Science.gov

Sample records for philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic

  1. Unrelated donor transplants in adults with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David I.; Pérez, Waleska S.; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Bishop, Michael R.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Copelan, Edward A.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Isola, Luis M.; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Keating, Armand; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Maziarz, Richard T.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Sabloff, Mitchell; Schiller, Gary; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S.; Waller, Edmund K.; Wiernik, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    We report the retrospective outcomes of unrelated donor (URD) transplants in 169 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first complete remission (CR1) who received transplants between 1995 and 2004. Median age was 33 years (range, 16-59 years). A total of 50% had a white blood cell count (WBC) more than 30 × 109/L, 18% extramedullary disease, 42% achieved CR more than 8 weeks from diagnosis, 25% had adverse cytogenetics, and 19% had T-cell leukemia. A total of 41% were HLA well-matched, 41% partially matched with their donors, and 18% were HLA-mismatched. At 54-month median follow-up, incidences of acute grade 2-IV, III to IV, and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 50%, 25%, and 43%, respectively. Five-year treatment-related mortality (TRM), relapse, and overall survival were 42%, 20%, and 39%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, TRM was significantly higher with HLA-mismatched donors and T-cell depletion. Relapse risk was higher if the diagnostic WBC was more than 100 × 109/L. Factors associated with poorer survival included WBC more than 100 × 109/L, more than 8 weeks to CR1, cytomegalovirus seropositivity, HLA mismatching, and T-cell depletion. Nearly 40% of adults with ALL in CR1 survive 5 years after URD transplantation. Relapse risks were modest; TRM is the major cause of treatment failure. Selecting closely HLA-matched URD and reducing TRM should improve results. PMID:18398065

  2. Prognostic Significance and Treatment Implications of Minimal Residual Disease Studies in Philadelphia-Negative Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Orietta; Tosi, Manuela; Peruta, Barbara; Guinea Montalvo, Marie Lorena; Maino, Elena; Scattolin, Anna Maria; Parolini, Margherita; Viero, Piera; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bassan, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is curable in about 40–50% of adult patients, however this is subject to ample variations owing to several host- and disease-related prognostic characteristics. Currently, the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) following induction and early consolidation therapy stands out as the most sensitive individual prognostic marker to define the risk of relapse following the achievement of remission, and ultimately that of treatment failure or success. Because substantial therapeutic advancement is now being achieved using intensified pediatric-type regimens, MRD analysis is especially useful to orientate stem cell transplantation choices. These strategic innovations are progressively leading to greater than 50% cure rates. PMID:25237475

  3. Characterization of pediatric Philadelphia-negative B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with kinase fusions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imamura, T; Kiyokawa, N; Kato, M; Imai, C; Okamoto, Y; Yano, M; Ohki, K; Yamashita, Y; Kodama, Y; Saito, A; Mori, M; Ishimaru, S; Deguchi, T; Hashii, Y; Shimomura, Y; Hori, T; Kato, K; Goto, H; Ogawa, C; Koh, K; Taki, T; Manabe, A; Sato, A; Kikuta, A; Adachi, S; Horibe, K; Ohara, A; Watanabe, A; Kawano, Y; Ishii, E; Shimada, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that a substantial proportion of patients with high-risk B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) harbor fusions involving tyrosine kinase and cytokine receptors, such as ABL1, PDGFRB, JAK2 and CRLF2, which are targeted by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). In the present study, transcriptome analysis or multiplex reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of 373 BCP-ALL patients without recurrent genetic abnormalities identified 29 patients with kinase fusions. Clinically, male predominance (male/female: 22/7), older age at onset (mean age at onset: 8.8 years) and a high white blood cell count at diagnosis (mean: 94 200/μl) reflected the predominance of National Cancer Institute high-risk (NCI-HR) patients (NCI-standard risk/HR: 8/21). Genetic analysis identified three patients with ABL1 rearrangements, eight with PDGFRB rearrangements, two with JAK2 rearrangements, three with IgH-EPOR and one with NCOR1-LYN. Of the 14 patients with CRLF2 rearrangements, two harbored IgH-EPOR and PDGFRB rearrangements. IKZF1 deletion was present in 16 of the 22 patients. The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates were 48.6±9.7% and 73.5±8.6%, respectively. The outcome was not satisfactory without sophisticated minimal residual disease-based stratification. Furthermore, the efficacy of TKIs combined with conventional chemotherapy without allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this cohort should be determined. PMID:27176795

  4. Characterization of pediatric Philadelphia-negative B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with kinase fusions in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, T; Kiyokawa, N; Kato, M; Imai, C; Okamoto, Y; Yano, M; Ohki, K; Yamashita, Y; Kodama, Y; Saito, A; Mori, M; Ishimaru, S; Deguchi, T; Hashii, Y; Shimomura, Y; Hori, T; Kato, K; Goto, H; Ogawa, C; Koh, K; Taki, T; Manabe, A; Sato, A; Kikuta, A; Adachi, S; Horibe, K; Ohara, A; Watanabe, A; Kawano, Y; Ishii, E; Shimada, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that a substantial proportion of patients with high-risk B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) harbor fusions involving tyrosine kinase and cytokine receptors, such as ABL1, PDGFRB, JAK2 and CRLF2, which are targeted by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). In the present study, transcriptome analysis or multiplex reverse transcriptase–PCR analysis of 373 BCP-ALL patients without recurrent genetic abnormalities identified 29 patients with kinase fusions. Clinically, male predominance (male/female: 22/7), older age at onset (mean age at onset: 8.8 years) and a high white blood cell count at diagnosis (mean: 94 200/μl) reflected the predominance of National Cancer Institute high-risk (NCI-HR) patients (NCI-standard risk/HR: 8/21). Genetic analysis identified three patients with ABL1 rearrangements, eight with PDGFRB rearrangements, two with JAK2 rearrangements, three with IgH-EPOR and one with NCOR1-LYN. Of the 14 patients with CRLF2 rearrangements, two harbored IgH-EPOR and PDGFRB rearrangements. IKZF1 deletion was present in 16 of the 22 patients. The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates were 48.6±9.7% and 73.5±8.6%, respectively. The outcome was not satisfactory without sophisticated minimal residual disease-based stratification. Furthermore, the efficacy of TKIs combined with conventional chemotherapy without allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this cohort should be determined. PMID:27176795

  5. Allogeneic transplantation is not superior to chemotherapy in most patients over 40 years of age with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission.

    PubMed

    Wolach, Ofir; Stevenson, Kristen E; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Steensma, David P; Ballen, Karen K; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Neuberg, Donna S; Ho, Vincent T; Stone, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    Survival of patients ≥40 years of age with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor with current therapeutic approaches. It is unknown whether allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in first remission confers a survival benefit compared to a chemotherapy-only approach. We retrospectively compared the outcome of patients >40 years treated with HSCT or chemotherapy alone in first remission (n = 40 in each cohort). Three-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were not significantly different between the chemotherapy-only and HSCT groups (OS, 46% [31-68] vs. 40% [27-59], P = 0.35; DFS, 31% [18-52] vs. 40% [27-59], P = 0.98). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 61% [41-76] and 9% [2-21] for the chemotherapy-only group and 28% [15-43] and 32% [17-47] for the transplant group (CIR, P = 0.011; NRM, P = 0.014). Allogeneic transplantation for patients ≥40 years with Ph-negative ALL in first remission is associated with a lower CIR, but this benefit is offset by considerable NRM as compared with chemotherapy-only approach. HSCT may be beneficial in patients with high-risk disease features. Am. J. Hematol. 91:793-799, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27153389

  6. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  7. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  9. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  11. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Changing of IKZF1 genotype during Philadelphia-negative precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression: a short clinical report.

    PubMed

    Vshyukova, Volha; Meleshko, Alexander; Mihal, Natalia; Aleinikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    •The case demonstrated a rare event of clonal heterogeneity by IKZF1 gene status in BCRABL1- ALL.•IKZF1 deletions are secondary events in ALL caused by clonal evolution during the treatment.•It's prognostic significance could be more crucial in BCR-ABL- rather than in BCR-ABL + ALL.•IKZF1 gene alterations may be determined and proved at the genome, expression and protein level.•IKZF1 deletions are suitable for MRD detection but not stable compared to Ig/TCR rearrangement. PMID:27489764

  13. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Haemophagocytic syndrome complicating acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, R.; Manoharan, A.

    1989-01-01

    A 41 year old female developed reactive haemophagocytic histiocytosis secondary to herpes simplex infection, during remission induction for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. She recovered fully with acyclovir and supportive treatment. Previous publications on the association between acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and haemophagocytic syndrome are reviewed, and the nature of the haemophagocytic disorder is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:2687829

  18. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  20. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  1. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  2. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  5. Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Adult B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Down Syndrome; Stage I B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Cardiac Manifestation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Werner, Rudolf A; Rudelius, Martina; Thurner, Annette; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lapa, Constantin

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report on a 38-year-old man with unclear right heart failure. Imaging with cardiac MRI and combined PET/CT with F-FDG revealed a hypermetabolic mass extending from the right ventricle to the atrium. In addition, intense glucose utilization throughout the bone marrow was noted. Biopsies of both bone marrow and cardiac mass were performed and revealed precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with gross leukemic infiltration of the myopericardium, a rare manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia at initial diagnosis. PMID:27088389

  9. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Morace, G; La Rocca, L M; Etuk, B; Di Mario, A; Pagano, L; Zini, G; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1993-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed rhinocerebral zygomycosis during the aplastic phase induced by antineoplastic chemotherapy. The patient was treated with fluconazole intravenously (400 mg daily) for 30 days and underwent surgical debridement. As a result of this treatment a complete remission of the zygomycosis-associated symptoms was observed. The possibility of treating zygomycosis with fluconazole is discussed. PMID:8015558

  14. Eosinophilic presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rezamand, Azim; Ghorashi, Ziaaedin; Ghorashi, Sona; Nezami, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 5 Primary Diagnosis: Rule-out appendicitis Co-existing Diseases: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Medication: Chemiotherapy Clinical Procedure: Chest CT • flow cytometry Specialty: Pediatrics’ oncology • infection diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Leukemias are among the most common childhood malignancies. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for 77% of all leukemias. In rare cases, ALL patients may present with eosinophilia. Case Report: Here, a 5-year old boy was admitted to our hospital with a possible diagnosis of appendicitis. This patient’s complete blood cell count demonstrated leukocytosis with severe eosinophilia. Following a 1-month clinical investigation, 2 bone marrow aspirations, and flow cytometry analysis, a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was proposed. Finally, the patient was transferred to the oncology ward to receive standard therapeutic protocol, which resulted in disease remission. After chemotherapy for 2 years, patient is successfully treated. Conclusions: ALL is diagnosed by eosinophilia in rare cases. These patients need immediate diagnosis and intensive therapy due to worsened prognosis of ALL presenting as hypereosinophilia. PMID:23869247

  15. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease. PMID:22031225

  20. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ajoy; Kenderian, Saad J; Westin, Gustavo F; Litzow, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy cures only a minority of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In addition, relapsed ALL has a poor outcome with 5-year survival as low as 7 %. Hence, there is a need to develop effective therapies to treat relapsed disease and to combine these agents with chemotherapy to improve outcomes in newly diagnosed patients. ALL cells express several antigens amenable to target therapies including CD19, CD20, CD22, and CD52. Over the last decade, there has been a surge in the development of immune therapies which target these receptors and that have induced robust responses. In this manuscript, we review these novel immune agents in the treatment of B-ALL. As these new therapies mature, the challenge going forward will be to find safe and effective combinations of these agents with chemotherapy and to determine their place in the current treatment schema. PMID:27101015

  1. Aspergillus osteoarthritis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gunsilius, E; Lass-Flörl, C; Mur, E; Gabl, C; Gastl, G; Petzer, A L

    1999-11-01

    We report an unusual case of arthritis of the right wrist due to Aspergillus fumigatus without evidence for a generalized infection, following chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis was made by surgical biopsy. Amphotericin-B (Am-B) was not tolerated by the patient. Liposomal preparations of Am-B penetrate poorly into bone and cartilage. Therefore, oral itraconazole was given; the arthritis improved and chemotherapy was continued without infectious complications. Two weeks after complete hematopoietic recovery, an intracranial hemorrhage from a mycotic aneurysm of a brain vessel occurred, although the patient was still receiving itraconazole. We emphasize the importance of prompt and thorough efforts to identify the causative agent in immunocompromised patients with a joint infection. Itraconazole is effective in Aspergillus osteoarthritis but, due to its poor penetration into the brain, the combination with a liposomal formulation of Am-B is recommended. PMID:10602898

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Treatment in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in adults (Beyond the Basics) Author Richard ... the content. Appropriately referenced content is required of all authors and must conform to UpToDate standards of ...

  3. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to available tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nelarabine demonstrates activity as monotherapy in T-cell ALL and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analogue approved in pediatric leukemia, has shown activity in adult acute leukemias including ALL and acute myeloid leukemia. The role of pegaspargase in adult ALL requires further investigation. The benefit of matched related-donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation is significant for standard-risk ALL but not for high-risk ALL. Development of new drugs and agents tailored to subset-specific cytogenetic-molecular characteristics remains vital to success in treating adult ALL. PMID:20425428

  4. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  6. Epigenetic deregulation in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chatterton, Zac; Morenos, Leah; Mechinaud, Francoise; Ashley, David M; Craig, Jeffrey M; Sexton-Oates, Alexandra; Halemba, Minhee S; Parkinson-Bates, Mandy; Ng, Jane; Morrison, Debra; Carroll, William L; Saffery, Richard; Wong, Nicholas C

    2014-01-01

    Similar to most cancers, genome-wide DNA methylation profiles are commonly altered in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, recent observations highlight that a large portion of malignancy-associated DNA methylation alterations are not accompanied by related gene expression changes. By analyzing and integrating the methylome and transcriptome profiles of pediatric B-cell ALL cases and primary tissue controls, we report 325 genes hypermethylated and downregulated and 45 genes hypomethylated and upregulated in pediatric B-cell ALL, irrespective of subtype. Repressed cation channel subunits and cAMP signaling activators and transducers are overrepresented, potentially indicating a reduced cellular potential to receive and propagate apoptotic signals. Furthermore, we report specific DNA methylation alterations with concurrent gene expression changes within individual ALL subtypes. The ETV6-RUNX1 translocation was associated with downregulation of ASNS and upregulation of the EPO-receptor, while Hyperdiploid patients (>50 chr) displayed upregulation of B-cell lymphoma (BCL) members and repression of PTPRG and FHIT. In combination, these data indicate genetically distinct B-cell ALL subtypes contain cooperative epimutations and genome-wide epigenetic deregulation is common across all B-cell ALL subtypes. PMID:24394348

  7. Genetic abnormalities associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takafumi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs with high frequency in childhood and is associated with high mortality in adults. Recent technical advances in next-generation sequencing have shed light on genetic abnormalities in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as the precursor to ALL pathogenesis. Based on these genetic abnormalities, ALL is now being reclassified into newly identified subtypes. Philadelphia chromosome-like B-lineage ALL is one of the new high-risk subtypes characterized by genetic alterations that activate various signaling pathways, including those involving cytokine receptors, tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic modifiers. Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL is essentially heterogeneous; however, deletion mutations in the IKZF1 gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS underlie many cases as a key factor inducing aggressive phenotypes and poor treatment responses. Whole-genome sequencing studies of ALL patients and ethnically matched controls also identified inherited genetic variations in lymphoid neoplasm-related genes, which are likely to increase ALL susceptibility. These findings are directly relevant to clinical hematology, and further studies on this aspect could contribute to accurate diagnosis, effective monitoring of residual disease, and patient-oriented therapies. PMID:26991355

  8. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise sub-classification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  9. Monoclonal antibodies in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Susan; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-01-01

    With modern intensive combination polychemotherapy, the complete response (CR) rate in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is 80% to 90%, and the cure rate is 40% to 50%. Hence, there is a need to develop effective salvage therapies and combine novel agents with standard effective chemotherapy. ALL leukemic cells express several surface antigens amenable to target therapies, including CD20, CD22, and CD19. Monoclonal antibodies target these leukemic surface antigens selectively and minimize off-target toxicity. When added to frontline chemotherapy, rituximab, an antibody directed against CD20, increases cure rates of adults with Burkitt leukemia from 40% to 80% and those with pre-B ALL from 35% to 50%. Inotuzumab ozogamicin, a CD22 monoclonal antibody bound to calicheamicin, has resulted in marrow CR rates of 55% and a median survival of 6 to 7 months when given to patients with refractory-relapsed ALL. Blinatumomab, a biallelic T cell engaging the CD3-CD19 monoclonal antibody, also resulted in overall response rates of 40% to 50% and a median survival of 6.5 months in a similar refractory-relapsed population. Other promising monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab) or CD19 or CD20 and bound to different cytotoxins or immunotoxins are under development. Combined modalities of chemotherapy and the novel monoclonal antibodies are under investigation. PMID:25999456

  10. New developments in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Douer, Dan; Thomas, Deborah A

    2014-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs in both children and adults. Significant improvements in survival outcomes have been realized over the last decade for all age groups with de novo ALL. Frontline treatment incorporates a tailored approach, based on factors such as the patient’s age and the disease subtype. Children, adolescents, and young adults are likely to receive intensifying or deintensifying chemotherapy regimens using standard chemotherapeutics (eg, anthracyclines, vincristine, asparaginase) based on risk stratification. Older adults appear to benefit from reduced-intensity chemotherapy regimens, which incorporate targeted therapy (eg, monoclonal antibodies). New data suggest that a more intensive pediatric protocol might be feasible in adult patients. More than half of ALL patients relapse, and their limited survival has led to the development of novel approaches. Recently approved chemotherapeutic agents include clofarabine, nelarabine, asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi, and vincristine sulfate liposome injection, a novel formulation that permits administration of a higher dosage of vincristine than that used in standard regimens. Approaches under investigation include cell therapy using autologous T-cell technologies, antibody-drug conjugates, and agents targeting common gene mutations. Many novel agents are undergoing evaluation in both the frontline and relapsed settings. PMID:25768275

  11. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise subclassification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase-driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  12. The prognostic value of glucocorticoid receptors for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    EL-Maghraby, Shereen M.; Kandil, Noha S.; El-Bendary, Waleed R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic protocols used in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are widely variable, and glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential components in ALL treatment. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the distribution of prominent glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene polymorphic variants among adult ALL patients. We also investigated the association between GR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) isoform expressions and the response to chemotherapy. Methods Fifty-two newly diagnosed Philadelphia-negative adult ALL patients and 30 healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Genotyping was carried out using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. GR mRNA isoform expressions were assayed by quantitative real-time PCR. Results ALL patients in this study had a median age of 34 years (range, 18-75). GRα expression was associated with complete remission (P=0.03), while GRγ mRNA expression was significantly higher in GC resistant patients (P=0.032) and in non-responders (P=0.019). However, there were no significant associations with GC resistance. The BclI polymorphic variant of the GR gene was the most frequent in adult ALL patients and was not associated with the GC response. Both higher GRα expression and lower GRγ expression were associated with achievement of complete remission, while higher GRγ expression was associated with GC-resistance. Conclusion Our data suggest that the level of GR isoform expression may be useful in predicting GC response, achievement of complete remission, and better event-free survival in ALL patients. However, further evaluation with a larger cohort of patients is warranted. PMID:26770951

  13. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  14. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  15. Pulmonary function after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Nysom, K.; Holm, K.; Olsen, J. H.; Hertz, H.; Hesse, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pulmonary function after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and identify risk factors for reduced pulmonary function. We studied a population-based cohort of 94 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood who were in first remission after treatment without spinal irradiation or bone marrow transplantation. Pulmonary function test results were compared with reference values for our laboratory, based on 348 healthy subjects who had never smoked from a local population study. A median of 8 years after cessation of therapy (range 1-18 years) the participants had a slight, subclinical, restrictive ventilatory insufficiency and reduced transfer factor and transfer coefficient. The changes in lung function were related to younger age at treatment and to more dose-intensive treatment protocols that specified more use of cranial irradiation and higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines, cytosine arabinoside and intravenous cyclophosphamide than previous protocols. We conclude that, 8 years after treatment without bone marrow transplantation or spinal irradiation, survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission were without pulmonary symptoms but had signs of slight restrictive pulmonary disease including reduced transfer factor. The increased dose intensity of many recent protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may lead to increased late pulmonary toxicity. PMID:9662245

  16. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  17. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  20. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Langabeer, Stephen E.; Haslam, Karl; O'Brien, David; Kelly, Johanna; Andrews, Claire; Ryan, Ciara; Flavin, Richard; Hayden, Patrick J.; Bacon, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known. PMID:26904322

  1. [Massive bilateral subconjunctival hemorrhage revealing acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Taamallah-Malek, I; Chebbi, A; Bouladi, M; Nacef, L; Bouguila, H; Ayed, S

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of 20-year-old patient who presented in emergency with bilateral massive, spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhage. Clinical findings suggested a blood dyscrasia, which was confirmed by blood cell count. The patient was urgently referred to hematology where the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was made. This case highlights the importance of working up any unusual subconjunctival hemorrhage, as it may reveal, in certain cases, a severe life-threatening disease. PMID:23122838

  2. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Inhibition of MDM2 by Nilotinib Contributes to Cytotoxicity in Both Philadelphia-Positive and Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Chiang, Kuang-Yueh; Zhou, Muxiang

    2014-01-01

    Nilotinib is a selective BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor related to imatinib that is more potent than imatinib. Nilotinib is widely used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The present study identifies Mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) as a target of nilotinib. In studying ALL cell lines, we found that the expression of MDM2 in both Philadelphia positive (Ph+) and Philadelphia negative (Ph-) ALL cells was remarkably inhibited by nilotinib, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further studies demonstrated that nilotinib inhibited MDM2 at the post-translational level by inducing MDM2 self-ubiquitination and degradation. Nilotinib-mediated MDM2 downregulation did not result in accumulation and activation of p53. Inhibition of MDM2 in nilotinib-treated ALL cells led to downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), a translational target of MDM2, resulting in activation of caspases. Inhibition of XIAP following nilotinib-mediated downregulation of MDM2 resulted in apoptosis of MDM2-expressing ALL; however, similar nilotinib treatment induced stronger apoptosis in Ph+/MDM2+ ALL than in Ph-/MDM2+ or Ph+/MDM2- ALL. The ALL cells that were Ph-/MDM2- were totally resistant to nilotinib. These results suggested that nilotinib can inhibit MDM2 and induce a p53-independent apoptosis pathway by downregulating XIAP; thus, nilotinib can treat not only Ph+, but also Ph- ALL patients whose cancer cells overexpress MDM2. PMID:24968304

  4. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  5. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Acute parotitis during induction therapy including L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Pagano, L; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1994-02-01

    In a patient affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and subjected to therapy with Erwinia L-asparaginase, acute parotitis was observed. Microbiological studies excluded any infectious etiology. Regression of parotitis was spontaneous. This complication has not been previously reported and could be due to the same mechanism of pancreatic injury. The occurrence of acute parotitis needs to be promptly recognized in order to avoid the continuation of L-asparaginase. PMID:8148421

  7. Bone marrow fibrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, J P; Reid, M M

    1989-01-01

    Bone marrow trephine biopsy specimens were obtained at diagnosis from 63 of 76 consecutively presenting children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The association between marrow fibrosis and presenting features, including immunophenotype, was analysed. Reticulin was increased in 45 of 56 cases in which blasts expressed B lineage markers, but in only one of seven with T-ALL. A weak association was also found between marrow fibrosis and splenomegaly in those with common ALL. Marrow fibrosis is apparently associated with some examples of ALL of B cell lineage, but precisely which subtypes and whether the phenomenon is clinically important remain to be determined. PMID:2613918

  8. Transplantations in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia--grounds for optimism?

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Anthony H

    2009-01-01

    The large MRC/ECOG Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Study establishes the value of sibling donor allogeneic transplantation in patients with standard risk, demonstrating superior outcome to conventional chemotherapy. The small but significant number of patients having matched unrelated donor transplantations on this study protocol appear to do well and might establish the value of such an approach for those without a sibling. Reduced-intensity conditioning might begin to address the transplantation-related mortality problems of the older patients. The youngest adults might not need to undergo transplantation at all. If they are now treated on pediatric chemotherapy protocols, their outcome appears to improve significantly. PMID:19778843

  9. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Fanconi Syndrome: A Rare Initial Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kamal Kant; Law, Arjun Datt; Jain, Nidhi; Khadwal, Alka; Suri, Vikas; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash Chander

    2016-06-01

    A-14-year old boy, presented with a short history of excessive thirst and increased urine output. Clinical examination showed pallor, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. For evaluation of his polyuric state he underwent routine laboratory investigations, including renal function test, acid-base studies, urine analysis. Blood tests suggested hypokalemia, hypouricemia, hypocalcemia and hyperchloremia with normal liver and kidney function tests. The arterial blood gas analysis was suggestive of normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Urine analysis was suggestive of hyperuricosuria, hypercalciuria and glycosuria with a positive urine anion gap. His hemogram showed pancytopenia with differential count showing 88% blasts. Bone marrow examination and flowcytometry confirmed the diagnosis of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hence this case was atypical and very interesting in the sense that the Fanconi syndrome is very rare to be an initial presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was started on oral as well intravenous supplementation with potassium, bicarbonate, calcium and phosphorus. Simultaneously, as per the modified BFM -90 protocol (four drug based regimen-Prednisolone, vincristine, daunorubicin, cyclophosphamide along with l-asparaginase), he was started on induction protocol. By the end of 3rd week of induction therapy, his urine output started normalizing and finally settled at the end of induction therapy. At present he is in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy. PMID:27408343

  11. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults.

    PubMed

    Speziali, Craig; Paulson, Kristjan; Seftel, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    The majority of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia will achieve a first complete remission (CR). However relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure. Outcomes after relapse remain poor, with long-term survival in the order of 10 %. Treatment decisions made at the time of first complete remission are thus critical to ensuring long-term survival. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is effective at preventing relapse in many transplant recipients but is also associated with significant treatment related morbidity and mortality. Alternatively, ongoing systemic chemotherapy offers lower toxicity at the expense of increased relapse rates. Over the past decades, both the safety of transplant and the efficacy of non-transplant chemotherapy have improved. Emerging data show substantially improved outcomes for young adults treated with pediatric-inspired chemotherapy regimens that question the role of HCT in the upfront setting. In this review, we review the data supporting the role of allogeneic transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and we propose a therapeutic algorithm for upfront therapy of adults with ALL. PMID:26984203

  12. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Flores-Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification. PMID:24716037

  13. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and mumps.

    PubMed

    Kurekci, A Emin; Atay, A Avni; Demirkaya, Erkan; Sarici, S Umit; Ozcan, Okan

    2006-03-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in childhood is characterized by a typical history of acute development of purpura and bruising in an otherwise healthy child. In children it usually follows a viral infection (eg, mumps, rubella) or immunization. We report for the first time a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura due to mumps during the maintenance phase of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. PMID:16679943

  14. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer1,2. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males3. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is significantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:20228800

  15. Orbital mass secondary to infantile acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ibtesham Tausif; Moosajee, Mariya; Abou-Rayyah, Yassir; Pavasovic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    An 8-month-old Asian infant girl was referred with a 1-week history of left periorbital swelling on a background of a narrowed left palpebral aperture over the preceding 8 weeks. There was no history of chronic illness, fever or other systemic features. Examination revealed a tender and fluctuant medial canthal swelling with associated periorbital haematoma. There were no other ophthalmic findings and neurological examination was normal. A MRI scan of the brain and orbit demonstrated abnormal soft tissue with features of an aggressive tumour in the left orbital region with no globe invasion. Peripheral blood smear revealed blast cells, confirmed by bone marrow aspirate. A diagnosis of infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was made. The patient was started on risk-stratified chemotherapy according to the Interfant-06 Protocol The periorbital swelling resolved by day eight following a course of prednisolone, the patient continues on chemotherapy and is currently in molecular remission. PMID:27143162

  16. Mechanisms of clonal evolution in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ford, Anthony; Kweon, Soo-Mi; Trageser, Daniel; Hasselfeld, Brian; Henke, Nadine; Mooster, Jana; Geng, Huimin; Schwarz, Klaus; Kogan, Scott C.; Casellas, Rafael; Schatz, David G.; Lieber, Michael R; Greaves, Mel F.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia can often be retraced to a pre-leukemic clone carrying a prenatal genetic lesion. Postnatally acquired mutations then drive clonal evolution towards overt leukemia. RAG1-RAG2 and AID enzymes, the diversifiers of immunoglobulin genes, are strictly segregated to early and late stages of B-lymphopoiesis, respectively. Here, we identified small pre-BII cells as a natural subset of increased genetic vulnerability owing to concurrent activation of these enzymes. Consistent with epidemiological findings on childhood ALL etiology, susceptibility to genetic lesions during B-lymphopoiesis at the large to small pre-BII transition is exacerbated by abnormal cytokine signaling and repetitive inflammatory stimuli. We demonstrate that AID and RAG1-RAG2 drive leukemic clonal evolution with repeated exposure to inflammatory stimuli, paralleling chronic infections in childhood. PMID:25985233

  17. Metabolic syndrome in the survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M; Jan, Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a common complication encountered in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Affected patients develop obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Metabolic syndrome is a consequence of multiple factors, particularly hormonal imbalance induced by various ALL treatments. This review aims to evaluate the risk factors and mechanisms leading to the development of metabolic syndrome. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of the mechanisms leading to insulin resistance and the associated endothelial and adipose tissue dysfunction. Future studies should also examine other possible contributing factors, such as environmental and genetic factors. Understanding these factors will help in guiding modifications of the current ALL treatment protocols in order to prevent the development of this syndrome and hence improve the quality of life of ALL survivors. Until this is achieved, clinicians should continue to identify patients at risk early and use a therapeutic approach that combines dietary restrictions and enhanced physical activity. PMID:25081809

  18. THE GENOMIC LANDSCAPE OF HYPODIPLOID ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Wei, Lei; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Walsh, Michael; Zhang, Jinghui; Ding, Li; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Churchman, Michelle; Andersson, Anna; Chen, Shann-Ching; McCastlain, Kelly; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Wu, Gang; Patel, Samir N.; Heatley, Susan L.; Phillips, Letha A.; Song, Guangchun; Easton, John; Parker, Matthew; Chen, Xiang; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Hedlund, Erin; Drenberg, Christina; Baker, Sharyn; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Huether, Robert; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Tabib, Yashodhan; Dooling, David J.; Ochoa, Kerri; Minden, Mark; Lewis, Ian D.; To, L. Bik; Marlton, Paula; Roberts, Andrew W.; Raca, Gordana; Stock, Wendy; Neale, Geoffrey; Drexler, Hans G.; Dickins, Ross A.; Ellison, David W.; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Carroll, Andrew J.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Wood, Brent; Borowitz, Michael J.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a subtype of ALL characterized by aneuploidy and poor outcome, is unknown. Genomic profiling of 124 hypodiploid ALL cases, including whole genome and exome sequencing of 40 cases, identified two subtypes that differ in severity of aneuploidy, transcriptional profile and submicroscopic genetic alterations. Near haploid cases with 24–31 chromosomes harbor alterations targeting receptor tyrosine kinase- and Ras signaling (71%) and the lymphoid transcription factor IKZF3 (AIOLOS; 13%). In contrast, low hypodiploid ALL with 32–39 chromosomes are characterized by TP53 alterations (91.2%) which are commonly present in non-tumor cells, and alterations of IKZF2 (HELIOS; 53%) and RB1 (41%). Both near haploid and low hypodiploid tumors exhibit activation of Ras- and PI3K signaling pathways, and are sensitive to PI3K inhibitors, indicating that these drugs should be explored as a new therapeutic strategy for this aggressive form of leukemia. PMID:23334668

  19. Skin nodules in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Le Clech, Lenaïg; Hutin, Pascal; Le Gal, Solène; Guillerm, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Opportunistic infections cause a significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. We describe the case of a patient with skin fusariosis and a probable cerebral toxoplasmosis after UCB stem cell transplantation for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Fusarium species (spp) infections are difficult to treat. To date, there has been no consensus on the treatment of fusariosis and the management of its side effects. Given the negative pretransplant Toxoplasma serology in this case, identifying the origin of the Toxoplasma infection was challenging. All usual transmission routes were screened for and ruled out. The patient's positive outcome was not consistent with that of the literature reporting 60% mortality due to each infection. PMID:24408938

  20. Asparaginase-associated toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hijiya, Nobuko; van der Sluis, Inge M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Asparaginase is an integral component of multiagent chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Positive outcomes are seen in patients who are able to complete their entire prescribed course of asparaginase therapy. Toxicities associated with asparaginase use include hypersensitivity (clinical and subclinical), pancreatitis, thrombosis, encephalopathy, and liver dysfunction. Depending on the nature and severity of the toxicity, asparaginase therapy may be altered or discontinued in some patients. Clinical hypersensitivity is the most common asparaginase-associated toxicity requiring treatment discontinuation, occurring in up to 30% of patients receiving Escherichia coli–derived asparaginase. The ability to rapidly identify and manage asparaginase-associated toxicity will help ensure patients receive the maximal benefit from asparaginase therapy. This review will provide an overview of the common toxicities associated with asparaginase use and recommendations for treatment management. PMID:26457414

  1. Update on developmental therapeutics for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm A

    2009-07-01

    This is an exciting time in drug development for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A confluence of trends makes it likely that highly effective new agents for ALL will be identified in the coming decade. One contributory factor is the development of more representative preclinical models of ALL for testing and prioritizing novel agents. Another important trend in ALL drug development is the increasing understanding at the molecular level of the genomic changes that occur in B-precursor and T-cell ALL. A final important trend is the increasing availability of new agents against relevant molecular targets. Molecularly targeted agents of interest discussed in this review include novel antibody-based drugs targeted against leukemia surface antigens, proteasome inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, JAK inhibitors, Aurora A kinase inhibitors, and inhibitors of Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:20425431

  2. Cerebral aspergillus infection in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Gaurav; Thulkar, Sanjay; Arava, Sudheer Kumar; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2012-01-01

    Angioinvasive pulmonary infection from filamentous fungi is not an uncommon occurrence in immunocompromised patients like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Rarely, these lesions can spread via the hematogenous route and involve multiple visceral organs. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy with ALL who developed angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis early in the course of induction therapy, which was followed by hematogenous dissemination and formation of multiple brain abscesses. The patient was treated with intravenous amphotericin B. There was no response to the therapy and the patient succumbed to disseminated infection. Postmortem lung biopsy confirmed angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Poor penetration of amphotericin B across the blood-brain barrier could be one of the contributory factors for poor response to antifungal therapy. We discuss the various antifungal agents with respect to their penetration in brain. PMID:23580827

  3. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T progenitors: from biology to clinics].

    PubMed

    Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Jordi; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the main cause of morbidity among childhood blood disorders. There are 2 subtypes according to the affected lymphoid progenitor: B-ALL and T-ALL. The T-ALL is the less common and, although historically was associated with poor prognosis in both adults and children, at present, treatment outcomes do not differ significantly between the 2 types of ALL. The T-ALL subtype is the most complex and heterogeneous at the genetic level and currently the one with less new therapeutic alternatives available. This trend is changing thanks to the remarkable progress upon understanding its biology. This review summarizes the most recent and important biological findings in T-ALL and their possible therapeutic implications. PMID:24667111

  4. Targeting survivin overcomes drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Gang, Eun Ji; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Schaefer, Paul; Chae, Sanna; Klemm, Lars; Huantes, Sandra; Loh, Mignon; Conway, Edward M.; Kang, Eun-Suk; Hoe Koo, Hong; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Heisterkamp, Nora; Pelus, Louis; Keerthivasan, Ganesan; Crispino, John; Kahn, Michael; Müschen, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Relapse of drug-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with increased expression of survivin/BIRC5, an inhibitor of apoptosis protein, suggesting a survival advantage for ALL cells. In the present study, we report that inhibition of survivin in patient-derived ALL can eradicate leukemia. Targeting survivin with shRNA in combination with chemotherapy resulted in no detectable minimal residual disease in a xenograft model of primary ALL. Similarly, pharmacologic knock-down of survivin using EZN-3042, a novel locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide, in combination with chemotherapy eliminated drug-resistant ALL cells. These findings show the importance of survivin expression in drug resistance and demonstrate that survivin inhibition may represent a powerful approach to overcoming drug resistance and preventing relapse in patients with ALL. PMID:21715311

  5. Biology and treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, L; Lin, R

    1996-01-01

    The molecular analysis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has provided exciting insights into the pathogenesis of this disease. This disease is heterogenous and can be subtyped based on chromosomal, immunophenotypic, and structural criteria. The varying prognostic implications of different ALL subtypes markedly influence the treatment decisions in adults. Many patients with T-cell ALL can be cured with chemotherapy alone. In contrast, patients with early B-lineage ALL with certain chromosomal abnormalities, especially the Philadelphia chromosome, do not have durable responses to chemotherapy and should receive a bone marrow transplantation if an HLA-matched donor is available. Recent reports have shown improved results for adults with B-cell ALL (Burkitt's) after intensive alternating cycles of chemotherapy containing high doses of methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. Future clinical and laboratory investigation should lead to the development of novel and possibly more effective treatments specifically tailored for different subsets of ALL. PMID:8775728

  6. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  7. The genetics and mechanisms of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Belver, Laura; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2016-07-25

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive haematological malignancy derived from early T cell progenitors. In recent years genomic and transcriptomic studies have uncovered major oncogenic and tumour suppressor pathways involved in T-ALL transformation and identified distinct biological groups associated with prognosis. An increased understanding of T-ALL biology has already translated into new prognostic biomarkers and improved animal models of leukaemia and has opened opportunities for the development of targeted therapies for the treatment of this disease. In this Review we examine our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of T-ALL and recent developments in the translation of these results to the clinic. PMID:27451956

  8. Acute myeloid leukaemia after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in girl with Bloom syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Madeleine; Jenney, Meriel; Lazarou, Laz; White, Rhian; Birdsall, Sanda; Staab, Timo; Schindler, Detlev; Meyer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an inherited genomic instability disorder caused by disruption of the BLM helicase and confers an extreme cancer predisposition. Here we report on a girl with BS who developed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at age nine, and treatment-related acute myeloid leukaemia (t-AML) aged 12. She was compound heterozygous for the novel BLM frameshift deletion c.1624delG and the previously described c.3415C>T nonsense mutation. Two haematological malignancies in a child with BS imply a fundamental role for BLM for normal haematopoiesis, in particular in the presence of genotoxic stress. PMID:24932421

  9. Acute myeloid leukaemia after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in girl with Bloom syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adams, Madeleine; Jenney, Meriel; Lazarou, Laz; White, Rhian; Birdsall, Sanda; Staab, Timo; Schindler, Detlev; Meyer, Stefan

    2013-09-18

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an inherited genomic instability disorder caused by disruption of the BLM helicase and confers an extreme cancer predisposition. Here we report on a girl with BS who developed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at age nine, and treatment-related acute myeloid leukaemia (t-AML) aged 12. She was compound heterozygous for the novel BLM frameshift deletion c.1624delG and the previously described c.3415C>T nonsense mutation. Two haematological malignancies in a child with BS imply a fundamental role for BLM for normal haematopoiesis, in particular in the presence of genotoxic stress. PMID:24932421

  10. Economic evaluation of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Rae, C; Furlong, W; Jankovic, M; Moghrabi, Albert; Naqvi, A; Sala, A; Samson, Y; DePauw, S; Feeny, D; Barr, R

    2014-11-01

    Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) consortia's treatment strategies for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children are widely used. We compared the health effects and monetary costs of hospital treatments for these two strategies. Parents of children treated at seven centres in Canada, Italy and the USA completed health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessments during four active treatment phases and at 2 years after treatment. Mean HRQL scores were used to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for a period of 5 years following diagnosis. Total costs of treatment were determined from variables in administrative databases in a universally accessible and publicly funded healthcare system. Valid HRQL assessments (n = 1200) were collected for 307 BFM and 317 DFCI patients, with costs measured for 66 BFM and 28 DFCI patients. QALYs per patient were <1.0% greater for BFM than DFCI. Median HRQL scores revealed no difference in QALYs. The difference in mean total costs for BFM (US$88 480) and DFCI (US$93 026) was not significant (P = 0.600). This study provides no evidence of superiority for one treatment strategy over the other. Current BFM or DFCI strategies should represent conventional management for the next economic evaluation of treatments for ALL in childhood. PMID:24393150

  11. [Transient hyperphosphatasemia observed in a boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, S; Fujikawa, S; Hara, K; Ohira, M; Kojima, C; Maekawa, M

    1997-08-01

    A detailed time course of alkaline phosphatase (ALP; EC3.1.3.1) activity of transient hyperphosphatasemia (TH) in a 9-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is described. The patient's serum ALP activity rose transiently to 49 times the upper limit of normal adult, without any evidences of hepatic and bone disease. The half-life of ALP activity was calculated about 10 days. We characterized ALP isoenzymes by usual electrophoresis using cellulose acetate membrane (Titan III iso-vis) and polyacrylamide disc gel (AlkPhor), and isoelectric focusing using polyacrylamide slab gel. The former two methods showed typical two bands (fast-alpha 2 and alpha 2 beta bands) and the latter one method revealed more basic bands of liver and bone, suggesting the extensive sialylation. The patient complained fever and diarrhea. Enterococcus faecium was detected from his stool. Etiologically, two more patients in the same ward showed TH in the same period. It suggested TH would be occurred by infectious states. Awareness of such benign forms of hyperphosphatasemia not related to malignancy will aid the physician in the differential diagnosis of elevated ALP activity. PMID:9283233

  12. Oligoclonality and new agent evaluation in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gaynon, Paul S; Sun, Weili

    2016-06-01

    New agent development rests on the fundamental assumption that candidate agents or drug combinations that induce objective responses after relapse will prevent relapse, if applied prior to relapse. However, cumulative experience now includes at least 5 examples of interventions with post-relapse objective response rates greater than 50% that failed to improve outcomes when applied prior to relapse. Emerging insights into oligoclonality provide some explanation. In acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the predominant clones at relapse differ from the predominant clones at presentation. Arguably, the more highly proliferative clones that predominate at relapse differ in drug sensitivity from the less proliferative clones that escape primary therapy. Interventions effective against the predominant clones at relapse may have no effect on the antecedent escapee clones. Response is not sufficient in new agent development. Duration of response has attracted less attention because of variability in post-remission therapy but some patient subsets have such a uniformly dismal outcome that details of post-remission therapy may be irrelevant. Benchmarks are needed. Are recovering blasts members of the same clone or do they represent a new clone? When you eradicate the predominant clones you get a response. When you eradicate all clones, you get a cure. PMID:27221005

  13. Personalization of dexamethasone therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rosanna K; Irving, Julie A E; Veal, Gareth J

    2016-04-01

    Dexamethasone is a key component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Despite playing a key role in the improved survival of ALL over several decades, intensification of dexamethasone therapy has also contributed to the increased toxicity associated with treatment, which is now seen to be at unacceptable levels given the favourable disease prognosis. Therefore the focus for treatment is now shifting towards reducing toxicity whilst maintaining current survival rates. As approximately 50% of patients were successfully treated on less intensive protocols of the 1980s, it has been questioned whether therapy intensification is necessary in all patients. Furthermore, there remains a subset of children who are still not cured of their disease. New strategies are therefore needed to identify patients who could benefit from dose reduction or intensification. However, adjusting a potentially life threatening therapy is a challenging task, particularly given the heterogeneous nature of ALL. This review focuses on the potential for patient stratification based on our current knowledge of dexamethasone pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics and the action of dexamethasone at the cellular level. A carefully designed, combined approach is needed if we are to achieve the aim of improved personalization of dexamethasone therapy for future patients. PMID:26729065

  14. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  15. Targeting bone marrow lymphoid niches in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Uy, Geoffrey L; Hsu, Yen-Michael S; Schmidt, Amy P; Stock, Wendy; Fletcher, Theresa R; Trinkaus, Kathryn M; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F; Link, Daniel C

    2015-12-01

    In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) the bone marrow microenvironment provides growth and survival signals that may confer resistance to chemotherapy. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) potently inhibits lymphopoiesis by targeting stromal cells that comprise the lymphoid niche in the bone marrow. To determine whether lymphoid niche disruption by G-CSF sensitizes ALL cells to chemotherapy, we conducted a pilot study of G-CSF in combination with chemotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL. Thirteen patients were treated on study; three patients achieved a complete remission (CR/CRi) for an overall response rate of 23%. In the healthy volunteers, G-CSF treatment disrupted the lymphoid niche, as evidenced by reduced expression of CXCL12, interleukin-7, and osteocalcin. However, in most patients with relapsed/refractory ALL expression of these genes was markedly suppressed at baseline. Thus, although G-CSF treatment was associated with ALL cell mobilization into the blood, and increased apoptosis of bone marrow resident ALL cells, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment were modest and highly variable. These data suggest that disruption of lymphoid niches by G-CSF to sensitize ALL cells to chemotherapy may be best accomplished in the consolidation where the bone marrow microenvironment is more likely to be normal. PMID:26467815

  16. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Eosinophilia and Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

    PubMed Central

    Nesheli, Hassan Mahmoodi; Moghaddam, Tahereh Galini; Zahedpasha, Yadollah; Norouzi, Ali-Reza

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. Bone pain is an important symptom that can be severe. Eosinophilia without any other abnormal laboratory findings is rare in ALL. Strongyloides stercoralis in ALL causes disseminated fatal disease. Case Presentation This 9-year-old girl presented with bone pain in lumbar region. Bone pain was the only symptom. The patient didn't have organomegaly. The BM samples were studied by flow cytometry, which showed pre-B cell ALL. Larva of Strongyloides stercoralis was found in fecal examination. Plain chest x ray showed bilateral para-cardiac infiltration. Strongyloidiasis was treated before starting chemotherapy. After two days treatment with Mebendazol the patient developed cough, dyspnea, respiratory distress and fever. The treatment changed to Ivermectin for 2 days. Chemotherapy started five days after diagnosis of leukemia. Conclusion The patient complained merely of bone pain in lumbar region without any other signs and symptoms. Peripheral blood smear showed eosinophilia without any other abnormality. Stool examination showed Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. We suggest that all patients diagnosed as ALL in tropical and subtropical regions should be evaluated for parasitic infection especially with Strongyloides stercoralis. PMID:23056848

  17. Microenvironmental cues for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Diana; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens have led to a substantial improvement in the cure rate of patients suffering from T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite this progress, about 15% and 50% of pediatric and adult cases, respectively, show resistance to treatment or relapse with dismal prognosis, calling for further therapeutic investigations. T-ALL is an heterogeneous disease, which presents intrinsic alterations leading to aberrant expression of transcription factors normally involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development and mutations in genes implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and T-cell development. Gene expression profiling allowed the classification of T-ALL into defined molecular subgroups that mostly reflects the stage of their differentiation arrest. So far this knowledge has not translated into novel, targeted therapy. Recent evidence points to the importance of extrinsic signaling cues in controlling the ability of T-ALL to home, survive, and proliferate, thus offering the perspective of new therapeutic options. This review summarizes the present understanding of the interactions between hematopoietic cells and bone marrow/thymic niches during normal hematopoiesis, describes the main signaling pathways implicated in this dialog, and finally highlights how malignant T cells rely on specific niches to maintain their ability to sustain and propagate leukemia. PMID:27088913

  18. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  19. Genetic and epigenetic characterization of hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Setareh; Olsson, Linda; Biloglav, Andrea; Veerla, Srinivas; Blendberg, Molly; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Behrendtz, Mikael; Castor, Anders; Hansson, Markus; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic and epigenetic landscape of hypodiploid (<45 chromosomes) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods Single nucleotide polymorphism array, whole exome sequencing, RNA sequencing, and methylation array analyses were performed on eleven hypodiploid ALL cases. Results In line with previous studies, mutations in IKZF3 and FLT3 were detected in near-haploid (25–30 chromosomes) cases. Low hypodiploidy (31–39 chromosomes) was associated with somatic TP53 mutations. Notably, mutations of this gene were also found in 3/3 high hypodiploid (40–44 chromosomes) cases, suggesting that the mutational patterns are similar in low hypodiploid and high hypodiploid ALL. The high hypodiploid ALLs frequently displayed substantial cell-to-cell variability in chromosomal content, indicative of chromosomal instability; a rare phenomenon in ALL. Gene expression analysis showed that genes on heterodisomic chromosomes were more highly expressed in hypodiploid cases. Cases clustered according to hypodiploid subtype in the unsupervised methylation analyses, but there was no association between chromosomal copy number and methylation levels. A comparison between samples obtained at diagnosis and relapse showed that the relapse did not arise from the major diagnostic clone in 3/4 cases. Conclusion Taken together, our data support the conclusion that near-haploid and low hypodiploid ALL are different with regard to mutational profiles and also suggest that ALL cases with high hypodiploidy may harbor chromosomal instability. PMID:26544893

  20. Longitudinal language outcomes following intrathecal chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Fiona M; Perry, Meghan L; Murdoch, Bruce E

    2013-04-01

    Intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC) is the treatment option for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Neurocognitive deficits have been described following ITC, but language status post-treatment is yet to be clarified. This study examined the language skills of nine children following ITC for ALL (mean age 7;8 years and 3;2 years post-diagnosis at baseline measurement) and nine age- and sex-matched controls, at baseline then 2 years later, using a battery of tests assessing general language skills. An assessment of cognitively-demanding high level language skills was undertaken on a sub-group of the children (n =12). Statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between children treated with ITC and controls when comparing change in performance scores from baseline measurement to 2 years post-baseline measurement. Descriptive analysis of three of the ALL participants in the Intermediate Stage survivorship at language re-assessment indicated no clinically-significant change in performance over 2 years for all measures except receptive language skills, which improved over the time for two of the children. As language skills continue to develop into late adolescence, the need for the monitoring of language abilities of children treated at a young age with ITC as they enter the Intermediate and Late Stages of survivorship is discussed. PMID:22663017

  1. Suppressed neutrophil function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fumiko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Kajiwara, Ryosuke; Naruto, Takuya; Nishimaki, Shigeru; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-10-01

    Infection is a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. Neutropenia has been considered to be the most important risk factor for severe infection; however, other factors, such as impaired neutrophil function, may be involved in susceptibility to infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed neutrophil function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Whole blood samples were obtained from 16 children with ALL at diagnosis, after induction chemotherapy, and after consolidation chemotherapy. Oxidative burst and phagocytic activity of neutrophils were analyzed by flow cytometry. Oxidative burst of neutrophils was impaired in ALL patients. The percentage of neutrophils with normal oxidative burst after PMA stimulation was 59.0 +/- 13.2 or 70.0 +/- 21.0% at diagnosis or after induction chemotherapy, respectively, which was significantly lower compared with 93.8 +/- 6.1% in healthy control subjects (P = 0.00004, or 0.002, respectively); however, this value was normal after consolidation chemotherapy. No significant differences were noted in phagocytic activity in children with ALL compared with healthy control subjects. Impaired oxidative burst of neutrophils may be one risk factor for infections in children with ALL, especially in the initial periods of treatment. PMID:19728023

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Transformation in Polycythemia Vera: A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Gaweł, Władysław B; Helbig, Grzegorz; Boral, Kinga; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira

    2016-06-01

    Leukemic transformation in patients diagnosed with polycythemia vera (PV) is associated with poor prognosis and median survival not exceeding 3 months. To date only a few cases of post-PV acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have been reported. A 64-year-old female patient developed ALL 4 years after she had met PV criteria. At PV diagnosis a molecular study was positive for the JAK2V617F mutation. Due to high risk features (history of deep vein thrombosis) she was treated with hydroxyurea (HU) with moderate efficacy. She became anemic and thrombocytopenic with mild leukocytosis while still on HU. Blood and bone marrow smears revealed 40 and 100 % of blast cells, respectively. The immunophenotyping of blasts was consistent with a diagnosis of early precursor B cell ALL. She was found to be positive for the JAK2V617F mutation. Patient received an ALL induction regimen and achieved complete remission with negative minimal residual disease by flow cytometry. The post-chemotherapy study for the JAK2V617F mutation was positive. Patient has remained in remission for 4 months. A suitable donor searching was initiated. Post-PV ALL is an extremely rare phenomenon. Due to poor prognosis, an allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in fit patients who achieved remission. PMID:27408357

  3. Ancestry and pharmacogenomics of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun J; Cheng, Cheng; Devidas, Meenakshi; Cao, Xueyuan; Fan, Yiping; Campana, Dario; Yang, Wenjian; Neale, Geoff; Cox, Nancy J; Scheet, Paul; Borowitz, Michael J; Winick, Naomi J; Martin, Paul L; Willman, Cheryl L; Bowman, W Paul; Camitta, Bruce M; Carroll, Andrew; Reaman, Gregory H; Carroll, William L; Loh, Mignon; Hunger, Stephen P; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2011-03-01

    Although five-year survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are now over 80% in most industrialized countries, not all children have benefited equally from this progress. Ethnic differences in survival after childhood ALL have been reported in many clinical studies, with poorer survival observed among African Americans or those with Hispanic ethnicity when compared with European Americans or Asians. The causes of ethnic differences remain uncertain, although both genetic and non-genetic factors are likely important. Interrogating genome-wide germline SNP genotypes in an unselected large cohort of children with ALL, we observed that the component of genomic variation that co-segregated with Native American ancestry was associated with risk of relapse (P = 0.0029) even after adjusting for known prognostic factors (P = 0.017). Ancestry-related differences in relapse risk were abrogated by the addition of a single extra phase of chemotherapy, indicating that modifications to therapy can mitigate the ancestry-related risk of relapse. PMID:21297632

  4. Pharmacogenetic studies in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Hilda Verónica; D'Aloi, Karina; Foncuberta, María Eugenia; Sanchez La Rosa, Christian Germán; Alonso, Cristina Noemí; Chertkoff, Lilien; Felice, Marisa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the most common genetic variants in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) on the outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in Argentinean children. Two hundred and eighty-six patients with ALL treated with two Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM)-based protocols were analyzed. Ten genetic variants were studied. Toxicity was evaluated during the consolidation phase. Children who received 2 g/m(2)/day of methotrexate and carried at least one 677T allele in MTHFR showed an increased risk of developing severe leukopenia (p = 0.004) and neutropenia (p = 0.003). Intermediate-risk (IR) patients with a heterozygous TPMT genotype had a higher probability of event-free survival than those with a wild-type genotype. Genotyping of MTHFR polymorphisms might be useful to optimize consolidation therapy, reducing the associated severe hematologic toxicity. Further studies are necessary to establish the usefulness of MTHFR and TPMT variants as additional markers to predict outcome in the IR group. PMID:25110820

  5. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  6. Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fabian; Wojcik, Bartosch; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by a remarkable intertumoral, intratumoral, and cellular heterogeneity that might be explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) and/or the clonal evolution models. CSCs have the ability to generate all different cells of a tumor and to reinitiate the disease after remission. In the clonal evolution model, a consecutive accumulation of mutations starting in a single cell results in competitive growth of subclones with divergent fitness in either a linear or a branching succession. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a highly malignant cancer of the lymphoid system in the bone marrow with a dismal prognosis after relapse. However, stabile phenotypes and functional data of CSCs in ALL, the so-called leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), are highly controversial and the question remains whether there is evidence for their existence. This review discusses the concepts of CSCs and clonal evolution in respect to LICs mainly in B-ALL and sheds light onto the technical controversies in LIC isolation and evaluation. These aspects are important for the development of strategies to eradicate cells with LIC capacity. Common properties of LICs within different subclones need to be defined for future ALL diagnostics, treatment, and disease monitoring to improve the patients' outcome in ALL. PMID:26236346

  7. Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Exposure to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Nsouly-Maktabi, Hala; Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Ortega-Garcia, Juan Antonio; Colantino, Drew; Barr, Dana B.; Luban, Naomi L.; Shad, Aziza T.; Nelson, David

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphates are pesticides ubiquitous in the environment and have been hypothesized as one of the risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we evaluated the associations of pesticide exposure in a residential environment with the risk for pediatric ALL. This is a case–control study of children newly diagnosed with ALL, and their mothers (n = 41 child–mother pairs) were recruited from Georgetown University Medical Center and Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, between January 2005 and January 2008. Cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and county of residence. Environmental exposures were determined by questionnaire and by urinalysis of pesticide metabolites using isotope dilution gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry. We found that more case mothers (33%) than controls (14%) reported using insecticides in the home (P < 0.02). Other environmental exposures to toxic substances were not significantly associated with the risk of ALL. Pesticide levels were higher in cases than in controls (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between children with ALL and controls for the organophosphate metabolites diethylthiophosphate (P < 0.03) and diethyldithiophosphate (P < 0.05). The association of ALL risk with pesticide exposure merits further studies to confirm the association. PMID:19571777

  8. Transplant Outcomes for Children with Hypodiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda A.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Eapen, Mary; He, Wensheng; Seber, Adriana; Gibson, Brenda; Camitta, Bruce M.; Kitko, Carrie L.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Lehmann, Leslie; Vicent, Marta Gonzalez; Diaz Pérez, Miguel A.; Ayas, Mouhab; Qayed, Muna; Carpenter, Paul A.; Jodele, Sonata; Lund, Troy C.; Leung, Wing H.; Davies, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have inferior outcomes despite intensive risk adapted chemotherapy regimens. We describe 78 children with hypodiploid ALL who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) between 1990 and 2010. Thirty nine (50%) patients had ≤ 43 chromosomes, 12 (15%) had 44 chromosomes and 27 (35%) had 45 chromosomes. Forty three (55%) patients were transplanted in first remission (CR1) while 35 (45%) were transplanted in ≥CR2. Twenty nine patients (37%) received a graft from a related donor and 49 (63%) from an unrelated donor. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen. The 5-year probabilities of leukemia-free survival (LFS), overall survival (OS), relapse, and treatment related mortality (TRM) for the entire cohort were 51%, 56%, 27% and 22% respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that mortality risks were higher for patients transplanted in CR2 (HR 2.16, p=0.05), with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.15, p=0.05) and for those transplanted in the first decade of the study period (HR 2.60, p=0.01). Similarly, treatment failure risks were higher with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.28, p=0.04) and the earlier transplant period (HR 2.51, p=0.01). Although survival is better with advances in donor selection and supportive care, disease-related risk factors significantly influence transplantation outcomes. PMID:25865650

  9. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2012-01-01

    Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention. Mutations in genes regulating lymphoid development are a hallmark of ALL, and alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene IKZF1 (IKAROS) are associated with a high risk of treatment failure in B-ALL. Approximately 20% of B-ALL cases harbor genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling that may be amenable to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including rearrangements of the cytokine receptor gene CRLF2; rearrangements of ABL1, JAK2, and PDGFRB; and mutations of JAK1 and JAK2. Whole-genome sequencing has also identified novel targets of mutation in aggressive T-lineage ALL, including hematopoietic regulators (ETV6 and RUNX1), tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic regulators. Challenges for the future are to comprehensively identify and experimentally validate all genetic alterations driving leukemogenesis and treatment failure in childhood and adult ALL and to implement genomic profiling into the clinical setting to guide risk stratification and targeted therapy. PMID:23233609

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  11. Hemophagocytosis by Leukemic Blasts in T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Unusual Finding.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Aradhana; Chandra, Dinesh; Kakkar, Naveen; Das, Sheila; John, M Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Hemophagocytosis shows engulfment of hematopoietic cells by histiocytes and is a property generally associated with cells of the histiocytic lineage. It can be familial or is seen in a wide spectrum of acquired disorders. Hemophagocytosis by leukemic blasts is an uncommon phenomenon and has been reported mainly in acute myeloid leukemia. Its association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is rare. We present a case of hemophagocytosis by blasts in the bone marrow in a 11 year old boy with T cell-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27408348

  12. The outcome of full-intensity and reduced-intensity conditioning matched sibling or unrelated donor transplantation in adults with Philadelphia chromosome–negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first and second complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David I.; Wang, Tao; Pérez, Waleska S.; Antin, Joseph H.; Copelan, Edward; Gale, Robert Peter; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Halter, Joerg; Khoury, H. Jean; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Lewis, Victor A.; McCarthy, Philip; Rizzieri, David A.; Sabloff, Mitchell; Szer, Jeff; Tallman, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and compared outcomes of 93 patients older than 16 years after RIC with 1428 patients receiving full-intensity conditioning for allografts using sibling and unrelated donors for Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first or second complete remission. RIC conditioning included busulfan 9 mg/kg or less (27), melphalan 150 mg/m2 or less (23), low-dose total body irradiation (TBI; 36), and others (7). The RIC group was older (median 45 vs 28 years, P < .001) and more received peripheral blood grafts (73% vs 43%, P < .001) but had similar other prognostic factors. The RIC versus full-intensity conditioning groups had slightly, but not significantly, less acute grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease (39% vs 46%) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (34% vs 42%), yet similar transplantation-related mortality. RIC led to slightly more relapse (35% vs 26%, P = .08) yet similar age-adjusted survival (38% vs 43%, P = .39). Multivariate analysis showed that conditioning intensity did not affect transplantation-related mortality (P = .92) or relapse risk (P = .14). Multivariate analysis demonstrated significantly improved overall survival with: Karnofsky performance status more than 80, first complete remission, lower white blood count, well-matched unrelated or sibling donors, transplantation since 2001, age younger than 30 years, and conditioning with TBI, but no independent impact of conditioning intensity. RIC merits further investigation in prospective trials of adult ALL. PMID:20404137

  13. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348 PMID:26001791

  14. Randomized trial of radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis comparing intrathecal triple therapy with liposomal cytarabine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bassan, Renato; Masciulli, Arianna; Intermesoli, Tamara; Audisio, Ernesta; Rossi, Giuseppe; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Cassibba, Vincenzo; Mattei, Daniele; Romani, Claudio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Corti, Consuelo; Scattolin, Anna Maria; Spinelli, Orietta; Tosi, Manuela; Parolini, Margherita; Marmont, Filippo; Borlenghi, Erika; Fumagalli, Monica; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Gallamini, Andrea; Marfisi, Rosa Maria; Oldani, Elena; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Developing optimal radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis is a desirable goal in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, to avoid the long-term toxicity associated with cranial irradiation. In a randomized, phase II trial enrolling 145 adult patients, we compared intrathecal liposomal cytarabine (50 mg: 6/8 injections in B-/T-cell subsets, respectively) with intrathecal triple therapy (methotrexate/cytarabine/prednisone: 12 injections). Systemic therapy included methotrexate plus cytarabine or L-asparaginase courses, with methotrexate augmented to 2.5 and 5 g/m2 in Philadelphia-negative B- and T-cell disease, respectively. The primary study objective was the comparative assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, combining the analysis of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. In the liposomal cytarabine arm 17/71 patients (24%) developed grade 3–4 neurotoxicity compared to 2/74 (3%) in the triple therapy arm (P=0.0002), the median number of episodes of neurotoxicity of any grade was one per patient compared to zero, respectively (P=0.0001), and even though no permanent disabilities or deaths were registered, four patients (6%) discontinued intrathecal prophylaxis on account of these toxic side effects (P=0.06). Neurotoxicity worsened with liposomal cytarabine every 14 days (T-cell disease), and was improved by the adjunct of intrathecal dexamethasone. Two patients in the liposomal cytarabine arm suffered from a meningeal relapse (none with T-cell disease, only one after high-dose chemotherapy) compared to four in the triple therapy arm (1 with T-cell disease). While intrathecal liposomal cytarabine could contribute to improved, radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis, the toxicity reported in this trial does not support its use at 50 mg and prompts the investigation of a lower dosage. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT-00795756). PMID:25749825

  15. Assessing Compliance With Mercaptopurine Treatment in Younger Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve treatment outcomes. |

  16. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Meralgia Paresthetica as a Presentation of Acute Appendicitis in a Girl With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Miho; Kodama, Yuichi; Fukano, Reiji; Okamura, Jun; Ogaki, Kippei; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Migita, Masahiro; Inagaki, Jiro

    2015-04-01

    A 7-year-old girl with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed recurrent fever and meralgia paresthetica (MP) during chemotherapy, which resolved after administration of antibiotics. Five months after the onset of these symptoms, enhanced computed tomography showed a periappendiceal abscess extending into the psoas muscle. The cause of her fever and MP was thought to be appendicitis, which probably developed during induction chemotherapy but did not result in typical abdominal pain. Patients with recurrent fever and MP should be evaluated by imaging examinations including computed tomography to search for appendicitis. PMID:24942034

  18. Anticancer activity of cryptotanshinone on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Klauck, Sabine M; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Cryptotanshinone, a well-known diterpene quinone from a widely used traditional Chinese herb named Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been reported for its therapeutical potentials on diverse activities. In this study, pharmacological effects of cryptotanshinone on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells were investigated. IC50 values of 5.0 and 4.8 were obtained in CEM/ADR5000 and CCRF-CEM. Microarray-based mRNA expression revealed that cryptotanshinone regulated genes associated with cell cycle, DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), NFκB signaling and cellular movement. The involvement of these pathways in the mode of action of cryptotanshinone was subsequently validated by additional independent in vitro studies. Cryptotanshinone stimulated ROS generation and induced DNA damage. It arrested cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and induced apoptosis as measured by annexin V-FITC-conjugating fluorescence. The induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by cryptotanshinone was proved by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cleavage of caspase 3/7, caspase 9 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). DNA-binding motif analysis of the microarray-retrieved deregulated genes in the promoter region revealed NFκB as potential transcription factor involved in cryptotanshinone's mode of action. Molecular docking and Western blotting provided supportive evidence, suggesting that cryptotanshinone binds to IKK-β and inhibits the translocation of p65 from the cytosol to the nucleus. In addition, cryptotanshinone inhibited cellular movement as shown by a fibronectin-based cellular adhesion assay, indicating that this compound exerts anti-invasive features. In conclusion, cryptotanshinone exerts profound cytotoxicity, which is caused by multispecific modes of actions, including G2/M arrest, apoptosis and inhibition of cellular movement. The inhibitory activities of this compound may be explained by inhibition of NFκB, which orchestrates all these mechanisms. PMID

  19. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  20. Cholinergic Machinery as Relevant Target in Acute Lymphoblastic T Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Valencia-Cruz, Georgina; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar O.; Liñan-Rico, Liliana; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Various types of non-neuronal cells, including tumors, are able to produce acetylcholine (ACh), which acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. T lymphocytes represent a key component of the non-neuronal cholinergic system. T cells-derived ACh is involved in a stimulation of their activation and proliferation, and acts as a regulator of immune response. The aim of the present work was to summarize the data about components of cholinergic machinery in T lymphocytes, with an emphasis on the comparison of healthy and leukemic T cells. Cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemias of T lineage (T-ALL) were found to produce a considerably higher amount of ACh than healthy T lymphocytes. Additionally, ACh produced by T-ALL is not efficiently hydrolyzed, because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is drastically decreased in these cells. Up-regulation of muscarinic ACh receptors was also demonstrated at expression and functional level, whereas nicotinic ACh receptors seem to play a less important role and not form functional channels in cells derived from T-ALL. We hypothesized that ACh over-produced in T-ALL may act as an autocrine growth factor and play an important role in leukemic clonal expansion through shaping of intracellular Ca2+ signals. We suggest that cholinergic machinery may be attractive targets for new drugs against T-ALL. Specifically, testing of high affinity antagonists of muscarinic ACh receptors as well as antagomiRs, which interfere with miRNAs involved in the suppression of AChE expression, may be the first choice options.

  1. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia During Therapy For Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Darbandi, Rashid; Pei, Deqing; Ramsey, Laura B.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Sandlund, John T.; Cheng, Cheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Jeha, Sima; Metzger, Monika L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asparaginase and steroids can cause hypertriglyceridemia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). There are no guidelines for screening or management of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (>1000 mg/dL) during ALL therapy. Patients and Methods Fasting lipid profiles were obtained prospectively at 4 time-points for 257 children consecutively enrolled on a frontline ALL study. Risk factors were evaluated by the exact chi-square test. Details of adverse events and management of hypertriglyceridemia were extracted retrospectively. Results Eighteen of 257 (7%) patients developed severe hypertriglyceridemia. Older age and treatment with higher doses of asparaginase and steroids on the standard/high-risk arm were significant risk factors. Severe hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with pancreatitis after adjustment for age and treatment arm or with osteonecrosis after adjustment for age. However, patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia had a 2.5 to 3 times higher risk of thrombosis compared to patients without, albeit the difference was not statistical significant. Of the 30 episodes of severe hypertriglyceridemia in 18 patients, 7 were managed conservatively while the others with pharmacotherapy. Seventeen of 18 patients continued to receive asparaginase and steroids. Triglyceride levels normalized after completion of ALL therapy in all 12 patients with available measurements. Conclusion Asparaginase- and steroid-induced transient hypertriglyceridemia can be adequately managed with dietary modifications and close monitoring without altering chemotherapy. Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia were not at increased risk of adverse events, with a possible exception of thrombosis. The benefit of pharmacotherapy in decreasing symptoms and potential complications requires further investigation. PMID:25087182

  2. Dorsal column myelopathy following intrathecal chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Prathap Jacob; Reyes, Maria Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective/context To describe a distinctive clinical and radiographic pattern of myelopathy following intrathecal chemotherapy. Myelopathy is a rare complication of intrathecal chemotherapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We present a 42-year-old female with T-cell ALL who developed a myelopathy primarily involving the dorsal columns. Method Case report and literature review. Findings Within 24 hours of an injection of intrathecal methotrexate, cytarabine, and hydrocortisone, the patient developed ascending lower limb numbness and balance difficulties progressing to the inability to ambulate. Clinical examination showed profound loss of lower limb proprioception and light touch sensation below T5, mild proximal limb weakness, but preserved pinprick and temperature sensation with intact bowel and bladder function. Initial thoracic and lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 week revealed no abnormalities. However, repeat imaging at 6 weeks showed abnormal signal in the posterior cord with sparing of the anterior and lateral columns, diffusely involving the lower cervical cord through the conus medullaris. Dermatomal somatosensory-evoked potential (DSEP) conduction abnormalities were consistent with thoracic myelopathy. An empiric trial of high-dose intravenous corticosteroids during inpatient rehabilitation more than 6 weeks later produced no significant clinical improvement. Conclusion/clinical relevance Preferential and persistent dorsal column myelopathy is a distinctive clinical and radiographic presentation of a rare complication of intrathecal chemotherapy. The MRI abnormalities were initially absent, but evolved to consist of multi-level spinal cord T2 and STIR hyperintensity with regional gadolinium enhancement. DSEPs more accurately reflected the clinical level of spinal cord dysfunction. PMID:24090227

  3. Rituximab in B-Lineage Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maury, Sébastien; Chevret, Sylvie; Thomas, Xavier; Heim, Dominik; Leguay, Thibaut; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Hunault, Mathilde; Boissel, Nicolas; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Hess, Urs; Vey, Norbert; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Braun, Thorsten; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chalandon, Yves; Lhéritier, Véronique; Beldjord, Kheira; Béné, Marie C; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2016-09-15

    Background Treatment with rituximab has improved the outcome for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may also have the CD20 antigen, which is targeted by rituximab. Although single-group studies suggest that adding rituximab to chemotherapy could improve the outcome in such patients, this hypothesis has not been tested in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned adults (18 to 59 years of age) with CD20-positive, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative ALL to receive chemotherapy with or without rituximab, with event-free survival as the primary end point. Rituximab was given during all treatment phases, for a total of 16 to 18 infusions. Results From May 2006 through April 2014, a total of 209 patients were enrolled: 105 in the rituximab group and 104 in the control group. After a median follow-up of 30 months, event-free survival was longer in the rituximab group than in the control group (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45 to 0.98; P=0.04); the estimated 2-year event-free survival rates were 65% (95% CI, 56 to 75) and 52% (95% CI, 43 to 63), respectively. Treatment with rituximab remained associated with longer event-free survival in a multivariate analysis. The overall incidence rate of severe adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups, but fewer allergic reactions to asparaginase were observed in the rituximab group. Conclusions Adding rituximab to the ALL chemotherapy protocol improved the outcome for younger adults with CD20-positive, Ph-negative ALL. (Funded by the Regional Clinical Research Office, Paris, and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00327678 .). PMID:27626518

  4. A revised definition for cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Pei, D; Campana, D; Cheng, C; Sandlund, J T; Bowman, W P; Hudson, M M; Ribeiro, R C; Raimondi, S C; Jeha, S; Howard, S C; Bhojwani, D; Inaba, H; Rubnitz, J E; Metzger, M L; Gruber, T A; Coustan-Smith, E; Downing, J R; Leung, W H; Relling, M V; Evans, W E

    2014-12-01

    With improved contemporary therapy, we reassess long-term outcome in patients completing treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to determine when cure can be declared with a high degree of confidence. In six successive clinical trials between 1984 and 2007, 1291 (84.5%) patients completed all therapies in continuous complete remission. The post-therapy cumulative risk of relapse or development of a second neoplasm and the event-free survival rate and overall survival were analyzed according to the presenting features and the three treatment periods defined by relative outcome. Over the three treatment periods, there has been progressive increase in the rate of event-free survival (65.2% vs 74.8% vs 85.1% (P<0.001)) and overall survival (76.5% vs 81.1% vs 91.7% (P<0.001)) at 10 years. The most important predictor of outcome after completion of therapy was the type of treatment. In the most recent treatment period, which omitted the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation, the post-treatment cumulative risk of relapse was 6.4%, death in remission 1.5% and development of a second neoplasm 2.3% at 10 years, with all relapses except one occurring within 4 years of therapy. None of the 106 patients with the t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1, t(1;19)/TCF3-PBX1 or t(4;11)/MLL-AFF1 had relapsed after 2 years from completion of therapy. These findings demonstrate that with contemporary effective therapy that excludes cranial irradiation, approximately 6% of children with ALL may relapse after completion of treatment, and those who remain in remission at 4 years post treatment may be considered cured (that is, less than 1% chance of relapse). PMID:24781017

  5. Bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Athanassiadou, Fani; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Rousso, Israel; Katsos, Georgios; Sidi, Vassiliki; Papageorgiou, Theodotis; Papastergiou, Christos; Tsituridis, Ioannis; Koliouskas, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate bone metabolism with measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) after management (chemo-, radiotherapy) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Bone mineral density (g/cm2) of lumbar spine was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (Norland bone densitometer) in 18 children with ALL and a median of 34 months' post-diagnosis with no history of relapse, secondary malignancy, or transplantation. In addition, patients' BMDs were correlated with particular attention to age, sex and time (years) from completion of chemotherapy. The results were compared with healthy age- and sex-matched controls of the same population and expressed as standard deviation scores (SDS). Mean age of children was 9.8 +/- 3.7 years. Of 18 children (10 boys and 8 girls), 13 were grouped as standard and 5 as high-risk, respectively. Based on z-score values, 9 were classified as normal (z-score <1 SD), 7 as osteopenic (z-score 1-2.5 SD) and 2 as osteoporotic (z-score >2.5 SD). Children with ALL had reduced lumbar BMDs (z score -0.99) in comparison to healthy controls (z score -0.14) (p=0.011), which is indicative of relative osteopenia. Moreover, the reduced BMD was associated with patient age (z score -0.14 and -1.52 for ages <10 and >10 years, respectively, p=0.016). Reduced BMD was not correlated with time from completion of chemotherapy (p=0.33), risk group (p=0.9) and sex (p=0.3). We conclude that children's BMDs are reduced after completion of chemotherapy for ALL. The causes are multifactorial and mainly related to antineoplastic treatments, such as corticosteroids and methotrexate, physical inactivity and cranial irradiation. We suggest that further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effect on BMD in these children and to prevent pathological fractures later in life. PMID:16848106

  6. Drugs under preclinical and clinical study for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Joe Antony; Salmani, Jumah Masoud Mohammad; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy has modernized the treatment of both chronic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The introduction of monoclonal antibodies and combinational drugs has increased the survival rate of patients. Preclinical studies with various agents have resulted in positive outputs with Phase III trial drugs and monoclonal antibodies entering clinical trials. Most of the monoclonal antibodies target the CD20 and CD22 receptors. This has led to the approval of a few of these drugs by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on the drugs under preclinical and clinical study in the ongoing efforts for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27382259

  7. Hemiparesis in an Adolescent With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Everything Is Not Always What it Seems.

    PubMed

    Andina, David; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Sevilla, Julian; Gutierrez, Silvia; Madero, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a common malignancy in childhood. Managing adverse events during treatment can result in very complex situations. A previously healthy adolescent diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed on day +55 of induction chemotherapy hemiparesis, dysesthesia, and facial palsy. Blood tests and brain imaging techniques were unremarkable. The patient was diagnosed with a conversion disorder, which completely resolved. Although rare in clinical practice, children and adolescents with cancer do not always have organic pathology explaining their symptoms. Psychiatric disorders such as those of the somatoform spectrum must be considered, particularly in patients with anxiety or depression. PMID:25072371

  8. Evolving Therapeutic Strategies for the Classic Philadelphia-Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jason B.; Stein, Brady L.; McMahon, Brandon; Giles, Francis J.; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the emergence of JAK inhibitors, there is a need for disease-modifying treatments for Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). JAK inhibitors ameliorate symptoms and address splenomegaly, but because of the heterogeneous contributors to the disease process, JAK inhibitor monotherapy incompletely addresses the burden of disease. The ever-growing understanding of MPN pathogenesis has provided the rationale for testing novel and targeted therapeutic agents, as monotherapies or in combination, in preclinical and clinical settings. A number of intriguing options have emerged, and it is hoped that further progress will lead to significant changes in the natural history of MPNs. PMID:26870834

  9. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL. PMID:27149388

  10. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  11. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  12. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  13. Delayed Neurotoxicity Associated with Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Peter D.; Kamen, Barton A.

    2006-01-01

    Most children diagnosed today with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured. However, treatment entails risk of neurotoxicity, causing deficits in neurocognitive function that can persist in the years after treatment is completed. Many of the components of leukemia therapy can contribute to adverse neurologic sequelae, including…

  14. An Initial Reintegration Treatment of Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Michelle; Kaufman, Nadeen

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the cognitive, psychological, and social adjustment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and assessed how their needs could best be met through reintegration programs focusing on learning/ educational needs. Findings from three case studies highlight the need for ALL patients to be provided with comprehensive programs…

  15. Induction of apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by isolated fractions from strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberries contain phytochemicals that have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. We investigated the ability of isolated fractions from strawberry extracts to induce apoptotic cell death in three pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) lines, including SEM and RS4;11 cell lines derived fr...

  16. Management and treatment of osteonecrosis in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    te Winkel, Mariël L.; Pieters, Rob; Wind, Ernst-Jan D.; Bessems, J.H.J.M. (Gert); van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding how to manage osteonecrosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Therefore, we performed a quality assessment of the literature with the result of a search strategy using the MESH terms osteonecrosis, children, childhood cancer, surgery, bisphosphonates, 6 hydroxymethyl-glutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors, anticoagulants and hyperbaric oxygen, and terms related to these MESH terms. A randomized controlled trial showed that osteonecrosis can be prevented by intermittent, instead of continuous, corticosteroid administration. The studies on interventions after onset of osteonecrosis were of low-quality evidence. Seven pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia studies described non-surgical interventions; bisphosphonates (n=5), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (n=1), or prostacyclin analogs (n=1). Safety and efficacy studies are lacking. Five studies focused on surgical interventions; none was of sufficient quality to draw definite conclusions. In conclusion, preventing osteonecrosis is feasible in a proportion of the pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients by discontinuous, instead of continuous, steroid scheduling. The questions as to how to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with osteonecrosis cannot be answered as good-quality studies are lacking. PMID:24598854

  17. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  18. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, Giovanni F.; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S.; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL+ blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL+ blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL+, are worth pursuing further. PMID:24658822

  19. High sensitivity of flow cytometry improves detection of occult leptomeningeal disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Maurillo, Luca; Di Caprio, Luigi; Di Piazza, Fabio; Sarlo, Chiara; De Angelis, Gottardo; Irno Consalvo, Maria; Fraboni, Daniela; De Santis, Giovanna; Ditto, Concetta; Postorino, Massimiliano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-09-01

    Conventional cytology (CC) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fails to demonstrate malignant cells in up to 45 % of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL/LL) in whom occult leptomeningeal disease is present. Flow cytometry (FCM) is considered more sensitive than CC, but clinical implications of CC negativity/CC positivity are not yet established. CSF samples from 38 adult patients with newly diagnosed ALL/LL were examined. Five (13 %) and nine (24 %) specimens were CC positive-FC positive (FCM(pos)/CC(pos)) and CC negative-FC positive (CC(neg)/FCM(pos)), respectively. The remaining 24 (63 %) samples were double negative (CC(neg)/FCM(neg)) (p = 0.001). CC(neg)/FCM(pos) patients showed a significantly shorter overall survival (OS) compared to CC(neg)/FCM(neg) ones. In multivariate analysis, the status of single FCM positivity was demonstrated to affect independently duration of OS (p = 0.005). In conclusion, FCM significantly improves detection of leptomeningeal occult localization in ALL/LL and appears to anticipate an adverse outcome. Further prospective studies on larger series are needed to confirm this preliminary observation. PMID:24752416

  20. Circulating Cytokine Levels as Markers of Inflammation in Philadelphia Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Diagnostic and Prognostic Interest

    PubMed Central

    Mondet, Julie; Hussein, Kais; Mossuz, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are well known mediators of numerous physiological and pathological processes. They contribute to the regulation of normal hematopoiesis but increasing data suggest that they also have a clinical impact in some hematopoietic malignancies. In particular, there is evidence that cytokines are implicated in the functional symptoms of Philadelphia negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph− MPNs), suggesting that evaluation of circulating levels of cytokines could be of clinical interest for the characterization of patients at the time of diagnosis and for disease prognosis. In this review, we present the current knowledge on alteration of circulating cytokine profiles in MPNs and their role in myelofibrosis pathogenesis. Phenotypic correlation, prognostic value of cytokines, and impact of JAK inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:26525644

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents: prognostic factors and analysis of survival

    PubMed Central

    Lustosa de Sousa, Daniel Willian; de Almeida Ferreira, Francisco Valdeci; Cavalcante Félix, Francisco Helder; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Vinicios

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical and laboratory features of children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated at three referral centers in Ceará and evaluate prognostic factors for survival, including age, gender, presenting white blood cell count, immunophenotype, DNA index and early response to treatment. Methods Seventy-six under 19-year-old patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância – acute lymphoblastic leukemia-93 and -99 protocols between September 2007 and December 2009 were analyzed. The diagnosis was based on cytological, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic criteria. Associations between variables, prognostic factors and response to treatment were analyzed using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Overall and event-free survival were estimated by Kaplan–Meier analysis and compared using the log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent prognostic factors. Results The average age at diagnosis was 6.3 ± 0.5 years and males were predominant (65%). The most frequently observed clinical features were hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Central nervous system involvement and mediastinal enlargement occurred in 6.6% and 11.8%, respectively. B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia was more common (89.5%) than T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A DNA index >1.16 was found in 19% of patients and was associated with favorable prognosis. On Day 8 of induction therapy, 95% of the patients had lymphoblast counts <1000/μL and white blood cell counts <5.0 × 109/L. The remission induction rate was 95%, the induction mortality rate was 2.6% and overall survival was 72%. Conclusion The prognostic factors identified are compatible with the literature. The 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were lower than those reported for developed countries. As shown by the multivariate analysis, age and baseline white

  3. Acute Sensitivity of Ph-like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia to the SMAC-Mimetic Birinapant.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Jennifer; Robbins, Alissa; Evans, Kathryn; Beck, Dominik; Kurmasheva, Raushan T; Billups, Catherine A; Carol, Hernan; Heatley, Sue; Sutton, Rosemary; Marshall, Glenn M; White, Deborah; Pimanda, John; Houghton, Peter J; Smith, Malcolm A; Lock, Richard B

    2016-08-01

    Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a genetically defined high-risk ALL subtype with a generally poor prognosis. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of birinapant, a small-molecule mimetic of the apoptotic regulator SMAC, against a diverse set of ALL subtypes. Birinapant exhibited potent and selective cytotoxicity against B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL) cells that were cultured ex vivo or in vivo as patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX). Cytotoxicity was consistently most acute in Ph-like BCP-ALL. Unbiased gene expression analysis of BCP-ALL PDX specimens identified a 68-gene signature associated with birinapant sensitivity, including an enrichment for genes involved in inflammatory response, hematopoiesis, and cell death pathways. All Ph-like PDXs analyzed clustered within this 68-gene classifier. Mechanistically, birinapant sensitivity was associated with expression of TNF receptor TNFR1 and was abrogated by interfering with the TNFα/TNFR1 interaction. In combination therapy, birinapant enhanced the in vivo efficacy of an induction-type regimen of vincristine, dexamethasone, and L-asparaginase against Ph-like ALL xenografts, offering a preclinical rationale to further evaluate this SMAC mimetic for BCP-ALL treatment. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4579-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302164

  4. Mild axonal neuropathy of children during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Reinders-Messelink, H A; Van Weerden, T W; Fock, J M; Gidding, C E; Vingerhoets, H M; Schoemaker, M M; Göeken, L N; Bökkerink, J P; Kamps, W A

    2000-01-01

    Neurophysiological functioning was studied prospectively in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with a low dose vincristine regime (8 x 1.5 mg/m2/dose), to obtain more insight into vincristine neuropathy. A WHO neurotoxicity score was estimated and vibration sense and electrophysiological measurements were taken at standardized times during vincristine treatment. The WHO neurotoxicity score showed decreased or disappearance of Achilles tendon reflexes, and mild sensory disturbances, but a grade 3-4 neurotoxicity was not demonstrated by any of the children. Vibration perception thresholds increased progressively during treatment and amplitudes of action potentials of peroneal and sensory ulnar and median nerves decreased, whereas nerve conduction velocities stayed unchanged. Both vibration perception thresholds and the electrophysiological findings hardly exceeded the limits of normality. We conclude that children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with a low dose vincristine regimen have mild axonal neuropathy which may be responsible for the motor problems in these children. PMID:11030069

  5. Supportive medical care for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Antillon, Federico; Pacheco, Carlos; Sullivan, Courtney E; Lam, Catherine G; Howard, Scott C; Conter, Valentino

    2015-10-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable progress in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been achieved in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), but survival rates remain significantly lower than those in high-income countries. Inadequate supportive care and consequent excess mortality from toxicity are important causes of treatment failure for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in LMIC. This article summarizes practical supportive care recommendations for healthcare providers practicing in LMIC, starting with core approaches in oncology nursing care, management of tumor lysis syndrome and mediastinal masses, nutritional support, use of blood products for anemia and thrombocytopenia, and palliative care. Prevention and treatment of infectious diseases are described in a parallel paper. PMID:26013005

  6. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention.

  7. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Yazici, Pinar; Duyu, Muhterem; Polat, Suleyha Hilmioglu; Atabay, Berna; Doganavsargil, Basak; Karapinar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26937339

  8. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Yazici, Pinar; Duyu, Muhterem; Polat, Suleyha Hilmioglu; Atabay, Berna; Doganavsargil, Basak; Karapinar, Bulent

    2016-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26937339

  9. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  10. [Epidemiologic, clinical and cytohematologic characteristics of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Elloumi, Moez; Hafsia, Raouf; el Omri, Halima; Souissi, Taoufik; Hafsia, Aicha; Ennabli, Souad; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2002-04-01

    Through a national retrospective study, the authors report the clinical and hematological characteristics of 124 acute lymphoblastic leukemia of the adult diagnosed during 5 years (1993-1997). The national prevalence is of 0.28/100.000 inhabitants/year. The sex-ratio is of 1.3. Sixty six per cent of patients were 16-35 years of age, and only 10% of them were more than 60 years of age. A tumoral syndrome was present at 71% of the cases with peripheral adenopathies in 55%, splenomegaly in 40%, hepatomegaly in 19% and a mediastinal tumor in 18% of the cases. The bone pain were rarely signaled (10%) and neuro-meningeal affection was found in only 3% of cases. There was no testicular lesions. The white blood cells count was less than 30.000/mm3 in 60% whereas an important hyperleucocytosis superior than 100.103/mm3 was observed in 20% of the cases. Anemia and thrombopenia were noted in 94% and 90% of the cases respectively. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia typing by cytological study of Bone marrow according to the Fransh-American-Britain criteria (FAB) had found 43%, 48% and 4% for type 1,2 and 3 respectively. In 5% of the cases the type of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia was not precised (diagnosis based on the Bone biopsy). PMID:12416355

  11. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  12. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  13. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Clinical features of patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms complicated by portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Matthew; Geyer, Holly; Mesa, Ruben; Atallah, Ehab; Callum, Jeannie; Bartoszko, Justyna; Yee, Karen; Maganti, Manjula; Wong, Florence; Gupta, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Backgroud Portal hypertension (PHTN) has been reported to afflict 7-18% of patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), with complications of variceal bleeding and ascites. The clinical features and outcomes of these patients are unclear. Patients and Methods In this multi-centre retrospective study, we evaluated the clinical features of 51 patients with MPNs complicated by PHTN. Results The diagnosis of underlying MPN was most frequently polycythemia vera (PV) (39%) and primary myelofibrosis (MF) (35%), followed by post-PV myelofibrosis (18%), essential thrombocythemia (ET) (4%) and post-ET myelofibrosis (4%). Frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation appears as expected in the underlying MPN. Thrombosis within the splanchnic circulation was prevalent in patients with polycythemia compared to other MPNs (76% vs. 26%, p=0.0007). Conclusions PV and MF patients have a higher incidence of PHTN in our population, with thrombosis contributing to PHTN development in PV patients. Patients with splanchnic circulation thrombosis are potential candidates for screening for portal hypertension. These data may be useful for developing screening strategies for early detection of PHTN in patients with MPN. PMID:25027569

  15. Management of Concurrent Pregnancy and Acute Lymphoblastic Malignancy in Teenaged Patients: Two Illustrative Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Liza-Marie; Church, Christopher L.; Gomez-Garcia, Wendy C.; Popescu, Marcela I.; Margolin, Judith F.; Ribeiro, Raul C.

    2014-01-01

    The usual age range of acute lymphoblastic malignancies (acute lymphoblastic leukemia and advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymphoma) includes teenagers and young adults (<22 years of age) and coincides with the age of fertility. Concurrence of acute lymphoblastic malignancy with pregnancy is therefore most likely to happen during the younger childbearing ages. However, the therapeutic challenges posed by the dual diagnosis of lymphoblastic malignancy and pregnancy have not specifically been studied in the context of age, and management guidelines for pregnant young patients are lacking. Inconsistency in defining the legal decision-making rights of pregnant teenaged patients adds a further level of complexity in this age group. Management of this challenging combination in the young patient therefore entails unique ethical considerations. Here we present two illustrative cases of teenage pregnancy complicated by acute lymphoblastic malignancy, review the available literature, and offer suggestions for the therapeutic management of such cases in adolescent and young adult patients. Importantly, practical management recommendations are provided in the context of clinical ethics principles that are universally applicable, including in developing countries, where the highest incidence of adolescent pregnancies has been documented. PMID:25538861

  16. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating pediatric ALL with dexamethasone administration with respect to activation of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS); in addition, we investigated whether these side effects were correlated with the level of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3–16 years of age) with ALL were studied during a 5-day dexamethasone course during the maintenance phase of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL-10 and ALL-11 protocols. Fasting insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides levels were measured at baseline (before the start of dexamethasone; T1) and on the fifth day of treatment (T2). Dexamethasone trough levels were measured at T2. We found that dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the following fasting serum levels (P<0.05): HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. In addition, dexamethasone increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR>3.4) from 8% to 85% (P<0.01). Dexamethasone treatment also significantly increased the diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, dexamethasone trough levels (N = 24) were directly correlated with high glucose levels at T2, but not with other parameters. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment acutely induces three components of the MetS. Together with the weight gain typically associated with dexamethasone treatment, these factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of MetS and cardiovascular risk among survivors of childhood leukemia who received dexamethasone treatment. PMID:27362350

  17. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Increased gene expression of histone deacetylases in patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Jensen, Morten K; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2012-01-01

    Myeloproliferation, myeloaccumulation (decreased apoptosis), inflammation, bone marrow fibrosis and angiogenesis are cardinal features of the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms: essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have a critical role in modulating gene expression and, accordingly, in the control of cell pathobiology and cancer development. HDAC inhibition has been shown to inhibit tumor growth (impaired myeloproliferation), to modulate the balance between pro- and antiapoptotic proteins in favor of apoptosis (enhanced apoptosis) and also to inhibit angiogenesis. Recently, enhanced HDAC enzyme activity has been found in CD34+cells from patients with PMF, enzyme activity levels highly exceeding those recorded in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (CMPNs). The raised levels correlated to the degree of splenomegaly, suggesting that HDAC might be recruited as ET or PV progresses into myelofibrosis or PMF progresses into a more advanced stage. Accordingly, HDAC inhibition is an obvious novel therapeutic approach in these neoplasms. Using global gene expression profiling of whole blood from patients with CMPNs, we have found a pronounced deregulation of HDAC genes, involving significant up-regulation of the HDAC genes 9 and 11, with the highest expression levels being found in patients with ET (HDAC9 and 11), PMF (HDAC9) and CMPNs (both HDAC9 and HDAC11). Furthermore, we have identified that the HDAC6 gene is progressively expressed in patients with ET, PV and PMF, reflecting a steady accumulation of abnormally expressed HDAC6 during disease evolution. Our results lend further support to HDACs as important epigenetic targets in the future treatment of patients with CMPNs. Since the highest expression levels of HDAC genes were recorded in ET, in PMF and in the entire CMPN group, their down-regulation by HDAC inhibitors might be associated with decreased disease

  19. Philadelphia-Negative Classical Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Critical Concepts and Management Recommendations From European LeukemiaNet

    PubMed Central

    Barbui, Tiziano; Barosi, Giovanni; Birgegard, Gunnar; Cervantes, Francisco; Finazzi, Guido; Griesshammer, Martin; Harrison, Claire; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Hehlmann, Rudiger; Hoffman, Ronald; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Kröger, Nicolaus; Mesa, Ruben; McMullin, Mary F.; Pardanani, Animesh; Passamonti, Francesco; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Reiter, Andreas; Silver, Richard T.; Verstovsek, Srdan; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2011-01-01

    We present a review of critical concepts and produce recommendations on the management of Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms, including monitoring, response definition, first- and second-line therapy, and therapy for special issues. Key questions were selected according the criterion of clinical relevance. Statements were produced using a Delphi process, and two consensus conferences involving a panel of 21 experts appointed by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) were convened. Patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) should be defined as high risk if age is greater than 60 years or there is a history of previous thrombosis. Risk stratification in primary myelofibrosis (PMF) should start with the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) for newly diagnosed patients and dynamic IPSS for patients being seen during their disease course, with the addition of cytogenetics evaluation and transfusion status. High-risk patients with PV should be managed with phlebotomy, low-dose aspirin, and cytoreduction, with either hydroxyurea or interferon at any age. High-risk patients with ET should be managed with cytoreduction, using hydroxyurea at any age. Monitoring response in PV and ET should use the ELN clinicohematologic criteria. Corticosteroids, androgens, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and immunomodulators are recommended to treat anemia of PMF, whereas hydroxyurea is the first-line treatment of PMF-associated splenomegaly. Indications for splenectomy include symptomatic portal hypertension, drug-refractory painful splenomegaly, and frequent RBC transfusions. The risk of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation–related complications is justified in transplantation-eligible patients whose median survival time is expected to be less than 5 years. PMID:21205761

  20. Segmentation of White Blood Cell from Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Images Using Dual-Threshold Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Rui; Mi, Lei; Cao, Yihui; Yao, Di

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dual-threshold method based on a strategic combination of RGB and HSV color space for white blood cell (WBC) segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: preprocessing, threshold segmentation, and postprocessing. In the preprocessing part, we get two images for further processing: one contrast-stretched gray image and one H component image from transformed HSV color space. In the threshold segmentation part, a dual-threshold method is proposed for improving the conventional single-threshold approaches and a golden section search method is used for determining the optimal thresholds. For the postprocessing part, mathematical morphology and median filtering are utilized to denoise and remove incomplete WBCs. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the lymphoblasts on a public Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) image dataset. The results show that the performance of the proposed method is better than single-threshold approach independently performed in RGB and HSV color space and the overall single WBC segmentation accuracy reaches 97.85%, showing a good prospect in subsequent lymphoblast classification and ALL diagnosis. PMID:27313659

  1. Segmentation of White Blood Cell from Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Images Using Dual-Threshold Method

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yihui; Yao, Di

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dual-threshold method based on a strategic combination of RGB and HSV color space for white blood cell (WBC) segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: preprocessing, threshold segmentation, and postprocessing. In the preprocessing part, we get two images for further processing: one contrast-stretched gray image and one H component image from transformed HSV color space. In the threshold segmentation part, a dual-threshold method is proposed for improving the conventional single-threshold approaches and a golden section search method is used for determining the optimal thresholds. For the postprocessing part, mathematical morphology and median filtering are utilized to denoise and remove incomplete WBCs. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the lymphoblasts on a public Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) image dataset. The results show that the performance of the proposed method is better than single-threshold approach independently performed in RGB and HSV color space and the overall single WBC segmentation accuracy reaches 97.85%, showing a good prospect in subsequent lymphoblast classification and ALL diagnosis. PMID:27313659

  2. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J.; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27151989

  3. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27151989

  4. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura following successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tannir, N M; Kantarjian, H

    2001-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. It is a universal side effect of dose-intensive regimens employed in the treatment of adult ALL. In patients with ALL who achieve remission, thrombocytopenia frequently indicates relapse. We report three adult patients successfully treated for ALL who developed thrombocytopenia and were found to have immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP). Possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the association of ALL and ITP are discussed. PMID:11342378

  5. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase in a Case of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Ronald; Smoler, Donna F.; Baltimore, David

    1973-01-01

    Cells from a patient with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia contain an apparent DNA polymerase activity that was not found in any other cells except thymus cells. The enzyme has the properties of terminal transferase, an enzyme known to be found in thymocytes. The cells also contain the three major DNA polymerases found in growing cells. The results suggest that these tumor cells arose from a block in the differentiation of thymocytes. Terminal transferase may be a marker for the origin of leukemic cells. PMID:4346893

  6. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with multiple hemorrhagic brain metastases (case report)].

    PubMed

    Halefoğlu, Ahmet M; Ertürk, Mehmet; Ozel, Alper; Calişkan, K Can

    2004-06-01

    Intracranial metastases represent 7-17% of all brain tumors. Renal cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, choriocarcinoma, melanoma, retinoblastoma, lung cancer and breast cancer have a propensity for producing hemorrhagic brain metastases. Leukemias have also been rarely reported to cause hemorrhagic brain metastases. We describe an 18-year-old girl diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with multiple hemorrhagic brain metastases. MRI demonstrated high signal intensity lesions on both T1- and T2-weighted images which were characteristic for extracellular methemoglobin and consistent with hemorrhagic metastases. PMID:15236125

  7. Institutional adherence to cardiovascular risk factor screening guidelines for young survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Maria H; Wood, Jamie R; Mittelman, Steven D; Freyer, David R

    2015-05-01

    Survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have increased risk for long-term cardiovascular complications. Early identification of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) may allow for effective interventions. In this retrospective cohort study of 194 patients at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, we investigated CVRF screening practices in an established childhood cancer survivorship program relative to both the Children's Oncology Group (COG) Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations. CVRF screening practices met COG but not the more stringent AAP recommendations, particularly in areas of dyslipidemia and diabetes screening. Implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:25757021

  8. Targetable kinase-activating lesions in Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Publication Abstract:  Philadelphia chromosome-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-like ALL) is characterized by a gene-expression profile similar to that of BCR-ABL1-positive ALL, alterations of lymphoid transcription factor genes, and a poor outcome. The frequency and spectrum of genetic alterations in Ph-like ALL and its responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibition are undefined, especially in adolescents and adults. We performed genomic profiling of 1725 patients with precursor B-cell ALL and detailed genomic analysis of 154 patients with Ph-like ALL.

  9. Brain white matter changes during treatment of a child for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Miho; Hayakawa, Jun; Ueda, Takahiro; Migita, Makoto; Asano, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Yoshitaka; Amano, Yasuo

    2005-10-01

    A 13-year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had bilateral paresis of the upper extremities and aphasia 1 week after high dose methotrexate and triple intrathecal therapy (methotrexate, cytarabin, hydrocortisone). The stroke-like neurological symptoms disappeared on the third day. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensities of white matter on the second day. Despite resolution of the neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance images were still abnormal 3 years after the attack. Methotrexate has been considered to be responsible for ischemic damage to oligodendroglial cells, resulting in demyelination. The changes are occasionally prolonged without persistent neurologic symptoms. PMID:16247223

  10. Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lymphoid Blast Crisis.

    PubMed

    Kolenova, Alexandra; Maloney, Kelly W; Hunger, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in lymphoid blast crisis (BC) can resemble those of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph ALL). Because of this, there can be concern as to whether a patient with newly diagnosed Ph leukemia has Ph ALL or CML in lymphoid BC. This distinction has significant potential therapeutic implications because most children with Ph ALL are now treated with chemotherapy plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplant is usually recommended for any patient with CML that presents in or later develops BC. PMID:27164534

  11. Spectral karyotyping reveals a comprehensive karyotype in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bo; Zhu, Hong Li; Li, Su Xia; Lu, Xue Chun; Fan, Hui; Da, Wan Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are frequently detected in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Comprehensive karyotype was related to poor prognosis frequently in ALL. We present a comprehensive karyotype in an adult ALL by spectral karyotyping (SKY) and R-banding. SKY not only confirmed the abnormalities previously seen by R-banding but also improved comprehensive karyotype analysis with the following result 47,XY,+9, ins(1;5)(q23;q23q34) t(6;7)(q23;p13). Our report demonstrated that SKY is able to provide more information accurately for prediction of disease prognosis in adult ALL with comprehensive karyotype. PMID:27298606

  12. Function of Ikaros as a tumor suppressor in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, Philippe; Dupuis, Arnaud; Gaub, Marie-Pierre; Herbrecht, Raoul; Lutz, Patrick; Chan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is crucial for many aspects of hematopoiesis. Loss of function mutations in IKZF1, the gene encoding Ikaros, have been implicated in adult and pediatric B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). These mutations result in haploinsufficiency of the Ikaros gene in approximately half of the cases. The remaining cases contain more severe or compound mutations that lead to the generation of dominant-negative proteins or complete loss of function. All IKZF1 mutations are associated with a poor prognosis. Here we review the current genetic, clinical and mechanistic evidence for the role of Ikaros as a tumor suppressor in B-ALL. PMID:23358883

  13. Rationale for targeting the pre-B-cell receptor signaling pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Müschen, Markus

    2015-06-11

    Inhibitors of B-cell receptor (BCR) and pre-BCR signaling were successfully introduced into patient care for various subtypes of mature B-cell lymphoma (e.g., ibrutinib, idelalisib). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) typically originates from pre-B cells that critically depend on survival signals emanating from a functional pre-BCR. However, whether patients with ALL benefit from treatment with (pre-) BCR inhibitors has not been explored. Recent data suggest that the pre-BCR functions as tumor suppressor in the majority of cases of human ALL. However, a distinct subset of human ALL is selectively sensitive to pre-BCR antagonists. PMID:25878119

  14. Gonadal function after 12-Gy testicular irradiation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, L.A.; Craft, A.W.; Kernahan, J.; Evans, R.G.; Aynsley-Green, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Gonadal function was assessed in 15 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had received testicular irradiation. The dose to the testes was 12 Gy in 12, 15 Gy in 1, and 24 Gy in 2 cases. All of those who had received 12 or 15 Gy had normal Leydig cell function, although high levels of gonadotropins suggest subclinical Leydig cell damage. The 2 who had 24 Gy had Leydig cell failure. All who were old enough to produce a semen specimen were azoospermic.

  15. Adipose tissue attracts and protects acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Rocky; Sheng, Xia; Ichihara, Brian; Heisterkamp, Nora; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse. Using mouse and cell co-culture models, we investigated whether adipose tissue attracts ALL to a protective microenvironment. Syngeneically implanted ALL cells migrated into adipose tissue within ten days. In vitro, murine ALL cells migrated towards adipose tissue explants and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Human and mouse ALL cells migrated toward adipocyte conditioned media, which was mediated by SDF-1α. In addition, adipose tissue explants protected ALL cells against daunorubicin and vincristine. Our findings suggest that ALL migration into adipose tissue could contribute to drug resistance and potentially relapse. PMID:23332453

  16. Clofarabine-based combination chemotherapy for relapse and refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yuki; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Aoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Yasuo; Oyama, Ryo; Mori, Makiko; Hayashi, Mayumi; Hanada, Ryoji

    2014-11-01

    Clofarabine, one of the key treatment agents for refractory and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), achieves a remission rate of approximately 30% with single-agent clofarabine induction chemotherapy. However, a remission rate of approximately 50% was reported with a combination chemotherapy regimen consisting of clofarabine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide. We treated two cases with refractory and relapsed ALL with combination chemotherapy including clofarabine; one was an induction failure but the other achieved remission. Both cases developed an infectious complication (NCI-CTCAE grade 3) and body pain with infusion. Prophylactic antibiotic and opioid infusions facilitated avoiding septic shock and pain. Further investigation of such cases is required. PMID:25501414

  17. Cardiac Failure 30 Years after Treatment Containing Anthracycline for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John M.; Scully, Rebecca E.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    In 1977, a 5-year-old girl diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was treated on DFCI Childhood ALL Protocol 77-01, receiving a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 465 mg/m2, cranial radiation, and other drugs. After being in continuous complete remission for 34 months, she developed heart failure (HF) and was treated with digoxin and furosemide. At 16, she was diagnosed and treated for dilated cardiomyopathy. Over the years she continued to have bouts of HF, which became less responsive to treatment. At 36, she received a heart transplant. Six months later, she stopped taking her medications and suffered a sudden cardiac death. PMID:22584777

  18. Fatal adenovirus hepatitis during standard chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hough, Rachael; Chetwood, Andrew; Sinfield, Rebecca; Welch, Jenny; Vora, Ajay

    2005-02-01

    Fulminant hepatitis is a rare complication of adenoviral infection that has not previously been reported in children receiving standard chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The authors have observed fatal adenovirus hepatitis in three children receiving first-line chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The patients presented 10, 17, and 8 months into therapy according to the UKALL XI (third intensification), UKALL 97/99 (maintenance), and pilot UKALL 2003 (delayed intensification II) protocols, respectively. All patients received aggressive supportive care and intravenous immunoglobulins. The second and third patients were also treated with intravenous cidofovir. Despite these measures, all three children deteriorated rapidly and died of fulminant liver failure. Although rare, adenovirus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hepatitis in children receiving standard chemotherapy for ALL. PMID:15701979

  19. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Predicting interactome network perturbations in human cancer: application to gene fusions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hajingabo, Leon Juvenal; Daakour, Sarah; Martin, Maud; Grausenburger, Reinhard; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Dequiedt, Franck; Simonis, Nicolas; Twizere, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Genomic variations such as point mutations and gene fusions are directly or indirectly associated with human diseases. They are recognized as diagnostic, prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. However, predicting the functional effect of these genetic alterations beyond affected genes and their products is challenging because diseased phenotypes are likely dependent of complex molecular interaction networks. Using as models three different chromosomal translocations—ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1), BCR-ABL1, and TCF3-PBX1 (E2A-PBX1)—frequently found in precursor-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (preB-ALL), we develop an approach to extract perturbed molecular interactions from gene expression changes. We show that the MYC and JunD transcriptional circuits are specifically deregulated after ETV6-RUNX1 and TCF3-PBX1 gene fusions, respectively. We also identified the bulk mRNA NXF1-dependent machinery as a direct target for the TCF3-PBX1 fusion protein. Through a novel approach combining gene expression and interactome data analysis, we provide new insight into TCF3-PBX1 and ETV6-RUNX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25273558

  1. Studies on the assessment of neurotoxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Muchi, H.; Satoh, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Karube, T.; Miyao, M.

    1987-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis caused a remarkable reduction in the incidence of CNS disease, however there has evolved a growing concern regarding the immediate or late toxicities to the developing CNS. Twenty-eight children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who survived for more than 2 years were examined for the assessment of neurotoxicity induced by CNS prophylaxis and its treatment. The patients were stratified into three groups: Stratum I, prophylaxis with methotrexate; Stratum II, prophylaxis with cranial irradiation with methotrexate; and Stratum III, with CNS leukemia. Once CNS disease developed the sequelae were frequent and severe, due to the elevated methotrexate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. CNS prophylaxis with intermediate-dose methotrexate was less toxic to the developing CNS than prophylactic cranial irradiation, especially in children under 5 years of age. Electroencephalograms and evoked potentials are likely to find increasing application in defining the CNS sequelae of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and its treatment. Although the sample size was small, the findings delineate specific areas of neurotoxicity.

  2. Blinatumomab: Bridging the Gap in Adult Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Folan, Stephanie A; Rexwinkle, Amber; Autry, Jane; Bryan, Jeffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse after frontline therapy have extremely poor outcomes despite advances in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Blinatumomab is a first-in-class bispecific T-cell engager that links T cells to tumor cells leading to T-cell activation and tumor cell lysis. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration approved blinatumomab for treatment of relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In a phase II trial, blinatumomab produced response rates of 43%, and 40% of patients achieving a complete remission proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Early use of blinatumomab was complicated with adverse effects, including cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Management strategies, including dexamethasone premedication and 2-step dose escalation during the first cycle of blinatumomab, have decreased the incidence and severity of these adverse effects. Blinatumomab currently is being studied for other B-cell malignancies and has the potential to benefit many patients with CD19+ malignancies in the future. PMID:27521320

  3. Association of Serum Leptin Level with Obesity in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, S; Shorafa, S; Haghpanah, S; Karamizadeh, Z; Adelian, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is a medical problem in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Obesity is associated with many complications, so it is important to investigate the respective etiology. Leptin is a protein synthesized in the fatty tissue and is effective in the control of obesity. Survey of leptin in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors could be helpful in controlling obesity. Materials and Methods In this prospective study, 53 pediatric patients diagnosed with ALL between 2006 and 2012 from Southern Iran, were enrolled. We examined body mass index (BMI) status and performed laboratory measuring tests including triglyceride, cholesterol, fasting blood sugar, leptin at diagnosis time and then every 6 months and in the last visit. Results Participants consisted of 35 male and 18 female patients. At the time of diagnosis, 5.66% were overweight or obese, whereas at the end of treatment, approximately 13 patients (24.53%) were overweight or obese. The median and interquartile range (IQR) for blood leptin level were significantly higher for obese patients than other patients (885, 1120 vs. 246, 494 pg/ml), (P=0.030). The median and IQR were also significantly higher in females than in males (861, 969 vs. 204, 267 pg/ml), (P=0.006). Conclusion Obesity is a complication of ALL treatment. It is associated with elevated blood leptin level. Hypothalamus leptin resistance in obese patients should be considered. In each visit, clinicians should weight and their patient’s BMI take into account. PMID:26705449

  4. Suppressed spontaneous secretion of growth hormone in girls after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Moëll, C; Garwicz, S; Westgren, U; Wiebe, T; Albertsson-Wikland, K

    1989-01-01

    The spontaneous secretion of growth hormone during a 24 hour period and the response of growth hormone to growth hormone releasing hormone was studied in 13 girls who had received treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia that included cranial irradiation with 20-24 Gy in 12-14 fractions. At the time of investigation the girls were at varying stages of puberty and had normal concentrations of thyroid hormones. The mean interval between the end of treatment and investigation was 4.6 years. The mean age at onset of the disease was 3.2 years and at investigation 10.7 years. The average attained height equalled -0.3 SD at onset, and -1.0 SD at the time of investigation. Secretion of growth hormone was substantially reduced compared with controls and did not increase during puberty. A prompt rise in growth hormone secretion was seen after injection of growth hormone releasing hormone, but the mean maximum growth hormone concentration was, however, only 25 mU/l. There was no correlation between the 24 hour secretion and growth hormone response to growth hormone releasing hormone, or the time since irradiation. These results confirm earlier work that suggested that girls who had received treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, that included cranial irradiation, have a comparative growth hormone insufficiency characterised by normal prepubertal growth and slow growth during puberty because of an inability to respond to the increased demands for growth hormone at that time. PMID:2494952

  5. Antileukemic potency of CD19-specific T cells against chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dolnikov, Alla; Shen, Sylvie; Klamer, Guy; Joshi, Swapna; Xu, Ning; Yang, Lu; Micklethwaite, Kenneth; O'Brien, Tracey A

    2015-12-01

    Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells (CART cells) has exhibited great promise in clinical trials, with efficient response correlated with CART-cell expansion and persistence. Despite extensive clinical use, the mechanisms regulating CART-cell expansion and persistence have not been completely elucidated. We have examined the antileukemia potency of CART cells targeting CD19 antigen using second-generation CAR containing a CD28 co-stimulatory domain cloned into piggyBac-transposon vector and patient-derived chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples. In the presence of large numbers of target cells characteristic of patients with high leukemia burden, excessive proliferation of CART cells leads to differentiation into short-lived effector cells. Transient leukemia growth delay was induced by CART-cell infusion in mice xenografted with rapidly growing CD19+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and was followed by rapid CART-cell extinction. Conditioning with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-activating caspase 3 and promotion of apoptosis in leukemia cells maximized the effect of CART cells and improved CART-cell persistence. These data suggest that the clinical use of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine before CART cells could be considered. Coculture of leukemia cells with bone marrow stroma cells reduced target cell loss, suggesting that leukemia cell mobilization into circulation may help to remove the protective effect of bone marrow stroma and increase the efficacy of CART-cell therapy. PMID:26384559

  6. High incidence of obesity in young adults after treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Didi, M; Didcock, E; Davies, H A; Ogilvy-Stuart, A L; Wales, J K; Shalet, S M

    1995-07-01

    To determine whether obesity complicated the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we studied the body mass index (BMI) of 63 female when and 51 male patients from the time of diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia to the time when final height was attained. The BMI z score was calculated for each patient at diagnosis, at end of treatment, and at attainment of final height. Obesity at attainment of final height was defined as a BMI greater than the 85th percentile of the normal reference population. At final height 23 of 51 male (45%) and 30 of 63 female patients (47%) were obese. Girls became obese between diagnosis and the end of chemotherapy (p = 0.02), after which they had no further increase, indicating that chemotherapy may have played a role in their obesity. Boys had a progressive and gradual increase in BMI z score through to attainment of final height. Obesity did not appear to be associated with growth hormone insufficiency, disproportionate growth, or abnormal timing of puberty. We conclude that approximately half the survivors of leukemia in childhood become obese young adults. Many of those treated with the more recent regimens studied are still only in their mid or preteen years and should be advised regarding a more active lifestyle and a healthy diet in an attempt to reduce the incidence of obesity. PMID:7608813

  7. Intragenic ERG Deletions Do Not Explain the Biology of ERG-Related Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Potuckova, Eliska; Zuna, Jan; Hovorkova, Lenka; Starkova, Julia; Stary, Jan; Trka, Jan; Zaliova, Marketa

    2016-01-01

    Intragenic ERG deletions occur in 3–5% of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, specifically in B-other subtype lacking the classifying genetic lesions. They represent the only genetic lesion described so far present in the majority of cases clustering into a subgroup of B-other subtype characterized by a unique gene expression profile, probably sharing a common, however, not yet fully described, biological background. We aimed to elucidate whether ERG deletions could drive the specific biology of this ERG-related leukemia subgroup through expression of aberrant or decreased expression of wild type ERG isoforms. We showed that leukemic cells with endogenous ERG deletion express an aberrant transcript translated into two proteins in transfected cell lines and that one of these proteins colocalizes with wild type ERG. However, we did not confirm expression of the proteins in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases with endogenous ERG deletion. ERG deletions resulted in significantly lower expression of wild type ERG transcripts compared to B-other cases without ERG deletion. However, cases with subclonal ERG deletion, clustering to the same ERG deletion associated subgroup, presented similar levels of wild type ERG as cases without ERG deletion. In conclusion, our data suggest that neither the expression of aberrant proteins from internally deleted allele nor the reduced expression of wild type ERG seem to provide a plausible explanation of the specific biology of ERG -related leukemia subgroup. PMID:27494621

  8. Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status on Outcome in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sahaja; Hsieh, Samantha; Shinohara, Eric T; DeWees, Todd; Frangoul, Haydar; Perkins, Stephanie M

    2016-07-01

    With modern therapy, overall survival (OS) for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia approaches 90%. However, inferior outcomes for minority children have been reported. Data on the effects of ethnicity/race as it relates to socioeconomic status are limited. Using state cancer registry data from Texas and Florida, we evaluated the impact of neighborhood-level poverty rate and race/ethnicity on OS for 4719 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. On multivariable analysis, patients residing in neighborhoods with the highest poverty rate had a 1.8-fold increase in mortality compared with patients residing in neighborhoods with the lowest poverty rate (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-2.30). Hispanic and non-Hispanic black patients also had increased risk of mortality compared with non-Hispanic white patients (Hispanic: HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.39; non-Hispanic black: HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03-1.66). On subgroup analysis, there was a 21.7% difference in 5-year OS when comparing non-Hispanic white children living in the lowest poverty neighborhoods (5-year OS, 91.2%; 95% CI, 88.6-93.2) to non-Hispanic black children living in the highest poverty neighborhoods (5-year OS, 69.5%; 95% CI, 61.5-76.1). To address such disparities in survival, further work is needed to identify barriers to cancer care in this pediatric population. PMID:27177145

  9. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA. Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  11. Germline ETV6 Mutations Confer Susceptibility to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lauren; Maria, Ann; Villano, Danylo; Gaddam, Pragna; Wu, Gang; McGee, Rose B.; Quinn, Emily; Inaba, Hiroto; Hartford, Christine; Pui, Ching-hon; Pappo, Alberto; Edmonson, Michael; Zhang, Michael Y.; Stepensky, Polina; Steinherz, Peter; Schrader, Kasmintan; Lincoln, Anne; Bussel, James; Lipkin, Steve M.; Goldgur, Yehuda; Harit, Mira; Stadler, Zsofia K.; Mullighan, Charles; Weintraub, Michael; Shimamura, Akiko; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R.; Nichols, Kim E.; Offit, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations affecting ETV6 often occur in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy. The genetic factors that predispose to ALL remain poorly understood. Here we identify a novel germline ETV6 p. L349P mutation in a kindred affected by thrombocytopenia and ALL. A second ETV6 p. N385fs mutation was identified in an unrelated kindred characterized by thrombocytopenia, ALL and secondary myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemic cells from the proband in the second kindred showed deletion of wild type ETV6 with retention of the ETV6 p. N385fs. Enforced expression of the ETV6 mutants revealed normal transcript and protein levels, but impaired nuclear localization. Accordingly, these mutants exhibited significantly reduced ability to regulate the transcription of ETV6 target genes. Our findings highlight a novel role for ETV6 in leukemia predisposition. PMID:26102509

  12. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis in a neutropenic patient after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ejduk, Anna; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is most frequently reported in critically ill patients following sepsis, extensive injury or surgery. It is rather uncommon as a chemotherapy-induced complication, which is usually life-threatening in neutropenic patients subjected to myelosuppressive therapy. A 23-year-old patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was subjected to myelosuppressive chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, pegaspargase). After the first chemotherapy cycle the patient was neutropenic and feverish; she presented with vomiting and pain in the right epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder with wall thickening up to 14 mm. The ACC was diagnosed. Medical therapy included a broad spectrum antibiotic regimen and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors. On the second day after ACC diagnosis the patient's general condition worsened. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The resected gallbladder showed no signs of bacterial or leukemic infiltrates. The postoperative course was uneventful. In the management of neutropenic patients with ACC surgical treatment is as important as pharmacological therapy. PMID:25337176

  13. Pathologic rupture of the spleen as the initial manifestation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bernat, S; García Boyero, R; Guinot, M; López, F; Gozalbo, T; Cañigral, G

    1998-08-01

    Pathologic splenic rupture is a rare and life-threatening complication of acute leukemia. It is even more uncommon as the initial manifestation, and only a few cases has been reported in the literature. Early recognition of this complication is vital because the prognosis is fatal without immediate treatment by splenectomy. We report the case of a spontaneous spleen rupture irreversibly complicating the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a 19-year-old man, in spite of splenectomy. In our case abdominal ultrasound was a good, non-invasive diagnostic test. Therefore, we believe that the course of the underlying disease and the physical condition of the patient dramatically influenced the disease evolution. PMID:9793269

  14. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with MonoMAC syndrome/GATA2 haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Koegel, Ashley K; Hofmann, Inga; Moffitt, Kristin; Degar, Barbara; Duncan, Christine; Tubman, Venée N

    2016-10-01

    Patients with GATA2 haploinsufficiency have a significant predisposition to developing cytopenias, unique infectious manifestations, and myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML). We report a unique case of a patient who presented with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and was subsequently diagnosed with monocytopenia and mycobacterium avium complex (MonoMAC) syndrome/GATA2 haploinsufficiency. The development of MDS/AML in patients with GATA2 haploinsufficiency is well described, however, the development of ALL has not been reported in the literature. ALL may be associated with GATA2 haploinsufficiency. Clinicians should be attuned to the features of the MonoMAC syndrome in patients with ALL that would prompt additional testing and alter treatment. PMID:27232273

  15. Pharmacogenetics predictive of response and toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lin; Ontiveros, Evelena P; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Thompson, James E; Wang, Eunice S; Wetzler, Meir

    2015-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease in adults accounting for no more than 20% of all cases of acute leukemia. By contrast with the pediatric population, in whom significant improvements in long term survival and even cure have been achieved over the last 30years, adult ALL remains a significant challenge. Overall survival in this group remains a relatively poor 20-40%. Modern research has focused on improved pharmacokinetics, novel pharmacogenetics and personalized principles to optimize the efficacy of the treatment while reducing toxicity. Here we review the pharmacogenetics of medications used in the management of patients with ALL, including l-asparaginase, glucocorticoids, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate, vincristine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Incorporating recent pharmacogenetic data, mainly from pediatric ALL, will provide novel perspective of predicting response and toxicity in both pediatric and adult ALL therapies. PMID:25614322

  16. Elevated common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen expression in pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, A S; Campbell, D; Schwartz, E; Poncz, M

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow examination is often performed in thrombocytopenic children to distinguish immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) from acute leukemia. We describe a patient with thrombocytopenia and 50% common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) positivity in his marrow who was subsequently shown to have ITP. CALLA (CD10) is a surface antigen found in early B-lymphocytes and is elevated in most cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This case prompted us to prospectively study the frequency of immature lymphocyte populations in children with ITP. Fourteen patients with acute ITP and five with other conditions were studied. The two groups were comparable with respect to age: ITP mean, 4.3 (range 0.3-15.5) years; control mean, 5.8 (0.6-13.8) years. The ITP group had a significantly higher percentage of CD10 positive bone marrow lymphocytes (p = 0.007). Five of the 10 patients younger than 4 years of age in the ITP group had CD10 levels of greater than 30%, which is in the leukemic range, whereas none of the control patients had a CD10 levels of greater than 17% (p = 0.003). There was good correlation between CD10 positivity and B4 positivity indicating that both of these markers arise from the same population of immature B-lymphocytes. None of the ITP patients who were older than 4 years had a CD10 level of greater than 30%. We conclude that it is common to have an increase in the proportion of immature lymphocytes in the marrow of young children with ITP. The cause of this increase in CD10 positive cells is unknown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1827572

  17. Novel in vivo model of inducible multidrug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia with chromosomal translocation t(4;11)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is classified as high-risk due to the generally poor prognosis for survival. Using the SEM cell line established from a patient with t(4;11) ALL, we evaluated the resistance of these cells to the...

  18. Rise and fall of subclones from diagnosis to relapse in pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    There is incomplete understanding of genetic heterogeneity and clonal evolution during cancer progression. Here we use deep whole-exome sequencing to describe the clonal architecture and evolution of 20 pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemias from diagnosis to relapse. We show that clonal diversity is comparable at diagnosis and relapse and clonal survival from diagnosis to relapse is not associated with mutation burden.

  19. mTOR inhibition by everolimus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces caspase-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Bendall, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  20. mTOR Inhibition by Everolimus in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O.; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  1. Corrigendum: The Associations Between Maternal Factors During Pregnancy and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kangkang; Xu, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Xikui; Hua, Shucheng; Wang, Chunpeng; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Because of the erroneous application of multiple publications, the conclusions of our recent paper (Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1162-70) were not reliable. The corrected results show that coffee drinking during pregnancy was risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (OR = 1.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-1.92). PMID:26999072

  2. Recognition of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells in Microscopic Images Using K-Means Clustering and Support Vector Machine Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Morteza Moradi; Kermani, Saeed; Talebi, Ardeshir; Oghli, Mostafa Ghelich

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of pediatric cancer which is categorized into three L1, L2, and L3 and could be detected through screening of blood and bone marrow smears by pathologists. Due to being time-consuming and tediousness of the procedure, a computer-based system is acquired for convenient detection of Acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Microscopic images are acquired from blood and bone marrow smears of patients with Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, cells nuclei are segmented by k-means algorithm. Then geometric and statistical features are extracted from nuclei and finally these cells are classified to cancerous and noncancerous cells by means of support vector machine classifier with 10-fold cross validation. These cells are also classified into their sub-types by multi-Support vector machine classifier. Classifier is evaluated by these parameters: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy which values for cancerous and noncancerous cells 98%, 95%, and 97%, respectively. These parameters are also used for evaluation of cell sub-types which values in mean 84.3%, 97.3%, and 95.6%, respectively. The results show that proposed algorithm could achieve an acceptable performance for the diagnosis of Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and its sub-types and can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists. PMID:25709941

  3. Is JAK2V617F Mutation the Only Factor for Thrombosis in Philadelphia-Negative Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Uyanik, Mehmet Sevki; Baysal, Mehmet; Pamuk, Gulsum Emel; Maden, Muhammet; Akker, Mustafa; Umit, Elif Gulsum; Demir, Muzaffer; Aydogdu, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    The most common genetic disorder in Philadelphia negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms is the JAK2-V617F mutation. In the present study, we aimed to determine risk factors for thrombosis in patients with essential thrombocytosis and polycythemia vera. We screened the medical records of 101 patients. Risk factors which may predict thrombosis were recorded. Venous thrombosis (VT) before diagnosis was significantly higher in JAK2 positive patients. VT after diagnosis was similar in JAK2 positive and negative groups, and was significantly higher in elderly patients. Treatment places importance on the JAK2 mutation under unmodifiable cardiovascular risk factors such as advanced age after diagnosis. PMID:27429517

  4. Inhibiting Polo-like kinase 1 causes growth reduction and apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartsink-Segers, Stefanie A.; Exalto, Carla; Allen, Matthew; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C.; Horstmann, Martin; Caron, Huib N.; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated Polo-like kinase 1, a mitotic regulator often over-expressed in solid tumors and adult hematopoietic malignancies, as a potential new target in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Polo-like kinase 1 protein and Thr210 phosphorylation levels were higher in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=172) than in normal bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=10) (P<0.0001). High Polo-like kinase 1 protein phosphorylation, but not expression, was associated with a lower probability of event-free survival (P=0.042) and was a borderline significant prognostic factor (P=0.065) in a multivariate analysis including age and initial white blood cell count. Polo-like kinase 1 was necessary for leukemic cell survival, since short hairpin-mediated Polo-like kinase 1 knockdown in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines inhibited cell proliferation by G2/M cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Primary patient cells with a high Polo-like kinase 1 protein expression were sensitive to the Polo-like kinase 1-specific inhibitor NMS-P937 in vitro, whereas cells with a low expression and normal bone marrow cells were resistant. This sensitivity was likely not caused by Polo-like kinase 1 mutations, since only one new mutation (Ser335Arg) was found by 454-sequencing of 38 pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. This mutation did not affect Polo-like kinase 1 expression or NMS-P937 sensitivity. Together, these results indicate a pivotal role for Polo-like kinase 1 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and show potential for Polo-like kinase 1-inhibiting drugs as an addition to current treatment strategies for cases expressing high Polo-like kinase 1 levels. PMID:23753023

  5. Acute renal failure and type B lactic acidosis as first manifestation of extranodal T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seongseok; Walker, Courtney N; Vincelette, Nicole D; Anwer, Faiz

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 19-year-old male patient with a history of epilepsy and developmental delay who presented with acute renal failure (ARF) and lactic acidosis (LA) as the first manifestation of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Renal ultrasound and CT of the abdomen showed renal parenchymal infiltration, and renal biopsy demonstrated T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. LA, ARF and electrolyte abnormalities were refractory to the initial treatment of bicarbonate infusion and hydration. However, these abnormalities rapidly normalised after the initiation of chemotherapy, suggesting that the LA and ARF were secondary to lymphomatous renal infiltration. PMID:24913086

  6. [Development of aseptic osteonecrosis during the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: review of the literature and author's own data].

    PubMed

    Baranova, O Iu; Shirin, A D; Falaleeva, N A; Osmanov, D Sh

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of aceptic osteonecrosis (AON) of the left hymerus epiphysis in programmed treatment of a male patient with lymphoblastic lymphoma to illustrate clinical, laboratory, epidemiological, pathogenetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of AON in programmed therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We believe that AON is a rather frequent but often missed for early diagnosis complication of ALL treatment. Even a weak pain in bones and joints under mechanical load in patients on long-term treatment with glucocorticosteroids is an alarming symptom which may indicate a risk of an osteodestructive process and relevant diagnostic and therapeutic measures may be needed. PMID:21894748

  7. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. The BCL2 rheostat in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ploner, C; Rainer, J; Niederegger, H; Eduardoff, M; Villunger, A; Geley, S; Kofler, R

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC)-induced apoptosis is essential in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and related malignancies. Pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the BCL2 family control many forms of apoptotic cell death, but the extent to which this survival ‘rheostat’ is involved in the beneficial effects of GC therapy is not understood. We performed systematic analyses of expression, GC regulation and function of BCL2 molecules in primary ALL lymphoblasts and a corresponding in vitro model. Affymetrix-based expression profiling revealed that the response included regulations of pro-apoptotic and, surprisingly, anti-apoptotic BCL2 family members, and varied among patients, but was dominated by induction of the BH3-only molecules BMF and BCL2L11/Bim and repression of PMAIP1/Noxa. Conditional lentiviral gene overexpression and knock-down by RNA interference in the CCRF-CEM model revealed that induction of Bim, and to a lesser extent that of BMF, was required and sufficient for apoptosis. Although anti-apoptotic BCL2 members were not regulated consistently by GC in the various systems, their overexpression delayed, whereas their knock-down accelerated, GC-induced cell death. Thus, the combined clinical and experimental data suggest that GCs induce both pro- and anti-apoptotic BCL2 family member-dependent pathways, with the outcome depending on cellular context and additional signals feeding into the BCL2 rheostat. PMID:18046449

  9. Sulforaphane Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suppipat, Koramit; Park, Chun Shik; Shen, Ye; Zhu, Xiao; Lacorazza, H. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9), inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling. PMID:23251470

  10. Pax5 loss imposes a reversible differentiation block in B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Grace J.; Cimmino, Luisa; Jude, Julian G.; Hu, Yifang; Witkowski, Matthew T.; McKenzie, Mark D.; Kartal-Kaess, Mutlu; Best, Sarah A.; Tuohey, Laura; Liao, Yang; Shi, Wei; Mullighan, Charles G.; Farrar, Michael A.; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Gordon K.; Zuber, Johannes; Dickins, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors including PAX5 occur in most cases of B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), a disease characterized by the accumulation of undifferentiated lymphoblasts. Although PAX5 mutation is a critical driver of B-ALL development in mice and humans, it remains unclear how its loss contributes to leukemogenesis and whether ongoing PAX5 deficiency is required for B-ALL maintenance. Here we used transgenic RNAi to reversibly suppress endogenous Pax5 expression in the hematopoietic compartment of mice, which cooperates with activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) to induce B-ALL. In this model, restoring endogenous Pax5 expression in established B-ALL triggers immunophenotypic maturation and durable disease remission by engaging a transcriptional program reminiscent of normal B-cell differentiation. Notably, even brief Pax5 restoration in B-ALL cells causes rapid cell cycle exit and disables their leukemia-initiating capacity. These and similar findings in human B-ALL cell lines establish that Pax5 hypomorphism promotes B-ALL self-renewal by impairing a differentiation program that can be re-engaged despite the presence of additional oncogenic lesions. Our results establish a causal relationship between the hallmark genetic and phenotypic features of B-ALL and suggest that engaging the latent differentiation potential of B-ALL cells may provide new therapeutic entry points. PMID:24939936

  11. Cannabis extract treatment for terminal acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a Philadelphia chromosome mutation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yadvinder; Bali, Chamandeep

    2013-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells and is typically well treated with combination chemotherapy, with a remission state after 5 years of 94% in children and 30-40% in adults. To establish how aggressive the disease is, further chromosome testing is required to determine whether the cancer is myeloblastic and involves neutrophils, eosinophils or basophils, or lymphoblastic involving B or T lymphocytes. This case study is on a 14-year-old patient diagnosed with a very aggressive form of ALL (positive for the Philadelphia chromosome mutation). A standard bone marrow transplant, aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy were revoked, with treatment being deemed a failure after 34 months. Without any other solutions provided by conventional approaches aside from palliation, the family administered cannabinoid extracts orally to the patient. Cannabinoid resin extract is used as an effective treatment for ALL with a positive Philadelphia chromosome mutation and indications of dose-dependent disease control. The clinical observation in this study revealed a rapid dose-dependent correlation. PMID:24474921

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced alterations in mitochondrial membrane properties and respiration in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Karin; Rainer, Johannes; Bindreither, Daniel; Ritter, Ireen; Gnaiger, Erich; Kofler, Reinhard; Oefner, Peter J; Renner, Kathrin

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria are signal-integrating organelles involved in cell death induction. Mitochondrial alterations and reduction in energy metabolism have been previously reported in the context of glucocorticoid (GC)-triggered apoptosis, although the mechanism is not yet clarified. We analyzed mitochondrial function in a GC-sensitive precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) model as well as in GC-sensitive and GC-resistant T-ALL model systems. Respiratory activity was preserved in intact GC-sensitive cells up to 24h under treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone before depression of mitochondrial respiration occurred. Severe repression of mitochondrial respiratory function was observed after permeabilization of the cell membrane and provision of exogenous substrates. Several mitochondrial metabolite and protein transporters and two subunits of the ATP synthase were downregulated in the T-ALL and in the precursor B-ALL model at the gene expression level under dexamethasone treatment. These data could partly be confirmed in ALL lymphoblasts from patients, dependent on the molecular abnormality in the ALL cells. GC-resistant cell lines did not show any of these defects after dexamethasone treatment. In conclusion, in GC-sensitive ALL cells, dexamethasone induces changes in membrane properties that together with the reduced expression of mitochondrial transporters of substrates and proteins may lead to repressed mitochondrial respiratory activity and lower ATP levels that contribute to GC-induced apoptosis. PMID:21237131

  13. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre–B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Rachel M. A.; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A.; Jacobsen, Kristen M.; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N.; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K.; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K.; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H. Shelton

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre–B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy could reduce minimal residual disease and/or allow for chemotherapy dose reduction, thereby leading to improved event-free survival and reduced therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. Additionally, Mer is aberrantly expressed in numerous other malignancies suggesting that this approach may have broad applications. PMID:23861246

  14. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Linger, Rachel M A; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A; Jacobsen, Kristen M; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K

    2013-08-29

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre-B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy could reduce minimal residual disease and/or allow for chemotherapy dose reduction, thereby leading to improved event-free survival and reduced therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. Additionally, Mer is aberrantly expressed in numerous other malignancies suggesting that this approach may have broad applications. PMID:23861246

  15. Antigen-based immunotherapy for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the emerging role of blinatumomab

    PubMed Central

    Litzow, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arises from immature B and T lymphoblasts. An increasing array of cytogenetic and molecular markers have been identified in ALL, which allows for increasingly sophisticated prognostication, as well as identification of potential new targets for therapy. The treatment of ALL in children has shown astounding success in the last 50 years, with more than 90% of children now able to be cured of their ALL. In adults, these success rates have not been duplicated. However, the use of pediatric-intensive regimens in young adults has shown increasing success. The use of monoclonal antibodies conjugated to drugs, immunotoxins, and cells also has shown early success and promises to enhance the outcome of newly diagnosed patients. Blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager antibody, brings a malignant B cell in proximity to a T cell with redirected lysis. This antibody construct has shown promising results in patients with relapsed and refractory disease and is entering randomized clinical trials in newly diagnosed patients. The addition of monoclonal antibody therapy to chemotherapy in adults promises to enhance outcomes while hopefully not increasing toxicity. After many years of stagnation, it appears that the therapy of adults with ALL is showing significant improvement.

  16. Cutaneous B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with IL3/IgH translocation presenting with hypereosinophilia and acute endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bomken, Simon; Haigh, Shaun; Bown, Nick; Carey, Peter; Wood, Katrina; Windebank, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Hypereosinophilia is a rare phenomenon associated with childhood malignancy, predominantly acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Causation is unclear and likely to have multiple mechanisms. We report a six year old boy presenting with hypereosinophilia and associated Loeffler endocarditis. Three months following his initial hypereosinophilia he developed cutaneous B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Re-analysis of apparently uninvolved bone marrow, taken at initial presentation, revealed a single, previously unidentified, t(5;14)(q31;q32) positive cell. Using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, we demonstrate IL3/IgH@ fusion in cutaneous lymphoma cells. Our case confirms the association of hypereosinophilia and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma and strengthens the association between IL3 hypersecretion and hypereosinophilia. PMID:25382309

  17. MTHFR polymorphisms' influence on outcome and toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Chiusolo, Patrizia; Reddiconto, Giovanni; Farina, Giuliana; Mannocci, Alice; Fiorini, Alessia; Palladino, Mariangela; La Torre, Giuseppe; Fianchi, Luana; Sorà, Federica; Laurenti, Luca; Leone, Giuseppe; Sica, Simona

    2007-12-01

    Recently the influence of polymorphisms of different genes involved in metabolism of chemoterapic agents have been studied especially in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We evaluated the influence of C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms on time to relapse and survival and on methotrexate (MTX) toxicity in 82 ALL adult patients. Relapse free survival and event free survival between homozygous wild-type and variant patients in both polymorphisms were not significantly different. However, we observed an association between 677TT variant and survival in a subset of ALL patients homogenously treated with MTX-based maintenance (p=0.02). In the same subgroup we confirmed the role of 677TT variant on toxicity during MTX treatment (p=0.003). PMID:17512587

  18. [Pregnancy outcome in five women after autologous bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Hołowiecka, Aleksandra; Zielińska, Monika; Rozmus, Wioletta; Krzemień, Sławomira; Hołowiecki, Jerzy

    2005-10-01

    There are reports of successful pregnancies in women with haematological malignancies after either autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We report six cases of uncomplicated pregnancies in five women treated with high-dose chemotherapy, radiotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. One patient was diagnosed as having leukaemia during pregnancy. The pregnancy ended with medical termination. Each woman received conditioning regimens without total body irradiation (TBI). Of five women, who received AMBT, all resumed spontaneous cyclical menstruation post transplantation. All of them conceived naturally between 15-52 months following ABMT. We noted one miscarriage in our 29-year-old patient. Six pregnancies went to term and each resulted in the successful delivery of a full-term baby. We did not notice any case of relapse of leukaemia in pregnancy. PMID:16417095

  19. Developmental timing of mutations revealed by whole-genome sequencing of twins with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yussanne; Dobbins, Sara E; Sherborne, Amy L; Chubb, Daniel; Galbiati, Marta; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Micalizzi, Concetta; Tearle, Rick; Lloyd, Amy L; Hain, Richard; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2013-04-30

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer. At diagnosis, the developmental timing of mutations contributing critically to clonal diversification and selection can be buried in the leukemia's covert natural history. Concordance of ALL in monozygotic, monochorionic twins is a consequence of intraplacental spread of an initiated preleukemic clone. Studying monozygotic twins with ALL provides a unique means of uncovering the timeline of mutations contributing to clonal evolution, pre- and postnatally. We sequenced the whole genomes of leukemic cells from two twin pairs with ALL to comprehensively characterize acquired somatic mutations in ALL, elucidating the developmental timing of all genetic lesions. Shared, prenatal, coding-region single-nucleotide variants were limited to the putative initiating lesions. All other nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants were distinct between tumors and, therefore, secondary and postnatal. These changes occurred in a background of noncoding mutational changes that were almost entirely discordant in twin pairs and likely passenger mutations acquired during leukemic cell proliferation. PMID:23569245

  20. Bone Marrow Cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Create a Proinflammatory Microenvironment Influencing Normal Hematopoietic Differentiation Fates

    PubMed Central

    Vilchis-Ordoñez, Armando; Contreras-Quiroz, Adriana; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Reyes-López, Alfonso; Quintela-Nuñez del Prado, Henry Martin; Venegas-Vázquez, Jorge; Mayani, Hector; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; López-Martínez, Briceida; Pelayo, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a serious public health problem in the pediatric population worldwide, contributing to 85% of deaths from childhood cancers. Understanding the biology of the disease is crucial for its clinical management and the development of therapeutic strategies. In line with that observed in other malignancies, chronic inflammation may contribute to a tumor microenvironment resulting in the damage of normal processes, concomitant to development and maintenance of neoplastic cells. We report here that hematopoietic cells from bone marrow B-ALL have the ability to produce proinflammatory and growth factors, including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, and GM-CSF that stimulate proliferation and differentiation of normal stem and progenitor cells. Our findings suggest an apparently distinct CD13+CD33+ population of leukemic cells contributing to a proinflammatory microenvironment that may be detrimental to long-term normal hematopoiesis within B-ALL bone marrow. PMID:26090405

  1. Genetic loss of SH2B3 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Hadler, Michael; Rigo, Isaura; LeDuc, Charles A.; Kelly, Kara; Jalas, Chaim; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M.; Tallman, Martin S.; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Tong, Wei; Chung, Wendy K.

    2013-01-01

    The SH2B adaptor protein 3 (SH2B3) gene encodes a negative regulator of cytokine signaling with a critical role in the homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells and lymphoid progenitors. Here, we report the identification of germline homozygous SH2B3 mutations in 2 siblings affected with developmental delay and autoimmunity, one in whom B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) developed. Mechanistically, loss of SH2B3 increases Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling, promotes lymphoid cell proliferation, and accelerates leukemia development in a mouse model of NOTCH1-induced ALL. Moreover, extended mutation analysis showed homozygous somatic mutations in SH2B3 in 2 of 167 ALLs analyzed. Overall, these results demonstrate a Knudson tumor suppressor role for SH2B3 in the pathogenesis of ALL and highlight a possible link between genetic predisposition factors in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and leukemogenesis. PMID:23908464

  2. RBP2 Promotes Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia by Upregulating BCL2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Minran; Fu, Yue; Sun, Ting; Chen, Jin; Qin, Xuemei; Yu, Yuan; Jia, Jihui; Chen, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent increases in the cure rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), adult ALL remains a high-risk disease that exhibits a high relapse rate. In this study, we found that the histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein-2 (RBP2) was overexpressed in both on-going and relapse cases of adult ALL, which revealed that RBP2 overexpression was not only involved in the pathogenesis of ALL but that its overexpression might also be related to relapse of the disease. RBP2 knockdown induced apoptosis and attenuated leukemic cell viability. Our results demonstrated that BCL2 is a novel target of RBP2 and supported the notion of RBP2 being a regulator of BCL2 expression via directly binding to its promoter. As the role of RBP2 in regulating apoptosis was confirmed, RBP2 overexpression and activation of BCL2 might play important roles in ALL development and progression. PMID:27008505

  3. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  4. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic test systems that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limited amounts of primary tumor material. A popular assay is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice. The protocol includes injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice with subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated are then used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. Detailed in this unit are procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for use in basic research and translational studies. PMID:25737157

  5. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment. PMID:25897332

  6. The Approach to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Older Patients: Conventional Treatments and Emerging Therapies.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Victor D; Upadhyay, Vivek A; Fathi, Amir T

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among older adult patients presents significant clinical challenges. As opposed to pediatric populations, in whom long-term outcomes are markedly superior, those for adults remain grim. Nevertheless, younger adults with ALL have experienced a steady improvement in long-term survival in the last few decades. This is significantly different for older ALL patients, for whom long-term outcomes remain poor. Conventional chemotherapies are associated with sub-optimal outcomes and increased toxicity in this population. However, several emerging therapies, including antibody-drug conjugates, bi-specific engagers, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, have demonstrated much promise and are either incorporated into the existing therapeutic paradigms or being actively investigated to improve outcomes. PMID:26939921

  7. X-linked agammaglobulinemia associated with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Akihiro; Okuno, Yusuke; Migita, Masahiro; Ban, Hideki; Yang, Xi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Adachi, Yuichi; Kojima, Seiji; Ohara, Osamu; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is clinically characterized by reduced number of peripheral B cells and diminished levels of serum immunoglobulins, and caused by a mutation in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene, which play a pivotal role in signal transduction of pre-B-cell receptor (BCR) and BCR. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) is the most common malignancy in children, and it may be associated with gene alterations that regulate B-cell development. Here we described a first case of XLA associated BCP-ALL. The whole-exome sequencing revealed a somatic mutation in MLL2 in the sample from the onset of BCP-ALL. This study suggests that the alterations of BTK and MLL2 synergistically function as leukemogenesis. PMID:25591849

  8. Deletion analysis of p16(INKa) and p15(INKb) in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Graf Einsiedel, Hagen; Taube, Tillmann; Hartmann, Reinhard; Wellmann, Sven; Seifert, Georg; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl

    2002-06-15

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of INK4 deletions and their impact on outcome in 125 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at first relapse using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients were enrolled into relapse trials ALL-REZ BFM (ALL-Relapse Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster) 90 and 96. The prevalence of p16(INK4a) and p15(INK4b) homozygous deletions was 35% (44 of 125) and 30% (38 of 125), respectively. A highly significant association of both gene deletions was found with the 2 major adverse prognostic factors known for relapsed childhood ALL: T-cell immunophenotype and first remission duration. There was no correlation between INK4 deletions and probability of event-free survival. These findings argue against an independent prognostic role of INK4 deletions in relapsed childhood ALL. PMID:12036898

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in pregnancy: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Shilpa; Friend, Sarah; Busowski, John; Langenstroer, Mary; Baidas, Said

    2013-01-01

    The management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during pregnancy requires treatment with high-dose chemotherapy that can pose risks to both the mother and fetus. Special consideration to chemotherapy regimen and its doses and to fetal gestational age at the time of chemotherapy administration should be taken in order to limit fetal exposure while still providing optimal therapy to the mother. Here we describe a 22-year-old patient who was diagnosed at 26 weeks gestation with ALL and was treated in the third trimester with HyperCVAD (cytoxan, vincristine, adriamycin, dexamethasone) combination chemotherapy giving birth via Caesarean section to a healthy baby girl 4 weeks after induction chemotherapy. PMID:24082992

  10. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment. PMID:25897332

  11. Executive Function Late Effects in Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Amanda L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Tyc, Vida L.; Stancel, Heather; Hinds, Pamela S.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kahalley, Lisa S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Survivors of pediatric brain tumors (BT) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk for neurocognitive late effects related to executive function. PROCEDURE Survivors of BT (48) and ALL (50) completed neurocognitive assessment. Executive function was compared to estimated IQ and population norms by diagnostic group. RESULTS Both BT and ALL demonstrated relative executive function weaknesses. As a group, BT survivors demonstrated weaker executive functioning than expected for age. Those BT survivors with deficits exhibited a profile suggestive of global executive dysfunction, while affected ALL survivors tended to demonstrate specific rapid naming deficits. CONCLUSION Findings suggest that pediatric BT and ALL survivors may exhibit different profiles of executive function late effects, which may necessitate distinct intervention plans. PMID:25126830

  12. Immunology of infusion reactions in the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Infusion reactions are potentially dose-limiting adverse events associated with intravenous administration of several common agents used to treat patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. True clinical hypersensitivity reactions are antibody-mediated and can occur only after repeated exposure to an antigen. Conversely, anaphylactoid infusion reactions are nonantibody-mediated and often occur on the initial exposure to a drug. Cytokine-release syndrome comprises a subset of nonantibody-mediated infusion reactions associated with the use of monoclonal antibodies and immune therapies. Clinical symptoms of hypersensitivity reactions and nonantibody-mediated infusion reactions heavily overlap and can be difficult to distinguish in practice. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, any infusion reaction can negatively affect treatment efficacy and patient safety. These events require prompt response, and potentially, modification of subsequent therapy. PMID:27086555

  13. A rare type of secondary cancer in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Incesoy Özdemir, Sonay; Balkaya, Eda; Ören, Ayşe C; Bozkurt, Ceyhun; Sahin, Gürses; Ünlü, Ramazan E; Ertem, Ayşe U

    2014-03-01

    Secondary cancers which are related with treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a significant problem with longer term. For development of secondary cancer after treatment, the latency period varies between 5 and 10 years. In this case, a 13 year-old-boy diagnosed as high-risk ALL was treated with chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial radiotherapy at a dose of 1800 cGy. Six years after the end of treatment he developed a 5 × 5 × 4 cm mass at the right temporal region of the cranium. The mass was excised totally with clear surgical margin. Pathology of mass has been diagnosed as malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), recently referred to as an undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS). After treatment of childhood ALL, reported cases of secondary MFH is extremely rare in the literature. Herein we present a case of MFH/UPS that developed as a secondary cancer 6 years after the end of ALL treatment. PMID:24096378

  14. Leukemia Cutis: An Unusual Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia; Wang, Weixia; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis (LC) is a nonspecific word used for cutaneous infiltration of leukemia, which is a rare presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and always a harbinger of poor prognosis. We report a case of LC in a 5-year-old boy with a past medical history of ALL (L1) presented with multiple asymptomatic oval or annular red patches and plaques on his thighs, buttocks and back waist, and part of them were scaling lesions. A biopsy was performed and histopathological examination showed that medium-sized atypical cells with round to oval contours, scant cytoplasm, and finely dispersed chromatin infiltrated into the dermis and subcutis, and the perivascular and periadnexal areas were involved. Immunophenotyping showed that the atypical cells were positive for CD45, CD3ε, CD99, and Ki67 (about 70%). Considering the patient's medical history and the histopathology, the patient was diagnosed with LC. PMID:26677299

  15. Refractory chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Rikiishi, Takeshi; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yuko; Onuma, Masaei; Hoshi, Yoshiyuki; Sasahara, Yoji; Yoshinari, Miyako; Kazama, Takuro; Hayashi, Yutaka; Kumaki, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2009-11-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has been associated with several hematologic malignancies such as Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but it is rare in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here, we report a 7-year-old girl with chronic ITP during early intensive phase of chemotherapy for ALL. She underwent splenectomy because thrombocytopenia had persisted even after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), steroids, vincristine, rituximab, and anti-D antibody. After splenectomy, her platelet count had recovered, and maintenance therapy could be resumed with a support of IVIG. To our knowledge, this is the first child case of chronic ITP during chemotherapy for ALL and splenectomy was effective in this patient. PMID:19816666

  16. Initial presentation of CNS-restricted acute lymphoblastic B cell leukaemia as peripheral polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Piovezani Ramos, Guilherme; Villasboas Bisneto, Jose C; Chen, Dong; Pardanani, Animesh

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with a 1-month course of progressive lower and upper extremity weakness in addition to binocular diplopia. Diagnostic lumbar puncture revealed atypical lymphoid cells with 28% blasts. Immunophenotype was consistent with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL). Further work up showed no systemic involvement but extensive thoracolumbar-sacral leptomeningeal disease. The patient was treated with several courses of intrathecal and systemic chemotherapy followed by craniospinal irradiation for consolidation. There was initial steady improvement in neurological symptoms and leptomeningeal disease, the latter being ascertained through radiological studies and cerebrospinal fluid examination. After 10 months of response, the patient relapsed with central nervous system (CNS) and systemic disease. B-ALL is a rare precursor lymphoid neoplasm that generally presents with systemic disease. While CNS involvement is not uncommon, isolated involvement of this compartment without systemic disease is exceedingly rare. PMID:27095809

  17. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic models that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limiting amounts of primary tumor material. A frequently used model is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice and involves injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice, and subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated can then be used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. This unit describes detailed procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for potential use in basic research or translational studies. PMID:25737157

  18. Direct reversal of glucocorticoid resistance by AKT inhibition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Piovan, Erich; Yu, Jiyang; Tosello, Valeria; Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Da Silva, Ana Carolina; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Rigo, Isaura; Castillo, Mireia; Indraccolo, Stefano; Cross, Justin R; de Stanchina, Elisa; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Basso, Giuseppe; Meijerink, Jules P; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoid resistance is a major driver of therapeutic failure in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we identify the AKT1 kinase as a major negative regulator of the NR3C1 glucocorticoid receptor protein activity driving glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL. Mechanistically, AKT1 impairs glucocorticoid-induced gene expression by direct phosphorylation of NR3C1 at position S134 and blocking glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus. Moreover, we demonstrate that loss of PTEN and consequent AKT1 activation can effectively block glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis and induce resistance to glucocorticoid therapy. Conversely, pharmacologic inhibition of AKT with MK2206 effectively restores glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus, increases the response of T-ALL cells to glucocorticoid therapy, and effectively reverses glucocorticoid resistance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24291004

  19. Metabolic reprogramming induces resistance to anti-NOTCH1 therapies in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sudderth, Jessica; Sánchez-Martín, Marta; Belver, Laura; Tosello, Valeria; Xu, Luyao; Wendorff, Agnieszka A.; Castillo, Mireia; Haydu, J. Erika; Márquez, Javier; Matés, José M.; Kung, Andrew L.; Rayport, Stephen; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in NOTCH1 are common in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (TALL). Here we identify glutaminolysis as a critical pathway for leukemia cell growth downstream of NOTCH1 and a key determinant of clinical response to anti-NOTCH1 therapies. Mechanistically, inhibition of NOTCH1 signaling in T-ALL induces a metabolic shutdown with prominent inhibition of glutaminolysis and triggers autophagy as a salvage pathway supporting leukemia cell metabolism. Consequently, both inhibition of glutaminolysis and inhibition of autophagy strongly and synergistically enhance the antileukemic effects of anti-NOTCH1 therapies. Moreover, we demonstrate that Pten loss induces increased glycolysis and consequently rescues leukemic cell metabolism abrogating the antileukemic effects of NOTCH1 inhibition. Overall, these results identify glutaminolysis as a major node in cancer metabolism controlled by NOTCH1 and as therapeutic target for the treatment of T-ALL. PMID:26390244

  20. Direct reversal of glucocorticoid resistance by AKT inhibition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tosello, Valeria; Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Da Silva, Ana Carolina; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Rigo, Isaura; Castillo, Mireia; Indraccolo, Stefano; Cross, Justin R; de Stanchina, Elisa; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Basso, Giuseppe; Meijerink, Jules P; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Glucocorticoid resistance is a major driver of therapeutic failure in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here we identify the AKT1 kinase as a major negative regulator of the NR3C1 glucocorticoid receptor protein activity driving glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL. Mechanistically, AKT1 impairs glucocorticoid-induced gene expression by direct phosphorylation of NR3C1 at position S134 and blocking glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus. Moreover, we demonstrate that loss of PTEN and consequent AKT1 activation can effectively block glucocorticoid induced apoptosis and induce resistance to glucocorticoid therapy. Conversely, pharmacologic inhibition of AKT with MK2206 effectively restores glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus, increases the response of T-ALL cells to glucocorticoid therapy and effectively reverses glucocorticoid resistance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24291004

  1. Impact of clinical and subclinical hypersensitivity to asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Barbara L; Fisher, Vicki

    2014-12-01

    Asparaginase is an essential element of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. It depletes serum asparagine (an amino acid necessary for synthesis of cellular proteins), deprives leukemic blast cells of asparagine, and eventually results in cell death. To gain benefit from asparaginase, asparagine depletion must be ensured by giving intensive therapy and completing the full course of treatment. Three formulations of asparaginase exist; two are derived from Escherichia coli, a native form and pegylated form, and one is derived from Erwinia chrysanthemi (Erwinia asparaginase). Like many large proteins, asparaginases are immunogenic, and some patients develop antibodies to asparaginase. Antibodies may result in clinical hypersensitivity or subclinical hypersensitivity without symptoms, and both can result in a reduction in asparaginase activity and may affect therapeutic benefit. Clinical hypersensitivity is the most common reason for patients to stop asparaginase treatment. Subclinical hypersensitivity can only be identified by laboratory testing; therapeutic monitoring of asparaginase activity is used as a surrogate measure for asparagine depletion. PMID:25427712

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia as second primary tumor in a patient with retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Anasua; Kaliki, Swathi; Mohammad, Faraz Ali; Mishra, Dilip K.; Vanajakshi, S.; Reddy, Vijay Anand

    2016-01-01

    Second primary tumor (SPT) is defined as a second tumor that presents either simultaneously or after the diagnosis of an index tumor. Second primary malignancies are the leading cause of death in patients with heritable retinoblastoma (RB). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), as SPT in RB patients, is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only five cases of ALL as SPT in patients with RB has been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of a 6-year-old girl with bilateral RB, who developed ALL during the course of treatment of RB. This case highlights the importance of reviewing blood investigations regularly to diagnose leukemia as SPT in RB and also the necessity for proper counseling and lifelong follow-up in these patients. PMID:27433042

  3. Genetic heterogeneity of RPMI-8402, a T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    STOCZYNSKA-FIDELUS, EWELINA; PIASKOWSKI, SYLWESTER; PAWLOWSKA, ROZA; SZYBKA, MALGORZATA; PECIAK, JOANNA; HULAS-BIGOSZEWSKA, KRYSTYNA; WINIECKA-KLIMEK, MARTA; RIESKE, PIOTR

    2016-01-01

    Thorough examination of genetic heterogeneity of cell lines is uncommon. In order to address this issue, the present study analyzed the genetic heterogeneity of RPMI-8402, a T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell line. For this purpose, traditional techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry were used, in addition to more advanced techniques, including cell sorting, Sanger sequencing and massive parallel sequencing. The results indicated that the RPMI-8402 cell line consists of several genetically different cell subpopulations. Furthermore, massive parallel sequencing of RPMI-8402 provided insight into the evolution of T-ALL carcinogenesis, since this cell line exhibited the genetic heterogeneity typical of T-ALL. Therefore, the use of cell lines for drug testing in future studies may aid the progress of anticancer drug research. PMID:26870252

  4. Non-tumour bone marrow lymphocytes correlate with improved overall survival in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Claire; Dean, Joanne; Bonnett, Laura; Phillips, Kate; Keenan, Russell

    2016-10-01

    Composition of tumour immune cell infiltrates correlates with response to treatment and overall survival (OS) in several cancer settings. We retrospectively examined immune cells present in diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from paediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Our analysis identified a sub-group (∼30% of patients) with >2.37% CD20 and >6.05% CD7 expression, which had 100% OS, and a sub-group (∼30% of patients) with ≤2.37% CD20 and ≤6.05% CD7 expression at increased risk of treatment failure (66.7% OS, P < 0.05). Immune cell infiltrate at diagnosis may predict treatment response and could provide a means to enhance immediate treatment risk stratification. PMID:27348401

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia as second primary tumor in a patient with retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anasua; Kaliki, Swathi; Mohammad, Faraz Ali; Mishra, Dilip K; Vanajakshi, S; Reddy, Vijay Anand

    2016-01-01

    Second primary tumor (SPT) is defined as a second tumor that presents either simultaneously or after the diagnosis of an index tumor. Second primary malignancies are the leading cause of death in patients with heritable retinoblastoma (RB). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), as SPT in RB patients, is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only five cases of ALL as SPT in patients with RB has been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of a 6-year-old girl with bilateral RB, who developed ALL during the course of treatment of RB. This case highlights the importance of reviewing blood investigations regularly to diagnose leukemia as SPT in RB and also the necessity for proper counseling and lifelong follow-up in these patients. PMID:27433042

  6. [Automated kinetic assay of plasmatic L-asparaginase activity undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orsonneau, J-L; Brassart, E A; Lecame, M; Thomare, P; Delaroche, O; Dudouet, D

    2004-01-01

    The L-asparaginase is a critical drug for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, that achieves blood L-asparagin depletion. However, such a therapy is associated with a high rate of negative side effects, particularly antibody synthesis against L-asparaginase. This therefore decreases therapy efficiency requiring the monitoring of L-asparaginase activity since L-asparagin determination is not easy. We compared here the results obtained with an automated kinetic enzymatic method to those obtained with the most commonly used Nessler reagent method. The correlation coefficient, r = 0,992, obtained was very good, and the allometric regression line was y = 1,038x - 0,37 microkat/L. We also showed that the specificity and the precision were better with the enzymatic method than the Nessler one. Moreover, the enzymatic method was easier and required less time to perform. Finally, the method appears able to perform real time monitoring of the therapy. PMID:15355807

  7. Geographical distribution of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia subtypes: second report of the collaborative group study.

    PubMed

    Greaves, M F; Colman, S M; Beard, M E; Bradstock, K; Cabrera, M E; Chen, P M; Jacobs, P; Lam-Po-Tang, P R; MacDougall, L G; Williams, C K

    1993-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) T and B precursor subtypes have been identified by standardised immunophenotyping in different geographic and ethnic settings. Comparison of the relative frequencies and estimated incidence rates of the major subtypes indicates very similar values, with the striking exception of black childhood populations in Africa in which there appears to be a significant and selective deficit in the incidence of the common (B-cell precursor) subset of ALL. There is suggestive evidence for a similar bias in ALL subtypes in South Africans of mixed ethnic origin and in Mapuche Indians from Chile. Several interpretations of these data are possible but the one favoured attributes these differences primarily to socio-economic factors and patterns of infection in infancy. PMID:8418376

  8. Successful treatment of disseminated mucormycosis in a neutropenic patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Guymer, Chelsea; Khurana, Sanjeev; Suppiah, Ram; Hennessey, Iain; Cooper, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare angioinvasive fungal infection, more commonly seen in immunosuppressed patients, with reported mortality rates of 95% in disseminated disease. We present a case report of a patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed disseminated infection with mucormycosis (involving the pancreas, left occipital lobe, right lower lobe of lung, appendix and right kidney) after having completed induction and consolidation chemotherapy. Growth of Lichtheimia corymbifera was initially isolated following a right pleural tap with fungal elements identified repeatedly on subsequent pathology specimens. Following radical surgical debridement and concurrent treatment with combination antifungal therapy, the patient survived. This case demonstrates that aggressive multisite surgical de-bulking of disseminated fungal foci, in conjunction with combination antifungal therapy and reversal of immunosuppression, can result in survival despite the grave prognosis associated with disseminated mucormycosis. PMID:23904418

  9. Leydig-cell function in children after direct testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, R.; Czernichow, P.; Cramer, P.; Schaison, G.; Rappaport, R.

    1983-07-07

    To assess the effect of testicular irradiation on testicular endocrine function, we studied 12 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had been treated with direct testicular irradiation 10 months to 8 1/2 years earlier. Insufficient Leydig-cell function, manifested by a low response of plasma testosterone to chorionic gonadotropin or an increased basal level of plasma luteinizing hormone (or both), was observed in 10 patients, 7 of whom were pubertal. Two of these patients had a compensated testicular endocrine insufficiency with only high plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone. Testosterone secretion was severely impaired in three pubertal boys studied more than four years after testicular irradiation. A diminished testicular volume indicating tubular atrophy was found in all pubertal patients, including three who had not received cyclophosphamide or cytarabine. These data indicate that testosterone insufficiency is a frequent complication of testicular irradiation, although some patients continue to have Leydig-cell activity for several years after therapy.

  10. Significance of CD66c expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Tomita, Osamu; Miharu, Masashi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Okita, Hajime; Kajiwara, Michiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Inukai, Takeshi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Fukushima, Takashi; Nanmoku, Toru; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Akira; Sugita, Kanji; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Ohara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Upon analyzing 696 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cases, we identified the characteristics of CD66c expression. In addition to the confirmation of strong correlation with BCR-ABL positivity and hyperdiploid, we further observed that CD66c is frequently expressed in CRLF2-positive (11/15, p<0.01 against chimeric gene-negative) as well as hypodiploid cases (3/4), whereas it is never expressed in ETV6-RUNX1, MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, and E2A-PBX1-positive cases. Although the expression of CD66c itself is not directly linked to the prognosis, the accompanying genetic abnormalities are important prognostic factors for BCP-ALL, indicating the importance of CD66c expression in the initial diagnosis of BCP-ALL. PMID:24231528

  11. Genetic Aberrations in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: Application of High-Density Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array

    PubMed Central

    Sulong, Sarina

    2010-01-01

    Screening of the entire human genome using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNPA) has become a powerful technique used in cancer genetics and population genetics studies. The GeneChip® Mapping Array, introduced by Affymetrix, is one SNPA platform utilised for genotyping studies. This GeneChip system allows researchers to gain a comprehensive view of cancer biology on a single platform for the quantification of chromosomal amplifications, deletions, and loss of heterozygosity or for allelic imbalance studies. Importantly, this array analysis has the potential to reveal novel genetic findings involved in the multistep development of cancer. Given the importance of genetic factors in leukaemogenesis and the usefulness of screening the whole genome, SNPA analysis has been utilised in many studies to characterise genetic aberrations in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. PMID:22135543

  12. Two pairs of monozygotic twins with concordant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): case report.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Sun, Nianzheng; Huang, Xiaoyang; Ju, Xiuli

    2014-07-01

    The occurrence of leukemia in twins is rare but has a crucial implication in the genetic research of leukemia. This report presents 2 pairs of monozygotic twins with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF4 fusion genes were found in the twin sisters. This study is the first to report on infant ALL harboring the 46,XY, -4, +10, -13, del(14)(q24), -15, +2mar[4 cells] complex chromosome abnormality. Our report showed that the unified cytogenetic features in monozygotic twins and MLL-AF4 fusion gene may be necessary but insufficient for the clinical development and prognosis of identical twins with leukemia. PMID:24807006

  13. Fatal disseminated fusarium infection in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Austen, B; McCarthy, H; Wilkins, B; Smith, A; Duncombe, A

    2001-01-01

    Fusarium species are increasingly recognised as serious pathogens in the immunocompromised. The outcome in the context of persistent severe neutropenia has been almost universally fatal. However, there have been several case reports of successful treatment if neutrophil recovery can be achieved. This report presents the case of a fatality that occurred despite neutrophil recovery. A 67 year old man developed disseminated fusariosis during the neutropenic phase of induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Fusarium dimerum was isolated from blood cultures. This species is highly unusual and very few case reports exist in the literature. An initial response to amphotericin treatment coincided with neutrophil recovery but a subsequent relapse occurred, despite adequate neutrophil counts, which proved fatal. It is postulated that reseeding of the blood from an occult site, namely the right vitreum in this case, led to this secondary relapse despite achieving complete leukaemic remission. Key Words: fusarium • disseminated • neutropenia • remission PMID:11376027

  14. Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

  15. Febrile neutropenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal; Tüysüz, Gülen; Çelik, Nigar; Yantri, Leman; Erginöz, Ethem; Apak, Hilmi; Özkan, Alp; Yıldız, İnci; Celkan, Tiraje

    2016-01-01

    Aim: An important life-threatening complication of intensive chemotherapy administered in children with leukemia is febrile neutropenia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and consequences of febrile neutropenia attacks in children who were treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Material and Methods: Nighty-six children who received chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in our center between January 1995 and December 2010 were included in the study. The data related to demographic characteristics, treatment features, relapse and febrile neutropenia incidences, risk factors, culture results and prognosis were retrospectively evaluated from the patients’ files. Results: A total of two hundred-ninety nine febrile neutropenia attacks observed in the patients during initial treatment and relapse treatment were evaluated. When the incidence of febrile neutropenia was evaluated by years, it was observed that the patients treated after year 2000 had statistically significantly more febrile neutopenia attacks compared to the patients treated before year 2000. When the incidences of febrile neutropenia during initial treatment and during relapse treatment were compared, it was observed that more febrile neutropenia attacks occured during relapse treatment. Fifty-nine percent of all febrile neutropenia attacks were fever of unknown origin. Eighty microorganisms grew in cultures during febrile neutropenia throughout treatment in 75 patients; 86% were bacterial infections (50% gram positive and 50% gram negative), 8% were viral infections and 6% were fungal infections. Coagulase negative staphylococcus (n=17) was the most frequent gram positive pathogen; E. Coli (n=17) was the most commonly grown gram negative pathogen. Conclusions: In this study, it was found that an increase in the incidence of febrile neutropenia occured in years. Increments in treatment intensities increase the incidence of febrile neutropenia while improving

  16. Predicting the neurobehavioral side effects of dexamethasone in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Warris, Lidewij T; van den Akker, Erica L T; Aarsen, Femke K; Bierings, Marc B; van den Bos, Cor; Tissing, Wim J E; Sassen, Sebastiaan D T; Veening, Margreet A; Zwaan, Christian M; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2016-10-01

    Although dexamethasone is an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can induce a variety of serious neurobehavioral side effects. We hypothesized that these side effects are influenced by glucocorticoid sensitivity at the tissue level. We therefore prospectively studied whether we could predict the occurrence of these side effects using the very low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (DST) or by measuring trough levels of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3-16 years of age) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were initially included during the maintenance phase (with dexamethasone) of the Dutch ALL treatment protocol. As a marker of glucocorticoid sensitivity, the salivary very low-dose DST was used. A post-dexamethasone cortisol level <2.0nmol/L was considered a hypersensitive response. The neurobehavioral endpoints consisted of questionnaires regarding psychosocial and sleeping problems administered before and during the course of dexamethasone (6mg/m(2)), and dexamethasone trough levels were measured during dexamethasone treatment. Patients with a hypersensitive response to dexamethasone had more behavioral problems (N=11), sleeping problems, and/or somnolence (N=12) (P<0.05 for all three endpoints). The positive predictive values of the DST for psychosocial problems and sleeping problems were 50% and 30%, respectively. Dexamethasone levels were not associated with neurobehavioral side effects. We conclude that neither the very low-dose DST nor measuring dexamethasone trough levels can accurately predict dexamethasone-induced neurobehavioral side effects. However, patients with glucocorticoid hypersensitivity experienced significantly more symptoms associated with dexamethasone-induced depression. Future studies should elucidate further the mechanisms by which neurobehavioral side effects are influenced by glucocorticoid sensitivity. PMID:27448086

  17. Soluble Fas and Fas ligand and prognosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Mina; Amirghofran, Zahra; Shahriari, Mehdi

    2012-09-01

    The soluble forms of Fas and its ligand (sFas and sFasL) correlate with disease progression in various malignancies. We compared serum levels of sFas and sFasL in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and healthy children to determine the prognostic significance of these molecules. Serum levels of sFas and sFasL were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 48 patients with newly diagnosed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 38 healthy children. Cut-off values of sFas and sFasL levels were based on their levels in controls. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were recorded on admission. The mean serum concentration of sFas was 243 ± 40 pg/mL in patients and 238 ± 29 pg/mL in controls. Serum levels of sFasL were 4.33 ± 0.25 ng/mL in patients and 4.27 ± 0.11 ng/mL in controls. Neither difference was significant. Based on the cut-off value, 12.5% of the patients were positive for sFas, and 16.6% were positive for sFasL. Survival was significantly longer in sFasL-positive patients (394 ± 69.6 vs. 254 ± 24.3 days) and the duration of complete remission was also longer (380 ± 65.0 vs. 246 ± 26.0 days) than in sFasL-negative patients (P < 0.02), indicating the important role of this molecule in the response to therapy. Higher sFas levels were associated with hepatosplenomegaly (P < 0.047). In conclusion, sFasL positivity was associated with a favorable outcome in ALL patients. PMID:21528407

  18. [Markers of metabolic syndrome and peptides regulating metabolism in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Skoczeń, Szymon; Tomasik, Przemysław; Balwierz, Walentyna; Surmiak, Marcin; Sztefko, Krystyna; Galicka-Latała, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Along with the growing epidemic of overweight the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality are increasing markedly. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a condition clustering together several risk factors of those complications such as visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension and dislipidemia. The risk of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors is higher than in general population. We aimed to assess (1) the relationships between chosen adipokines and neuropeptides, chemotherapy, CRT, and body fatness and (2) evaluate adipokines and neuropeptides concentrations as a new markers of MS in children. We conducted cross-sectional evaluation of 82 ALL survivors (median age: 13.2 years; range: 4,8-26,2; median time from treatment: 3.2 years), including fasting laboratory testing: peptides (leptin, GLP-1, orexin, PYY, apelin), total cholesterol and its fractions, triglycerides; anthropometric measurements (weight, height), systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We estimated percentiles of body mass index and percentiles of blood pressure. Between 82 survivors overweight and diastolic hypertension was diagnosed in 31% of patients (35% in CRT group) and 15% respectively. At least one abnormality in lipids concentrations was found in 43%. Girls were more affected than boys. Statistically significant increased in leptin and apelin concentrations and decreased in soluble leptin receptor concentrations in the overweight group were observed compared to the non overweight subjects. Significant increase in orexin levels in females who had received CRT compared to those who had not received CRT was found. CRT is the main risk factor of elevated of body mass among survivors of childhood leukemia. Dyslipidemia and hypertension, along with increased adiposity indicate higher risk of MS development. Girls are more affected than boys. Leptin, orexin and apelin seem to be good markers of increased adiposity especially after CRT

  19. Environment-mediated drug resistance in Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Feldhahn, Niklas; Arutyunyan, Anna; Stoddart, Sonia; Zhang, Bin; Schmidhuber, Sabine; Yi, Sun-Ju; Kim, Yong-mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Although cure rates for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased, development of resistance to drugs and patient relapse are common. The environment in which the leukemia cells are present during the drug treatment is known to provide significant survival benefit. Here, we have modeled this process by culturing murine Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the presence of stroma while treating them with a moderate dose of two unrelated drugs, the farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib. This results in an initial large reduction in cell viability of the culture and inhibition of cell proliferation. However, after a number of days, cell death ceases and the culture becomes drug-tolerant, enabling cell division to resume. Using gene expression profiling, we found that the development of drug resistance was accompanied by massive transcriptional upregulation of genes that are associated with general inflammatory responses such as the metalloproteinase MMP9. MMP9 protein levels and enzymatic activity were also increased in ALL cells that had become nilotinib-tolerant. Activation of p38, Akt and Erk correlated with the development of environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR), and inhibitors of Akt and Erk in combination with nilotinib reduced the ability of the cells to develop resistance. However, inhibition of p38 promoted increased resistance to nilotinib. We conclude that development of EMDR by ALL cells involves changes in numerous intracellular pathways. Development of tolerance to drugs such as nilotinib may therefore be circumvented by simultaneous treatment with other drugs having divergent targets. PMID:22934254

  20. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    PubMed

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:23619116

  1. RUNX1 amplification in lineage conversion of childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Podgornik, Helena; Debeljak, Marusa; Zontar, Darja; Cernelc, Peter; Prestor, Veronika Velensek; Jazbec, Janez

    2007-10-01

    Amplification of RUNX1 (alias AML1) is a recurrent karyotypic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that is generally associated with a poor outcome. It does not occur with other primary chromosomal abnormalities in acute ALL. AML1 amplification in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a rare secondary event described mainly in therapy-related cases. AML1 amplification was found in a 13-year-old patient with AML M4/M5 leukemia that occurred 5 years after she had been diagnosed with common B-cell ALL. Conventional cytogenetic, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and polymerase chain reaction methods revealed no other chromosomal change expected to occur in a disease that we assumed to be a secondary leukemia. Due to the lack of cytogenetic data from the diagnostic sample, we developed a new approach to analyze the archived bone marrow smear, which had been stained previously with May-Grünwald-Geimsa by the FISH method. This analysis confirmed that in addition to t(12;21), AML1 amplification and overexpression existed already at the time the diagnosis was made. The chromosomal changes, however, were found in different clones of bone marrow cells. While the first course of chemotherapy successfully eradicated the cell line with the t(12;21), the second cell line with AML1 amplification remained latent during the time of complete remission and reappeared with a different immunophenotype. PMID:17889714

  2. Clofarabine for the treatment of adult acute lymphoid leukemia: the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia intergroup.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Françoise; Leguay, Thibaut; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Rousselot, Philippe; Vey, Norbert; Pigneux, Arnaud; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analog displaying potent inhibition of DNA synthesis and favorable pharmacologic profile, is approved for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after failure of at least two previous regimens in patients up to 21 years of age at diagnosis. Good neurologic tolerance, synergy with alkylating agents, management guidelines defined through pediatric ALL and adult acute myeloid leukemia, have also prompted its administration in more than 100 adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and negative B lineage and T lineage ALL, as single agent (40 mg/m(2)/ day for 5 days), or in combination. In a Group for Research on Adult Acute Lympho- blastic Leukemia (GRAALL) retrospective study of two regimens (clofarabine ± cyclophosphamide + / - etoposide (ENDEVOL) ± mitoxantrone ± asparaginase ± dexamethasone (VANDEVOL)), remission was achieved in 50% of 55 relapsed/refractory patients, and 17-35% could proceed to allogeneic stem cell. Clofarabine warrants further exploration in advanced ALL treatment and bridge-to-transplant. PMID:24996442

  3. Invasive fungal infection caused by geotrichum capitatum in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guang-Xun; Tang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Xuan; Xin, Xiao-Li; Feng, Juan; Chen, Xie-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Geotrichum capitatum infection has a very low incidence rate with atypical clinical symptoms, making diagnosis difficult, and it has a poor prognosis. The incidence is even more rare in China. This paper reports the first case of infection caused by G. capitatum during bone marrow suppression after chemotherapy in a Chinese patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition, it reports a systematic literature review of diagnosis and treatment. The patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was confirmed to be infected with G. capitatum, involving lung, liver and skin, through a blood culture test. Caspofungin, amphotericin B loposome, and a combination therapy of amphotericin B liposome and voriconazole were used in succession for treatment. Despite normal body temperature and a slight improvement of clinical symptoms with the combination therapy treatment, the patient died 40 days after chemotherapy due to heart and lung failure. PMID:26550401

  4. REDUCED INTENSITY CONDITIONING REGIMENS FOR ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Verneris, Michael R.; Eapen, Mary; Duerst, Reggie; Carpenter, Paul A.; Burke, Michael J.; Afanasyev, B.V.; Cowan, Morton J.; He, Wensheng; Krance, Robert; Li, Chi-Kong; Tan, Poh-Lin; Wagner, John E.; Davies, Stella M.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have been used extensively in adults with hematological malignancies. To address whether this is a feasible approach for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we evaluated transplant outcomes in 38 recipients transplanted from 1995–2005 for whom this was their first transplant. The median age at transplant was 12 years and 47% had performance scores <90%. Disease status was first complete remission (CR) in 13%, ≥CR2 in 60% of patients and 22% had active disease at transplantation. Matched related donors were available for a third of patients and about half of whom received bone marrow (BM) and the others, peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC). Sixty percent of unrelated donor transplant recipients received PBPC. The day-100 probability of grade 2–4 acute GVHD was 37% and the 3-year probability of chronic GVHD, 26%. At 3-years, the probability of transplant related mortality was 40%, relapse, 37% and disease-free survival (DFS), 30%. These data indicate long-term DFS can be achieved using RIC regimens in children with ALL. Given the relatively small cohort, these findings must be validated in a larger population. PMID:20302960

  5. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene.

    PubMed

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5' region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  6. Successful cord blood transplantation in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Shugo; Fujishima, Yukiteru; Suzuki, Yuzo; Tsukushi, Yasuhiko; Oyake, Tatsuo; Togawa, Ryou; Oyama, Kotaro; Ikai, Akio; Ito, Shigeki; Ishida, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in surgical corrections and supportive care for congenital heart disease have resulted in increasing numbers of adult survivors who may develop hematological malignancies. Treatments including chemotherapy for such patients may cause serious hemodynamic or cardiac complications, especially in those receiving stem cell transplantation. We present a 29-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and congenital heart disease. She had been diagnosed with pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum at birth, and the anomaly was surgically corrected according to the Fontan technique at age 9 years. Her induction chemotherapy required modifications due to poor cardiac status with Fontan circulation. However, after surgical procedures including total cavopulmonary connection and aortic valve replacement at first complete remission, her cardiac status was significantly improved. Subsequently, she underwent cord blood stem cell transplantation at the third complete remission. She required intensive supportive care for circulatory failure as a pre-engraftment immune reaction and stage III acute graft versus host disease of the gut, but recovered from these complications. She was discharged on day 239, and remained in complete remission at 1-year post-transplantation. PMID:27599417

  7. Medical neglect death due to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Sameshima, Naomi; Tsuji, Akiko; Kudo, Keiko; Nishida, Naoki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of 2-year-old girl who died of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. She had no remarkable medical history. She was transferred to a hospital because of respiratory distress and died 4 hours after arrival. Two weeks before death, she had a fever of 39 degrees C, which subsided after the administration of a naturopathic herbal remedy. She developed jaundice 1 week before death, and her condition worsened on the day of death. Laboratory test results on admission showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count. Accordingly, the cause of death was suspected to be acute leukaemia. Forensic autopsy revealed the cause of death to be precursor B-cell ALL. With advancements in medical technology, the 5-year survival rate of children with ALL is nearly 90%. However, in this case, the deceased's parents preferred complementary and alternative medicine (i.e., naturopathy) to evidence-based medicine and had not taken her to a hospital for a medical check-up or immunisation since she was an infant. Thus, if she had received routine medical care, she would have a more than 60% chance of being alive 5 years after diagnosis. Therefore, we conclude that the parents should be accused of medical neglect regardless of their motives. PMID:25895240

  8. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol.

    PubMed

    Raja, Raheel A; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Albertsen, Birgitte K; Prunsild, Kaie; Zeller, Bernward; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Heyman, Mats; Taskinen, Mervi; Harila-Saari, Arja; Kanerva, Jukka; Frandsen, Thomas L

    2014-04-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Treatment is associated with several toxicities, including acute pancreatitis. Clinical course, presentation, re-exposure to L-asparginase after pancreatitis and risk of recurrent pancreatitis within an asparaginase-intensive protocol has been poorly reported. Children (1-17 years) on the ongoing Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL2008 protocol with asparaginase-associated pancreatitis (AAP) diagnosed between 2008 and 2012 were identified through the online NOPHO ALL toxicity registry. NOPHO ALL2008 includes eight or 15 doses of intramuscular pegylated L-asparginase (PEG-asparaginase) 1000 iu/m(2) /dose at 2-6 weeks intervals, with a total of 30 weeks of exposure to PEG-asparaginase (clinicaltrials.gov no: NCT00819351). Of 786 children, 45 were diagnosed with AAP with a cumulative risk of AAP of 5·9%. AAP occurred after a median of five doses (range 1-13), and 11 d (median) from the latest administration of PEG-Asparaginase. Thirteen patients developed pseudocysts (30%) and 11 patients developed necrosis (25%). One patient died from pancreatitis. Twelve AAP patients were re-exposed to L-asparginase, two of whom developed mild AAP once more, after four and six doses respectively. In conclusion, re-exposure to PEG-asparaginase in ALL patients with mild AAP seems safe. PMID:24428625

  9. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Residential Levels of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in California

    PubMed Central

    Colt, Joanne S.; Deziel, Nicole C.; Whitehead, Todd P.; Reynolds, Peggy; Gunier, Robert B.; Nishioka, Marcia; Dahl, Gary V.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Metayer, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: House dust is a major source of exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are found at high levels in U.S. homes. Methods: We studied 167 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases 0–7 years of age and 214 birth certificate controls matched on date of birth, sex, and race/ethnicity from the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. In 2001–2007, we sampled carpets in the room where the child spent the most time while awake; we used a high-volume small-surface sampler or we took dust from the home vacuum. We measured concentrations of 14 PBDE congeners including penta (28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154), octa (183, 196, 197, 203), and decaBDEs (206–209). Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for demographics, income, year of dust collection, and sampling method. Results: BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209 were found at the highest concentrations (medians, 1,173, 1,579, and 938 ng/g, respectively). Comparing the highest to lowest quartile, we found no association with ALL for summed pentaBDEs (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4, 1.3), octaBDEs (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.7, 2.3), or decaBDEs (OR = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.8). Comparing homes in the highest concentration (nanograms per gram) tertile to those with no detections, we observed significantly increased ALL risk for BDE-196 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.8), BDE-203 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), BDE-206 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.9), and BDE-207 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.8). Conclusion: We found no association with ALL for common PBDEs, but we observed positive associations for specific octa and nonaBDEs. Additional studies with repeated sampling and biological measures would be informative. Citation: Ward MH, Colt JS, Deziel NC, Whitehead TP, Reynolds P, Gunier RB, Nishioka M, Dahl GV, Rappaport SM, Buffler PA, Metayer C. 2014. Residential levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in California. Environ Health Perspect 122:1110–1116

  11. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: recommendations by the Hemostasis Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) and the Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research (GTH).

    PubMed

    Appelmann, Iris; Kreher, Stephan; Parmentier, Stefani; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Bisping, Guido; Kirschner, Martin; Bergmann, Frauke; Schilling, Kristina; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Petrides, Petro E; Tiede, Andreas; Matzdorff, Axel; Griesshammer, Martin; Riess, Hanno; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPN) comprise a heterogeneous group of chronic hematologic malignancies. The quality of life, morbidity, and mortality of patients with MPN are primarily affected by disease-related symptoms, thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications, and progression to myelofibrosis and acute leukemia. Major bleeding represents a common and important complication in MPN, and the incidence of such bleeding events will become even more relevant in the future due to the increasing disease prevalence and survival of MPN patients. This review discusses the causes, differential diagnoses, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in patients with MPN, aiming at defining updated standards of care in these often challenging situations. PMID:26916570

  13. Bacillus cereus septicemia in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ya-Ling; Cheng, Shin-Nan; Hsieh, Kao-Hsian; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Lo, Wen-Tsung

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is an aerobic Gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is responsible for foodborne illnesses. We report on a 15-year-old girl with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who fell into a somnolent state after presenting with a 12-hour history of fever, muscle soreness, myalgia in both calves, sore throat, and vomiting. Fulminant septicemic syndrome caused by B. cereus was finally identified. The aim of this work is the introduction of B. cereus as a differential diagnosis of sepsis in patients with acute leukemia in induction chemotherapy, to prevent delayed treatment. PMID:23927823

  14. PARC/CCL18 Is a Plasma CC Chemokine with Increased Levels in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Struyf, Sofie; Schutyser, Evemie; Gouwy, Mieke; Gijsbers, Klara; Proost, Paul; Benoit, Yves; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines play an important role in leukocyte mobilization, hematopoiesis, and angiogenesis. Tissue-specific expression of particular chemokines also influences tumor growth and metastasis. Here, the CC chemokine pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC)/CCL18 was measured in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Surprisingly, PARC immunoreactivity was consistently detected in plasma from healthy donors. After purification to homogeneity, the presence of intact PARC (1–69) and processed PARC (1–68) in normal human plasma was confirmed by sequence and mass spectrometry analysis. Furthermore, PARC serum levels were significantly increased in children with T-ALL and prepreB-ALL compared to control serum samples, whereas serum levels in AML and preB-ALL patients were not significantly different from controls. In contrast, the hemofiltrate CC chemokine-1 (HCC-1)/CCL14 was not found to be a biomarker in any of these patients’ strata, whereas the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly decreased in AML and prepreB-ALL. Stimulated leukocytic cell lines or lymphoblasts from patients produced IL-8/CXCL8 or macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) but not PARC, not even after IL-4 or IL-10 treatment. However, PARC was produced by superantigen or IL-4 stimulated monocytes co-cultured with lymphocytes or lymphoblastic cells. Serum PARC levels thus constitute a novel leukemia marker, possibly reflecting tumor/host cell interactions in the circulation. PMID:14578205

  15. Fractional model for pharmacokinetics of high dose methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Jovan K.; Spasić, Dragan T.; Tošić, Jela; Kolarović, Jovanka L.; Malti, Rachid; Mitić, Igor M.; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to promote a model based on the fractional differential calculus related to the pharmacokinetic individualization of high dose methotrexate treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, especially in high risk patients. We applied two-compartment fractional model on 8 selected cases with the largest number (4-19) of measured concentrations, among 43 pediatric patients received 24-h methotrexate 2-5 g/m2 infusions. The plasma concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Our mathematical procedure, designed by combining Post's and Newton's method, was coded in Mathematica 8.0 and performed on Fujicu Celsius M470-2 PC. Experimental data show that most of the measured values of methotrexate were in decreasing order. However, in certain treatments local maximums were detected. On the other hand, integer order compartmental models do not give values which fit well with the observed data. By the use of our model, we obtained better results, since it gives more accurate behavior of the transmission, as well as the local maximums which were recognized in methotrexate monitoring. It follows from our method that an additional test with a small methotrexate dose can be suggested for the fractional system parameter identification and the prediction of a possible pattern with a full dose in the case of high risk patients. A special feature of the fractional model is that it can also recognize and better fit an observed non-monotonic behavior. A new parameter determination procedure can be successfully used.

  16. Subgroups of Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Might Differ Significantly in Genetic Predisposition to Asparaginase Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kutszegi, Nóra; Semsei, Ágnes F; Gézsi, András; Sági, Judit C; Nagy, Viktória; Csordás, Katalin; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Gábor, Krisztina Míta; Kovács, Gábor T; Erdélyi, Dániel J; Szalai, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASP) is a key element in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to ASP are major challenges in paediatric patients. Our aim was to investigate genetic variants that may influence the risk to Escherichia coli-derived ASP hypersensitivity. Sample and clinical data collection was carried out from 576 paediatric ALL patients who were treated according to protocols from the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GRIA1 and GALNT10 genes were genotyped. Patients with GRIA1 rs4958351 AA/AG genotype showed significantly reduced risk to ASP hypersensitivity compared to patients with GG genotype in the T-cell ALL subgroup (OR = 0.05 (0.01-0.26); p = 4.70E-04), while no such association was found in pre-B-cell ALL. In the medium risk group two SNPs of GRIA1 (rs2055083 and rs707176) were associated significantly with the occurrence of ASP hypersensitivity (OR = 0.21 (0.09-0.53); p = 8.48E-04 and OR = 3.02 (1.36-6.73); p = 6.76E-03, respectively). Evaluating the genders separately, however, the association of rs707176 with ASP HSRs was confined only to females. Our results suggest that genetic variants of GRIA1 might influence the risk to ASP hypersensitivity, but subgroups of patients can differ significantly in this respect. PMID:26457809

  17. Authenticity and drug resistance in a panel of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Beesley, A H; Palmer, M-L; Ford, J; Weller, R E; Cummings, A J; Freitas, J R; Firth, M J; Perera, K U; de Klerk, N H; Kees, U R

    2006-01-01

    Cell lines are important models for drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), but are often criticised as being unrepresentative of primary disease. There are also doubts regarding the authenticity of many lines. We have characterised a panel of ALL cell lines for growth and drug resistance and compared data with that published for primary patient specimens. In contrast to the convention that cell lines are highly proliferative, those established in our laboratory grow at rates similar to estimates of leukaemic cells in vivo (doubling time 53–442 h). Authenticity was confirmed by genetic fingerprinting, which also demonstrated the potential stability of long-term cultures. In vitro glucocorticoid resistance correlated well with that measured ex vivo, but all lines were significantly more sensitive to vincristine than primary specimens. Sensitivity to methotrexate was inversely correlated to that of glucocorticoids and L-asparaginase, indicating possible reciprocity in resistance mechanisms. A cell line identified as highly methotrexate resistant (IC50 >8000-fold higher than other lines) was derived from a patient receiving escalating doses of the drug, indicating in vivo selection of resistance as a cause of relapse. Many of these lines are suitable as models to study naturally occurring resistance phenotypes in paediatric ALL. PMID:17117183

  18. PAX5 is a tumor suppressor in mouse mutagenesis models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Jinjun; Wei, Lei; de Ridder, Jeroen; Su, Xiaoping; Rust, Alistair G.; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Cheng, Jinjun; Ma, Jing; Qu, Chunxu; Wu, Gang; Song, Guangchun; Huether, Robert G.; Schulman, Brenda; Janke, Laura; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R.; van der Weyden, Louise; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of genes encoding transcriptional regulators of lymphoid development are a hallmark of B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and most commonly involve PAX5, encoding the DNA-binding transcription factor paired-box 5. The majority of PAX5 alterations in ALL are heterozygous, and key PAX5 target genes are expressed in leukemic cells, suggesting that PAX5 may be a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor. To examine the role of PAX5 alterations in leukemogenesis, we performed mutagenesis screens of mice heterozygous for a loss-of-function Pax5 allele. Both chemical and retroviral mutagenesis resulted in a significantly increased penetrance and reduced latency of leukemia, with a shift to B-lymphoid lineage. Genomic profiling identified a high frequency of secondary genomic mutations, deletions, and retroviral insertions targeting B-lymphoid development, including Pax5, and additional genes and pathways mutated in ALL, including tumor suppressors, Ras, and Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling. These results show that in contrast to simple Pax5 haploinsufficiency, multiple sequential alterations targeting lymphoid development are central to leukemogenesis and contribute to the arrest in lymphoid maturation characteristic of ALL. This cross-species analysis also validates the importance of concomitant alterations of multiple cellular growth, signaling, and tumor suppression pathways in the pathogenesis of B-ALL. PMID:25855603

  19. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  20. Dissecting the clonal origins of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia by single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gawad, Charles; Koh, Winston; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers have substantial genomic heterogeneity within a given tumor, and to fully understand that diversity requires the ability to perform single cell analysis. We performed targeted sequencing of a panel of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), deletions, and IgH sequences in 1,479 single tumor cells from six acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. By accurately segregating groups of cooccurring mutations into distinct clonal populations, we identified codominant clones in the majority of patients. Evaluation of intraclonal mutation patterns identified clone-specific punctuated cytosine mutagenesis events, showed that most structural variants are acquired before SNVs, determined that KRAS mutations occur late in disease development but are not sufficient for clonal dominance, and identified clones within the same patient that are arrested at varied stages in B-cell development. Taken together, these data order the sequence of genetic events that underlie childhood ALL and provide a framework for understanding the development of the disease at single-cell resolution. PMID:25425670

  1. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  2. Expression of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CD10) in mesenchymal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Mechtersheimer, G.; Möller, P.

    1989-01-01

    The expression of the CD10 antigen, formerly designated as common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen and recently identified as neutral endopeptidase, was examined immunohistochemically in 26 benign and in 55 malignant mesenchymal tumors. CD10 expression was found in 4 of 4 leiomyomas, 7 of 10 leiomyosarcomas, 1 of 6 rhabdomyosarcomas, 2 of 2 Triton tumors, 1 of 2 aggressive fibromatoses, 1 of 3 fibrosarcomas, 1 of 4 synovial sarcomas, 1 of 1 giant cell tumors of tendon sheath, 4 of 4 malignant fibrous histiocytomas, 3 of 3 Ewing's sarcomas, and 2 of 3 osteosarcomas. Furthermore, CD10 was expressed consistently in the myoepithelial compartment of 12 fibroadenomas and, in 7 of these cases, in a minor stromal cell population, probably of (myo-) fibroblastic origin. Tumors of adipose tissue (4 lipomas, 5 liposarcomas), tumors of autonomic ganglia (2 ganglioneuromas, 1 ganglioneuroblastoma, 2 neuroblastomas), tumors of peripheral nerves with purely schwannian differentiation (7 malignant schwannomas), and tumors of disputed origin were consistently CD10-negative, however, as were single cases of fibroma and chondrosarcoma. These findings indicate that the expression of CD10 is a frequent but not obligatory feature in some mesenchymal tumors. Therefore CD10 is of value in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2541615

  3. Different reactivity of monoclonal antibodies against common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen (CD10).

    PubMed Central

    Haralambidou, S; Melo, J V; Catovsky, D

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of five monoclonal antibodies J5, OKB-cALLA, Nu-N1, Nu-N2 and VIL-A1 against the common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (common-ALL) antigen (glycoprotein 100, CD10); was investigated by indirect immunofluorescence in cell suspensions, and by immunoperoxidase in cytocentrifuge slides of ALL, chronic B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and plasma cell dyscrasias. The five monoclonal antibodies gave similar positive results with both techniques only in samples of ALL. J5 was positive in variable degrees by immunofluorescence in the majority of B cell disorders examined but this was not confirmed by immunoperoxidase. OKB-cALLA reacted in a similar way to J5 in both techniques, although with a lower percentage of cells by immunofluorescence. Nu-N1, Nu-N2, and VIL-A1 were mainly negative when tested by both immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase in B cell disorders other than ALL and therefore seemed to be more specific for the diagnosis of common-ALL. PMID:2953763

  4. Heterogeneity of cultured leukemic lymphoid progenitor cells from B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Kersey, J H; Gajl-Peczalska, K J; Heerema, N A; Provisor, A J; Haag, D; Gilchrist, G; Song, C W; Arthur, D C; Roloff, J

    1987-01-01

    Colony assays were performed for 50 patients with B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Blast colony formation was observed for 33 patients, and the plating efficiency (PE) showed a marked interpatient variation, which indicates a pronounced biological heterogeneity at the level of leukemic progenitor cells. Notably, the mean PE of leukemic B cell precursors from patients with a pseudodiploid or near-diploid karyotype with structural chromosomal abnormalities (SCA) was significantly higher than the mean PE of normal diploid or hyperdiploid cases. All patients who had SCA involving 7p13, 11q23-24, or 12p11-13, and patients with a Philadelphia chromosome had high PE values. The S phase percentage, expression of CD19 antigen, and relapse status were also correlated with PE. Significantly, colony blasts had slightly different surface marker profiles in each case and were common ALL antigen negative in 33% of cases, which indicates the existence of a marked immunological heterogeneity at the level of leukemic progenitor cells. PMID:3497949

  5. Sensitization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for LCL161-induced cell death by targeting redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haß, Christina; Belz, Katharina; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Fulda, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed redox homeostasis with both elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense mechanisms has been reported in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of pathways responsible for ROS detoxification renders ALL cells more susceptible for cell death. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibitors of key pathways for the elimination of ROS, i.e. Erastin, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and Auranofin, sensitize ALL cells for cell death upon treatment with the Smac mimetic LCL161 that antagonizes Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Erastin, BSO or Auranofin significantly increase LCL161-induced cell death and also act in concert with LCL161 to profoundly suppress long-term clonogenic survival in several ALL cell lines. Erastin or BSO cooperates with LCL161 to stimulate ROS production and lipid peroxidation prior to cell death. ROS production and lipid peroxidation are required for this cotreatment-induced cell death, since ROS scavengers or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation provides significant protection against cell death. These results emphasize that inhibition of antioxidant defense mechanisms can serve as a potent approach to prime ALL cells for LCL161-induced cell death. PMID:26774450

  6. [Genetic characteristics of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Molt-4].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Cai; Liu, Cong-Yan; Sun, Xue-Jing; He, Jing-Juan; Wan, Sui-Gui; Sun, Wan-Ling

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the genetic characteristics of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Molt-4, and evaluate its application in measuring telomere length by Flow-FISH. Molt-4 cell line was cultured in suspension and subcultured regularly. Eight different passages of Molt-4 cells in exponential stage were selected.The growth curves were drawn by cell counting method, meanwhile calculating the population doubling times of cells,DNA ploidies were determined by flow cytometry,karyotypes were analyzed by G-banding and telomere lengths were measured by Southern blot. The results showed that the population doubling time of Molt-4 cell line was (1.315 ± 0.062) d, DNA ploidy index was (2.085 ± 0.0093) , and the telomere length was (32.05 ± 5.27) kb. There were no significant difference among different passages (P = 0.931,0.888 and 0.935 separately). The karyotypes showed that the chromosome numbers of Molt-4 cell line were from 91 to 99 in different metaphases, and the majority of them were hypertetraploid, and stable and recurrent structural abnormalities of chromosomes could be kept. It is concluded that the stable genetic characteristics and the longer telomere length of Molt-4 cell line makes it be a feasible control cells in measurement of telomere length by Flow-FISH. PMID:24762992

  7. Overexpression of SLC25A38 protein on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaying; Lu, Quanyi; Zhang, Yunwu; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Han; Xu, Huaxi

    2014-05-01

    SLC25A38 is a recently identified protein that belongs to the mitochondrial solute carrier family, SLC25. Previous studies have shown that it is a pro-apoptotic protein, which regulates intrinsic caspase-dependent apoptosis. In order to clarify the effect of SLC25A38 protein expression on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, we detected the expression of SLC25A38 in various cell lines (RPMI 8226, U266, Molt-4 and Jurkat) by western blot analysis. The results indicate that SLC25A38 is highly expressed in the four cell lines. Among 55 leukemia patients (adult, n=32 and infant, n=23), a high expression of SLC25A38 protein was observed in seven infant (7/23, 30.4%) and 15 adult (15/32, 46.9%) ALL patients. Two adult ALL patients that were positive for SLC25A38 were analyzed and the level of SLC25A38 significantly reduced or disappeared following combined chemotherapy, however, reappeared upon ALL recurrence. The expression level was identified to be associated with the proportion of blast cells in the bone marrow. Additionally, SLC25A38 and Notch1 were co-expressed in the four cell lines and the ALL patient samples. The present results show that expression of SLC25A38 is a common feature of ALL cells and may be a novel biomarker for diagnosis, as well as a potential therapeutic target for ALL. PMID:24765149

  8. IKZF1 rs4132601 polymorphism and acute lymphoblastic leukemia susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihui; Ren, Lili; Fan, Li; Wang, Guangsheng

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have been conducted to examine the association between IKZF1 rs4132601 polymorphism and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) risk. However, the conclusions remain controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Weipu and Chinese Biomedical Literature (CBM) databases were searched. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of association. A total of 15 case-control studies with 8333 cases and 36 036 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The results suggested that rs4132601 was associated with an increased ALL risk. Significant associations were found among Caucasians and Hispanics but not among Asians. In subgroup analysis by age group, both adults and children showed increased ALL risk. In subgroup analysis by subtype of ALL, significantly increased risks were observed in B-cell ALL and B hyperdiploid ALL, but not in T-cell ALL. This study suggests that IKZF1 rs4132601polymorphism is a risk factor for ALL. PMID:25012940

  9. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: facts and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Malagola, Michele; Papayannidis, Cristina; Baccarani, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), imatinib and dasatinib, are registered for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in adults. Other two TKIs (nilotinib and ponatinib) have been tested in the second-line, can offer an alternative in the patients who fail the first-line, and can acquire a role also in the first-line. Here, we provide a summary of the reports of TKIs, used alone, and in combination with chemotherapy. TKIs are very effective alone and with corticosteroids and are likely to improve substantially the outcome when they are combined with standard or dose-adapted chemotherapy. While the complete haematologic remission rate is always very high, close to 100 %, the cytogenetic and molecular remission rates are lower, so that TKIs are still considered as a complement to chemotherapy and as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, many patients relapse before transplant, and many patients still relapse, even if they have been submitted to allo-SCT. A proper use of TKIs, the introduction of ponatinib, and of "new generation" TKIs should improve further on the outcome of Ph+ ALL. PMID:26891878

  10. Oral microbiota distinguishes acute lymphoblastic leukemia pediatric hosts from healthy populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; You, Meng; Du, Qin; Yang, Xue; He, Jinzhi; He, Jingzhi; Zou, Jing; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Zhu, Yiping; Li, Jiyao; Shi, Wenyuan; Xu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In leukemia, oral manifestations indicate aberrations in oral microbiota. Microbiota structure is determined by both host and environmental factors. In human hosts, how health status shapes the composition of oral microbiota is largely unknown. Taking advantage of advances in high-throughput sequencing, we compared the composition of supragingival plaque microbiota of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) pediatric patients with healthy controls. The oral microbiota of leukemia patients had lower richness and less diversity compared to healthy controls. Microbial samples clustered into two major groups, one of ALL patients and another of healthy children, with different structure and composition. Abundance changes of certain taxa including the Phylum Firmicutes, the Class Bacilli, the Order Lactobacillales, the Family Aerococcaceae and Carnobacteriaceae, as well as the Genus Abiotrophia and Granulicatella were associated with leukemia status. ALL patients demonstrated a structural imbalance of the oral microbiota, characterized by reduced diversity and abundance alterations, possibly involved in systemic infections, indicating the importance of immune status in shaping the structure of oral microbiota. PMID:25025462

  11. CD19-Targeted Nanodelivery of Doxorubicin Enhances Therapeutic Efficacy in B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinu; Xu, Xian; Kelly, Dakota; Snook, Adam; Waldman, Scott A; Mason, Robert W; Jia, Xinqiao; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2015-06-01

    Nanomedicine has advanced to clinical trials for adult cancer therapy. However, the field is still in its infancy for treatment of childhood malignancies such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Nanotherapy offers multiple advantages over conventional therapy. It facilitates targeted delivery and enables controlled release of drugs to reduce treatment-related side effects. Here, we demonstrate that doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) modified with targeting ligands against CD19 (CD19-DOX-NPs) can be delivered in a CD19-specific manner to leukemic cells. The CD19-DOX-NPs were internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis and imparted cytotoxicity in a CD19-dependent manner in CD19-positive ALL cells. Leukemic mice treated with CD19-DOX-NPs survived significantly longer and manifested a higher degree of agility, indicating reduced apparent systemic toxicity during treatment compared to mice treated with free DOX. We suggest that targeted delivery of drugs used in childhood cancer treatment should improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce treatment-related side effects in children. PMID:25898125

  12. How I treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in older adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Emily

    2015-01-01

    At the intersection between children and older adults, the care of adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) poses unique challenges and issues beyond those faced by other age groups. Although the survival of AYA patients is inferior to younger children, growing evidence suggests that AYA patients have improved outcomes, with disease-free survival rates of 60% to 70%, when treated with pediatric-based approaches. A holistic approach, incorporating a multidisciplinary team, is a key component of successful treatment of these AYA patients. With the appropriate support and management of toxicities during and following treatment, these regimens are well tolerated in the AYA population. Even with the significant progress that has been made during the last decade, patients with persistence of minimal residual disease (MRD) during intensive therapy still have a poor prognosis. With new insights into disease pathogenesis in AYA ALL and the availability of disease-specific kinase inhibitors and novel targeted antibodies, future studies will focus on individualized therapy to eradicate MRD and result in further improvements in survival. This case-based review will discuss the biology, pharmacology, and psychosocial aspects of AYA patients with ALL, highlighting our current approach to the management of these unique patients. PMID:25805810

  13. Heterogeneity in mechanisms of emergent resistance in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Babasaheb D; Samuels, Amy L; Wells, Julia E; Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C; Bendak, Katerina; Anderson, Denise; Marshall, Glenn M; Cole, Catherine H; Beesley, Alex H; Kees, Ursula R; Lock, Richard B

    2016-08-11

    Relapse in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem and is thought to be associated with clonal selection during treatment. In this study we used an established pre-clinical model of induction therapy to increase our understanding of the effect of engraftment and chemotherapy on clonal selection and acquisition of drug resistance in vivo. Immune-deficient mice were engrafted with patient diagnostic specimens and exposed to a repeated combination therapy consisting of vincristine, dexamethasone, L-asparaginase and daunorubicin. Any re-emergence of disease following therapy was shown to be associated with resistance to dexamethasone, no resistance was observed to the other three drugs. Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements closely matched those in respective diagnosis and relapse patient specimens, highlighting that these clonal markers do not fully reflect the biological changes associated with drug resistance. Gene expression profiling revealed the significant underlying heterogeneity of dexamethasone-resistant xenografts. Alterations were observed in a large number of biological pathways, yet no dominant signature was common to all lines. These findings indicate that the biological changes associated with T-ALL relapse and resistance are stochastic and highly individual, and underline the importance of using sophisticated molecular techniques or single cell analyses in developing personalized approaches to therapy. PMID:27623214

  14. RALLE pilot: response-guided therapy for marrow relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Békàssy, Albert N; Glomstein, Anders; Möttönen, Merja

    2012-05-01

    Despite improved treatment results of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 20% to 30% have a relapse, and then the outcome is very poor. We studied 40 children with ALL marrow relapse piloting an ALL relapse protocol with well-known drugs and drug combinations by using a concept of response-guided design. We also measured response in logarithmic fashion. Our primary end points were achievement of M1 marrow status, minimal residual disease status below 10, and second remission. The remission induction rate was 90% with 10% induction mortality. After the A blocks (dexamethasone, vincristine, idarubicin and pegylated L-asparaginase), 85% had M1 status, 39% had minimal residual disease ≤1×10, and 66% had 2 to 3 log response. After B1 block (cyclo, VP-16) the figures were 92%, 58%, and 83%, respectively. Twenty-five of 40 patients received allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three-year event-free survival of the whole cohort was 37%, and the relapse rate was 38%. Three-year event-free survival by risk group was 53% for late, 34% for early, and 21% for very early relapses. An ALL marrow relapse nonresponsive to steroids, vincristine, asparaginase, anthracyclines, and alkylating agents is uncommon, and these classic drugs can still be advocated for induction of ALL relapse. The problems lie in creating a consolidation capable of preventing particularly posttransplant relapses. PMID:22246158

  15. Survival improvements in adolescents and young adults after myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Lee, Stephanie J; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Ballen, Karen K; Buchbinder, David K; Dehn, Jason; Freytes, Cesar O; Lazarus, Hillard M; Lemaistre, Charles F; Mehta, Paulette; Szwajcer, David; Joffe, Steven; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15 to 40 years) with cancer have not experienced survival improvements to the same extent as younger and older patients. We compared changes in survival after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among children (n = 981), AYAs (n = 1218), and older adults (n = 469) who underwent transplantation over 3 time periods: 1990 to 1995, 1996 to 2001, and 2002 to 2007. Five-year survival varied inversely with age group. Survival improved over time in AYAs and paralleled that seen in children; however, overall survival did not change over time for older adults. Survival improvements were primarily related to lower rates of early treatment-related mortality in the most recent era. For all cohorts, relapse rates did not change over time. A subset of 222 AYAs between the ages of 15 and 25 at 46 pediatric or 49 adult centers were also analyzed to describe differences by center type. In this subgroup, there were differences in transplantation practices among pediatric and adult centers, although HCT outcomes did not differ by center type. Survival for AYAs undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HCT for ALL improved at a similar rate as survival for children. PMID:24607554

  16. Venous thromboembolism prevention during asparaginase-based therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sibai, H.; Seki, J.T.; Wang, T.Q.; Sakurai, N.; Atenafu, E.G.; Yee, K.W.L.; Schuh, A.C.; Gupta, V.; Minden, M.D.; Schimmer, A.D.; Brandwein, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (vte) is a recognized complication in patients treated with asparaginase-containing chemotherapy regimens; the optimal preventive strategy is unclear. We assessed the safety and efficacy of prophylaxis using low-dose low molecular weight heparin in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in complete remission treated with an asparaginase-based post-remission chemotherapy regimen. Methods As part of the intensification phase of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 91-01 regimen, asparaginase was administered weekly to 41 consecutive patients for 21–30 weeks; these patients also received prophylaxis with enoxaparin 40 mg daily (60 mg for patients ≥80 kg). Outcomes were assessed against outcomes in a comparable cohort of 99 patients who received the same chemotherapy regimen without anticoagulation prophylaxis. Results The overall rate of symptomatic venous thrombosis was not significantly different in the prophylaxis and non-prophylaxis cohorts (18.92% and 21.74% respectively). Among patients receiving prophylaxis, vte occurred in higher proportion in those who weighed at least 80 kg (42.86% vs. 4.35%, p = 0.0070). No major bleeding complications occurred in the prophylaxis group (minor bleeding: 8.1%). Conclusions Prophylaxis with low-dose enoxaparin during the intensification phase was safe, but was not associated with a lower overall proportion of vte. PMID:27536184

  17. Progress in Treatment of Viral Infections in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moschovi, Maria; Adamaki, Maria; Vlahopoulos, Spiros A.

    2016-01-01

    In children, the most commonly encountered type of leukemia is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). An important source of morbidity and mortality in ALL are viral infections. Even though allogeneic transplantations, which are often applied also in ALL, carry a recognized risk for viral infections, there are multiple factors that make ALL patients susceptible to viral infections. The presence of those factors has an influence in the type and severity of infections. Currently available treatment options do not guarantee a positive outcome for every case of viral infection in ALL, without significant side effects. Side effects can have very serious consequences for the ALL patients, which include nephrotoxicity. For this reason a number of strategies for personalized intervention have been already clinically tested, and experimental approaches are being developed. Adoptive immunotherapy, which entails administration of ex vivo grown immune cells to a patient, is a promising approach in general, and for transplant recipients in particular. The ex vivo grown cells are aimed to strengthen the immune response to the virus that has been identified in the patients’ blood and tissue samples. Even though many patients with weakened immune system can benefit from progress in novel approaches, a viral infection still poses a very significant risk for many patients. Therefore, preventive measures and supportive care are very important for ALL patients. PMID:27471584

  18. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678. PMID:25587040

  19. Extreme Spindles and Leukoencephalopathy after Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment: An Undescribed Association.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Paulo Afonso Medeiros; Kanda, Rafael Guimarães; Mei, Paulo Afonso; Cury, Ivan José

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of a child whose EEG demonstrated extreme spindles (ES) after acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. This finding has not been reported previously. In 1962, Gibbs and Gibbs described the ES EEG pattern due to its high amplitude (200 to 400 μV). ES are a rare spindle variant that is found in EEGs of 0.05% of normal children (average age, 3 years, with a range of 1 to 12 years), and are even rarer after 11 years. Moreover due to changes in the white matter of the frontal lobe, ES have been associated with such conditions as cerebral palsy and mental retardation, residual brain damage, undefined infections, infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, Menkes' kinky-hair syndrome, congenital muscular dystrophy, hydrocephalus, porencephaly, epilepsy, progressive cerebellar degeneration, and mycoplasma encephalitis. Methotrexate has a notably toxic effect on the central nervous system, with leukoencephalopathy being the most common form. In our case, frontocentral ES were associated with hyperintense lesions in the white matter of the frontal lobe. Lesional deafferentation can be the substrate for an almost continuous ES, since both initiation and termination of spindle oscillations are thought to originate in thalamocortical neurons. Thus, we postulate that in some cases a partial functional cortical differentiation could generate ES. PMID:26793900

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from low risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients promote NK cell antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Entrena, Ana; Varas, Alberto; Vázquez, Miriam; Melen, Gustavo J; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M; García-Castro, Javier; Ramírez, Manuel; Zapata, Agustín G; Vicente, Ángeles

    2015-07-28

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key components of the bone marrow microenvironment which contribute to the maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell niche and exert immunoregulatory functions in innate and adaptive immunity. We analyze the immunobiology of MSCs derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and their impact on NK cell function. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on the immune response exerted by MSCs from healthy donors (Healthy-MSCs), we demonstrate that MSCs derived from low/intermediate risk ALL patients at diagnosis (ALL-MSCs) promote an efficient NK cell response including cytokine production, phenotypic activation and most importantly, cytotoxicity. Longitudinal studies indicate that these immunostimulatory effects of ALL-MSCs are progressively attenuated. Healthy-MSCs adopt ALL-MSC-like immunomodulatory features when exposed to leukemia cells, acquiring the ability to stimulate NK cell antitumor function. The mechanisms underlying to these functional changes of ALL-MSCs include reduced production of soluble inhibitory factors, differential expression of costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules, increased expression of specific TLRs and Notch pathway activation. Collectively our findings indicate that, in response to leukemia cells, ALL-MSCs could mediate a host beneficial immunomodulatory effect by stimulating the antitumor innate immune response. PMID:25917077

  1. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  2. Rhizobium etli asparaginase II: an alternative for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed; Moreno-Enriquez, Angélica; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial L-asparaginase has been a universal component of therapies for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia since the 1970s. Two principal enzymes derived from Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi are the only options clinically approved to date. We recently reported a study of recombinant L-asparaginase (AnsA) from Rhizobium etli and described an increasing type of AnsA family members. Sequence analysis revealed four conserved motifs with notable differences with respect to the conserved regions of amino acid sequences of type I and type II L-asparaginases, particularly in comparison with therapeutic enzymes from E. coli and E. chrysanthemi. These differences suggested a distinct immunological specificity. Here, we report an in silico analysis that revealed immunogenic determinants of AnsA. Also, we used an extensive approach to compare the crystal structures of E. coli and E. chrysantemi asparaginases with a computational model of AnsA and identified immunogenic epitopes. A three-dimensional model of AsnA revealed, as expected based on sequence dissimilarities, completely different folding and different immunogenic epitopes. This approach could be very useful in transcending the problem of immunogenicity in two major ways: by chemical modifications of epitopes to reduce drug immunogenicity, and by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues to diminish immunogenicity without reduction of enzymatic activity. PMID:22895060

  3. Best Practices in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Boissel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of asparaginase in chemotherapy regimens to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has had a positive impact on survival in pediatric patients. Historically, asparaginase has been excluded from most treatment protocols for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients because of perceived toxicity in this population, and this is believed to have contributed to poorer outcomes in these patients. However, retrospective analyses over the past 12 years have shown that 2-, 5-, and 7-year overall survival of AYA patients is significantly improved with pediatric versus adult protocols. The addition of asparaginase to adult protocols yielded high rates of first remission and improved survival. However, long-term survival remains lower compared with what has been seen in pediatrics. The notion that asparaginase is poorly tolerated by AYA patients has been challenged in multiple studies. In some, but not all, studies, the incidences of hepatic and pancreatic toxicities were higher in AYA patients, whereas the rates of hypersensitivity reactions did not appear to differ with age. There is an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, and management with anti-coagulation therapy is recommended. Overall, the risk of therapy-related mortality is low. Together, this suggests that high-intensity pediatric protocols offer an effective and tolerable approach to treating ALL in the AYA population. PMID:26421220

  4. Thiopurine methyltransferase and treatment outcome in the UK acute lymphoblastic leukaemia trial ALL2003

    PubMed Central

    Lennard, Lynne; Cartwright, Cher S; Wade, Rachel; Vora, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    The influence of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) genotype on treatment outcome was investigated in the United Kingdom childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia trial ALL2003, a trial in which treatment intensity was adjusted based on minimal residual disease (MRD). TPMT genotype was measured in 2387 patients (76% of trial entrants): 2190 were homozygous wild-type, 189 were heterozygous for low activity TPMT alleles (166 TPMT*1/*3A, 19 TPMT*1/*3C, 3 TPMT*1/*2 and 1 TPMT*1/*9) and 8 were TPMT deficient. In contrast to the preceding trial ALL97, there was no difference in event-free survival (EFS) between the TPMT genotypes. The 5-year EFS for heterozygous TPMT*1/*3A patients was the same in both trials (88%), but for the homozygous wild-type TPMT*1/*1 patients, EFS improved from 80% in ALL97% to 88% in ALL2003. Importantly, the unexplained worse outcome for heterozygous TPMT*1/*3C patients observed in ALL97 (5-year EFS 53%) was not seen in ALL2003 (5-year EFS 94%). In a multivariate Cox regression analysis the only significant factor affecting EFS was MRD status (hazard ratio for high-risk MRD patients 4·22, 95% confidence interval 2·97–5·99, P < 0·0001). In conclusion, refinements in risk stratification and treatment have reduced the influence of TPMT genotype on treatment outcome in a contemporary protocol. PMID:25940902

  5. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-12-15

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  6. The Progression of Bone Mineral Density Abnormalities After Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vitanza, Nicholas A; Hogan, Laura E; Zhang, Guangxiang; Parker, Robert I

    2015-07-01

    Although reduced bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is well documented, the degree of demineralization and relation to age are not well described. This is a retrospective chart analysis of 58 patients consecutively treated for ALL without relapse, cranial irradiation, or transplantation. Bone mineral densities were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and patients were divided by sex and age (≤5, 6 to 10, and >10 y) at diagnosis. Serial scans for 6 years after therapy were analyzed as Z-scores. Over 6 years after therapy, 93.1% of patients exhibited a decreased Z-score in at least 1 anatomic site. The difference in Z-score among the age cohorts was significant at both the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Patients older than 10 years at diagnosis had the lowest Z-scores: -2.78 and -2.87 for boys and -2.39 and -2.91 for girls at the lumbar spine and femoral neck, respectively. Children after ALL therapy exhibit a significant bone mineral deficit shortly after completion of therapy that persists for at least 6 years. The degree of bone demineralization can be followed up by a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan and is most severe in patients older than 10 years at the initiation of therapy. PMID:25222061

  7. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Prognosis of B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaime-Perez, Jose Carlos; Carrillo-Sanchez, Karol; Ramos-Del Hoyo, Maria Guadalupe; Lugo-Trampe, Angel; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Cesar Homero; Gonzalez-Llano, Oscar; Salazar-Riojas, Rosario; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Gomez-Almaguer, David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia type B (B-ALL) is a neoplastic disorder with high mortality rates. The aim of this study was to validate the expression profile of 45 genes associated with signaling pathways involved in leukemia and to evaluate their association with the prognosis of B-ALL. Methods. 219 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from 73 B-ALL patients were studied at diagnosis, four, and eight weeks after starting treatment. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. Normalized delta Cq values of 23 genes showed differences between B-ALL and controls at diagnosis time (P values < 0.05). There were significant associations between B-ALL patients relapse/death and the expression levels of IL2RA, SORT1, DEFA1, and FLT3 genes at least in one of the times evaluated (P values < 0.05 and odds ratio ranges: 3.73–27). The association between FLT3 deregulation and relapse/death was a constant in the times studied and their overexpression significantly increased the odds of relapse/death in a range of 3.73 and 6.05 among study population (P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Overexpression of FLT3 and DEFA1 genes retained independent prognostic significance for B-ALL outcome, reflected as increased risks of relapse/death among the study population. PMID:25802479

  8. Natural killer cell function and lymphoid subpopulations in acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia in complete remission.

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolo, G.; Trentin, L.; Vinante, F.; Agostini, C.; Zambello, R.; Masciarelli, M.; Feruglio, C.; Dazzi, F.; Todeschini, G.; Chilosi, M.

    1988-01-01

    A long term follow-up study has been undertaken in 33 patients with acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia (ANLL) in order to establish whether a correlation exists between the clinical course and the immunologic pattern of lymphoid subpopulations. Peripheral blood lymphoid cells have been investigated longitudinally (each 1 to 4 months) during complete remission (CR), by morphologic, phenotypic and functional analyses. Particular attention has been paid to the evaluation of the natural killer (NK) cell compartment, by the detection of cells expressing an NK-related phenotype and by NK in vitro assay. Among the patients so far evaluable, 20 relapsed (R) and 10 are long survivors in CR 'off therapy' (LS). The most relevant finding was represented by statistically higher values of NK activity observed in LS vs. R patients (P less than 0.01). The removal of adherent cells before the NK assay, performed to investigate the possible inhibitory effect on NK function played by the macrophage component, abolished this difference, due to a selective increase of NK function in the R group. The longitudinal study revealed that NK activity tended to decrease in individual patients who subsequently relapsed. These data suggest a possible role of NK cells in the relapse control of ANLL, although it cannot be excluded that the low level of NK activity observed in the R group is the result of impending relapse rather than its cause. PMID:3179190

  9. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  10. Novel management options for adult patients with progressive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: introduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eunice S

    2015-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous hematologic malignancy characterized by highly proliferative immature lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. In adults, ALL accounts for approximately 20% of all adult leukemias. ALL carries a poor prognosis in adults. The 5-year overall survival is 24% in patients ages 40 to 59 years and 18% in patients ages 60 to 69 years. ALL can be grouped into different categories according to its cell lineage (B cell or T cell), the presence or absence of the Philadelphia chromosome, and various cytogenetic and molecular classifications. A main goal of treatment is to allow the patient to achieve a complete remission and to consolidate this remission with either a maintenance regimen or an allogeneic stem cell transplant. Although the overall rate of complete remission following frontline therapy for newly diagnosed ALL is high, the majority of patients experience a disease relapse. In general, the duration of initial complete remission impacts the patient’s prognosis and response to further therapies. Subsequent treatments must balance the goal of achieving a remission with the need for the patient to maintain or improve quality of life. Recently approved agents, such as blinatumomab and vincristine sulfate liposome injection, offer the promise of a second remission that can serve as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplant while still maintaining quality of life. A novel approach using adoptive cellular immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells is associated with extremely robust responses. PMID:26431322

  11. Effect of Malnutrition at Diagnosis on Clinical Outcomes of Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Nadine; Samia, Loma; Saab, Raya; Abboud, Miguel R; Solh, Hassan; Muwakkit, Samar

    2016-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy among children. Although studies have shown that malnutrition can negatively affect treatment outcome, results are controversial. This retrospective study aims at determining the prevalence of malnutrition and its association with treatment outcome among children with ALL treated at the Children's Cancer Institute in Lebanon. A total of 103 patients diagnosed with ALL between April 2002 and May 2010 were enrolled. Anthropometric data were collected from medical records upon diagnosis, at 3 and 6 months, and at the end of treatment. Body mass index was calculated for children 2 years of age and older, whereas weight-for-height ratio was used for patients below 2 years. Patients were considered underweight, stunted, or wasted if their Z-scores were <-2 SD. The prevalence of malnourished children was 25.2% at diagnosis and remained almost the same at the end of treatment. The odds of having a poor outcome (death and relapse) was higher among malnourished children and more so among stunted children with an odds ratios=2.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-8.3 and odds ratio=2.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-11.5, respectively. Although there was a trend showing worse outcomes in malnourished children with ALL at diagnosis when compared with well-nourished children larger studies using additional tools like arm anthropometry need to be conducted to prove the association. PMID:26479995

  12. Oral Microbiota Distinguishes Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Pediatric Hosts from Healthy Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuedong; You, Meng; Du, Qin; Yang, Xue; He, Jingzhi; Zou, Jing; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Zhu, Yiping; Li, Jiyao; Shi, Wenyuan; Xu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In leukemia, oral manifestations indicate aberrations in oral microbiota. Microbiota structure is determined by both host and environmental factors. In human hosts, how health status shapes the composition of oral microbiota is largely unknown. Taking advantage of advances in high-throughput sequencing, we compared the composition of supragingival plaque microbiota of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) pediatric patients with healthy controls. The oral microbiota of leukemia patients had lower richness and less diversity compared to healthy controls. Microbial samples clustered into two major groups, one of ALL patients and another of healthy children, with different structure and composition. Abundance changes of certain taxa including the Phylum Firmicutes, the Class Bacilli, the Order Lactobacillales, the Family Aerococcaceae and Carnobacteriaceae, as well as the Genus Abiotrophia and Granulicatella were associated with leukemia status. ALL patients demonstrated a structural imbalance of the oral microbiota, characterized by reduced diversity and abundance alterations, possibly involved in systemic infections, indicating the importance of immune status in shaping the structure of oral microbiota. PMID:25025462

  13. Polymorphisms of the vincristine pathway and response to treatment in children with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Francesco; Langlois-Pelletier, Chloé; Gagné, Vincent; Rousseau, Julie; Ciolino, Claire; Lorenzo, Samanta De; Kevin, Kojok M; Cijov, Diana; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Background Vincristine (VCR) is a standard component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). VCR cytotoxicity is primarily due to its ability to disrupt the formation of microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Patients & methods A total of 17 polymorphisms in regulatory and coding regions of genes controlling VCR targets (TUBB1, MAP4, ACTG1 and CAPG) or potentially influencing VCR levels (ABCB1 and CYP3A5) were investigated for an association with peripheral neuropathy and outcome in childhood ALL patients. Results High-grade neurotoxicity was more frequent in carriers of the A allele of synonymous (Ala310) G to A (rs1135989) variation in the ACTG1 gene. Substitution (rs4728709) in the promoter of the ABCB1 gene had a protective effect against lower grade neurotoxicity and C to A variation (rs3770102) located 17 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start site had a protective effect against high-grade neurotoxicity. Patients with the ABCB1 3435TT genotype had lower event-free survival; the association with event-free survival was not supported by the analysis in the replication patient set. Conclusion The polymorphisms in the ACTG1, CAPG and ABCB1 genes may modulate VCR-related neurotoxicity, whereas the risk of relapse seems not to be affected by the genes of the VCR pathway. PMID:25084203

  14. Oral manifestations in pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Torres, Elena; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Ma del Socorro; Alejo-González, Francisco; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury de J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral manifestations in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving chemotherapy, and to evaluate the significance of independent risk factors (oral health, gender, age, time and type of treatment, and phase of chemotherapy). A cross-sectional study was made in 49 children with ALL between 2 and 14 years of age. To describe oral manifestations, a clinical diagnosis was made and the following criteria were applied: the OHI-S index to describe oral health and the IMPA index to describe periodontal conditions and to differentiate gingivitis from periodontitis. The prevalence of oral manifestations was: gingivitis, 91.84%; caries, 81.63%; mucositis, 38.77%; periodontitis, 16.32%; cheilitis, 18.36%; recurrent herpes, 12.24%; and primary herpetic gingivostomatitis, 2.04%. Other oral manifestations were: dry lips, mucosal pallor, mucosal petechiae, ecchymoses, and induced ulcers. The prevalence of oral candidiasis was 6.12%. It was observed that high risk ALL and poor oral hygiene were important risk factors for the development of candidiasis and gingivitis. The type of leukemia, gender and phase of chemotherapy were apparently associated with the presence of candidiasis, gingivitis, and periodontitis, and they could be considered risk factors for the development of oral manifestations. PMID:20578668

  15. Multi-loci diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferret, Yann; Caillault, Aurélie; Sebda, Shéhérazade; Duez, Marc; Grardel, Nathalie; Duployez, Nicolas; Villenet, Céline; Figeac, Martin; Preudhomme, Claude; Salson, Mikaël; Giraud, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) is considered a technical revolution that has improved our knowledge of lymphoid and autoimmune diseases, changing our approach to leukaemia both at diagnosis and during follow-up. As part of an immunoglobulin/T cell receptor-based minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients, we assessed the performance and feasibility of the replacement of the first steps of the approach based on DNA isolation and Sanger sequencing, using a HTS protocol combined with bioinformatics analysis and visualization using the Vidjil software. We prospectively analysed the diagnostic and relapse samples of 34 paediatric patients, thus identifying 125 leukaemic clones with recombinations on multiple loci (TRG, TRD, IGH and IGK), including Dd2/Dd3 and Intron/KDE rearrangements. Sequencing failures were halved (14% vs. 34%, P = 0.0007), enabling more patients to be monitored. Furthermore, more markers per patient could be monitored, reducing the probability of false negative MRD results. The whole analysis, from sample receipt to clinical validation, was shorter than our current diagnostic protocol, with equal resources. V(D)J recombination was successfully assigned by the software, even for unusual recombinations. This study emphasizes the progress that HTS with adapted bioinformatics tools can bring to the diagnosis of leukaemia patients. PMID:26898266

  16. Intracellular Signaling Pathways Involved in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Layton Tovar, Cristian Fabián; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of immature lymphoid cells. ALL is the most common hematologic malignancy in early childhood, and it reaches peak incidence between the ages of 2 and 3 years. The prognosis of ALL is associated with aberrant gene expression, in addition to the presence of numerical or structural chromosomal alterations, age, race, and immunophenotype. The Relapse rate with regard to pharmacological treatment rises in childhood; thus, the expression of biomarkers associated with the activation of cell signaling pathways is crucial to establish the disease prognosis. Intracellular pathways involved in ALL are diverse, including Janus kinase/Signal transducers and transcription activators (JAK-STAT), Phosphoinositide-3-kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT), Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras-MAPK), Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), Nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB), and Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α), among others. In this review, we present several therapeutic targets, intracellular pathways, and molecular markers that are being studied extensively at present. PMID:27065575

  17. Absence of Genomic Ikaros/IKZF1 Deletions in Pediatric B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Sanjive; Ma, Hong; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the results of gene expression analyses using multiple probesets aimed at determining the incidence of Ikaros/IKZF1 deletions in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL). Primary leukemia cells from 122 Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)+ BPL patients and 237 Ph− BPL patients as well as normal hematopoietic cells from 74 normal non-leukemic bone marrow specimens were organized according to expression levels of IKZF1 transcripts utilizing two-way hierarchical clustering technique to identify specimens with low IKZF1 expression for the 10 probesets interrogating Exons 1 through 4 and Exon 8. Our analysis demonstrated no changes in expression that would be expected from homozygous or heterozygous deletions of IKZF1 in primary leukemic cells. Similar results were obtained in gene expression analysis of primary leukemic cells from 20 Ph+ positive and 155 Ph− BPL patients in a validation dataset. Taken together, our gene expression analyses in 534 pediatric BPL cases, including 142 cases with Ph+ BPL, contradict previous reports that were based on SNP array data and suggested that Ph+ pediatric BPL is characterized by a high frequency of homozygous or heterozygous IKZF1 deletions. Further, exon-specific genomic PCR analysis of primary leukemia cells from 21 high-risk pediatric BPL patients and 11 standard-risk pediatric BPL patients, and 8 patients with infant BPL did not show any evidence for homozygous IKZF1 locus deletions. Nor was there any evidence for homozygous or heterozygous intragenic IKZF1 deletions. PMID:24478816

  18. SYK as a New Therapeutic Target in B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Qazi, Sanjive

    2014-01-01

    The identification of SYK as a master regulator of apoptosis controlling the activation of the PI3-K/AKT, NFκB, and STAT3 pathways—three major anti-apoptotic signaling pathways in B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cells—prompts the hypothesis that rationally designed inhibitors targeting SYK may overcome the resistance of malignant B-lineage lymphoid cells to apoptosis and thereby provide the foundation for more effective multi-modality treatment regimens for poor prognosis B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL). In recent preclinical proof-of-concept studies, a liposomal nanoparticle (LNP) formulation of a SYK substrate-binding site inhibitor, known as C61, has been developed as a nanomedicine candidate against poor prognosis and relapsed BPL. This nanoscale formulation of C61 exhibited a uniquely favorable pharmacokinetics and safety profile in mice, induced apoptosis in radiation-resistant primary leukemic cells taken directly from BPL patients as well as in vivo clonogenic BPL xenograft cells, destroyed the leukemic stem cell fraction of BPL blasts, and exhibited potent in vivo anti-leukemic activity in xenograft models of aggressive BPL. Further development of C61-LNP may provide the foundation for new and effective treatment strategies against therapy-refractory BPL. PMID:24851191

  19. L-asparaginase in the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Egler, Rachel A.; Ahuja, Sanjay P.; Matloub, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a hematologic malignancy that predominantly occurs in children between 2 and 10 years of age. L-asparaginase is an integral component of treatment for patients with ALL and since its introduction into pediatric treatment protocols in the 1960s, survival rates in children have progressively risen to nearly 90%. Outcomes for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients, aged 15-39 years and diagnosed with ALL, have historically been less favorable. However, recent reports suggest substantially increased survival in AYA patients treated on pediatric-inspired protocols that include a greater cumulative dose of asparaginase. All  currently available asparaginases share the same mechanism of action - the deamination and depletion of serum asparagine levels - yet each displays a markedly different pharmacokinetic profile. Pegylated asparaginase derived from the bacterium Escherichia coli is used as first-line therapy; however, up to 30% of patients develop a treatment-limiting hypersensitivity reaction. Patients who experience a hypersensitivity reaction to an E. coli-derived asparaginase can continue treatment with Erwinia chrysanthemi asparaginase. Erwinia asparaginase is immunologically distinct from E. coli-derived asparaginases and exhibits no cross-reactivity. Studies have shown that with adequate dosing, therapeutic levels of Erwinia asparaginase activity can be achieved, and patients switched to Erwinia asparaginase due to hypersensitivity can obtain outcomes similar to patients who do not experience a hypersensitivity reaction. Therapeutic drug monitoring may be required to ensure that therapeutic levels of asparaginase activity are maintained. PMID:27440950

  20. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10(-3) a 10(-5)), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  1. Evaluation of neuropathy during intensive vincristine chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorchin, M; Masoumi Dehshiri, R; Soleiman, S; Manashi, M

    2013-01-01

    Back ground: Vincristine (VCR), is a chemotherapy drug, useful in the treatment of leukemia, lymphoma and solid tumor and it is a potent neurotoxin and sensory neuropathy drug which a common behavioral toxicity of this drug. Neuropathy is common squeal of intensive chemotherapy protocols that contain vincristine and corticosteroids. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective and descriptive study of neuropathy during in chemotherapy program with vincristine for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). Data was analyzed by spss Version16 software. Results: From total of 51 cases, 23 patients had vincristine neuropathy (45%). Patients with visceral neuropathy have shown ileus, constipation in 13 patients (25%), occasionally severe diarrhea 11 (21%), mild diarrhea 7 (13.7%) and transient diarrhea in 16 patients (31%). Motor neuropathy were found in one patient with Bell, s palsy (1.9%) and one patient with Hoarseness. 12 patients (23.5%) had some type of complication together with sensory peripheral neuropathy. Conclusion: Almost half of patients with vincristin chemotherapy had neuropathy and the mean age of patients with neuropathy was 12.3 years. PMID:24575286

  2. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S; Winter, Stuart S; Larson, Richard S; Li, Wei; Liu, X Shirley; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. Promoters occupied by TAL1 were also frequently bound by the class I bHLH proteins E2A and HEB, suggesting that TAL1/E2A as well as TAL1/HEB heterodimers play a role in transformation of T-cell precursors. Using RNA interference, we demonstrated that TAL1 is required for the maintenance of the leukemic phenotype in Jurkat cells and showed that TAL1 binding can be associated with either repression or activation of genes whose promoters occupied by TAL1, E2A, and HEB. In addition, oligonucleotide microarray analysis of RNA from 47 primary T-ALL samples showed specific expression signatures involving TAL1 targets in TAL1-expressing compared with -nonexpressing human T-ALLs. Our results indicate that TAL1 may act as a bifunctional transcriptional regulator (activator and repressor) at the top of a complex regulatory network that disrupts normal T-cell homeostasis and contributes to leukemogenesis. PMID:16621969

  3. Quantitative MRI assessments of white matter in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Helton, Kathleen J.; Li, Chin-Shang; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use objective quantitative MR imaging methods to prospectively assess changes in the physiological structure of white matter during the temporal evolution of leukoencephalopathy (LE) in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The longitudinal incidence, extent (proportion of white matter affect), and intensity (elevation of T1 and T2 relaxation rates) of LE was evaluated for 44 children. A combined imaging set consisting of T1, T2, PD, and FLAIR MR images and white matter, gray matter and CSF a priori maps from a spatially normalized atlas were analyzed with a neural network segmentation based on a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM). Quantitative T1 and T2 relaxation maps were generated using a nonlinear parametric optimization procedure to fit the corresponding multi-exponential models. A Cox proportional regression was performed to estimate the effect of intravenous methotrexate (IV-MTX) exposure on the development of LE followed by a generalized linear model to predict the probability of LE in new patients. Additional T-tests of independent samples were performed to assess differences in quantitative measures of extent and intensity at four different points in therapy. Higher doses and more courses of IV-MTX placed patients at a higher risk of developing LE and were associated with more intense changes affecting more of the white matter volume; many of the changes resolved after completion of therapy. The impact of these changes on neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in survivors remains to be determined.

  4. TYK2-STAT1-BCL2 Pathway Dependence in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanda, Takaomi; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ngo, Vu N.; Glover, Jason; Chang, Bill H.; Yost, Arla; Ma, Wenxue; Fleischman, Angela G.; Zhou, Wenjun; Yang, Yandan; Kleppe, Maria; Ahn, Yebin; Tatarek, Jessica; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Levine, Ross L.; Moriggl, Richard; Müller, Mathias; Gray, Nathanael S.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.; Weng, Andrew P.; Staudt, Louis M.; Druker, Brian J.; Look, A. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy has yielded remarkable outcomes in certain cancers, but specific therapeutic targets remain elusive for many others. As a result of two independent RNA interference (RNAi) screens, we identified pathway dependence on a member of the JAK tyrosine kinase family, TYK2, and its downstream effector STAT1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Gene knockdown experiments consistently demonstrated TYK2 dependence in both T-ALL primary specimens and cell lines, and a small-molecule inhibitor of JAK kinase activity induced T-ALL cell death. Activation of this TYK2-STAT1 pathway i n T-ALL cell lines occurs by gain-of-function TYK2 mutations or activation of IL-10 receptor signaling, and this pathway mediates T-ALL cell survival through upregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. These findings indicate that in many T-ALL cases, the leukemic cells are dependent upon the TYK2-STAT1-BCL2 pathway for continued survival, supporting the development of molecular therapies targeting TYK2 and other components of this pathway. PMID:23471820

  5. Increased Body Mass Index during Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Significant and Underestimated Complication.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen C; Marsh, Julie A; Rath, Shoshana R; Kotecha, Rishi S; Gough, Hazel; Taylor, Mandy; Walwyn, Thomas; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Cole, Catherine H; Choong, Catherine S

    2015-01-01

    Objective & Design. We undertook a retrospective review of children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and treated with modern COG protocols (n = 80) to determine longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of obesity compared with a healthy reference population. Results. At diagnosis, the majority of patients (77.5%) were in the healthy weight category. During treatment, increases in BMI z-scores were greater for females than males; the prevalence of obesity increased from 10.3% to 44.8% (P < 0.004) for females but remained relatively unchanged for males (9.8% to 13.7%, P = 0.7). Longitudinal analysis using linear mixed-effects identified associations between BMI z-scores and time-dependent interactions with sex (P = 0.0005), disease risk (P < 0.0001), age (P = 0.0001), and BMI z-score (P < 0.0001) at diagnosis and total dose of steroid during maintenance (P = 0.01). Predicted mean BMI z-scores at the end of therapy were greater for females with standard risk ALL irrespective of age at diagnosis and for males younger than 4 years of age at diagnosis with standard risk ALL. Conclusion. Females treated on standard risk protocols and younger males may be at greatest risk of becoming obese during treatment for ALL. These subgroups may benefit from intervention strategies to manage BMI during treatment for ALL. PMID:26101530

  6. Characterization of a set of tumor suppressor microRNAs in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Viraj R; Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Wolfe, Andrew L; Carty, Mark; Mohan, Prathibha; Rondou, Pieter; Socci, Nicholas D; Benoit, Yves; Taghon, Tom; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Leslie, Christina S; Speleman, Frank; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-11-18

    The posttranscriptional control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) is highly redundant, and compensatory effects limit the consequences of the inactivation of individual miRNAs. This implies that only a few miRNAs can function as effective tumor suppressors. It is also the basis of our strategy to define functionally relevant miRNA target genes that are not under redundant control by other miRNAs. We identified a functionally interconnected group of miRNAs that exhibited a reduced abundance in leukemia cells from patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To pinpoint relevant target genes, we applied a machine learning approach to eliminate genes that were subject to redundant miRNA-mediated control and to identify those genes that were exclusively targeted by tumor-suppressive miRNAs. This strategy revealed the convergence of a small group of tumor suppressor miRNAs on the Myb oncogene, as well as their effects on HBP1, which encodes a transcription factor. The expression of both genes was increased in T-ALL patient samples, and each gene promoted the progression of T-ALL in mice. Hence, our systematic analysis of tumor suppressor miRNA action identified a widespread mechanism of oncogene activation in T-ALL. PMID:25406379

  7. Banding cytogenetic analysis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic studies in Brazilian population about childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, are scarce. Moreover, Brazilian race is very heterogeneous and is made by the confluence of people of several different origins, from the original Native Brazilians, with the influx of Portuguese colonizers, Black African slaves, and recent European, Arab and Japanese immigration. The purpose of this prospective, multicentric study was to assess the sociodemographic, clinic and cytogenetic characteristics of the children treated for ALL in the Northeast region of Brazil. Results This study includes thirty patients between 4 months and 17 years old treated for ALL from January 1st, 2009 to November 30th, 2010. Cytogenetic analysis showed that in nineteen out of thirty patients (64%) presented some chromosome abnormalities, in which 53% corresponds to numerical abnormalities, 21% structural and numerical abnormalities, and 26% only structural changes. Moreover, seven patients presented complexes karyotype not yet described in the literature. Taken together these results show the importance of the cytogenetic analysis in ALL pediatric patients and illustrates that the studied population presented unexpected complexes karyotypes which were correlated to poor outcome. Conclusion The results demonstrate the importance of banding cytogenetics for ALL diagnosis despite the use of most modern techniques such as FISH and aCGH, and provide reliable insight into the ALL in Brazil. PMID:24025689

  8. Pharmacogenetics of microRNAs and microRNAs biogenesis machinery in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    López-López, Elixabet; Gutiérrez-Camino, Ángela; Piñán, Maria Ángeles; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Uriz, Jose Javier; Ballesteros, Javier; García-Miguel, Purificación; Navajas, Aurora; García-Orad, África

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical success of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy, toxicity is frequent. Therefore, it would be useful to identify predictors of adverse effects. In the last years, several studies have investigated the relationship between genetic variation and treatment-related toxicity. However, most of these studies are focused in coding regions. Nowadays, it is known that regions that do not codify proteins, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), may have an important regulatory function. MiRNAs can regulate the expression of genes affecting drug response. In fact, the expression of some of those miRNAs has been associated with drug response. Genetic variations affecting miRNAs can modify their function, which may lead to drug sensitivity. The aim of this study was to detect new toxicity markers in pediatric B-ALL, studying miRNA-related polymorphisms, which can affect miRNA levels and function. We analyzed 118 SNPs in pre-miRNAs and miRNA processing genes in association with toxicity in 152 pediatric B-ALL patients all treated with the same protocol (LAL/SHOP). Among the results found, we detected for the first time an association between rs639174 in DROSHA and vomits that remained statistically significant after FDR correction. DROSHA had been associated with alterations in miRNAs expression, which could affect genes involved in drug transport. This suggests that miRNA-related SNPs could be a useful tool for toxicity prediction in pediatric B-ALL. PMID:24614921

  9. Skeletal, neuromuscular and fitness impairments among children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kirsten K; Kaste, Sue C; Zhu, Liang; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Nathan, Paul C; Inaba, Hiroto; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Shah, Durga; Wells, Robert J; Karlage, Robyn E; Robison, Leslie L; Cox, Cheryl L

    2015-04-01

    This study describes skeletal, neuromuscular and fitness impairments among 109 children (median age 10 [range 4-18] years, 65.1% male, 63.3% white) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Outcomes were measured 7-10 days after diagnosis and compared to age- and sex-specific expected values. Associations between function and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were evaluated with logistic regression. Children with ALL had sub-optimal bone mineral density (BMD) Z-score/height (mean ± standard error: - 0.53 ± 0.16 vs. 0.00 ± 0.14, p < 0.01), body mass index percentile (57.6 ± 3.15 vs. 50.0 ± 3.27%, p = 0.02), quadriceps strength (201.9 ± 8.3 vs. 236.1 ± 5.4 N, p < 0.01), 6 min walk distance (385.0 ± 13.1 vs. 628.2 ± 7.1 m, p < 0.001) and Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency scores (23 ± 2.5 vs. 50 ± 3.4%, p < 0.01). Quadriceps weakness was associated with a 20.9-fold (95% confidence interval 2.5-173.3) increase in poor physical HRQL. Children with newly diagnosed ALL have weakness and poor endurance and may benefit from early rehabilitation that includes strengthening and aerobic conditioning. PMID:25030039

  10. Absence of Association between CCR5 rs333 Polymorphism and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Perim, Aparecida de Lourdes; Ozawa, Patricia Midori Murobushi; Freire Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder that originates from one single hematopoietic precursor committed to B- or T-cell lineage. Ordinarily, these cells express CCR5 chemokine receptor, which directs the immune response to a cellular pattern and is involved in cancer pathobiology. The genetic rs333 polymorphism of CCR5 (Δ32), results in a diminished receptor expression, thus leading to impaired cell trafficking. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CCR5 chemokine receptor rs333 polymorphism in the pathogenesis of ALL. The genotype distribution was studied in 79 patients and compared with 80 control subjects, in a childhood population of Southern Brazil. Genotyping was performed using DNA samples amplified by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The homozygous (Δ32/Δ32) deletion was not observed in any subject involved in the study. Heterozygous genotype was not associated with ALL risk (OR 0.7%; 95% CI 0.21–2.32; P > 0.05), nor recurrence status of ALL (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.13–5.48; P > 0.05). This work demonstrated, for the first time, no significant differences in the frequency of the CCR5/Δ32 genotype between ALL and control groups, indicating no effect of this genetic variant on the ALL susceptibility and recurrence risk. PMID:24822066

  11. Feasibility and Initial Effectiveness of Home Exercise During Maintenance Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Friedman, Debra L.; Smith, Webb A.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for ALL patients undergoing maintenance therapy. Methods Participants were children with ALL, age 5-10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and post-study testing evaluated strength, flexibility, fitness and motor function. Results Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7±7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements ≥5% occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-minute-walk-test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy. PMID:24979081

  12. CD19-Targeted Nanodelivery of Doxorubicin Enhances Therapeutic Efficacy in B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vinu; Xu, Xian; Kelly, Dakota; Snook, Adam; Waldman, Scott A.; Mason, Robert W.; Jia, Xinqiao; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has advanced to clinical trials for adult cancer therapy. However, the field is still in its infancy for treatment of childhood malignancies such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Nanotherapy offers multiple advantages over conventional therapy. It facilitates targeted delivery and enables controlled release of drugs to reduce treatment-related side effects. Here, we demonstrate, that doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) modified with targeting ligands against CD19 (CD19-DOX-NPs) can be delivered in a CD19-specific manner to leukemic cells. The CD19-DOX-NPs were internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis and imparted cytotoxicity in a CD19-dependent manner in CD19 positive ALL cells. Leukemic mice treated with CD19-DOX-NPs survived significantly longer and manifested a higher degree of agility indicating reduced apparent systemic toxicity during treatment compared to mice treated with free DOX. We suggest that targeted delivery of drugs used in childhood cancer treatment should improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce treatment-related side effects in children. PMID:25898125

  13. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Sherief, Laila M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Abdalrahman, Hadel M.; Youssef, Doaa M.; Alhady, Mohamed A Abd; Ali, Adel SA; Elbasset, Maha Aly Abd; Hashim, Hiatham M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents. The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients. The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents’ low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents’ reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients. Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents. PMID:26705211

  14. Patterns and severity of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ellen M. Lavoie; Li, Lang; Chiang, ChienWei; Thomas, Karin; Hutchinson, Raymond J.; Wells, Elizabeth M.; Ho, Richard H.; Skiles, Jodi; Chakraborty, Arindom; Bridges, Celia M.; Renbarger, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Vincristine, a critical component of combination chemotherapy treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), can lead to vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN). Longitudinal VIPN assessments were obtained over 12 months from newly diagnosed children with ALL (N = 128) aged 1–18 years who received vincristine at one of four academic children’s hospitals. VIPN assessments were obtained using the Total Neuropathy Score-Pediatric Vincristine (TNS©-PV), National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE©), Balis© grading scale, and Pediatric Neuropathic Pain Scale©–Five (PNPS©-5). Of children who provided a full TNS©-PV score, 85/109 (78%) developed VIPN (TNS©-PV ≥4). Mean TNS©-PV, grading scale, and pain scores were low. CTCAE©-derived grades 3 and 4 sensory and motor VIPN occurred in 1.6%/0%, and 1.9%/0% of subjects, respectively. VIPN did not resolve in months 8–12 despite decreasing dose density. VIPN was worse in older children. Partition cluster analysis revealed 2–3 patient clusters; one cluster (n = 14) experienced severe VIPN. In this population, VIPN occurs more commonly than previous research suggests, persists throughout the first year of treatment, and can be severe. PMID:25977177

  15. A pre-clinical model of resistance to induction therapy in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samuels, A L; Beesley, A H; Yadav, B D; Papa, R A; Sutton, R; Anderson, D; Marshall, G M; Cole, C H; Kees, U R; Lock, R B

    2014-01-01

    Relapse and acquired drug resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. This study was designed to establish a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy in childhood T-ALL to examine the emergence of drug resistance and identify novel therapies. Patient-derived T-ALL xenografts in immune-deficient (non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient) mice were exposed to a four-drug combination of vincristine, dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase and daunorubicin (VXLD). 'Relapse' xenografts were characterized by responses to drugs, changes in gene expression profiles and Connectivity Map (CMap) prediction of strategies to reverse drug resistance. Two of four xenografts developed ex vivo and in vivo drug resistance. Both resistant lines showed altered lipid and cholesterol metabolism, yet they had a distinct drug resistance pattern. CMap analyses reinforced these features, identifying the cholesterol pathway inhibitor simvastatin (SVT) as a potential therapy to overcome resistance. Combined ex vivo with DEX, SVT was significantly synergistic, yet when administered in vivo with VXLD it did not delay leukemia progression. Synergy of SVT with established chemotherapy may depend on higher drug doses than are tolerable in this model. Taken together, we have developed a clinically relevant in vivo model of T-ALL suitable to examine the emergence of drug resistance and to identify novel therapies. PMID:25083816

  16. A pre-clinical model of resistance to induction therapy in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, A L; Beesley, A H; Yadav, B D; Papa, R A; Sutton, R; Anderson, D; Marshall, G M; Cole, C H; Kees, U R; Lock, R B

    2014-01-01

    Relapse and acquired drug resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. This study was designed to establish a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy in childhood T-ALL to examine the emergence of drug resistance and identify novel therapies. Patient-derived T-ALL xenografts in immune-deficient (non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient) mice were exposed to a four-drug combination of vincristine, dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase and daunorubicin (VXLD). ‘Relapse' xenografts were characterized by responses to drugs, changes in gene expression profiles and Connectivity Map (CMap) prediction of strategies to reverse drug resistance. Two of four xenografts developed ex vivo and in vivo drug resistance. Both resistant lines showed altered lipid and cholesterol metabolism, yet they had a distinct drug resistance pattern. CMap analyses reinforced these features, identifying the cholesterol pathway inhibitor simvastatin (SVT) as a potential therapy to overcome resistance. Combined ex vivo with DEX, SVT was significantly synergistic, yet when administered in vivo with VXLD it did not delay leukemia progression. Synergy of SVT with established chemotherapy may depend on higher drug doses than are tolerable in this model. Taken together, we have developed a clinically relevant in vivo model of T-ALL suitable to examine the emergence of drug resistance and to identify novel therapies. PMID:25083816

  17. UTX inhibition as selective epigenetic therapy against TAL1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Benyoucef, Aissa; Palii, Carmen G; Wang, Chaochen; Porter, Christopher J; Chu, Alphonse; Dai, Fengtao; Tremblay, Véronique; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Singh, Kulwant; Huang, Suming; Pflumio, Francoise; Hébert, Josée; Couture, Jean-Francois; Perkins, Theodore J; Ge, Kai; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Brand, Marjorie

    2016-03-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematological tumors composed of distinct subtypes that vary in their genetic abnormalities, gene expression signatures, and prognoses. However, it remains unclear whether T-ALL subtypes differ at the functional level, and, as such, T-ALL treatments are uniformly applied across subtypes, leading to variable responses between patients. Here we reveal the existence of a subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability in T-ALL by which a particular subgroup of T-ALL characterized by expression of the oncogenic transcription factor TAL1 is uniquely sensitive to variations in the dosage and activity of the histone 3 Lys27 (H3K27) demethylase UTX/KDM6A. Specifically, we identify UTX as a coactivator of TAL1 and show that it acts as a major regulator of the TAL1 leukemic gene expression program. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UTX, previously described as a tumor suppressor in T-ALL, is in fact a pro-oncogenic cofactor essential for leukemia maintenance in TAL1-positive (but not TAL1-negative) T-ALL. Exploiting this subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability, we propose a novel therapeutic approach based on UTX inhibition through in vivo administration of an H3K27 demethylase inhibitor that efficiently kills TAL1-positive primary human leukemia. These findings provide the first opportunity to develop personalized epigenetic therapy for T-ALL patients. PMID:26944678

  18. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: the Estelle study (SFCE)

    PubMed Central

    Ajrouche, R; Rudant, J; Orsi, L; Petit, A; Baruchel, A; Lambilliotte, A; Gambart, M; Michel, G; Bertrand, Y; Ducassou, S; Gandemer, V; Paillard, C; Saumet, L; Blin, N; Hémon, D; Clavel, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factors related to early stimulation of the immune system (breastfeeding, proxies for exposure to infectious agents, normal delivery, and exposure to animals in early life) have been suggested to decrease the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Methods: The national registry-based case–control study, ESTELLE, was carried out in France in 2010–2011. Population controls were frequency matched with cases on age and gender. The participation rates were 93% for cases and 86% for controls. Data were obtained from structured telephone questionnaires administered to mothers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using unconditional regression models adjusted for age, gender, and potential confounders. Results: In all, 617 ALL and 1225 controls aged ⩾1 year were included. Inverse associations between ALL and early common infections (OR=0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.6, 1.0), non-first born (⩾3 vs 1; OR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0), attendance of a day-care centre before age 1 year (OR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0), breastfeeding (OR=0.8, 95% CI: 0.7, 1.0), and regular contact with pets (OR=0.8, 95% CI: 0.7, 1.0) in infancy were observed. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that conditions promoting the maturation of the immune system in infancy have a protective role with respect to ALL. PMID:25675150

  19. Integrated methylome and transcriptome analysis reveals novel regulatory elements in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Almamun, Md; Levinson, Benjamin T; van Swaay, Annette C; Johnson, Nathan T; McKay, Stephanie D; Arthur, Gerald L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer diagnosed in children under the age of 15. In addition to genetic aberrations, epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation are altered in cancer and impact gene expression. To identify epigenetic alterations in ALL, genome-wide methylation profiles were generated using the methylated CpG island recovery assay followed by next-generation sequencing. More than 25,000 differentially methylated regions (DMR) were observed in ALL patients with ∼ 90% present within intronic or intergenic regions. To determine the regulatory potential of the DMR, whole-transcriptome analysis was performed and integrated with methylation data. Aberrant promoter methylation was associated with the altered expression of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and proliferation. Novel enhancer-like sequences were identified within intronic and intergenic DMR. Aberrant methylation in these regions was associated with the altered expression of neighboring genes involved in cell cycle processes, lymphocyte activation and apoptosis. These genes include potential epi-driver genes, such as SYNE1, PTPRS, PAWR, HDAC9, RGCC, MCOLN2, LYN, TRAF3, FLT1, and MELK, which may provide a selective advantage to leukemic cells. In addition, the differential expression of epigenetic modifier genes, pseudogenes, and non-coding RNAs was also observed accentuating the role of erroneous epigenetic gene regulation in ALL. PMID:26308964

  20. A novel integrated cytogenetic and genomic classification refines risk stratification in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V; Enshaei, Amir; Schwab, Claire; Wade, Rachel; Chilton, Lucy; Elliott, Alannah; Richardson, Stacey; Hancock, Jeremy; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Christopher D; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Harrison, Christine J

    2014-08-28

    Recent genomic studies have provided a refined genetic map of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increased the number of potential prognostic markers. Therefore, we integrated copy-number alteration data from the 8 most commonly deleted genes, subordinately, with established chromosomal abnormalities to derive a 2-tier genetic classification. The classification was developed using 809 ALL97/99 patients and validated using 742 United Kingdom (UK)ALL2003 patients. Good-risk (GR) genetic features included ETV6-RUNX1, high hyperdiploidy, normal copy-number status for all 8 genes, isolated deletions affecting ETV6/PAX5/BTG1, and ETV6 deletions with a single additional deletion of BTG1/PAX5/CDKN2A/B. All other genetic features were classified as poor risk (PR). Three-quarters of UKALL2003 patients had a GR genetic profile and a significantly improved event-free survival (EFS) (94%) compared with patients with a PR genetic profile (79%). This difference was driven by a lower relapse rate (4% vs 17%), was seen across all patient subgroups, and was independent of other risk factors. Even genetic GR patients with minimal residual disease (>0.01%) at day 29 had an EFS in excess of 90%. In conclusion, the integration of genomic and cytogenetic data defines 2 subgroups with distinct responses to treatment and identifies a large subset of children suitable for treatment deintensification. PMID:24957142

  1. Paternal Smoking and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association between paternal smoking and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Method. We identified 18 published epidemiologic studies that reported data on both paternal smoking and childhood ALL risk. We performed a meta-analysis and analyzed dose-response relationships on ALL risk for smoking during preconception, during pregnancy, after birth, and ever smoking. Results. The summary odds ratio (OR) of childhood ALL associated with paternal smoking was 1.11 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.05–1.18, I2 = 18%) during any time period, 1.25 (95% CI: 1.08–1.46, I2 = 53%) preconception; 1.24 (95% CI: 1.07–1.43, I2 = 54%) during pregnancy, and 1.24 (95% CI: 0.96–1.60, I2 = 64%) after birth, with a dose-response relationship between childhood ALL and paternal smoking preconception or after birth. Conclusion. The evidence supports a positive association between childhood ALL and paternal ever smoking and at each exposure time period examined. Future epidemiologic studies should assess paternal smoking during well-defined exposure windows and should include biomarkers to assess smoking exposure and toxicological mechanisms. PMID:21765828

  2. Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Andreia Luís; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro Sampaio; Abadesso, Clara; Loureiro, Helena Cristina; Duarte, Ximo; Almeida, Helena Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare metabolic disorder in children and is potentially fatal. It has a wide differential diagnosis, including cancer. Here, we report the case of a previously healthy 3-year-old who was admitted to the emergency room with fatigue, hyporeactivity, fever and limping gait that had evolved over 5 days and that was progressively worsening. On examination the patient was unconscious (Glasgow coma score: 8). Laboratory tests indicated severe hypercalcemia (total calcium 21.39mg/dL, ionized calcium 2.93mmol/L) and microcytic anemia. Hyperhydration was initiated, and the child was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with calcium-free solution was instituted, which brought progressive normalization of serum calcium and an improved state of consciousness. Zoledronate was administered, and metabolic and infectious causes and poisoning were excluded. The bone marrow smear revealed a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia associated with malignancy in children is rare and occurs as a form of cancer presentation or recurrence. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration should be considered in situations where there is imminent risk to life. PMID:26761480

  3. Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andreia Luís; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro Sampaio; Abadesso, Clara; Loureiro, Helena Cristina; Duarte, Ximo; Almeida, Helena Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare metabolic disorder in children and is potentially fatal. It has a wide differential diagnosis, including cancer. Here, we report the case of a previously healthy 3-year-old who was admitted to the emergency room with fatigue, hyporeactivity, fever and limping gait that had evolved over 5 days and that was progressively worsening. On examination the patient was unconscious (Glasgow coma score: 8). Laboratory tests indicated severe hypercalcemia (total calcium 21.39mg/dL, ionized calcium 2.93mmol/L) and microcytic anemia. Hyperhydration was initiated, and the child was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with calcium-free solution was instituted, which brought progressive normalization of serum calcium and an improved state of consciousness. Zoledronate was administered, and metabolic and infectious causes and poisoning were excluded. The bone marrow smear revealed a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia associated with malignancy in children is rare and occurs as a form of cancer presentation or recurrence. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration should be considered in situations where there is imminent risk to life. PMID:26761480

  4. The effects of Dexamethasone on sleep in young children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Gerald; Harris, Anne K.; Liu, Meixia; Dreyfus, Jill; Krueger, James; Messinger, Yoav H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Corticosteroids, which are a mainstay in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), have a well-documented adverse effect on sleep. We sought to characterize the effects of dexamethasone on sleep over an entire 28-day treatment cycle using actigraphy, an objective measure of sleep. Methods The sleep of 25 children aged 2–9 years (mean 4.5 years) with ALL treated with dexamethasone were evaluated during maintenance chemotherapy using a within-subject experimental design, actigraphy, and standardized questionnaires to assess sleep, sleep problems, and fatigue. Results During the five days of dexamethasone treatment, sleep time increased during the night (535 vs. 498 min; p = 0.004) and daytime napping increased the following day (14 vs. 0 min; p = 0.002), and the number of wake episodes during the night was lower (14 vs. 20; p = ≤ 0.001). However, when assessed individually, sleep-onset time, efficiency, and wake after sleep onset during the night were unchanged during dexamethasone treatment; when the cumulative effect of all of these factors was assessed, there was a statistically and clinically significant increase in nighttime sleep duration during dexamethasone treatment. Conclusions During the five days of treatment with dexamethasone, an increase in nighttime sleep as well as daytime napping was observed in young children with ALL. The increases in sleep duration return to baseline one day after the discontinuation of dexamethasone. PMID:25799940

  5. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abdalrahman, Hadel M; Youssef, Doaa M; Abd Alhady, Mohamed A; Ali, Adel S A; Abd Elbasset, Maha Aly; Hashim, Hiatham M

    2015-12-01

    To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents.The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients.The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents' low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents' reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients.Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents. PMID:26705211

  6. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child’s lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, cholorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia. PMID:19700145

  7. Recurrent DUX4 fusions in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia of adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takahiko; Tsuzuki, Shinobu; Kawazu, Masahito; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Kojima, Shinya; Ueno, Toshihide; Imoto, Naoto; Kohsaka, Shinji; Kunita, Akiko; Doi, Koichiro; Sakura, Toru; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Kondo, Eisei; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Ueda, Yasunori; Aoyama, Yasutaka; Ohtake, Shigeki; Takita, Junko; Sai, Eirin; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Morishita, Shinichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Naoe, Tomoki; Mano, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    The oncogenic mechanisms underlying acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA; 15-39 years old) remain largely elusive. Here we have searched for new oncogenes in AYA-ALL by performing RNA-seq analysis of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative AYA-ALL specimens (n = 73) with the use of a next-generation sequencer. Interestingly, insertion of D4Z4 repeats containing the DUX4 gene into the IGH locus was frequently identified in B cell AYA-ALL, leading to a high level of expression of DUX4 protein with an aberrant C terminus. A transplantation assay in mice demonstrated that expression of DUX4-IGH in pro-B cells was capable of generating B cell leukemia in vivo. DUX4 fusions were preferentially detected in the AYA generation. Our data thus show that DUX4 can become an oncogenic driver as a result of somatic chromosomal rearrangements and that AYA-ALL may be a clinical entity distinct from ALL at other ages. PMID:27019113

  8. Combination of drug therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a CXCR4 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Yu, Min; Lim, Min; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow (BM) stromal niche can protect acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells against the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents and is a possible source of relapse. The SDF-1/CXCR4 axis is a major determinant in the crosstalk between leukemic cells and BM stroma. In the current study, we investigated the use of AMD11070, an orally available, small molecule antagonist of CXCR4, as an ALL-sensitizing agent. This compound effectively blocked stromal-induced migration of human ALL cells in culture and disrupted pre-established adhesion to stroma. To examine how to optimally use this compound in vivo, several combinations with cytotoxic drugs were tested in a stromal co-culture system. The best treatment regimen was then tested in vivo. Mice transplanted with murine Bcr/Abl ALL cells survived significantly longer when treated with a combination of nilotinib and AMD11070. Similarly, immunocompromised mice transplanted with human ALL cells and treated with vincristine and AMD11070 had few circulating leukemic cells, normal spleens and reduced human CD19+ cells in the bone marrow at the termination of the experiment. These results show that combined treatment with AMD11070 may be of significant benefit in eradicating residual leukemia cells at locations where they would otherwise be protected by stroma. PMID:21483439

  9. Integrin alpha4 blockade sensitizes drug resistant pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Te; Gang, Eun Ji; Geng, Huimin; Park, Eugene; Huantes, Sandra; Chudziak, Doreen; Dauber, Katrin; Schaefer, Paul; Scharman, Carlton; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Klemm, Lars; Parameswaran, Reshmi; Loh, Mignon; Kang, Eun-Suk; Koo, Hong Hoe; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Andrade, Jacob; Crooks, Gay M.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Müschen, Markus; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Heisterkamp, Nora; Bönig, Halvard

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) provides chemoprotection for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, contributing to lack of efficacy of current therapies. Integrin alpha4 (alpha4) mediates stromal adhesion of normal and malignant B-cell precursors, and according to gene expression analyses from 207 children with minimal residual disease, is highly associated with poorest outcome. We tested whether interference with alpha4-mediated stromal adhesion might be a new ALL treatment. Two models of leukemia were used, one genetic (conditional alpha4 ablation of BCR-ABL1 [p210+] leukemia) and one pharmacological (anti-functional alpha4 antibody treatment of primary ALL). Conditional deletion of alpha4 sensitized leukemia cell to nilotinib. Adhesion of primary pre-B ALL cells was alpha4-dependent; alpha4 blockade sensitized primary ALL cells toward chemotherapy. Chemotherapy combined with Natalizumab prolonged survival of NOD/SCID recipients of primary ALL, suggesting adjuvant alpha4 inhibition as a novel strategy for pre-B ALL. PMID:23319569

  10. Diet-induced obesity accelerates acute lymphoblastic leukemia progression in two murine models*

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jason P.; Behan, James W.; Heisterkamp, Nora; Butturini, Anna; Klemm, Lars; Ji, Lingyun; Groffen, John; Müschen, Markus; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased incidence of many cancers, including leukemia, though it is unknown whether leukemia incidence is increased directly by obesity, or rather by associated genetic, lifestyle, health, or socio-economic factors. We developed animal models of obesity and leukemia to test whether obesity could directly accelerate acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using BCR/ABL transgenic and AKR/J mice weaned onto a high-fat diet. Mice were observed until development of progressive ALL. Although obese and control BCR/ABL mice had similar median survival, older obese mice had accelerated ALL onset, implying a time-dependent effect of obesity on ALL. Obese AKR mice developed ALL significantly earlier than controls. The effect of obesity was not explained by WBC count, thymus/spleen weight, or ALL phenotype. However, obese AKR mice had higher leptin, insulin, and IL-6 levels than controls, and these obesity-related hormones all have potential roles in leukemia pathogenesis. In conclusion, obesity directly accelerates presentation of ALL, likely by increasing the risk of an early event in leukemogenesis. This is the first study to demonstrate that obesity can directly accelerate the progression of ALL. Thus, the observed associations between obesity and leukemia incidence are likely to be directly related to biological effects of obesity. PMID:20823291

  11. A functional receptor for B-cell activating factor is expressed on human acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Muschen, Markus; Kim, Yong-mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-01-01

    B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arises by transformation of a progenitor (pre-B) cell. Cure rates in adults remain low and treatment is complicated by support provided by the microenvironment to the leukemic cells, indicating an urgent need to better understand the factors that promote their survival. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and its receptor BAFF-R are important for survival and growth of mature normal and malignant B-cells but are not expressed on pre-B cells. Unexpectedly, all cells in the primary Philadelphia-chromosome positive and negative ALL samples tested were positive for high BAFF-R cell surface expression. The BAFF-R was fully competent to bind BAFF and stimulation of the receptor activated both the classical and the non-canonical NFκB pathways. Recombinant BAFF supported survival of the ALL cells in the absence of stroma, and it significantly attenuated the rate of apoptosis caused by exposure to nilotinib, a drug used therapeutically to treat Philadelphia-chromosome positive ALLs. Surprisingly, BAFF mRNA and protein were also expressed in the same cells but BAFF was not shed into the medium. Our report is the first showing universal expression of the BAFF-R by pre-B ALL cells and opens the possibility of blocking its function as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy. PMID:20460528

  12. Development of resistance to dasatinib in Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Stoddart, Sonia; Müschen, Markus; Kim, Yong-mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-01-01

    Dasatinib is a potent dual Abl/Src inhibitor approved for treatment of Ph-positive leukemias. At a once-daily dose and a relatively short half-life of 3-5 hours, tyrosine kinase inhibition is not sustained. However, transient inhibition of K562 leukemia cells with a high-dose pulse of dasatinib or long-term treatment with a lower dose was reported to irreversibly induce apoptosis. Here, the effect of dasatinib on treatment of Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells was evaluated in the presence of stromal support. Dasatinib eradicated Bcr/Abl ALL cells, caused significant apoptosis and eliminated tyrosine phosphorylation on Bcr/Abl, Src, Crkl and Stat-5. However, treatment of mouse ALL cells with lower doses of dasatinib over an extended period of time allowed the emergence of viable drug-resistant cells. Interestingly, dasatinib treatment increased cell surface expression of CXCR4, which is important for survival of B-lineage cells, but this did not promote survival. Combined treatment of cells with dasatinib and a CXCR4 inhibitor resulted in enhanced cell death. These results do not support the concept that long-term treatment with low dose dasatinib monotherapy will be effective in causing irreversible apoptosis in Ph-positive ALL, but suggest that combined treatment with dasatinib and drugs such as AMD3100 may be effective. PMID:20111071

  13. Cytotoxicity of CD56-positive lymphocytes against autologous B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Lim, Min; George, Aswathi A.; Kirzner, Jonathan; Lee, Dean; Seeger, Robert; Groffen, John; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Precursor B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) affects hematopoietic development and therefore is associated with immune deficiencies that can be further exacerbated by chemotherapy. It is unclear if and when monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that stimulate antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) can be used for treatment because this depends on the presence of functional effector cells. Here, we used flow cytometry to determine that patient samples at diagnosis, post-induction and relapse contain detectable numbers of CD56+ cells. We were able to selectively expand CD56+ immune effector cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood samples at diagnosis and at various stages of treatment by co-culture with artificial antigen-presenting K562 clone 9.mbIL-21 cells. Amplified CD56+CD3- cells had spontaneous and anti-BAFF-R mAb-stimulated ADCC activity against autologous ALL cells, which could be further enhanced by IL15. Importantly, matched CD56+ effector cells also killed autologous ALL cells grown out from leukemia samples of the same patient, through both spontaneous as well as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Since autologous cell therapy will not be complicated by graft-versus-host disease, our results show that expanded CD56+ cells could be applied for treatment of pre-B-ALL without transplantation, or for purging of bone marrow in the setting of autologous bone marrow transplants. PMID:25134458

  14. Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an rGel/BLyS fusion toxin

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Yu, Min; Lyu, Mi-Ae; Lim, Min; Rosenblum, Michael G.; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy affecting children and a major cause of mortality from hematopoietic malignancies in adults. A substantial number of patients become drug resistant during chemotherapy, necessitating the development of alternative modes of treatment. rGel/BLyS is a toxin-cytokine fusion protein used for selective killing of malignant B-cells expressing receptors for B-cell Activating Factor (BAFF/BLyS) by receptor-targeted delivery of the toxin, Gelonin. Here we demonstrate that rGel/BLyS binds to ALL cells expressing BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) and upon internalization, it induces apoptosis of these cells and causes down-regulation of survival genes even in the presence of stromal protection. Using an immunodeficient transplant model for human ALL, we show that rGel/BLyS prolongs survival of both Philadelphia chromosome-positive and negative ALL-bearing mice. Furthermore, we used AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, to mobilize the leukemic cells protected in the bone marrow microenvironment and the combination with rGel/BLyS resulted in a significant reduction of the tumor load in the bone marrow and complete eradication of ALL cells from the circulation. Thus, a combination treatment with the B-cell-specific fusion toxin rGel/BLyS and the mobilizing agent AMD3100 could be an effective alternative approach to chemotherapy for the treatment of primary and relapsed ALL. PMID:22373785

  15. Genetic markers in a multi-ethnic sample for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Amy E; Kamdar, Kala Y; Lupo, Philip J; Okcu, M Fatih; Scheurer, Michael E; Dorak, M Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple risk loci for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but mostly in European/White populations, despite Hispanics having a greater risk. We re-examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of known associations with childhood ALL and known human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region lymphoma risk markers in a multi-ethnic population. Significant associations were found in two ARID5B variants (rs7089424 and rs10821936). We replicated a strong risk association in non-Hispanic White males with rs2395185, a protective marker for lymphoma. Another HLA region marker, rs2647012, showed a risk association among Hispanics only, while a strong protective association was found with rs1048456, a follicular lymphoma risk marker. Our study validated this new case-control sample by confirming genetic markers associated with childhood ALL, and yielded new associations with lymphoma markers. Despite positive results, our study did not provide any clues as to why Hispanics have a higher susceptibility to childhood leukemia, suggesting that environmental factors may have a strong contribution. PMID:24707947

  16. Transcription-coupled genetic instability marks acute lymphoblastic leukemia structural variation hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Vuorenmaa, Tapio; Teppo, Susanna; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Bouvy-Liivrand, Maria; Mehtonen, Juha; Niskanen, Henri; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Laukkanen, Saara; Liuksiala, Thomas; Teittinen, Kaisa; Lohi, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Progression of malignancy to overt disease requires multiple genetic hits. Activation-induced deaminase (AID) can drive lymphomagenesis by generating off-target DNA breaks at loci that harbor highly active enhancers and display convergent transcription. The first active transcriptional profiles from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients acquired here reveal striking similarity at structural variation (SV) sites. Specific transcriptional features, namely convergent transcription and Pol2 stalling, were detected at breakpoints. The overlap was most prominent at SV with recognition motifs for the recombination activating genes (RAG). We present signal feature analysis to detect vulnerable regions and quantified from human cells how convergent transcription contributes to R-loop generation and RNA polymerase stalling. Wide stalling regions were characterized by high DNAse hypersensitivity and unusually broad H3K4me3 signal. Based on 1382 pre-B-ALL patients, the ETV6-RUNX1 fusion positive patients had over ten-fold elevation in RAG1 while high expression of AID marked pre-B-ALL lacking common cytogenetic changes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13087.001 PMID:27431763

  17. HLA-A11 is associated with poor prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Orgad, S; Cohen, I J; Neumann, Y; Vogel, R; Kende, G; Ramot, B; Zaizov, R; Gazit, E

    1988-12-01

    A possible association between HLA antigens, susceptibility or resistance to leukemia, and responsiveness to treatment has been studied in 144 patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and compared to other prognostic factors, i.e. white blood cell (WBC) counts, age at onset, sex, ethnic origin, and cell surface markers. All sequentially newly diagnosed children (97) comprised the group for the prospective study (PSG) and were followed for 6 years. The group included 37 patients classified as T-ALL, 41 as CALLA+, 27 as NULL, 12 as B and pre-B, and 27 unclassified patients, who were diagnosed before 1980. During the follow-up period, 45 patients of the PSG died. Forty-seven patients designated long-term survivors (LTS) have been followed 6-20 years after diagnosis, having completed a 3-5 year course of anti-leukemia therapy, and having remained disease free thereafter. High WBC counts at diagnosis and T-cell-surface markers were associated with poor prognosis, as were enthnic origin and specific HLA antigens. Thus, there was one (1) a significant increase in HLA-A30 and a decrease in HLA B-14 in the PSG Jewish patients; and (2) a complete absence of HLA-ALL in LTS while, in the PSG, 8 of 9 HLA-All-positive patients died during the follow-up period. This suggests that HLA-All is associated with poor prognosis in childhood ALL. PMID:3199882

  18. The potential of clofarabine in MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stumpel, Dominique J P M; Schneider, Pauline; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W

    2015-09-01

    MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in infants is the most difficult-to-treat type of childhood ALL, displaying a chemotherapy-resistant phenotype, and unique histone modifications, gene expression signatures and DNA methylation patterns. MLL-rearranged infant ALL responds remarkably well to nucleoside analogue drugs in vitro, such as cytarabine and cladribine, and to the demethylating agents decitabine and zebularine as measured by cytotoxicity assays. These observations led to the inclusion of cytarabine into the treatment regimens currently used for infants with ALL. However, survival chances for infants with MLL-rearranged ALL do still not exceed 30-40%. Here we explored the in vitro potential of the novel nucleoside analogue clofarabine for MLL-rearranged infant ALL. Therefore we used both cell line models as well as primary patient cells. Compared with other nucleoside analogues, clofarabine effectively targeted primary MLL-rearranged infant ALL cells at the lowest concentrations, with median LC50 values of ∼25 nM. Interestingly, clofarabine displayed synergistic cytotoxic effects in combination with cytarabine. Furthermore, at concentrations of 5-10nM clofarabine induced demethylation of the promoter region of the tumour suppressor gene FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad), a gene typically hypermethylated in MLL-rearranged ALL. Demethylation of the FHIT promoter region was accompanied by subtle re-expression of this gene both at the mRNA and protein level. We conclude that clofarabine is an interesting candidate for further studies in MLL-rearranged ALL in infants. PMID:26188848

  19. Advances in the treatment of relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study compendium.

    PubMed

    Roboz, Gail J; Jabbour, Elias J; Faderl, Stefan; Douer, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous hematologic malignancy characterized by proliferation of immature lymphoid cells throughout the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Most cases are diagnosed before the age of 20 years. Adults have a worse prognosis than children. Approximately half of adult ALL patients relapse after their initial treatment. There is no standard treatment for ALL; strategies vary according to the patient’s age, comorbidities, and Philadelphia chromosome status. Regimens used in pediatric patients are being adapted for use in adults. Frontline management can include hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone alternating with cycles of high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine (hyper-CVAD) and the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster regimen. Relapsed/refractory patients have several options, including a regimen consisting of fludarabine, high-dose cytarabine, and granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (FLAG); tyrosine kinase inhibitors; and chemotherapy. The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved 3 therapies for these patients: clofarabine, nelarabine, and vincristine sulfate liposome injection, a modified formulation of vincristine that allows the drug to be administered at a higher dosage. Several novel strategies are currently under investigation, including the monoclonal antibody blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager that targets the B-cell–specific antigen CD19 and activates T cells to exert cytotoxic activity against the target B cell. This clinical roundtable monograph features case studies that illustrate important points in the management of adult patients with relapsed/refractory ALL. PMID:25768269

  20. CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Teachey, David T.; Porter, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains difficult to treat, with minimal improvement in outcomes seen in more than 2 decades despite advances in upfront therapy and improved survival for de novo ALL. Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a powerful targeted immunotherapy, showing striking responses in highly refractory populations. Complete remission (CR) rates as high as 90% have been reported in children and adults with relapsed and refractory ALL treated with CAR-modified T cells targeting the B-cell–specific antigen CD19. Distinct CAR designs across several studies have produced similar promising CR rates, an encouraging finding. Even more encouraging are durable remissions observed in some patients without additional therapy. Duration of remission and CAR-modified T-cell persistence require further study and more mature follow-up, but emerging data suggest these factors may distinguish CAR designs. Supraphysiologic T-cell proliferation, a hallmark of this therapy, contributes to both efficacy and the most notable toxicity, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), posing a unique challenge for toxicity management. This review will discuss the current landscape of CD19 CAR clinical trials, CRS pathophysiology and management, and remaining challenges. PMID:25999455

  1. Developing "Care Assistant": A smartphone application to support caregivers of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingting; Yao, Nengliang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Fen; Liu, Yanyan; Geng, Zhaohui; Yuan, Changrong

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Caring for children with ALL is an uncommon experience for parents without medical training. They urgently need professional assistance when their children are recovering at home. This paper documents the process of developing an Android application (app) "Care Assistant" for family caregivers of children with ALL. Key informant interviews and focus group studies were used before programming the app. The key informants and focus group members included: caregivers of children with ALL, cancer care physicians and nurses, and software engineers. We found several major challenges faced by caregivers: limited access to evidence-based clinic information, lack of financial and social assistance, deficient communications with doctors or nurses, lack of disease-related knowledge, and inconvenience of tracking treatments and testing results. This feedback was used to develop "Care Assistant". This app has eight modules: personal information, treatment tracking, family care, financial and social assistance, knowledge centre, self-assessment questionnaires, interactive platform, and reminders. We have also developed a web-based administration portal to manage the app. The usability and effectiveness of "Care Assistant" will be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26271029

  2. ABL kinase mutation and relapse in 4 pediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases.

    PubMed

    Aoe, Michinori; Shimada, Akira; Muraoka, Michiko; Washio, Kana; Nakamura, Yoshimi; Takahashi, Takahide; Imada, Masahide; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Okada, Ken; Nishiuchi, Ritsuo; Miyamura, Takako; Chayama, Kosuke; Shibakura, Misako; Oda, Megumi; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib mesylate (IM) revolutionized the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-ALL), which had showed poor prognosis before the dawn of IM treatment. However, if Ph-ALL patients showed IM resistance due to ABL kinase mutation, second-generation TKI, dasatinib or nilotinib, was recommended. We treated 4 pediatric Ph-ALL patients with both IM and bone marrow transplantation (BMT); however, 3 relapsed. We retrospectively examined the existence of ABL kinase mutation using PCR and direct sequencing methods, but there was no such mutation in all 4 diagnostic samples. Interestingly, two relapsed samples from patients who were not treated with IM before relapse did not show ABL kinase mutation and IM was still effective even after relapse. On the other hand, one patient who showed resistance to 3 TKI acquired dual ABL kinase mutations, F359C at the IM-resistant phase and F317I at the dasatinib-resistant phase, simultaneously. In summary, Ph-ALL patients relapsed with or without ABL kinase mutation. Furthermore, ABL kinase mutation was only found after IM treatment, so an IM-resistant clone might have been selected during the IM treatment and intensive chemotherapy. The appropriate combination of TKI and BMT must be discussed to cure Ph-ALL patients. PMID:24652384

  3. Targeting BCL-2 and ABL/LYN in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Jessica T; Rowley, Joelle S J; Eide, Christopher A; Traer, Elie; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Loriaux, Marc; Spurgeon, Stephen E; Druker, Brian J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Chang, Bill H

    2016-08-31

    Treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+)ALL) remains a challenge. Although the addition of targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to standard cytotoxic therapy has greatly improved upfront treatment, treatment-related morbidity and mortality remain high. TKI monotherapy provides only temporary responses and renders patients susceptible to the development of TKI resistance. Thus, identifying agents that could enhance the activity of TKIs is urgently needed. Recently, a selective inhibitor of B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), ABT-199 (venetoclax), has shown impressive activity against hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the combination of TKIs with venetoclax is highly synergistic in vitro, decreasing cell viability and inducing apoptosis in Ph(+)ALL. Furthermore, the multikinase inhibitors dasatinib and ponatinib appear to have the added advantage of inducing Lck/Yes novel tyrosine kinase (LYN)-mediated proapoptotic BCL-2-like protein 11 (BIM) expression and inhibiting up-regulation of antiapoptotic myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL-1), thereby potentially overcoming the development of venetoclax resistance. Evaluation of the dasatinib-venetoclax combination for the treatment of primary Ph(+)ALL patient samples in xenografted immunodeficient mice confirmed the tolerability of this drug combination and demonstrated its superior antileukemic efficacy compared to either agent alone. These data suggest that the combination of dasatinib and venetoclax has the potential to improve the treatment of Ph(+)ALL and should be further evaluated for patient care. PMID:27582059

  4. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1 and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereas KMT2A(MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes -ABL1,ABL2,PDGFRB,CSF1R,CRLF2,JAK2 and EPOR in-vitro and in-vivo studies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  5. Integrated methylome and transcriptome analysis reveals novel regulatory elements in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Almamun, Md; Levinson, Benjamin T; van Swaay, Annette C; Johnson, Nathan T; McKay, Stephanie D; Arthur, Gerald L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer diagnosed in children under the age of 15. In addition to genetic aberrations, epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation are altered in cancer and impact gene expression. To identify epigenetic alterations in ALL, genome-wide methylation profiles were generated using the methylated CpG island recovery assay followed by next-generation sequencing. More than 25,000 differentially methylated regions (DMR) were observed in ALL patients with ∼90% present within intronic or intergenic regions. To determine the regulatory potential of the DMR, whole-transcriptome analysis was performed and integrated with methylation data. Aberrant promoter methylation was associated with the altered expression of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and proliferation. Novel enhancer-like sequences were identified within intronic and intergenic DMR. Aberrant methylation in these regions was associated with the altered expression of neighboring genes involved in cell cycle processes, lymphocyte activation and apoptosis. These genes include potential epi-driver genes, such as SYNE1, PTPRS, PAWR, HDAC9, RGCC, MCOLN2, LYN, TRAF3, FLT1, and MELK, which may provide a selective advantage to leukemic cells. In addition, the differential expression of epigenetic modifier genes, pseudogenes, and non-coding RNAs was also observed accentuating the role of erroneous epigenetic gene regulation in ALL. PMID:26308964

  6. A computer-aided method to expedite the evaluation of prognosis for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Mulvihill, John J; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Bin

    2006-08-01

    This study presented a fully-automated computer-aided method (scheme) to detect metaphase chromosomes depicted on microscopic digital images, count the total number of chromosomes in each metaphase cell, compute the DNA index, and correlate the results to the prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The computer scheme first uses image filtering, threshold, and labeling algorithms to segment and count the number of the suspicious "chromosome," and then computes a feature vector for each "detected chromosome." Based on these features, a knowledge-based classifier is used to eliminate those "non-chromosome" objects (i.e., inter-phase cells, stain debris, and other kinds of background noises). Due to the possible overlap of the chromosomes, a classification criterion was used to identify the overlapped chromosomes and adjust the initially counted number of the total chromosomes in each image. In this preliminary study with 60 testing images (depicting metaphase chromosome cells) acquired from three pediatric patients, the computer scheme generated results matched with the diagnostic results provided by the clinical cytogeneticists. The results demonstrated the feasibility or potential of using a computerized method to replace the tedious and the reader-dependent diagnostic methods commonly used in genetic laboratories to date. PMID:16866573

  7. Central Nervous System Involvement in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Diagnostic Tools, Prophylaxis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; De Santis, Giovanna; Di Veroli, Ambra; Ditto, Concetta; Nasso, Daniela; Postorino, Massimiliano; Refrigeri, Marco; Attrotto, Cristina; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    In adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement is associated with a very poor prognosis. The diagnostic assessment of this condition relies on the use of neuroradiology, conventional cytology (CC) and flow cytometry (FCM). Among these approaches, which is the gold standard it is still a matter of debate. Neuroradiology and CC have a limited sensitivity with a higher rate of false negative results. FCM demonstrated a superior sensitivity over CC, particularly when low levels of CNS infiltrating cells are present. Although prospective studies of a large series of patients are still awaited, a positive finding by FCM appears to anticipate an adverse outcome even if CC shows no infiltration. Current strategies for adult ALL CNS-directed prophylaxis or therapy involve systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and radiation therapy. An early and frequent intrathecal injection of cytostatic combined with systemic chemotherapy is the most effective strategy to reduce the frequency of CNS involvement. In patients with CNS overt ALL, at diagnosis or upon relapse, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation might be considered. This review discusses risk factors, diagnostic techniques for identification of CNS infiltration and modalities of prophylaxis and therapy to manage it. PMID:25408861

  8. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A single center experience with Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster-95 protocol

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Gupta, Sumant; Ganesan, Prasanth; Rajendranath, Rejiv; Ganesan, Trivadi S.; Rajalekshmy, Kamalalayan Raghavan; Sagar, Tenali Gnana

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data on the outcome following the treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from developing countries. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-eight consecutive patients with ALL <30 years of age diagnosed between January 2005 and December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were treated modified Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster 95 protocol. Event-free survival (EFS) was calculated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and variables were compared using log-rank test. Results: The EFS was 63.4% at a median follow-up was 32.7 months. On univariate analysis National Cancer Institute (NCI) risk stratification, sex, white blood cell count, day 8 blast clearance, and income were significantly associated with EFS. However, on multivariate analysis only female sex (P = 0.01) and day 8 blast clearance (P = 0.006) were significantly associated with EFS. Seventy-four of 238 (31%) patients had recurrent leukemia. The common sites of relapse were bone marrow in 55/74 (75%) patients and central nervous system in 11/74 (20%) patients. Conclusion: Compared to western data, there was an increased proportion of NCI high-risk patients and T-cell immunophenotype in our study. There has been an improvement in outcome of patients with ALL at our center over the last 2 decades. Female sex and clearance of blast in peripheral blood by day 8 of induction was associated with better EFS. PMID:26811597

  9. Minimal residual disease diagnostics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: need for sensitive, fast, and standardized technologies

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Brüggemann, Monika; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) has become routine clinical practice in frontline treatment of virtually all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in many adult ALL patients. MRD diagnostics has proven to be the strongest prognostic factor, allowing for risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from significant treatment reduction to mild or strong intensification. Also in relapsed ALL patients and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, MRD diagnostics is guiding treatment decisions. This is also why the efficacy of innovative drugs, such as antibodies and small molecules, are currently being evaluated with MRD diagnostics within clinical trials. In fact, MRD measurements might well be used as a surrogate end point, thereby significantly shortening the follow-up. The MRD techniques need to be sensitive (≤10−4), broadly applicable, accurate, reliable, fast, and affordable. Thus far, flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes (allele-specific oligonucleotide [ASO]-PCR) are claimed to meet these criteria, but classical flow cytometry does not reach a solid 10−4, whereas classical ASO-PCR is time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, 2 high-throughput technologies are being explored, ie, high-throughput sequencing and next-generation (multidimensional) flow cytometry, both evaluating millions of sequences or cells, respectively. Each of them has specific advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25999452

  10. Signalling thresholds and negative B-cell selection in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengshan; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Buchner, Maike; Geng, Huimin; Lee, Jae Woong; Klemm, Lars; Titz, Björn; Graeber, Thomas G; Park, Eugene; Tan, Ying Xim; Satterthwaite, Anne; Paietta, Elisabeth; Hunger, Stephen P; Willman, Cheryl L; Melnick, Ari; Loh, Mignon L; Jung, Jae U; Coligan, John E; Bolland, Silvia; Mak, Tak W; Limnander, Andre; Jumaa, Hassan; Reth, Michael; Weiss, Arthur; Lowell, Clifford A; Müschen, Markus

    2015-05-21

    B cells are selected for an intermediate level of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling strength: attenuation below minimum (for example, non-functional BCR) or hyperactivation above maximum (for example, self-reactive BCR) thresholds of signalling strength causes negative selection. In ∼25% of cases, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells carry the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase (Philadelphia chromosome positive), which mimics constitutively active pre-BCR signalling. Current therapeutic approaches are largely focused on the development of more potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors to suppress oncogenic signalling below a minimum threshold for survival. We tested the hypothesis that targeted hyperactivation--above a maximum threshold--will engage a deletional checkpoint for removal of self-reactive B cells and selectively kill ALL cells. Here we find, by testing various components of proximal pre-BCR signalling in mouse BCR-ABL1 cells, that an incremental increase of Syk tyrosine kinase activity was required and sufficient to induce cell death. Hyperactive Syk was functionally equivalent to acute activation of a self-reactive BCR on ALL cells. Despite oncogenic transformation, this basic mechanism of negative selection was still functional in ALL cells. Unlike normal pre-B cells, patient-derived ALL cells express the inhibitory receptors PECAM1, CD300A and LAIR1 at high levels. Genetic studies revealed that Pecam1, Cd300a and Lair1 are critical to calibrate oncogenic signalling strength through recruitment of the inhibitory phosphatases Ptpn6 (ref. 7) and Inpp5d (ref. 8). Using a novel small-molecule inhibitor of INPP5D (also known as SHIP1), we demonstrated that pharmacological hyperactivation of SYK and engagement of negative B-cell selection represents a promising new strategy to overcome drug resistance in human ALL. PMID:25799995

  11. Reduced incidence of the somnolence syndrome after prophylactic cranial irradiation in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Uzal, D; Ozyar, E; Hayran, M; Zorlu, F; Atahan, L; Yetkin, S

    1998-07-01

    A prospective double blind randomized trial comparing two different dose schedules of continuous steroid coverage during prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) in leukemic children was conducted to find out the optimum dose to be prescribed to reduce the incidence of Somnolence Syndrome (SS). Between April 1994 and February 1996, 32 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia received CRT of 18 Gy in 10 fractions. Patients were randomized to receive oral dexamethasone of 2 or 4 mg/m2 during radiotherapy. The diagnosis of SS was made clinically based on symptoms of somnolence. All patients were followed for a minimum of 8 months. The overall incidence of SS was 40%. The development of SS was steroid dose dependent. In low dose steroid arm the incidence of SS was 64.3% (9/14), compared to 17.6% (3/17) in high dose arm with statistically significant difference (P = 0.008). The median time to development of SS was 4 weeks. The most common symptom of SS was drowsiness followed by anorexia, headache, nausea, vomiting, decreased activity, irritability, fever and ataxia, respectively. The duration of symptoms ranged from 2 to 14 days. The development of SS was not related to the presence of acute reactions, age at the time of CRT and sex. In all cases the symptoms subsided completely and spontaneously. Our results suggest that steroid coverage at a dose of 4 mg/m2 during CRT reduces the incidence of SS. However, a multicentric prospective randomized trial is needed to determine the role and the optimal dose of steroid. PMID:9756169

  12. Prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Short, Nicholas J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; Garris, Rebecca; Qiao, Wei; Huang, Xuelin; Jain, Nitin; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    In acute myelogenous leukemia, the persistent detection of abnormal cytogenetics at complete remission (ACCR) is associated with inferior outcomes. However, the prognostic significance of ACCR in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown. We evaluated 272 adult patients with ALL and abnormal cytogenetics at baseline who were treated with frontline induction chemotherapy, achieved complete remission (CR) and had cytogenetic analysis performed at the time of CR. ACCR was observed in 26 patients (9.6%). Median relapse-free survival was 22 months (95% CI, 12 months to not reached) for patients with ACCR vs. 48 months (range, 30-125 months) in patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (NCCR; P = 0.31). Median overall survival also did not differ significantly between the ACCR (99 months [range, 17 months to not reached]) and NCCR groups (67 months [range, 47 months to not reached], P = 0.86). The specificity of ACCR for minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was 43%, and there was overall poor correlation between these two methods for the detection of residual disease. When patients were stratified by MRD status, the presence or absence of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR did not add additional prognostic information. This study suggests that there is poor association between MRD assessment by MFC and the presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities at CR in adult patients with ALL. ACCR was not associated with adverse outcomes in ALL and did not add additional prognostic information when MRD status by MFC was known. PMID:26800008

  13. Unbiased pro-thrombotic features at diagnosis in 977 thrombocythemic patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gugliotta, Luigi; Iurlo, Alessandra; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Tieghi, Alessia; Specchia, Giorgina; Gaidano, Gianluca; Scalzulli, Potito R; Rumi, Elisa; Dragani, Alfredo; Martinelli, Vincenzo; Santoro, Cristina; Randi, Maria Luigia; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Candoni, Anna; Cattaneo, Daniele; Ricco, Alessandra; Palmieri, Raffaele; Liberati, Marina A; Langella, Maria; Rago, Angela; Bergamaschi, Micaela; Monari, Paola; Miglio, Rossella; Santoro, Umberto; Cacciola, Rossella; Rupoli, Serena; Mastrullo, Lucia; Musto, Pellegrino; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Vignetti, Marco; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Vianelli, Nicola; Martino, Bruno; De Stefano, Valerio; Passamonti, Francesco; Vannucchi, Alessandro M

    2016-07-01

    In patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), the anti-thrombotic and/or cytoreductive treatment in the follow-up may affect the evaluation of the pro-thrombotic weight of the clinical and biological characteristics at diagnosis. In order to avoid this potential confounding effect, we investigated the relationship between prior thrombosis (PrTh: thrombosis occurred before diagnosis and before treatment) and the characteristics at diagnosis in 977 thrombocythemic patients with MPN, reclassified according to the WHO 2008 criteria. PrTh occurred in 194 (19.9%) patients, with similar rates in the different MPNs. In multivariate analysis, PrTh rate was significantly related to minor thrombocytosis (platelets ≤700×10(9)/L), leukocytosis (leukocytes >10×10(9)/L), higher hematocrit (HCT >45%), JAK2 V617F mutation, older age, and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). The highest PrTh rate (33.9%) was associated with the coexistence of minor thrombocytosis and leukocytosis. Of note, the inverse relationship between PrTh rate and platelet count is consistent with the hemostatic paradox of thrombocytosis. In conclusion, this analysis in MPN patients disclosed the unbiased characteristics at diagnosis with a pro-thrombotic effect. Moreover, it suggests that the optimal control of blood cells counts, and CVRFs might be of utmost importance in the prevention of thrombosis during the follow-up. PMID:27107744

  14. Proposal for the standardization of flow cytometry protocols to detect minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Beltrame, Miriam Perlingeiro; Ferreira, Silvia Inês Alejandra Cordoba Pires; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Malvezzi, Mariester; Yamamoto, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease is the most powerful predictor of outcome in acute leukemia and is useful in therapeutic stratification for acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols. Nowadays, the most reliable methods for studying minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction. Both provide similar results at a minimal residual disease level of 0.01% of normal cells, that is, detection of one leukemic cell in up to 10,000 normal nucleated cells. Currently, therapeutic protocols establish the minimal residual disease threshold value at the most informative time points according to the appropriate methodology employed. The expertise of the laboratory in a cancer center or a cooperative group could be the most important factor in determining which method should be used. In Brazil, multiparametric flow cytometry laboratories are available in most leukemia treatment centers, but multiparametric flow cytometry processes must be standardized for minimal residual disease investigations in order to offer reliable and reproducible results that ensure quality in the clinical application of the method. The Minimal Residual Disease Working Group of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation (SBTMO) was created with that aim. This paper presents recommendations for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on the literature and expertise of the laboratories who participated in this consensus, including pre-analytical and analytical methods. This paper also recommends that both multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction are complementary methods, and so more laboratories with expertise in immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (Ig/TCR) gene assays are necessary in Brazil. PMID:26670404

  15. The effect of resveratrol on the expression of MDR1 gene in leukemic lymphoblast’s of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Hosein poor Feyzi, Abbas Ali; Farshdousti Hagh, Majid; Ebadi, Tohid; Shams Asanjan, Karim; Movasagpoor Akbari, Aliakbar; Talebi, Mehdi; Emadi, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy plays a very important role in the treatment of leukemia but the resistance properties of the lymphoblasts limit the effect of chemotherapy. One of the main mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy is the increased expression of MDR1 gene. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of resveratrol on the expression of MDR1 gene in leukemic lymphoblast of new cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients in vitro. Methods: Separation of lymphoblasts of 5 new case ALL patients from peripheral blood was performed by ficoll density gradient centrifugation. Lymphoblasts were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium. Lymphoblasts were treated with 50µmol/L resveratrol for 48 h. Total RNA was extracted with guanidine isothiocyanate. RNA was converted to cDNA. Real time PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of MDR1. Results: The results of gene detection showed that the expression of MDR1 did not change significantly in the patients however, in one patient expression of MDR1 increased upon treatment with resveratrol. Conclusion: The results of this study did not support resveratrol as a compound to reverse multidrug resistance in leukemic lymphoblasts. PMID:26221511

  16. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  17. Prethymic Cytoplasmic CD3 Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cannizzo, Elisa; Carulli, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Azzarà, Antonio; Galimberti, Sara; Ottaviano, Virginia; Preffer, Frederic; Petrini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Acute undiffentiated leukemia (AUL) is an acute leukemia with no more than one membrane marker of any given lineage. Blasts often express HLA-DR, CD34, and/or CD38 and may be positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). The expression of CD34, HLA-DR, and CD38 has been shown in pro-T-ALL, although in this case, blasts should also express CD7 and cyCD3. However, some cases of T-ALL without CD3 in the cytoplasm and all TCR chain genes in germ line configuration are reported, features that fit well with a very early hematopoietic cell. We report a case of acute leukemia CD34+/−HLADR+CD7+CD38+cyCD3− in which a diagnosis of AUL was considered. However the blasts were also positive for CD99 and TCR delta gene rearrangement which was found on molecular studies. Therefore a differential diagnosis between AUL and an early cyCD3 negative T-ALL was debated. PMID:22937302

  18. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  19. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  20. Identification of cooperative genes for E2A-PBX1 to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sera, Yasuyuki; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Oda, Hideaki; Nagamachi, Akiko; Wolff, Linda; Inukai, Takeshi; Inaba, Toshiya; Honda, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    E2A-PBX1 is a chimeric gene product detected in t(1;19)-bearing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with B-cell lineage. To investigate the leukemogenic process, we generated conditional knock-in (cKI) mice for E2A-PBX1, in which E2A-PBX1 is inducibly expressed under the control of the endogenous E2A promoter. Despite the induced expression of E2A-PBX1, no hematopoietic disease was observed, strongly suggesting that additional genetic alterations are required to develop leukemia. To address this possibility, retroviral insertional mutagenesis was used. Virus infection efficiently induced T-cell, B-cell, and biphenotypic ALL in E2A-PBX1 cKI mice. Inverse PCR identified eight retroviral common integration sites, in which enhanced expression was observed in the Gfi1, Mycn, and Pim1 genes. In addition, it is of note that viral integration and overexpression of the Zfp521 gene was detected in one tumor with B-cell lineage; we previously identified Zfp521 as a cooperative gene with E2A-HLF, another E2A-involving fusion gene with B-lineage ALL. The cooperative oncogenicity of E2A-PBX1 with overexpressed Zfp521 in B-cell tumorigenesis was indicated by the finding that E2A-PBX1 cKI, Zfp521 transgenic compound mice developed B-lineage ALL. Moreover, upregulation of ZNF521, the human counterpart of Zfp521, was found in several human leukemic cell lines bearing t(1;19). These results indicate that E2A-PBX1 cooperates with additional gene alterations to develop ALL. Among them, enhanced expression of ZNF521 may play a clinically relevant role in E2A fusion genes to develop B-lineage ALL. PMID:27088431

  1. DNA methylation analysis of bone marrow cells at diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and at remission.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Jessica; Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2012-01-01

    To detect genes with CpG sites that display methylation patterns that are characteristic of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, we compared the methylation patterns of cells taken at diagnosis from 20 patients with pediatric ALL to the methylation patterns in mononuclear cells from bone marrow of the same patients during remission and in non-leukemic control cells from bone marrow or blood. Using a custom-designed assay, we measured the methylation levels of 1,320 CpG sites in regulatory regions of 413 genes that were analyzed because they display allele-specific gene expression (ASE) in ALL cells. The rationale for our selection of CpG sites was that ASE could be the result of allele-specific methylation in the promoter regions of the genes. We found that the ALL cells had methylation profiles that allowed distinction between ALL cells and control cells. Using stringent criteria for calling differential methylation, we identified 28 CpG sites in 24 genes with recurrent differences in their methylation levels between ALL cells and control cells. Twenty of the differentially methylated genes were hypermethylated in the ALL cells, and as many as nine of them (AMICA1, CPNE7, CR1, DBC1, EYA4, LGALS8, RYR3, UQCRFS1, WDR35) have functions in cell signaling and/or apoptosis. The methylation levels of a subset of the genes were consistent with an inverse relationship with the mRNA expression levels in a large number of ALL cells from published data sets, supporting a potential biological effect of the methylation signatures and their application for diagnostic purposes. PMID:22493696

  2. DNA Methylation Analysis of Bone Marrow Cells at Diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and at Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nordlund, Jessica; Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2012-01-01

    To detect genes with CpG sites that display methylation patterns that are characteristic of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, we compared the methylation patterns of cells taken at diagnosis from 20 patients with pediatric ALL to the methylation patterns in mononuclear cells from bone marrow of the same patients during remission and in non-leukemic control cells from bone marrow or blood. Using a custom-designed assay, we measured the methylation levels of 1,320 CpG sites in regulatory regions of 413 genes that were analyzed because they display allele-specific gene expression (ASE) in ALL cells. The rationale for our selection of CpG sites was that ASE could be the result of allele-specific methylation in the promoter regions of the genes. We found that the ALL cells had methylation profiles that allowed distinction between ALL cells and control cells. Using stringent criteria for calling differential methylation, we identified 28 CpG sites in 24 genes with recurrent differences in their methylation levels between ALL cells and control cells. Twenty of the differentially methylated genes were hypermethylated in the ALL cells, and as many as nine of them (AMICA1, CPNE7, CR1, DBC1, EYA4, LGALS8, RYR3, UQCRFS1, WDR35) have functions in cell signaling and/or apoptosis. The methylation levels of a subset of the genes were consistent with an inverse relationship with the mRNA expression levels in a large number of ALL cells from published data sets, supporting a potential biological effect of the methylation signatures and their application for diagnostic purposes. PMID:22493696

  3. Autologous versus unrelated donor allogeneic marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weisdorf, D J; Billett, A L; Hannan, P; Ritz, J; Sallan, S E; Steinbuch, M; Ramsay, N K

    1997-10-15

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure patients with high-risk or recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Those lacking a related donor can receive either autologous or histocompatible unrelated donor (URD) marrow. Autotransplantation may result in higher risk of relapse, whereas URD allografts, although associated with serious posttransplant toxicities, may reduce relapse risk. Six years (1987 to 1993) of consecutive autologous BMT (University of Minnesota, Dana Farber Cancer Institute; n = 214) were compared with URD transplants (National Marrow Donor Program; n = 337). Most transplants (70% autologous, 48% URD) were in early remission (first or second complete remission [CR1 or CR2]); 376 patients (75% autologous, 64% URD) were less than 18 years old. Autologous BMT led to significantly lower transplant-related mortality (TRM; relative risk [RR] 0.35; P = .001). URD transplantation offered greater protection against relapse (autologous RR 3.1; P = .001). Patients greater than 18 years old, women, and BMT recipients beyond CR2 had higher TRM, whereas adults, BMT recipients in CR2+, or BMT recipients during 1991 through 1993 had significantly more relapse. After 25 months median follow-up, 100 URD and 56 autologous recipients survive leukemia free. URD BMT in CR2 resulted in superior disease-free survival (DFS), especially for adult patients. Multivariate analysis showed superior DFS for children, men, and BMT during CR1 or 2. Autologous and URD BMT can extend survival for a minority of patients unlikely to be cured by chemotherapy, and the results with either technique are comparable. Greater toxicity and TRM after URD BMT are counterbalanced by better protection against relapse. Prospective studies addressing additional clinical variables are needed to guide clinical decision making about transplant choices for patients with ALL. PMID:9376576

  4. Potential for bispecific T-cell engagers: role of blinatumomab in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Le Jeune, Caroline; Thomas, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and patients whose minimal residual disease persists during treatment have a poor leukemia-free survival. Despite improvements in front-line therapy, the outcome in these patients remains poor, especially after relapse. As there are no standard chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of patients with R/R B-precursor ALL, T-cell-based therapeutic approaches have recently come to the forefront in ALL therapy. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have been developed to target specific antigens expressed in B-lineage blast cells. In this setting, CD19 is of great interest as this antigen is expressed in B-lineage cells. Therefore, it has been selected as the target antigen for blinatumomab, a new bi-specific T-cell engager antibody. This sophisticated antibody binds sites for both CD19 and CD3, leading to T-cell proliferation and activation and B-cell apoptosis. Owing to its short serum half-life, blinatumomab has been administrated by continuous intravenous infusion with a favorable safety profile. The most significant toxicities were central nervous system events and the cytokine release syndrome. This new therapeutic approach using blinatumomab has been shown to be effective in patients with positive minimal residual disease and in patients with R/R B-precursor ALL leading to a recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated review process. This review focuses on the profile of blinatumomab and its efficacy and safety. PMID:26937176

  5. Radiation resistance of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Uckun, F.M. Childrens Cancer Group, Arcadia, CA ); Aeppli, D.; Song, C.W. )

    1993-11-15

    Detailed comparative analyses of the radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were performed to achieve a better understanding of clinical radiation resistance in ALL. The radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from 74 children with newly diagnosed ALL was analyzed using leukemic progenitor cell (LPC) assays. Primary bone marrow blasts from all 74 patients were exposed to ionizing radiation and subsequently assayed for LPC-derived blast colony formation. Radiation survival curves of LPC were constructed for each of the newly diagnosed patients using computer programs for the single-hit multitarget as well as the linear quadratic models of cell survival. A marked interpatient variation in intrinsic radiation sensitivity was observed between LPC populations. The SF[sub 2] values ranged from 0.01 to 1.00. Patients were divided into groups according to their sex, age, WBC at diagnosis, cell cycle distribution of leukemic blasts, and immunophenotype. Only immunophenotype provided a significant correlation with the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of LPC. Patients with B-lineage ALL had higher SF[sub 2] and smaller [alpha] values than T-lineage ALL patients, consistent with greater intrinsic radiation resistance at the level of LPC. Notably, 43% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 27% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with SF[sub 2] [ge] 0.5. Similarly, 66% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 37% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with [alpha] values [le] 0.4 Gy[sup [minus]1]. Combining the two indicators of radiation resistance, they found that only 34% of the B-lineage ALL patients had none of the two parameters in the respective critical regions, while 63% of the T-lineage patients had none. In multivariate analyses, the immunophenotypic B-lineage affiliation was the only significant predictor of radiation resistance at the level of LPC. 42 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Perinatal and Familial Risk Factors for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Swedish National Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Perinatal factors including high birth weight have been associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in case-control studies. However, these findings have seldom been examined in large population-based cohort studies, and the specific contributions of gestational age and fetal growth remain unknown. Methods We conducted a national cohort study of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008, followed up for ALL incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years) to examine perinatal and familial risk factors. Results There were 1,960 ALL cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for potential confounders, risk factors for ALL included high fetal growth (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per additional 1 standard deviation, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11, P=0.002; IRR for large vs. appropriate for gestational age, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.40; P=0.005), first-degree family history of ALL (IRR, 7.41; 95% CI, 4.60-11.95, P<0.001), male sex (IRR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.10-1.31; P<0.001), and parental country of birth (IRR for both parents born in Sweden vs. other countries, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.00-1.27, P=0.045). These risk factors did not appear to vary by age at ALL diagnosis. Gestational age at birth, season of birth, birth order, multiple birth, parental age, and parental education level were not associated with ALL. Conclusions In this large cohort study, high fetal growth was associated with an increased risk of ALL in childhood through young adulthood, independently of gestational age at birth, suggesting that growth factor pathways may play an important long-term role in the etiology of ALL. PMID:25417823

  7. Endocrinological and Cardiological Late Effects Among Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Pakize; Yılmaz, Şebnem; Tüfekçi, Özlem; Kır, Mustafa; Böber, Ece; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have significantly improved and late effects of therapy have been important in the follow-up of survivors. The objective of this study is to identify the endocrinological and cardiological late effects of ALL patients treated in our pediatric hematology unit. Materials and Methods: Patients treated for ALL with BFM protocols after at least 5 years of diagnosis and not relapsed were included in the study. Endocrinological late effects (growth failure, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid gland disorders, osteopenia/osteoporosis, and pubertal disorders) and cardiological late effects were evaluated. The study group was evaluated with anthropometric measurements, body mass index, and laboratory testing of fasting glucose, insulin, serum lipids, thyroid functions, and bone mineral densities. Echocardiography and pulsed wave Doppler imaging were performed for analysis of cardiac functions. Results: Of the 38 ALL survivors, at least 1 adverse event occurred in 23 (60%), with 8 of them (21%) having multiple problems. Six (16%) of the survivors were obese and 8 (21%) of them were overweight. Subjects who were overweight or obese at the time of diagnosis were more likely to be overweight or obese at last follow-up. Obesity was more frequently determined in patients who were younger than 6 years of age at the time of diagnosis. Insulin resistance was observed in 8 (21%) subjects. Insulin resistance was more frequently seen in subjects who had family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hyperlipidemia was detected in 8 (21%) patients. Hypothyroidism or premature thelarche were detected in 2 children. Two survivors had osteopenia. Cardiovascular abnormalities occurred in one of the subjects with hypertension and cardiac diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion: We point out the necessity of follow-up of these patients for endocrinological and cardiological late effects, since at least one adverse

  8. Sensitive and Specific Measurement of Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Alexander A.; Latham, Sue; Brisco, Michael J.; Sykes, Pamela J.; Sutton, Rosemary; Hughes, Elizabeth; Wilczek, Vicki; Budgen, Bradley; van Zanten, Katrina; Kuss, Bryone J.; Venn, Nicola C.; Norris, Murray D.; Crock, Catherine; Storey, Colin; Revesz, Tamas; Waters, Keith

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive and specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method, involving three rounds of amplification with two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers directed against an rearrangement, was developed to quantify minimal residual disease (MRD) in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). For a single sample containing 10 μg of good quality DNA, MRD was quantifiable down to approximately 10−6, which is at least 1 log more sensitive than current methods. Nonspecific amplification was rarely observed. The standard deviation of laboratory estimations was 0.32 log units at moderate or high levels of MRD, but increased markedly as the level of MRD and the number of intact marker gene rearrangements in the sample fell. In 23 children with ALL studied after induction therapy, the mean MRD level was 1.6 × 10−5 and levels ranged from 1.5 × 10−2 to less than 10−7. Comparisons with the conventional one-round quantitative polymerase chain reaction method on 29 samples from another 24 children who received treatment resulted in concordant results for 22 samples and discordant results for seven samples. The sensitivity and specificity of the method are due to the use of nested polymerase chain reaction, one segment-specific and two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, and the use of a large amount of good quality DNA. This method may improve MRD-based decisions on treatment for ALL patients, and the principles should be applicable to DNA-based MRD measurements in other disorders. PMID:19324989

  9. Therapeutic potential of targeting mTOR in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (review).

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Camilla; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Chiarini, Francesca; Lonetti, Annalisa; Buontempo, Francesca; Bressanin, Daniela; Cappellini, Alessandra; Orsini, Ester; McCubrey, James A; Martelli, Alberto M

    2014-09-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a heterogeneous neoplastic disorder of immature hematopoietic precursors committed to the T-cell lineage. T-ALL comprises about 15% of pediatric and 25% of adult ALL cases. Even if the prognosis of T-ALL has improved especially in the childhood due to the use of new intensified treatment protocols, the outcome of relapsed patients who are resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs or who relapse is still poor. For this reason, there is a need for novel and less toxic targeted therapies against signaling pathways aberrantly activated in T-ALL, such as the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Small molecules designed to target key components of this signaling axis have proven their efficacy both in vitro and in vivo in pre-clinical settings of T-ALL. In particular, different classes of mTOR inhibitors have been disclosed by pharmaceutical companies, and they are currently being tested in clinical trials for treating T-ALL patients. One of the most promising approaches for the treatment of T-ALL seems to be the combination of mTOR inhibitors with traditional chemotherapeutic agents. This could lead to a lower drug dosage that may circumvent the systemic side effects of chemotherapeutics. In this review, we focus on the different classes of mTOR inhibitors that will possibly have an impact on the therapeutic arsenal we have at our disposal against T-ALL. PMID:24968804

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis of leukoencephalopathy in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, John O.; Li, Chin-Shang; Helton, Kathleen J.; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use objective quantitative MR imaging methods to develop a computer-aided diagnosis tool to differentiate white matter (WM) hyperintensities as either leukoencephalopathy (LE) or normal maturational processes in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with intravenous high dose methotrexate. A combined imaging set consisting of T1, T2, PD, and FLAIR MR images and WM, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid a priori maps from a spatially normalized atlas were analyzed with a neural network segmentation based on a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map. Segmented regions were manually classified to identify the most hyperintense WM region and the normal appearing genu region. Signal intensity differences normalized to the genu within each examination were generated for two time points in 203 children. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering algorithm with the agglomeration method of McQuitty was used to divide data from the first examination into normal appearing or LE groups. A C-support vector machine (C-SVM) was then trained on the first examination data and used to classify the data from the second examination. The overall accuracy of the computer-aided detection tool was 83.5% (299/358) with sensitivity to normal WM of 86.9% (199/229) and specificity to LE of 77.5% (100/129) when compared to the readings of two expert observers. These results suggest that subtle therapy-induced leukoencephalopathy can be objectively and reproducibly detected in children treated for cancer using this computer-aided detection approach based on relative differences in quantitative signal intensity measures normalized within each examination.

  11. Dust-metal Loadings and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Ward, Mary H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Dahl, Gary; Ducore, Jonathan; Reinier, Kyndaron; Gunier, Robert B.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and levels of metals in carpet dust. A dust sample was collected from the homes of 142 ALL cases and 187 controls participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study using a high volume small surface sampler (2001–2006). Samples were analyzed using microwave-assisted acid digestion in combination with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, tungsten, and zinc. Eight metals were detected in at least 85% of the case and control homes; tungsten was detected in less than 15% of homes. Relationships between dust-metal loadings (μg metal per m2 carpet) and ALL risk were modeled using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for the child’s age, sex, and race/ethnicity and confounders, including household annual income. A doubling of dust-metal loadings was not associated with significant changes in ALL risk [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): arsenic: 0.94 (0.83, 1.05), cadmium: 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), chromium: 0.99 (0.87, 1.12), copper: 0.96 (0.90, 1.03), lead: 1.01 (0.93, 1.10), nickel: 0.92 (0.80, 1.07), tin: 0.93 (0.82, 1.05), and zinc: 0.91 (0.81, 1.02)]. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that metals in carpet dust are risk factors for childhood ALL. PMID:25736162

  12. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and stromal cells communicate through Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Joo, Eun Ji; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Schiffer, Isabelle; Paz, Helicia; Fabbri, Muller; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions between B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) cells and stromal cells in the bone marrow that provide microenvironmentally-mediated protection against therapeutic drugs are not well-defined. Galectin-3 (Lgals3) is a multifunctional galactose-binding lectin with reported location in the nucleus, cytoplasm and extracellular space in different cell types. We previously reported that ALL cells co-cultured with stroma contain high levels of Galectin-3. We here establish that, in contrast to more mature B-lineage cancers, Galectin-3 detected in and on the ALL cells originates from stromal cells, which express it on their surface, secrete it as soluble protein and also in exosomes. Soluble and stromal-bound Galectin-3 is internalized by ALL cells, transported to the nucleus and stimulates transcription of endogenous LGALS3 mRNA. When human and mouse ALL cells develop tolerance to different drugs while in contact with protective stromal cells, Galectin-3 protein levels are consistently increased. This correlates with induction of Galectin-3 transcription in the ALL cells. Thus Galectin-3 sourced from stroma becomes supplemented by endogenous Galectin-3 production in the pre-B ALL cells that are under continuous stress from drug treatment. Our data suggest that stromal Galectin-3 may protect ALL cells through auto-induction of Galectin-3 mRNA and tonic NFκB pathway activation. Since endogenously synthesized Galectin-3 protects pre-B ALL cells against drug treatment, we identify Galectin-3 as one possible target to counteract the protective effects of stroma. PMID:25869099

  13. A Possible Role for WNT5A Hypermethylation in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hatırnaz Ng, Özden; Fırtına, Sinem; Can, İsmail; Karakaş, Zeynep; Ağaoğlu, Leyla; Doğru, Ömer; Celkan, Tiraje; Akçay, Arzu; Yıldırmak, Yıldız; Timur, Çetin; Özbek, Uğur; Sayitoğlu, Müge

    2015-01-01

    Objective: WNT5A is one of the most studied noncanonical WNT ligands and is shown to be deregulated in different tumor types. Our aim was to clarify whether hypermethylation might be the cause of low WNT5A mRNA levels and whether we could restore this downregulation by reversing the event. Materials and Methods: The expression of WNT5A mRNA was studied in a large acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patient group (n=86) by quantitative real-time PCR. The methylation status was detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSPCR) and bisulphate sequencing. In order to determine whether methylation has a direct effect on WNT5A expression, disease-representative cell lines were treated by 5’-aza-20-deoxycytidine. Results: Here we designed a validation experiment of the WNT5A gene, which was previously examined and found to be differentially expressed by microarray study in 31 T-cell ALL patients. The expression levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and the expression levels were significantly lower in T-cell ALL patients than in control thymic subsets (p=0.007). MSPCR revealed that 86% of the patients were hypermethylated in the WNT5A promoter region. Jurkat and RPMI cell lines were treated with 5’-aza-20-deoxycytidine and WNT5A mRNA expression was restored after treatment. Conclusion: According to our results, WNT5A hypermethylation does occur in ALL patients and it has a direct effect on mRNA expression. Our findings show that epigenetic changes of WNT signaling can play a role in ALL pathogenesis and reversing methylation might be useful as a possible treatment of leukemia. PMID:26316480

  14. Oncogenetics and minimal residual disease are independent outcome predictors in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beldjord, Kheira; Chevret, Sylvie; Asnafi, Vahid; Huguet, Françoise; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Leguay, Thibaut; Thomas, Xavier; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Grardel, Nathalie; Chalandon, Yves; Boissel, Nicolas; Schaefer, Beat; Delabesse, Eric; Cavé, Hélène; Chevallier, Patrice; Buzyn, Agnès; Fest, Thierry; Reman, Oumedaly; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Lhéritier, Véronique; Béné, Marie C; Lafage, Marina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2014-06-12

    With intensified pediatric-like therapy and genetic disease dissection, the field of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has evolved recently. In this new context, we aimed to reassess the value of conventional risk factors with regard to new genetic alterations and early response to therapy, as assessed by immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor minimal residual disease (MRD) levels. The study was performed in 423 younger adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL in first remission (265 B-cell precursor [BCP] and 158 T-cell ALL), with cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) as the primary end point. In addition to conventional risk factors, the most frequent currently available genetic alterations were included in the analysis. A higher specific hazard of relapse was independently associated with postinduction MRD level ≥10(-4) and unfavorable genetic characteristics (ie, MLL gene rearrangement or focal IKZF1 gene deletion in BCP-ALL and no NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutation and/or N/K-RAS mutation and/or PTEN gene alteration in T-cell ALL). These 2 factors allowed definition of a new risk classification that is strongly associated with higher CIR and shorter relapse-free and overall survival. These results indicate that genetic abnormalities are important predictors of outcome in adult ALL not fully recapitulated by early response to therapy. Patients included in this study were treated in the multicenter GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. Both trials were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027 and #NCT00327678, respectively. PMID:24740809

  15. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197148

  16. Modeling the Mechanism of GR/c-Jun/Erg Crosstalk in Apoptosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daphne Wei-Chen; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common forms of malignancy that occurs in lymphoid progenitor cells, particularly in children. Synthetic steroid hormones glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used as part of the ALL treatment regimens due to their apoptotic function, but their use also brings about various side effects and drug resistance. The identification of the molecular differences between the GCs responsive and resistant cells therefore are essential to decipher such complexity and can be used to improve therapy. However, the emerging picture is complicated as the activities of genes and proteins involved are controlled by multiple factors. By adopting the systems biology framework to address this issue, we here integrated the available knowledge together with experimental data by building a series of mathematical models. This rationale enabled us to unravel molecular interactions involving c-Jun in GC induced apoptosis and identify Ets-related gene (Erg) as potential biomarker of GC resistance. The results revealed an alternative possible mechanism where c-Jun may be an indirect GR target that is controlled via an upstream repressor protein. The models also highlight the importance of Erg for GR function, particularly in GC sensitive C7 cells where Erg directly regulates GR in agreement with our previous experimental results. Our models describe potential GR-controlled molecular mechanisms of c-Jun/Bim and Erg regulation. We also demonstrate the importance of using a systematic approach to translate human disease processes into computational models in order to derive information-driven new hypotheses. PMID:23181019

  17. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo. PMID:20406497

  18. Bim polymorphisms: influence on function and response to treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Vincent; Rousseau, Julie; Labuda, Malgorzata; Sharif-Askari, Bahram; Brukner, Ivan; Laverdière, Caroline; Ceppi, Francesco; Sallan, Stephen E.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Corticosteroids (CS) induce apoptosis in the malignant lymphoid cells and are critical component of combination therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Several genome-wide microarray studies demonstrated major implication of proapoptotic Bim in mediating CS-related resistance in leukemia cells. Experimental design We investigated Bim gene polymorphisms and their association with childhood ALL outcome, and the mechanism underlying the observed finding. Results Lower overall survival (OS) was associated with Bim C29201T located in BH3 domain (p=0.01). An association remained significant in multivariate model (p=0.007), was more apparent in high risk (HR) patients (p=0.004) and patients treated with dexamethasone (p=0.009), and was subsequently confirmed in the replication patient cohort (p=0.03). RNA analysis revealed that C29201T affects generation of gamma isoforms (gamma1) that lack pro-apoptotic BH3 domain. The phenotypic effect was minor suggesting the influence of additional factors that may act in conjunction with Bim genotype. Combined analysis with Mcl gene polymorphism (G -486T) revealed profound reduction in OS in individuals with both risk genotypes (p<0.0005 in discovery and p=0.002 in replication cohort) and particularly in HR patients (p≤0.008). Conclusions Increased expression of pro-survival Mcl1 and presence of Bim isoforms lacking pro-apoptotic function might explain marked reduction of OS in a disease and dose dependent manner in ALL patients carrying Bim and Mcl1 risk genotypes. PMID:23908358

  19. Polymorphisms of asparaginase pathway and asparaginase-related complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tanfous, Mohsen Ben; Sharif-Askari, Bahram; Ceppi, Francesco; Laaribi, Haithem; Gagné, Vincent; Rousseau, Julie; Labuda, Malgorzata; Silverman, Lewis B.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Asparaginase is a standard and critical component in the therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but it is also associated with several toxicities. Experimental design We recently reported the results of an association study between asparaginase pathway genes and event free survival (EFS) in childhood ALL patients. The same polymorphisms were interrogated here in relation to allergies, pancreatitis and thrombotic events following treatment with E.coli asparaginase. Results Among patients of discovery group, allergies and pancreatitis were more frequent in individuals who are homozygous for the triple repeat allele (3R) of asparagine synthetase ASNS gene, resulting in remarkably higher risk of these toxicities associated with 3R3R genotype (OR for allergies =14.6, 95% CI= 3.6–58.7, p<0.0005 and OR for pancreatitis = 8.6, 95% CI= 2.0–37.3, p=0.01). In contrast, the ASNS haplotype *1 harbouring double repeat (2R) allele had protective effect against these adverse reactions (p≤0.01). The same haplotype was previously reported to confer reduction in EFS. The risk effect of 3R3R genotype was not replicated in validation cohort, whereas the protective effect of haplotype *1 against allergies was maintained (p≤0.002). Analysis with additional polymorphisms in ASNS locus in lymphoblastoid cell lines showed that haplotype *1 is diversified in several subtypes of which one was associated with reduced in vitro sensitivity to asparaginase (rs10486009p=0.01) possibly explaining an association seen in clinical setting. Conclusions This finding might have implication for treatment individualization in ALL and other cancers employing asparagine depletion strategies. PMID:24907114

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 polymorphism in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    EL ANSARY, MERVAT M.; MOHAMMED, LAMIAA A.; HASSAN, TAMER H.; BARAKA, AHMED; AHMED, ALSHYMAA A.

    2015-01-01

    Similar to autoimmune diseases, there are clear associations between resistance or susceptibility to cancer and the classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile of an individual. HLA-associated susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may provide clues to leukemogenesis in general and to the role of other risk factors. The present study aimed to determine the association between the HLA-DRB1 genotype and susceptibility to ALL in children and to assess the prognostic value of HLA-DRB1 alleles in these patients. This study included 50 ALL patients who were consecutively admitted to the Pediatric Oncology Unit of Zagazig University Hospital and 50 gender-matched healthy volunteers as a control group. The patients were subjected to full clinical history, thorough clinical examination and routine laboratory investigations. Molecular HLA-DRB1 typing for patients and controls using the reverse sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe technique was performed. HLA-DRB1*04 allele frequency was significantly higher in female patients compared to that in female controls (P=0.03) and in patients aged <10 years compared to those aged ≥10 years at the time of diagnosis (P=0.01). HLA-DRB1*11 allele frequency was significantly higher in high-risk compared to standard-risk patients (P=0.01) and in refractory patients compared to those who achieved remission (P=0.02). In conclusion, the HLA-DRB1*04 allele appears to be a female-specific susceptibility factor for the acquisition of childhood ALL and it may affect the age of onset of ALL. In addition, the HLA-DRB1*11 allele may be of prognostic significance in childhood ALL. However, further larger studies are required to support the conclusions drawn from this study. PMID:25798280

  1. Clinical significance of thymidine kinase in Egyptian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Saad, Mohamed A.; Mohamed, Sohair A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy, representing one-third of pediatric cancers. Thymidine kinase-1 (TK-1) is expressed in proliferating cells so elevated TK-1 indicates active tumor growth. Objective: To study the clinical significance of TK-1 in children with ALL. Patients and Methods: This study was carried out on 40 children with newly diagnosed ALL who were admitted to Oncology Unit, Pediatric department, Tanta University (26 males and 14 females) with their ages ranged from 4 to 10 years and 30 healthy children of matched age and sex as a control group. For all patients the following were done: Complete blood picture, bone marrow examination, immunophenotyping and TK-1 serum levels. Results: Mean TK-1 level was significantly higher in patients at diagnosis than controls and significantly higher in patients with unfavorable outcome than patients with favorable outcome. Mean TK-1 level was significantly higher in patients in relapse than patients in remission and controls. No significant differences in mean TK-1 level between patients in remission and controls. There were statistically significant differences in disease free survival and overall survival between patients with favorable and unfavorable outcome. Conclusion: From this study we concluded that TK is a helpful marker in diagnosis and follow-up of patients with ALL. Recommendations: Thymidine kinase-1 should be routinely assessed at diagnosis and during follow-up in ALL patients for better diagnostic and prognostic assessment and should be taken in consideration in designing future therapeutic strategies based on patients-specific risk factors. PMID:25992345

  2. [Ph1 positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia with DIC after operation of colon and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Yashige, H; Fujii, H

    1989-07-01

    We reported a rare case of triple cancers with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) after the operations of colon cancer and primary lung cancer. A 78-year-old Japanese male, who had been operated upon for colon cancer (adenocarcinoma) on March 1981, metastatic brain tumor (adenocarcinoma) on December 1986, and primary lung cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) on February 1987, was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise on December 6 1987. On admission, he had mild hepatosplenomegaly and hemorrhage diathesis such as purpura. Serum LDH increased to 2,515 mU/ml. The white blood cell count was 6,210/microliters with 53% leukemia cells, and the platelet count was 12,000/microliters. A bone marrow was infiltrated with 96.0% leukemia cells. The leukemia cells stained positively for PAS and negatively for peroxidase. Immunological examination of leukemia cells showed that HLA-DR, TdT, B1 and J5 were positive and cytoplasmic Igmu and surface Ig were negative, indicating common ALL. The coagulation studies revealed that the activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged to 42.0 seconds, FDP increased to 79.9 micrograms/ml, and antithrombin-III decreased to 62%. Chromosome analysis showed a 48, XY, +2, +21q-, t(9;22) karyotype. He was diagnosed as having Ph1 positive ALL associated with DIC. He was treated with vindesine, prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and adriamycin and complete remission (CR) was achieved after two months. But on August 1988, 8 months after CR, ALL and brain tumor relapsed and he died of pneumonia on September 19, 1988. PMID:2810793

  3. TESTIN Induces Rapid Death and Suppresses Proliferation in Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Robert J.; Ludgate, Jackie L.; LeMée, Gwenn; Morison, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. Despite high cure rates, side effects and late consequences of the intensive treatments are common. Unquestionably, the identification of new therapeutic targets will lead to safer, more effective treatments. We identified TES promoter methylation and transcriptional silencing as a very common molecular abnormality in childhood ALL, irrespective of molecular subtype. The aims of the present study were to demonstrate that TES promoter methylation is aberrant, to determine the effects of TES re-expression in ALL, and to determine if those effects are mediated via TP53 activity. Methods Normal fetal and adult tissue DNA was isolated and TES promoter methylation determined by Sequenom MassARRAY. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot were used to confirm re-expression of TES in ALL cell lines after 5’-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (decitabine) exposure or transfection with TES expression plasmids. The effects of TES re-expression on ALL cells were investigated using standard cell proliferation, cell death and cell cycle assays. Results In this study, we confirm that the TES promoter is unmethylated in normal adult and fetal tissues. We report that decitabine treatment of ALL cell lines results in demethylation of the TES promoter and attendant expression of TES mRNA. Re-expression of TESTIN protein in ALL cells using expression plasmid transfection results in rapid cell death or cell cycle arrest independent of TP53 activity. Conclusions These results suggest that TES is aberrantly methylated in ALL and that re-expression of TESTIN has anti-leukaemia effects which point to novel therapeutic opportunities for childhood ALL. PMID:26985820

  4. Subgroups of Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Might Differ Significantly in Genetic Predisposition to Asparaginase Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kutszegi, Nóra; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Gézsi, András; Sági, Judit C.; Nagy, Viktória; Csordás, Katalin; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Gábor, Krisztina Míta; Kovács, Gábor T.; Erdélyi, Dániel J.; Szalai, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASP) is a key element in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to ASP are major challenges in paediatric patients. Our aim was to investigate genetic variants that may influence the risk to Escherichia coli-derived ASP hypersensitivity. Sample and clinical data collection was carried out from 576 paediatric ALL patients who were treated according to protocols from the Berlin—Frankfurt—Münster Study Group. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GRIA1 and GALNT10 genes were genotyped. Patients with GRIA1 rs4958351 AA/AG genotype showed significantly reduced risk to ASP hypersensitivity compared to patients with GG genotype in the T-cell ALL subgroup (OR = 0.05 (0.01–0.26); p = 4.70E-04), while no such association was found in pre-B-cell ALL. In the medium risk group two SNPs of GRIA1 (rs2055083 and rs707176) were associated significantly with the occurrence of ASP hypersensitivity (OR = 0.21 (0.09–0.53); p = 8.48E-04 and OR = 3.02 (1.36–6.73); p = 6.76E-03, respectively). Evaluating the genders separately, however, the association of rs707176 with ASP HSRs was confined only to females. Our results suggest that genetic variants of GRIA1 might influence the risk to ASP hypersensitivity, but subgroups of patients can differ significantly in this respect. PMID:26457809

  5. Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia stem cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which constitute a minority of the tumor bulk, are functionally defined on the basis of their ability to transfer leukemia into an immunodeficient recipient animal. The presence of LSCs has been demonstrated in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), of which ALL with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+). The use of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), as part of front-line treatment and in combination with cytotoxic agents, has greatly improved the proportions of complete response and molecular remission and the overall outcome in adults with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. New challenges have emerged with respect to induction of resistance to imatinib via Abelson tyrosine kinase mutations. An important recent addition to the arsenal against Ph+ leukemias in general was the development of novel TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib. However, in vitro experiments have suggested that TKIs have an antiproliferative but not an antiapoptotic or cytotoxic effect on the most primitive ALL stem cells. None of the TKIs in clinical use target the LSC. Second generation TKI dasatinib has been shown to have a more profound effect on the stem cell compartment but the drug was still unable to kill the most primitive LSCs. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains the only curative treatment available for these patients. Several mechanisms were proposed to explain the resistance of LSCs to TKIs in addition to mutations. Hence, TKIs may be used as a bridge to SCT rather than monotherapy or combination with standard chemotherapy. Better understanding the biology of Ph+ ALL will open new avenues for effective management. In this review, we highlight recent findings relating to the question of LSCs in Ph+ ALL. PMID:22993661

  6. microRNAs regulate TAL1 expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Correia, Nádia C; Melão, Alice; Póvoa, Vanda; Sarmento, Leonor; Gómez de Cedrón, Marta; Malumbres, Marcos; Enguita, Francisco J; Barata, João T

    2016-02-16

    The transcription factor TAL1 is a proto-oncogene whose aberrant expression in committed T-cell precursors is associated with the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The mechanisms leading to aberrant activation of TAL1 in T-ALL patients who lack chromosomal rearrangements involving the TAL1 locus remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TAL1 levels decrease during normal T-cell development at least in part due to miRNA-dependent silencing, in which case TAL1 over-expression in some T-ALL cases could be the consequence of deregulated miRNA expression. By performing computational prediction of miRNAs that bind to the human TAL1 mRNA we compiled a list of miRNAs that are candidates to regulate TAL1. Using a luciferase reporter system and mutagenesis assays we confirmed the miRNA-TAL1 mRNA interactions and selected candidate miRNAs: miR-101, miR-520d-5p, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p. Over-expression of these microRNAs in different T-ALL cell lines consistently resulted in the down-regulation of TAL1 protein. In accordance, inhibition of miR-101 and miR-520d-5p promoted TAL1 protein expression. Importantly, we found that miR-101, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p were down-regulated in T-ALL patient specimens and T-ALL cell lines. Our results show for the first time the existence of epigenetic regulation of TAL1 by specific miRNAs which may contribute, at least in part, to the ectopic expression of TAL1 in some T-ALL cases. PMID:26882564

  7. Genetics of glucocorticoid-associated osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karol, Seth E; Yang, Wenjian; Van Driest, Sara L; Chang, Tamara Y; Kaste, Sue; Bowton, Erica; Basford, Melissa; Bastarache, Lisa; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C; Larsen, Eric; Winick, Naomi; Carroll, William L; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Fernandez, Christian A; Liu, Chengcheng; Smith, Colton; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hunger, Stephen P; Scheet, Paul; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Devidas, Meenakshi; Mattano, Leonard A; Relling, Mary V

    2015-10-01

    Glucocorticoids are important therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their major adverse effect is osteonecrosis. Our goal was to identify genetic and nongenetic risk factors for osteonecrosis. We performed a genome-wide association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a discovery cohort comprising 2285 children with ALL, treated on the Children's Oncology Group AALL0232 protocol (NCT00075725), adjusting for covariates. The minor allele at SNP rs10989692 (near the glutamate receptor GRIN3A locus) was associated with osteonecrosis (hazard ratio = 2.03; P = 3.59 × 10(-7)). The association was supported by 2 replication cohorts, including 361 children with ALL on St. Jude's Total XV protocol (NCT00137111) and 309 non-ALL patients from Vanderbilt University's BioVU repository treated with glucocorticoids (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87 and 2.26; P = .063 and .0074, respectively). In a meta-analysis, rs10989692 was also highest ranked (P = 2.68 × 10(-8)), and the glutamate pathway was the top ranked pathway (P = 9.8 × 10(-4)). Osteonecrosis-associated glutamate receptor variants were also associated with other vascular phenotypes including cerebral ischemia (OR = 1.64; P = 2.5 × 10(-3)), and arterial embolism and thrombosis (OR = 1.88; P = 4.2 × 10(-3)). In conclusion, osteonecrosis was associated with inherited variations near glutamate receptor genes. Further understanding this association may allow interventions to decrease osteonecrosis. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00075725 and #NCT00137111. PMID:26265699

  8. In vitro toxicity assay of cisplatin on mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shabani, R; Ashtari, K; Behnam, B; Izadyar, F; Asgari, H; Asghari Jafarabadi, M; Ashjari, M; Asadi, E; Koruji, M

    2016-06-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in reproductive age, and cisplatin is one of the major helpful chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of this cancer. In addition, exposure of testes cancer cells to cisplatin could potentially eliminate tumour cells from germ cells in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on viability of mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line (EL-4) and neonatal mouse spermatogonial cells in vitro. In this study, the isolated spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and EL-4 were divided into six groups including control (received medium), sham (received DMSO in medium) and experimental groups which received different doses of cisplatin (0.5, 5, 10 and 15 μg ml(-1) ). Cells viability was evaluated with MTT assay. The identity of the cultured cells was confirmed by the expression of specific markers. Our finding showed that viability of both SSC and EL-4 cells was reduced with the dose of 15 μg/ml when compared to the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Also, the differences between the IC50 in doses 10 and 15 μg/ml at different time were significant (P ≤ 0.05). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was increased, and the BAX and caspase-3 expressions were upregulated in EL4 cells for group that received an effective dose of cisplatin). In conclusion, despite the dramatic effects of cisplatin on both cells, spermatogonial stem cells could form colony in culture. PMID:26428408

  9. Inhibition of IRAK1/4 sensitizes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoyang; Younger, Kenisha; Gartenhaus, Ronald; Joseph, Ann Mary; Hu, Fang; Baer, Maria R; Brown, Patrick; Davila, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Signaling via the MyD88/IRAK pathway in T cells is indispensable for cell survival; however, it is not known whether this pathway functions in the progression of T acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we determined that compared with thymic and peripheral T cells, T-ALL cells from patients have elevated levels of IRAK1 and IRAK4 mRNA as well as increased total and phosphorylated protein. Targeted inhibition of IRAK1 and IRAK4, either with shRNA or with a pharmacological IRAK1/4 inhibitor, dramatically impeded proliferation of T-ALL cells isolated from patients and T-ALL cells in a murine leukemia model; however, IRAK1/4 inhibition had little effect on cell death. We screened several hundred FDA-approved compounds and identified a set of drugs that had enhanced cytotoxic activity when combined with IRAK inhibition. Administration of an IRAK1/4 inhibitor or IRAK knockdown in combination with either ABT-737 or vincristine markedly reduced leukemia burden in mice and prolonged survival. IRAK1/4 signaling activated the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6, increasing K63-linked ubiquitination and enhancing stability of the antiapoptotic protein MCL1; therefore, IRAK inhibition reduced MCL1 stability and sensitized T-ALL to combination therapy. These studies demonstrate that IRAK1/4 signaling promotes T-ALL progression through stabilization of MCL1 and suggest that impeding this pathway has potential as a therapeutic strategy to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy. PMID:25642772

  10. Current Concepts in Pediatric Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Hunger, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) or Philadelphia chromosome creates a BCR–ABL1 fusion gene encoding for a chimeric BCR–ABL1 protein. It is present in 3–4% of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL), and about 25% of adult ALL cases. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), Ph+ ALL was associated with a very poor prognosis despite the use of intensive chemotherapy and frequently hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in first remission. The development of TKIs revolutionized the therapy of Ph+ ALL. Addition of the first generation ABL1 class TKI imatinib to intensive chemotherapy dramatically increased the survival for children with Ph+ ALL and established that many patients can be cured without HSCT. In parallel, the mechanistic understanding of Ph+ ALL expanded exponentially through careful mapping of pathways downstream of BCR–ABL1, the discovery of mutations in master regulators of B-cell development such as IKZF1 (Ikaros), PAX5, and early B-cell factor (EBF), the recognition of the complex clonal architecture of Ph+ ALL, and the delineation of genomic, epigenetic, and signaling abnormalities contributing to relapse and resistance. Still, many important basic and clinical questions remain unanswered. Current clinical trials are testing second generation TKIs in patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. Neither the optimal duration of therapy nor the optimal chemotherapy backbone are currently defined. The role of HSCT in first remission and post-transplant TKI therapy also require further study. In addition, it will be crucial to continue to dig deeper into understanding Ph+ ALL at a mechanistic level, and translate findings into complementary targeted approaches. Expanding targeted therapies hold great promise to decrease toxicity and improve survival in this high-risk disease, which provides a paradigm for how targeted therapies can be incorporated into treatment of other high-risk leukemias. PMID:24724051

  11. Atypical Structural Connectome Organization and Cognitive Impairment in Young Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Shelli R; Gugel, Meike; Huston-Warren, Emily; Watson, Christa

    2016-05-01

    Survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for cognitive impairments that disrupt everyday functioning and decrease quality of life. The specific biological mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment following ALL remain largely unclear, but previous studies consistently demonstrate significant white matter pathology. We aimed to extend this literature by examining the organization of the white matter connectome in young patients with a history of ALL treated with chemotherapy only. We applied graph theoretical analysis to diffusion tensor imaging obtained from 31 survivors of ALL age 5-19 years and 39 matched healthy controls. Results indicated significantly lower small-worldness (p = 0.007) and network clustering coefficient (p = 0.019), as well as greater cognitive impairment (p = 0.027) in the ALL group. Regional analysis indicated that clustered connectivity in parietal, frontal, hippocampal, amygdalar, thalamic, and occipital regions was altered in the ALL group. Random forest analysis revealed a model of connectome and demographic variables that could automatically classify survivors of ALL as having cognitive impairment or not (accuracy = 0.89, p < 0.0001). These findings provide further evidence of brain injury in young survivors of ALL, even those without a history of central nervous system (CNS) disease or cranial radiation. Efficiency of local information processing, reorganization of hub connectivity, and cognitive reserve may contribute to cognitive outcome in these children. Certain connectome properties showed U-shaped relationships with cognitive impairment suggesting an optimal range of regional connectivity. PMID:26850738

  12. microRNAs regulate TAL1 expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Nádia C.; Melão, Alice; Póvoa, Vanda; Sarmento, Leonor; de Cedrón, Marta Gómez; Malumbres, Marcos; Enguita, Francisco J.; Barata, João T.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor TAL1 is a proto-oncogene whose aberrant expression in committed T-cell precursors is associated with the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The mechanisms leading to aberrant activation of TAL1 in T-ALL patients who lack chromosomal rearrangements involving the TAL1 locus remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TAL1 levels decrease during normal T-cell development at least in part due to miRNA-dependent silencing, in which case TAL1 over-expression in some T-ALL cases could be the consequence of deregulated miRNA expression. By performing computational prediction of miRNAs that bind to the human TAL1 mRNA we compiled a list of miRNAs that are candidates to regulate TAL1. Using a luciferase reporter system and mutagenesis assays we confirmed the miRNA-TAL1 mRNA interactions and selected candidate miRNAs: miR-101, miR-520d-5p, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p. Over-expression of these microRNAs in different T-ALL cell lines consistently resulted in the down-regulation of TAL1 protein. In accordance, inhibition of miR-101 and miR-520d-5p promoted TAL1 protein expression. Importantly, we found that miR-101, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p were down-regulated in T-ALL patient specimens and T-ALL cell lines. Our results show for the first time the existence of epigenetic regulation of TAL1 by specific miRNAs which may contribute, at least in part, to the ectopic expression of TAL1 in some T-ALL cases. PMID:26882564

  13. Association Between PIP4K2A Polymorphisms and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fei; Yin, Dandan; Zhang, Yan; Hou, Qianqian; Zheng, Zhaoyue; Yang, Li; Shu, Yang; Xu, Heng; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common pediatric cancers in the world. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) locating at PIP4K2A locus were identified to be associated with ALL susceptibility through genome-wide association studies, however, followed by inconsistent reports in replication studies. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association status of the top independent SNPs (rs7088318 and rs4748793) with ALL susceptibility by combining the data from 6 independent studies, totally including 3508 cases and 12,446 controls with multiethnic populations. Consistent association with ALL risk of both SNPs were observed (odds ratio [OR] 1.28 and 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–1.36 and 1.19–1.40, respectively). Considering clinic characteristics, rs7088318 is more related to patients with African ancestry (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.21–1.80) and hyperdiploid subtype (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.25–1.61). Moreover, several SNPs (eg, rs45469096) were identified to be in high linage disequilibrium with rs7088318, and affected PIP4K2A expression in lymphocytes probably by altering the binding affinity of some transcriptional factors. In conclusion, we systematically investigated the relationship between SNPs at PIP4K2A locus and ALL susceptibility, and further found potential causal variant candidates, thus better elucidating the role of PIP4K2A gene in leukemogenesis. PMID:27149463

  14. Tobacco Smoke Exposure and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemias by Cytogenetic Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Zhang, Luoping; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Bartley, Karen; Schiffman, Joshua; Ma, Xiaomei; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Selvin, Steve; Fu, Cecilia H.; Ducore, Jonathan; Smith, Martyn T.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke contains carcinogens known to damage somatic and germ cells. We investigated the effect tobacco smoke on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myeloid leukemia (AML), especially subtypes of pre-natal origin like ALL with translocation t(12;21) or high-hyperdiploidy (51–67 chromosomes). Methods We collected information on exposures to tobacco smoking before conception, during pregnancy, and after birth in 767 ALL cases, 135 AML cases, and 1,139 controls (1996–2008). Among cases, chromosome translocations, deletions, or aneuploidy were identified by conventional karyotype and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Results Multivariable regression analyses for ALL and AML overall showed no definite evidence of associations with self-reported (yes/no) parental prenatal active smoking and child's passive smoking. However, children with history of paternal prenatal smoking combined with postnatal passive smoking had a 1.5-fold increased risk of ALL (95% CI: 1.01–2.23), compared to those without smoking history (ORs for pre- or postnatal smoking only were close to one). This joint effect was seen for B-cell precursor ALL with t(12;21) (OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.04–4.16), but not high hyperdiploid B-cell ALL. Similarly, child's passive smoking was associated with an elevated risk of AML with chromosome structural changes (OR=2.76; 95% CI: 1.01–7.58), but not aneuploidy. Conclusions our data suggest that exposure to tobacco smoking before were associated with increased risks of childhood ALL and AML; and risks varied by timing of exposure (before and/or after birth) and cytogenetic subtype, based on imprecise estimates. Impact Parents should limit exposures to tobacco smoke before and after the child's birth. PMID:23853208

  15. Comparative genomics reveals multistep pathogenesis of E2A-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Feng, Jue; Scherer, Florian; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Wong, Stephen H.K.; Wang, Zhong; Iwasaki, Masayuki; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer; however, its genetic diversity limits investigation into the molecular pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic strategies. Here, we engineered mice that conditionally express the E2A-PBX1 fusion oncogene, which results from chromosomal translocation t(1;19) and is present in 5% to 7% of pediatric ALL cases. The incidence of leukemia in these mice varied from 5% to 50%, dependent on the Cre-driving promoter (Cd19, Mb1, or Mx1) used to induce E2A-PBX1 expression. Two distinct but highly similar subtypes of B cell precursor ALLs that differed by their pre–B cell receptor (pre-BCR) status were induced and displayed maturation arrest at the pro-B/large pre–B II stages of differentiation, similar to human E2A-PBX1 ALL. Somatic activation of E2A-PBX1 in B cell progenitors enhanced self-renewal and led to acquisition of multiple secondary genomic aberrations, including prominent spontaneous loss of Pax5. In preleukemic mice, conditional Pax5 deletion cooperated with E2A-PBX1 to expand progenitor B cell subpopulations, increasing penetrance and shortening leukemia latency. Recurrent secondary activating mutations were detected in key signaling pathways, most notably JAK/STAT, that leukemia cells require for proliferation. These data support conditional E2A-PBX1 mice as a model of human ALL and suggest targeting pre-BCR signaling and JAK kinases as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26301816

  16. Gene set enrichment and topological analyses based on interaction networks in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    SUI, SHUXIANG; WANG, XIN; ZHENG, HUA; GUO, HUA; CHEN, TONG; JI, DONG-MEI

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for over one-quarter of all pediatric cancers. Interacting genes and proteins within the larger human gene interaction network of the human genome are rarely investigated by studies investigating pediatric ALL. In the present study, interaction networks were constructed using the empirical Bayesian approach and the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/proteins database, based on the differentially-expressed (DE) genes in pediatric ALL, which were identified using the RankProd package. Enrichment analysis of the interaction network was performed using the network-based methods EnrichNet and PathExpand, which were compared with the traditional expression analysis systematic explored (EASE) method. In total, 398 DE genes were identified in pediatric ALL, and LIF was the most significantly DE gene. The co-expression network consisted of 272 nodes, which indicated genes and proteins, and 602 edges, which indicated the number of interactions adjacent to the node. Comparison between EASE and PathExpand revealed that PathExpand detected more pathways or processes that were closely associated with pediatric ALL compared with the EASE method. There were 294 nodes and 1,588 edges in the protein-protein interaction network, with the processes of hematopoietic cell lineage and porphyrin metabolism demonstrating a close association with pediatric ALL. Network enrichment analysis based on the PathExpand algorithm was revealed to be more powerful for the analysis of interaction networks in pediatric ALL compared with the EASE method. LIF and MLLT11 were identified as the most significantly DE genes in pediatric ALL. The process of hematopoietic cell lineage was the pathway most significantly associated with pediatric ALL. PMID:26788135

  17. Regulation of cancer stem cell properties by CD9 in human B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Wilson Xu, C.; Naito, Motohiko; Nishida, Hiroko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Iwata, Satoshi; Inukai, Takeshi; Sugita, Kanji; Morimoto, Chikao

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} We performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for CSC properties in B-ALL. {yields} Leukemogenic fusion/Src family proteins were markedly regulated in the CD9{sup +} cells. {yields} Proliferation of B-ALL cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. {yields} Knockdown of CD9 by RNAi remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. {yields} CD9-knockdown affected the expression and phosphorylation of Src family and USP22. -- Abstract: Although the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved considerably in recent years, some of the cases still exhibit therapy-resistant. We have previously reported that CD9 was expressed heterogeneously in B-ALL cell lines and CD9{sup +} cells exhibited an asymmetric cell division with greater tumorigenic potential than CD9{sup -} cells. CD9{sup +} cells were also serially transplantable in immunodeficient mice, indicating that CD9{sup +} cell possess self-renewal capacity. In the current study, we performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for the cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. In patient sample, CD9 was expressed in the most cases of B-ALL cells with significant correlation of CD34-expression. Gene expression analysis revealed that leukemogenic fusion proteins and Src family proteins were significantly regulated in the CD9{sup +} population. Moreover, CD9{sup +} cells exhibited drug-resistance, but proliferation of bulk cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. Knockdown of CD9 remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. Furthermore, gene ablation of CD9 affected the expression and tyrosine-phosphorylation of Src family proteins and reduced the expression of histone-deubiquitinase USP22. Taken together, our results suggest that CD9 links to several signaling pathways and epigenetic modification for regulating the CSC properties of B-ALL.

  18. Activity of the Aurora Kinase inhibitor VX-680 against Bcr/Abl positive acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Stoddart, Sonia; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors due to point mutations in Bcr/Abl is a challenging problem for Philadelphia-chromosome positive (Ph-positive) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, especially for those with the T315I mutation, against which neither nilotinib or dasatinib shows significant activity. VX-680 is a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor active against all Bcr/Abl proteins but has not been extensively examined in preclinical models of Ph-positive ALL. Here, we have tested VX-680 for treatment of Bcr/Abl positive ALL when leukemic cells are protected by the presence of stroma. Under these conditions, VX-680 showed significant effects on primary human Ph-positive ALL cells both with and without the T315I mutation, including ablation of tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of Bcr/Abl, decreased viability and induction of apoptosis. However, drug treatment of human Ph-positive ALL cells for 3 days followed by drug removal allowed the outgrowth of abnormal cells 21 days later, and upon culture of mouse Bcr/Abl ALL cells on stroma with lower concentrations of VX-680, drug-resistant cells emerged. Combined treatment of human ALL cells lacking the T315I mutation with both VX-680 and dasatinib caused significantly more cytotoxicity than each drug alone. We suggest that use of VX-680 together with a second effective drug as first-line treatment for Ph-positive ALL is likely to be safer and more useful than second-line treatment with VX-680 as monotherapy for drug-resistant T315I Ph-positive ALL. PMID:20388735

  19. Mechanism-anchored profiling derived from epigenetic networks predicts outcome in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinan; Huang, Yong; Chen, James L; Xie, Jianming; Sun, Xiao; Lussier, Yves A

    2009-01-01

    Background Current outcome predictors based on "molecular profiling" rely on gene lists selected without consideration for their molecular mechanisms. This study was designed to demonstrate that we could learn about genes related to a specific mechanism and further use this knowledge to predict outcome in patients – a paradigm shift towards accurate "mechanism-anchored profiling". We propose a novel algorithm, PGnet, which predicts a tripartite mechanism-anchored network associated to epigenetic regulation consisting of phenotypes, genes and mechanisms. Genes termed as GEMs in this network meet all of the following criteria: (i) they are co-expressed with genes known to be involved in the biological mechanism of interest, (ii) they are also differentially expressed between distinct phenotypes relevant to the study, and (iii) as a biomodule, genes correlate with both the mechanism and the phenotype. Results This proof-of-concept study, which focuses on epigenetic mechanisms, was conducted in a well-studied set of 132 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) microarrays annotated with nine distinct phenotypes and three measures of response to therapy. We used established parametric and non parametric statistics to derive the PGnet tripartite network that consisted of 10 phenotypes and 33 significant clusters of GEMs comprising 535 distinct genes. The significance of PGnet was estimated from empirical p-values, and a robust subnetwork derived from ALL outcome data was produced by repeated random sampling. The evaluation of derived robust network to predict outcome (relapse of ALL) was significant (p = 3%), using one hundred three-fold cross-validations and the shrunken centroids classifier. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first method predicting co-expression networks of genes associated with epigenetic mechanisms and to demonstrate its inherent capability to predict therapeutic outcome. This PGnet approach can be applied to any regulatory mechanisms including

  20. Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arslan, O; Ustün, C; Arat, M; Celebi, H; Akan, H; Beksaç, M; Ilhan, O; Gürman, G; Ozcan, M; Konuk, N; Uysal, A; Koç, H

    1998-12-01

    Unmodified allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT) was performed in 20 consecutive acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) patients from their HLA-identical siblings. There were 11 males and 9 females. Median age was 34 years (range 17-43). Donors were primed with 2.5-15 micrograms/kg/day s.c. granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, Neupogen, Roche). Conditioning regimen was Bu (16 mg/kg) + Cy (120 mg/kg) in 19 patients and high dose Ara-C (3 gr/m2 twice daily for 3 days) for one patient who relapsed after bone marrow transplantation. Eighteen patients were in CR1. CsA + short-term MTX (n = 19) or CsA alone (n = 1) were used for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The median number of apheresis procedures for each patient was 2 (2-4). A median of 6.5 (3.2-38.2) x 10(8)/kg MNC or 9.4 (2.2-12.4) x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells were given. Median days to reach granulocyte of > 0.5 x 10(9)/l and platelet of > 50 x 10(9)/l were 12 (10-14) and 15 (11-35) respectively. Day 100 transplant-related mortality was 20 per cent (4/20). Grade 2 to 4 AGVHD was seen in 8 out of 17 (47%) evaluable patients. Severe AGVHD occurred in 3 out of 17 (18%). Clinical CGVHD of all grades developed in 12 out of 17 (70%) evaluable patients. The mean disease-free survival and overall survival were 17 (range: 8-33 months) and 18 months (range: 10-34 months), respectively. In conclusion, alloPBSCT in ANLL is associated with a faster engraftment, no greater incidence of AGVHD, but increased risk of CGVHD. PMID:10414235

  1. Nilotinib combined with multiagent chemotherapy for newly diagnosed Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Young; Joo, Young-Don; Lim, Sung-Nam; Kim, Sung-Doo; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Je-Hwan; Kim, Dong Hwan Dennis; Kim, Kihyun; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Inho; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Park, Seonyang; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Ho-Sup; Kim, Yang Soo; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Hawk; Park, Jae Hoo; Moon, Joon Ho; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Won Sik; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Won, Jong-Ho; Hyun, Myung Soo; Park, Jinny; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Ho-Jin; Chung, Joo-Seop; Lee, Hyewon; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Lee, Gyeong Won; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the effects of nilotinib plus multiagent chemotherapy, followed by consolidation/maintenance or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) for adult patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia-positive (Ph-pos) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Study subjects received induction treatment that comprised concurrent vincristine, daunorubicin, prednisolone, and nilotinib. After achieving complete hematologic remission (HCR), subjects received either 5 courses of consolidation, followed by 2-year maintenance with nilotinib, or allo-HCT. Minimal residual disease (MRD) was assessed at HCR, and every 3 months thereafter. The molecular responses (MRs) were defined as MR3 for BCR-ABL1/G6PDH ratios ≤10(-3) and MR5 for ratios <10(-5). Ninety evaluable subjects, ages 17 to 71 years, were enrolled in 17 centers. The HCR rate was 91%; 57 subjects received allo-HCT. The cumulative MR5 rate was 94%; the 2-year hematologic relapse-free survival (HRFS) rate was 72% for 82 subjects that achieved HCR, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 72%. Subjects that failed to achieve MR3 or MR5 were 9.1 times (P = .004) or 6.3 times (P = .001) more prone to hematologic relapse, respectively, than those that achieved MR3 or MR5. MRD statuses just before allo-HCT and at 3 months after allo-HCT were predictive of 2-year HRFS. Adverse events occurred mainly during induction, and most were reversible with dose reduction or transient interruption of nilotinib. The combination of nilotinib with high-dose cytotoxic drugs was feasible, and it effectively achieved high cumulative complete molecular remission and HRFS rates. The MRD status at early postremission time was predictive of the HRFS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00844298. PMID:26065651

  2. Are parenting behaviors associated with child sleep problems during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Maria C; Bastiani, Jessica; Williams, Lauren K

    2016-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a recognized common side effect in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although associated with treatment factors such as hospitalization and corticosteroids, sleep problems may also be influenced by modifiable environmental factors such as parenting behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine sleep problems in children undergoing treatment for ALL compared to healthy children and whether parenting practices are associated with sleep difficulties. Parents of 73 children aged 2-6 years who were (1) in the maintenance phase of ALL treatment (ALL group, n = 43) or (2) had no major medical illness (healthy control group, n = 30) participated in the study. Parents completed questionnaires measuring their child's sleep behavior and their own parenting practices. Parents of children undergoing ALL treatment reported significantly more child sleep problems; 48% of children with ALL compared to 23% of healthy children had clinical levels of sleep disturbance. Parents of the ALL group also reported significantly more lax parenting practices and strategies associated with their child's sleep including co-sleeping, comforting activities, and offering food and drink in the bedroom. Results of multivariate regression analysis indicated that, after controlling for illness status, parent-child co-sleeping was significantly associated with child sleep difficulties. Strategies employed by parents during ALL treatment may be a potential modifiable intervention target that could result in improved child sleep behaviors. Future research aimed at developing and testing parenting interventions aimed to improve child sleep in the context of oncology treatment is warranted. PMID:27108598

  3. Altered erythrocyte membrane characteristics during anemia in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shyamasree; Bandyopadhyay, Suman; Bhattacharya, Dilip K; Mandal, Chitra

    2005-02-01

    Anemia is a prominent feature in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To investigate the erythrocyte features during anemia in these patients, we studied the altered characters of these cells and oxidative stress imposed in their serum. This investigation reveals that erythrocytes from ALL patients show (1) increased membrane fluidity detected by fluorescence anisotropy studies, increased osmotic fragility detected by hemolysis of erythrocytes in different saline concentrations, and increased hydrophobicity as measured by binding with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, (2) enhanced (approximately threefold) glycosylation and sialylation, monitored by digoxigenin enzyme assay, and (3) expression of disease-specific 210, 105, 83, 54, and 28 kDa 9-O-acetyl sialoglycoconjugates (9-O-AcSGs) demonstrated by Western blot analysis and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis studies using Achatinin-H with specificity towards 9-O-AcSAalpha2-6GalNAc as the analytical probe. (4) In addition, induced oxidative stress was observed in the sera of these children as indicated by increased nitric oxide (approximately fourfold) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reactive species (twofold) as detected by Griess reaction and TBA assay, respectively. For all the experiments, erythrocytes from normal individuals served as controls. Thus, the altered membrane characteristics together with their exposure to induced oxidative stress in serum are found to be a few features restricted to diseased erythrocytes. Taken together, our results are suggestive of their interplay in the contribution to the observed anemia in these patients, which may be exploited for better management of the disease. PMID:15338196

  4. The combination effects of bendamustine with antimetabolites against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shoko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Tomoko

    2016-05-01

    Bendamustine combined with other drugs is clinically efficacious for some adult lymphoid malignancies, but to date there are no reports of the use of such combinatorial approaches in pediatric patients. We investigated the in vitro activity of bendamustine combined with other antimetabolite drugs on B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cell lines established from pediatric patients with refractory or relapsed ALL. We also developed a mathematically drown improved isobologram method to assess the data objectively. Three BCP-ALL cell lines; YCUB-2, YCUB-5, and YCUB-6, were simultaneously exposed to various concentrations of bendamustine and cladribine, cytarabine, fludarabine, or clofarabine. Cell growth inhibition was determined using the WST-8 assay. Combinatorial effects were estimated using our improved isobologram method with IC80 (drug concentration corresponding to 80 % of maximum inhibition). Bendamustine alone inhibited ALL cell growth with mean IC80 values of 11.30-18.90 μg/ml. Combinations of bendamustine with other drugs produced the following effects: (1) cladribine; synergistic-to-additive on all cell lines; (2) cytarabine; synergistic-to-additive on YCUB-5 and YCUB-6, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2; (3) fludarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on YCUB-5, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2 and YCUB-6; (4) clofarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on all cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis also showed the combination effects of bendamustine and cladribine. Bendamustine/cladribine or bendamustine/cytarabine may thus represent a promising combination for salvage treatment in childhood ALL. PMID:26886449

  5. Hypermethylation of the spleen tyrosine kinase promoter in T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Patricia A; Burkhardt, Nicole; Juran, Brian; Tibbles, Heather E; Uckun, Faith M

    2003-04-24

    Sequence analysis of the noncoding first exon (exon 1) of the Syk gene demonstrated the presence of a previously cloned CpG island (GenBank #Z 65706). Transient transfection analysis in Daudi cells demonstrated promoter activity (18-fold increase over parental luciferase plasmid) for a 348 bp BstXI-BsrBI fragment containing this island. This region exhibits a high GC content (approximately 75%), contains several SP1 binding sites and a potential initiator sequence, but lacks a strong TATA consensus. Bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) of this region demonstrated that the Syk promoter CpG island was largely unmethylated in B-lineage leukemia cell lines, control peripheral blood cells, human thymocytes and CD3(+) T lymphocytes. However, dense methylation was seen in four T-lineage leukemia cell lines, Jurkat, H9, Molt 3 and HUT 78. MSP screening of leukemia cells from six T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients demonstrated methylation of the Syk promoter CpG island in one T-lineage ALL patient. Promoter methylation was correlated with reduced to absent expression of Syk mRNA and SYK protein in the T-lineage leukemia cell lines. Treatment of the leukemia lines Ha and Molt 3, with the methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) resulted in increased Syk mRNA expression. The presence of a methylated promoter sequence in these T-lineage leukemia cell lines and in one T-lineage patient suggests a potential role for SYK as a tumor suppressor in T-ALL. PMID:12717427

  6. Epigenetic landscape correlates with genetic subtype but does not predict outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Alem S; Lafta, Fadhel M; Schwalbe, Edward C; Nakjang, Sirintra; Cockell, Simon J; Iliasova, Alice; Enshaei, Amir; Schwab, Claire; Rand, Vikki; Clifford, Steven C; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Chris D; Vora, Ajay; Harrison, Christine J; Moorman, Anthony V; Strathdee, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Although children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) generally have a good outcome, some patients do relapse and survival following relapse is poor. Altered DNA methylation is highly prevalent in ALL and raises the possibility that DNA methylation-based biomarkers could predict patient outcome. In this study, genome-wide methylation analysis, using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip platform, was carried out on 52 diagnostic patient samples from 4 genetic subtypes [ETV6-RUNX1, high hyperdiploidy (HeH), TCF3-PBX1 and dic(9;20)(p11-13;q11)] in a 1:1 case-control design with patients who went on to relapse (as cases) and patients achieving long-term remission (as controls). Pyrosequencing assays for selected loci were used to confirm the array-generated data. Non-negative matrix factorization consensus clustering readily clustered samples according to genetic subgroups and gene enrichment pathway analysis suggested that this is in part driven by epigenetic disruption of subtype specific signaling pathways. Multiple bioinformatics approaches (including bump hunting and individual locus analysis) were used to identify CpG sites or regions associated with outcome. However, no associations with relapse were identified. Our data revealed that ETV6-RUNX1 and dic(9;20) subtypes were mostly associated with hypermethylation; conversely, TCF3-PBX1 and HeH were associated with hypomethylation. We observed significant enrichment of the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway in TCF3-PBX1 as well as an enrichment of genes involved in immunity and infection pathways in ETV6-RUNX1 subtype. Taken together, our results suggest that altered DNA methylation may have differential impacts in distinct ALL genetic subtypes. PMID:26237075

  7. Different molecular mechanisms causing 9p21 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Novara, Francesca; Beri, Silvana; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Malovini, Alberto; Ciccone, Roberto; Cometa, Angela Maria; Locatelli, Franco; Giorda, Roberto; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2009-10-01

    Deletion of chromosome 9p21 is a crucial event for the development of several cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Double strand breaks (DSBs) triggering 9p21 deletions in ALL have been reported to occur at a few defined sites by illegitimate action of the V(D)J recombination activating protein complex. We have cloned 23 breakpoint junctions for a total of 46 breakpoints in 17 childhood ALL (9 B- and 8 T-lineages) showing different size deletions at one or both homologous chromosomes 9 to investigate which particular sequences make the region susceptible to interstitial deletion. We found that half of 9p21 deletion breakpoints were mediated by ectopic V(D)J recombination mechanisms whereas the remaining half were associated to repeated sequences, including some with potential for non-B DNA structure formation. Other mechanisms, such as microhomology-mediated repair, that are common in other cancers, play only a very minor role in ALL. Nucleotide insertions at breakpoint junctions and microinversions flanking the breakpoints have been detected at 20/23 and 2/23 breakpoint junctions, respectively, both in the presence of recombination signal sequence (RSS)-like sequences and of other unspecific sequences. The majority of breakpoints were unique except for two cases, both T-ALL, showing identical deletions. Four of the 46 breakpoints coincide with those reported in other cases, thus confirming the presence of recurrent deletion hotspots. Among the six cases with heterozygous 9p deletions, we found that the remaining CDKN2A and CDKN2B alleles were hypermethylated at CpG islands. PMID:19484265

  8. Evaluation of bone metabolism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after induction chemotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Athanassiadou, Fani; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Rousso, Israel; Katsos, Georgios; Sidi, Vassiliki; Koliouskas, Dimitrios; Papastergiou, Cristos; Tsituridis, Ioannis

    2005-06-01

    Osteopenia and osteoporosis are currently receiving particular attention as late effects of therapy in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aim of this study was to evaluate abnormalities in bone mass and mineral homeostasis in children with ALL after induction therapy (during consolidation treatment). Lumbar spine (L2-L4) bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in 20 children with ALL, a median of 25.9 months postdiagnosis and results were expressed as z-scores relative to healthy Caucasian children (controls). Serum levels of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium, phosphate, and magnesium were also analyzed. In addition, the body mass indexes (kg/cm(2)) of patients and controls were calculated. Results were compared with those of 40 healthy controls. Among the 20 children with ALL (12 boys and 8 girls), 12 presented z-scores < 1 SD (normal) and 8 were osteopenic (z-score between 1 and 2.5 SD). In addition, children with ALL had reduced lumbar BMDs (z-score -0.817) in comparison to healthy controls (z-score -0.353) (p = .04). Moreover, alkaline phosphatase and intact parathyroid hormone values were significantly increased compared to controls values. The data demonstrate that bone metabolism in children with ALL during consolidation therapy is disturbed, resulting in a reduced BMD and z-score with respect to healthy controls. Since a reduced BMD predisposes to osteopenia and osteoporosis, specific attention and therapeutic interventions should be considered. PMID:16020115

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A; Frandsen, Thomas L; Rosthøj, Steen; Schrøder, Henrik; Albertsen, Birgitte K

    2014-07-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The objective of this study was to describe CSF asparagine depletion during 30 weeks of pegylated asparaginase therapy, 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week, and to correlate CSF asparagine concentration with serum L-asparaginase enzyme activity. Danish children (1-17 years) with ALL, treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol, standard and intermediate risk, were included. CSF samples were obtained throughout L-asparaginase treatment at every scheduled lumbar puncture. A total of 128 samples from 31 patients were available for analysis. Median CSF asparagine concentration decreased from a pre-treatment level of 5·3 μmol/l to median levels ≤1·5 μmol/l. However, only 4/31 patients (five samples) had CSF asparagine concentrations below the limit of detection (0·1 μmol/l). In 11 patients, 24 paired same day serum and CSF samples were obtained. A decrease in CSF asparagine corresponded to serum enzyme activities above 50 iu/l. Higher serum enzyme activities were not followed by more extensive depletion. In conclusion, pegylated asparaginase 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week effectively reduced CSF asparagine levels. PMID:24702187

  10. Comparison of allergic reactions to intravenous and intramuscular pegaspargase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, William C; Clark, Dana; Senn, Stacy L; Cash, W Thomas; Gillespie, Scott E; McCracken, Courtney E; Keller, Frank G; Lew, Glen

    2014-05-01

    Pegaspargase (PEG) is a standard component of therapy for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Because PEG preparations are bacterially derived, they are highly immunogenic. PEG has traditionally been delivered intramuscularly (IM), but over the last several years, more PEG has been given intravenously (IV) in order to provide a less painful and more convenient means of delivery. However, there are limited data comparing allergic reactions between IV and IM PEG recipients, especially in a large cohort of patients. We reviewed the charts of pediatric ALL patients diagnosed from 2006 to 2011 who received PEG at our institution and compared the incidence, time to onset of symptoms, reaction grade, and hospitalization rate for patients who had allergic reactions to PEG. Of 318 evaluable patients, 159 received IV and 159 received IM PEG. Thirty-one (19.5%) IV patients had an allergic reaction, compared to 17 (10.7%) IM patients (P = .028). Time to onset of symptoms was ≤ 30 minutes for 26 of 27 evaluable IV patients (96.3%) versus only two of 11 evaluable IM patients (18.2%; P < .001). Four of 31 IV patients (12.9%) and six of 17 IM patients (35.5%) required hospitalization (P = .134). There is increased incidence of allergy in patients who received IV PEG compared to IM. Grade of reaction was similar between IV and IM, but allergic reactions to IV PEG had a more rapid onset. While the risk of allergy may be increased, IV delivery appears to have an acceptable safety profile for administration in ALL patients. PMID:24498943

  11. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: clinical facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Nielsen, Stine N; Frandsen, Thomas L; Nersting, Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The antileukemic mechanisms of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy are poorly understood, but the benefits of several years of myelosuppressive maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well proven. Currently, there is no international consensus on drug dosing. Because of significant interindividual and intraindividual variations in drug disposition and pharmacodynamics, vigorous dose adjustments are needed to obtain a target degree of myelosuppression. As the normal white blood cell counts vary by patients' ages and ethnicity, and also within age groups, identical white blood cell levels for 2 patients may not reflect the same treatment intensity. Measurements of intracellular levels of cytotoxic metabolites of 6MP and MTX can identify nonadherent patients, but therapeutic target levels remains to be established. A rise in serum aminotransferase levels during maintenance therapy is common and often related to high levels of methylated 6MP metabolites. However, except for episodes of hypoglycemia, serious liver dysfunction is rare, the risk of permanent liver damage is low, and aminotransferase levels usually normalize within a few weeks after discontinuation of therapy. 6MP and MTX dose increments should lead to either leukopenia or a rise in aminotransferases, and if neither is experienced, poor treatment adherence should be considered. The many genetic polymorphisms that determine 6MP and MTX disposition, efficacy, and toxicity have precluded implementation of pharmacogenomics into treatment, the sole exception being dramatic 6MP dose reductions in patients who are homozygous deficient for thiopurine methyltransferase, the enzyme that methylates 6MP and several of its metabolites. In conclusion, maintenance therapy is as important as the more intensive and toxic earlier treatment phases, and often more challenging. Ongoing research address the applicability of drug metabolite measurements for dose adjustments

  12. Energy balance and fitness in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kaste, Sue C.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Karlage, Robyn E.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Howell, Carrie R.; Lu, Lu; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on body composition, energy balance, and fitness among survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), especially those treated without cranial radiation therapy (CRT). This analysis compares these metrics among 365 ALL survivors with a mean age of 28.6 ± 5.9 years (149 treated with and 216 without CRT) and 365 age-, sex-, and race-matched peers. We also report risk factors for outcomes among survivors treated without CRT. Male survivors not exposed to CRT had abnormal body composition when compared with peers (% body fat, 26.2 ± 8.2 vs 22.7 ± 7.1). Survivors without CRT had similar energy balance but had significantly impaired quadriceps strength (−21.9 ± 6.0 Newton-meters [Nm]/kg, 60°/s) and endurance (−11.4 ± 4.6 Nm/kg, 300°/s), exercise capacity (−2.0 ± 2.1 ml/kg per minute), low-back and hamstring flexibility (−4.7 ± 1.6 cm), and dorsiflexion range of motion (−3.1 ± 0.9°) and higher modified total neuropathy scores (+1.6 ± 1.1) than peers. Cumulative asparaginase dose ≥120 000 IU/m2 was associated with impaired flexibility, vincristine dose ≥39 mg/m2 with peripheral neuropathy, glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalent) dose ≥8000 mg/m2 with hand weakness, and intrathecal methotrexate dose ≥225 mg with dorsiflexion weakness. Physical inactivity was associated with hand weakness and decreased exercise capacity. Smoking was associated with peripheral neuropathy. Elimination of CRT from ALL therapy has improved, but not eliminated, body-composition outcomes. Survivors remain at risk for impaired fitness. PMID:25814529

  13. Functional screening identifies CRLF2 in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akinori; Yoda, Yuka; Chiaretti, Sabina; Bar-Natan, Michal; Mani, Kartik; Rodig, Scott J; West, Nathan; Xiao, Yun; Brown, Jennifer R; Mitsiades, Constantine; Sattler, Martin; Kutok, Jeffrey L; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Wadleigh, Martha; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Dal Cin, Paola; Bradner, James E; Griffin, James D; Anderson, Kenneth C; Stone, Richard M; Ritz, Jerome; Foà, Robin; Aster, Jon C; Frank, David A; Weinstock, David M

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for adults with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) remains poor, in part from a lack of therapeutic targets. We identified the type I cytokine receptor subunit CRLF2 in a functional screen for B-ALL-derived mRNA transcripts that can substitute for IL3 signaling. We demonstrate that CRLF2 is overexpressed in approximately 15% of adult and high-risk pediatric B-ALL that lack MLL, TCF3, TEL, and BCR/ABL rearrangements, but not in B-ALL with these rearrangements or other lymphoid malignancies. CRLF2 overexpression can result from translocation with the IGH locus or intrachromosomal deletion and is associated with poor outcome. CRLF2 overexpressing B-ALLs share a transcriptional signature that significantly overlaps with a BCR/ABL signature, and is enriched for genes involved in cytokine receptor and JAK-STAT signaling. In a subset of cases, CRLF2 harbors a Phe232Cys gain-of-function mutation that promotes constitutive dimerization and cytokine independent growth. A mutually exclusive subset harbors activating mutations in JAK2. In fact, all 22 B-ALLs with mutant JAK2 that we analyzed overexpress CRLF2, distinguishing CRLF2 as the key scaffold for mutant JAK2 signaling in B-ALL. Expression of WT CRLF2 with mutant JAK2 also promotes cytokine independent growth that, unlike CRLF2 Phe232Cys or ligand-induced signaling by WT CRLF2, is accompanied by JAK2 phosphorylation. Finally, cells dependent on CRLF2 signaling are sensitive to small molecule inhibitors of either JAKs or protein kinase C family kinases. Together, these findings implicate CRLF2 as an important factor in B-ALL with diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. PMID:20018760

  14. Vincristine-induced paralytic ileus during induction therapy of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Yasu, Takeo; Ohno, Nobuhiro; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Kurokawa, Yosuke

    2016-06-01

    Vincristine (VCR) is an important drug used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). VCR-induced neurotoxicity can manifest as peripheral neuropathy, constipation, or paralytic ileus. While there are some case reports describing VCR-induced paralytic ileus (VIPI) in pediatric ALL, there are fewer publication on adult ALL patients. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated VIPI during induction therapy of treatment protocols for ALL in 19 adult patients. The incidence of VIPI was 32%. VIPI was significantly increased in patients receiving concomitant itraconazole (ITCZ) (p = 0.04). We recommend avoidance of the combination of VCR and ITCZ. PMID:27087157

  15. A successful treatment of hypercalcemia with zoledronic acid in a 15-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Jin; Choi, Eun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Severe hypercalcemia in children is a rare medical emergency. We present a case of a 15-year-old boy with hypercalcemia (total calcium level, 14.2 mg/dL) with a normal complete blood count, no circulating blasts in the peripheral blood film, and no other signs of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), including no signs of lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly. The hypercalcemia was successfully treated with zoledronic acid. As hypercalcemia can be the only presenting symptom of ALL in children, the diagnosis is often delayed. In children presenting with hypercalcemia, malignancies must be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:27462588

  16. Early UK experience in the use of clofarabine in the treatment of relapsed and refractory paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David; Sibson, Keith; Caswell, Mark; Connor, Philip; Cummins, Michelle; Mitchell, Chris; Motwani, Jayashree; Taj, Mary; Vora, Ajay; Wynn, Robert; Kearns, Pamela R

    2011-08-01

    Clofarabine is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue, which has shown promising activity in relapsed and refractory paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). This report summarizes the early United Kingdom experience of clofarabine for the treatment of paediatric ALL in 23 patients, outside of the context of a clinical trial. Our results demonstrated that clofarabine-based chemotherapy regimes were effective and well-tolerated in this heavily pre-treated group, with an overall response rate of 67% when used in combination regimes. Responses were seen in both B and T cell disease and in patients with adverse cytogenetics. PMID:21689087

  17. Mucormycosis Rhinosinusitis at Diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Diagnostics and Management Challenges in a Low-Middle-income Country.

    PubMed

    Mandegari, Elham; Fu, Ligia; Arambú, Carolina; Montoya, Sandra; Peña, Armando; Johnson, Kyle M; Perfect, John R; Caniza, Miguela A

    2015-04-01

    We present the case of an adolescent with mucor rhinosinusitis diagnosed concomitantly with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at a hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. We also discuss the challenges faced in the dual management of hematologic malignancies and invasive fungal disease in a low-middle-income country, such as access to diagnostics, immunosuppressants, imaging, and antifungals. Despite these shortcomings, the patient was successfully treated for both the diseases. Low-middle-income country hospitals can effectively treat invasive fungal diseases by providing adequate diagnostic and support services, which can improve the outcomes of pediatric cancer patients. PMID:24942033

  18. Identification of novel kinase fusion transcripts in paediatric B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with IKZF1 deletion.

    PubMed

    Yano, Mio; Imamura, Toshihiko; Asai, Daisuke; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Deguchi, Takao; Hashii, Yoshiko; Honda, Yu-ko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Sasahara, Yoji; Ishii, Mutsuo; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Shima, Midori; Hori, Hiroki; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Oda, Megumi; Horibe, Keizo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    Activating tyrosine kinase mutations or cytokine receptor signalling alterations have attracted attention as therapeutic targets for high-risk paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We identified two novel kinase fusions, OFD1-JAK2 and NCOR1-LYN, in paediatric ALL patients with IKZF1 deletion, by mRNA sequencing. The patient with CSF2RA-CRLF2 also harboured IGH-EPOR. All these patients had high-risk features, such as high initial white blood cell counts and initial poor response to prednisolone. The functional analysis of these novel fusions is on-going to determine whether these genetic alterations can be targeted by drugs. PMID:26404892

  19. Socioeconomic status and event free survival in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Sutradhar, Rinku; Guttmann, Astrid; Sung, Lillian; Pole, Jason D

    2014-12-01

    The impact of socioeconomic status (SES) upon childhood cancer outcomes has not been extensively examined. Our objective was to determine the association between SES and event-free survival (EFS) among children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) diagnosed in Ontario, Canada from 1995-2011 (N=1541) using Cox proportional hazards. Neither neighborhood-level median income quintile, distance from tertiary center, or rural residence significantly predicted EFS in the context of a universal healthcare system. Immigrant children experienced significantly superior EFS; confounding by ethnicity could not be ruled out. Confirmatory studies using additional individual-level SES variables are warranted. PMID:25224660

  20. CD7 aberrant expression led to a lineage switch at relapsed childhood acute pre-B lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fallah Azad, Vahid; Hedayati Asl, Amir Abbas; Tashvighi, Maryam; Niktoreh Mofrad, Naghmeh; Haghighi, Mansoureh; Mehrvar, Azim

    2016-03-01

    Immunophenotypic changes and lineage switch between diagnosis and relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are uncommon and accompanied by poor outcomes. In this report, a 12-year-old boy with diagnosis of pre-B ALL with an aberrant expression of CD 7 is described. Patient was treated with the ALL-BFM 2000 protocol and suffered an episode of relapse with a lineage switch from pre-B ALL to T cell ALL. This report concludes that presence of aberrant expression of CD7 at diagnosis of pre-B ALL can have prognostic value of lineage switch to T cell ALL at relapse. PMID:26242204

  1. T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia presenting with sudden onset right oculomotor nerve palsy with normal neuroradiography and cerebrospinal fluid studies

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Naqi, Muniba; Bartaula, Rajiv; Murukutla, Srujitha; Misra, Sulagna; Popalzai, Muhammad; Paramanathan, Kavitha; Dai, Qun

    2012-01-01

    Leptomeningeal disease presenting with neurological dysfunction is not uncommon in leukaemia. However, it is often accompanied by abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies and/or neuroradiography. Here, the authors describe a case of a young patient presenting with sudden onset right oculomotor nerve palsy with normal neuroradiography and CSF studies, who was subsequently diagnosed to have T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). This case highlights that neurological manifestations can be the initial presenting feature of T-ALL and can occur suddenly despite normal neuroradiography and initial CSF studies. PMID:22605802

  2. Immunological Reconstitution in Children After Completing Conventional Chemotherapy of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia is Marked by Impaired B-cell Compartment.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, Minna; Ekman, Ilse; Saha, Emmi; Salokannel, Ellinoora; Matomäki, Jaakko; Ilonen, Jorma; Kainulainen, Leena; Arola, Mikko; Lähteenmäki, Päivi Maria

    2016-09-01

    Humoral and cellular immunity were studied in 28 children completing conventional treatment of standard-risk (SR) or intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Both naïve and memory B cells were most severely affected and showed slow recovery during the 2-year follow-up, while the T-cell compartment showed only minor changes. Immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses, components, and antibodies against vaccine-preventable diseases were not significantly affected. In conclusion, immune recovery after conventional chemotherapy for SR and IR ALL is marked by B-cell depletion, but otherwise did not show any severe deficiencies in lymphocyte function. PMID:27163649

  3. Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation With Clofarabine and Busulfan Conditioning for a Child With Multiple Recurrent Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuki; Miyawaki, Reiji; Imai, Kohsuke; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kajiwara, Michiko; Ishiwata, Yasuyoshi; Yasuhara, Masato; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki; Tomizawa, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Outcome of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved over the years, but not for those with multiple recurrences because of high therapy resistance and heavily pretreated history that potentially cause physical damages. We describe the case of an 11-year-old boy with a third relapse of ALL and a history of 2 allogeneic bone marrow transplantations. He was successfully treated with clofarabine combination chemotherapy and achieved a fourth remission at 16 months following haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with conditioning regimen of clofarabine and busulfan. Clofarabine/busulfan conditioning might be a preferable option for children with multiple recurrent ALL, and warrants further investigation. PMID:26523380

  4. A rare case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with light chain (AL) amyloidosis treated with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ranjit; Gheith, Shereen; Popescu, Dan; Agostino, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    Lenalidomide belongs to a novel class of drugs called Immunomodulators which are now being used for the treatment of plasma cell dyscrasias with variable degrees of efficacy and toxicity. Though Second Primary Malignancies (SPM) have been a concern with its use, the benefits of the treatment outweigh the risks. The leukemogenic risk seems to be potentiated especially when combined with alkylating agents and the SPMs documented are predominantly myeloblastic. To date there are no reported cases of new lymphocytic leukemias in AL amyloidosis, regardless of whether undergone treatment or not. We present a case of AL amylodosis who was treated with lenalidomide and subsequently developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:24966987

  5. Cerebral Thrombotic Complications Related to l-Asparaginase Treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Retrospective Review of 10 Cases.

    PubMed

    Eden, D; Hipkins, R; Bradbury, C A

    2016-09-01

    l-Asparaginase is a potent antileukemia agent and an essential part of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, toxicity limits dose escalation, especially in adults. This includes a significant risk of thrombosis, which remains an important source of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Here, we provide a detailed report of 10 cases of cerebral thrombotic complications that occurred over a 5-year period at 4 large tertiary referral hospitals. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this type in the published literature. PMID:25693917

  6. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. An experience with plasma exchange treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a case with fulminant hepatitis related to L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Bilgir, Oktay; Calan, Mehmet; Bilgir, Ferda; Cagliyan, Gulsum; Arslan, Oyku

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of lymphoid precursors with arrested maturation. L-asparaginase is commonly used in combination chemotherapy of both pediatric and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemias. The most commonly encountered side effects of L-asparaginase are hypersensitivity reactions like pyrexia, urticaria, skin rash, and respiratory distress. There are also other side effects like anaphylaxis, coagulopathy, pancreatitis, thrombosis, and hepatic toxicity. Plasmapheresis can sometimes be appropriate to manage an overdose of drugs that circulate in the plasma compartment. We have reported plasmapheresis treatment of fulminant hepatitis in a patient with ALL after L-asparaginase treatment. PMID:23871581

  8. Prognostic Impact of WT-1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A; Badraia, Ibrahim M; Hassan, Samir M; Abd El-Lateef, Amal E

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer representing 23% of pediatric cancers. Wilms’ tumor -1 gene is a novel prognostic factor, minimal residual disease marker and therapeutic target in acute leukemia. Aim of the work The aim of this work was to study the impact of WT-1 gene expression in the prognosis of ALL. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 40 Egyptian children with newly diagnosed ALL who were subjected to full history taking, thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations including; complete blood count, LDH, BM aspiration, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping, FISH technique for detection of t(12;21) and t(9;22) and assessment of WT-1 Gene by real-time PCR in BM samples at time of diagnosis. Results Positive WT-1 gene expression was found in 22 cases (55%) and negative expression in 18 cases (45%). Positive WT-1 gene expression group (n=22) includes 14 males and 8 females with mean age at presentation of 5.261 ± 0.811 while negative WT-1 gene expression group (n=18) includes 12 males and 6 females with mean age at diagnosis of 9.669 ± 3.731 with significantly older age in negative WT-1 gene expression group but no significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding sex and clinical presentations. There were no significant differences in platelets and WBCs counts, hemoglobin and LDH levels and the number of peripheral blood and BM blast cells at diagnosis between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups but after induction therapy there were significantly lower BM blast cells in positive WT-1 gene expression group. There were no statistically significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding immunophenotyping and chromosomal translocations including t(12;21) and t(9;22). There were a significantly higher relapse and death rate and a lower rate of CR, DFS, and OAS in negative WT-1 gene expression

  9. Small molecule inhibition of CBP/catenin interactions eliminates drug resistant clones in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Eun Ji; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Pham, Jennifer; Zhao, Yi; Nguyen, Cu; Huantes, Sandra; Park, Eugene; Naing, Khatija; Klemm, Lars; Swaminathan, Srividya; Conway, Edward M.; Pelus, Louis M.; Crispino, John; Mullighan, Charles; McMillan, Michael; Müschen, Markus; Kahn, Michael; Kim, Yong-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a major problem warranting new treatment strategies. Wnt/catenin signaling is critical for the self-renewal of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Deregulated Wnt signaling is evident in chronic and acute myeloid leukemia, however little is known about ALL. Differential interaction of catenin with either the Kat3 coactivator CREBBP (CBP) or the highly homologous EP300 (p300) is critical to determine divergent cellular responses and provides a rationale for the regulation of both proliferation and differentiation by the Wnt signaling pathway. Usage of the coactivator CBP by catenin leads to transcriptional activation of cassettes of genes that are involved in maintenance of progenitor cell self-renewal. However, the use of the coactivator p300, leads to activation of genes involved in the initiation of differentiation. ICG-001 is a novel small molecule modulator of Wnt/catenin signaling, which specifically binds to the N-terminus of CBP and not p300, within amino acids 1–110, thereby disrupting the interaction between CBP and catenin. Here, we report that selective disruption of the CBP/β- and γ-catenin interactions using ICG-001 leads to differentiation of pre-B ALL cells and loss of self-renewal capacity. Survivin, an inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein, was also downregulated in primary ALL after treatment with ICG-001. Using ChIP assay, we demonstrate occupancy by CBP of the survivin promoter, which is decreased by ICG-001 in primary ALL. CBP-mutations have been recently identified in a significant percentage of ALL patients, however, almost all of the identified mutations reported occur C-terminal to the binding site for ICG-001. Importantly, ICG-001, regardless of CBP mutational status and chromosomal aberration, leads to eradication of drug-resistant primary leukemia in combination with conventional therapy in vitro and significantly prolongs the survival of NOD/SCID mice engrafted with primary

  10. Differential CD95 expression and function in T and B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, L; Wuchter, C; Ruppert, V; Drexler, H; Gruss, H J; Dörken, B; Ludwig, W D

    1997-08-01

    CD95 (Fas/APO-1) is a cell surface receptor able to trigger apoptosis in a variety of cell types. The expression and function of the CD95 antigen on leukemic blasts from 42 patients with B lineage and 53 patients with T lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were investigated using immunofluorescence staining and apoptosis assays. The CD95 surface antigen was expressed in most ALL cases, with the T lineage ALL usually showing a higher intensity of surface CD95 expression as compared with the B lineage ALL cells (relative fluorescence intensity, RFI: 4.8 +/- 0.47 vs 2.2 +/- 0.23, respectively, P < 0.01). Functional studies disclosed that upon oligomerization by anti-CD95 monoclonal antibodies the CD95 protein was either not able to initiate apoptosis of leukemic cells (75% of cases) or induced low rates of apoptosis (20% of cases). Only in 5% of cases did the apoptosis rate exceed the 20% level of the CD95-specific apoptosis. Most of the CD95-sensitive cases were found among T lineage ALLs (38% of T lineage vs 10% of B lineage ALLs). Overall, the extent of CD95-induced apoptosis did not correlate with the expression level of CD95. Similarly, no significant correlation between expression level and functionality of CD95 in human leukemia cell lines of B and T cell origin could be observed. Bcl-2 protein has been associated with prolonged cell survival and has been shown to block partially CD95-mediated apoptosis, but for ALL cells no correlation between bcl-2 expression and spontaneous or CD95-mediated apoptosis could be found. The results obtained in this study indicate that, despite constitutive expression of CD95, the ALL cells are mainly resistant to CD95-triggering. More detailed investigations of the molecular mechanisms involved in the intracellular apoptotic signal transduction, such as interactions of the bcl-2 and the other members of the bcl-2 family, and functionality of the interleukin-1beta converting enzyme (ICE) like-proteases, may give new

  11. The PAX5 gene is frequently rearranged in BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but is not associated with outcome. A report on behalf of the GIMEMA Acute Leukemia Working Party

    PubMed Central

    Iacobucci, Ilaria; Lonetti, Annalisa; Paoloni, Francesca; Papayannidis, Cristina; Ferrari, Anna; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana; Vignetti, Marco; Cilloni, Daniela; Messa, Francesca; Guadagnuolo, Viviana; Paolini, Stefania; Elia, Loredana; Messina, Monica; Vitale, Antonella; Meloni, Giovanna; Soverini, Simona; Pane, Fabrizio; Baccarani, Michele; Foà, Robin; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, in genome-wide analyses of DNA copy number abnormalities using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays, genetic alterations targeting PAX5 were identified in over 30% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. So far the occurrence of PAX5 alterations and their clinical correlation have not been investigated in adults with BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods The aim of this study was to characterize the rearrangements on 9p involving PAX5 and their clinical significance in adults with BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Eighty-nine adults with de novo BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled into institutional (n=15) or GIMEMA (Gruppo Italiano Malattie EMatologiche dell’Adulto) (n=74) clinical trials and, after obtaining informed consent, their genome was analyzed by single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (Affymetrix 250K NspI and SNP 6.0), genomic polymerase chain reaction analysis and re-sequencing. Results PAX5 genomic deletions were identified in 29 patients (33%) with the extent of deletions ranging from a complete loss of chromosome 9 to the loss of a subset of exons. In contrast to BCR-ABL1-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia, no point mutations were found, suggesting that deletions are the main mechanism of inactivation of PAX5 in BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The deletions were predicted to result in PAX5 haploinsufficiency or expression of PAX5 isoforms with impaired DNA-binding. Deletions of PAX5 were not significantly correlated with overall survival, disease-free survival or cumulative incidence of relapse, suggesting that PAX5 deletions are not associated with outcome. Conclusions PAX5 deletions are frequent in adult BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and are not associated with a poor outcome. PMID:20534699

  12. NUP214-ABL1-mediated cell proliferation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is dependent on the LCK kinase and various interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    De Keersmaecker, Kim; Porcu, Michaël; Cox, Luk; Girardi, Tiziana; Vandepoel, Roel; de Beeck, Joyce Op; Gielen, Olga; Mentens, Nicole; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The NUP214-ABL1 fusion protein is a constitutively active protein tyrosine kinase that is found in 6% of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and that promotes proliferation and survival of T-lymphoblasts. Although NUP214-ABL1 is sensitive to ABL1 kinase inhibitors, development of resistance to these compounds is a major clinical problem, underlining the need for additional drug targets in the sparsely studied NUP214-ABL1 signaling network. In this work, we identify and validate the SRC family kinase LCK as a protein whose activity is absolutely required for the proliferation and survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells that depend on NUP214-ABL1 activity. These findings underscore the potential of SRC kinase inhibitors and of the dual ABL1/SRC kinase inhibitors dasatinib and bosutinib for the treatment of NUP214-ABL1-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition, we used mass spectrometry to identify protein interaction partners of NUP214-ABL1. Our results strongly support that the signaling network of NUP214-ABL1 is distinct from that previously reported for BCR-ABL1. Moreover, we found that three NUP214-ABL1-interacting proteins, MAD2L1, NUP155, and SMC4, are strictly required for the proliferation and survival of NUP214-ABL1-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In conclusion, this work identifies LCK, MAD2L1, NUP155 and SMC4 as four new potential drug targets in NUP214-ABL1-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23872305

  13. Efficacy and effects of palifermin for the treatment of oral mucositis in patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alessandra; Matarese, Giovanni; Ghislanzoni, Luis Huanca; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gherlone, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    This randomized-controlled trial studied the efficacy of palifermin, administered as a dose during hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) therapy, as primary prophylaxis on pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in order to reduce oral mucositis (OM). Patients in the palifermin group were randomly assigned to receive palifermin, 60 μg/kg, intravenously as a single dose 3 days before and 0, +1, and +2 post autologous HSCT infusion. The patients in the control group received only a placebo treatment. OM-related assessments were the WHO oral-toxicity scale and the patient-reported outcomes. There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of OM grade 3 and 4 in the palifermin group compared to the control group. There was also a reduction in the degree of severity of OM in the palifermin group (1.65 grade respect to 2.33 in the control group). Palifermin could prevent the recurrence of severe OM and improve the quality of life in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PMID:26428409

  14. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenix, P.J.; Kernan, W.J.; Tassinari, M.S.; Schunior, A.; Waber, D.P.; Howes, A.; Tarbell, N.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy.

  15. Fermented Brown Rice Extract Causes Apoptotic Death of Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells via Death Receptor Pathway.

    PubMed

    Horie, Yukiko; Nemoto, Hideyuki; Itoh, Mari; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Morita, Kyoji

    2016-04-01

    Mixture of brown rice and rice bran fermented with Aspergillus oryzae, designated as FBRA, has been reported to reveal anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects in rodents. Then, to test its potential anti-cancer activity, the aqueous extract was prepared from FBRA powder, and the effect of this extract on human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells was directly examined. The exposure to FBRA extract reduced the cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The reduction of the cell viability was accompanied by the DNA fragmentation, and partially restored by treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor. Further studies showed that FBRA extract induced the cleavage of caspase-8, -9, and -3, and decreased Bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, the expression of tBid, DR5, and Fas proteins was enhanced by FBRA extract, and the pretreatment with caspase-8 inhibitor, but not caspase-9 inhibitor, restored the reduction of the cell viability induced by FBRA extract. These findings suggested that FBRA extract could induce the apoptotic death of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells probably through mainly the death receptor-mediated pathway and supplementarily through the tBid-mediated mitochondrial pathway, proposing the possibility that FBRA was a potential functional food beneficial to patients with hematological cancer. PMID:26769704

  16. NSE/αNAE positivity in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: revisiting a potential cytochemical diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Tyagi, S

    2014-01-01

    Cytochemical staining for leukemia typing is declining in hematology laboratories, but the use of flow cytometry may not be possible in some settings. Aberrant cytochemical nonspecific esterase/α-naphthyl acetate esterase (NSE/αNAE) positive B-lymphoblasts can cause confusion with monoblasts, a potentially dangerous pitfall. This unusual cytochemical NSE/αNAE positivity had been associated with relatively poorer outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the era prior to the advent of routine multicolor flow cytometric immunophenotyping. We reviewed morphological, cytochemical and flow-cytometric data from five cases of B-lineage ALL that showed NSE/αNAE positivity and were diagnosed definitively using multi-parametric flow cytometric immunophenotypic analysis. Diffuse or dot-like (localized) strong cytochemical NSE/αNAE activity was detected in all cases and all showed one or more features of high risk disease. The number of NSE/αNAE positive blasts in the marrow varied from 10 to 75%. The morphological differential diagnoses included T-lymphoid lineage ALL and acute monoblastic leukemia (AML-M5). Flow cytometric data revealed B-lineage antigens and the absence of monocytic or other myeloid markers resolved the diagnosis. These cases underscore the importance of immunophenotyping in all cases of suspected ALL regardless of the cytochemical findings. Although the numbers are small, the association with high risk disease observed in all five of our cases may corroborate the previously reported poor prognostic value of such aberrant cytochemical staining. PMID:23957699

  17. ABT-199 mediated inhibition of BCL-2 as a novel therapeutic strategy in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Sofie; Matthijssens, Filip; Goossens, Steven; Van de Walle, Inge; Ruggero, Katia; de Bock, Charles E; Degryse, Sandrine; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Briot, Delphine; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Lammens, Tim; De Moerloose, Barbara; Benoit, Yves; Poppe, Bruce; Meijerink, Jules P; Cools, Jan; Soulier, Jean; Rabbitts, Terence H; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2014-12-11

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with gradually improved survival through introduction of intensified chemotherapy. However, therapy-resistant or refractory T-ALL remains a major clinical challenge. Here, we evaluated B-cell lymphoma (BCL)-2 inhibition by the BH3 mimetic ABT-199 as a new therapeutic strategy in human T-ALL. The T-ALL cell line LOUCY, which shows a transcriptional program related to immature T-ALL, exhibited high in vitro and in vivo sensitivity for ABT-199 in correspondence with high levels of BCL-2. In addition, ABT-199 showed synergistic therapeutic effects with different chemotherapeutic agents including doxorubicin, l-asparaginase, and dexamethasone. Furthermore, in vitro analysis of primary patient samples indicated that some immature, TLX3- or HOXA-positive primary T-ALLs are highly sensitive to BCL-2 inhibition, whereas TAL1 driven tumors mostly showed poor ABT-199 responses. Because BCL-2 shows high expression in early T-cell precursors and gradually decreases during normal T-cell differentiation, differences in ABT-199 sensitivity could partially be mediated by distinct stages of differentiation arrest between different molecular genetic subtypes of human T-ALL. In conclusion, our study highlights BCL-2 as an attractive molecular target in specific subtypes of human T-ALL that could be exploited by ABT-199. PMID:25301704

  18. PTEN microdeletions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia are caused by illegitimate RAG-mediated recombination events.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rui D; Sarmento, Leonor M; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Zuurbier, Linda; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G C A M; Póvoa, Vanda; Smits, Willem K; Abecasis, Miguel; Yunes, J Andres; Sonneveld, Edwin; Horstmann, Martin A; Pieters, Rob; Barata, João T; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2014-07-24

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-inactivating mutations and/or deletions are an independent risk factor for relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients treated on Dutch Childhood Oncology Group or German Cooperative Study Group for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia protocols. Some monoallelic mutated or PTEN wild-type patients lack PTEN protein, implying that additional PTEN inactivation mechanisms exist. We show that PTEN is inactivated by small deletions affecting a few exons in 8% of pediatric T-ALL patients. These microdeletions were clonal in 3% and subclonal in 5% of patients. Conserved deletion breakpoints are flanked by cryptic recombination signal sequences (cRSSs) and frequently have non-template-derived nucleotides inserted in between breakpoints, pointing to an illegitimate RAG recombination-driven activity. Identified cRSSs drive RAG-dependent recombination in a reporter system as efficiently as bona fide RSSs that flank gene segments of the T-cell receptor locus. Remarkably, equivalent microdeletions were detected in thymocytes of healthy individuals. Microdeletions strongly associate with the TALLMO subtype characterized by TAL1 or LMO2 rearrangements. Primary and secondary xenotransplantation of TAL1-rearranged leukemia allowed development of leukemic subclones with newly acquired PTEN microdeletions. Ongoing RAG activity may therefore actively contribute to the acquisition of preleukemic hits, clonal diversification, and disease progression. PMID:24904117

  19. Next-generation-sequencing of recurrent childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals mutations typically associated with high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cai; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Gombert, Michael; Okpanyi, Vera; Binder, Vera; Röttgers, Silja; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Harbott, Jochen; Ginzel, Sebastian; Thiele, Ralf; Husemann, Peter; Krell, Pina F I; Borkhardt, Arndt; Dugas, Martin; Hu, Jianda; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    20% of children suffering from high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia develop recurrent disease. The molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the genetic landscape of five patients at relapse, who developed recurrent disease without prior high-risk indication using whole-exome- and whole-genome-sequencing. Oncogenic mutations of RAS pathway genes (NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, n=4) and deactivating mutations of major epigenetic regulators (CREBBP, EP300, each n=2 and ARID4B, EZH2, MACROD2, MLL2, each n=1) were prominent in these cases and virtually absent in non-recurrent cases (n=6) or other pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases (n=18). In relapse nucleotide variations were detected in cell fate determining transcription factors (GLIS1, AKNA). Structural genomic alterations affected genes regulating B-cell development (IKZF1, PBX1, RUNX1). Eleven novel translocations involved the genes ART4, C12orf60, MACROD2, TBL1XR1, LRRN4, KIAA1467, and ELMO1/MIR1200. Typically, patients harbored only single structural variations, except for one patient who displayed massive rearrangements in the context of a germline tumor suppressor TP53 mutation and a Li-Fraumeni syndrome-like family history. Another patient harbored a germline mutation in the DNA repair factor ATM. In summary, the relapse patients of our cohort were characterized by somatic mutations affecting the RAS pathway, epigenetic and developmental programs and germline mutations in DNA repair pathways. PMID:26189108

  20. Morphologic characteristics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with abnormalities of chromosome 8, band q24.

    PubMed

    Davey, F R; Lawrence, D; MacCallum, J; Varney, J; Hutchison, R; Wurster-Hill, D; Schiffer, C; Sobol, R E; Ciminelli, N; Le Beau, M

    1992-07-01

    The CALGB prospectively studied 140 adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients for cytogenetic abnormalities. Seven (5%) patients with adequate cytogenetic preparations had t(8;14)(q24;q32) or t(8;22)(q24;q11). Patients were compared with non-8q24 patients for clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to therapy, and survival. The median age of patients with translocations involving 8q24 (71% males) was 40 years. Forty-three percent had lymphadenopathy, 29% splenomegaly, and 29% hepatomegaly. None exhibited central nervous system (CNS), skin, or gum involvement. These features did not differ significantly from non-8q24 ALLs. Patients with 8q24 translocations had higher hemoglobins (11.5 vs. 9.8 g/dl; P = 0.04) and lower percentage of blasts in the peripheral blood (8.5% vs. 69%; P = 0.007). Although all seven were finally categorized as ALL-L3, a marked variation in the proportion of typical L3 blasts was observed that initially resulted in the diagnoses of ALL-L2 in three cases and prolymphocytic leukemia in one. In five of five patients, the blasts typed as B cells (SIg+ and CD19+). Complete remission rates for patients with 8q24 translocations were 43%, whereas they were 68% for non-8q24 ALLS (P = 0.22). Furthermore, patients with 8q24 abnormalities exhibited significantly shorter survival (4.8 vs. 18.4 mo; P less than 0.001). We conclude that ALL with translocations of 8q24 in adults shows a mature B-cell immunophenotype (SIg+), poor prognosis and morphology ranging from classical ALL-L3 to ALL with a subpopulation of L3 cells. Thus, the diagnosis of ALL-L3 should be made when blastic cells possess a mature B-cell immunophenotype (SIg+) and an 8q24 translocation, even though the number of L3 cells is low. PMID:1609772

  1. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  2. The role of blinatumomab in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jonathan E.; Stein, Anthony S.

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed/refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a complete remission (CR) rate of 20–45% and median overall survival of 3–9 months, depending on the duration of the first remission and number of lines of salvage therapy. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only curative option for adult patients with relapsed/refractory ALL, and achievement of CR is a crucial step before alloHSCT. Blinatumomab is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody construct with dual specificity for CD19 and CD3, simultaneously binding CD3-positive cytotoxic T cells and CD19-positive B cells, resulting in T-cell-mediated serial lysis of normal and malignant B cells. It recently gained accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of relapsed/refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, based on a large phase II trial of 189 adults with relapsed/refractory B-ALL, which showed a CR/CRh (CR with partial hematologic recovery) of 43% after two cycles of treatment. Toxicities include cytokine-release syndrome (CRS) and neurologic events (encephalopathy, aphasia, and seizure). CRS can be alleviated by step-up dosing and dexamethasone, without affecting the cytotoxic effect of blinatumomab. The cause of neurologic toxicity is unclear but is also observed with other T-cell therapies and may relate to variable expression of CD19 within the brain. This review encompasses the preclinical rationale of using the BITE® class of compounds (blinatumomab being the only one that is FDA approved), with clinical data using blinatumomab in the relapsed/refractory setting (pediatrics and adults), the minimal residual disease setting (adults), as well as Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The review also examines the main adverse events: their prevention, recognition, and management; possible mechanisms of resistance; causes of relapse. It also summarizes future trials evaluating the drug earlier in the

  3. Prognostic Value of Protease Activated Receptor-1 in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Nosair, Nahla A.; Ghaith, Fatma M.; Elshenawy, Eman H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute Lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder of lymphoid progenitor cells that proliferate and replace the normal hematopoietic cells of the bone marrow. Protease-activated receptors (PARs) comprise a family of trans-membrane G-protein coupled receptors. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) is a typical member of this family of receptors that mediate cellular responses to thrombin and related proteases. PAR1 is expressed by a wide range of tumor cells and can promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this work was to study the role of PAR-1 expression in newly diagnosed ALL patients. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 44 children with newly diagnosed ALL who were admitted to Hematology Unit, Pediatric department, Tanta University Hospital including 24 males and 20 females with their age ranged from 4–17 years and their mean age value of 9.06±3.26. All patients were subjected to complete history taking, thorough clinical examination, bone marrow aspiration and flow cytometric analysis for detection of PAR-1 expression by malignant cells. Results PAR-1 was positive in 18 cases (41%) and negative in 26 cases (59%) of studied patients. This study showed no significant relation between PAR-1 expression and age, sex and most of the clinical data including hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and purpura while generalized lymphadenopathy was significantly higher in PAR-1 positive group. PAR-1 positive expression was associated with some bad prognostic laboratory parameters including higher hemoglobin, higher white blood cells, higher peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cells, higher serum LDH and lower platelets count. No significant association was detected between PAR-1 expression and immunophenotyping. There were significantly higher remission rates in PAR-1 negative group and significantly higher relapse and death rates in PAR-1 positive group. Conclusion From this study, it could be concluded that PAR-1 expression

  4. Targetable Kinase-Activating Lesions in Ph-like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, K.G.; Li, Y.; Payne-Turner, D.; Harvey, R.C.; Yang, Y.-L.; Pei, D.; McCastlain, K.; Ding, L.; Lu, C.; Song, G.; Ma, J.; Becksfort, J.; Rusch, M.; Chen, S.-C.; Easton, J.; Cheng, J.; Boggs, K.; Santiago-Morales, N.; Iacobucci, I.; Fulton, R.S.; Wen, J.; Valentine, M.; Cheng, C.; Paugh, S.W.; Devidas, M.; Chen, I-M.; Reshmi, S.; Smith, A.; Hedlund, E.; Gupta, P.; Nagahawatte, P.; Wu, G.; Chen, X.; Yergeau, D.; Vadodaria, B.; Mulder, H.; Winick, N.J.; Larsen, E.C.; Carroll, W.L.; Heerema, N.A.; Carroll, A.J.; Grayson, G.; Tasian, S.K.; Moore, A.S.; Keller, F.; Frei-Jones, M.; Whitlock, J.A.; Raetz, E.A.; White, D.L.; Hughes, T.P.; Auvil, J.M. Guidry; Smith, M.A.; Marcucci, G.; Bloomfield, C.D.; Mrózek, K.; Kohlschmidt, J.; Stock, W.; Kornblau, S.M.; Konopleva, M.; Paietta, E.; Pui, C.-H.; Jeha, S.; Relling, M.V.; Evans, W.E.; Gerhard, D.S.; Gastier-Foster, J.M.; Mardis, E.; Wilson, R.K.; Loh, M.L.; Downing, J.R.; Hunger, S.P.; Willman, C.L.; Zhang, J.; Mullighan, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Philadelphia chromosome–like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-like ALL) is characterized by a gene-expression profile similar to that of BCR–ABL1–positive ALL, alterations of lymphoid transcription factor genes, and a poor outcome. The frequency and spectrum of genetic alterations in Ph-like ALL and its responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibition are undefined, especially in adolescents and adults. METHODS We performed genomic profiling of 1725 patients with precursor B-cell ALL and detailed genomic analysis of 154 patients with Ph-like ALL. We examined the functional effects of fusion proteins and the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in mouse pre-B cells and xenografts of human Ph-like ALL. RESULTS Ph-like ALL increased in frequency from 10% among children with standard-risk ALL to 27% among young adults with ALL and was associated with a poor outcome. Kinase-activating alterations were identified in 91% of patients with Ph-like ALL; rearrangements involving ABL1, ABL2, CRLF2, CSF1R, EPOR, JAK2, NTRK3, PDGFRB, PTK2B, TSLP, or TYK2 and sequence mutations involving FLT3, IL7R, or SH2B3 were most common. Expression of ABL1, ABL2, CSF1R, JAK2, and PDGFRB fusions resulted in cytokine-independent proliferation and activation of phosphorylated STAT5. Cell lines and human leukemic cells expressing ABL1, ABL2, CSF1R, and PDGFRB fusions were sensitive in vitro to dasatinib, EPOR and JAK2 rearrangements were sensitive to ruxolitinib, and the ETV6–NTRK3 fusion was sensitive to crizotinib. CONCLUSIONS Ph-like ALL was found to be characterized by a range of genomic alterations that activate a limited number of signaling pathways, all of which may be amenable to inhibition with approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Trials identifying Ph-like ALL are needed to assess whether adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to current therapy will improve the survival of patients with this type of leukemia. (Funded by the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities and

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    BADR, MOHAMED AHMED; HASSAN, TAMER HASAN; EL-GERBY, KHALED MOHAMED; LAMEY, MOHAMED EL-SAYED

    2013-01-01

    The issue of delayed neurological damage as a result of treatment is becoming increasingly important now that an increased number of children survive treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Following modification of the treatment protocols, severe symptomatic late effects are rare, and most adverse effects are detected by sensitive imaging methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or by neuropsychological testing. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of late central nervous system (CNS) damage by MRI and clinical examination in children treated for ALL. A cross-sectional study was carried out at the pediatric oncology unit of Zagazig University, Egypt, and included 25 patients who were consecutively enrolled and treated according to the modified Children’s Cancer Group (CCG) 1991 protocol for standard risk ALL and the modified CCG 1961 protocol for high-risk ALL and who had survived more than 5 years from the diagnosis. All relevant data were collected from patients’ medical records; particularly the data concerning the initial clinical presentation and initial brain imaging. All patients were subjected to thorough history and full physical examination with special emphasis on the neurological system. MRI of the brain was performed for all patients. The mean age of patients was 6.9±3.04 years at diagnosis and was 12.9±3.2 years at the time of study. The patients comprised 14 boys and 11 girls. Abnormal MRI findings were detected in six patients (24%). They were in the form of leukoencephalopathy in two patients (8%), brain atrophy in two patients (8%), old infarct in one patient (4%) and old hemorrhage in one patient (4%). The number of abnormal MRI findings was significantly higher in high-risk patients, patients who had CNS manifestations at diagnosis and patients who had received cranial irradiation. We concluded that cranial irradiation is associated with higher incidence of MRI changes in children

  6. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism in Egyptian pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia correlation with BMD

    PubMed Central

    Tantawy, Maha; Amer, Mahmoud; Raafat, Tarek; Hamdy, Nayera

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We studied the frequencies of the 3′ and 5′-end vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and their correlation with bone mineral density (BMD) in Egyptian pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients receiving calcium and vitamin D supplements. The purpose of this study is to find out the relation between VDR polymorphism and the response to vitamin D intake in pediatric ALL cases who receive corticosteroid therapy which predispose to osteoporosis. This study might shed the light on some genetic variants that are effect the response of individuals to vitamin D therapy. Methods Forty newly diagnosed pediatrics ALL cases were studied. Three SNPs at the 3′-end of the VDR gene (BsmI rs1544410, ApaI rs739837and TaqI rs731236) and two SNPs at the 5′-end (Cdx-2 rs11568820 and GATA rs4516035) were analyzed by Allelic discrimination assay. Of those twenty-six cases with initial BMD data available were further analyzed with regards to the effect of various VDR genotypes/haplotypes on BMD. Results The genotype frequencies at 3′-end of VDR gene were, TaqI TT 23%, Tt 54% and tt 23%, BsmI bb 19.2%, Bb 65.4% and BB 15.4% and ApaI AA 12%, Aa 27% and aa 61%. The frequencies at the 5′-end were Cdx-2 GG 34.5%, GA 54% and AA 11.5% and GATA AA 8%, AG 50% and GG 42%. Eight and four possible haplotypes were observed at the 3′ and 5′-ends of the VDR gene respectively. The Tt genotype was significantly correlated with high BMD as compared to other TaqI genotypes (P = 0.0420). There was a trend towards higher BMD with the genotype Bb as compared to other BsmI genotypes. No statistical significance was found between the other VDR genotypes or haplotypes studied and BMD. Conclusions This is the first report on VDR gene polymorphisms in Egyptian pediatric ALL patients. The Tt genotype was associated with increased BMD. Our study showed marked genetic heterogeneity in VDR gene in Egyptian pediatric ALL patients. PMID:27114922

  7. BCL6 enables Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to survive BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duy, Cihangir; Hurtz, Christian; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Cerchietti, Leandro; Geng, Huimin; Swaminathan, Srividya; Klemm, Lars; Kweon, Soo-mi; Nahar, Rahul; Braig, Melanie; Park, Eugene; Kim, Yong-mi; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Herzog, Sebastian; Jumaa, Hassan; Koeffler, H Phillip; Yu, J. Jessica; Heisterkamp, Nora; Graeber, Thomas G.; Wu, Hong; Ye, B. Hilda; Melnick, Ari; Müschen, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are widely used to treat patients with leukemia driven by BCR-ABL11 and other oncogenic tyrosine kinases2,3. Recent efforts focused on the development of more potent TKI that also inhibit mutant tyrosine kinases4,5. However, even effective TKI typically fail to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells6–8, which often cause recurrence of leukemia after initially successful treatment. Here we report on the discovery of a novel mechanism of drug-resistance, which is based on protective feedback signaling of leukemia cells in response to TKI-treatment. We identified BCL6 as a central component of this drug-resistance pathway and demonstrate that targeted inhibition of BCL6 leads to eradication of drug-resistant and leukemia-initiating subclones. BCL6 is a known proto-oncogene that is often translocated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)9. In response to TKI-treatment, BCR-ABL1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells upregulate BCL6 protein levels by ~90-fold, i.e. to similar levels as in DLBCL (Fig. 1a). Upregulation of BCL6 in response to TKI-treatment represents a novel defense mechanism, which enables leukemia cells to survive TKI-treatment: Previous work suggested that TKI-mediated cell death is largely p53-independent. Here we demonstrate that BCL6 upregulation upon TKI-treatment leads to transcriptional inactivation of the p53 pathway. BCL6-deficient leukemia cells fail to inactivate p53 and are particularly sensitive to TKI-treatment. BCL6−/− leukemia cells are poised to undergo cellular senescence and fail to initiate leukemia in serial transplant recipients. A combination of TKI-treatment and a novel BCL6 peptide inhibitor markedly increased survival of NOD/SCID mice xenografted with patient-derived BCR-ABL1 ALL cells. We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases and BCL6-dependent feedback (Supplementary Fig. 1) represents a novel strategy to eradicate drug-resistant and leukemia-initiating subclones in

  8. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimal residual disease (MRD) testing by higher performance techniques such as flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to detect the proportion of remaining leukemic cells in bone marrow or peripheral blood during and after the first phases of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The results of MRD testing are used to reclassify these patients and guide changes in treatment according to their future risk of relapse. We conducted a systematic review of the economic literature, cost-effectiveness analysis, and budget-impact analysis to ascertain the cost-effectiveness and economic impact of MRD testing by flow cytometry for management of childhood precursor B-cell ALL in Ontario. Methods A systematic literature search (1998–2014) identified studies that examined the incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing by either flow cytometry or PCR. We developed a lifetime state-transition (Markov) microsimulation model to quantify the cost-effectiveness of MRD testing followed by risk-directed therapy to no MRD testing and to estimate its marginal effect on health outcomes and on costs. Model input parameters were based on the literature, expert opinion, and data from the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Networked Information System. Using predictions from our Markov model, we estimated the 1-year cost burden of MRD testing versus no testing and forecasted its economic impact over 3 and 5 years. Results In a base-case cost-effectiveness analysis, compared with no testing, MRD testing by flow cytometry at the end of induction and consolidation was associated with an increased discounted survival of 0.0958 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and increased discounted costs of $4,180, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43,613/QALY gained. After accounting for parameter uncertainty, incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing was associated with an ICER of $50,249/QALY gained. In

  9. The role of blinatumomab in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Jonathan E; Stein, Anthony S

    2016-06-01

    Adults with relapsed/refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a complete remission (CR) rate of 20-45% and median overall survival of 3-9 months, depending on the duration of the first remission and number of lines of salvage therapy. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only curative option for adult patients with relapsed/refractory ALL, and achievement of CR is a crucial step before alloHSCT. Blinatumomab is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody construct with dual specificity for CD19 and CD3, simultaneously binding CD3-positive cytotoxic T cells and CD19-positive B cells, resulting in T-cell-mediated serial lysis of normal and malignant B cells. It recently gained accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of relapsed/refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, based on a large phase II trial of 189 adults with relapsed/refractory B-ALL, which showed a CR/CRh (CR with partial hematologic recovery) of 43% after two cycles of treatment. Toxicities include cytokine-release syndrome (CRS) and neurologic events (encephalopathy, aphasia, and seizure). CRS can be alleviated by step-up dosing and dexamethasone, without affecting the cytotoxic effect of blinatumomab. The cause of neurologic toxicity is unclear but is also observed with other T-cell therapies and may relate to variable expression of CD19 within the brain. This review encompasses the preclinical rationale of using the BITE® class of compounds (blinatumomab being the only one that is FDA approved), with clinical data using blinatumomab in the relapsed/refractory setting (pediatrics and adults), the minimal residual disease setting (adults), as well as Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The review also examines the main adverse events: their prevention, recognition, and management; possible mechanisms of resistance; causes of relapse. It also summarizes future trials evaluating the drug earlier in the

  10. Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL. Methods To address clinical and genetic differences between DS-ALL and non-DS-ALL and to identify prognostic factors in DS-ALL, we ascertained and reviewed all 128 pediatric DS-ALL diagnosed in the Nordic countries between 1981 and 2010. Their clinical and genetic features were compared with those of the 4,647 B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL cases diagnosed during the same time period. Results All 128 DS-ALL were BCP ALL, comprising 2.7% of all such cases. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly (P = 0.026 and P = 0.003, respectively) worse for DS-ALL patients with white blood cell counts ≥50 × 109/l. The age distributions varied between the DS and non-DS cases, with age peaks at 2 and 3 years, respectively; none of the DS patients had infant ALL (P = 0.029). The platelet counts were lower in the DS-ALL group (P = 0.005). Abnormal karyotypes were more common in non-DS-ALL (P < 0.0001), and there was a significant difference in the modal number distribution, with only 2% high hyperdiploid DS-ALL cases (P < 0.0001). The 5-year EFS and 5-year OS were significantly worse for DS-ALL (0.574 and 0.691, respectively) compared with non-DS-ALL (0.783 and 0.894, respectively) in the NOPHO ALL-1992/2000 protocols (P < 0.001). Conclusions The present study adds further support for genetic and clinical differences between DS-ALL and non-DS-ALL. PMID:24726034

  11. Dietary resveratrol does not delay engraftment, sensitize to vincristine, or inhibit growth of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is a high-risk leukemia found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is often refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics after relapse. Although resveratrol is able to kill high-risk leukemia in vitro, this agent has not been evaluated agai...

  12. Resveratrol given intraperitoneally does not inhibit growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of the phytochemical resveratrol as a preventive agent against the growth of t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) ALL line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by ...

  13. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  14. Diagnosis of Ureaplasma urealyticum Septic Polyarthritis by PCR Assay and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galicier, Lionel; Wargnier, Alain; Pereyre, Sabine; Itzykson, Raphaël; Zouakh, Myriem; Bébéar, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of polyarthritis with axial involvement in a young female patient treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Detection in the hip fluid of Ureaplasma urealyticum by broad-range PCR followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the diagnosis of septic arthritis and ad integrum recovery upon adapted antibiotic therapy. PMID:24958801

  15. Diagnosis of ureaplasma urealyticum septic polyarthritis by PCR assay and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Balsat, Marie; Galicier, Lionel; Wargnier, Alain; Pereyre, Sabine; Itzykson, Raphaël; Zouakh, Myriem; Bébéar, Cécile; Boissel, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of polyarthritis with axial involvement in a young female patient treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Detection in the hip fluid of Ureaplasma urealyticum by broad-range PCR followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the diagnosis of septic arthritis and ad integrum recovery upon adapted antibiotic therapy. PMID:24958801

  16. Immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell leukemia patients have an early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia gene signature and typically have non-rearranged T-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zuurbier, Linda; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mullighan, Charles G.; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Gevaert, A. Olivier; de Rooi, Johan; Li, Yunlei; Smits, Willem K.; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Look, A. Thomas; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2014-01-01

    Three distinct immature T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia entities have been described including cases that express an early T-cell precursor immunophenotype or expression profile, immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster cases based on gene expression analysis (immature cluster) and cases that retain non-rearranged TRG@ loci. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exclusively overlap with immature cluster samples based on the expression of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia signature genes, indicating that both are featuring a single disease entity. Patients lacking TRG@ rearrangements represent only 40% of immature cluster cases, but no further evidence was found to suggest that cases with absence of bi-allelic TRG@ deletions reflect a distinct and even more immature disease entity. Immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases are strongly enriched for genes expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as genes expressed in normal early thymocyte progenitor or double negative-2A T-cell subsets. Identification of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases solely by defined immunophenotypic criteria strongly underestimates the number of cases that have a corresponding gene signature. However, early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples correlate best with a CD1 negative, CD4 and CD8 double negative immunophenotype with expression of CD34 and/or myeloid markers CD13 or CD33. Unlike various other studies, immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated on the COALL-97 protocol did not have an overall inferior outcome, and demonstrated equal sensitivity levels to most conventional therapeutic drugs compared to other pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:23975177

  17. Comparison between qualitative and real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate minimal residual disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Francisco Danilo Ferreira; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; Ganazza, Mônica Aparecida; Jotta, Patricia Yoshioka; Yunes, José Andrés; Viana, Marcos Borato; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Minimal residual disease is an important independent prognostic factor that can identify poor responders among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze minimal residual disease using immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements by conventional polymerase chain reaction followed by homo-heteroduplex analysis and to compare this with real-time polymerase chain reaction at the end of the induction period in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods Seventy-four patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled. Minimal residual disease was evaluated by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in 57 and by both tests in 44. The Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox methods and the log-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results Nine patients (15.8%) were positive for minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction and 11 (25%) by real-time polymerase chain reaction considering a cut-off point of 1 × 10−3 for precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 1 × 10−2 for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using the qualitative method, the 3.5-year leukemia-free survival was significantly higher in children negative for minimal residual disease compared to those with positive results (84.1% ± 5.6% versus 41.7% ± 17.3%, respectively; p-value = 0.004). There was no significant association between leukemia-free survival and minimal residual disease by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction was the only variable significantly correlated to leukemia-free survival. Conclusion Given the difficulties in the implementation of minimal residual disease monitoring by real-time polymerase chain reaction in most treatment centers in Brazil, the qualitative polymerase chain reaction strategy may be a cost-effective alternative. PMID:26670399

  18. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. Results The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4–5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%–12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%–30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%–53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%–72%). Conclusions The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available. PMID:20145276

  19. LMO2 expression reflects the different stages of blast maturation and genetic features in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and predicts clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Raquel; Fresquet, Vicente; Roman-Gomez, Jose; Bobadilla, Miriam; Robles, Eloy F.; Altobelli, Giovanna G.; Calasanz, M.ª José; Smeland, Erlend B.; Aznar, Maria Angela; Agirre, Xabier; Martin-Palanco, Vanesa; Prosper, Felipe; Lossos, Izidore S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Background LMO2 is highly expressed at the most immature stages of lymphopoiesis. In T-lymphocytes, aberrant LMO2 expression beyond those stages leads to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, while in B cells LMO2 is also expressed in germinal center lymphocytes and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, where it predicts better clinical outcome. The implication of LMO2 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia must still be explored. Design and Methods We measured LMO2 expression by real time RT-PCR in 247 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient samples with cytogenetic data (144 of them also with survival and immunophenotypical data) and in normal hematopoietic and lymphoid cells. Results B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases expressed variable levels of LMO2 depending on immunophenotypical and cytogenetic features. Thus, the most immature subtype, pro-B cells, displayed three-fold higher LMO2 expression than pre-B cells, common-CD10+ or mature subtypes. Additionally, cases with TEL-AML1 or MLL rearrangements exhibited two-fold higher LMO2 expression compared to cases with BCR-ABL rearrangements or hyperdyploid karyotype. Clinically, high LMO2 expression correlated with better overall survival in adult patients (5-year survival rate 64.8% (42.5%–87.1%) vs. 25.8% (10.9%–40.7%), P= 0.001) and constituted a favorable independent prognostic factor in B-ALL with normal karyotype: 5-year survival rate 80.3% (66.4%–94.2%) vs. 63.0% (46.1%–79.9%) (P= 0.043). Conclusions Our data indicate that LMO2 expression depends on the molecular features and the differentiation stage of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, assessment of LMO2 expression in adult patients with a normal karyotype, a group which lacks molecular prognostic factors, could be of clinical relevance. PMID:21459790

  20. Parvovirus B19 infection presenting as pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a transient and progressive course in two children.

    PubMed

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Cetin, Mualla; Aslan, Deniz; Ozyurek, Emel; Oyürek, Emel; Anlar, Banu; Uçkan, Duygu

    2004-10-01

    Parvovirus B19 is the causative agent of various forms of hematologic diseases such as aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hypoplastic anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In addition, parvovirus B19 infection may precede or be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The authors present two cases of parvovirus B19 infection and bone marrow infiltration with pre-B-cell lymphoblasts; one patients was diagnosed as having ALL, and the other patient, with neurologic findings, showed total resolution of the blastic morphology and phenotype. PMID:15454845

  1. RAG-mediated recombination is the predominant driver of oncogenic rearrangement in ETV6-RUNX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Rapado, Inmaculada; Li, Yilong; Potter, Nicola E; Wedge, David C; Tubio, Jose; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Van Loo, Peter; Cooke, Susanna L; Marshall, John; Martincorena, Inigo; Hinton, Jonathan; Gundem, Gunes; van Delft, Frederik W; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Jones, David R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Titley, Ian; Stebbings, Lucy; Leroy, Catherine; Menzies, Andrew; Gamble, John; Robinson, Ben; Mudie, Laura; Raine, Keiran; O'Meara, Sarah; Teague, Jon W; Butler, Adam P; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Zuna, Jan; Kempski, Helena; Muschen, Markus; Ford, Anthony M; Stratton, Michael R; Greaves, Mel; Campbell, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    The ETV6-RUNX1 fusion gene, found in 25% of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases, is acquired in utero but requires additional somatic mutations for overt leukemia. We used exome and low-coverage whole-genome sequencing to characterize secondary events associated with leukemic transformation. RAG-mediated deletions emerge as the dominant mutational process, characterized by recombination signal sequence motifs near breakpoints, incorporation of non-templated sequence at junctions, ∼30-fold enrichment at promoters and enhancers of genes actively transcribed in B cell development and an unexpectedly high ratio of recurrent to non-recurrent structural variants. Single-cell tracking shows that this mechanism is active throughout leukemic evolution, with evidence of localized clustering and reiterated deletions. Integration of data on point mutations and rearrangements identifies ATF7IP and MGA as two new tumor-suppressor genes in ALL. Thus, a remarkably parsimonious mutational process transforms ETV6-RUNX1-positive lymphoblasts, targeting the promoters, enhancers and first exons of genes that normally regulate B cell differentiation. PMID:24413735

  2. The Incidence of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Pegylated Asparaginase in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A City-wide Experience.

    PubMed

    Alrazzak, Muaz; Beaupin, Lynda K; Kinyoun, Peter; Barth, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase (ASNase) is an imperative component of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy. Pegylating the ASNase extends its biological half-life in vivo and has become the only ASNase available in the United States for frontline therapy of ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma. It is either infused intravenously (IV) or injected intramuscularly (IM), administrations of which are associated with hypersensitivity reaction ranging from localized skin reaction to severe anaphylaxis. A retrospective review of 96 medical records of pediatric ALL patients was performed. We compared the incidence of hypersensitivity reaction associated with IV versus IM administration of pegylated ASNase. Ninety-one patients were included in the final analysis; 31 having received pegylated ASNase IV and 60 receiving it IM. The incidence of any grade ≥ 2 hypersensitivity reaction in patients who received IV ASNase was 32.2% compared with 13.3% in the IM group (P=0.032). There was no difference in higher grade hypersensitivity reactions (19.4% vs. 11.7%). Most reactions tended to occur during periods of leukemia therapy that did not include concomitant steroid therapy. Our retrospective analysis indicates that IV administration of pegylated ASNase increases the incidence of low-grade, but not grade 3-4, hypersensitivity reactions compared with IM administration. PMID:26558809

  3. Immune reconstitution during maintenance therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relation to co-existing infection.

    PubMed

    El-Chennawi, Farha A; Al-Tonbary, Youssef A; Mossad, Youssef M; Ahmed, Mona A

    2008-08-01

    Immunosuppression is a major side effect of cancer chemotherapy. The process of immune reconstitution can be dissimilar according to the nature of the disease, type and doses of drugs, and age of the patients. Recently, several studies have examined immune reconstitution in children and young adults after intensive chemotherapy for solid tumours or stem cell transplantation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate immune reconstitution (cellular and humoral) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during the maintenance phase of therapy and to correlate between the complicating infections and the abnormalities in immune system during reconstitution. To achieve this goal, 36 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (24 females and 12 males) in the maintenance phase of therapy with 12 healthy children of matched age and sex served as a control group were recruited in this study. The patients were taken consecutively from the Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic of Mansoura University Children's Hospital (MUCH). They were subjected to thorough history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations in the form of: complete blood count, serum creatinine, liver function tests and evaluation of the immune system by estimation of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and CD56 (cellular immunity) by flow cytometry and immunoglobulins A, M and G (humoral immunity) at the first and the third month of maintenance therapy. The results of the study documented presence and persistence of leucopenia and lymphopenia during maintenance therapy with decreased medians of CD3, CD4 and CD8 from the first to the third month of therapy and in comparison to the control group. The other markers CD19, CD56, IgA, IgM, IgG and CD4/CD8 ratio showed increasing median from the first to the third month of therapy. Also we detect a significant correlation between infection and CD19 and serum IgM at the first month and between infection and CD19, IgM and CD4/CD8 ratio at the third month of

  4. In Vivo T Cell Depletion with Myeloablative Regimens on Outcomes after Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Doris M; Eapen, Mary; Sparapani, Rodney; O'Brien, Tracey A; Chan, Ka Wah; Chen, Junfang; Craddock, John; Schultz, Kirk R; Wagner, John E; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-12-01

    The inclusion of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in cord blood transplantation is controversial. We evaluated outcomes according to ATG inclusion in 297 children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received myeloablative total body irradiation-based conditioning and either single-unit (74%) or double-unit (26%) grafts. Ninety-two patients (31%) received ATG and 205 (69%) did not. ATG recipients were more likely to be cytomegalovirus seronegative. The incidences of day 100 grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD; 30% versus 54%, P = .0002) and chronic GVHD (22% versus 43%, P = .0008) were lower with ATG compared with non-ATG regimens. However, day 100 grades III to IV acute GVHD was comparable (11% versus 17%, P = .15). The 3-year incidences of transplant-related mortality (16% versus 17%, P = .98), relapse (17% versus 27%, P = .12), and leukemia-free survival (66% versus 55%, P = .23) in ATG and non-ATG recipients were similar. There were no differences in viral reactivation between treatment groups (60% versus 58%, P = .83). Therefore, the data suggest that incorporation of ATG with myeloablative conditioning regimens may be useful in reducing the risk of acute and chronic GVHD without any deleterious effect on transplant-related mortality, relapse, or leukemia-free survival in children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26327630

  5. Growth hormone deficiency predicts cardiovascular risk in young adults treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Link, Katarina; Moëll, Christian; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Björk, Jonas; Thilén, Ulf; Ahrén, Bo; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2004-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy, and until recently prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) was important for achieving long-term survival. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormone insufficiency is a well-recognized consequence of CRT for childhood cancer. Another problem is increased cardiovascular risk, which has been shown in long-term survivors of other childhood cancers. In the only previously reported study on cardiovascular risk after childhood ALL, obesity and dyslipidemia were recorded in a small subgroup treated with CRT, compared with patients treated with chemotherapy. The mechanisms behind the increase in cardiovascular risk in survivors of childhood cancer are not clarified. The aim of the present study was to elucidate mechanisms of increased cardiovascular risk in former childhood ALL patients. A group of 44 ALL survivors (23 males, median age 25 yr, range 19-32 yr at the time of study) treated with CRT (median 24 Gy, 18-30 Gy) at a median age of 5 yr (1-18 yr) and chemotherapy were investigated for prevalence of GH deficiency and cardiovascular risk factors. Comparison was made with controls randomly selected from the general population and individually matched for sex, age, smoking habits, and residence. All patients and controls underwent a GHRH-arginine test, and patients with a peak GH 3.9 microg/liter or greater were further investigated with an additional insulin tolerance test. Significantly higher plasma levels of insulin (P = 0.002), blood glucose (P = 0.01), and serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein (Apo) B, triglycerides, fibrinogen, and leptin (all P

  6. Molecular Cytogenetics in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Hospital-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Pandita, Aakash; Harish, Rekha; Digra, Sanjeev K; Raina, Alok; Sharma, Annie Arvind; Koul, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was conducted to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in children aged <19 years with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), attending/admitted in the Department of Pediatrics and Radiotherapy, Government Medical College, Jammu. Furthermore, we aimed to study the correlation between the cytogenetic molecular abnormalities and the immediate clinical outcome (induction of remission). MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 2 years (May 2011 to May 2013) in a tertiary care hospital in India. Forty pediatric (1–19 years) patients (18 males, 22 females; M: F = 0.8 : 1) with newly diagnosed ALL were studied for molecular cytogenetic analysis. Written consent was obtained from the parents of the patients. Bone marrow aspiration was done for making the diagnosis of ALL. Children lost to follow-up and who failed to give consent were excluded from the survey. Host factors and clinical parameters were obtained from patients. RESULTS Bone marrow aspirate samples of 40 diagnosed cases of ALL were subjected to routine cytogenetic analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique was used for molecular analysis. Well-spread metaphase plates were obtained in 18/40 (45%) cases for analysis. RT-PCR revealed abnormal genes in 20/40 (50%) patients. The results of molecular cytogenetic analysis were correlated with patients’ clinical and hematological parameters for risk stratification and immediate outcome (induction of remission). Eighteen out of 40 (45%) cases revealed no abnormality. Among the remaining 22 cases, 8 had TEL–AML1 (20%), 6 had BCR–ABL (15%), 4 had MLL–AF4 (10%), 2 had E2A–PBX1 (5%) fusion genes, and 2 had hyperdiploidy. To conclude, a higher proportion of cases in this study showed adverse translocations such as t (9;22), t (4;11), and t (1;19) compared to that reported in literature. CONCLUSION RT-PCR assay was useful in detecting the

  7. Persistent Multiyear Control of Relapsed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With Successive Donor Lymphocyte Infusions: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jeffrey S; Symons, Heather J; Robey, Nancy; Borowitz, Michael J; Schafer, Eric S; Chen, Allen R

    2016-07-01

    There are few therapeutic options for patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) who have recurrent disease after initial matched sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. While a second hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from a haploidentical donor offers the conceptual possibility of greater graft versus leukemia effect, there is minimal literature to describe the efficacy of this approach in recurrent pediatric T-ALL. We present the case of a now 9-year-old female in whom second haploidentical HSCT, followed by successive donor lymphocyte infusions in response to minimal residual disease reemergence, has led to 3+ years of ongoing disease control without graft versus host disease and excellent quality of life. PMID:26990138

  8. A longitudinal study of growth and growth hormone secretion in children during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Marky, I.; Mellander, L.; Lannering, B.; Albertsson-Wikland, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Diminished growth rate during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is of the multifactorial etiology. Effects on GH secretion have been shown after discontinuation of treatment including prophylactic CNS irradiation. Seventeen children treated for ALL with three different CNS preventive schedules were followed longitudinally with repeated estimations of the spontaneous GH secretion during a 24-month period. No difference was found in GH secretion during this time between patients who had received no radiotherapy and those who had received 18 or 24 Gy as CNS prophylaxis. During dexamethasone treatment the GH secretion was completely suppressed, which can be a mediator for the diminished growth rate during the first 2 years of ALL treatment. We conclude that there is no clinical reason to perform GH analysis within the first 24 months of treatment for ALL.

  9. Update on the Use of l-Asparaginase in Infants and Adolescent Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Augusto F; Borges, Kleiton S; Silveira, Vanessa S

    2014-01-01

    Great improvements have been made in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in the past decades, especially due to the use of l-asparaginase (l-ASP). Despite the significant success rate, several side effects mainly caused by toxicity, asparaginase silent inactivation, and cellular resistance, encourage an open debate regarding the optimal dosage and formulation of l-ASP. Alternative sources of asparaginases have been constantly investigated in order to overcome hypersensitivity clinical toxicity. Additionally, genomic modulation as gene expression profiling, genetic polymorphisms, and epigenetic changes is also being investigated concerning their role in cellular resistance to l-ASP. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate the resistance to l-ASP treatment may bring new insights into ALL pathobiology and contribute to the development of more effective treatment strategies. In summary, this review presents an overview on l-ASP data and focuses on cellular mechanisms underlying resistance and alternative therapies for the use of asparaginase in childhood ALL treatment. PMID:25210485

  10. Am80 inhibits stromal cell-derived factor-1-induced chemotaxis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Taichi; Jimi, Shiro; Hara, Shuuji; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) play a potent role in metastasis and infiltration of many types of tumors, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), into the central nervous system or lymph nodes. Although higher levels of CXCR4 expression have been shown to correlate with shorter survival of patients, effective drugs affecting cell surface CXCR4 expression are still unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid Am80 on CXCR4 expression of cultured T-ALL cells, such as Jurkat. Am80 inhibited surface CXCR4 expression and SDF-1-induced chemotaxis by the acceleration of CXCR4 internalization via activation of conventional PKC. Am80 may be an effective drug to inhibit the extramedullary infiltration of T-ALL cells. PMID:20141446

  11. Mutational analysis of the candidate tumor suppressor genes TEL and KIP1 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, K; Takeuchi, S; Golub, T R; Bohlander, S K; Bartram, C R; Koeffler, H P

    1996-03-15

    We have shown previously that loss of heterozygosity at chromosome band 12p13 is among the most frequent genetic abnormalities identified in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of childhood. Two known genes map within the critically deleted region of 12p: TEL, the gene encoding a new member of the ETS family of transcription factors, which is rearranged in a variety of hematological malignancies; and KIP1, the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. Both genes are, therefore, excellent candidate tumor suppressor genes. In this report, we determined the exon organization of the TEL gene and performed mutational analysis of TEL and KIP1 in 33 childhood ALL patients known to have loss of heterozygosity at this locus. No mutations in either TEL or KIP1 were found; this suggest that neither TEL nor KIP1 is the critical 12p tumor suppressor gene in childhood ALL. PMID:8640833

  12. Tumor-specific HSP90 inhibition as a therapeutic approach in JAK-mutant acute lymphoblastic leukemias.

    PubMed

    Kucine, Nicole; Marubayashi, Sachie; Bhagwat, Neha; Papalexi, Efthymia; Koppikar, Priya; Sanchez Martin, Marta; Dong, Lauren; Tallman, Marty S; Paietta, Elisabeth; Wang, Kai; He, Jie; Lipson, Doron; Stephens, Phil; Miller, Vince; Rowe, Jacob M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Mullighan, Charles G; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Krivtsov, Andrei; Armstrong, Scott; Leung, Laura; Ochiana, Stefan O; Chiosis, Gabriela; Levine, Ross L; Kleppe, Maria

    2015-11-26

    The development of the dual Janus kinase 1/2 (JAK1/2) inhibitor ruxolitinib for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) has led to studies of ruxolitinib in other clinical contexts, including JAK-mutated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, the limited ability of JAK inhibition to induce molecular or clinicopathological responses in MPNs suggests a need for development of better therapies for JAK kinase-dependent malignancies. Here, we demonstrate that heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibition using a purine-scaffold HSP90 inhibitor in early clinical development is an effective therapeutic approach in JAK-dependent ALL and can overcome persistence to JAK-inhibitor therapy in ALL cells. PMID:26443624

  13. Bacteremia due to Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akiko; Fujieda, Atsushi; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc species are vancomycin-resistant Gram-positive cocci. Infections due to Leuconostoc species have been reported in various immunocompromised patients, but little is known about such infection in patients with hematologic malignancies. We report a case of Leuconostoc infection in a 44-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient developed a high fever despite antimicrobial therapy with doripenem after induction chemotherapy. After an isolate from blood cultures was identified as L. pseudomesenteroides, we changed the antibiotics to piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin, after which the patient recovered from the infection. Physicians should be aware of Leuconostoc species as causative pathogen if they encounter Gram-positive cocci bacteremia resistant to standard antibiotics such as vancomycin and teicoplanin, especially in patients with hematologic malignancies.

  14. Apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells after cell cycle arrest induced by pharmacological inhibition of notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Huw D; Leveridge, Matthew; Strack, Peter R; Haldon, Christine D; O'neil, Jennifer; Kim, Hellen; Madin, Andrew; Hannam, Joanne C; Look, A Thomas; Kohl, Nancy; Draetta, Giulio; Harrison, Timothy; Kerby, Julie A; Shearman, Mark S; Beher, Dirk

    2007-02-01

    In this report, inhibitors of the gamma-secretase enzyme have been exploited to characterize the antiproliferative relationship between target inhibition and cellular responses in Notch-dependent human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Inhibition of gamma-secretase led to decreased Notch signaling, measured by endogenous NOTCH intracellular domain (NICD) formation, and was associated with decreased cell viability. Flow cytometry revealed that decreased cell viability resulted from a G(0)/G(1) cell cycle block, which correlated strongly to the induction of apoptosis. These effects associated with inhibitor treatment were rescued by exogenous expression of NICD and were not mirrored when a markedly less active enantiomer was used, demonstrating the gamma-secretase dependency and specificity of these responses. Together, these data strengthen the rationale for using gamma-secretase inhibitors therapeutically and suggest that programmed cell death may contribute to reduction of tumor burden in the clinic. PMID:17317574

  15. The functional role of microRNA in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: relevance for diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Chengxin; Yang, Zixue; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a new class of noncoding RNAs, which can hybridize to target messenger RNAs and regulate their expression posttranscriptionally, express differentially in distinct stages of lymphopoiesis and influence the direction of lymphoid precursor maturation. Hence, there is aberrant expression of miRNAs involved in malignant lymphopoiesis, and these aberrations can be used as signatures of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with different subtypes. In addition, changes in the expression of several miRNAs may have functional relevance with leukemogenesis or drug resistance. As a result, the reversal of the expression of these miRNAs may alleviate the disease to some extent and improve clinical outcomes. However, among the studies of miRNAs, there are still some problems that need to be solved to understand the function of miRNAs in ALL more thoroughly. PMID:26508875

  16. The NOTCH signaling pathway: role in the pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and implication for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tosello, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) is characterized by aberrant activation of NOTCH1 in over 60% of T-ALL cases. The high prevalence of activating NOTCH1 mutations highlights the critical role of NOTCH signaling in the pathogenesis of this disease and has prompted the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the NOTCH signaling pathway. Small molecule gamma secretase inhibitors (GSIs) can effectively inhibit oncogenic NOTCH1 and are in clinical testing for the treatment of T-ALL. Treatment with GSIs and glucocorticoids are strongly synergistic and may overcome the gastrointestinal toxicity associated with systemic inhibition of the NOTCH pathway. In addition, emerging new anti-NOTCH1 therapies include selective inhibition of NOTCH1 with anti-NOTCH1 antibodies and stapled peptides targeting the NOTCH transcriptional complex in the nucleus. PMID:23730497

  17. [Prolonged molecular response induced by imatinib in Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia A case report and brief review].

    PubMed

    Raissi, Abderrahim; Bouaouad, Majdouline; Drideb, Noufissa Alami; Jennane, Selim; Mahtat, El Mahdi; Doghmi, Kamal; Mikdame, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Philadelphia or BCR-ABL positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PH+ ALL) is the most common and severe of adult ALL. The only potentially curator treatment remains allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (SCT) in first complete remission. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Its incorporation into PH + ALL protocols also improved the prognosis of this disease giving better complete remission rates compared to chemotherapy alone. The treatment of patients not eligible for SCT remains controversial. Prolonged use of high dose tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) (ie: imatinib at 600 or 800 mg/j) as maintenance therapy seems to be a reasonable approach. We present a case of prolonged molecular remission of PH+ ALL under TKI alone as maintenance therapy. PMID:25847743

  18. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  19. Patterns and frequencies of acquired and constitutional uniparental isodisomies in pediatric and adult B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Kristina B; Olsson, Linda; Safavi, Setareh; Biloglav, Andrea; Paulsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays are increasingly being used in clinical routine for genetic analysis of pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias (BCP ALL). Because constitutional DNA is not readily available as a control at the time of diagnosis, it is important to be able to distinguish between acquired and constitutional aberrations in a diagnostic setting. In the present study we focused on uniparental isodisomies (UPIDs). SNP array analyses of 143 pediatric and 38 adult B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias and matched remission samples revealed acquired whole chromosome or segmental UPIDs (wUPIDs, sUPIDs) in 32 cases (18%), without any age- or gender-related frequency differences. Acquired sUPIDs were larger than the constitutional ones (mean 35.3 Mb vs. 10.7 Mb; P < 0.0001) and were more often terminally located in the chromosomes (69% vs. 4.5%; P < 0.0001). Chromosomes 3, 5, and 9 were most often involved in acquired wUPIDs, whilst recurrent acquired sUPIDs targeted 6p, 9p, 9q, and 14q. The majority (56%) of sUPID9p was associated with homozygous CDKN2A deletions. In pediatric ALL, all wUPIDs were found in high hyperdiploid (51-67 chromosomes) cases and an extended analysis, also including unmatched diagnostic samples, revealed a higher frequency of wUPID-positivity in higher modal number (56-67 chromosomes) than in lower modal number (51-55 chromosomes) high hyperdiploid cases (34% vs. 11%; P = 0.04), suggesting different underlying mechanisms of formation of these subtypes of high hyperdiploidy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773847

  20. Infection-related mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an analysis of infectious deaths on UKALL2003.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David; Bate, Jessica; Wade, Rachel; Clack, Rachel; Dhir, Sunita; Hough, Rachael; Vora, Ajay; Goulden, Nick; Samarasinghe, Sujith

    2014-08-14

    Although infection is the major cause of treatment-related mortality (TRM) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, factors as