein, Érica Marcela; Corrêa, Rúbia Carvalho Gomes; Nishida, Verônica Sayuri; Correa, Vanesa Gesser; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2016-09-01

    This work compares the phenolic contents and the total antioxidant capacity of the 36 most popular Brazilian foods submitted to aqueous extraction or in vitro digestion. The purpose was to evaluate the extent by which digestion differs from the simple aqueous extraction procedures of several food matrices. After in vitro digestion, cereals, legumes, vegetables, tuberous vegetables, chocolates and fruits showed higher phenolic contents and higher antioxidant activities than those obtained by aqueous extraction. Contrarily, the digestion caused a reduction in the phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of beverages (red wine, coffee and yerba mate). Our results suggest that the phenolics of food groups with solid and complex matrix are protected against enzymatic action and alteration in pH during the digestion, what does not occur in liquid food matrices such as the beverages. This fact would overestimate the antioxidant activities of beverages submitted solely to aqueous extraction. PMID:27210900

  15. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  16. Phenolic composition and related antioxidant properties in differently colored lettuces: a study by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Usue; Pinzino, Calogero; Quartacci, Mike Frank; Ranieri, Annamaria; Sgherri, Cristina

    2014-12-10

    Differently colored lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars (green, green/red, and red) were studied to correlate their phenolic composition with their antioxidant kinetic behavior. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was employed to monitor decay kinetics of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)), which allowed the identification of three differently paced antioxidants. The results showed that as long as lettuce had higher red pigmentation, the hydrophilic antioxidant capacity increased together with the contents in free and conjugated phenolic acids, free and conjugated flavonoids, and anthocyanins. EPR allowed the identification of slow-rate antioxidants in green and green/red cultivars, intermediate-rate antioxidants in green, green/red, and red cultivars, and fast-rate antioxidants in green/red and red cultivars. At present, the different kinetic behaviors cannot be attributed to a specific antioxidant, but it is suggested that the flavonoid quercetin accounted for the majority of the intermediate-rate antioxidants, whereas the anthocyanins accounted for the majority of the fast-rate antioxidants. PMID:25389053

  17. Evaluation of the effect of germination on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in sorghum varieties.

    PubMed

    Dicko, Mamoudou H; Gruppen, Harry; Traore, Alfred S; van Berkel, Willem J H; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2005-04-01

    The screening of 50 sorghum varieties showed that, on average, germination did not affect the content in total phenolic compounds but decreased the content of proanthocyanidins, 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, and flavan-4-ols. Independent of germination, there are intervarietal differences in antioxidant activities among sorghum varieties. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were more positively correlated in ungerminated varieties than in germinated ones. Sorghum grains with pigmented testa layer, chestnut color glumes, and red plants had higher contents, larger diversity of phenolic compounds, and higher antioxidant activities than other sorghums. Some red sorghum varieties had higher antioxidant activities (30-80 mumol of Trolox equiv/g) than several sources of natural antioxidants from plant foods. Among varieties used for "to", "dolo", couscous, and porridge preparation, the "dolo"(local beer) varieties had the highest average content and diversity in phenolic compounds as well as the highest antioxidant activities. The biochemical markers determined are useful indicators for the selection of sorghum varieties for food and agronomic properties. PMID:15796598

  18. Plant phenolics affect oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Heinonen, Marina

    2008-08-27

    The effect of berry phenolics such as anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins from raspberry (Rubus idaeus), black currant (Ribes nigrum), and cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and byproducts of deoiling processes rich in phenolics such as rapeseed (Brassica rapa L.), camelina (Camelina sativa), and soy (Glycine max L.) as well as scots pine bark (Pinus sylvestris) was investigated in an H2O2-oxidized tryptophan (Trp) solution. The oxidation of Trp was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography using both fluorescence and diode array detection of Trp and its oxidation products. Mechanisms of antioxidative action of the phenolic compounds toward the oxidation of Trp were different as the pattern of Trp oxidation products varied with different phenolic compounds. The antioxidant protection toward oxidation of Trp was best provided with pine bark phenolics, black currant anthocyanins, and camelina meal phenolics as well as cranberry proanthocyanidins. PMID:18646765

  19. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... purpose of this section, the phenolic resins are those produced when one or more of the phenols listed in...-triphenyl-s-triazine): (1) Phenols: p-tert-Amylphenol. p-tert-Butylphenol. o-, m-, and p-Cresol. p-Octylphenol. Phenol. o- and p-Phenylethylphenol mixture produced when phenol is made to react with styrene...

  20. Olive oil phenols are absorbed in humans.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Maud N; Zock, Peter L; Roodenburg, Annet J C; Leenen, Rianne; Katan, Martijn B

    2002-03-01

    Animal and in vitro studies suggest that olive oil phenols are effective antioxidants. The most abundant phenols in olive oil are the nonpolar oleuropein- and ligstroside-aglycones and the polar hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the metabolism of those phenols in humans. We measured their absorption in eight healthy ileostomy subjects. We also measured urinary excretion in the ileostomy subjects and in 12 volunteers with a colon. Subjects consumed three different supplements containing 100 mg of olive oil phenols on separate days in random order. Ileostomy subjects consumed a supplement with mainly nonpolar phenols, one with mainly polar phenols and one with the parent compound oleuropein-glycoside. Subjects with a colon consumed a supplement without phenols (placebo) instead of the supplement with oleuropein-glycoside. Ileostomy effluent and urine were collected for 24 h after supplement intake. Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol concentrations were low (< 4 mol/100 mol of intake) in the ileostomy effluent, and no aglycones were detected. We estimated that the apparent absorption of phenols was at least 55-66% of the ingested dose. Absorption was confirmed by the excretion of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol in urine. In ileostomy subjects, 12 mol/100 mol and in subjects with a colon, 6 mol/100 mol of the phenols from the nonpolar supplement were recovered in urine as tyrosol or hydroxytyrosol. In both subject groups, 5--6 mol/100 mol of the phenols was recovered from the polar supplement. When ileostomy subjects were given oleuropein-glycoside, 16 mol/100 mol was recovered in 24-h urine, mainly in the form of hydroxytyrosol. Thus, humans absorb a large part of ingested olive oil phenols and absorbed olive oil phenols are extensively modified in the body. PMID:11880564

  1. Prevention and Treatment of Oral Mucositis in Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Misty M.; Donald, David V.; Hagemann, Tracy M.

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis affects more than three-fourths of patients undergoing chemotherapy and represents a significant burden to patients and caregivers. Lesions develop as a result of chemotherapeutic agents attacking the rapidly dividing cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Severity can range from mild, painless tissue changes to bleeding ulcerations that prevent oral intake and require narcotic pain relievers. Oral mucositis also leads to an increased risk of infection and can often delay further chemotherapy treatment. A number of assessment scales have been developed to better qualify the symptoms associated with this condition. Few pharmacologic agents have been approved to either prevent the development or alleviate the symptoms of oral mucositis. Current options include the use of antimicrobial mouthwashes, amino acid rinses, and topical healing agents. Palifermin, a keratinocyte growth factor, may be a future option after its use in children is explored. With achievements in other areas of supportive care in patients undergoing chemotherapy, oral mucositis should represent the forefront of new research. This review will provide a comprehensive examination of available options for children who have oral mucositis. PMID:23413048

  2. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Peatman, Eric; Lange, Miles; Zhao, Honggang; Beck, Benjamin H

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catfish depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Our understanding of these barriers, while growing, is still limited relative to that of mammalian model systems. Nevertheless, a combination of molecular and cellular studies in catfish over the last few decades, and particularly within the last few years, has helped to elucidate many of the primary actors and pathways critical to their mucosal health. Here we describe aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses in the primary mucosal tissues (skin, gill, and intestine) of catfish, focusing on mucus-driven responses, pathogen recognition, soluble mediators, and immunoglobulin and T-cell derived immunity. Modulation of mucosal barriers will be critical moving forward for crafting better diets, improving vaccine delivery, enhancing water quality, and ensuring sustainable production practices in catfish. PMID:26716071

  3. Awareness assessment in Turkish subpopulation with chronic oral mucosal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okumus, Ozlem; Kalkan, Sevda; Keser, Gaye; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of group Turkish patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases by chronic oral mucosal diseases questionnaires (COMDQ). Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases were participated in the study. A detailed medical history of each patient was taken, and all the COMDQ questions, which were translated from English version, were filled out. The data were analyzed with the IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences Statistics 22.0. Results: The mean ages of patients were 48.91 ± 13.36 years. Of the total 80 cases of chronic oral mucosal diseases identified 52 (65%) were female and 28 (35%) male. The standardized mean scores for COMDQ were 1.72 ± 1.11 for “pain and functional limitation,” 1.09 ± 0.94 for “medication and treatment,” 2.31 ± 1.06 for “social and emotional,” and 2.27 ± 0.83 for “patient support,” respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the Turkish version of the COMDQ has the profitable psychometric peculiarity and comfortable to patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases in Turkey. PMID:26929697

  4. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  5. Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Knox, J J; Puodziunas, A L; Feld, R

    2000-10-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent and potentially severe complication of chemotherapy which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While the management of other chemotherapy-related toxicities has improved, the incidence of mucositis is increasing. A critical review of the literature published between 1985 and 1999 reveals very few strategies or agents with proven efficacy, leaving few recommendations for the standard care in the prevention and treatment of mucositis at this time. Recommendations that can be made include: reducing patient risk factors, implementing proven preventative interventions such as utilising oral ice chips with fluorouracil chemotherapy, and optimising supportive care practices individualised to the patients' needs and symptoms. Progress in understanding the pathophysiology of mucositis at the molecular level has led to the evaluation of a number of new investigational agents, specifically those directed to the epithelial mucosa, such as mitogens and epithelial growth factors. These appear to be very promising in preclinical studies. Randomised clinical trials with these agents may finally demonstrate an impact on the clinical practice of mucositis management in the coming years. PMID:11087004

  6. Induction of apoptosis of lymphocytes in rat mucosal immune system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Wan-Dai; Song, Yu-Gang; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To undergo apoptosis during negative and positive selection processes in rat mucosal immune system which are implicated in the pathogenesis of various mucosal diseases. METHODS: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, intravenously or intraperitoneally, an apoptosis was recognized by morphological hallmark under light and electronmicroscopy, and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen was visualized immunohistochemically. RESULTS: The apoptosis of mucosal lymphocytes in the digestive tract, as well as in trachea, uterus and lacrimal gland was induced by cycloheximide ( > 1.0 mg·kg-1 body weight), which were located mainly in lamina propria and germinal centers of lymphoid nodules. At the same time, a portion of crypt epithelial cells of proliferating zone in small and large intestine, and the epithelial cells in genital tract were also found to undergo apoptosis. Immunostainings showed that apoptotic cells expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen. CONCLUSION: Apoptosis of lymphocytes in mucosal immune system can be induced by cycloheximide. This model will facilitate the understanding of normal mucosal immune system and its role in the pathogenesis of related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:11819221

  7. Mucosal Immune Development in Early Life: Setting the Stage.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Sylvia; Perdijk, Olaf; van Neerven, R J Joost; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2015-08-01

    Our environment poses a constant threat to our health. To survive, all organisms must be able to discriminate between good (food ingredients and microbes that help digest our food) and bad (pathogenic microbes, viruses and toxins). In vertebrates, discrimination between beneficial and harmful antigens mainly occurs at the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory, digestive, urinary and genital tract. Here, an extensive network of cells and organs form the basis of what we have come to know as the mucosal immune system. The mucosal immune system is composed of a single epithelial cell layer protected by a mucus layer. Different immune cells monitor the baso-lateral side of the epithelial cells and dispersed secondary lymphoid organs, such as Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles are equipped with immune cells able to mount appropriate and specific responses. This review will focus on the current knowledge on host, dietary and bacterial-derived factors that shape the mucosal immune system before and after birth. We will discuss current knowledge on fetal immunity (both responsiveness and lymphoid organ development) as well as the impact of diet and microbial colonization on neonatal immunity and disease susceptibility. Lastly, inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed as an example of how the composition of the microbiota might predispose to disease later in life. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in mucosal immune development and tolerance will aid nutritional intervention strategies to improve health in neonatal and adult life. PMID:25666708

  8. Removal Of Phenol From Wastewater By Using Low-Cost Catalyst From Metal Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbičková, Blanka; Soldán, Maroš; Belčík, Michal; Balog, Karol

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of AOPs (Advanced oxidation processes) as an emerging technology for removing of pollutants from wastewater is developed. In this paper, UV photodegradation was used for removing of phenol from wastewater. As a source of UV radiation medium pressure mercury lamp with output 400W was used. The influence of low-cost catalysts on this process was also monitored. Wastes from metal production, red mud and black nickel mud, were used as catalysts.

  9. Antioxidant activities of two sweet pepper Capsicum annuum L. varieties phenolic extracts and the effects of thermal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yazdizadeh Shotorbani, Narmin; Jamei, Rashid; Heidari, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Sweet peppers Capsicum annuum L. (C. annuum) are an excellent source of vitamins A and C as well as phenolic compounds, which are important antioxidant components that may reduce the risk of diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate their antioxidant activity under various temperatures. Materials and Methods: To compare the antioxidant activity in various temperatures (20, 35, 50, and 65 °C), two different types of colored (red and green) sweet bell peppers C annuum were selected. The red peppers were selected from those cultivated in Shahreza, Esfahan and the green peppers with the local name of Gijlar were selected from those cultivated in Urmia, West Azarbayjan. The experiments were carried out to measure the total phenolic and flavonoid content, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), chain-breaking activity, scavenging activities of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and hydrogen peroxide radicals. Results: Total phenol and flavonoid contents of pepper extracts were enhanced with increasing temperature to 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of DPPH radical of red pepper extract was enhanced because of putting at 50 °C for 30 min and for Gijlar pepper extract scavenging capacity was increased at 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of hydrogen peroxide radical of extracts was the highest at 35 °C. Chain-breaking activity of red pepper extract was increased for 60 min at 35 °C. FRAP (C) of red pepper extract was significantly different (p<0.05) in compare with Gijlar pepper. Conclusion: An appropriate temperature maintained a high antioxidant activity of phenolic compound, which could be due to the combined effect of non enzymatic reaction and phenolic compound stability. PMID:25050256

  10. Production of Phenol from Benzene via Cumene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, D. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment involving the production of phenol from benzene with the intermediate production of isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene hydroperoxide. (SL)

  11. Substrate inhibition kinetics of phenol biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Goudar, C.T.; Ganji, S.H.; Pujar, B.G.; Strevett, K.A.

    2000-02-01

    Phenol biodegradation was studied in batch experiments using an acclimated inoculum and initial phenol concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.3 g/L. Phenol depletion an associated microbial growth were monitored over time to provide information that was used to estimate the kinetics of phenol biodegradation. Phenol inhibited biodegradation at high concentrations, and a generalized substrate inhibition model based on statistical thermodynamics was used to describe the dynamics of microbial growth in phenol. For experimental data obtained in this study, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form that is analogous to the Andrews equation, and the biokinetic parameters {micro}{sub max}, maximum specific growth; K{sub s}, saturation constant; and K{sub i}, inhibition constant were estimated as 0.251 h{sup {minus}1}, 0.011 g/L, and 0.348 g/L, respectively, using a nonlinear least squares technique. Given the wide variability in substrate inhibition models used to describe phenol biodegradation, an attempt was made to justify selection of particular model based on theoretical considerations. Phenol biodegradation data from nine previously published studies were used in the generalized substrate inhibition model to determine the appropriate form of the substrate inhibition model. In all nine cases, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form analogous to the Andrews equation suggesting the suitability of the Andrews equation to describe phenol biodegradation data.

  12. Further knowledge on the phenolic profile of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Shott.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Federico; Gonçalves, Rui F; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Valentão, Patrícia; Silva, Artur M S; Silva, João B; Santos, Delfim; Andrade, Paula B

    2012-07-18

    Colocasia esculenta (L.) Shott, commonly called taro, is an ancient species selected for its edible tuber. Its huge "elephant ear" like leaves are also consumed in sauces and stews or as soups. Forty-one phenolic metabolites (11 hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and 30 glycosylated flavonoids) were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n)) in the leaves of two C. esculenta varieties cultivated in Azores Islands. To our knowledge, 34 of the 41 phenolic compounds are being reported for the first time in this species. Phenolics quantification was achieved by an HPLC-DAD accurate and sensitive validated method. Although the qualitative profile of the two varieties is quite similar, quantitative differences were observed between them. "Giant white" and "red" varieties (local denomination) contain, respectively, ca. 14 and 21% of phenolic acids, 37 and 28% of flavones mono-C-glycosides, 42 and 43% of flavones di-C-glycosides, 3 and 4% of flavones mono-C-(O-glycosyl)glycosides, and both of them ca. 2% of flavones di-C-(O-glycosyl)glycosides and 2% of flavones-O-glycosides. Luteolin-6-C-hexoside was the compound present in higher amounts in both varieties. The established phenolic profile is an added value for the authenticity and quality control of C. esculenta and may be useful in the discrimination of its varieties. PMID:22724554

  13. Phenolic Profiles and Contribution of Individual Compounds to Antioxidant Activity of Apple Powders.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Raudonis, Raimondas; Liaudanskas, Mindaugas; Viskelis, Jonas; Pukalskas, Audrius; Janulis, Valdimaras

    2016-05-01

    Apples (Malus domestica L.) are the most common source of phenolic compounds in northern European diet. Besides pectins, dietary fibers, vitamins, and oligosaccharides they contain phenolic compounds of different classes. Apple powders are convenient functional forms retaining significant amounts of phenolic antioxidants. In this study reducing and radical scavenging profiles of freeze-dried powders of "Aldas,ˮ "Auksis,ˮ "Connel Red,ˮ "Ligol,ˮ "Lodel,ˮ and "Rajkaˮ were determined and phenolic constituents were identified using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole and time-of-flight mass spectrometers. A negative ionization mode was applied and seventeen compounds: phenolic acids (coumaroylquinic, chlorogenic), flavonoids (quercetin derivatives), and procyanidin derivatives (B1, B2, and C1) were identified in all tested apple samples. Total values of Trolox equivalents varied from 7.72 ± 0.32 up to 20.02 ± 0.52 and from 11.10 ± 0.57 up to 21.42 ± 0.75 μmol/g of dry weight of apple powder in FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) and ABTS (2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) postcolumn assays, respectively. The greatest Trolox equivalent values were determined for apples of "Aldasˮ cultivar. Chlorogenic acid and procyanidin C1 were the most significant contributors to total reducing and radical scavenging activity in all apple cultivars tested, therefore they could be considered as markers of antioxidant activity. PMID:27002313

  14. Expression Profile of Human Fc Receptors in Mucosal Tissue: Implications for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Effector Functions Targeting HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Hannah M.; Carias, Ann M.; Evans, Abbey B.; Olejniczak, Natalia J.; Ziprin, Paul; King, Deborah F. L.; Hope, Thomas J.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of new Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 infections are acquired via sexual transmission at mucosal surfaces. Partial efficacy (31.2%) of the Thai RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial has been correlated with Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting the V1V2 region of the HIV-1 envelope. This has led to speculation that ADCC and other antibody-dependent cellular effector functions might provide an important defense against mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection. However, the ability of antibody-dependent cellular effector mechanisms to impact on early mucosal transmission events will depend on a variety of parameters including effector cell type, frequency, the class of Fc-Receptor (FcR) expressed, the number of FcR per cell and the glycoslyation pattern of the induced antibodies. In this study, we characterize and compare the frequency and phenotype of IgG (CD16 [FcγRIII], CD32 [FcγRII] and CD64 [FcγRI]) and IgA (CD89 [FcαR]) receptor expression on effector cells within male and female genital mucosal tissue, colorectal tissue and red blood cell-lysed whole blood. The frequency of FcR expression on CD14+ monocytic cells, myeloid dendritic cells and natural killer cells were similar across the three mucosal tissue compartments, but significantly lower when compared to the FcR expression profile of effector cells isolated from whole blood, with many cells negative for all FcRs. Of the three tissues tested, penile tissue had the highest percentage of FcR positive effector cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to determine the location of CD14+, CD11c+ and CD56+ cells within the three mucosal tissues. We show that the majority of effector cells across the different mucosal locations reside within the subepithelial lamina propria. The potential implication of the observed FcR expression patterns on the effectiveness of FcR-dependent cellular effector functions to impact on the initial events in

  15. Pathogenesis of mucosal biofilm infections: challenges and progress

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Living-tissue biofilms remained unrecognized until very recently, mainly as a result of traditional microbial sampling techniques or histologic processing, which disrupt the spatial organization of the tissue microorganisms. Thus, the biofilm nature of certain mucosal infections was frequently unintentionally missed or disregarded. To a large extent, the study of human tissue biofilms is still in its infancy. However, with the advent of newer methodologies, such as fluorescent in situ hybridization and endoscopic confocal laser scanning microscopy, which combine the identification of microbes with in situ, direct visualization of their relationships with each other and with their substratum, mucosal tissue biofilms are becoming easier to study and, thus, their role in human infections is becoming more apparent. This review summarizes the challenges in the study of tissue biofilms, proposes two inflammation-centered – albeit opposite – pathogenetic models of mucosal tissue biofilm infections and suggests directions for future research and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:18380602

  16. Identification and quantification of 56 targeted phenols in wines, spirits, and vinegars by online solid-phase extraction - ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography - quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barnaba, C; Dellacassa, E; Nicolini, G; Nardin, T; Malacarne, M; Larcher, R

    2015-12-01

    Phenolic compounds seriously affect the sensory and nutritional qualities of food products, both through the positive contribution of wood transfer in barrel-aged products and as off-flavours. A new targeted analytical approach combining on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up to reduce matrix interference and rapid chromatographic detection performed with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole/high-resolution mass spectrometry (Q-Orbitrap), was developed for the quantification of 56 simple phenols. Considering the advantages of using on-line SPE and a resolving power of 140,000, the proposed method was applied to define phenolic content in red (N=8) and white (8) wines, spirits (8), common (8) and balsamic (8) vinegars. The final method was linear from the limits of quantification (0.0001-0.001μgmL(-1)) up to 10μgmL(-1) with R(2) of at least 0.99. Recovery, used to define method accuracy, ranged from 80 to 120% for 89% of compounds. The method was suitable for analytical requirements in the tested matrices being able to analyse 46 phenols in red wines, 41 phenols in white wines and in spirits, 42 phenols in common vinegars and 44 phenols in balsamic vinegars. PMID:26582576

  17. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  18. STARVATION INDUCED PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL ATROPHY DIMINISHED WITH AGING

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Starvation induces small bowel atrophy with increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Here, we examined these parameters after starvation in aged animals. Methods Sixty-four 6 week-old and 26 month-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum fed or fasted group. The small bowel was harvested at 12, 48, and 72 hours following starvation. Proximal gut mucosal height was measured and epithelial cells counted. Apoptosis was identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Proliferation was determined by immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Comparison of fed vs. fasted and adult vs. old groups was done by one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s test and unpaired t-test. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results Aged mice had higher proximal gut weights, mucosal heights and cell numbers at baseline compared with the adult group (p<0.05). The rate of apoptosis was lower in the aged (p<0.05) while proliferation was not different between groups before starvation. After starvation, proximal gut wet weight decreased only in adult mice (p<0.05); Gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number decreased greater in adult than in aged mice (p<0.05). This was related to decreased proliferation only in the adult group (p<0.05). The fold of epithelial apoptosis increased was higher in the aged group than in the adult after starvation (p<0.05). Conclusions Gut mucosal kinetics change with age had lower rates of apoptosis and greater mucosal mass; the character of starvation-induced atrophy is diminished with aging. PMID:19126762

  19. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    PubMed Central

    Witzeman, Kathryn; Nguyen, Ruby HN; Eanes, Alisa; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 8.3%—16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy. Objective To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD. Design In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity. Methods We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100) was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the highest level of pain. Results The lower vestibule’s mucosa 5.81 (standard deviation =2.83) was significantly more sensitive than the upper vestibule 2.52 (standard deviation =2.6) (P<0.01) on exam. However, mucosal sensitivity was not associated with intercourse pain, while muscle sensitivity was moderately associated with both average and highest intensity of intercourse pain (r=−0.46, P=0.01 and r=−0.42, P=0.02), respectively. Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that mucosal measures alone may not sufficiently capture the spectrum of clinical pain report in women with PVD, which is consistent with the empirical success of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26316805

  20. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  1. Mucosal wrinkling in animal antra induced by volumetric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Surface wrinkling of animal mucosas is crucial for the biological functions of some tissues, and the change in their surface patterns is a phenotypic characteristic of certain diseases. Here we develop a biomechanical model to study the relationship between morphogenesis and volumetric growth, either physiological or pathological, of mucosas. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are performed to unravel the critical characteristics of mucosal wrinkling in a spherical antrum. It is shown that the thicknesses and elastic moduli of mucosal and submucosal layers dictate the surface buckling morphology. The results hold clinical relevance for such diseases as inflammation and gastritis.

  2. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  3. Grape and Wine Phenolics: A Refresher

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolics are plant secondary metabolites, and are a very diverse group of compounds. These compounds have been linked to several functions: protection from UV radiation, pigmentation, anti-fungal properties, nodule production, and attraction of pollinators and seed dispersers. The phenolic content ...

  4. Plant phenolics – from field to fork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, are important to human health and for the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumers judge appearance, taste, and texture when making purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic compounds is key to discern...

  5. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified ...

  6. Performance of phenol-acclimated activated sludge in the presence of various phenolic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun-Wei; Tan, Je-Zhen; Seng, Chye-Eng

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of phenol-acclimated activated sludge in the presence of various phenolic compounds in the separated batch reactors. The phenol-acclimated activated sludge was observed to be capable of completely removing phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, and 4-chlorophenol. Nevertheless, in the presence of 2-chlorophenol and 3-chlorophenol merely at 50 mg/L, incomplete removal of these phenolic compounds were noticed. The specific oxygen uptake rate patterns obtained for phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, and 4-chlorophenol could be used to approximate the end point of these phenolic compounds removal as well as to monitor the growth of biomass. As the 2-chlorophenol and 3-chlorophenol were only partially removed in the mixed liquor, the patterns of specific oxygen uptake rate attained for these phenolic compounds were not feasible for the similar estimation. The calculated toxicity percentages show the toxicity effects of phenolic compounds on the phenol-acclimated activated sludge followed the order of 2-chlorophenol ≈ 3-chlorophenol > 4-chlorophenol > o-cresol ≈ m-cresol > phenol.

  7. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  8. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  9. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    MedlinePlus

    ... dignity and resilience Geneva, 14 September 2016 – The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies... ... News Contact us Sitemap Go to top The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies ( ...

  10. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival. PMID:26116012

  11. Why Chitosan? From properties to perspective of mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Vimal, Archana; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-10-01

    Non-parenteral drug delivery routes primarily remove the local pain at the injection site. The drugs administered through the oral route encounter the process of hepatic first pass metabolism. Among the alternative delivery routes, mucosal route is being investigated as the most preferred route. Different mucosal routes include the gastrointestinal tract (oral), vagina, buccal cavity and nasal cavity. Novel formulations are being developed using natural and synthetic polymers that could increase the residence time of the drug at mucosal surface in order to facilitate permeation and reduce (or bypass) the first pass metabolism. For recombinant drugs, the formulations are accompanied by enzyme inhibitors and penetration enhancers. Buccal cavity (buccal and sublingual mucosa) has smaller surface area than the gastrointestinal tract but the drugs can easily escape the first pass metabolism. Chitosan is the most applied natural polymer while synthetic polymers include Carbopol and Eudragit. Chitosan has inherent properties of mucoadhesion and penetration enhancement apart from biodegradability and efflux pump inhibition. This review hoards the important research purview of chitosan as a compatible drug carrier macromolecule for mucosal delivery on single platform. PMID:27196368

  12. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M.; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a “self-eating” survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446072

  13. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma and conjunctival melanoma, which are very rare in Black people. The symptoms are not tumour-specific and are related to the organ system affected, and the disease is most often diagnosed at an advanced clinical stage. The diagnosis of a primary tumour is difficult, and metastatic cutaneous melanoma and choroidal melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins is the treatment of choice. The prognosis is poor, with the 5-year survival rate ranging from 0% (gastric melanoma) to 80% (conjunctival melanoma). PMID:27004972

  14. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6  J/cm(2) during 6  s/point, 0.24  J/point, for a total dose of 1.44  J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway. PMID:26720873

  15. Gut Check: IFNγ Delays Mucosal Recovery during Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lawton K; Bliska, James B

    2016-08-10

    Antibiotic therapy has been largely ineffective in improving clinical outcomes following Salmonellosis, yet the reasons why remain obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Dolowschiak et al. (2016) report that IFNγ produced by NK and T cells following antibiotic treatment of acute Salmonella infection limits mucosal remission. PMID:27512899

  16. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  17. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  18. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  19. Individual mammalian mucosal glucosidase subunits digest various starch structures differently

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch digestion in the human body requires two luminal enzymes,salivary and pancreatic alpha-amylase (AMY), and four small intestinal mucosal enzyme activities related to the maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) complexes. Starch consists of two polysaccharides, amylose (AM) and ...

  20. Palifermin: new drug. Prevention of oral mucositis: inappropriate evaluation.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    (1) Patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy combined with total body irradiation (myeloablative therapy) often develop oral mucositis. Prevention is based mainly on sucking ice during chemotherapy. (2) Palifermin is a growth factor marketed for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in adults with malignant haemopathies who are receiving myeloablative therapy followed by peripheral stem cell autografting. (3) Palifermin has not been compared with sucking ice, despite the efficacy of this simple treatment. (4) In a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial involving 212 adult patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation, palifermin reduced the incidence of severe oral mucositis (63% versus 98%) and its duration (about 3 days versus 9 days). The myeloablative regimen used in this trial is not that commonly used in Europe. The efficacy of palifermin during less aggressive regimens, which cause less severe oral mucositis, is not known. (5) The main adverse events noted in clinical trials were erythema and cutaneous oedema. It is not known whether palifermin increases the long-term risk of cancer. (6) Treatment with palifermin is expensive, 4800.00 euros in France); the optimal dosing schedule is not known and the unit dose chosen by the manufacturer is wastefully large. (7) In practice, it remains to be demonstrated that palifermin is more effective than simply sucking ice. PMID:17724832

  1. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Aamelfot, Maria; McBeath, Alastair; Christiansen, Debes H; Matejusova, Iveta; Falk, Knut

    2015-01-01

    All viruses infecting fish must cross the surface mucosal barrier to successfully enter a host. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), the causative agent of the economically important infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., has been shown to use the gills as its entry point. However, other entry ports have not been investigated despite the expression of virus receptors on the surface of epithelial cells in the skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the conjunctiva. Here we investigate the ISAV mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon after experimental immersion (bath) challenge and in farmed fish collected from a confirmed outbreak of ISA in Norway. We show for the first time evidence of early replication in several mucosal surfaces in addition to the gills, including the pectoral fin, skin and GI tract suggesting several potential entry points for the virus. Initially, the infection is localized and primarily infecting epithelial cells, however at later stages it becomes systemic, infecting the endothelial cells lining the circulatory system. Viruses of low and high virulence used in the challenge revealed possible variation in virus progression during infection at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:26490835

  2. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  3. Characterisation of phenolic compounds in South African plum fruits (Prunus salicina Lindl.) using HPLC coupled with diode-array, fluorescence, mass spectrometry and on-line antioxidant detection.

    PubMed

    Venter, Alet; Joubert, Elizabeth; de Beer, Dalene

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are abundant secondary metabolites in plums, with potential health benefits believed to be due to their antioxidant activity, amongst others. Phenolic characterisation of South African Prunus salicina Lindl. plums is necessary to fully evaluate their potential health benefits. An HPLC method using diode-array detection (DAD) for quantification of phenolic compounds was improved and fluorescence detection (FLD) was added for quantification of flavan-3-ols. Validation of the HPLC-DAD-FLD method showed its suitability for quantification of 18 phenolic compounds, including flavan-3-ols using FLD, and phenolic acids, anthocyanins and flavonols using DAD. The method was suitable for characterisation of the phenolic composition of 11 South African plum cultivars and selections, including various types with yellow and red skin and flesh. The method was used in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS) to identify 24 phenolic compounds. Neochlorogenic acid and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside were the major compounds in most of the plums, while cyanidin-3-O-glucoside was absent in Sun Breeze plums with yellow skin and flesh. Post-column on-line coupling of the ABTS•+ scavenging assay with HPLC-DAD enabled qualitative evaluation of the relative contribution of individual phenolic compounds to the antioxidant activity. The flavan-3-ols, neochlorogenic acid and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside displayed the largest antioxidant response peaks. PMID:23644975

  4. Oral and intestinal mucositis - causes and possible treatments.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M; Grant, G

    2003-11-01

    Chemotherapy and radiotherapy, whilst highly effective in the treatment of neoplasia, can also cause damage to healthy tissue. In particular, the alimentary tract may be badly affected. Severe inflammation, lesioning and ulceration can occur. Patients may experience intense pain, nausea and gastro-enteritis. They are also highly susceptible to infection. The disorder (mucositis) is a dose-limiting toxicity of therapy and affects around 500 000 patients world-wide annually. Oral and intestinal mucositis is multi-factorial in nature. The disruption or loss of rapidly dividing epithelial progenitor cells is a trigger for the onset of the disorder. However, the actual dysfunction that manifests and its severity and duration are greatly influenced by changes in other cell populations, immune responses and the effects of oral/gut flora. This complexity has hampered the development of effective palliative or preventative measures. Recent studies have concentrated on the use of bioactive/growth factors, hormones or interleukins to modify epithelial metabolism and reduce the susceptibility of the tract to mucositis. Some of these treatments appear to have considerable potential and are at present under clinical evaluation. This overview deals with the cellular changes and host responses that may lead to the development of mucositis of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, and the potential of existing and novel palliative measures to limit or prevent the disorder. Presently available treatments do not prevent mucositis, but can limit its severity if used in combination. Poor oral health and existing epithelial damage predispose patients to mucositis. The elimination of dental problems or the minimization of existing damage to the alimentary tract, prior to the commencement of therapy, lowers their susceptibility. Measures that reduce the flora of the tract, before therapy, can also be helpful. Increased production of free radicals and the induction of inflammation are

  5. Phenolic composition, physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of interspecific hybrids of grapes growing in Poland.

    PubMed

    Samoticha, Justyna; Wojdyło, Aneta; Golis, Tomasz

    2017-01-15

    The study evaluated fruit quality parameters and chemical properties (soluble solids, pH, total acidity and total sugars content, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity (ABTS, FRAP and ORAC methods)) of 30 grape cultivars of white, red and pink grape, as 28 interspecific hybrids and 2 Vitis vinifera L. popularly grown in Poland. Some of them were analyzed for the first time. A total of 49 polyphenolic compounds were identified by LC-PDA-QTOF/MS and quantified by UPLC-PDA-FL, as 26 anthocyanins, 9 flavonols and flavons, 7 phenolic acids, 6 flavan-3-ols, and 1 stilbene. The content of total polyphenols ranged from 1037.0 (Cascade cv.) to 5759.1mg/100gdm (Roesler cv.). However, the content of stilbene represented by trans resveratrol-3-glucoside was only 18.5-70.5mg/100gdm. Red grape cultivars like Roesler, Rothay and Swenson Red were characterized by the highest content of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity (significantly more than 24, 12 and 53mmol TE/100gdm, by ABTS, FRAP and ORAC, respectively). Average total acidity and soluble solids for white (0.95g of tartaric acid in 100gfm and 17.1°Bx, respectively) and for red and pink (0.93g of tartaric acid in 100gfm and 17.4°Bx, respectively) cultivars were not significantly different (p>0.05). PMID:27542475

  6. Age and Helicobacter pylori decrease gastric mucosal surface hydrophobicity independently

    PubMed Central

    Hackelsberger, A; Platzer, U; Nilius, M; Schultze, V; Gunther, T; Dominguez-Munoz, J; Malfertheiner, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric mucosal surface hydrophobicity (GMSH) is an essential component of the mucosal defence system that is decreased by Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Gastric ulcers occur predominantly in elderly subjects, and may thus reflect diminished mucosal resistance. 
Aims—To investigate whether aging decreases GMSH. 
Patients—One hundred and twenty patients without peptic ulcer disease were divided into three age groups: I (41 years or below); II (41-64 years); and III (65 years or above). 
Methods—Biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, corpus, and cardia for histology (Sydney system), urease testing for H pylori, and for contact angle measurement of GMSH with a goniometer. The presence of specific H pylori antibodies was checked by immunoblotting. 
Results—Fifty two patients (43%) were infected, and 68 were uninfected with H pylori. GMSH at all biopsy sites was lower in H pylori infected subjects (p=0.0001), but also decreased with age independently of infection status (p=0.0001). The most notable decrease in GMSH occurred between age groups I and II in those with, and between age groups II and III in those without, H pylori infection. GMSH was greater in antral than in corpus mucosa in both infected (p=0.0001) and uninfected patients (p=0.0003). 
Conclusions—A physiological decrease in GMSH with aging may contribute to the risk of ulcer development in the elderly, and may act synergistically with H pylori and/or NSAIDs on gastric mucosal defence. 

 Keywords: gastric mucosal defence; surface hydrophobicity; aging; Helicobacter pylori PMID:9824570

  7. Mucosal immunologic responses in cholera patients in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Taher; Harris, Jason B; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Shirin, Tahmina; Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Chowdhury, Fahima; LaRocque, Regina C; Alam, Nur Haque; Ryan, Edward T; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi

    2011-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 causes dehydrating diarrhea with a high mortality rate if untreated. The infection also elicits long-term protective immunity. Since V. cholerae is noninvasive, mucosal immunity is likely important for protection. In this study, we compared humoral immune responses in the duodenal mucosa and blood of cholera patients at different time points after the onset of disease and compared them with those of healthy controls (HCs). Immune responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. Significant increases in V. cholerae LPS-specific IgA and IgG antibody levels were seen in duodenal extracts on day 30, but the levels decreased to baseline by day 180; plasma V. cholerae LPS-specific IgA levels remained elevated longer. Levels of mucosal CTB antibodies also peaked on day 30, but the increase reached statistical significance only for IgG. A significant correlation was found between the CTB antibody-secreting cell (ASC) response in the circulatory system on day 7 and subsequent CTB-specific IgA levels in duodenal extracts on day 30 and the numbers of CTB-specific IgA ASCs in duodenal tissues on day 180. The proportion (0.07%) of mucosal V. cholerae LPS IgA ASCs peaked on day 30 and remained elevated through day 180 compared to that of HCs (P = 0.03). These results suggest that protective immunity against V. cholerae is not likely mediated by the constitutive secretion of antibodies at the mucosal surface; our results are consistent with those of other studies that suggest instead that anamnestic immune responses of mucosal lymphocytes may play a major role in protection against cholera. PMID:21248157

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucosal Biopsy versus Endoscopic Mucosal Resection in Barrett's Esophagus and Related Superficial Lesions.

    PubMed

    Elsadek, Hany M; Radwan, Mamdouh M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic surveillance for early detection of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) depends usually on biopsy. The diagnostic and therapeutic role of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) in BE is rapidly growing. Objective. The aim of this study was to check the accuracy of biopsy for precise histopathologic diagnosis of dysplasia and neoplasia, compared to EMR in patients having BE and related superficial esophageal lesions. Methods. A total of 48 patients with previously diagnosed BE (36 men, 12 women, mean age 49.75 ± 13.3 years) underwent routine surveillance endoscopic examination. Biopsies were taken from superficial lesions, if present, and otherwise from BE segments. Then, EMR was performed within three weeks. Results. Biopsy based histopathologic diagnoses were nondysplastic BE (NDBE), 22 cases; low-grade dysplasia (LGD), 14 cases; high-grade dysplasia (HGD), 8 cases; intramucosal carcinoma (IMC), two cases; and invasive adenocarcinoma (IAC), two cases. EMR based diagnosis differed from biopsy based diagnosis (either upgrading or downgrading) in 20 cases (41.67%), (Kappa = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.170-0.69). Conclusions. Biopsy is not a satisfactory method for accurate diagnosis of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in BE patients with or without suspicious superficial lesions. EMR should therefore be the preferred diagnostic method in such patients. PMID:27347544

  9. [Growth kinetics and phenol degradation of highly efficient phenol-degrading Ochrobactrum sp. CH10].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Hua; Wei, Gang; Liu, Si-Yuan; Sun, Jiang-Man; Wang, Fang-Fang; Li, Hao-Yuan; Liu, Yu-Jun

    2012-11-01

    The strain Ochrobactrum sp. CH10 was a highly efficient phenol degrading bacterial strain isolated from soil in a constructed wetland in Yuan Dynasty Capital City Wall Relics in Beijing. Growth and biodegradation were investigated in details with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. The best growth and most efficient phenol biodegradation occurred when the strain was cultured in medium containing 400 mg x L(-1) phenol at initial pH of 7.0 and 30 degrees C, with 5% inoculation volume. The phenol degradation rate was around 100% , 92.3 and 82.2% with an initial concentration of 400, 900 and 1 000 mg x L(-1) phenol in 24, 44 and 48 h, respectively. Phenol degradation kinetic studies indicated that the strain followed Haldane's model, and the parameters were: upsilon(max) (maximum specific rate) = 0.126 h(-1), K(s) (half-saturation constant) = 23.53 mg x L(-1) and K(I) (inhibition constant) = 806.1 mg x L(-1). The phenol-limited growth kinetics of CH10 by Andrews's model also followed a similar trend to that of phenol degradation. Among all the strains belonging to Ochrobactrum genus, this strain is the most efficient at present. The strain has a good application potential for the phenolic wastewater treatment. PMID:23323431

  10. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic C-H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the

  11. Gastric mucosal cell proliferation in ethanol-induced chronic mucosal injury is related to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, R; Montiel-Ruíz, C; Vázquez-Martínez, O

    2000-08-01

    The oxygen free radicals-induced lipid peroxidation (LP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions. However, the role of LP in the generation of chronic gastric mucosal injury is unknown. We have developed a model of chronic mucosal injury induced by continuous ethanol ingestion for 5 days and characterized by marked alterations in plasma membranes from gastric mucosa. Therefore, LP was evaluated in this experimental model. Indicators of peroxidative activity, mucosal glutathione content, thymidine kinase activity (an index of cell proliferation), and histamine H2-receptor (H2R) binding constants were quantified in animals undergoing gastric mucosal damage. The effect of famotidine, a H2R antagonist that readily ameliorates the chronic mucosal injury, was also tested. Increased free radicals and LP levels were detected during gastritis; however, a second, higher peak of LP was noted in mucosal plasma membranes after ethanol withdrawal (recovery period). This further increase of LP coincided with active cell proliferation, decreased mucosal glutathione levels, and diminished specific cimetidine binding by H2R. Administration of famotidine accelerated the mucosal proliferative process, inducing the second lipoperoxidative episode sooner, and preserved the content of glutathione. In addition, LP correlated directly with cell proliferation and inversely with mucosal membrane cimetidine binding. In conclusion, LP seems to be involved in chronic ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury. However, a further enhancement of plasma membrane LP occurred, associated with increased DNA synthesis and diminished cimetidine binding by membrane H2R. Therefore, increased LP could also participate in the compensatory mucosal proliferation initiated after ethanol withdrawal. PMID:10950107

  12. Differential metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by two Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains grown in red wines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids) and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric acids, respectively) are found in red wines in varying concentrations depending on cultivars and other factors. While some Brettanomyces form volatile phenols...

  13. Identification of Natural Animicrobial Substances in Red Muscadine Juice against Cranonbacter sakazakii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) juice with natural organic, phenolic acids and polyphenol compounds identified in red muscadine juice (‘Noble’) were tested against Cronobacter sakazakii. Commercial baby juices with high polyphenol content (176.7~347.7 mg/mL), showed poor antimicrobial a...

  14. The French Paradox: Determining the Superoxide-Scavenging Capacity of Red Wine and Other Beverages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Barry A.; Hammond, Matthew P.; Stormo, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    Plant-derived phenolic compounds such as those found in red wine, tea, and certain fruit juices may protect against cardiovascular disease by detoxifying (scavenging) superoxide and other unstable reactive oxygen species. We present a laboratory exercise that can be used to assess the superoxide-scavenging capacity of beverages. Among the…

  15. Bioactive potential of Vitis labrusca L. grape juices from the Southern Region of Brazil: phenolic and elemental composition and effect on lipid peroxidation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Toaldo, Isabela Maia; Cruz, Fernanda Alves; Alves, Tatiana de Lima; de Gois, Jefferson Santos; Borges, Daniel L G; Cunha, Heloisa Pamplona; da Silva, Edson Luiz; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2015-04-15

    Grapes are rich in polyphenols with biologically active properties. Although the bioactive potential of grape constituents are frequently reported, the effects of Brazilian Vitis labrusca L. grape juices ingestion have not been demonstrated in humans. This study identified the phenolic and elemental composition of red and white grape juices and the effect of organic and conventional red grape juice consumption on lipid peroxidation in healthy individuals. Concentrations of anthocyanins, flavanols and phenolic acids and the in vitro antioxidant activity were significantly higher in the organic juice. The macro-elements K, Ca, Na and Mg were the most abundant minerals in all juices. The acute consumption of red grape juices promoted significant decrease of lipid peroxides in serum and TBARS levels in plasma. It is concluded that red V. labrusca L. grape juices produced in Southern Brazil showed lipid peroxidation inhibition abilities in healthy subjects, regardless of the cultivation system. PMID:25466055

  16. A comparative study of lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in urethral stricture disease: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Depak Kumar; Ghosh, Bastab; Bera, Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: A prospective study to compare the outcomes of lingual versus buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients with long segment anterior urethral strictures disease. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 patients for buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty (group I) and 30 patients for lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (group II) for treatment of long segment (>3 cm) incomplete anterior urethral stricture disease using single-stage dorsal onlay free oral mucosal graft urethroplasty by Barbagli's technique between February 2013 to September 2014. All patients underwent complete evaluation of the stricture including inspection of the oral cavity. Results: The results of urethroplasty in between two group were not significant (P > 0.05) in terms of Qmax (P = 0.63), mean postoperative AUA symptom score (P = 0.83), operative time (P = 0.302) intra operative blood loss (P = 0.708), duration of postoperative hospitalization (P = 0.83), but slurring of speech complications was seen in group II, but not in group I. Long-term complications of salivary disturbance, tightness of the mouth, persistent pain at graft site, perioral numbness, seen only in group I (BMGU). Conclusion: LMG urethroplasty is an excellent alternative to BMG urethroplasty with comparable results of urethroplasty and minimal donor site complications. PMID:27141184

  17. Preconcentration of phenols by fibrous sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, I.Yu.; Kuvaldina, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    Phenols are among the most toxic contaminants of natural and waste waters. There are standard procedures for determining them in low concentrations. However, the samples cannot be preserved at phenol concentrations of 50 {mu}g/L or lower, and the determination of phenols must be performed no later than 2 h after sampling. This is not always possible. Because of this, the preconcentration of phenols at the site of sampling, followed by analysis of the concentrate in a stationary chemical laboratory after a time, is of interest. The technique of phenol preconcentration with active carbon, recommended in the standard procedure, is unsuitable for these purposes because the adsorption and desorption of phenols are too prolonged. At the same time, a fibrous carbon sorbent provides for a high rate of adsorption and desorption of some organic substances (humic acids, fulvic acids, and surfactants) it can be easily regenerated and repeatedly used. In this work, the authors investigated the possibility of using two fibers-namely, a carbon fiber and a polyethylene-polyamine-modified polyacrylonitrile-based fiber (PAN-PEA) containing amino groups with different numbers of substituents-for the preconcentration of phenols.

  18. Electrochemical oxidation of phenol using graphite anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Y.M.; Abuzaid, N.S.

    1999-02-01

    The effects of current and pH on the electrochemical oxidation of phenol on graphite electrodes is investigated in this study. There was no sign of deterioration of the graphite bed after 5 months of operation. Phenol removal efficiency was a function of the current applied and was around 70% at a current of 2.2 A. The increase of phenol removal efficiency with current is attributed to the increase of ionic transport which increases the rate of electrode reactions responsible for the removal process. The percentage of complete oxidation of phenol increases with current, with a maximum value of about 50%. However, at pH 0.2 it is slightly higher than that at pH 0.5 at all currents. The phenol removal rate increases with increases of current and pH. While the current (CO{sub 2}) efficiency reaches a maximum value in the current range of 1.0--1.2 A, it increases with an increase of acid concentration. The findings of this study have important implications: while anodic oxidation of phenol on graphite can achieve acceptable removal of phenol, the extent of oxidation should not be overlooked.

  19. Phytochemical phenolics in organically grown vegetables.

    PubMed

    Young, Janice E; Zhao, Xin; Carey, Edward E; Welti, Ruth; Yang, Shie-Shien; Wang, Weiqun

    2005-12-01

    Fruit and vegetable intake is inversely correlated with risks for several chronic diseases in humans. Phytochemicals, and in particular, phenolic compounds, present in plant foods may be partly responsible for these health benefits through a variety of mechanisms. Since environmental factors play a role in a plant's production of secondary metabolites, it was hypothesized that an organic agricultural production system would increase phenolic levels. Cultivars of leaf lettuce, collards, and pac choi were grown either on organically certified plots or on adjacent conventional plots. Nine prominent phenolic agents were quantified by HPLC, including phenolic acids (e. g. caffeic acid and gallic acid) and aglycone or glycoside flavonoids (e. g. apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin, and quercetin). Statistically, we did not find significant higher levels of phenolic agents in lettuce and collard samples grown organically. The total phenolic content of organic pac choi samples as measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay, however, was significantly higher than conventional samples (p < 0.01), and seemed to be associated with a greater attack the plants in organic plots by flea beetles. These results indicated that although organic production method alone did not enhance biosynthesis of phytochemicals in lettuce and collards, the organic system provided an increased opportunity for insect attack, resulting in a higher level of total phenolic agents in pac choi. PMID:16302198

  20. Mucosal immunity and protection against HIV/SIV infection: strategies and challenges for vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    To date most HIV vaccine strategies have focused on parenteral immunization and systemic immunity. These approaches have not yielded the efficacious HIV vaccine urgently needed to control the AIDS pandemic. As HIV is primarily mucosally transmitted, efforts are being refocused on mucosal vaccine strategies, in spite of complexities of immune response induction and evaluation. Here we outline issues in mucosal vaccine design and illustrate strategies with examples from the recent literature. Development of a successful HIV vaccine will require in depth understanding of the mucosal immune system, knowledge that ultimately will benefit vaccine design for all mucosally transmitted infectious agents. PMID:19241252

  1. Natural Products for Management of Oral Mucositis Induced by Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aghamohamamdi, Azar; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck in patients with cancer. Severe oral mucositis is painful and affects oral functions, including intake of food and medications and speech. Prevention of oral mucositis affects the life quality of patients. Recent studies have been focused on natural products to improve or reduce this complication. Many clinical trials have been performed to assess natural products for treatment of mucositis and their results are promising. The authors reviewed the evidence for natural products in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:26306626

  2. Immunogold Labelling to Localize Polyphenol Oxidase (PPO) During Wilting of Red Clover Leaf Tissue and the Effect of Removing Cellular Matrices on PPO Protection of Glycerol-Based Lipid in the Rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) reduces the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis within red clover fed to ruminants. PPO catalyses the conversion of phenols to quinones which can react with nucleophilic cellular constituents (e.g. proteins), forming protein-phenol complexes that may reduce protei...

  3. Novel Phr1 mutations and the evolution of phenol reaction variation in US weedy rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Briana L.; Skare, Karl J.; Olsen, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Red rice, a major agricultural weed, is phenotypically diverse and possesses traits that are similar to both wild and cultivated rice. The genetic resources available for rice make it possible to examine the molecular basis and evolution of traits characterizing this weed. Here, we assess the phenol reaction – a classical trait for distinguishing among cultivated rice varieties – in red rice at the phenotypic and molecular levels.We phenotyped more than 100 US weed samples for the phenol reaction and sequenced the underlying Phr1 locus in a subset of samples. Data were analyzed in combination with previously published Phr1 data for cultivated rice.Most weed accessions (96.3%) are positive for the phenol reaction, and samples with a negative response carry loss-of-function alleles that are rare or heretofore undocumented. One such allele may have evolved through mutational convergence of a 1-bp frameshift insertion. Haplotype sharing between red rice and US cultivars suggests occasional crop–weed hybridization.Our discovery of previously undocumented nonfunctional phr1 alleles suggests that there are likely to be other loss-of-function mutations segregating in Oryza sativa around the world. Red rice may provide a useful study system for understanding the adaptive significance of Phr1 variation in agricultural settings. PMID:19674331

  4. Garnacha Tintorera-based sweet wines: chromatic properties and global phenolic composition by means of UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-González, M; Cancho-Grande, B; Simal-Gándara, J

    2013-09-01

    Valdeorras (the N.W. corner of Spain) wants to promote the production and marketing of new sweet wines. The present work represents the first study on sweet wines manufactured with red grapes Vitis vinifera L. Garnacha Tintorera, a teinturier cultivar. Two different red sweet wines were elaborated: the first one was made with dried grapes; Vitis vinifera L. Garnacha Tintorera has excellent potential to produce wines from raisined grapes; the second one, a fortified sweet wine aged in oak barrels. Different red Garnacha Tintorera-based wines (a dry base wine, GBW; a naturally sweet wine, GNSW; and a fortified sweet wine, GFSW) were characterized. Chromatic characteristics and phenolic compounds were established by spectrophotometric methods in order to assess the technology of Garnacha Tintorera-based sweet wines. High molecular weight brown polymers, produced during the grape drying process and isolated from sweet wines by the dialysis process, were responsible for the brown colour of sweet wines. As a consequence, yellowness of sweet wines was also higher which was confirmed by colorimetric indexes. With respect to phenolic content, GFSW presented the lowest content because the maceration-alcoholic fermentation was stopped through the addition of alcohol before the diffusion of red pigments from skins to must was complete. GNSW presented the highest phenolic content due to the concentration effect resulting from evaporation of water from the grapes. Anthocyanins of sweet wines were polymerised in great extent. The percentage of polymerised tannins was sufficient to guarantee the aging process of sweet wines. PMID:23578636

  5. Assessment of antioxidant capacities and phenolic contents of nigerian cultivars of onions (Allium cepa L) and garlic (Allium sativum L).

    PubMed

    Onyeoziri, Ukoha Pius; Romanus, Ekere Nwachukwu; Onyekachukwu, Uzodinma Irene

    2016-07-01

    This report assessed and compared the antioxidant potentials, quantities of ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds in methanolic extract of varieties of onions and garlic cultivars in Nigeria. The pH and total acidity of the extracts were equally determined. Antioxidancy of the cultivars were analysed using the in vitro assay techniques with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl Hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and ferric reducing capacity. Ascorbic acid phenolic content were determined by volumetric and Folin-Ciocalteu's method respectively. The pH and total acidity were respectively 5.65 and 0.150mmol/L (red onion), 5.69 and 0.123mmol/L (white onion) and 6.94 and 0.105mmol/L (garlic). Red onion had the highest value of total phenols, ascorbic acid and free radical scavenging activity of 14.25±0.35mg GAE/ml, 229.098mg/100g, 66.44% respectively. In DPPH assay, red and white onion showed higher tendency to inhibit auto-oxidation when compared to garlic. The ferric reducing ability was greatest in garlic and least in white onions. These data indicate that with respect to antioxidant activity, red onion variety has highest health promoting potential among others. PMID:27393431

  6. Phenol removal by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, F.F.; Fane, A.G.; Fell, C.J.D.

    1994-11-01

    This paper examines the application of the supported liquid membrane (SLM) to phenol removal. n-Decanol was proven to be a suitable membrane liquid. The phenol transfer kinetics through the SLMs is quantitatively estimated according to models based on the resistance-in-series concept. The models can be modified to describe the performance of decayed SLMs and thereby provide insight into the effect of membrane liquid loss and penetration of aqueous solutions on the phenol flux. An experimental method is described for the measurement of mass transfer coefficients in the bulk phases using the well-characterized Anopore membrane.

  7. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, Foster A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

  8. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, F.A.

    1998-09-15

    A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

  9. Oral mucosal injury caused by cancer therapies: current management and new frontiers in research.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Siri B; Peterson, Douglas E

    2014-02-01

    This invited update is designed to provide a summary of the state-of-the-science regarding oral mucosal injury (oral mucositis) caused by conventional and emerging cancer therapies. Current modeling of oral mucositis pathobiology as well as evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis are presented. In addition, studies addressing oral mucositis as published in the Journal of Oral Pathology and Medicine 2008-2013 are specifically highlighted in this context. Key research directions in basic and translational science associated with mucosal toxicity caused by cancer therapies are also delineated as a basis for identifying pathobiologic and pharmacogenomic targets for interventions. This collective portfolio of research and its ongoing incorporation into clinical practice is setting the stage for the clinician in the future to predict mucosal toxicity risk and tailor therapeutic interventions to the individual oncology patient accordingly. PMID:24261541

  10. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W. )

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Modification of ammonium lignosulfonate by phenolation for use in phenolic resins.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Maria V; Oliet, M; Rodríguez, F; García, J; Gilarranz, M A; Rodríguez, J J

    2005-06-01

    The structural modification of softwood ammonium lignosulfonate by phenolation was studied. A central factorial design was applied to determine the influence of reaction conditions (temperature, time and lignosulfonate content) on the properties of phenolation products. The reaction was monitored through the concentration of free phenol determined by gas chromatography (GC). The characterization of phenolation products was accomplished by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Empirical models were developed to predict phenol conversion and adduct formation according to operating conditions. The optimum phenolation conditions, attained by means of a response surface method, were found to be 120 degrees C; 160 min and 30% lignosulfonate content PMID:15786587

  12. Identification of (poly)phenol treatments that modulate the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Christopher T; Richardson, Siân; McArdle, Francis; Lotito, Silvina B; Crozier, Alan; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-05-28

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables (FV), which contain (poly)phenols, protect against age-related inflammation and chronic diseases. T-lymphocytes contribute to systemic cytokine production and are modulated by FV intake. Little is known about the relative potency of different (poly)phenols in modulating cytokine release by lymphocytes. We compared thirty-one (poly)phenols and six (poly)phenol mixtures for effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release by Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Test compounds were incubated with Jurkat cells for 48 h at 1 and 30 µm, with or without phorbol ester treatment at 24 h to induce cytokine release. Three test compounds that reduced cytokine release were further incubated with primary lymphocytes at 0·2 and 1 µm for 24 h, with lipopolysaccharide added at 5 h. Cytokine release was measured, and generation of H2O2 by test compounds was determined to assess any potential correlations with cytokine release. A number of (poly)phenols significantly altered cytokine release from Jurkat cells (P<0·05), but H2O2 generation did not correlate with cytokine release. Resveratrol, isorhamnetin, curcumin, vanillic acid and specific (poly)phenol mixtures reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release from T-lymphocytes, and there was evidence for interaction between (poly)phenols to further modulate cytokine release. The release of interferon-γ induced protein 10 by primary lymphocytes was significantly reduced following treatment with 1 µm isorhamnetin (P<0·05). These results suggest that (poly)phenols derived from onions, turmeric, red grapes, green tea and açai berries may help reduce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in people at risk of chronic inflammation. PMID:26984113

  13. Biological removal of phenol from wastewaters: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, N. V.; Anupama, S.; Navya, K.; Shalini, H. N.; Idris, M.; Hampannavar, U. S.

    2014-03-01

    Phenol and its derivatives are common water pollutants and include wide variety of organic chemicals. Phenol poisoning can occur by skin absorption, inhalation, ingestion and various other methods which can result in health effects. High exposures to phenol may be fatal to human beings. Accumulation of phenol creates toxicity both for flora and fauna. Therefore, removal of phenol is crucial to perpetuate the environment and individual. Among various treatment methods available for removal of phenols, biodegradation is environmental friendly. Biological methods are gaining importance as they convert the wastes into harmless end products. The present work focuses on assessment of biological removal (biodegradation) of phenol. Various factors influence the efficiency of biodegradation of phenol such as ability of the microorganism, enzymes involved, the mechanism of degradation and influencing factors. This study describes about the sources of phenol, adverse effects on the environment, microorganisms involved in the biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) and enzymes that polymerize phenol.

  14. Investigation of chitosan-phenolics systems as wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    Peshkova, Svetlana; Li, Kaichang

    2003-04-24

    Chitosan-phenolics systems were investigated as wood adhesives. Adhesion between two pieces of wood veneer developed only when all three components-chitosan, a phenolic compound, and laccase-were present. For the adhesive systems containing a phenolic compound with only one phenolic hydroxyl group, adhesive strengths were highly dependent upon the chemical structures of phenolic compounds used in the system and the relative oxidation rates of the phenolic compounds by laccase. The adhesive strengths were also directly related to the viscosity of the adhesive systems. However, for the adhesive systems containing a phenolic compound with two or three phenolic hydroxyl groups adjacent to each other, no correlations among adhesive strengths, relative oxidation rates of the phenolic compounds by laccase, and viscosities were observed. The adhesion mechanisms of these chitosan-phenolics systems were proposed to be similar to those of mussel adhesive proteins. PMID:12697397

  15. Biological removal of phenol from wastewaters: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, N. V.; Anupama, S.; Navya, K.; Shalini, H. N.; Idris, M.; Hampannavar, U. S.

    2015-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives are common water pollutants and include wide variety of organic chemicals. Phenol poisoning can occur by skin absorption, inhalation, ingestion and various other methods which can result in health effects. High exposures to phenol may be fatal to human beings. Accumulation of phenol creates toxicity both for flora and fauna. Therefore, removal of phenol is crucial to perpetuate the environment and individual. Among various treatment methods available for removal of phenols, biodegradation is environmental friendly. Biological methods are gaining importance as they convert the wastes into harmless end products. The present work focuses on assessment of biological removal (biodegradation) of phenol. Various factors influence the efficiency of biodegradation of phenol such as ability of the microorganism, enzymes involved, the mechanism of degradation and influencing factors. This study describes about the sources of phenol, adverse effects on the environment, microorganisms involved in the biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) and enzymes that polymerize phenol.

  16. A comparative study on phenolic profiles and antioxidant activities of legumes as affected by extraction solvents.

    PubMed

    Xu, B J; Chang, S K C

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how 6 commonly used solvent systems affected the yields of phenolic substances and the antioxidant capacity of extracts from 8 major classes of food legumes. Several antioxidant-related phytochemical compositions, namely, total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoids content (TFC), and condensed tannins content (CTC), were investigated. In addition, antioxidant activities were tested using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). The results showed that the 50% acetone extracts exhibited the highest TPC for yellow pea, green pea, chickpea, and yellow soybean. Acidic 70% acetone (+0.5% acetic acid) extracts exhibited the highest TPC, TFC, and FRAP values for black bean, lentil, black soybean, and red kidney bean. The 80% acetone extracts exhibited the highest TFC, CTC, and DPPH-free radical scavenging activity for yellow pea, green pea, chickpea, and yellow soybean. The 70% ethanol extracts exhibited the greatest ORAC value for all selected legumes. These results indicated that solvents with different polarity had significant effects on total phenolic contents, extracted components, and antioxidant activities. High correlations between phenolic compositions and antioxidant activities of legume extracts were observed. The information is of interest to the nutraceutical food/ingredient industries since legumes are a rich source of antioxidants. PMID:17995858

  17. Bioconversion of Biomass-Derived Phenols Catalyzed by Myceliophthora thermophila Laccase.

    PubMed

    Zerva, Anastasia; Manos, Nikolaos; Vouyiouka, Stamatina; Christakopoulos, Paul; Topakas, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    Biomass-derived phenols have recently arisen as an attractive alternative for building blocks to be used in synthetic applications, due to their widespread availability as an abundant renewable resource. In the present paper, commercial laccase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila was used to bioconvert phenol monomers, namely catechol, pyrogallol and gallic acid in water. The resulting products from catechol and gallic acid were polymers that were partially characterized in respect to their optical and thermal properties, and their average molecular weight was estimated via solution viscosity measurements and GPC. FT-IR and ¹H-NMR data suggest that phenol monomers are connected with ether or C-C bonds depending on the starting monomer, while the achieved molecular weight of polycatechol is found higher than the corresponding poly(gallic acid). On the other hand, under the same condition, pyrogallol was dimerized in a pure red crystalline compound and its structure was confirmed by ¹H-NMR as purpurogallin. The herein studied green synthesis of enzymatically synthesized phenol polymers or biological active compounds could be exploited as an alternative synthetic route targeting a variety of applications. PMID:27128897

  18. Domestic cooking methods affect the nutritional quality of red cabbage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Zheng, Yonghua; Yang, Zhenfeng; Cao, Shifeng; Shao, Xingfeng; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of domestic cooking methods, including steaming, microwave heating, boiling and stir-frying on the nutritional quality of red cabbage. Compared with fresh-cut red cabbage, all cooking methods were found to cause significant reduction in anthocyanin and total glucosinolates contents. Moreover, steaming resulted in significantly greater retention of vitamin C and DPPH radical-scavenging activity, while stir-frying and boiling, two popular Chinese cooking methods, led to significant losses of total phenolic, vitamin C, DPPH radical-scavenging activity, and total soluble sugar as well as reducing sugars. Normally, red cabbage consumed fresh in salads could maintain the highest nutrition. However, considering the habits of Asian cuisine, it is recommended to use less water and less cooking time, such as steaming based on our present results, so as to retain the optimum benefits of the health-promoting compounds. PMID:24837935

  19. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  20. Adsorption of phenolic compounds on fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Zardkoohi, M.

    1996-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms for adsorption of phenol, 3-chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol from water onto fly ash were determined. These isotherms were modeled by the Freundlich isotherm. The fly ash adsorbed 67, 20, and 22 mg/g for phenol, chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively, for the highest water phase concentrations used. The affinity of phenolic compounds for fly ash is above the expected amount corresponding to a monolayer coverage considering that the surface area of fly ash is only 1.87 m{sup 2}/g. The isotherms for contaminants studied were unfavorable, indicating that adsorption becomes progressively easier as more solutes are taken up. Phenol displayed a much higher affinity for fly ash than 3-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  1. Spectroscopic properties of pharmacologically active phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Polozov, G. I.; Sorokin, V. L.; Ksendzova, G. A.

    2012-05-01

    The IR Fourier-transform spectra of pharmacologically active phenol molecules in solutions in CCl4 and in the crystalline state have been studied. Phenol derivatives with different directivities and different levels of pharmacological efficiency have been examined. Based on analysis of the IR spectra of screened phenols, the antimicrobial activity of phenols with free hydroxyl groups has been shown to be highest. The high antimicrobial activity of aminophenols is related to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. For aminophenols that are active against herpesviruses, O-H...N hydrogen bonds are formed in molecules. The main characteristic of the high antiviral activity against A-type influenza is predominance of intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the O-H...O=C type in molecules. Sulfur-containing aminophenols, which manifest activity against HIV infection, are characterized by the occurrence of hydrogen bonds that involve the participation of the OH, NH, and SO2 groups.

  2. Phenolic cutter for machining foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, T. A.; Miller, A. C.; Price, B. W.; Stiles, W. S.

    1970-01-01

    Pre-pregged fiber glass is an efficient abrasive for machining polystyrene and polyurethane foams. It bonds easily to any cutter base made of aluminum, steel, or phenolic, is inexpensive, and is readily available.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10237 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. 721.10237 Section 721.10237 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10237 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. 721.10237 Section 721.10237 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10238 Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10237 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. 721.10237 Section 721.10237 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10238 Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10238 Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection...

  9. Catalytic dehydroxylation of phenols. [Metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, W.J.M.

    1984-05-29

    Phenolic compounds are dehydroxylated in the vapor phase by contacting with a reducing atmosphere substantially comprising hydrogen sulfide as the reducing agent in the presence of a sulfur-tolerant metal sulfide catalyst. The additional presence of hydrogen gas helps to desulfurize the catalyst and maintain catalytic activity. The process is useful in the treatment of phenolic naphtha fractions present in coal liquids, produced by pyrolysis or direct coal liquefaction.

  10. Eucoleus boehmi infection in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) from Italy.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Fabrizia; Morganti, Giulia; di Cesare, Angela; Lepri, Elvio; Cassini, Rudi; Zanet, Stefania; Deni, Dario; Chiari, Mario; Ferroglio, Ezio

    2014-12-15

    In the last decade an increase of the number of red foxes in anthropized habitats across European countries, including Italy, has been observed. This pones implications in terms of disease transmission between wildlife and domestic animals; in fact, there are evidences of the role of foxes as reservoirs and amplifiers of a broad spectrum of parasites infecting pets. The present study evaluated the prevalence of Eucoleus boehmi, an emerging extra-intestinal nematodes of the Capillariinae subfamily, in red foxes. The nasal passages and sinuses of 179 red foxes culled from several areas of northern and central Italy were inspected and the mucosal surfaces were scrapped and examined for adult nematodes and eggs, microscopically and genetically identified. Overall 55 foxes (30.7%) were found to be infected with E. boehmi, i.e. 27 on inspection of the nasal passages and sinuses and 28 on mucosal flush and scraping. The occurrence of E. boehmi was significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to the sampling location, the age and gender of the animals examined; the higher rates of prevalence were observed in animals culled in Piedmont (43.3%) and in female (60.6%) and adult (38.1%) subjects. A total of 184 adult parasites were recovered, with a mean intensity of infection of 3.34, and a more frequent localization of E. boehmi in the nasal passages rather than in the sinuses. A significant (p < 0.05) relationship was found between the parasite burden and body condition and age of the animals; the intensity of infection was significantly higher in juveniles (mean: 6.3 specimens) and in animals showing poor fox body condition (mean: 7.8 specimens). These results show that E. boehmi is highly prevalent in the red fox populations of certain areas of Italy. Epidemiological implications are discussed, with a special focus on the role that this wild canid may have in the increasing transmission of nasal eucoleosis to domestic dogs. PMID:25458564

  11. The role of Th17 cytokines in primary mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kolls, Jay K.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2010-01-01

    The T helper type 17 (Th17) lineage of CD4+ T-cells produce several effector molecules including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22. In addition to CD4+, αβ T-cells, these cytokines can be produced by natural killer and γδ T-cells. These effector cytokines can be produced rapidly upon infection at mucosal sites and evidence to date strongly implicates that this arm of the immune system plays a critical role in mucosal immunity to many extracellular pathogens. Moreover these cytokines can also coordinate adaptive immunity to some intracellular pathogens. In this review, we will highlight recent progress in our understanding of these cytokines, and mechanisms of their effector function in the mucosa. PMID:21095154

  12. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Rosa Miranda Corrêa, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs. PMID:25313360

  13. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  14. Immunotherapies Targeting Fish Mucosal Immunity - Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Koshio, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, studies on the mucosal immunity in fish species have shown much progress. Although there are some organs such as skin, gills, and gut are directly associated with the mucosal immunity of fish species, this mini review emphasizes the general knowledge on the role and production figures of skin mucus and factors affecting the secretion of skin mucus of fish species. As the skin mucus of fish species is the first defense line for protection against invading microorganisms such as pathogens (bacteria, virus), parasites, etc., the information for understanding the roles of the skin mucus is very important. Furthermore, the information in the review will shed light on the development of high quality aquafeeds for the sustainable aquaculture field as well. PMID:26779184

  15. Rapid Inflammasome Activation following Mucosal SIV Infection of Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Ghneim, Khader; Bosche, William J; Li, Yuan; Berkemeier, Brian; Hull, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra; Cameron, Mark; Liu, Jinyan; Smith, Kaitlin; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Li, Hualin; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Colantonio, Arnaud; Kang, Hyung-Joo; Li, Wenjun; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2016-04-21

    The earliest events following mucosal HIV-1 infection, prior to measurable viremia, remain poorly understood. Here, by detailed necropsy studies, we show that the virus can rapidly disseminate following mucosal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys and trigger components of the inflammasome, both at the site of inoculation and at early sites of distal virus spread. By 24 hr following inoculation, a proinflammatory signature that lacked antiviral restriction factors was observed in viral RNA-positive tissues. The early innate response included expression of NLRX1, which inhibits antiviral responses, and activation of the TGF-β pathway, which negatively regulates adaptive immune responses. These data suggest a model in which the virus triggers specific host mechanisms that suppress the generation of antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses in the first few days of infection, thus facilitating its own replication. These findings have important implications for the development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent infection. PMID:27085913

  16. Microbiota-Host Interactions in Mucosal Homeostasis and Systemic Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Longman, Randy S.; Yang, Yi; Diehl, Gretchen E.; Kim, Sangwon V.; Littman, Dan R.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate intestinal tract is colonized by hundreds of species of bacteria that must be compartmentalized and tolerated to prevent invasive growth and harmful inflammatory responses. Signaling initiated by commensal bacteria shapes antigen-specific mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity. A distinct type of effector CD4+ T cells, Th17 cells, play a key role in coordinating the inflammatory immune responses that afford protection to pathogens at the mucosal interface. Balancing this powerful inflammatory response, regulatory T cells limit collateral damage and provide antigen-specific tolerance to both food and microbial antigens. Here, we discuss the implications for how the microbiota as a whole contribute to compartmentalization from the host and how individual constituents of the microbiota influence the functions and repertoire of effector T cells and organ-specific autoimmune disease. PMID:24913313

  17. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal Lesions in Male Smokers and Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Hayati, Zahra; Rezaei, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is one of the most important risk factors for the development of oral mucosal lesions such as leukoplakia and hairy tongue. Controversy exists in the literature, however, about the prevalence of oral lesions in smokers. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral lesions in male smokers compared with nonsmokers in Hamadan. A total of 516 male participants were assessed, 258 of whom were smokers and 258 of whom were healthy nonsmokers. The prevalence of lesions was evaluated by clinical observation and biopsy. We found that the most prevalent lesions among smokers were gingival problems and coated tongue; smokers had significantly more lesions than did nonsmokers. Malignant and premalignant lesions were found in a higher age range. Among all participants in our study, we found a large number of oral mucosal lesions in smokers that had a strong correlation with smoking. Dental services need to implement care and health education for smokers to promote health. PMID:24010068

  18. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  19. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  20. Berry Phenolics of Grapevine under Challenging Environments

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, António; Eiras-Dias, José; Castellarin, Simone D.; Gerós, Hernâni

    2013-01-01

    Plant phenolics have been for many years a theme of major scientific and applied interest. Grape berry phenolics contribute to organoleptic properties, color and protection against environmental challenges. Climate change has already caused significant warming in most grape-growing areas of the world, and the climatic conditions determine, to a large degree, the grape varieties that can be cultivated as well as wine quality. In particular, heat, drought and light/UV intensity severely affect phenolic metabolism and, thus, grape composition and development. In the variety Chardonnay, water stress increases the content of flavonols and decreases the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of stilbene precursors. Also, polyphenolic profile is greatly dependent on genotype and environmental interactions. This review deals with the diversity and biosynthesis of phenolic compounds in the grape berry, from a general overview to a more detailed level, where the influence of environmental challenges on key phenolic metabolism pathways is approached. The full understanding of how and when specific phenolic compounds accumulate in the berry, and how the varietal grape berry metabolism responds to the environment is of utmost importance to adjust agricultural practices and thus, modify wine profile. PMID:24030720

  1. Free and bound total phenolics, procyanidin and anthocyanin profiles and their antioxidant capacities in whole grain rice (Oryza sativa L.) of different bran colors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the polyphenols in whole grain rice varying in bran color, total phenolics, flavonoids and antioxidant capacities of the solvent-extractable (Free) and cell-wall bound (Bound) fractions and the profiles of procyanidins and anthocyanins were determined. Red and purple bran rices had signific...

  2. Metabolic alterations to the mucosal microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Michael; Poles, Jordan; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Wolff, Martin J.; Abidi, Wasif M.; Ullman, Thomas; Mayer, Lloyd; Cho, Ilseung; Loke, P'ng

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammation during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may alter nutrient availability to adherent mucosal bacteria and impact their metabolic function. Microbial metabolites may regulate intestinal CD4+ T cell homeostasis. We investigated the relationship between inflammation and microbial function by inferred metagenomics of the mucosal microbiota from colonic pinch biopsies of IBD patients. Methods Paired pinch biopsy samples of known inflammation states were analyzed from UC (23), CD (21) and controls (24) by 16S ribosomal sequencing, histopathology and flow cytometry. PICRUSt was used to generate metagenomic data, and derive relative Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway abundance information. Leukocytes were isolated from paired biopsy samples and analyzed by multi-color flow cytometry. Active inflammation was defined by neutrophil infiltration into the epithelium Results Carriage of metabolic pathways in the mucosal microbiota was relatively stable among IBD patients despite large variations in individual bacterial community structures. However, microbial function was significantly altered in inflamed tissue of UC patients, with a reduction in carbohydrate and nucleotide metabolism in favor of increased lipid and amino acid metabolism. These differences were not observed in samples from CD patients. In CD, microbial lipid, carbohydrate, and amino acid metabolism was tightly correlated with frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs, whereas in UC these pathways were correlated with frequency of CD4+IL-22+ (TH22) cells. Conclusions Metabolic pathways of the mucosal microbiota in CD do not vary as much as UC with inflammation state, indicating a more systemic perturbation of host-bacteria interactions in CD compared to more localized dysfunction in UC. PMID:24583479

  3. Compartmentalization of the mucosal immune responses to commensal intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Andrew J; Uhr, Therese

    2004-12-01

    Mammals coexist with a luxuriant load of bacteria in the lower intestine (up to 10(12) organisms/g of intestinal contents). Although these bacteria do not cause disease if they remain within the intestinal lumen, they contain abundant immunostimulatory molecules that trigger immunopathology if the bacteria penetrate the body in large numbers. The physical barrier consists only of a single epithelial cell layer with overlying mucus, but comparisons between animals kept in germ-free conditions and those colonized with bacteria show that bacteria induce both mucosal B cells and some T cell subsets; these adaptations are assumed to function as an immune barrier against bacterial penetration, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In mice with normal intestinal flora, but no pathogens, there is a secretory IgA response against bacterial membrane proteins and other cell wall components. Whereas induction of IgA against cholera toxin is highly T help dependent, secretory IgA against commensal bacteria is induced by both T independent and T dependent pathways. When animals are kept in clean conditions and free of pathogens, there is still a profound intestinal secretory IgA response against the commensal intestinal flora. However, T dependent serum IgG responses against commensal bacteria do not occur in immunocompetent animals unless they are deliberately injected intravenously with 10(4) to 10(6) organisms. In other words, unmanipulated pathogen-free mice are systemically ignorant but not tolerant of their commensal flora despite the mucosal immune response to these organisms. In mice that are challenged with intestinal doses of commensal bacteria, small numbers of commensals penetrate the epithelial cell layer and survive within dendritic cells (DC). These commensal-loaded DC induce IgA, but because they are confined within the mucosal immune system by the mesenteric lymph nodes, they do not induce systemic immune responses. In this way the mucosal immune responses

  4. Effect of supplemental ultraviolet radiation on the concentration of phytonutrients in green and red leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa) cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Steven; Caldwell, Charles; Mirecki, Roman; Slusser, James; Gao, Wei

    2005-08-01

    Eight cultivars each of red and green leaf lettuce were raised in a greenhouse with supplemental UV radiation, either UV-A (wavelengths greater than ca. 315 nm) or UV-A+UV-B (wavelengths greater than ca. 290 nm; 6.4 kJ m-2 daily biologically effective UV-B), or no supplemental UV (controls). Several phytonutrients were analyzed in leaf flours to identify lines with large differences in composition and response to UV-B. Red leaf lettuce had higher levels of phenolic acid esters, flavonols and anthocyanins than green lines. Both green and red lines exposed to UV-B for 9 days showed 2-3-fold increases in flavonoids compared to controls, but only 45% increases in phenolic acid esters, suggesting these compounds may be regulated by different mechanisms. There were large differences between cultivars in levels of phenolic compounds under control conditions and also large differences in UV-B effects. Among red varieties, cv. Galactic was notable for high levels of phenolics and a large response to UV-B. Among green varieties, cvs. Black-Seeded Simpson and Simpson Elite had large increases in phenolics with UV-B exposure. Photosynthetic pigments were also analyzed. Green leaf lettuce had high levels of pheophytin, a chlorophyll degradation product. Total chlorophylls (including pheophytin) were much lower in green compared to red varieties. Lutein, a carotenoid, was similar for green and red lines. Total chlorophylls and lutein increased 2-fold under supplemental UV-B in green lines but decreased slightly under UV-B in red lines. Lettuce appears to be a valuable crop to use to study phytochemical-environment interactions.

  5. Phenolic glycosides from Kaempferia parviflora.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Kikuzaki, Hiroe

    2008-11-01

    Three phenolic glycosides were isolated together with two known flavonol glycosides from the H2O-soluble fraction of rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora. Their structures were determined to be rel-(5aS,10bS)-5a,10b-dihydro-1,3,5a,9-tetrahydroxy-8-methoxy-6H-benz[b]indeno[1,2-d]furan-6-one 5a-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-d-glucopyranoside] (1), its rel-5aS,10bR isomer (2), and (2R,3S,4S)-3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-d-glucopyranosyl]-3'-O-methyl-ent-epicatechin-(2alpha-->O-->3,4alpha-->4)-(5aS,10bS)-5a,10b-dihydro-1,3,5a,9-tetrahydroxy-8-methoxy-6H-benz[b]indeno[1,2-d]furan-6-one 5a-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside] (3). The structures were elucidated on the basis of analyses of chemical and spectroscopic evidence. PMID:18922550

  6. RP-HPLC-DAD analysis of phenolic compounds in pomace extracts from five grape cultivars: Evaluation of their antioxidant, antiradical and antifungal activities in orange and apple juices.

    PubMed

    Sagdic, Osman; Ozturk, Ismet; Ozkan, Gulcan; Yetim, Hasan; Ekici, Lutfiye; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin

    2011-06-15

    Phenolic compounds, related to antioxidative and antifungal properties of ethanolic extracts from five commercial grape cultivars (three red and two white) grown in Turkey were determined. A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) procedure was developed, and a total 18 different phenolic compounds were identified. Total phenolic contents of the extracts were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau method. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by using DPPH radical scavenging and phosphomolybdenum methods. All extracts exhibited strong antioxidant and antiradical activity. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of the extracts were variety dependent. Antifungal activities of the pomaces and extracts were screened by both in vitro agar-well diffusion assay and antifungal activity in apple and orange juices in situ using Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Z. bailii. Antifungal activities revealed that the pomaces and extracts of Gamay and Kalecik karasi could be more effective antifungal agents than those of Emir, Narince and Okuzgozu grape cultivars. PMID:25213954

  7. Octreotide effectively decreases mucosal damage in experimental colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Okon, E; Rachmilewitz, D

    1993-01-01

    The effect of octreotide, a synthetic analogue of somatostatin, on the modulation of the acetic acid model of experimental colitis was examined. Colitis was induced by intracolonic administration of 2 ml of 5% acetic acid. The inflammatory response elicited by the acetic acid resulted in increased colonic synthesis of platelet activating factor, leukotriene B4 and decreased mucosal somatostatin levels. Subcutaneous administration of octreotide (10 micrograms/rat) 1 hour before or immediately after damage induction, as well as 1 and 23 hours after acetic acid application, resulted in a significant reduction in mucosal damage. The protective effect was accompanied by a significant reduction in platelet activating factor activity, leukotriene B4, and vasoactive intestinal peptide concentrations. There were no significant changes in mucosal leukotriene C4 and calcitonin gene related peptide levels. This study shows that acetic acid induced colitis is pharmacologically manipulated by octreotide. The mechanism of action of octreotide has not yet been fully determined. The potential use of octreotide in treating active inflammatory bowel disease remains to be evaluated. Images Figure 5 PMID:8381760

  8. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  9. Myofibroblasts in the mucosal layer of the uterine tube.

    PubMed

    Walter, I

    1998-01-01

    Uterine tubes from cow, sheep, horse, pig, dog, cat, rabbit, and guinea pig were examined immunohistochemically for presence and distribution of contractile cells in the mucosal lamina propria. We tested for the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin, tropomyosin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin (heavy chain) and cytoskeletal proteins vimentin and cytokeratin. Immunostaining for alpha-smooth muscle actin showed two distribution patterns: either positive cells were freely dispersed in the mucosal lamina propria or a distinct subepithelial layer of positive cells was seen. The first distribution pattern was found in the isthmic uterine tube segments of all animals examined. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was colocalized with tropomyosin (all species), desmin (horse, sheep), and smooth muscle myosin (sheep, cow). All these cells were found reactive with anti-vimentin but not with anticytokeratin and therefore were classified as myofibroblasts. A distinct subepithelial layer of alpha-actin and tropomyosin positive cells was seen in horse fimbriae. In other examined species alpha-smooth muscle actin immunoreactivity in the subepithelial region was very weak. Contractile cells in the uterine tube mucosa were supposed to influence mucosal condition and motility, and therefore to play a role in gamete transport. PMID:11315956

  10. Treatment-induced mucositis: an old problem with new remedies.

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    Mucositis may be a painful, debilitating, dose-limiting side-effect of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy for which there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. The basis of management is pain relief, prevention of dehydration and adequate nutrition. When tested vigorously, most antiseptic mouthwashes and anti-ulcer agents are ineffective. Simple mechanical cleansing by saline is the most effective traditional measure. A variety of new agents are effective. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) act outwith the haemopoeitic system and can reduce mucositis, but the best schedule, dosage and method of administration is not known or which is the best growth factor to prevent this side-effect. A placebo-controlled randomized trial of antibiotic pastilles has shown a significant reduction in mucositis and weight loss during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Another method to reduce radiation effects in normal tissue is to stimulate cells to divide before radiotherapy by silver nitrate or interleukin 1. These methods may be particularly effective when given along with hyperfractionated radiation treatment such as CHART. PMID:9635851

  11. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297

  12. Epidemiology of mucosal human papillomavirus infection and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Helen; Burchell, Ann N

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the epidemiology of mucosal human papillomavirs (HPV) in adults and children, its mode of transmission and its associated diseases. Over 40 genotypes of HPV infect the epithelial lining of the anogenital tract and other mucosal areas of the body. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection globally, with high prevalences found in both females and males. The predominant route of transmission is via sexual contact, although mother-to-child transmission is also possible. HPV infection may exist asymptomatically or may induce the formation of benign or malignant tumours in the genital, oral or conjunctival mucosa. Although most infections clear spontaneously, those that persist result in substantial morbidity and invoke high costs associated with the treatment of clinically relevant lesions. Some 13-18 mucosal HPV types are considered to have high oncogenic potential. HPV is recognized unequivocally as the main causal factor for cervical cancer, and is further responsible for a substantial proportion of many other anogenital neoplasms and head and neck cancers. Infections with HPV types that have low oncogenic risk, such as HPV-6 and 11, are associated with benign lesions of the anogenital areas known as condylomata acuminata (genital warts), oral papillomas, conjunctival papillomas, as well as low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions of the cervix. Perinatally acquired HPV can also cause recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in infants and young children. The implementation of HPV vaccination therefore has the potential to prevent a substantial proportion of HPV-related disease in the future. PMID:19684442

  13. The Effect of Peritoneal Air Exposure on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jun; Tan, Shanjun; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Dong, Yi; Chen, Qiyi; Shi, Jialiang; Duan, Kaipeng; Bai, Xiaowu; Xu, Lin; Li, Jieshou

    2014-01-01

    Background. Damage of the intestinal mucosa barrier may result in intestinal bacterial and endotoxin translocation, leading to local and systemic inflammation. The present study was designed to investigate whether peritoneal air exposure induces damage of intestinal mucosal barrier. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 210 to 230 g) were randomized into five groups (6/group): a control group, a sham group, and three exposure groups with peritoneal air exposure for 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively. At 24 h after surgery, blood and terminal ileum were sampled. The serum D-lactate levels were determined using an ELISA kit. The intestinal permeability was determined by measuring the intestinal clearance of FITC-dextran (FD4). The histopathological changes in terminal ileum were also assessed. Results. Compared with the controls, peritoneal air exposure caused an increase in both serum D-lactate level and intestinal FD4 clearance, which were proportional to the length of peritoneal air exposure and correlated to Chiu's scores, indices for intestinal mucosal injury. Edema and inflammatory cells were also observed in mucosa and submucosa of ileum in three exposure groups. Conclusions. Peritoneal air exposure could induce damage to the intestinal mucosal barrier, which is proportional to the time length of peritoneal air exposure. PMID:25210511

  14. Cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission: the neglected pathway.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Deborah J; Le Grand, Roger

    2014-12-15

    This supplement to The Journal of Infectious Diseases is devoted to the important and understudied topic of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV) mucosal transmission. It stems from a workshop held in Boston, Massachusetts, in October 2013, in which scientists discussed their research and insights regarding cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission. The 10 articles in this supplement present the case for cell-associated HIV transmission as an important element contributing to the HIV epidemic, review evidence for the efficacy of current HIV prevention strategies against cell-associated HIV transmission and opportunities for further development, and describe in vitro, ex vivo, and animal cell-associated transmission models that can be used to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission and test HIV prevention strategies. We hope that these articles will help to inform and invigorate the HIV prevention field and contribute to the development of more-effective vaccine, treatment, and microbicide strategies for HIV prevention. PMID:25414413

  15. Mucosal transmission and pathogenesis of chronic wasting disease in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Perrott, Matthew R; Sigurdson, Christina J; Mason, Gary L; Hoover, Edward A

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids is almost certainly transmitted by mucosal contact with the causative prion, whether by direct (animal-to-animal) or indirect (environmental) means. Yet the sites and mechanisms of prion entry remain to be further understood. This study sought to extend this understanding by demonstrating that ferrets exposed to CWD via several mucosal routes developed infection, CWD prion protein (PrP(CWD)) amplification in lymphoid tissues, neural invasion and florid transmissible spongiform encephalopathy lesions resembling those in native cervid hosts. The ferrets developed extensive PrP(CWD) accumulation in the nervous system, retina and olfactory epithelium, with lesser deposition in tongue, muscle, salivary gland and the vomeronasal organ. PrP(CWD) accumulation in mucosal sites, including upper respiratory tract epithelium, olfactory epithelium and intestinal Peyer's patches, make the shedding of prions by infected ferrets plausible. It was also observed that regionally targeted exposure of the nasopharyngeal mucosa resulted in an increased attack rate when compared with oral exposure. The latter finding suggests that nasal exposure enhances permissiveness to CWD infection. The ferret model has further potential for investigation of portals for initiation of CWD infection. PMID:23100363

  16. Sensory representation of typicality of Cabernet franc wines related to phenolic composition: impact of ripening stage and maceration time.

    PubMed

    Cadot, Yves; Caillé, Soline; Samson, Alain; Barbeau, Gérard; Cheynier, Véronique

    2012-06-30

    Phenolics are responsible for important sensory properties of red wines, including colour, astringency, and possibly bitterness. From a technical viewpoint, the harvest date and the maceration duration are critical decisions for producing red wine with a distinctive style. But little is known about the evolution of phenolics and of their extractability during ripening to predict the composition of the wine and related sensory properties. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between the sensory profile of the wines and (i) the ripening stage of the berries (harvest date) and (ii) the extraction time (maceration duration). Phenolic acids, flavonols, anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins of Vitis Vinifera var. Cabernet franc were measured in grapes and in wines from two stages of maturity and with two maceration durations. Phenolic composition was analysed by high performance liquid chromatography, after fractionation and thiolysis for proanthocyanidins. The distinctive style of wines was investigated by descriptive analysis (trained panel), Just About Right profiles and typicality assessment (wine expert panel). Relationships between phenolics and sensory attributes were established by multidimensional analysis, and phenolics were classified according to sensory data by ANOVA and PLS regressions. Astringency, bitterness, colour intensity and alcohol significantly increased with ripening and astringency and colour intensity increased with maceration time. Grape anthocyanins increased and thiolysis yield significantly decreased with ripening. In wine, proanthocyanidins increased, and mean degree of polymerisation and thiolysis yield decreased with longer extraction time. The high impact of harvest date on the sensory profiles could be due to changes in anthocyanin and sugar contents, but also to an evolution of proanthocyanidins. Moreover, proanthocyanidin composition was affected by maceration time as suggested by the decrease of thiolysis yield. Our

  17. An Overview of Challenges Limiting the Design of Protective Mucosal Vaccines for Finfish

    PubMed Central

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein, it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish. PMID:26557121

  18. Investigation of Gastroduodenal Mucosal Injury in Japanese Asymptomatic Antiplatelet Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Sogabe, Masahiro; Okahisa, Toshiya; Nakasono, Masahiko; Fujino, Yasuteru; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Takaoka, Yoshihumi; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-07-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cerebral vascular disorders. Although there have been several studies on gastroduodenal mucosal injury with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as GI bleeding, in antiplatelet drug users (including low-dose aspirin (LDA)), there have been few reports on the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users. This study was a cross-sectional study elucidating the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users.Subjects were 186 asymptomatic Japanese antiplatelet drug users who underwent a regular health checkup. Subjects were divided into those with and without gastroduodenal mucosal injury endoscopically, and the association between gastroduodenal mucosal injury and other data in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users was investigated.The prevalence of males and drinkers were significantly higher in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in those without. In addition, the prevalence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) users was significantly lower in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in subjects without gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Logistic regression analysis showed PPI (odds ratios: 0.116; 95% confidence intervals: 0.021-0.638; P < 0.05) was a significant predictor of a decreased prevalence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury and closed-type (C-type) atrophy (3.172; 1.322-7.609; P < 0.01) was a significant predictor of an increased prevalence of severe gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users.Gender and lifestyle, such as drinking, may have an impact on risk of gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic subjects taking antiplatelet drugs. Although PPI is a significant predictor of a decreased prevalence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury, including in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users, status of

  19. Effects of γ-irradiation on phenolics content, antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of whole grainrice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yafang; Tang, Fufu; Xu, Feifei; Wang, Yuefei; Bao, Jinsong

    2013-04-01

    Three rice genotypes with different color were gamma irradiated at a dose of 2, 4, 6, 8and 10 kGy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the phenolics content and the antioxidant activity, as well as physicochemical properties of whole grain rice. The bound phenolics content in all the genotypes were significantly increased with the increase of dose of irradiation. Gamma irradiation at high dose significantly increased the free, bound and total antioxidant activities of three rice genotypes except for the free antioxidant activities of red rice. Though the color parameters were slightly changed, these changes could not be visibly identified. Rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) viscosities and gel hardness decreased continuously with the increase of the irradiation doses. It is suggested that gamma irradiation enhanced the antioxidant potential and eating quality of whole grainrice.

  20. IgG transport across mucosal barriers by neonatal Fc receptor for IgG and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaru; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Kuo, Timothy T; Kobayashi, Kanna; Claypool, Steven M; Takagawa, Tetsuya; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi; Lencer, Wayne I; Blumberg, Richard S

    2006-12-01

    Mucosal secretions of the human gastrointestinal, respiratory, and genital tracts contain significant quantities of IgG. The neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) plays a major role in regulating host IgG levels and transporting IgG and associated antigens across polarized epithelial barriers. The FcRn can then recycle the IgG/antigen complex back across the intestinal barrier into the lamina propria for processing by dendritic cells and presentation to CD4(+) T cells in regional organized lymphoid structures. FcRn, through its ability to secrete and absorb IgG, thus integrates luminal antigen encounters with systemic immune compartments and, as such, provides essential host defense and immunoregulatory functions at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:17051393

  1. Red Clover Breeding Progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is an important forage legume grown on approximately 4 million hectares worldwide. It has a long and varied history in agriculture. Active breeding efforts began at the end of the 19th century. Since this time significant improvement in red clover cultivar for a...

  2. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  3. Mucosal CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising in the Oral Cavity Following Dental Implants: Report of the First Case.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jung; Choe, Ji-Young; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CD30+ T-cell LPD) is a novel entity with unique clinicopathological features and an indolent behavior. Here we report the first case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD arising in the oral cavity following dental implant. A 70-year-old woman presented with swelling and redness of the oral mucosa of right maxilla and left mandible surrounding dental implants that had been placed 8 years previously. Radiological examination revealed enhancing oral lesions and multiple cervical lymph nodes. Microscopic examination showed diffuse infiltration of large anaplastic cells with characteristic morphology of hallmark cells described in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. These cells were diffusely positive for CD30, CD3, CD4, CD2, CD5, CD7, TIA-1, and TCRβF1, but negative for CD20, CD8, CD45, EMA, ALK, and Epstein-Barr virus. T-cell monoclonality was detected in a TCRγ gene rearrangement study. This a unique case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD with unusual presentation following dental implant. PMID:26261101

  4. Phenolic composition and inhibitory effect against oxidative DNA damage of cooked cowpeas as affected by simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Nderitu, Alice M; Dykes, Linda; Awika, Joseph M; Minnaar, Amanda; Duodu, Kwaku G

    2013-12-01

    Cowpeas contain phenolic compounds with potential health benefits. The effect of simulated gastrointestinal digestion on phenolic composition of cooked cowpeas and the ability of the digests to inhibit radical-induced DNA damage was determined. A red and a cream-coloured cowpea type were used. The phenolic composition of acetone extracts and enzyme digests of cooked cowpeas was determined using UPLC-MS. Compounds such as p-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-coumaric acid, coumaroylaldaric acid and feruloylaldaric acid were present in the acetone extracts of the cooked cowpeas but were not detected in the enzyme digests. Glycosides of quercetin and myricetin decreased upon in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of cooked cowpeas whereas flavan-3-ols were hardly present except catechin glucoside. The enzyme digest of the red cowpea type was about thrice as effective as that of the cream cowpea type in protecting DNA from oxidative damage. The observation that enzyme digests of cooked cowpeas inhibited radical-induced DNA damage suggests that cowpea phenolics retain some radical scavenging activity after gastrointestinal digestion. PMID:23870889

  5. Use of image analysis to estimate anthocyanin and UV-excited fluorescent phenolic compound levels in strawberry fruit

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Yosuke; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Noguchi, Yuji; Horie, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry is rich in anthocyanins, which are responsible for the red color, and contains several colorless phenolic compounds. Among the colorless phenolic compounds, some, such as hydroxycinammic acid derivatives, emit blue-green fluorescence when excited with ultraviolet (UV) light. Here, we investigated the effectiveness of image analyses for estimating the levels of anthocyanins and UV-excited fluorescent phenolic compounds in fruit. The fruit skin and cut surface of 12 cultivars were photographed under visible and UV light conditions; colors were evaluated based on the color components of images. The levels of anthocyanins and UV-excited fluorescent compounds in each fruit were also evaluated by spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, respectively and relationships between these levels and the image data were investigated. Red depth of the fruits differed greatly among the cultivars and anthocyanin content was well estimated based on the color values of the cut surface images. Strong UV-excited fluorescence was observed on the cut surfaces of several cultivars, and the grayscale values of the UV-excited fluorescence images were markedly correlated with the levels of those fluorescent compounds as evaluated by HPLC analysis. These results indicate that image analyses can select promising genotypes rich in anthocyanins and fluorescent phenolic compounds. PMID:23853516

  6. Inhibition of gastric H+, K+-ATPase and Helicobacter pylori growth by phenolic antioxidants of Zingiber officinale.

    PubMed

    Siddaraju, Mugur N; Dharmesh, Shylaja M

    2007-03-01

    Ulcer is a common global problem characterized by acute gastric irritability, bleeding, etc. due to either increased gastric cell proton potassium ATPase activity (PPA) or perturbation of mucosal defence. Helicobacter pylori has been identified as a major ulcerogen in addition to oxidative stress and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In this paper, we report ginger-free phenolic (GRFP) and ginger hydrolysed phenolic (GRHP) fractions of ginger (Zingiber officinale) as potent inhibitors of PPA and H. pylori growth. GRFP and GRHP inhibited PPA at an IC(50) of 2.9 +/- 0.18 and 1.5 +/- 0.12 microg/mL, exhibiting six- to eight-fold better potency over lansoprazole. GRFP is constituted by syringic (38%), gallic (18%) and cinnamic (14%) acids and GRHP by cinnamic (48%), p-coumaric (34%) and caffeic (6%) acids as major phenolic acids. GRFP and GRHP further exhibited free radical scavenging (IC(50) 1.7 +/- 0.07 and 2.5 +/- 0.16), inhibition of lipid peroxidation (IC(50) 3.6 +/- 0.21 and 5.2 +/- 0.46), DNA protection (80% at 4 microg) and reducing power abilities (80-338 U/g) indicating strong antioxidative properties. GRFP and GRHP may thus be potential in-expensive multistep blockers against ulcer. PMID:17295419

  7. Identification and characterization of phenol hydroxylase from phenol-degrading Candida tropicalis strain JH8.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Zhixiong; Cheng, Li

    2014-09-01

    The gene phhY encoding phenol hydroxylase from Candida tropicalis JH8 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene phhY contained an open reading frame of 2130 bp encoding a polypeptide of 709 amino acid residues. From its sequence analysis, it is a member of a family of flavin-containing aromatic hydroxylases and shares 41% amino acid identity with phenol hydroxylase from Trichosporon cutaneum. The recombinant phenol hydroxylase exists as a homotetramer structure with a native molecular mass of 320 kDa. Recombinant phenol hydroxylase was insensitive to pH treatment; its optimum pH was at 7.6. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 30 °C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 60 °C. Under the optimal conditions with phenol as substrate, the K(m) and V(max) of recombinant phenol hydroxylase were 0.21 mmol·L(-1) and 0.077 μmol·L(-1)·min(-1), respectively. This is the first paper presenting the cloning and expression in E. coli of the phenol hydroxylase gene from C. tropicalis and the characterization of the recombinant phenol hydroxylase. PMID:25140701

  8. Selective defunctionalization by TiO2 of monomeric phenolics from lignin pyrolysis into simple phenols.

    PubMed

    Mante, Ofei D; Rodriguez, Jose A; Babu, Suresh P

    2013-11-01

    This study is focused on defunctionalizing monomeric phenolics from lignin into simple phenols for applications such as phenol/formaldehyde resins, epoxidized novolacs, adhesives and binders. Towards this goal, Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used to selectively remove hydroxyl, methoxy, carbonyl and carboxyl functionalities from the monomeric phenolic compounds from lignin to produce mainly phenol, cresols and xylenols. The results showed that anatase TiO2 was more selective and active compared to rutile TiO2. Catechols were found to be the most reactive phenolics and 4-ethylguaiacol the least reactive with anatase TiO2. An overall conversion of about 87% of the phenolics was achieved at 550°C with a catalyst-to-feed ratio of 5 w/w. Over 97% conversion of phenolics is achievable at moderate temperatures (550°C or ≤ 600°C) and a moderate catalyst-to-feed ratio of 6.5:1. The reactivity of catechols on TiO2 suggests that titania is a promising catalyst in the removal of hydroxyl moiety. PMID:24080289

  9. Blend of alkyl phenol ethoxylates and alkyl phenol glycoxylates and their use as surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Grolitzer, M. A.

    1985-11-12

    Nonionic surfactant compositions useful in forming stable emulsions with oil in saline solutions comprising a blend of: at least one alkyl phenol ethoxylate and at least one alkyl phenol glycoxylate. These surfactant compositions may be employed in enhanced oil recovery processes and other applications where good emulsification and high salinity tolerances are required such as textiles, leather, dairy, concrete grinding aids and drilling muds.

  10. Jupiter's Great Red spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This color composite made from Voyager 2 narrow-angle camera frames shows the Great Red Spot during the late Jovian afternoon. North of the Red Spot lies a curious darker section of the South Equatorial Belt (SEB), the belt in which the Red Spot is located. A bright eruption of material passing from the SEB northward into the diffuse equatorial clouds has been observed on all occasions when this feature passes north of the Red Spot. The remnants of one such eruption are apparent in this photograph. To the lower left of the Red Spot lies one of the three long-lived White Ovals. This photograph was taken on June 29, 1979, when Voyager 2 was over 9 million kilometers (nearly 6 million miles) from Jupiter. The smallest features visible are over 170 kilometers (106 miles) across.

  11. Rectal mucosal endometriosis primarily misinterpreted as adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Qiuping; Liu, Shaoyan; Xiong, Hanzhen; Jiang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis involving intestinal mucosa is relatively uncommon. It poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and pathologists. We herein report a case of colonoscopic specimen revealing rectal mucosal endometriosis. A 39-year-old woman complained of red rectal bleeding and intermittent abdominal pain. Colonoscopic examination showed a rectal mass with ulceration and circum wall involvement. Biopsy was processed in the suspicious of carcinoma. Morphologically, irregular glands replaced residual colorectal ones, displayed mucin depletion, nuclear stratification and subtile subnuclear vacuoles. The stroma was full of spindle cells with abundant pink cytoplasm and unclear boundary. Due to subjectively interpreting as dysplastic glands in desmoplastic setting, primary rectal adenocarcinoma was firstly raised. Immunohistochemically, CK7, ER and CD10 identified the essence of ectopic endometrium. CK20 and CDX2 highlighted residual glands. In case of misdiagnosis, any pathologists should be aware of intestinal endometriosis for each female’s colorectal biopsy, especially for that morphology not typical for primary adenocarcinoma or endometriosis. Reading slides carefully combined with a panel of immunomarkers would solve the pitfall. PMID:26191316

  12. Gastric intramural hematoma accompanied by severe epigastric pain and hematemesis after endoscopic mucosal resection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Tan, Shi-Yun; Liao, Guo-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Gastric intramural hematoma is a rare injury of the stomach, and is most often seen in patients with underlying disease. Such injury following endoscopic therapy is even rarer, and there are no universally accepted guidelines for its treatment. In this case report, we describe a gastric intramural hematoma which occurred within 6 h of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Past medical history of this patient was negative, and laboratory examinations revealed normal coagulation profiles and platelet count. Following EMR, the patient experienced severe epigastric pain and vomited 150 mL of gastric contents which were bright red in color. Subsequent emergency endoscopy showed a 4 cm × 5 cm diverticulum-like defect in the anterior gastric antrum wall and a 4 cm × 8 cm intramural hematoma adjacent to the endoscopic submucosal dissection lesion. Following unsatisfactory temporary conservative management, the patient was treated surgically and made a complete recovery. Retrospectively, one possible reason for the patient’s condition is that the arterioles in the submucosa or muscularis may have been damaged during deep and massive submucosal injection. Thus, endoscopists should be aware of this potential complication and improve the level of surgery, especially the skills required for submucosal injection. PMID:23323020

  13. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Dong, Z; Hecht, D K; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; Wilson, C C

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T-cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T-cell activation, inflammation, and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1-infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared with uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1-infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation, and blood T-cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  14. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Dong, Z; Hecht, DK; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; Wilson, CC

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T cell activation, inflammation and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1 infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared to uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1 infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation and blood T cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  15. Pyrolysis of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA).

    PubMed

    Bessire, Brody K; Lahankar, Sridhar A; Minton, Timothy K

    2015-01-28

    Molar yields of the pyrolysis products of thermal protection systems (TPSs) are needed in order to improve high fidelity material response models. The volatile chemical species evolved during the pyrolysis of a TPS composite, phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA), have been probed in situ by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 100 to 935 °C. The relative molar yields of the desorbing species as a function of temperature were derived by fitting the mass spectra, and the observed trends are interpreted in light of the results of earlier mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of phenolic resins. The temperature-dependent product evolution was consistent with earlier descriptions of three stages of pyrolysis, with each stage corresponding to a temperature range. The two main products observed were H2O and CO, with their maximum yields occurring at ∼350 °C and ∼450 °C, respectively. Other significant products were CH4, CO2, and phenol and its methylated derivatives; these products tended to desorb concurrently with H2O and CO, over the range from about 200 to 600 °C. H2 is presumed to be the main product, especially at the highest pyrolysis temperatures used, but the relative molar yield of H2 was not quantified. The observation of a much higher yield of CO than CH4 suggests the presence of significant hydroxyl group substitution on phenol prior to the synthesis of the phenolic resin used in PICA. The detection of CH4 in combination with the methylated derivatives of phenol suggests that the phenol also has some degree of methyl substitution. The methodology developed is suitable for real-time measurements of PICA pyrolysis and should lend itself well to the validation of nonequilibrium models whose aim is to simulate the response of TPS materials during atmospheric entry of spacecraft. PMID:25490209

  16. Biodegradation of Phenol by Bacteria Strain Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus PA Isolated from Phenolic Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenghui; Xie, Wenyu; Li, Dehao; Peng, Yang; Li, Zesheng; Liu, Shusi

    2016-01-01

    A phenol-degrading bacterium strain PA was successfully isolated from the effluent of petrochemical wastewater. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the strain PA was characterized as a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, nonmotile and short rod-shaped bacterium that utilizes phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that this strain is affiliated to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in the group of Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was efficient in removing 91.6% of the initial 800 mg∙L−1 phenol within 48 h, and had a tolerance of phenol concentration as high as 1700 mg∙L−1. These results indicated that A. calcoaceticus possesses a promising potential in treating phenolic wastewater. PMID:27005648

  17. Prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following cancer therapy: are there new approaches?

    PubMed

    Kwong, Karis K F

    2004-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is an acute and distressing toxic effect of chemotherapy and head and neck irradiation. This oral sequela significantly impairs the daily functioning and quality of life of patients. The biological basis of mucositis is quite complex, involving sequential interaction of chemotherapeutic drugs or irradiation on mitosis of proliferating epithelium, a number of cytokines, and elements of oral microbial environment. Various interventions based on biological attenuation have been tested for mucositis. Such interventions have been reviewed elsewhere; however, most reviews focus on biomedical outcomes. Little attention has been paid to mucositis outcomes with oral morbidity or psychosocial aspects. The purpose of this article is to review the current research studies on the prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and bone marrow transplantation with an emphasis on biomedical, oral symptomatic, and functional impairment outcomes. In addition, further avenues of mucositis management, including psychotherapeutic intervention and integrated and stage-based treatment approaches are discussed. PMID:15238805

  18. Betalain profile, phenolic content, and color characterization of different parts and varieties of Opuntia ficus-indica.

    PubMed

    Cejudo-Bastante, María Jesús; Chaalal, Makhlouf; Louaileche, Hayette; Parrado, Juan; Heredia, Francisco J

    2014-08-20

    Three different varieties of Opuntia ficus-indica (R, red; Y, yellow; RY, red-yellow) have been considered in this study. Attention was focused on differential tristimulus colorimetry and on the analysis of individual betalains (HPLC-DAD-ESI-ToF-MS) and phenolic content, scarcely previously reported in these kinds of samples. The importance of this research stems from the elucidation of the parts and varieties of cactus pear more optimal for use as natural colorants and sources of phenolics and betalains. Thus, the RY pulp was appropriate to obtain colorants with high color intensity (C*(ab) = 66.5), whereas the whole Y fruit and R pulp reached powerful and stable yellow and red colors, respectively (C*(ab)/h(ab), 57.1/84.7 and 61.1°/81.8°). This choice was also based on the visually appreciable differences (ΔE*(ab) > 5) among samples, mainly quantitative (%Δ(2)L, %Δ(2)C). In addition, seeds of all Opuntia varieties showed significantly (p < 0.05) similar phenolic content (around 23.3 mg/g) and color characteristics. PMID:25075631

  19. Antioxidant activity of isolated ellagitannins from red raspberries and cloudberries.

    PubMed

    Kähkönen, Marja; Kylli, Petri; Ollilainen, Velimatti; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Heinonen, Marina

    2012-02-01

    Ellagitannins from red raspberries (Rubus idaeus) and cloudberries (Rubus chamaemorus) were isolated by using column chromatography and preparative HPLC. The berry phenolic isolates consisted of 80% (cloudberry) and of 60% (raspberry) of ellagitannins, with raspberries also containing anthocyanins. The main ellagitannins of both raspberries and cloudberries were identified by ESI-MS to consist of the dimeric sanguiin H-6 and the trimeric lambertianin C. Monomeric ellagitannins such as casuarictin in raspberries and pedunculagin in cloudberries were also found. The antioxidant activity of the berry phenolic isolate, ellagitannin isolate (mixture), ellagitannin main fraction (dimer and trimer), and ellagic acid was studied in bulk and emulsified methyl linoleate, in human low-density lipoprotein in vitro, and the radical scavenging activity was studied in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test. Cloudberry and red raspberry ellagitannins were highly effective as radical scavengers. Berry ellagitannins also showed significant antioxidant activity toward oxidation of both human LDL and methyl linoleate emulsions. However, only weak or moderate antioxidant activity was exhibited by ellagitannins toward oxidation of bulk oil. Thus, ellagitannins contribute significantly to the antioxidant capacity of cloudberries and red raspberries in lipoprotein and lipid emulsion environments, the latter being more relevant for food applications. PMID:22229937

  20. [Antioxidant and antiradical properties of red grape wines].

    PubMed

    Ageeva, N M; Markosov, V A; Muzychenko, G F; Bessonov, V V; Khanferyan, R A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of studies of the antioxidant and antiradical capacity of red table wines. It is shown that the antioxidant and antiradical properties of red wines due to the varieties of grapes and processing technologies. A correlation between the concentration of phenolic components of the complex and antiradical properties, as well as antioxidant and antiradical properties of red wines has been established. Antioxidant and antiradical properties were higher in variants with the highest concentration of the most important components of a phenolic complex--catechins and tannins. Their greatest content has been identified in the wine materials Saperavi made on technologies which can extract components polyphenol complex not only from grape skin, and grape seed (seed) containing ellagitannins and gallocatechin (using Vinificator company Padovan; prepared by fermenting mash irrigation heated mash, using a fermentation mash by Fludase). Depending on the grape varieties and production technology, the antioxidant activity varied by more than 30%. These data indicate that the technology can increase the production of wine intravarietal (for grapes) antioxidant activity of 10 to 20%. PMID:26841558

  1. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. A program of research for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols, via a low energy mechanistic pathway that is based on the use of the CO/CO{sub 2} couple to remove phenolic oxygen atoms, is underway. We are focusing on systems which have significant promise as catalysts: Ir(triphos)OPh, (Pt(triphos)OPh){sup +} and Rh(triphos)OPh. Our studies of phenol deoxygenation focus on monitoring the reactions for the elementary processes upon which catalytic activity will depend: CO insertion into M-OPh bonds, CO{sub 2} elimination from aryloxy carbonyls {l brace}M-C(O)-O-Ph{r brace}, followed by formation of a coordinated benzyne intermediate.

  2. Effect of processing on phenolics of wines.

    PubMed

    Blanco, V Z; Auw, J M; Sims, C A; O'Keefe, S F

    1998-01-01

    Phenolics of grapes are the main compounds responsible for color, taste, mouth feel, oxidation and other chemical reactions in wine and juice. Phenolic levels in wine and juice are affected by numerous processing conditions (crushing, pressing, sulfite addition, skin contact, oak aging). Studies were conducted to better understand the effect of processing on phenolic composition of three varieties of grapes. Three different processing steps: immediate press, hot press, and hull treatment (skin contact) for 7 and 14 days were applied to three different grape varieties, Vitis rotundifolia cv. Noble, Vitis vinifer cv. Cabernet Sauvignon, and the French-American hybrid Chambourcin. Phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and bitterness/astringency were assessed using a trained sensory panel. V. rotundifolia wines had higher levels of epicatechin and gallic acid but lower caftaric acid and procyanidins compared to the other varieties and were more astringent and bitter. Processing treatment affected phenolics and color differently among the three varieties. PMID:9598211

  3. Ultrafiltration of micellar solutions containing phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczak, H.; Materna, K.; Urbanski, R.; Szymanowski, J.

    1999-10-15

    Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration represents a potentially attractive tool for the removal of different contaminants from wastewaters. The ultrafiltration of micellar solutions containing phenol or 4-nitrophenol was studied. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), hexadecylrimethyl ammonium sulfate, alkyl polyglucoside Glucopon 215 SC UP, and oxyethylated methyl dodecanoates with the average degree of oxyethylation equal to 5 and 9 were used as surfactants and NaHCO{sub 3} as an electrolyte and alkalizing agent. Filtration and phenol rejection depends on the presence of NaHCO{sub 3} and the type of surfactant. NaHCO{sub 3} depresses to the filtration rate, especially in the case of SDS and hydrophobic oxyethylated methyl dodecanoate. The highest filtration rates are obtained for hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and alkyl polyglucoside micellar solutions. The best separations, both of phenol and 4-nitrophenol (almost 100% rejection), are obtained for CTAB micellar solutions at the pH range from 3 to 11. Nonionic surfactants are not effective enough for the separation of phenol and 4-nitrophenol. SDS solutions permit only the separation of phenol.

  4. Phytohemagglutinin derived from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a cause for intestinal malabsorption associated with bacterial overgrowth in the rat.

    PubMed

    Banwell, J G; Boldt, D H; Meyers, J; Weber, F L

    1983-03-01

    Plant lectins or carbohydrate binding proteins interact with membrane receptors on cellular surfaces but their antinutritional effects are poorly defined. Studies were conducted to determine the effects of phytohemagglutinin, a lectin derived from raw red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), on small intestinal absorptive function and morphology, and on the intestinal microflora. Phytohemagglutinin was isolated in purified form by thyroglobulin-sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Red kidney bean and phytohemagglutinin (6% and 0.5%, respectively, of dietary protein) were fed in a purified casein diet to weanling rats for up to 21 days. Weight loss, associated with malabsorption of lipid, nitrogen, and vitamin B12, developed in comparison with animals pair-fed isonitrogenous casein diets. Antinutritional effects of red kidney bean were reversible on reinstitution of a purified casein diet. An increase in bacterial colonization of the jejunum and ileum occurred in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutin-fed animals. When antibiotics were included in the diet, malabsorption of [3H]triolein and 57Co-vitamin B12 in red kidney bean-fed animals was partially reversed and, in germ-free animals, purified phytohemagglutinin had no demonstrable antinutritional effect. Mucosal disaccharidase activity was reduced in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutinin-fed animals, but intestinal mucosal morphology was unchanged. Dietary administration of phytohemagglutinin, alone or as a component of red kidney bean, caused intestinal dysfunction, which was associated with, and dependent upon, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Adherence of enteric bacteria to the mucosal surface was enhanced by phytohemagglutinin which may have facilitated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. PMID:6822324

  5. Nonmucosal Alphavirus Vaccination Stimulates a Mucosal Inductive Environment in the Peripheral Draining Lymph Node1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Nicholson, Michael G.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Zamora, Melodie; West, Ande; Iwasaki, Akiko; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The strongest mucosal immune responses are induced following mucosal Ag delivery and processing in the mucosal lymphoid tissues, and much is known regarding the immunological parameters which regulate immune induction via this pathway. Recently, experimental systems have been identified in which mucosal immune responses are induced following nonmucosal Ag delivery. One such system, footpad delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP), led to the local production of IgA Abs directed against both expressed and codelivered Ags at multiple mucosal surfaces in mice. In contrast to the mucosal delivery pathway, little is known regarding the lymphoid structures and immunological components that are responsible for mucosal immune induction following nonmucosal delivery. In this study, we have used footpad delivery of VRP to probe the constituents of this alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. Following nonmucosal VRP delivery, J chain-containing, polymeric IgA Abs were detected in the peripheral draining lymph node (DLN), at a time before IgA detection at mucosal surfaces. Further analysis of the VRP DLN revealed up-regulated α4β7 integrin expression on DLN B cells, expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 on the DLN high endothelia venules, and production of IL-6 and CC chemokines, all characteristics of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Taken together, these results implicate the peripheral DLN as an integral component of an alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. A further understanding of the critical immunological and viral components of this pathway may significantly improve both our knowledge of viral-induced immunity and the efficacy of viral-based vaccines. PMID:18566424

  6. Gastric mucosal injury in systemic lupus erythematosus patients receiving pulse methylprednisolone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Chang, Full-Young; Chen, Tseng-Shing; Ng, Yee-Yung; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lu, Ching-Liang; Chen, Chih-Yen; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Whether glucocorticoids induce gastric mucosal injury remains uncertain. We investigated whether very high-dose steroids caused gastric mucosal injury in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) patients and evaluated the possible risk factors for mucosal injury. METHODS In this prospective paired study, 67 SLE patients who had received pulse methylprednisolone therapy were enrolled. Each patient underwent endoscopic examination and tissue and blood sampling before and after pulse steroid therapy. Mucosal injury was diagnosed if the follow-up injury scale was higher than the initial scale. Examined parameters included Helicobacter pylori infection, cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 activity, and current nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) usage including aspirin. RESULTS Eleven (16.4%) of 67 cases who developed gastric mucosal injury after pulse therapy had significantly higher rates of peptic ulcer history, NSAID/aspirin use, lower gastric thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 levels when compared with cases without gastric mucosal injury (P < 0.05). Infection by H. pylori was not a risk factor for gastric mucosal injury. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that NSAID/aspirin use was the only risk factor for gastric mucosal injury in these patients (odds ratio 26.99, 95% confidence interval 4.91, 148.57, P < 0.0001). Pulse steroid therapy alone did not induce gastric mucosal injury in fifty SLE patients without taking any NSAID/aspirin. CONCLUSIONS Use of NSAIDs/aspirin, but not H. pylori infection, increases gastric mucosal injury in SLE patients receiving pulse methylprednisolone therapy. Very high-dose steroids de novo seem not to induce gastric mucosal injury in these patients. A larger case-controlled study enrolling a heterogeneous population is needed to clarify the role of glucocorticoids in gastric mucosal injury. PMID:19694746

  7. Modulation of ligand-mediated human red cell agglutinability by prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    McLawhon, R.W.; Marikovsky, Y.; Weinstein, R.S.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol induces the transformation of human red cells from bioconcave discs to echinocytes in vitro. In addition, they have observed that ethanol can enhance the agglutination of red cells by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin or poly-L-lysine. Incubation of washed human red cells with 5 and 10% ethanol (v/v) in phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.3 at 25/sup 0/C produced a 30% increase in ligand-mediated agglutinability within 12 min. Simultaneous addition of ethanol and one of the following prostaglandin derivatives, PGE/sub 1/, pge/sub 2/, pgf/sub 2/-alpha, or PGl/sub 2/ (10/sup -9/ to 5 x 10/sup -7/ M) prevented the shape-associated increases in red cell agglutinability. Thromboxane-B/sub 2/ had no effect on agglutinability. Prostaglandins did not prevent ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations per se under identical experimental conditions. As intragastric administration of 100% ethanol results in the formation of spiculated red cell thrombi in postcapillary venules of rat gastric mucosa, they postulate that the cytoprotective role of prostanoids in preventing mucosal ulceration may be due in part to their capacity to inhibit intravascular ligand mediated red cell agglutination, hemostasis, and their sequelae, epithelial necrosis. Moreover, the data suggest that ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations and ligand-mediated agglutination represent two distinct and independent biological phenomena.

  8. Factors associated with mucosal pain in patients with partial removable dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H; Fueki, K; Yoshida-Kohno, E; Wakabayashi, N

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with mucosal pain in patients with partial removable dental prostheses (PRDPs). In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, 333 patients wearing 500 PRDPs (mean age 71·4 years, men 33·3%) were consecutively recruited from prosthetic clinic of a dental hospital in Japan. Subjects rated pain intensity and frequency of denture-bearing mucosa. An examiner recorded age, gender and systemic diseases as well as dental, mucosa, denture, sensory, behavioural- and psychological-related characteristics that were possibly associated with the mucosal pain. Multivariate analyses were performed to analyse factors related to mucosal pain. Pain intensity was rated as more than score 0 (presence) in 34·2% (171/500) PRDPs, and pain was experienced after denture delivery in 42·8% (214/500) PRDPs. Logistic regression analyses showed that younger age, mucosal damage, poor mucosal condition, bone prominence, poor residual ridge, higher pain sensitivity, presence of awake bruxism, perception of oral dryness, interim denture wear and high number of missing teeth were significant independent predictors for the presence of the mucosal pain intensity and/or frequency (P < 0·05). Multiple factors are associated with mucosal pain in patients with PRDPs. Oral mucosal characteristics, age, pain sensitivity and behavioural factors seem to be more critical for mucosal pain than distribution of missing teeth and number of abutment teeth. PMID:27289212

  9. Mucositis in head and neck cancer: economic and quality-of-life outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peterman, A; Cella, D; Glandon, G; Dobrez, D; Yount, S

    2001-01-01

    Outcomes research typically assesses three major health care outcomes, including quantity of life, quality of life (QOL), and health care cost. This article highlights the impact of treatment-associated mucositis on health care costs and QOL. After a background description of the economic analyses of overall cancer treatment costs and of the incremental costs associated with other treatment side effects, data from a retrospective study of mucositis-specific costs are presented. The second half of this article reviews current knowledge about the effect that mucositis has on QOL. Because the empirical work that specifically evaluates mucositis and QOL is quite limited, studies examining proxies for mucositis grading are described. These include studies comparing the QOL of patients currently undergoing treatment, in which symptoms likely to be associated with mucositis are worse, with that of patients who have completed treatment. Also discussed are investigations examining both the relationship between specific mucositis-associated symptoms, such as pain and difficulty swallowing, and QOL and the weighting of different domains of mucositis-associated problems. Finally, several future research directions are suggested, with the intent of expanding knowledge about the economic and QOL impact of mucositis in patients treated for head and neck cancer. PMID:11694566

  10. Augmentation of the gastric mucosal defense mechanism induced by KW-5805, a novel antiulcer agent.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Kosaka, N; Tomaru, A; Shuto, K; Ogihara, T; Sato, N

    1989-01-01

    KW-5805 (a new antiulcer agent), given p. o. at 30 mg/kg to rats, significantly increased the amount of gastric adherent mucus and mucosal glycoproteins. Gastric mucosal glucosamine synthetase activity was significantly enhanced by KW-5805 (30 mg/kg, p. o.). KW-5805 (10, 30 mg/kg, p. o.) significantly suppressed the decrease of gastric mucosal blood volume and oxygen sufficiency induced by hemorrhagic shock. The agent also significantly inhibited the extravasation of Evans blue into the gastric mucosa after ischemia-reinfusion. In conclusion, KW-5805 increased biosynthesis, storage and secretion of gastric mucus and improved the gastric mucosal hemodynamics. PMID:2595291

  11. Evaluation of topical external medicine for 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Hiromi; Suemaru, Katsuya; Li, Bingjin; Cui, Ranji; Araki, Hiroaki

    2006-12-01

    Oral ulcerative mucositis is a common and painful toxicity associated with chemotherapy for cancer. Current treatment for chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis is largely palliative, and no adequate treatment with conclusive evidence exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the topical external medicines used in clinical settings, and the authors investigated the effects of 1% azulene ointment, 0.12% dexamethasone ointment, and polaprezinc-sodium alginate suspension on an animal model for oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy. Oral mucositis was induced in hamsters through a combination treatment of 5-fluorouracil and mild abrasion of the cheek pouch. Each drug was administered topically to the oral mucosa of hamsters, and the process of healing of damaged oral mucositis was examined by measuring the size of the mucositis. Azulene ointment did not reduce the size of the mucositis compared with the vaseline-treated control group. Polaprezinc-sodium alginate suspension significantly improved the recovery from 5-fluorouracil-induced damage. In contrast, local treatment with dexamethasone exacerbated the mucositis markedly. These results suggested the healing effect of polaprezinc-sodium alginate suspension and the risk of steroids to severe oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy. PMID:17046745

  12. Oral mucositis complicating chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy: options for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Köstler, W J; Hejna, M; Wenzel, C; Zielinski, C C

    2001-01-01

    Chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients. This side effect causes significant morbidity and may delay the treatment plan, as well as increase therapeutic expenses. The pathogenesis of this debilitating side effect can be attributed to the direct mucosal toxicity of cytotoxic agents and ionizing radiation and to indirect mucosal damage caused by a concomitant inflammatory reaction exacerbated in the presence of neutropenia, and the emergence of bacterial, mycotic, and viral infections. The prophylactic and therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of oral mucositis consists of locally and systemically applied nonpharmacological measures and pharmacotherapeutics. PMID:11577493

  13. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota. PMID:26916597

  14. [Evolving therapeutic targets in inflammatory Bowel Disease: mucosal healing as an emerging end point].

    PubMed

    Condino, Giovanna; Margagnoni, Giovanna; Aratari, Annalisa; Luchetti, Roberto; Papi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    In the last years the therapeutic goals of inflammatory bowel disease have changed from control of symptoms only towards long term strategies aimed at modifying the natural history of the disease. In this setting mucosal healing has emerged as an important therapeutic goal both in clinical trials and in clinical practice. Growing evidence suggests that mucosal healing may be associated with lower relapse rates, reduced hospitalizations and reduced need of surgery both in ulcerative colitis and in Crohn's disease. However, a validated definition of mucosal healing is lacking: as a consequence, although several drugs are capable of inducing and maintaining mucosal healing in different clinical settings, the effect size of different treatments is difficult to assess. One of the most important question for clinical practice is if we should systematically assess mucosal healing in all patients and target our treatment strategies to achieve mucosal healing. This review focuses on the definition of mucosal healing and on the ability of different medications to induce and maintain mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease. The significance of mucosal healing as a surrogate end point of disease outcome is also discussed. PMID:26668042

  15. Identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in berries of Fragaria and Rubus species (family Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Määttä-Riihinen, Kaisu R; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf; Törrönen, A Riitta

    2004-10-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography combined with diode array and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection was used to study soluble and insoluble forms of phenolic compounds in strawberries, raspberries (red and yellow cultivated and red wild), arctic bramble, and cloudberries. Hydroxycinnamic acids were present as free forms in cloudberries and mainly as sugar esters in the other berries. Quercetin 3-glucuronide was the typical flavonol glycoside in all of the berries studied. The composition of the predominant anthocyanins can be used to distinguish the studied red Rubus species from each other since cyanidin was glycosylated typically with 3-sophorose (56%) in cultivated red raspberry, with 3-sophorose (30%) and 3-glucose (27%) in wild red raspberry, and with 3-rutinose (80%) in arctic bramble. Ellagic acid was present as free and glycosylated forms and as ellagitannins of varying degrees of polymerization. Comparable levels of ellagitannins were obtained by the analysis of soluble ellagitannins as gallic acid equivalents and by the analysis of ellagic acid equivalents released by acid hydrolysis of the extracts. PMID:15453684

  16. Mucosal barrier, bacteria and inflammatory bowel disease: possibilities for therapy.

    PubMed

    Merga, Yvette; Campbell, Barry J; Rhodes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal barrier has three major components, the mucus layer, the epithelial glycocalyx and the surface epithelium itself, whose integrity largely depends on tight junction function. In health, there is relatively little direct interaction between the luminal microbiota and the epithelium - the continuous mucus layer in the colon keeps the surface epithelium out of contact with bacteria and the ileo-caecal valve ensures that the distal small intestine is relatively microbe free. Most interaction takes place at the Peyer's patches in the distal ileum and their smaller colonic equivalents, the lymphoid follicles. Peyer's patches are overlain by a 'dome' epithelium, 5% of whose cells are specialised M (microfold) epithelial cells, which act as the major portal of entry for bacteria. There are no goblet cells in the dome epithelium and M cells have a very sparse glycocalyx allowing easy microbial interaction. It is intriguing that the typical age range for the onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is similar to the age at which the number of Peyer's patches is greatest. Peyer's patches are commonly the sites of the initial lesions in CD and the 'anti-pancreatic' antibody associated with CD has been shown to have as its epitope the glycoprotein 2 that is the receptor for type-1 bacterial fimbrial protein (fimH) on M cells. There are many reasons to believe that the mucosal barrier is critically important in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These include (i) associations between both CD and ulcerative colitis (UC) with genes that are relevant to the mucosal barrier; (ii) increased intestinal permeability in unaffected relatives of CD patients; (iii) increased immune reactivity against bacterial antigens, and (iv) animal models in which altered mucosal barrier, e.g. denudation of the mucus layer associated with oral dextran sulphate in rodents, induces colitis. Whilst some IBD patients may have genetic factors leading to weakening of the mucosal barrier

  17. High-Temperature Graphite/Phenolic Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Ellis C.; Bodepudi, Venu P.; Biggs, Robert W., Jr.; Cranston, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite-fiber/phenolic-resin composite material retains relatively high strength and modulus of elasticity at temperatures as high as 1,000 degrees F. Costs only 5 to 20 percent as much as refractory materials. Fabrication composite includes curing process in which application of full autoclave pressure delayed until after phenolic resin gels. Curing process allows moisture to escape, so when composite subsequently heated in service, much less expansion of absorbed moisture and much less tendency toward delamination. Developed for nose cone of external fuel tank of Space Shuttle. Other potential aerospace applications for material include leading edges, parts of nozzles, parts of aircraft engines, and heat shields. Terrestrial and aerospace applications include structural firewalls and secondary structures in aircraft, spacecraft, and ships. Modified curing process adapted to composites of phenolic with other fiber reinforcements like glass or quartz. Useful as high-temperature circuit boards and electrical insulators.

  18. Evaluation of exposure to phenol: absorption of phenol vapour in the lungs and through the skin and excretion of phenol in urine

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Jerzy K.

    1971-01-01

    Piotrowski, J. K. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 172-178. Evaluation of exposure to phenol: absorption of phenol vapour in the lungs and through the skin and excretion of phenol in urine. Volunteers were exposed to phenol vapour (5 to 25 mg/m3) by inhalation and through the skin, respectively, and the excretion of phenol in urine was examined. The retention of vapour in the lungs decreased from about 80 to 70% in the course of exposure. The absorption of vapour through the whole of the skin was approximately proportional to the concentration of vapour used, the absorption rate being somewhat lower than in the lungs. Almost 100% of the phenol was excreted in the urine within one day. The rate of excretion of phenol in the urine may be used as an exposure test which permits the absorbed dose to be estimated with a precision of about ±2 mg. PMID:5572685

  19. Isolation and characterization of a mucosal triacylglycerol pool undergoing hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton AD IV; Frase, S.; Mansbach, C.M. II )

    1989-12-01

    Absorbed and processed mucosal neutral lipid has been shown to be composed of at least two pools of triacylglycerol. One is likely to subserve chylomicron formation, and the other appears to be transported from the intestine via a nonlymphatic route. In the present study, 50 +/- 5% of the mucosal lipid pellets was centrifuged at 75,000 g.min (low-speed pellet (LSP)). Discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation of LSP showed that 61 +/- 7% of the lipid banded at the 0.25-0.86 M sucrose interface. Neutral lipid analysis showed that this subfraction was only 58% triacylglycerol, suggesting it was undergoing hydrolysis. Active lipolytic activity in vitro was found on incubation. The lipase had an alkaline pH optimum (pH 8.5) and persisted despite pancreatic ductular diversion. Lipolysis in vivo in a LSP fraction was shown by infusing (14C)glyceryltrioleate for 3.5 h followed by (3H)glyceryltrioleate for 30 min. Discontinuous sucrose density centrifugation of the LSP followed by an analysis of the lipids at the 0.25-0.86 M sucrose interface showed that 14C-neutral lipids were only 70 +/- 6% triacylglycerol, whereas 3H-neutral lipids were 88 +/- 2% triacylglycerol. 3H entered LSP slowly compared with the floating lipid in the same centrifuge tube. These studies suggest both in vivo and in vitro mucosal lipolysis by a specific, alkaline-active lipase. The turnover rate of LSP is likely to be slow by comparison with neutral lipid floating to the top of the centrifuge tube.

  20. Organ culture of mucosal biopsies of human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Browning, T H; Trier, J S

    1969-08-01

    In vitro experiments of small intestinal mucosal function and metabolism utilizing excised tissue have been limited to a few hours by rapid epithelial cell necrosis which occurs with current incubation methods. We describe a method for culturing human mucosal biopsies for up to 24 hr employing organ culture methodology and demonstrate its potential application to studies of mucosal function. Peroral biopsies were placed in organ culture plates and maintained with modified Trowell's medium in 95% O(2)-5% CO(2) at 37 degrees C for 6-24 hr. To study cell proliferation, 2 muc of thymidine-(3)H was added per ml of medium. To study fat absorption, biopsies were exposed to micellar solutions of linolenic acid, monoolein, and taurodeoxycholate in Krebs-Ringer buffer for 15 min after culture in vitro for 24 hr. After 24 hr of culture, villi were shorter and wider. Cells in the lamina were reduced in number. Light and electron microscopic morphology of epithelial cells compared favorably to those of control biopsies except in occasional areas of partial necrosis. Some absorptive cells were more cuboidal and contained more lysosomes; many appeared entirely normal. Most crypt cells appeared normal; some contained increased glycogen and lysosomes. Mitoses were present, and labeled cells were abundant in crypts of biopsies after 6 hr of incubation with thymidine-(3)H-containing medium. By 24 hr. labeled cells migrated to the base of the villi. When biopsies cultured in vitro were subsequently exposed to micellar lipid, numerous lipid droplets were identified in the cytoplasm of absorptive cells. Thus, after 24 hr in vitro under these culture conditions, many human small intestinal epithelial cells maintain near normal morphology, epithelial cell proliferation proceeds, and fat absorption occurs. PMID:5796354

  1. Airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Lockard, A J; Marlin, D J; Freed, A N

    2002-09-01

    In human subjects that exercise strenuously in cold weather, there is evidence that hyperventilation with cold air leads to peripheral airway cooling, desiccation and mucosal injury. Our hypothesis was that hyperventilation with cold air can result in penetration of unconditioned air (air that is not completely warmed and humidified) into the peripheral airways of exercising horses, resulting in peripheral airway mucosal injury. To test this hypothesis, a thermister-tipped catheter was inserted through the midcervical trachea and advanced into a sublobar bronchus in three horses that cantered on a treadmill at 6.6 m/s while breathing cold (5 degrees C) air. The mean (+/- s.e.) intra-airway temperature during cantering was 33.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, a value comparable to the bronchial lumen temperatures measured in man during maximal exercise while breathing subfreezing dry air. In a second experiment, 6 fit Thoroughbred racehorses with satisfactory performance were used to determine whether strenuous exercise in cold conditions can produce airway injury. Horses were assigned to Exercise (E) or Control (C) groups in a random crossover design. Samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the E treatment were recovered within 30 min of galloping exercise in 4 degrees C, 100% relative humidity (E), while in C BALF samples were obtained when the horses had not performed any exercise for at least 48 h prior. Ciliated epithelial cells in BALF were higher in E than in the C treatment. Similar results have been found in human athletes and laboratory animal models of cold weather exercise. These results support the hypothesis that, similar to man, horses that exercise in cold weather experience peripheral airway mucosal injury due to the penetration of unconditioned air. Furthermore, these results suggest that airway cooling and desiccation may be a factor in airway inflammation commonly found in equine athletes. PMID:12405726

  2. Impact of Mucosal Inflammation on Oral Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Ling; Hodara, Vida L.; Chu, Lianrui; Parodi, Laura M.; Smith, Lisa M.; Sexton, Valerie; Cappelli, David; Sodora, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are the primary route of transmission for most respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is epidemiological evidence that genital mucosal inflammation leads to enhanced HIV type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of periodontal inflammation on oral HIV transmission using a nonhuman primate model of teeth ligature-induced periodontitis. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was nontraumatically applied to the gingiva after moderate gingivitis was identified through clinical and immunologic analyses (presence of inflammatory cytokines). Overall oral SIV infection rates were similar in the gingivitis-induced and control groups (5 infections following 12 SIV administrations for each), although more macaques were infected with multiple viral variants in the gingivitis group. SIV infection also affected the levels of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid, and a synergistic effect was observed, with alpha interferon and interferon-inducible protein 10 undergoing significant elevations following SIV infection in macaques with gingivitis compared to controls. These increases in antiviral and inflammatory immune modulators in the SIV-infected gingivitis macaques could also be observed in blood plasma, although the effects at both compartments were generally restricted to the acute phase of the infection. In conclusion, while moderate gingivitis was not associated with increased susceptibility to oral SIV infection, it resulted in elevated levels of cytokines in the oral mucosa and plasma of the SIV-infected macaques. These findings suggest a synergy between mucosal inflammation and SIV infection, creating an immune milieu that impacts the early stages of the SIV infection with potential implications for long-term pathogenesis. PMID:23175379

  3. Activation of rat intestinal mucosal mast cells by fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Yang, Qing; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Yoder, Stephanie; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have linked certain types of gut mucosal immune cells with fat intake. We determined whether fat absorption activates intestinal mucosal mast cells (MMC), a key component of the gut mucosal immune system. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated, and the intraduodenal (i.d.) tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic concentrations of histamine, rat MMC protease II (RMCPII), a specific marker of rat intestinal MMC degranulation, and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) were measured by ELISA. Intestinal MMC degranulation was visualized by immunofluorescent microscopy of jejunum sections taken at 1 h after Liposyn II gavage. Intraduodenal bolus infusion of Liposyn II 20% (4.4 kcal/3 ml) induced approximately a onefold increase in lymphatic histamine and PGD(2), ∼20-fold increase in lymphatic RMCPII, but only onefold increase in peripheral serum RMCPII concentrations. Release of RMCPII into lymph increased dose dependently with the amount of lipid fed. In addition, i.d. infusion of long-chain triacylglycerol trilinolein (C18:2 n-6, the major composite in Liposyn II) significantly increased the lymphatic RMCPII concentration, whereas medium-chain triacylglycerol tricaprylin (C8:0) did not alter lymph RMCPII secretion. Immunohistochemistry image revealed the degranulation of MMC into lamina propria after lipid feeding. These novel findings indicate that intestinal MMC are activated and degranulate to release MMC mediators to the circulation during fat absorption. This action of fatty acid is dose and chain length dependent. PMID:22461027

  4. Mucosal Microbiome in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, K.; Lowe, T.; Meharg, C.; Berry, S.H.; Foley, J.; Hold, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation

  5. Environmental phenols and pubertal development in girls.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Mary S; Teitelbaum, Susan L; McGovern, Kathleen; Pinney, Susan M; Windham, Gayle C; Galvez, Maida; Pajak, Ashley; Rybak, Michael; Calafat, Antonia M; Kushi, Lawrence H; Biro, Frank M

    2015-11-01

    Environmental exposures to many phenols are documented worldwide and exposures can be quite high (>1 μM of urine metabolites). Phenols have a range of hormonal activity, but knowledge of effects on child reproductive development is limited, coming mostly from cross-sectional studies. We undertook a prospective study of pubertal development among 1239 girls recruited at three U.S. sites when they were 6-8 years old and were followed annually for 7 years to determine age at first breast or pubic hair development. Ten phenols were measured in urine collected at enrollment (benzophenone-3, enterolactone, bisphenol A, three parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-), 2,5-dichlorophenol, triclosan, genistein, daidzein). We used multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards ratios (HR (95% confidence intervals)) and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses to estimate relative risk of earlier or later age at puberty associated with phenol exposures. For enterolactone and benzophenone-3, girls experienced breast development 5-6 months later, adjusted HR 0.79 (0.64-0.98) and HR 0.80 (0.65-0.98) respectively for the 5th vs 1st quintiles of urinary biomarkers (μg/g-creatinine). Earlier breast development was seen for triclosan and 2,5-dichlorophenol: 4-9 months sooner for 5th vs 1st quintiles of urinary concentrations (HR 1.17 (0.96-1.43) and HR 1.37 (1.09-1.72), respectively). Association of breast development with enterolactone, but not the other three phenols, was mediated by body size. These phenols may be antiadipogens (benzophenone-3 and enterolactone) or thyroid agonists (triclosan and 2,5-dichlorophenol), and their ubiquity and relatively high levels in children would benefit from further investigation to confirm these findings and to establish whether there are certain windows of susceptibility during which exposure can affect pubertal development. PMID:26335517

  6. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  7. Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft. The image was created using two filters, violet and near-infrared, at each of two camera positions. The Great Red Spot is a storm in Jupiter's atmosphere and is at least 300 years-old. Winds blow counterclockwise around the Great Red Spot at about 400 kilometers per hour (250 miles per hour). The size of the storm is more than one Earth diameter (13,000 kilometers or 8,000 miles) in the north-south direction and more than two Earth diameters in the east-west direction. In this oblique view, where the Great Red Spot is shown on the planet's limb, it appears longer in the north-south direction. The image was taken on June 26, 1996.

    The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen ... hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming ...

  9. Imbalanced secondary mucosal antioxidant response in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kruidenier, Laurens; Kuiper, Ineke; Van Duijn, Wim; Mieremet-Ooms, Marij A C; van Hogezand, Ruud A; Lamers, Cornelis B H W; Verspaget, Hein W

    2003-09-01

    Intestinal mucosal damage in the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) involves reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs). ROMs are neutralized by endogenous antioxidant enzymes in a carefully balanced two-step pathway. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) convert superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which is subsequently neutralized to water by catalase (CAT) or glutathione peroxidase (GPO). Remarkably changed expression levels of the three isoforms of SOD in paired non-inflamed and inflamed mucosae from CD and UC patients have been previously reported in comparison to normal control mucosa. Most notable was the strong up-regulation of Mn-SOD in inflamed epithelium. It was hypothesized that in order to provide optimal protection against ROM-mediated damage, these changes should be coordinately counterbalanced by an increased H(2)O(2)-neutralizing capacity. Therefore, the same tissue samples were used to assess the levels, activities, and/or localization of the most prominent mucosal H(2)O(2)-related antioxidants CAT, GPO, glutathione (GSH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and metallothionein (MT). Quantitative measurements showed that in both CD and UC patients, intestinal inflammation was associated with increased activities of CAT, GPO, and MPO, whereas the mucosal GSH content was unaffected and the concentration of MT was decreased. Despite this overall increase in mucosal H(2)O(2)-metabolizing enzyme capacity, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a differentially disturbed antioxidant balance in IBD epithelium and lamina propria. In the lamina propria, the risk of direct H(2)O(2)-mediated damage seemed to be restrained by the increasing numbers of CAT- and MPO-positive monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils that infiltrated the inflamed areas. On the other hand, MPO overexpression might increase the lamina propria levels of hypochlorous acid, a stable ROM with multiple pro-inflammatory effects. In the epithelium, the number of

  10. Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses to Cryptosporidium—Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, Jacob G.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a major cause of diarrheal disease worldwide, particularly in malnourished children and untreated AIDS patients in developing countries in whom it can cause severe, chronic and debilitating disease. Unfortunately, there is no consistently effective drug for these vulnerable populations and no vaccine, partly due to a limited understanding of both the parasite and the host immune response. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of the systemic and mucosal immune responses to Cryptosporidium infection, discuss the feasibility of developing a Cryptosporidium vaccine and evaluate recent advances in Cryptosporidium vaccine development strategies PMID:26279971

  11. Familial occurrence of congenital incomplete prepyloric mucosal diaphragm.

    PubMed Central

    Gahukamble, D B

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete prepyloric mucosal diaphragm (IPMD) is an uncommon congenital anomaly that leads to gastric outlet obstruction in infancy and childhood. This report describes the occurrence of IPMD in six children in a closely knit tribal family from a geographically isolated desert town with a small population in the Sahara. Their records showed similarities of clinical, radiological, operative, and histopathological features. These features, as well as its occurrence in brothers, sisters, and cousins, suggest that this unusual anomaly is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Images PMID:9863605

  12. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  13. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  14. Chemical Characterization of Phenol/Formaldehyde Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayden, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses tests of commercial phenol/formaldehyde resins to establish relationships among composition before use, behavior during curing, and strength after curing. Resin used in carbon/carbon laminates. In curing process, two molecules of phenol joined together in sequence of reactions involving molecule of formaldehyde. Last step of sequence, molecule of water released. Sequence repeats until one of ingredients used up, leaving solidified thermoset plastic. Issues to be resolved: number and relative abundances of ingredients, presence of certain chemical groups, heat-producing ability of resin, and range of molecular weights present.

  15. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  16. Identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in grapes by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS on a semimicro separation scale.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Isabella; Bello, Cristiano; De Rossi, Antonella; Corradini, Danilo

    2008-10-01

    occurring in the whole berries of nine red and one white grape of different varieties of Vitis vinifera, comprising some autochthonous varieties of south Italy such as Aglianico, Malvasia Nera, Uva di Troia, Negroamaro, Primitivo, and Susumaniello. Large differences in the content of phenolic compounds was found in the investigated grape varieties. As expected, only glycosilated flavonols were quantified, and the total amount of these compounds was higher in the whole berries of red grapes than in the white Moscato, where the most abundant phenolic compound was quercetin 3-O-glucoside. In almost all samples, the most and least abundant anthocyanins were malvidin 3-O-glucoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, respectively, with the exception of Uva di Troia where the least abundant anthocyanin was delphinidin 3-O-glucoside. PMID:18781764

  17. Biodegradation of phenol at high initial concentration by Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Wen, Jianping; Bai, Jing; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Zongding

    2007-08-17

    Strain Alcaligenes faecalis was isolated and identified as a member of the genus Alcaligenes by using BIOLOG and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The phenol biodegradation tests showed that the phenol-degrading potential of A. faecalis related greatly to the different physiological phases of inoculum. The maximum phenol degradation occurred at the late phase of the exponential growth stages, where 1600 mg L(-1) phenol was completely degraded within 76 h. A. faecalis secreted and accumulated a vast quantity of phenol hydroxylase in this physiological phase, which ensured that the cells could quickly utilize phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. In addition, the kinetic behavior of A. faecalis in batch cultures was also investigated over a wide range of initial phenol concentrations (0-1600 mg L(-1)) by using Haldane model. It was clear that the Haldane kinetic model adequately described the dynamic behavior of the phenol biodegradation by the strain of A. faecalis. PMID:17597295

  18. Supercritical extraction of phenols from organically modified smectite

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.J.; Yeo, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    Supercritical extraction has been performed in a fixed column to desorb phenol and 4-nitrophenol from organically modified smectite. The experiments were carried out in the sequence of adsorption of hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) to montmorillonite, adsorption of phenols to organoclay in aqueous solutions, desorption of phenols from loaded organoclay using supercritical carbon dioxide, and adsorption of phenols to regenerated organoclay. The desorption characteristics of phenols were investigated at various pressures up to 420 bar; at temperatures of 40, 60, and 70 C, and at low concentrations of a cosolvent. The extraction percentages of phenols reached up to 90% in 3 hours of extraction. The results showed that under the experimental conditions investigated, the activity of HDTMA was intact during the supercritical extraction of phenols, and hence HDTMA-modified montmorillonite exhibited undiminished adsorption power toward phenols after several regeneration cycles.

  19. CO₂ enrichment can produce high red leaf lettuce yield while increasing most flavonoid glycoside and some caffeic acid derivative concentrations.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christine; Kläring, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment is a common practice in greenhouses to increase crop yields up to 30%. Yet, reports on the effect on foliar phenolic compounds vary. We studied the effect on two red leaf lettuce cultivars, grown for 25 days in growth chambers at CO2 concentrations of 200 or 1,000 ppm, with some plants exchanged between treatments after 11 days. As expected, head mass increased with higher CO2 concentration. Regression analysis, corrected for head mass, showed increased concentrations of most flavonoid glycosides at high CO2 concentrations while only some caffeic acid derivatives were increased, and not uniformly in both cultivars. Sugar concentrations increased with CO2 concentration. Generally, conditions in the 10 days before harvest determined concentrations. We suspect that phenolic compounds were mainly accumulated because plenty of precursors were available. The results indicate that CO2 enrichment can result in high yields of red leaf lettuce rich in phenolic compounds. PMID:26776031

  20. The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Development and Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, thereby promoting bacterial translocation. According to this five-phase model, the intestinal microbiota plays no role in the pathophysiology of mucositis. However, research has implicated a prominent role for the commensal intestinal microbiota in the development of several inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, pouchitis, and radiotherapy-induced diarrhea. Furthermore, chemotherapeutics have a detrimental effect on the intestinal microbial composition (strongly decreasing the numbers of anaerobic bacteria), coinciding in time with the development of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We hypothesize that the commensal intestinal microbiota might play a pivotal role in chemotherapy-induced mucositis. In this review, we propose and discuss five pathways in the development of mucositis that are potentially influenced by the commensal intestinal microbiota: 1) the inflammatory process and oxidative stress, 2) intestinal permeability, 3) the composition of the mucus layer, 4) the resistance to harmful stimuli and epithelial repair mechanisms, and 5) the activation and release of immune effector molecules. Via these pathways, the commensal intestinal microbiota might influence all phases in the Sonis model of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Further research is needed to show the clinical relevance of restoring dysbiosis, thereby possibly decreasing the degree of intestinal mucositis. PMID:20523891

  1. The red wine extract-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase is mediated by a great variety of polyphenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Auger, Cyril; Chaabi, Mehdi; Anselm, Eric; Lobstein, Annelise; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2010-07-01

    Phenolic extracts from red wine (RWPs) have been shown to induce nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasoprotective effects, mainly by causing the PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). RWPs contain several hundreds of phenolic compounds. The aim of the present study was to identify red wine phenolic compounds capable of activating eNOS in endothelial cells using multi-step fractionation. The red wine phenolic extract was fractionated using Sephadex LH-20 and preparative RP-HPLC approaches. The ability of a fraction to activate eNOS was assessed by determining the phosphorylation level of Akt and eNOS by Western blot analysis, and NO formation by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Tentative identification of phenolic compounds in fractions was performed by MALDI-TOF and HPLC-MS techniques. Separation of RWPs by Sephadex LH-20 generated nine fractions (fractions A to I), of which fractions F, G, H and I caused significant eNOS activation. Fraction F was then subjected to semi-preparative RP-HPLC to generate ten subfractions (subfraction SF1 to SF10), all of which caused eNOS activation. The active fractions and subfractions contained mainly procyanidins and anthocyanins. Isolation of phenolic compounds from SF9 by semi-preparative RP-HLPC lead to the identification of petunidin-O-coumaroyl-glucoside as a potent activator of eNOS. PMID:20440695

  2. Craniofacial mucosal immune system: importance of its unique organogenesis and function in the development of a mucosal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunari; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) play a critical role as inductive sites for the initiation of antigen-specific protective immunity against pathogens penetrating the mucus membranes. Nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), situated at the bottom of the rodent nasal cavity, is thought to be an important site for the induction of antigen-specific immune response to inhaled antigens. In addition, we have recently shown that tear duct-associated lymphoid tissue (TALT), present in the murine tear duct bridging the ocular and nasal cavities, is involved in the induction and regulation of both nasal and ocular immunity. Interestingly, cellular requirements for the organogenesis of NALT and TALT are quite different from those of other MALT (e.g. Peyer's patches; PPs) and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Moreover, mucosal imprinting molecules of NALT and TALT inducer cells are totally independent of currently known chemokines and adhesion molecules in PPs and lymph nodes, such as the CXCR5-CXCL13, α4β1 integrin-vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1), and CCR9-CCL25 axes. NALT and TALT lymphocytes are also independent of these tissue-specific migration molecules. Together with already-characterized conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT ), which has been demonstrated to play a critical role in ocular defense, the MALT associated with the head region seems to be coordinately organizing the unique craniofacial mucosal immune system of the ocular, nasal, oral-pharynx mucus membranes. Clarification of the immunological network of this unique craniofacial immune system will facilitate the development of a safe and effective mucosal vaccine against respiratory and ocular infections. PMID:21865684

  3. Over-seasons analysis of quantitative trait loci affecting phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in raspberry.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Patricia; Graham, Julie; Stewart, D; Brennan, Rex; Hackett, Christine A; McDougall, Gordon J

    2012-05-30

    This study examined the total phenol content (TPC) and total anthocyanin content (TAC) in ripe fruit of progeny of a mapping population generated from a cross between the European red raspberry cv. Glen Moy ( Rubus ideaus var. idaeus) and the North American red raspberry cv. Latham ( Rubus ideaus var. strigosus) over five seasons in two different growing environments. Measurements of antioxidant capacity (FRAP and TEAC) were also carried out. TPC was highly correlated with TEAC and FRAP across the entire data set. The subset of anthocyanin content was genotype-dependent but also correlated with TPC, although the proportion of anthocyanin compounds varied between progeny. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was carried out, and key markers were tested for consistency of effects over sites and years. Four regions, on linkage groups 2, 3, 5, and 6, were identified. These agree with QTLs from a previous study over a single season and indicate that QTL effects were robust over seasons. PMID:22583495

  4. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.843 - Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.843 Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted phenylazophenylazo, phenol (PMN P-00-0420) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.843 - Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.843 Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted phenylazophenylazo, phenol (PMN P-00-0420) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10506 - Alkylated phenols (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylated phenols (generic). 721.10506... Substances § 721.10506 Alkylated phenols (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkylated phenols (PMNs...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10249 - Disubstituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10249 Disubstituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted phenol (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10384 - Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted alkanolamine phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10384 Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted alkanolamine phenol (PMN P-10-332) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10508 - Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10508 Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkene substituted bis phenol (PMN P-07-161) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10249 - Disubstituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10249 Disubstituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted phenol (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10387 - Substituted bis-phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted bis-phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10387 Substituted bis-phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted bis-phenol (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10235 - Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10235 Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as phenol,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5900 - Trisubstituted phenol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trisubstituted phenol (generic name... Substances § 721.5900 Trisubstituted phenol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance trisubstituted phenol (PMN P-85-605) is subject...

  16. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... when one or more of the phenols listed in paragraph (a)(1) of this section are made to react with one... anhydro-formaldehyde aniline (hexahydro-1, 3,5-triphenyl-s-triazine): (1) Phenols: p-tert-Amylphenol. p-tert-Butylphenol. o-, m-, and p-Cresol. p-Octylphenol. Phenol. o- and p-Phenylethylphenol...

  17. 40 CFR 721.843 - Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.843 Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted phenylazophenylazo, phenol (PMN P-00-0420) is subject to reporting under this...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10386 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10386 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10387 - Substituted bis-phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted bis-phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10387 Substituted bis-phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted bis-phenol (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10384 - Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted alkanolamine phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10384 Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted alkanolamine phenol (PMN P-10-332) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5900 - Trisubstituted phenol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trisubstituted phenol (generic name... Substances § 721.5900 Trisubstituted phenol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance trisubstituted phenol (PMN P-85-605) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10235 - Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10235 Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as phenol,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10384 - Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkanolamine phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10384 Substituted alkanolamine phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted alkanolamine phenol (PMN P-10-332) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10386 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10386 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10249 - Disubstituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10249 Disubstituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted phenol (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.843 - Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.843 Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted phenylazophenylazo, phenol (PMN P-00-0420) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.843 - Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.843 Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted phenylazophenylazo, phenol (PMN P-00-0420) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10561 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10561 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  9. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... when one or more of the phenols listed in paragraph (a)(1) of this section are made to react with one... anhydro-formaldehyde aniline (hexahydro-1, 3,5-triphenyl-s-triazine): (1) Phenols: p-tert-Amylphenol. p-tert-Butylphenol. o-, m-, and p-Cresol. p-Octylphenol. Phenol. o- and p-Phenylethylphenol...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10456 - Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10456 Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (PMN P-03-104) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10561 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10561 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10235 - Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10235 Phenol, 2-ethoxy-4-(ethoxymethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as phenol,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10386 - Substituted phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10386 Substituted phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted phenol (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10456 - Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10456 Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (PMN P-03-104) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10508 - Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10508 Alkene substituted Bis phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkene substituted bis phenol (PMN P-07-161) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5900 - Trisubstituted phenol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trisubstituted phenol (generic name... Substances § 721.5900 Trisubstituted phenol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance trisubstituted phenol (PMN P-85-605) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10387 - Substituted bis-phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted bis-phenol (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10387 Substituted bis-phenol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted bis-phenol (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5900 - Trisubstituted phenol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trisubstituted phenol (generic name... Substances § 721.5900 Trisubstituted phenol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance trisubstituted phenol (PMN P-85-605) is subject...