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Sample records for phone sms news

  1. Mobile phone SMS messages can enhance healthy behaviour: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Orr, Jayne A; King, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Healthy behaviour, such as smoking cessation and adherence to prescribed medications, mitigates illness risk factors but health behaviour change can be challenging. Mobile phone short-message service (SMS) messages are increasingly used to deliver interventions designed to enhance healthy behaviour. This meta-analysis used a random-effects model to synthesise 38 randomised controlled trials that investigated the efficacy of SMS messages to enhance healthy behaviour. Participants (N = 19,641) lived in developed and developing countries and were diverse with respect to age, ethnicity, socioeconomic background and health behaviours targeted for change. SMS messages had a small, positive, significant effect (g = 0.291) on a broad range of healthy behaviour. This effect was maximised when multiple SMS messages per day were used (g = 0.395) compared to using lower frequencies (daily, multiple per week and once-off) (g = 0.244). The low heterogeneity in this meta-analysis (I (2) = 38.619) supports reporting a summary effect size and implies that the effect of SMS messaging is robust, regardless of population characteristics or healthy behaviour targeted. SMS messaging is a simple, cost-effective intervention that can be automated and can reach any mobile phone owner. While the effect size is small, potential health benefits are well worth achieving. PMID:25739668

  2. Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS): E-Mail and SMS Cell Phone Text Messaging Reminders to Support Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A.; Wentzell, Katherine; Laffel, Nikki

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell phone text messaging, via the Short Messaging Service (SMS), offers the promise of a highly portable, well-accepted, and inexpensive modality for engaging youth and young adults in the management of their diabetes. This pilot and feasibility study compared two-way SMS cell phone messaging with e-mail reminders that were directed at encouraging blood glucose (BG) monitoring. Methods: Forty insulin-treated adolescents and young adults with diabetes were randomized to receive electronic reminders to check their BG levels via cell phone text messaging or e-mail reminders for a 3-month pilot study. Electronic messages were automatically generated, and participant replies with BG results were processed by the locally developed Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS). Participants set their schedule for reminders on the secure CARDS website where they could also enter and review BG data. Results: Of the 40 participants, 22 were randomized to receive cell phone text message reminders and 18 to receive e-mail reminders; 18 in the cell phone group and 11 in the e-mail group used the system. Compared to the e-mail group, users in the cell phone group received more reminders (180.4 vs. 106.6 per user) and responded with BG results significantly more often (30.0 vs. 6.9 per user, P=0.04). During the first month cell phone users submitted twice as many BGs as e-mail users (27.2 vs. 13.8 per user); by month 3, usage waned. Conclusions: Cell phone text messaging to promote BG monitoring is a viable and acceptable option in adolescents and young adults with diabetes. However, maintaining interest levels for prolonged intervals remains a challenge. PMID:19848576

  3. Comparison of an SMS text messaging and phone reminder to improve attendance at a health promotion center: A randomized controlled trial*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhou-wen; Fang, Li-zheng; Chen, Li-ying; Dai, Hong-lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of a short messaging service (SMS) text messaging and phone reminder to improve attendance rates at a health promotion center. Methods: A total of 1 859 participants who had scheduled appointments in the health promotion center of our hospital from April 2007 to May 2007 were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned into 3 groups: control (no reminder) group, SMS text messaging reminder group and telephone reminder group. Attendance rates and costs of interventions were collected. Results: A total of 1848 participants were eligible for analysis. Attendance rates of control, SMS and telephone groups were 80.5%, 87.5% and 88.3%, respectively. The attendance rates were significantly higher in SMS and telephone groups than that in the control group, with odds ratio 1.698, 95% confidence interval 1.224 to 2.316, P=0.001 in the SMS group, and odds ratio 1.829, 95% confidence interval 1.333 to 2.509, P<0.001 in the telephone group. However, there was no difference between the SMS group and the telephone group (P=0.670). The cost effectiveness analysis showed that the cost per attendance for the SMS group (0.31 Yuan) was significantly lower than that for the telephone group (0.48 Yuan). Conclusion: SMS and telephone are effective reminders for improving attendance rate at a health promotion center. SMS reminder may be more cost-effective compared with the telephone reminder. PMID:18196610

  4. Effectiveness of mobile-phone short message service (SMS) reminders for ophthalmology outpatient appointments: Observational study

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Elizabeth; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-attendance for hospital outpatient appointments is a significant problem in many countries. It causes suboptimal use of clinical and administrative staff and financial losses, as well as longer waiting times. The use of Short Message Service (SMS) appointment reminders potentially offers a cost-effective and time-efficient strategy to decrease non-attendance and so improve the efficiency of outpatient healthcare delivery. Methods An SMS text message was sent to patients with scheduled appointments between April and September 2006 in a hospital ophthalmology department in London, reminding them of their appointments. This group acted as the intervention group. Controls were patients with scheduled ophthalmology appointments who did not receive an SMS or any alternative reminder. Results During the period of the study, 11.2% (50/447) of patients who received an SMS appointment reminder were non-attenders, compared to 18.1% (1720/9512) who did not receive an SMS reminder. Non-attendance rates were 38% lower in patients who received an SMS reminder than in patients who did not receive a reminder (RR of non-attendance = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.48 – 0.80). Conclusion The use of SMS reminders for ophthalmology outpatient appointments was associated with a reduction of 38% in the likelihood of patients not attending their appointments, compared to no appointment reminder. The use of SMS reminders may also be more cost-effective than traditional appointment reminders and require less labour. These findings should be confirmed with a more rigorous study design before a wider roll-out. PMID:18513438

  5. The feasibility of using mobile-phone based SMS reminders and conditional cash transfers to improve timely immunization in rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wakadha, Hotenzia; Chandir, Subhash; Were, Elijah Victor; Rubin, Alan; Obor, David; Levine, Orin S.; Gibson, Dustin; Odhiambo, Frank; Laserson, Kayla F.; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Demand-side strategies could contribute to achieving high and timely vaccine coverage in rural Africa, but require platforms to deliver either messages or conditional cash transfers (CCTs). We studied the feasibility of using short message system (SMS) reminders and mobile phone-based CCTs to reach parents in rural western Kenya. Methods In a Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), mothers with children aged 0–3 weeks old were approached to determine who had access to a mobile phone. SMS reminders were sent three days prior to and on the scheduled day of immunization for 1st (age 6 weeks) and 2nd doses (age 10 weeks) of DTP-HepB-Hib (Pentavalent) vaccine, using open-source Rapid SMS software. Approximately $2.00 USD was sent as cash using mPESA, a mobile money transfer platform (2/3 of mothers), or airtime (1/3 of mothers) via phone if the child was vaccinated within 4 weeks of the scheduled date. Follow-up surveys were done when children reached 14 weeks of age. Results We approached 77 mothers; 72 were enrolled into the study (26% owned a phone and 74% used someone else’s). Of the 63 children with known vaccination status at 14 weeks of age, 57 (90%) received pentavalent1 and 54 (86%) received pentavalent2 within 4 weeks of their scheduled date. Of the 61 mothers with follow-up surveys administered at 14 weeks of age, 55 (90%) reported having received SMS reminders. Of the 54 women who reported having received SMS reminders and answered the CCT questions on the survey, 45 (83%) reported receiving their CCT. Most (89%) of mothers in the mPESA group obtained their cash within 3 days of being sent their credit via mobile phone. All mothers stated they preferred CCTs as cash via mobile phone rather than airtime. Conclusion The data show that in rural western Kenya mobile phone-based strategies are a potentially useful platform to deliver reminders and cash transfers. Follow-up studies are needed that provide evidence for the effectiveness of

  6. Text Appeal: The Psychology of SMS Texting and Its Implications for the Design of Mobile Phone Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Fraser J. M.; Reid, Donna J.

    2004-01-01

    Argues that understanding the psychological drivers behind SMS uptake among key user groups could open the door to a range of user-centred applications capable of transforming handset usability--and hence operator revenues--for this inexpensive form of text messaging. Combines the findings of our own web-based survey of SMS users with…

  7. Short Message Service (SMS) Texting Symbols: A Functional Analysis of 10,000 Cellular Phone Text Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of symbolic expressions (e.g., "BTW," "LOL," "UR") in an SMS text messaging corpus consisting of over 10,000 text messages. More specifically, the purpose was to determine, not only how frequently these symbolic expressions are used, but how they are utilized in terms of the language functions…

  8. The Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS (CAMPS) Trial: A Randomized Trial of Text Messaging versus Usual Care for Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Thabane, Lehana; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre; Lester, Richard T.; Mills, Edward J.; Smieja, Marek; Dolovich, Lisa; Kouanfack, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Background Mobile phone technology is a novel way of delivering health care and improving health outcomes. This trial investigates the use of motivational mobile phone text messages (SMS) to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) over six months. Methodology/Principal Findings CAMPS was a single-site randomized two-arm parallel design trial in Yaoundé, Cameroon. We enrolled and randomized HIV-positive adults on ART, aged 21 years and above to receive a weekly standardized motivational text message versus usual care alone. The primary outcome was adherence measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), number of doses missed (in the week preceding the interview) and pharmacy refill data. Outcomes were measured at 3 and 6 months. Service providers and outcome assessors were blinded to allocation. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Between November and December 2010, 200 participants were randomized, with 101 in the intervention group and 99 in the control group. At 6 months, overall retention was 81.5%. We found no significant effect on adherence by VAS>95% (risk ratio [RR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89, 1.29; p = 0.542; reported missed doses (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.87, 1.16; p>0.999) or number of pharmacy refills (mean difference [MD] 0.1, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.43; p = 0.617. One participant in the intervention arm reported a possible disclosure of status. Conclusions/Significance Standardized motivational mobile phone text messages did not significantly improve adherence to ART in this study. Other types of messaging or longer term studies are recommended. Registration 1. Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry; PACTR201011000261458 2. Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01247181 PMID:23236345

  9. The challenges and opportunities of conducting a clinical trial in a low resource setting: the case of the Cameroon mobile phone SMS (CAMPS) trial, an investigator initiated trial.

    PubMed

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Thabane, Lehana; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre; Lang, Trudie

    2011-01-01

    Conducting clinical trials in developing countries often presents significant ethical, organisational, cultural and infrastructural challenges to researchers, pharmaceutical companies, sponsors and regulatory bodies. Globally, these regions are under-represented in research, yet this population stands to gain more from research in these settings as the burdens on health are greater than those in developed resourceful countries. However, developing countries also offer an attractive setting for clinical trials because they often have larger treatment naive populations with higher incidence rates of disease and more advanced stages. These factors can present a reduction in costs and time required to recruit patients. So, balance needs to be found where research can be encouraged and supported in order to bring maximum public health benefits to these communities. The difficulties with such trials arise from problems with obtaining valid informed consent, ethical compensation mechanisms for extremely poor populations, poor health infrastructure and considerable socio-economic and cultural divides. Ethical concerns with trials in developing countries have received attention, even though many other non-ethical issues may arise. Local investigator initiated trials also face a variety of difficulties that have not been adequately reported in literature. This paper uses the example of the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS trial to describe in detail, the specific difficulties encountered in an investigator-initiated trial in a developing country. It highlights administrative, ethical, financial and staff related issues, proposes solutions and gives a list of additional documentation to ease the organisational process. PMID:21658262

  10. SMS as a Learning Tool: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plana, Mar Gutiérrez-Colon; Torrano, Pere Gallardo; Grova, M. Elisa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to find out the potential of using mobile phones in teaching English as a foreign language (EFL), specifically the use of Short Message Service (SMS) as a support tool in the EFL class. The research questions formulated for this project are the following: (1) Is using SMS messages via a mobile phone an…

  11. Connecting with Students Using SMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broinowski, Ian

    2006-01-01

    In this article Ian Broinowski explores creative and interesting ways to incorporate text messaging (SMS) into his teaching practices. Using a computer he is able to send messages related to classroom activities and share ideas and resources with students. He also examines some of the protocols associated with the use of mobile phones and draws…

  12. Hand Anthropometry and SMS Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Vimala; Yeow, Paul H. P.

    The effect of hand anthropometry on Short Message Service (SMS) satisfaction was investigated using structured questionnaire interviews with 110 subjects, aged between 17-25 years old. Hand size was measured to assess its effect on mobile phone design factors satisfaction whereas thumb circumference and length were measured for keypad design factors. Small hand-sized subjects were found to be more satisfied with mobile phone dimensions than large hand-sized subjects. Thumb circumference significantly affects users` satisfaction towards key size and space between keys whereas thumb length significantly affects keypad layout satisfaction. Both thumb circumference and length significantly correlate negatively with the corresponding keypad design factors. Results confirm that hand anthropometry do affect users messaging satisfaction. These findings should prove useful to mobile phone designers who could look into the possibility of designing customized mobile phones that cater to large hand and thumb sized users, so as to increase their subjective satisfaction.

  13. Effectiveness of Vocabulary Learning via Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, M.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the penetration of mobile phones in Asian countries keeps climbing, little research has explored the application of the short message service (SMS) in second language learning. This study aims to examine the effectiveness of SMS vocabulary lessons of limited lexical information on the small screens of mobile phones. Thirty high school…

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    PHYSICS AT ASE Warm welcome for new-look Physics Education; TEACHING COMMUNITY Conference in the Netherlands; RESEARCH Evidence based practice; PHYSICS AT ASE Teacher of Physics Awards; PHYSICS AT ASE Festival encourages science teachers; AWARDS Bragg Medal; PHYSICS AT ASE Meteorites are cool! PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING March 2001 - a science odyssey; WEB RESOURCES New website launched to support the gifted and talented; PHYSICS TEACHING A Fun lesson; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Are cell phones safe? OBITUARY Roy Schofield 1924-2000

  15. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    Nearly Complete Set: I have an almost complete set of J. Chem. Educ., lacking only 3-4 volumes from the early 1930's. It is in pristine condition, bound each year (except the last five years), and used gently only by myself. I am retired and willing to part with this collection for a reasonable offer - I cannot afford to donate them. Any library or individual who might have a serious interest should contact Robert Goldenberg, P. O. Box 412, Westside Station, Buffalo, NY 14213; phone: 905/871-1098; email: goldenbe@vaxxine.com.

  16. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  17. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  18. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    EPS AWARD WINNERS Award for outreach to Physics Education authors; TEACHER TRAINING Helping teachers specialize in physics; AAPT SUMMER MEETING The science of light; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Do you believe in skepticism?; E-LEARNING Massive investment in Swedish online learning; UK SCIENCE YEAR News from Science Year; 11-16 CURRICULUM Naming the energy parts; TEACHER TRAINING Electronic Discussion Group for Trainee Teachers; PUBLICATIONS Physics on Course 2002; WALES Physics in Powys; HIGHER EDUCATION HE solutions to the physics teacher shortage; SCOTLAND The 27th Scottish Stirling Meeting; NORTHERN IRELAND Belfast physics teachers' meeting; SCOTLAND Physics Summer School, Edinburgh 2001; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Physics education research: massive growth; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Just-In-Time Teaching;

  19. Creating a Collaborative "Hot Clock": Using Smart Phones to Motivate Students' Learning in News Interviewing and Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Fang-Yi Flora

    2016-01-01

    This unit activity is integrated into the chapters on radio of the appropriate course--Survey of Mass Media, Broadcast Journalism, News Writing, Media Programing, or Communication Technology. Employing the concept of a "hot-clock radio format," the purpose of this unit activity is to motivate students' collaborative learning in news…

  20. The Effect of Bilingualism on Communication Efficiency in Text Messages (SMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Benitez, Sandra Y.

    2010-01-01

    The widespread use of cell phones has led to the proliferation of messages sent using the Short Messaging Service (SMS). The 160-character limit on text messages encourages the use of shortenings and other shortcuts in language use. When bilingual speakers use SMS, their access to multiple sources of vocabulary, sentence structure, and other…

  1. Symbolic Capital in a Virtual Heterosexual Market: Abbreviation and Insertion in Italian iTV SMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Susan C.; Zelenkauskaite, Asta

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes gender variation in nonstandard typography--specifically, abbreviations and insertions--in mobile phone text messages (SMS) posted to a public Italian interactive television (iTV) program. All broadcast SMS were collected for a period of 2 days from the Web archive for the iTV program, and the frequency and distribution of…

  2. [Use of SMS to ask mothers to come to vaccination sessions in Bobo-Dioulasso].

    PubMed

    Diallo, O; Schlumberger, M; Sanou, C; Dicko, H; Aplogan, A; Drabo, F

    2012-10-01

    Even though the expanded programme for immunization (EPI) coverage at national level is high in Burkina (95% of fully vaccinated children), mothers of children following EPI in Health Centres (HC) would benefit from being reminded of EPI sessions by sending SMS (short message service) to their own mobile phone, or through mobile phone of a family member living in the same compound. SMS could be sent through Computerized Immunization Registers (CIR), hosted by HC computers. 210 mothers of children aged 0 to 5 years were chosen at random and questioned if they owned a mobile phone, if they could read a SMS, or, if not, what language they would understand if a voice SMS was sent. They were also asked if a family member could receive, read and transmit the message, if mothers did not own a mobile phone. They were also asked if they are willing to give their telephone number to HC. 94% of mothers could be reached through written or voice SMS, sent to their own or family member's mobile phone. 100% of mothers would be willing to give their telephone number to their HC to improve their ability to come at the right time for vaccination sessions. SMS reminders, delivered through CIR, should improve EPI attendance and management of sessions in HC, especially in epidemic context. PMID:22669580

  3. Using SMS text messaging for teaching and data collection in the behavioral sciences.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2009-08-01

    Recent interest in university teaching has focused on interactivity in lectures and practical classes, and teachers in several fields have set up systems in which students can interact with the lecturer using mobile-phone-based SMS text messaging. This approach has particular potential in psychology, where students could use SMS messaging as a way of responding in simple psychology experiments or demonstrations. We describe a simple architecture for an SMS-based responding, using an SMS-to-HTTP message relay service, and a PHP/MySQL input-output handler. We describe briefly two experiments we have run using the system. The first experiment examined anchoring effects in an SMS-based auction. The second experiment examined delay discounting, with participants indicating their intertemporal preferences using SMS. Finally, we evaluate the feedback we obtained from students about the practical and conceptual issues surrounding text-message-based responding. PMID:19587178

  4. SMS versus telephone interviews for epidemiological data collection: feasibility study estimating influenza vaccination coverage in the Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Bexelius, Christin; Merk, Hanna; Sandin, Sven; Ekman, Alexandra; Nyrén, Olof; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Linde, Annika; Litton, Jan-Eric

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the use of Short Message Service (SMS) on mobile phones and the use of telephone interviews in collecting self-reported data about influenza vaccination. Through random selection from the Swedish population registry, 2,400 individuals were assigned to be contacted through SMS (SMS-group), and 2,150 were assigned to undergo personal telephone interviews (TI-group). Both groups were asked three questions about influenza and influenza vaccination. Mobile phone numbers were found for 1,055 persons in the SMS-group of whom 154 (6% of the original sample; 15% of all who had a listed mobile phone number) responded. Landline or mobile phone numbers were found for 1,636 persons in the TI-group and 1,009 (47% of the original TI sample; 62% of those where a telephone number was found) responded. The vaccination data collected via SMS was not statistically significantly different from data collected through telephone interviews, and adjustment for different background factors did not change this. Compared to the original sample, there was an under representation of elderly and less educated individuals among the participants in the SMS-group, and under representation of less educated in the TI-group. Though the participation rate was low, SMS is a feasible method for collection of information on vaccination status data among the Swedish population compared to telephone interviews. PMID:19082745

  5. Managing healthcare information using short message service (SMS) in wireless broadband networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Documet, Jorge; Tsao, Sinchai; Documet, Luis; Liu, Brent J.; Zhou, Zheng; Joseph, Anika O.

    2007-03-01

    Due to the ubiquity of cell phones, SMS (Short Message Service) has become an ideal means to wirelessly manage a Healthcare environment and in particular PACS (Picture Archival and Communications System) data. SMS is a flexible and mobile method for real-time access and control of Healthcare information systems such as HIS (Hospital Information System) or PACS. Unlike conventional wireless access methods, SMS' mobility is not limited by the presence of a WiFi network or any other localized signal. It provides a simple, reliable yet flexible method to communicate with an information system. In addition, SMS services are widely available for low costs from cellular phone service providers and allows for more mobility than other services such as wireless internet. This paper aims to describe a use case of SMS as a means of remotely communicating with a PACS server. Remote access to a PACS server and its Query-Retrieve services allows for a more convenient, flexible and streamlined radiology workflow. Wireless access methods such as SMS will increase dedicated PACS workstation availability for more specialized DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) workflow management. This implementation will address potential security, performance and cost issues of applying SMS as part of a healthcare information management system. This is in an effort to design a wireless communication system with optimal mobility and flexibility at minimum material and time costs.

  6. Short Message Service (SMS) Applications for Disease Prevention in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Suggs, L. Suzanne; Odermatt, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background The last decade has witnessed unprecedented growth in the number of mobile phones in the developing world, thus linking millions of previously unconnected people. The ubiquity of mobile phones, which allow for short message service (SMS), provides new and innovative opportunities for disease prevention efforts. Objective The aim of this review was to describe the characteristics and outcomes of SMS interventions for disease prevention in developing countries and provide recommendations for future work. Methods A systematic search of peer-reviewed and gray literature was performed for papers published in English, French, and German before May 2011 that describe SMS applications for disease prevention in developing countries. Results A total of 34 SMS applications were described, among which 5 had findings of an evaluation reported. The majority of SMS applications were pilot projects in various levels of sophistication; nearly all came from gray literature sources. Many applications were initiated by the project with modes of intervention varying between one-way or two-way communication, with or without incentives, and with educative games. Evaluated interventions were well accepted by the beneficiaries. The primary barriers identified were language, timing of messages, mobile network fluctuations, lack of financial incentives, data privacy, and mobile phone turnover. Conclusion This review illustrates that while many SMS applications for disease prevention exist, few have been evaluated. The dearth of peer-reviewed studies and the limited evidence found in this systematic review highlight the need for high-quality efficacy studies examining behavioral, social, and economic outcomes of SMS applications and mobile phone interventions aimed to promote health in developing country contexts. PMID:22262730

  7. Fostering Distance Training Programme (DTP) Students' Access to Semester Examination Results via SMS at University of Rwanda-College of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nizeyimana, Gerard; Yonah, Zaipuna O.; Nduwingoma, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a situation analysis and implementation of Distance Training Programme (DTP) Semester Examination Results Access (SERA) through Short Message Service (SMS) available anytime and anywhere. "Texting" or SMS mobile phone messaging is rapidly increasing communication in business and community service. The prompting…

  8. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J.; Poser, Benedikt A.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in‐plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal‐to‐noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross‐talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. Magn Reson Med 75:63–81, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:26308571

  9. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J; Norris, David G; Poser, Benedikt A

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in-plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross-talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. PMID:26308571

  10. Use of SMS to support parents who experience violence from their adolescents.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jo; Friend, Denise; Parker, Trish; Streker, Garry

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the use of the short messaging service (SMS) to support parents who experience violence from their adolescent. The parents participated in the Inner South Community Health Service (ISCHS) Who's the Boss program, an 8-week parent psycho-educational program for parents abused by their adolescents. An ISCHS counsellor, Andrew Compton, was interested in exploring the benefits of SMS technology and how text messages could be used to support women who had experienced family violence. We decided to pilot the use of SMS with group participants of Who's the Boss who were interested in this 'value-added' strategy. This pilot used SMS technology to reinforce behavioural strategies that had been learnt in the groups to support parents in self-care. The project involved 19 consumers (through focus groups) to design the SMS messages that would most benefit them, decide how often and when they would be sent and evaluate their usefulness in supporting them to take a stand against their adolescent's abuse and violence in the home. Safety concerns were also explored with all participants before the commencement of the project. The project findings demonstrated that SMS messages were useful and supported parents to make changes and address their adolescent's abuse and violence. The use of SMS has applicability to a range of therapeutic programs including parenting programs, anxiety and depression programs and family violence programs. An extensive risk assessment must be undertaken ifthe use of SMS is to be considered to support women who have left violent partners to ascertain the safety of women and the likelihood that their partners may have access to their mobile phones. Women with violent partners are most at risk at the point of, or immediately following, separation and the use of SMS may in fact severely compromise the safety of these women. For this reason, SMS may not be appropriate in the support of women who have experienced family violence where there

  11. The Only Safe SMS Texting Is No SMS Texting.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cheryl; Sacopulos, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians and practice staff use short messaging service (SMS) text messaging to communicate with patients. But SMS text messaging is unencrypted, insecure, and does not meet HIPAA requirements. In addition, the short and abbreviated nature of text messages creates opportunities for misinterpretation, and can negatively impact patient safety and care. Until recently, asking patients to sign a statement that they understand and accept these risks--as well as having policies, device encryption, and cyber insurance in place--would have been enough to mitigate the risk of using SMS text in a medical practice. But new trends and policies have made SMS text messaging unsafe under any circumstance. This article explains these trends and policies, as well as why only secure texting or secure messaging should be used for physician-patient communication. PMID:26856033

  12. CPR Help as Near as Your Phone

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158659.html CPR Help as Near as Your Phone When cardiac arrest occurs, bystanders can ... new study finds that "when we work together as a community -- using a telephone-based CPR system ...

  13. Research News

    MedlinePlus

    Research News - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis ... Email Home Research Research News & Progress Research News Research News Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Read ...

  14. 23 CFR 500.108 - SMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false SMS. 500.108 Section 500.108 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.108 SMS. An SMS is a systematic process with the goal of reducing the number and severity of...

  15. Short message service (SMS) text messaging as an intervention medium for weight loss: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Ryan; Bosworth, Hayden

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 68% of American adults are obese or overweight. Mobile devices such as mobile phones have emerged as a mode of intervention delivery to help people improve their health, particularly in relation to weight loss. This literature review examines the relationship between the use of short message service (SMS) text messaging as an intervention medium and weight loss. Results from this literature review (n = 14) suggest that SMS as an intervention tool for weight loss is still in its infancy. Initial results are promising but continued investigation is needed. We offer several recommendations for future research. PMID:23257055

  16. SMS text message reminders to improve infant vaccination coverage in Guatemala: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Domek, Gretchen J.; Contreras-Roldan, Ingrid L.; O’Leary, Sean T.; Bull, Sheana; Furniss, Anna; Kempe, Allison; Asturias, Edwin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient reminder systems are an evidence-based way to improve childhood vaccination rates but are difficult to implement in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Short Message Service (SMS) texts may offer a potential low-cost solution, especially in LMICs where mobile phones are becoming more ubiquitous. Objective To determine if an SMS-based vaccination reminder system aimed at improving completion of the infant primary immunization series is feasible and acceptable in Guatemala. Methods A pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted at two public health clinics in Guatemala City. Infants aged 8–14 weeks presenting for the first dose of the primary immunization series were enrolled in March–April 2013. Participants randomized into the intervention received three SMS reminders one week before the second and third dose. A follow-up acceptability survey was administered to both groups. Results The participation rate was 86.8% (321/370); 8 did not own a cell phone and 12 could not use SMS. 96.9% of intervention parents were sent at least one SMS reminder prior to visit 2 and 96.3% prior to visit 3. Both intervention and usual care participants had high rates of vaccine and visit completion, with a non-statistically significant higher percentage of children in the intervention completing both visit 2 (95.0% vs. 90.1%, p = .12) and visit 3 (84.4% vs. 80.7%, p = .69). More intervention vs. usual care parents agreed that SMS reminders would be helpful for remembering appointments (p < .0001), agreed to being interested in receiving future SMS reminders (p < .0001), and said that they would be willing to pay for future SMS reminders (p = .01). Conclusion This proof of concept evaluation showed that a new application of SMS technology is feasible to implement in a LMIC with high user satisfaction. Larger studies with modifications in the SMS system are needed to determine effectiveness (Clinical Trial Registry NCT01663636). PMID:27026145

  17. Crowdsourcing oriented Ontology Applies in Instant Debris-flow Disaster Information Platform in Web and Smart Phone Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuan-Fan; Chan, Chun-Hsiang; Huang, Chu-Yi; Chou, Huan-Chieh

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, extreme climates events increase the frequency of typhoon and rainstorm, and this induces more natural disasters in Taiwan, such as flood and landsides. Thus, disaster reduction has become a dispensable issue in present government policy. However, most of people cannot obtain the latest disaster information, thus causing second disaster, on these reasons above, this study attempts to build an interface which provides instant disaster information. The proposal of study aims at establishing an instant information platform for debris flow disaster both on website and smart phone application, which combines crowdsourcing concepts and official open data through sending SMS, email notifications, disaster map and news to people. In addition, both website and smart phone application will not only automatically deliver official warning information, but also sending other disaster information uploaded by other people. However, the quality of crowdsourcing-based information is difficult to control, hence, this study utilizes three types validation method: one is instant rainfall information, another is potential region of debris flow disaster from ontology analysis, and the other is people mutual validation to maintain information quality. To sum up, this study has successfully established an instant information platform for debris flow disaster on website and smart phone application, and this provides the latest official and uploaded disaster information to reach disaster reduction, even for disaster prevention in the future. Keywords: Crowdsourcing-based Information, Disaster Ontology, Debris-flow Disaster

  18. Reexamining the Effectiveness of Vocabulary Learning via Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Haisen; Song, Wei; Burston, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reexamine the effectiveness of vocabulary learning via mobile phones. Students (N=78) from two intact classes of sophomores at a Chinese university were assigned to two groups: the SMS group (the experimental group) and the paper group (the control group). Then, they were administered a pretest to identify the level…

  19. Development of Adaptive Kanji Learning System for Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mengmeng; Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Liu, Yuqin; Uosaki, Noriko; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive learning system based on mobile phone email to support the study of Japanese Kanji. In this study, the main emphasis is on using the adaptive learning to resolve one common problem of the mobile-based email or SMS language learning systems. To achieve this goal, the authors main efforts focus on three aspects:…

  20. Using SMS as a Harm Reduction Strategy: An Evaluation of the RAGE (Register and Get Educated) Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockett, Belinda; Keleher, Helen; Rudd, Annette; Klein, Ruth; Locke, Beth; Roussy, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The RAGE (Register And Get Educated) project explored the feasibility of SMS (Short Messaging Service) as a means for communicating harm reduction messages in relation to alcohol and other drugs to young people residing in the City of Knox, Victoria. Almost 700 young people aged 12-26 years registered their mobile phone numbers to receive a series…

  1. End-to-end Encryption for SMS Messages in the Health Care Domain.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Marko; Laitinen, Pertti

    2005-01-01

    The health care domain has a high level of expectation on security and privacy of patient information. The security, privacy, and confidentiality issues are consistent all over the domain. Technical development and increasing use of mobile phones has led us to a situation in which SMS messages are used in the electronic interactions between health care professionals and patients. We will show that it is possible to send, receive and store text messages securely with a mobile phone with no additional hardware required. More importantly we will show that it is possible to obtain a reliable user authentication in systems using text message communication. Programming language Java is used for realization of our goals. This paper describes the general application structure, while details for the technical implementation and encryption methods are described in the referenced articles. We also propose some crucial areas where the implementation of encrypted SMS can solve previous lack of security. PMID:16160278

  2. Study Regarding Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure Generated By Mobile Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marica, Lucia; Moraru, Luminita

    2011-12-01

    Number of mobile phone users reached to 5 billion subscribers in 2010 [ABI Research, 2010]. A large number of studies illustrated the public concern about adverse effects of mobile phone radiation and possible health hazards. Position of mobile phone use in close proximity to the head leads the main radiation between the hand and the head. Many investigations studying the possible effects of mobile phone exposure, founded no measurable effects of short-term mobile phone radiation, and there was no evidence for the ability to perceive mobile phone EMF in the general population. In this study, field radiation measurements were performed on different brand and different models of mobile phones in active mode, using an EMF RF Radiation Field Strength Power Meter 1 MHz-8 GHz. The study was effectuated on both the 2G and 3G generations phones connected to the providers operating in the frequency range 450 MHz-1800 MHz. There were recorded values in outgoing call and SMS mode, incoming call and SMS mode. Results were compared with ICNIRP guidelines for exposure to general public.

  3. Study Regarding Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure Generated By Mobile Phone

    SciTech Connect

    Marica, Lucia; Moraru, Luminita

    2011-12-26

    Number of mobile phone users reached to 5 billion subscribers in 2010 [ABI Research, 2010]. A large number of studies illustrated the public concern about adverse effects of mobile phone radiation and possible health hazards. Position of mobile phone use in close proximity to the head leads the main radiation between the hand and the head. Many investigations studying the possible effects of mobile phone exposure, founded no measurable effects of short-term mobile phone radiation, and there was no evidence for the ability to perceive mobile phone EMF in the general population. In this study, field radiation measurements were performed on different brand and different models of mobile phones in active mode, using an EMF RF Radiation Field Strength Power Meter 1 MHz-8 GHz. The study was effectuated on both the 2G and 3G generations phones connected to the providers operating in the frequency range 450 MHz-1800 MHz. There were recorded values in outgoing call and SMS mode, incoming call and SMS mode. Results were compared with ICNIRP guidelines for exposure to general public.

  4. SMS versus voice messaging to deliver MNCH communication in rural Malawi: assessment of delivery success and user experience

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Jessica; Larsen-Cooper, Erin; Jezman, Zachariah; Cunningham, Stacey C; Bancroft, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the difference in delivery success of health messages delivered through pushed SMS, pushed voice messages sent to personal phones, and voice messages retrieved from a community phone (“retrieved voice messaging”), as well as the difference in quality of the user experience. Methods: We analyzed the project's electronic monitoring data between September 2011 and June 2013, including demographics, enrollment data, and messages sent and successfully delivered. We also collected and analyzed information from quarterly phone-based surveys with users to assess quality of the user experience, including acceptability, comprehension, new information learned, and reported behavior change. Results: More than half of subscribers enrolled in the retrieved voice messaging service while nearly one-third enrolled in the pushed SMS service and less than 10% in pushed voice messaging. Message delivery success was highest among pushed SMS subscribers and lowest among retrieved voice subscribers. Overall, 99% of survey respondents reported trusting messages they received, and about 75% of respondents recalled the last message they received and learned something new. Almost 75% of respondents reported that they had already changed or intended to change their behavior based on received messages. Intended or actual behavior change was significantly higher among pushed SMS enrollees than among pushed or retrieved voice messaging enrollees (P = .01). Conclusion: All message modalities led to high levels of satisfaction, comprehension, and new information learned. Due to lower cost, higher delivery success, and higher levels of intended or actual behavior change, SMS is the preferred delivery modality. However, the majority of users included in this study did not have access to a personal phone, and retrieved voice messages provided an opportunity to access a population that otherwise could not be served. Providing multiple methods by which users could access

  5. Diabetes Text-Message Self-Management Support Program (SMS4BG): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Karen; Cutfield, Richard; Hulme, Ashley; Hulme, Richard; McNamara, Catherine; Maddison, Ralph; Murphy, Rinki; Shepherd, Matthew; Strydom, Johan; Whittaker, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of diabetes and costly long-term complications associated with poor glycemic control are issues facing health services worldwide. Diabetes self-management, with the support of health care providers, is critical for successful outcomes, however, frequent clinical contact is costly. Text messages via short message service (SMS) have the advantage of instant transmission at low cost and, given the ubiquity of mobile phones, may be the ideal platform for the delivery of diabetes self-management support. A tailored text message-based diabetes support intervention called Self-Management Support for Blood Glucose (SMS4BG) was developed. The intervention incorporates prompts around diabetes education, management, and lifestyle factors (healthy eating, exercise, and stress management), as well as blood glucose monitoring reminders, and is tailored to patient preferences and clinical characteristics. Objective To determine the usability and acceptability of SMS4BG among adults with poorly controlled diabetes. Methods Adults (aged 17 to 69 years) with type 1 (n=12) or type 2 diabetes (n=30), a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) over 70 mmol/mol (8.6%), and who owned a mobile phone (n=42) were recruited to take part in a 3-month pilot study of SMS4BG. At registration, participants selected the modules they would like to receive and, where appropriate, the frequency and timing of blood glucose monitoring reminders. Patient satisfaction and perceptions of the usability of the program were obtained via semistructured phone interviews conducted at completion of the pilot study. HbA1c was obtained from patient records at baseline and completion of the pilot study. Results Participants received on average 109 messages during the 3-month program with 2 participants withdrawing early from the study. Follow-up interviews were completed with 93% of participants with all reporting SMS4BG to be useful and appropriate to their age and culture. Participants reported

  6. Texting from the Bush: Data Collection using SMS Text Messaging in Areas of Low Network Coverage from Low-Literacy Providers

    PubMed Central

    Perosky, Joseph E.; Munro, Michelle L.; Kay, Jillian L.; Nyanplu, Aloysius; Williams, Garfee; Andreatta, Pamela B.; Lori, Jody R.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health technology, specifically Short Message Service (SMS), provides a low-cost medium to transmit data in real-time. SMS has been used for data collection by highly literate and educated healthcare workers in low-resource countries; however, no previous studies have evaluated implementation of an SMS-intervention by low-literacy providers. The Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare identified a lack of accurate data on the number of pregnancies from rural areas. To capture this data from 11 rural communities in Liberia, 66 low-literate traditional midwives (TMs) and 15 high-literate certified midwives (CMs) were trained to report data via SMS. Data were reported via a 9-digit code sent from Java-based mobile phones. Study aims included determining the following components of SMS transmission: success rate, accuracy, predictors of successful transmission, and acceptance. Success rate of SMS transmission was significantly higher for CMs than TMs. The error rate was significantly higher for TMs than CMs. Years of education was the only predictor of successful SMS transmission. Both TMs and CMs accepted the intervention, although CMs found it easier to use. Based on our study, CMs performed significantly better than TMs. SMS texting interventions should be targeted toward healthcare workers with higher rates of literacy. PMID:26147537

  7. Using SMS Quiz in Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziden, Azidah Abu; Rahman, Muhammad Faizal Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper discusses the development of a system using SMS (short messaging system) to facilitate learning and also as a new method in the evaluation of teaching and learning. Design/methodology/approach: The design of a system that uses SMS for the quiz is proposed as an alternative for formative assessment of teaching and learning for…

  8. Lecture Rule No. 1: Cell Phones ON, Please! A Low-Cost Personal Response System for Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Ng, Joseph K. Y.; Wong, Eva Y. W.; Tan, Alfred; Lau, April K. Y.; Lai, Stephen F. Y.

    2013-01-01

    phone, that can be used to replace the "clicker" as a personal response device. Our mobile phone-based response system (iQlickers) collects and analyzes the answers or opinions sent in by the students as SMS (short message service) messages. The statistic of the…

  9. Cell Phones

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cell phones are a relatively novel and evolving technology. While the potential benefits of this technology continue to emerge, so do the potential psychosocial risks. For example, one psychosocial risk is user stress, which appears to be related to feeling compelled to promptly respond to cell-phone activity in order to maintain spontaneity and access with others. Other potential psychosocial risks include disruptions in sleep; the user’s risk of exposure to cyberbullying, particularly the unwanted exposure of photographs and/or videos of the victim; and overuse, particularly among adolescents. With regard to the latter phenomenon, the boundaries among overuse, misuse, dependence, and addiction are not scientifically clear. Therefore, while cell phones are a convenient and expedient technology, they are not without their potential psychosocial hazards. PMID:23439568

  10. Cell-Phone Use and Cancer: A Case Study Exploring the Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colon Parrilla, Wilma V.

    2007-01-01

    Designed for an introductory nonmajors biology course, this case study presents students with a series of short news stories describing a scientific study of cell-phone use and its health effects. Students read the news stories and then the scientific paper they are based on, comparing the information presented by the news media to the information…

  11. Knowledge and Skill Retention of a Mobile Phone Data Collection Protocol in Rural Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Michelle L.; Lori, Jody R.; Boyd, Carol J.; Andreatta, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Introduction With a large number of births occurring outside the formal health system it is difficult to determine the number of pregnant women in rural regions of Liberia. The exponential growth of mobile phone use in developing countries provides a potential avenue for data collection on maternal and child health in such rural, remote regions. Methods A pre-, post-, and one-year post-test design was used to collect data on knowledge and skill retention for seven essential items required for mobile phone use among traditional birth attendants (TBAs) trained in a short message service (SMS) texting data collection protocol (n=99) in rural Liberia. Results Sixty-three participants (63.6% retention) completed the one-year post-test and displayed evidence of statistically significant knowledge and skill retention in six of the seven tasks (p<.005) including the ability to: (a) turn on the phone; (b) use the mobile phone to make a call; (c) recognize they have coverage; (d) recognize the mobile phone is charged; (e) create a SMS text message without help; and (f) send a SMS text message without help. The TBAs continued to have difficulty with more complex tasks such as adding minutes to a phone. Discussion The mobile phone data collection protocol proved feasible with TBAs demonstrating knowledge retention in a one-year post-test, however clinical significance needs further investigation. The protocol increased communication and collaboration among TBAs, certified midwives, and clinic staff. PMID:24655593

  12. The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite /SMS/ system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, D. V.; Wirth, R. J.; Shenk, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) system is described which is being utilized in a program to obtain day and night information on the earth's weather by means of earth imaging, retransmission of imaged data, meteorological data collection and relay, and space environment monitoring. The components and functions of the ground system are discussed together with the basic satellite payloads. The launch and orbit of SMS-A are reviewed, and the functions of the visible IR spin-scan radiometer are described in detail. Other systems and units discussed include the data collection system, solar environment monitor, weather-facsimile unit, and central data distribution system. It is noted that SMS-A was used to support the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment and that the SMS system will be complemented by geostationary environmental satellites from ESRO, Japan, and the USSR.

  13. Sierra Nevada snow melt from SMS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Mcmillan, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    A film loop from SMS-2 imagery shows snow melt over the Sierra Nevadas from May 10 to July 8, 1975. The sequence indicates a successful application of geostationary satellite data for monitoring dynamic hydrologic conditions.

  14. A security scheme of SMS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangzhou; Yang, Hong-Wei; Song, Chuck

    2005-02-01

    With the prosperous development and the use of SMS, more and more important information need to be transferred through the wireless and mobile networks by the users. But in the GSM/GPRS network, the SMS messages are transferred in text mode through the signaling channel and there is no integrality for SMS messages. Because of the speciality of the mobile communications, the security of signaling channel is very weak. So we need to improve and enhance the security and integrality of SMS. At present, developed investigation based on SMS security is still incomplete. The key distribution and management is not perfect to meet the usability in a wide area. This paper introduces a high-level security method to solve this problem. We design the Secure SMS of GSM/GPRS in order to improve the security of the important information that need to be transferred by the mobile networks. Using this method, we can improve the usability of E-payment and other mobile electronic commerce.

  15. Delta-102 Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS-A): Operations summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) program is a joint effort of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Department of Commerce. This program is intended to provide systematic worldwide weather coverage on an operational basis. The pilot SMS program is expected to launch three spacecraft: two prototype spacecraft designated SMS-A and SMS-B and one operational spacecraft designated SMS-C. The SMS program will use spacecraft in synchronous orbit to obtain day and night information on the earth's weather by means of earth imaging instruments, retransmission of image data, data collection, data relay, and space environmental monitoring.

  16. LabPush: A Pilot Study of Providing Remote Clinics with Laboratory Results via Short Message Service (SMS) in Swaziland, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Wen-Shan; Hsu, Min-Huei; Sukati, Hosea; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Scholl, Jeremiah; Dube, Nduduzo; Hsu, Chun-Kung; Wu, Tai-jung; Lin, Vera; Chi, Tex; Chang, Peter; Li, Yu-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Background Turnaround time (TAT) is an important indicator of laboratory performance. It is often difficult to achieve fast TAT for blood tests conducted at clinics in developing countries. This is because clinics where the patient is treated are often far away from the laboratory, and transporting blood samples and test results between the two locations creates significant delay. Recent efforts have sought to mitigate this problem by using Short Message Service (SMS) to reduce TAT. Studies reporting the impact of this technique have not been published in scientific literature however. In this paper we present a study of LabPush, a system developed to test whether SMS delivery of HIV related laboratory results to clinics could shorten TAT time significantly. Method LapPush was implemented in six clinics of the Kingdom of Swaziland. SMS results were sent out from the laboratory as a supplement to normal transport of paper results. Each clinic was equipped with a mobile phone to receive SMS results. The laboratory that processes the blood tests was equipped with a system for digital input of results, and transmission of results via SMS to the clinics. Results Laboratory results were received for 1041 different clinical cases. The total number of SMS records received (1032) was higher than that of paper records (965), indicating a higher loss rate for paper records. A statistical comparison of TAT for SMS and paper reports indicates a statistically significant improvement for SMS. Results were more positive for more rural clinics, and an urban clinic with high workload. Conclusion SMS can be used to reduce TAT for blood tests taken at clinics in developing countries. Benefits are likely to be greater at clinics that are further away from laboratories, due to the difficulties this imposes on transport of paper records. PMID:23028543

  17. Short message service (SMS) can enhance compliance and reduce cancellations in a sedation gastrointestinal endoscopy center: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yuting; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, WeiYi; Yin, Yan; Ye, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Many outpatients who inadequately prepared for the procedure were cancelled on the day of the examination for various reasons. The aim of study was to investigate whether short message service (SMS) can improve patients' compliance and reduce cancellation rates. Outpatients scheduled for sedation gastrointestinal endoscopy were randomly assigned to mobile phone SMS group or control group. Patients in the control group received a leaflet on preparation instructions, while patients in the SMS group received SMS reminders after making an appointment. A total of 1786 patients were analyzed. There was a significant reduction in the rate of cancellations for patients in the SMS group (4.8%) compared with patients in the control group (8.0%) (P<0.001). Patients in the SMS group were 40% less likely to be cancelled by medical staff than patients in the control group. The compliance score of the two groups based on demographic and clinic characteristic distribution showed that for both male and female patients, the compliance score was higher in the SMS group than that in the control group (P=0.023, P<0.001, respectively). Additionally, the compliance score was also significantly higher in the SMS group among patients who were under 50 years old, less than an undergraduate education level, experiencing their first time for procedure, or whose procedures were gastroscopy, waiting time was between 4 and 15 days, and schedules were in morning (P≤0.032). SMS reminders can be considered a complement to conventional preparation instructions, which could help improve the compliance of outpatients and reduce the rate of cancellations. PMID:25476268

  18. News and the overloaded consumer: factors influencing information overload among news consumers.

    PubMed

    Holton, Avery E; Chyi, Hsiang Iris

    2012-11-01

    News producers continue to increase their volume of production and delivery platforms in an effort to reach and maintain news consumers. However, consumers may not necessarily find more news desirable. Previous studies have suggested that information surplus can lead to negative outcomes for consumers, but research of outcomes related to news production and consumption has been scant. This study explores novel areas of news surplus and overload, empirically examining factors associated with the degree of perceived overload across a broad spectrum of news delivery platforms. The findings reveal that the majority of today's news consumers feel overloaded with the amount of news they are confronted with. Gender, news interest, and the use of specific news platforms and outlets predict the degree of that overload. News access through platforms and outlets such as computers, e-readers, and Facebook is positively associated with overload, whereas other platforms such as television and the iPhone are negatively associated with overload. Implications for media psychology and news consumption are discussed. PMID:23020743

  19. Cell Phones to Collect Pregnancy Data From Remote Areas in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Jody R.; Munro, Michelle L.; Boyd, Carol J.; Andreatta, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report findings on knowledge and skill acquisition following a 3-day training session in the use of short message service (SMS) texting with non- and low-literacy traditional midwives. Design A pre- and post-test study design was used to assess knowledge and skills acquisition with 99 traditional midwives on the use of SMS texting for real-time, remote data collection in rural Liberia, West Africa. Methods Paired sample t-tests were conducted to establish if overall mean scores varied significantly from pre-test to immediate post-test. Analysis of variance was used to compare means across groups. The nonparametric McNemar’s test was used to determine significant differences between the pre-test and post-test values of each individual step involved in SMS texting. Pearson’s chi-square test of independence was used to examine the association between ownership of cell phones within a family and achievement of the seven tasks. Findings The mean increase in cell phone knowledge scores was 3.67, with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 3.39 to 3.95. Participants with a cell phone in the family did significantly better on three of the seven tasks in the pre-test: “turns cell on without help” (χ2(1) = 9.15, p = .003); “identifies cell phone coverage” (χ2(1) = 5.37, p = .024); and “identifies cell phone is charged” (χ2(1) = 4.40, p = .042). Conclusions A 3-day cell phone training session with low- and nonliterate traditional midwives in rural Liberia improved their ability to use mobile technology for SMS texting. Clinical Relevance Mobile technology can improve data collection accessibility and be used for numerous healthcare and public health issues. Cell phone accessibility holds great promise for collecting health data in low-resource areas of the world. PMID:22672157

  20. Towards School Management System (SMS) Success in Teacher's Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Haslina binti; Rahmatullah, Bahbibi binti; Nordin, Norhisham bin Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    School Management System-SMS (Sistem Pengurusan Sekolah) is a system developed by Ministry of Education Malaysia in order to reduce teachers' burden and for Educational Data Integration. SMS is a type of Management Information System (MIS) and is pivotal for efficient and effective running of schools in Malaysia. As SMS is newly introduced, no…

  1. Tuning the SMS spectrum based on UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Di; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Jianzhong; Sun, Weimin; Yuan, Libo

    2014-05-01

    We propose a fine spectrum-tuning scheme of the single-multi-single mode fiber (SMS) structure, realised by using UV radiation to modify the propagation constants of different modes in Multi-mode fiber of SMS. The primary experiments also demonstrated. It expect to have applications in the design of SMS based optical filters and sensors.

  2. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    sent to Keene P. Dimick Award Committee, Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh, 300 Penn Center Boulevard, Suite 332, Pittsburgh, PA 15235-5503. The deadline for nominations is April 15, 2000.

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Upcoming Conferences PITTCON The Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy will present its annual event, PITTCON 2000, at the Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, LA, March 12-17, 2000. There will be more than 1,900 technical presentations and 3,000 exposition booths. Further information is available on the Web at http://www.pittcon.org or by telephone at 412/826-3220, ext. 142. Oilseed Conference The 49th Oilseed Conference will be held March 19-21, 2000, at the Doubletree Hotel in New Orleans, LA. The theme of the meeting is "Surviving in a Changing Global Economy". More information is available at the conference Web site: www.aocs.org/oilseed.htm, by phone: 217/359-2344, or by fax: 217/351-8091. American Oil Chemists' Society The 91st American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) Annual Meeting and Expo will be held April 25-28, 2000, at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA. Further information is available by contacting the AOCS Meetings & Exhibits Department; phone: 217/359-2344; fax: 217/351-8091; email: meetings@aocs.org. Chem 13 News: In Memory of Reg Friesen Issue 278 of Chem 13 News (October 1999) is in memory of Reg Friesen (see also JCE, 1999, 76, 27). A complimentary copy of this memorial issue is available upon request to kjackson@uwaterloo.ca. Free Source of Problems The Moles Web site (http://138.100.72.157/moles) is a free source of problems (in the Spanish language) that can be used in teaching problems of chemistry at the college/university level. While it is specially devoted to engineering education, it is also of interest for other studies where chemistry is involved. This site seeks to broaden its base by soliciting contributions from the United States and

  3. Challenges to translating new media interventions in community practice: a sexual health SMS program case study.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cassandra J C; Leinberger, Kaytlyn; Lim, Megan S C

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Herein we discuss translational challenges for new media interventions, using the Sexual Health & Youth (SHY) short message service (SMS) project to illustrate particular challenges relating to recruitment and evaluation. Methods Following the delivery of an SMS sexual health program, available documents (progress reports, communications with project staff, ethics submissions and reporting) were analysed thematically to elucidate the barriers to recruitment, implementation and evaluation. Results Despite being framed by evidence-based research, the project had little impact on the intended population. Only 119 of an expected 5100 young people (2%) enrolled to receive SMS messages. Program documents highlighted the difficulty of recruiting participants for new media interventions. Key issues identified in recruitment included under-resourcing, delays waiting to receive ethics approval and challenges of school-based recruitment. Conclusion The minimal impact of the SHY program illustrates the need for improved research translation in the field of new media interventions. It is important that recruitment procedures align with the convenience and appeal of mobile phone-based interventions. So what? New media research is not always easily translated into community settings. Large-scale recruitment requires adequate resourcing and careful planning, even for low-cost mobile interventions. Stronger formative research, documentation and use of partnerships are essential for successful implementation. Researchers must also consider translation in planning and disseminating their work. PMID:26480819

  4. 23 CFR 500.108 - SMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... NHTSA, May 1996. Available for inspection and copying as prescribed in 49 CFR part 7, appendix D. (a... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false SMS. 500.108 Section 500.108 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND...

  5. 23 CFR 500.108 - SMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... NHTSA, May 1996. Available for inspection and copying as prescribed in 49 CFR part 7, appendix D. (a... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false SMS. 500.108 Section 500.108 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND...

  6. New states in SmS ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, F.; Ribault, M.; Holtzberg, F.; Flouquet, J.

    1981-10-01

    Quasihydrostatic pressure resistivity experiments on a single crystal of SmS are reported up to 27.5 kbar. At low temperature, a regime change occurs at P ˜ 20 kbar, between a "quasiinsulating" behavior (P < 20 kbar) and a metallic ground state (P 20 kbar). Striking similarities appear with TmSe and TmS cases.

  7. 23 CFR 500.108 - SMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... NHTSA, May 1996. Available for inspection and copying as prescribed in 49 CFR part 7, appendix D. (a... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false SMS. 500.108 Section 500.108 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND...

  8. 23 CFR 500.108 - SMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NHTSA, May 1996. Available for inspection and copying as prescribed in 49 CFR part 7, appendix D. (a... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false SMS. 500.108 Section 500.108 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND...

  9. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    page 876 of the July 2001 issue or JCE Online.

    National Educators' Workshop

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology's Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory will host the 16th annual National Educators' Workshop (NEW: Update): Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology. NEW: Update is part of the NIST centennial celebration. It will be held in Gaithersburg, MD, and at the University of Maryland, College Park, October 14-17, 2001. NEW: Update, is a partnership involving industry, government, and education. It will have a program of Experiments and Demonstrations, Mini Workshops, and Plenary Sessions. For registration information, contact Jim Jacobs, NEW: Update 2001, School of Science and Technology, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504-8060; phone: 757/823-8109/9072; fax: 757/823-8215; dplaclaire@nsu.edu. The latest information about the workshop will be at http://MST-Online.nsu.edu/new.

    Chemistry Is in the News Conference

    Chemistry Is in the News-Teaching Organic Chemistry in the Context of Real World Issues, will be held at the University of Missouri-Columbia September 21-23, 2001. Funding from the Dreyfus Foundation will support 18 participants and will offer some partial travel grants. The conference will instruct faculty about the philosophy, pedagogy, implementation, and assessment of the project, doing so in small collaborative groups. It will focus on facilitating news-media-based authentic learning activities aimed at connecting real-world social, economic, and political issues to the teaching of organic chemistry and the development of student-assisted collaborative learning groups. The conference organizers are Rainer Glaser and James Groccia. Those interested should contact Rainer Glaser, University of Missouri, Department of Chemistry, Columbia, MO 65211; phone: 573/882-0331; fax: 573/882-2754; GlaserR@missouri.edu.

    ChemNet-Chemistry Lecture on the Internet

    A multimedia chemistry lecture

  10. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW: http://www.dreyfus.org/

  11. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  12. PASTE: patient-centered SMS text tagging in a medication management system

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin B; Denny, Joshua C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of a system that extracts medication information and administration-related actions from patient short message service (SMS) messages. Design Mobile technologies provide a platform for electronic patient-centered medication management. MyMediHealth (MMH) is a medication management system that includes a medication scheduler, a medication administration record, and a reminder engine that sends text messages to cell phones. The object of this work was to extend MMH to allow two-way interaction using mobile phone-based SMS technology. Unprompted text-message communication with patients using natural language could engage patients in their healthcare, but presents unique natural language processing challenges. The authors developed a new functional component of MMH, the Patient-centered Automated SMS Tagging Engine (PASTE). The PASTE web service uses natural language processing methods, custom lexicons, and existing knowledge sources to extract and tag medication information from patient text messages. Measurements A pilot evaluation of PASTE was completed using 130 medication messages anonymously submitted by 16 volunteers via a website. System output was compared with manually tagged messages. Results Verified medication names, medication terms, and action terms reached high F-measures of 91.3%, 94.7%, and 90.4%, respectively. The overall medication name F-measure was 79.8%, and the medication action term F-measure was 90%. Conclusion Other studies have demonstrated systems that successfully extract medication information from clinical documents using semantic tagging, regular expression-based approaches, or a combination of both approaches. This evaluation demonstrates the feasibility of extracting medication information from patient-generated medication messages. PMID:21984605

  13. The synchronous meteorological satellite /SMS/ system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burr, P. T.; Pipkin, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    The responsibilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Commerce (DOC) pertaining to SMS are described in this paper. A description of the program objectives, payload, and spacecraft subsystems, is included along with an abbreviated description of the SMS ground system. Particular interest is directed towards the visible and infrared spin-scan radiometer (VISSR) as it will be the prime sensor and its performance directly effect the mission objectives. Also, of significant importance is the description of the communications subsystem since transmission and retransmission of image data, data relay, and data collection platform (DCP) transmissions play such a major role in the system. The conclusion is established that the current plans form a workable system for providing timely, high-quality day and night imaging of the earth's weather.

  14. [Positive impact on the Expanded Program on Immunization when sending call-back SMS through a Computerized Immunization Register, Bobo Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, M; Bamoko, A; Yaméogo, T M; Rouvet, F; Ouedraogo, R; Traoré, B; Tinto, M; Bakyono, J F; Sombie, I; Bazié, B B; Ganama, S; Savadogo, Y; Yelkoumi, G A

    2015-12-01

    The impact of a Computerized Immunization Register (CIR) on Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI), with sending SMS to parents before immunization sessions, has never been studied in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study is to measure EPI quickness and completeness of vaccinations after sending call-back SMS to parents through CIR put in place in a health center. In a health center, chosen at random (Colma 1) in the city of Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, West Africa, mothers, at first EPI session, if they had a mobile phone available at hand or in her surrounding, were randomized for receiving, or not, a call-back SMS before following EPI sessions, after child registration on a Francophone CIR (Siloxane's Intervax ©). Mothers, which were sent SMS and did not correctly followed sessions were asked through mobile phone why their child was late for EPI. 523 newborns were included in the study, with 253 whose parents were sent SMS, and 268 being informed of sessions only by ordinary methods. At second EPI session at 2 months of age, there was a statistical significant increase of coverage for children whose parents received SMS (p<0.001). Quickness to come also to this session was significantly shorter when parents received SMS (p=0.03). At third EPI session at 3 months of age, attendance to EPI for children whose parents were sent SMS was significantly better (p<0.001). Quickness to come to this session was shorter for children with SMS (p=0.02). At fourth EPI session at 4 months of age, attendance for children with SMS was significantly better for children whose parents were sent SMS (p<0.001). Quickness to come to this session was better but not significantly different (p=0.49). Out of 101 children registered as late for EPI sessions in Colma 1 CIR, even with call-back SMS, 19 (19%) parents could not be reached on the telephone. 31/82 (38%) mothers had shifted for EPI to a more proximate vaccination center (Colma 2), and 5 (6%) to private or civil

  15. Prospect for Cell Phones as Instructional Tools in the EFL Classroom: A Case Study of Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begum, Roksana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potentiality of cell phone use in the EFL classroom of Bangladesh as an instructional tool. The researcher conducted a case study on Jahangirnagar University of Bangladesh. For the study, some SMS based class tests were conducted in the English Department of the university where one hundred…

  16. Reviews Website: Online Graphing Calculator Video Clip: Learning From the News Phone App: Graphing Calculator Book: Challenge and Change: A History of the Nuffield A-Level Physics Project Book: SEP Sound Book: Reinventing Schools, Reforming Teaching Book: Physics and Technology for Future Presidents iPhone App: iSeismometer Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    WE RECOMMEND Online Graphing Calculator Calculator plots online graphs Challenge and Change: A History of the Nuffield A-Level Physics Project Book delves deep into the history of Nuffield physics SEP Sound Booklet has ideas for teaching sound but lacks some basics Reinventing Schools, Reforming Teaching Fascinating book shows how politics impacts on the classroom Physics and Technology for Future Presidents A great book for teaching physics for the modern world iSeismometer iPhone app teaches students about seismic waves WORTH A LOOK Teachers TV Video Clip Lesson plan uses video clip to explore new galaxies Graphing Calculator App A phone app that handles formulae and graphs WEB WATCH Physics.org competition finds the best websites

  17. Stability and Evolution of Supermassive Stars (SMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, A.; Amaro-Seoane, P.

    Highly condensed gaseous objects with masses larger than 5× 10^4 Modot are called Supermassive stars. They are thought to be possible precursors of Supermassive Black Holes in the centres of galaxies. In the quasi-stationary contraction phase the hydrostatic equilibrium is determined by radiation pressure and gravitation. The global structure is an n=3 polytrope which is at the stability limit. Small relativistic corrections for example can initiate a free fall collapse due to the “post Newtonian" instability. Since the outcome of the final collapse Supermassive Black Hole or Hypernova depends sensitively on the structure and the size of the object, when the instability sets in, it is important to investigate in more detail the contraction phase of the SMS. If the gaseous object is embedded in a dense stellar system, the central star cluster, the interaction and coupling of both components due to dynamical friction change the energy balance and evolution of the SMS dramatically. Dynamical friction between stars and gas, which can be estimated semi-analytically (see Just et al. 1986), has 3 different effects on the 2-component system. 1) The gas is heated by decelerating the stars. This may stall the contraction process for a while until the stars in the “loss cone", these which cross the SMS, lost their kinetic energy (for the total heating rate see Amaro-Seoane & Spurzem 2001). 2) This cooling of the loss cone stars lead to a mass segregation in the stellar component resulting in a much more condensed central stellar core. 3) The inhomogeneities due to the gravitational wakes in the gas changes the effective absorption coefficient of the gas. This affects the condition for hydrostatic equilibrium and may give essential deviations from the n=3 polytrope. We discuss, in which evolutionary stages and parameter range these interaction processes are relevant and how they can influence the stability and evolution of the SMS.

  18. A randomized blinded controlled trial of mobile phone reminders on the follow-up medical care of HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in Cameroon: study protocol (MORE CARE)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Cameroon, only two-thirds of children with HIV exposure or infection receive appropriate HIV-directed medical care. Mortality, antiretroviral therapy resistance and suboptimal virological response are strongly related to missed opportunities for treatment, and, more specifically, to skipped scheduled medical appointments. The present trial, MORE CARE (Mobile Reminders for Cameroonian Children Requiring HIV Care) seeks to determine if reminders sent by text message (SMS), phone call, or concomitant SMS and phone calls most increase the presence at medical appointments of HIV-infected or -exposed children (efficacy), and which is the most efficient related to working time and financial cost (efficiency). Methods/Design We will carry out a multicenter single-blind, randomized, factorial controlled trial. A randomization list will be electronically generated using random block sizes. Central allocation will be determined by sequentially numbered. A total of 224 subjects will be randomized into four groups (SMS, Call, SMS + Call, and Control) with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1:1. SMS and calls will be sent between 48 and 72 hours before the scheduled appointment. A medical assistant will send out text messages and will call participants. Our primary outcome is appointment measured by efficacy and efficiency of interventions. We hypothesize that two reminders (concomitant use of SMS and phone calls) as an appointment reminder is more effective to improve appointment compared to one reminder (only SMS or only call), and that the most efficient is use of only SMS. The analysis will be intention to treat. Discussion This trial investigates the potential of SMS and phone calls as motivational reminders to improve children’s adherence to medical appointments for HIV-related care in Cameroon. The intervention will act to end missed appointment due to forgetfulness. Trial registration Pan African Clinical Trials Registry: PACTR201304000528276 PMID:24066735

  19. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  20. Efficacy of a text messaging (SMS) based intervention for adults with hypertension: protocol for the StAR (SMS Text-message Adherence suppoRt trial) randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . Anonymised demographic data are collected on non-participants. Discussion The StAR trial uses a novel, low cost system based on widely available mobile phone technology to deliver the SMS-based intervention, manage communication with patients, and measure clinically relevant outcomes. The results will inform implementation and wider use of mobile phone based interventions for health care delivery in a low-resource setting. Trial registration NCT02019823 PMID:24410738

  1. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  2. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of exposure ...

  3. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  4. Adventures with Cell Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are finding creative ways to turn the basic cell phone from a digital distraction into a versatile learning tool. In this article, the author explains why cell phones are important in learning and suggests rather than banning them that they be integrated into learning. She presents activities that can be done on a basic cell phone with a…

  5. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  6. Stereographic cloud heights from SMS/goes imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.; Shenk, W. E.; Teagle, R. D.; Steranka, J.

    1977-01-01

    Stereographic pairs of SMS/GOES images, generated simultaneously by the spin-scan cameras of each of two geostationary satellites (SMS 1 and SMS2), separated by 32 degrees of longitude on February 1, 1975, were analyzed photogrametrically to yield cloud heights with a two-sigma uncertainty of 500 meters. These cloud heights compare favorably with heights of the same clouds measured by radar and IR methods. The same SMS image pairs were used to measure mountaintop heights with a mean deviation of 0.24 km from cartographic values.

  7. Design of diffractive optical surfaces within the SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Lopes, João.; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.

    2015-08-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method was initially developed as a design method in Nonimaging Optics and later, the method was extended for designing Imaging Optics. We present the extension of the SMS method to design diffractive optical surfaces. This method involves the simultaneous calculation of N/2 diffractive surfaces, using the phase-shift properties of diffractive surfaces as an extra degree of freedom, such that N one-parameter wavefronts can be perfectly coupled. Moreover, the SMS method for diffractive surfaces is a direct method, i.e., it is not based in multi-parametric optimization techniques. Representative diffractive systems designed by the SMS method are presented.

  8. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  9. SMS design review summary report: Preliminary, NASA approval pending, type 1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The minutes of Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) design review sessions are presented. Notes concerning design deficiencies of the SMS control panels are listed. The SMS power system, instructor/operator stations, and forward crew station are evalutated.

  10. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  11. Society News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stuart; Goward, Ken; Davenhall, Clive

    2005-03-01

    Council Meeting, February; The Antiquarian Astronomer; Joint WHS/SHA meeting in Bath, Saturday 5 March 2005; Future meetings; Spring conference and AGM; Summer picnic; Sir Robert Ball Library News; New SHA Library manual; Formal opening of the Sir Robert Ball Library; Visit to the ROE Library.

  12. What's News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2005-01-01

    News analysis and entertainment media is part of a media literacy that helps students access, analyze, evaluate and create messages using media in various forms. Media literacy is a key asset in a democracy as well as a bridge to reading comprehension, as skillful media use and script-reading activities can support the English acquisition skills,…

  13. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  14. Aquarius iPhone Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Joseph C., Jr.; Arca. Jeremy M.; Ko, Michael A.; Oks, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The Office of the CIO at JPL has developed an iPhone application for the Aquarius/SAC-D mission. The application includes specific information about the science and purpose of the Aquarius satellite and also features daily mission news updates pulled from sources at Goddard Space Flight Center as well as Twitter. The application includes a media and data tab section. The media section displays images from the observatory, viewing construction up to the launch and also includes various videos and recorded diaries from the Aquarius Project Manager. The data tab highlights many of the factors that affect the Earth s ocean and the water cycle. The application leverages the iPhone s accelerometer to move the Aquarius Satellite over the Earth, revealing these factors. Lastly, this application features a countdown timer to the satellite s launch, which is currently counting the days since launch. This application was highly successful in promoting the Aquarius Mission and educating the public about how ocean salinity is paramount to understanding the Earth.

  15. Frequency of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis and its association with SMS texting

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Maryam; Asim, Muhammad; Danish, Syed Hasan; Ahmad, Farah; Iqbal, Afsheen; Hasan, Syed Danish

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective: to assess the frequency of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis and its association with SMS texting. Method: a cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate students studying in different physical therapy schools of Karachi belonging to both public and private sectors. Sample size was 300 students which were selected through convenience sampling. Data was collected through self-administered questionnaire and severity of the pain was assessed through Universal Pain Assessment Tool and De Quervain’s tenosynovitis was diagnosed through Finkelstein test. Data entry and analysis were done using computer software SPSS version 20. Frequency and percentages were taken for categorical variable. Chi-square was applied to determine association between different variables and Finkelstein test. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: male/female ratio was 1:4. Regarding the use of cell phones, majority 165 (55%) were using regular cell phones, another 89 (30%) were using touch screen and 38 (13%) were using QWERTY key pads. Almost half of the students were frequently using cell phones for texting, out of them 132 (44%) texted less than 50 messages per day. Another 96 (32%) did texting between 50–100 texts. Out of 300 students who filled the questionnaire 125 (42%) students were experiencing pain in the thumb/wrist. Finkelstein test when done on students almost half (n=149) showed positive results. It was noted that as frequency of mobile phone usage increased progressively more and more people showed positive Finkelstein Test (p value 0.000). Conclusion: the result of the study concluded that almost half of the students use their mobile phones for texting more than 50 S.M.S per day and because of their mobile key pads and high speed of texting they experienced pain and weakness over the base of the thumb/wrist which shows the De Quervain’s positive in that students and there is a positive association between the thumb pain and frequent

  16. SMS/GOES WEFAX users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide both the WEFAX user and the APT user with the basic equipments necessary to convert present equipment to the new SMS WEFAX frequency. This conversion is simple and, as in all communication systems, can be accomplished by innumerable approaches. The approach used here assumed commercial purchase of components and integration by the user into his system. This conversion requires no modification to existing equipment and is simply an RF conversion from S-band to the present VHF frequencies.

  17. SMS instructor operator stations. CE1 Part 1: Detail specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The requirements for performance, design, test, and qualification of equipment identified as SMS Fixed and Moving Base Instructor-Operator-Observer Stations are identified. This specification is used to provide all hardware and wiring requirements necessary for these stations and to define their interface with other SMS specifications.

  18. SMS/GOES cell and battery data analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The nickel-cadmium battery design developed for the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) provided background and guidelines for future development, manufacture, and application of spacecraft batteries. SMS/GOES battery design, development, qualification testing, acceptance testing, and life testing/mission performance characteristics were evaluated for correlation with battery cell manufacturing process variables.

  19. Effect of Reinforcement of Oral Health Education Message through Short Messaging Service in Mobile Phones: A Quasi-Experimental Trial.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Harish C; Dodamani, Arun S; Karibasappa, G N; Naik, Rahul G; Khairnar, Mahesh R; Deshmukh, Manjiri A; Vishwakarma, Prashanth

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of reinforcement of oral health education message through short messaging service (SMS) in mobile phones. Material and Methods. 400 subjects from two colleges (200 from each college) belonging to 18-20 years age group possessing mobile phones were randomly selected and baseline examination of oral hygiene and gingival status was carried out using Oral Hygiene Index (OHI) and Gingival Index (GI). Oral health education was provided to all the subjects. Oral health education message was reinforced through short messaging service (SMS) in mobile phones for the subjects belonging to the intervention group. There was no such reinforcement for the control group. Follow-up examinations were done at the end of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 6th month. After the 3rd month, subjects of the intervention group did not receive oral health education message through short messaging service (SMS) and were followed up after next three months. Compiled data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 statistical software. Result. Mean OHI and GI scores in intervention group were significantly (p < 0.01) less than those of control group after the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th month. Conclusion. Reinforcement of oral health education message through short messaging service (SMS) is effective media to improve oral health. PMID:26941793

  20. Effect of Reinforcement of Oral Health Education Message through Short Messaging Service in Mobile Phones: A Quasi-Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Harish C.; Dodamani, Arun S.; Karibasappa, G. N.; Naik, Rahul G.; Khairnar, Mahesh R.; Deshmukh, Manjiri A.; Vishwakarma, Prashanth

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of reinforcement of oral health education message through short messaging service (SMS) in mobile phones. Material and Methods. 400 subjects from two colleges (200 from each college) belonging to 18–20 years age group possessing mobile phones were randomly selected and baseline examination of oral hygiene and gingival status was carried out using Oral Hygiene Index (OHI) and Gingival Index (GI). Oral health education was provided to all the subjects. Oral health education message was reinforced through short messaging service (SMS) in mobile phones for the subjects belonging to the intervention group. There was no such reinforcement for the control group. Follow-up examinations were done at the end of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 6th month. After the 3rd month, subjects of the intervention group did not receive oral health education message through short messaging service (SMS) and were followed up after next three months. Compiled data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 statistical software. Result. Mean OHI and GI scores in intervention group were significantly (p < 0.01) less than those of control group after the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th month. Conclusion. Reinforcement of oral health education message through short messaging service (SMS) is effective media to improve oral health. PMID:26941793

  1. Feedback on SMS reminders to encourage adherence among patients taking antipsychotic medication: a cross-sectional survey nested within a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Kannisto, Kati Anneli; Adams, Clive E; Koivunen, Marita; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore feedback on tailored SMS reminders to encourage medication adherence and outpatient treatment among patients taking antipsychotic medication, and associations related to the feedback. Design A cross-sectional survey nested within a nationwide randomised clinical trial (“Mobile.Net” ISRCTN27704027). Setting Psychiatric outpatient care in Finland. Participants Between September 2012 and December 2013, 403 of 558 adults with antipsychotic medication responded after 12 months of SMS intervention. Main outcome measure Feedback was gathered with a structured questionnaire based on Technology Acceptance Model theory. Data were analysed by Pearson's χ2 test, binary logistic regression and stepwise multiple regression analyses. Results Almost all participants (98%) found the SMS reminders easy to use and 87% felt that the SMS did not cause harm. About three-quarters (72%) were satisfied with the SMS received, and 61% found it useful. Divorced people were particularly prone to find SMS reminders useful (χ2=13.17, df=6, p=0.04), and people seeking employment were more often ‘fully satisfied’ with the SMS compared with other groups (χ2=10.82, df=4, p=0.029). People who were older at first contact with psychiatric services were more often ‘fully satisfied’ than younger groups (OR=1.02, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.04, p=0.007). Conclusions The feedback of patients taking antipsychotic medication on SMS services was generally positive. Overall, people were quite satisfied despite considerable variation in their sociodemographic background and illness history. Our results endorse that the use of simple easy-to-use existing technology, such as mobile phones and SMS, is acceptable in psychiatric outpatient services. Moreover, people using psychiatric outpatient services are able to use this technology. This acceptable and accessible technology can be easily tailored to each patient's needs and could be customised to the needs of the isolated or jobless

  2. Short text messages (SMS) as a reminder system for making working women from Delhi Breast Aware.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Anita

    2009-01-01

    A community based study was conducted with women employees in a private sector office of Delhi. A total of 106 women who volunteered to participate in the study were trained in the technique of breast self-examination (BSE) with the help of a lecture, video, demonstration of the technique on breast model by the investigator followed by feedback demonstration by the technique participants. Subsequently, short text messages (SMS) were sent according to the last menstrual period information collected. Women who did not menstruate were sent reminders on the first of every month. Statistical analysis was done using epinfo software. All the 106 participants owned a personal mobile number, while 89% had a private connection of cell phone and 11% had a connection provided by a government agency. Some 76 (71.7%) of the women had a regular menstrual period, 11 (10.3%) had an irregular menstrual period and 19(18%) had stopped menstruating either because of menopause, surgery or some medication. The delivery status of the SMS could be confirmed in majority of the instances. From amongst those who did not do the self exam the main barriers to BSE identified were that they forgot to do it and will do it now (54%), busy (47%), anxiety (12%), pain in the breasts (4%), and some question regarding the exam (4%). Multiple responses were included. After the first two months of sending reminder the practice of BSE increased significantly (p<0.05). PMID:19537904

  3. An SMS-based HIV/AIDS education and awareness model for rural areas in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Suwamaru, Joseph Kim

    2012-01-01

    Access to basic healthcare in many parts of Papua New Guinea (PNG) remains a challenge partly because the majority of the population is thinly scattered across a geographically rugged country. The major health problems in PNG pertain to malaria, tuberculosis and diarrheal diseases while HIV has reached epidemic levels. The proliferation of the mobile phone technology in PNG has been unprecedented since the introduction of competition in the sector in July 2007. Users in rural areas now access the mobile phone signal making it their preferred form of modern communications medium. This paper introduces an SMS-based HIV/AIDS education, awareness and information dissemination model for a predominantly rural-based PNG society. PMID:23138091

  4. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for SMS exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Murakami, Fumitoshi; Tsukahara, Hotoshi; Mizohata, Shigeharu

    2014-05-01

    The Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) survey is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by sea-surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because the VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed it for the SMS survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We have been developing the VCS survey system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of these surveys are from 100m up to 2100 m. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been also completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system is available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed a new approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In 2013, we have carried out the second VCS survey using the surface-towed high-voltage sparker and ocean bottom source in the Izena Cauldron, which is one of the most promising SMS areas around Japan. The positions of ocean bottom source estimated by this method are consistent with the VCS field records. The VCS data with the sparker have been processed with 3D PSTM. It gives the very high resolution 3D volume deeper than two

  5. Mobile Phones: The Next Step towards Healthcare Delivery in Rural India?

    PubMed Central

    DeSouza, Sherwin I.; Rashmi, M. R.; Vasanthi, Agalya P.; Joseph, Suchitha Maria; Rodrigues, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the ubiquity of mobile phones, their use to support healthcare in the Indian context is inevitable. It is however necessary to assess end-user perceptions regarding mobile health interventions especially in the rural Indian context prior to its use in healthcare. This would contextualize the use of mobile phone communication for health to 70% of the country's population that resides in rural India. Objectives To explore the acceptability of delivering healthcare interventions through mobile phones among users in a village in rural Bangalore. Methods This was an exploratory study of 488 mobile phone users, residing in a village, near Bangalore city, Karnataka, South India. A pretested, translated, interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to obtain data on mobile phone usage patterns and acceptability of the mobile phone, as a tool for health-related communication. The data is described using basic statistical measures. Results The primary use of mobile phones was to make or receive phone calls (100%). Text messaging (SMS) was used by only 70 (14%) of the respondents. Most of the respondents, 484 (99%), were willing to receive health-related information on their mobile phones and did not consider receiving such information, an intrusion into their personal life. While receiving reminders for drug adherence was acceptable to most 479 (98%) of our respondents, 424 (89%) preferred voice calls alone to other forms of communication. Nearly all were willing to use their mobile phones to communicate with health personnel in emergencies and 367 (75%) were willing to consult a doctor via the phone in an acute illness. Factors such as sex, English literacy, employment status, and presence of chronic disease affected preferences regarding mode and content of communication. Conclusion The mobile phone, as a tool for receiving health information and supporting healthcare through mHealth interventions was acceptable in the rural Indian context. PMID

  6. IM and SMS for the Circulation Desk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2012-01-01

    It's been well documented in a number of articles regarding the contemporary library patron that with the rise in mobile computing and smart phone technology, patrons are looking for fast and easy service from whichever technological avenue they are using to access library services. Libraries are responding with increasing numbers of online…

  7. Are Tones Phones?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Denis; Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Chris; Ciocca, Valter; Schoknecht, Colin; Kasisopa, Benjawan; Luksaneeyanawin, Sudaporn

    2011-01-01

    The psycholinguistic status of lexical tones and phones is indexed via phonological and tonological awareness (PA and TA, respectively) using Thai speech. In Experiment 1 (Thai participants, alphabetic script and orthographically explicit phones/tones), PA was better than TA in children and primary school-educated adults, and TA improved to PA…

  8. Cell Phones for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, James H.; Hagevik, Rita A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell phones are fast becoming an integral part of students' everyday lives. They are regarded as important companions and tools for personal expression. School-age children are integrating the cell phone as such, and thus placing a high value on them. Educators endeavor to instill in students a high value for education, but often meet with…

  9. Cell phone explosion.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Alok; Kanchan, Tanuj; Nepal, Samata; Pandey, Bhuwan Raj

    2016-03-01

    Cell phone explosions and resultant burn injuries are rarely reported in the scientific literature. We report a case of cell phone explosion that occurred when a young male was listening to music while the mobile was plugged in for charging. PMID:26427492

  10. Researching Television News Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Frances Goins

    To demonstrate the uses and efficiency of major television news archives, a study was conducted to describe major archival programs and to compare the Vanderbilt University Television News Archives and the CBS News Index. Network coverage of an annual news event, the 1983 State of the Union address, is traced through entries in both. The findings…

  11. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  12. Astronauts Crippen and Payload specialist Garneau in front of SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Robert Crippen, left, crew commander, and Payload Specialist Marc Garneau stand in front of the Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) in the mockup and integration laboratory during a press conference prior to their STS 41-G mission.

  13. Stereographic cloud heights from imagery of SMS/GOES satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.; Shenk, W. E.; Teagle, R. D.; Steranka, J.

    1978-01-01

    Stereographic pairs of SMS/GOES images, generated simultaneously by the spin-scan cameras of each of two geostationary satellites (SMS 1 and SMS 2, separated by 32 degrees of longitude on February 17, 1975), have been analyzed photogrammetrically to yield cloud heights with a two-sigma uncertainty of 500 meters. The 32-degree angle between the image plane of the two satellites, plus the distortions involved in transferring the image of a nearly full hemisphere of the earth onto a plane, required the development of a special instrument to permit stereographic compilation. Cloud heights measured stereographically compared favorably with heights of the same clouds measured by radar and IR methods. The same SMS image pairs were used to measure mountain-top heights with a mean deviation of 0.24 km from cartographic values.

  14. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Helge H. Wehmeier, President and Chief Executive Office of Bayer Corporation, is the recipient of the 2001 Leadership in Education Award from the Keystone Center. Wehmeier was cited for his support in spearheading ongoing education and volunteer efforts such as Bayer's Making Science Make Sense program, which, in partnership with NSF, advances science literacy through hands-on, inquiry-based science learning.

    You are invited to send contributions to the News & Announcements column. They should be sent to Elizabeth A. Moore, Associate Editor, by email or by mail at Journal of Chemical Education, 209 N. Brooks St., Madison, WI 53715-1116. Contributions should be concise, to the point, and appropriate for the Journal's audience. They may be edited for clarity, timeliness, appropriateness, or length.

  15. Not 2 old 2 TXT: there is potential to use email and SMS text message healthcare reminders for rheumatology patients up to 65 years old.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Lyndsay D; Done, John; Young, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Short message service (SMS) and email reminders have the potential to improve adherence to appointments and medication taking. Within the UK, information and communication technology (ICT) is widely used with a very high proportion of people having access to the internet and mobile phones. Little is known about ICT use by older adults and those with chronic illness. A feasibility survey was carried out with 112 rheumatology patients in Hertfordshire, UK to determine their current use of the internet, email and SMS and their willingness to receive electronic reminders in the future. A high proportion of patients up to age 65 are successfully using ICT despite older age or functional disability caused by rheumatic disease. Forty-four percent would be willing to receive an electronic appointment reminder and 25% a medication reminder. The results suggest that reminders would be welcomed by some patients and extensive patient training would not be needed before implementation. PMID:22193827

  16. Mobile phone text messaging and Telephone follow-up in type 2 diabetic patients for 3 months: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate and to compare the effectiveness of a nurse short message service (SMS) by cellular phone and telephone follow-up by nurse on Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Methods Semi experimental study consisted of 77 patients with type 2 diabetes that randomly assigned to two groups: telephone follow-up (n = 39) and short message service (n = 38). Telephone interventions were applied by researcher for 3 months. SMS group that received message daily for 12 weeks. Data gathering instrument include data sheet to record HbA1c and questionnaire that consisted of demographic characteristics. Data gathering was performed at two points: initial the study and after 12 weeks. Data analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics methods with SPSS version 11.5. Results Demographic variables were compared and all of them were homogenous. Results of this study showed that both interventions had significant mean changes in HbA1c; for the telephone group (p = 0.001), with a mean change of −0.93% and for the SMS group (p = 0.001), with a mean change of −1.01%. Conclusion Finding of this research showed that intervention using SMS via cellular phone and nurse-led-telephone follow up improved HbA1c for three months in type 2 diabetic patients and it can consider as alternative methods for diabetes control. PMID:23497735

  17. Short message service (SMS)-based intervention to improve treatment adherence among HIV-positive youth in Uganda: focus group findings.

    PubMed

    Rana, Yashodhara; Haberer, Jessica; Huang, Haijing; Kambugu, Andrew; Mukasa, Barbara; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Wabukala, Peter; Wagner, Glenn J; Linnemayr, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the first qualitative studies to discuss programmatic barriers to SMS-based interventions for HIV-positive youth and discusses pathways through which youth perceive them to work. We conducted six focus groups with 20 male and 19 female HIV-positive youths in two clinics in Kampala, Uganda. We find that youth commonly use SMS as over 90% of this study's youths knew how to read, write and send messages and almost three-fourths of them had phones. Youth strongly felt that the success of this intervention hinged on ensuring confidentiality about their HIV-positive status. Key programmatic challenges discussed where restrictions on phone use and phone sharing that could exclude some youth. Participants felt that the intervention would improve their adherence by providing them with needed reminders and social support. Youths' suggestions about intervention logistics related to content, frequency, timing and two-way messages will be helpful to practitioners in the field. PMID:25881059

  18. Short Message Service (SMS)-Based Intervention to Improve Treatment Adherence among HIV-Positive Youth in Uganda: Focus Group Findings

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Yashodhara; Haberer, Jessica; Huang, Haijing; Kambugu, Andrew; Mukasa, Barbara; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Wabukala, Peter; Wagner, Glenn J.; Linnemayr, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the first qualitative studies to discuss programmatic barriers to SMS-based interventions for HIV-positive youth and discusses pathways through which youth perceive them to work. We conducted six focus groups with 20 male and 19 female HIV-positive youths in two clinics in Kampala, Uganda. We find that youth commonly use SMS as over 90% of this study’s youths knew how to read, write and send messages and almost three-fourths of them had phones. Youth strongly felt that the success of this intervention hinged on ensuring confidentiality about their HIV-positive status. Key programmatic challenges discussed where restrictions on phone use and phone sharing that could exclude some youth. Participants felt that the intervention would improve their adherence by providing them with needed reminders and social support. Youths’ suggestions about intervention logistics related to content, frequency, timing and two-way messages will be helpful to practitioners in the field. PMID:25881059

  19. Mobile phone text messaging for promoting adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile phone text messaging (SMS) has the potential to promote adherence to tuberculosis treatment. This systematic review aims to synthesize current evidence on the effectiveness of SMS interventions in improving patients’ adherence to tuberculosis treatment. Methods We searched electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index), reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings, and selected websites for eligible studies available by 15 February 2013; regardless of language or publication status. Two authors independently screened selected eligible studies, and assessed risk of bias in included studies; resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus. Results We identified four studies that compared the outcomes of the SMS intervention group with controls. Only one of the four studies was a randomized controlled trial. This was conducted in Argentina and the SMS intervention did not significantly improve adherence to tuberculosis treatment compared to self-administration of tuberculosis treatment (risk ratio [RR] 1.49, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.90 to 2.42). One of the non-randomized studies, conducted in South Africa, which compared SMS reminders to directly observed therapy short course (DOTS) reported similar rates of tuberculosis cure (62.35% vs. 66.4%) and treatment success (72.94% vs. 69.4%). A second study from South Africa, utilized SMS reminders when patients delayed in opening their pill bottles and reported increased tuberculosis cure (RR 2.32, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.36) and smear conversion (RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.42) rates compared to DOTS. In the third non-randomized study, conducted in Kenya, use of SMS reminders increased rates of clinic attendance on scheduled days compared to standard care (RR 1.56, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.29). Using the GRADE approach, we rate the quality of the evidence as low, mainly because of the high risk of bias and heterogeneity of effects across studies. Conclusions This systematic

  20. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... Workshop NCI Annual Fact Book NCI Visuals Online Social Media @NCIMedia NCI YouTube Subscribe to NCI News Releases ... posts Subscribe Events Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 ...

  1. Astronaut Eileen Collins during phone interview with news media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, pilot for the STS-63 mission, participates in a telephone interview with an out of town media representative after having been announced as the pilot on NASA's STS-63 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery.

  2. News: A Consumer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doig, Ivan; Doig, Carol

    A guide to news media, this book describes how to tell when a report is biased; provides tips on spotting hoaxes and public relations ploys in the news; gives standards to judge expert opinion and reliable sources; lists critics and other sources of help for the news consumer; discusses the endless contest among politicians, newsmen, and…

  3. Real Time Recognition of Heart Attack in a Smart Phone

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Mahshid Zomorodi; Ghuchani, Saeed Rahati; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Khalilzadeh, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many countries, including our own, cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity. Myocardial infarction (heart attack) is of particular importance in heart disease as well as time and type of reaction to acute myocardial infarction and these can be a determining factor in patients’ outcome. Methods: In order to reduce physician attendance time and keep patients informed about their condition, the smart phone as a common communication device has been used to process data and determine patients’ ECG signals. For ECG signal analysis, we used time domain methods for extracting the ST-segment as the most important feature of the signal to detect myocardial infarction and the thresholding methods and linear classifiers by LabVIEW Mobile Module were used to determine signal risk. Results: The sensitivity and specificity as criteria to evaluate the algorithm were 98% and 93.3% respectively in real time. Conclusions: This algorithm, because of the low computational load and high speed, makes it possible to run in a smart phone. Using Bluetooth to send the data from a portable monitoring system to a smart phone facilitates the real time applications. By using this program on the patient’s mobile, timely detection of infarction so to inform patients is possible and mobile services such as SMS and calling for a physician’s consultation can be done. PMID:26236081

  4. A simultaneous strain and temperature sensing module based on FBG-in-SMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dawei; Chai, Quan; Liu, Yanlei; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Jiangzhong; Sun, Weimin; Yuan, Libo; Canning, John; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2014-05-01

    We propose a compact multi-parameter fibre sensing module based on a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) in single-multi-single mode fibre structure (FBG-in-SMS). We experimentally demonstrated that the FBG-in-SMS can measure temperature and strain simultaneously. In addition, we found that the process of writing FBG in SMS could be an effective technique for tuning and optimizing SMS spectrum for sensing.

  5. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Aspirin Prize for Solidarity through Chemistry has been awarded to K. C. Nicolaou of Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, and the University of California, San Diego. The prize honors Nicolaou for his creativity in the synthesis of natural products and for his development of innovative synthetic methods. Nicolaou and his colleagues E. J. Sorensen and N. Winssinger contributed an overview of this area of chemistry to the Journal in their Viewpoints article, "The Art and Science of Organic and Natural Products Synthesis", J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1225. The award commemorates the centenary of the first synthesis of a pure and stable form of acetylsalicylic acid, the active ingredient of aspirin. Awarded every two years, the Aspirin Prize is sponsored by Química Farmacéutica Bayer S.A. (Barcelona) and includes a monetary award of 20,000. Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities Travel Awards, ACS Women Chemists Committee Women Chemists Committee of the American Chemical Society is calling for applications for travel awards for post-doctoral, graduate, and undergraduate women to make their first research presentation at a national meeting sponsored by Eli Lilly & Co. For more information and an application form, contact your department chair; http://www.tamug.tamu.edu/ascwcc; or Cheryl Brown, ACS, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036; phone: 800/227-5558 ext. 6022; email c_brown@acs.org. The deadline for receipt of applications for meetings between January 1 and June 30, 2000, is October 15, 1999; for meetings between July 1 and December 31, 2000, the deadline is March 15, 2000. Call for Symposia, Papers, Workshops: 16th BCCE The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held July 30­August 3, 2000, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The conference Web site at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce is ready to accept proposals for symposia, papers, posters, and workshops. Or proposals may be submitted in writing to the Program Chair, Brian Coppola

  6. JSC Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) visual system payload bay video image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This space shuttle orbiter payload bay (PLB) video image is used in JSC's Fixed Based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). The image is projected inside the FB-SMS crew compartment during mission simulation training. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  7. SMS-Based Learning in Tertiary Education: Achievement and Attitudinal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Yaacov J.

    2013-01-01

    SMS delivery platforms are being increasingly used at the university level to enhance student achievement as well as traits and attitudes related to the learning process. SMS delivery provides access to learning materials without being limited by space or time and sophisticated technological advances in SMS delivery have led to enhanced learner…

  8. Students' Experiences and Engagement with SMS for Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an evaluation of students' experiences and engagement with Short Message Service (SMS) (text) messages. SMS was used to support learning through engaging students in formative assessment objective questions with feedback, as well as SMS-based collaborative learning tasks. The rationale was derived from a perceived benefit of…

  9. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  10. Cell Phone RF Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2015-04-01

    In a recent article in Physics Today, Meredith and Redish emphasized the need to make introductory physics courses beneficial for life sciences majors.1 In this study, a lab activity is proposed to measure the intensity of electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones and connect these measurements to various standards, biological topics, and personal health.

  11. Cell Phones for Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.; Wighting, Mervyn J.

    2010-01-01

    Although in some schools cell phones have to be turned off or perhaps kept in lockers to avoid misuse, the authors hope to demonstrate in this article how they can be used under supervision to assist learning. This ubiquitous device can be a powerful classroom tool. (Contains 2 figures.)

  12. Cell Phone RF Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article in "Physics Today," Meredith and Redish emphasized the need to make introductory physics courses beneficial for life sciences majors. In this study, a lab activity is proposed to measure the intensity of electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones and connect these measurements to various standards, biological…

  13. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  14. An SMS-based System Architecture (Logical Model) to Support Management of Information Exchange in Emergency Stuations. poLINT-112-SMS PROJECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetulani, Zygmunt; Marciniak, Jacek; Konieczka, Pawel; Walkowska, Justyna

    In the paper we present the architecture of the POLINT-112-SMS system to support information management in emergency situations. The system interprets the text input in form of SMS messages, understands and interprets information provided by the human user. It is supposed to assist a human in taking decisions. The main modules of the system presented here are the following: the SMS gate, the NLP Module (processing Polish), the Situation Analysis Module (SAM) and the Dialogue Maintenance Module (DMM).

  15. Integrating Mobile Phones into Medical Abortion Provision: Intervention Development, Use, and Lessons Learned From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Constant, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical abortion is legal in South Africa but access and acceptability are hampered by the current protocol requiring a follow-up visit to assess abortion completion. Objective To assess the feasibility and efficacy of information and follow-up provided via mobile phone after medical abortion in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods Mobile phones were used in three ways in the study: (1) coaching women through medical abortion using short message service (SMS; text messages); (2) a questionnaire to assess abortion completion via unstructured supplementary service data (USSD, a protocol used by GSM mobile telephones that allows the user to interact with a server via text-based menus) and the South African mobile instant message and social networking application Mxit; and (3) family planning information via SMS, mobisite and Mxit. A needs and context assessment was done to learn about women’s experiences undergoing medical abortion and their use of mobile phones. After development, the mobile interventions were piloted. Recruitment was done by field workers at the clinics. In the RCT, women were interviewed at baseline and exit. Computer logs were also analyzed. All study participants received standard of care at the clinics. Results In the RCT, 234 women were randomized to the intervention group. Eight did not receive the intervention due to invalid numbers, mis-registration, system failure, or opt-out, leaving 226 participants receiving the full intervention. Of the 226, 190 returned and were interviewed at their clinic follow-up visit. The SMSs were highly acceptable, with 97.9% (186/190) saying that the SMSs helped them through the medical abortion. In terms of mobile phone privacy, 86.3% (202/234) said that it was not likely or possible that someone would see SMSs on their phone, although at exit, 20% (38/190) indicated that they had worried about phone privacy. Having been given training at baseline and subsequently asked via SMS to complete

  16. A Taxonomic Integrative Review of Short Message Service (SMS) Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To acquire self-management skills that affect clinical outcomes, collaboration and communication with one’s health care team is essential, yet many health care systems are not designed adequately to be responsive to a patient’s efforts to self-manage. This review synthesizes the intervention methodology of current studies facilitating the efforts of health care providers who wish to design, develop, and implement evidence-based SMS programs for patients with diabetes, focusing on clinical outcomes of A1C values, medication adherence rates, and participant satisfaction. Methods: This integrative review was conducted using an integrative taxonomic analysis approach. This approach involves creating a classification system with domains or characteristics, defining the relationships between those domains, and creating a foundation for new theories or constructs. Results: Synthesis of the evidence included in this integrated review suggests the best design for a SMS diabetes management program aimed at improving A1C levels, medication adherence rates, and participant satisfaction is an intervention providing weekly SMS education, with 2-way message direction, that is 3 months in length. Conclusions: The studies in this review have demonstrated that SMS interventions can be an important part of a viable and effective program in the effort to better manage adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25934517

  17. New generation of the health monitoring system SMS 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Rolf-Dietrich; Schwesinger, Peter

    2001-08-01

    The Structure Monitoring System SMS 2001 (applied for patent) represents a modular structured multi-component measurement devise for use under outdoor conditions. Besides usual continuously (static) measurements of e.g. environmental parameters and structure related responses the SMS is able to register also short term dynamic events automatically with measurement frequencies up to 1 kHz. A larger range of electrical sensors is able to be used. On demand a solar based power supply can be realized. The SMS 2001 is adaptable in a wide range, it is space-saving in its geometric structure and can meet very various demands of the users. The system is applicable preferably for small and medium sized concrete and steel structures (besides buildings and bridges also for special cases). It is suitable to support the efficient concept of a controlled life time extension especially in the case of pre-damaged structures. The interactive communication between SMS and the central office is completely remote controlled. Two point or multi-point connections using the internet can be realized. The measurement data are stored in a central data bank. A safe access supported by software modules can be organized in different levels, e.g. for scientific evaluation, service reasons or needs of authorities.

  18. "Good News" Tune Makes Discussion of "Bad News" Sing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    1984-01-01

    Recommends playing Anne Murray's recording of "A Little Good News" to promote discussion about the nature of news and Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billy Joe" for discussion on writing news stories about suicides. (CRH)

  19. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  20. Short message service (SMS) interventions for the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, the incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STI) is rising, posing a challenge to its control and appropriate management. Text messaging has become the most common mode of communication among almost six billion mobile phone users worldwide. Text messaging can be used to remind patients about clinic appointments, to notify patients that it is time for STI re-testing, and to facilitate patient communication with their health professionals with any questions and concerns they may have about their sexual health. While there are a handful of systematic reviews published on short message service (SMS) interventions in a variety of health settings and issues, none are related to sexual health. We plan to conduct a systematic review to examine the impact text messaging might have on interventions for the prevention and care of patients with STIs. Methods/Design Eligible studies will include both quantitative and qualitative studies published after 1995 that discuss the efficacy and effectiveness of SMS interventions for STI prevention and management using text messaging. Data will be abstracted independently by two reviewers using a standardized pre-tested data abstraction form. Inter-rater reliability scores will be obtained to ensure consistency in the inclusion and data extraction of studies. Heterogeneity will be assessed using the I2 test and subgroup analyses. A nonhypothesis driven inductive reasoning approach as well as a coding framework will be applied to analyze qualitative studies. A meta-analysis may be conducted if sufficient quantitative studies are found using similar outcomes. Discussion For this protocol, we identified ten related systematic reviews. The reviews were limited to a particular disease or setting, were not exclusive to SMS interventions, or were out of date. This systematic review will be the first comprehensive examination of studies that discuss the effectiveness of SMS on multiple outcomes that relate to STI

  1. SMS messages increase adherence to rapid diagnostic test results among malaria patients: results from a pilot study in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization now recommends parasitological confirmation for malaria case management. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are an accurate and simple diagnostic to confirm parasite presence in blood. However, where they have been deployed, adherence to RDT results has been poor, especially when the test result is negative. Few studies have examined adherence to RDTs distributed or purchased through the private sector. Methods The Rapid Examination of Malaria and Evaluation of Diagnostic Information (REMEDI) study assessed the acceptability of and adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care from private sector drug retailers in two cities in Oyo State in south-west Nigeria. In total, 465 adult participants were enrolled upon exit from a participating drug shop having purchased anti-malaria drugs for themselves. Participants were given a free RDT and the appropriate treatment advice based on their RDT result. Short Message Service (SMS) text messages reiterating the treatment advice were sent to a randomly selected half of the participants one day after being tested. Participants were contacted via phone four days after the RDT was conducted to assess adherence to the RDT information and treatment advice. Results Adherence to RDT results was 14.3 percentage points (P-val <0.001) higher in the treatment group who were sent the SMS. The higher adherence in the treatment group was robust to several specification tests and the estimated difference in adherence ranged from 9.7 to 16.1 percentage points. Further, the higher adherence to the treatment advice was specific to the treatment advice for anti-malarial drugs and not other drugs purchased to treat malaria symptoms in the RDT-negative participants who bought both anti-malarial and symptom drugs. There was no difference in adherence for the RDT-positive participants who were sent the SMS. Conclusions SMS text messages substantially increased adherence to RDT results for

  2. Attitudes towards SMS text message smoking cessation support: a qualitative study of pregnant smokers.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Felix; Jamison, James; Sutton, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    SMS text messaging shows promise for delivering smoking cessation support. However, little is known about smokers' feelings towards receiving behavioural advice and support on their mobile phones. This article explores the attitudes of women with experience of prenatal smoking towards receiving pregnancy-related smoking cessation support by text message. Data collected by semi-structured interviews and focus group from women who received either tailored smoking cessation texts or no text support (N = 33) were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: convenience, high expectations and perceived source. Texting was regarded as a highly convenient mode of support delivery leading to high levels of attention to messages, although high convenience sometimes resulted in the value of a text being short-lived. Many who did not receive texts had high expectations for text support to intervene with routine smoking behaviour in real time. Those who received texts (with no real-time intervention element), however, felt they were helpful and supportive. Participants discussed how factors relating to perceived source, including personalization, personal relevance and salience of text automatization, could affect message attention and impact. Our findings provide insight into how maximizing personalization and personal relevance can increase the value of text message support and reduce the risk of disengagement. PMID:23640985

  3. Hypertensive patients’ readiness to use of mobile phones and other information technological modes for improving their compliance to doctors’ advice in Karachi

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mirza Izhar; S. Naqvi, Baqir; Ahmed, Iqbal; Ali, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the use of information technology (IT) & electronic media for improving compliance rate to doctors’ advice in hypertensive patients in Karachi. Methods: Total 400 persons (200 males & 200 females) were randomly selected in six districts of Karachi. Data was collected through a pretested questionnaire. Following was sample criteria: age above 15 years, living in Karachi and ambulatory. Persons admitted in a hospital, individuals who were doing some physical activity during survey e.g. exercise, labor work etc., individual in stressed condition, non-cooperative individuals – not willing to get BP checked and fill questionnaire, and pregnant women were excluded. Those who did not sign the consent form were also excluded. SPSS was used for data analysis and descriptive statistics was employed for sensitivity analysis. Results: For healthcare awareness, people look for health programs on radio and TV channels. Short Message Service (SMS) and phone are highly appreciated by patients for reminders. To increase compliance to doctors’ advice, less educated people prefer phone calls over SMS whereas educated individuals favor SMS. Although price of medicine has not emerged as a major contributing factor for non-compliance, discount on medicinal products is highly appreciated by the patients. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is a widespread awareness of high blood pressure in the sample population of Karachi e.g. 72.5%. People consider reminder message system i.e. Calls and Short Messaging Service (SMS) would help them in improving compliance to doctors’ advice. PMID:25878606

  4. Can mobile phone messages to drug sellers improve treatment of childhood diarrhoea?--A randomized controlled trial in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Willa; Woodman, Benjamin; Chatterji, Minki

    2015-03-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) and zinc are the recommended treatment in developing countries for the management of uncomplicated diarrhoea in children under five (World Health Organization and UNICEF 2004). However, drug sellers often recommend costly and unnecessary treatments instead. This article reports findings from an experiment to encourage licensed chemical sellers (LCS) in Ghana to recommend ORS and zinc for the management of childhood diarrhoea. The intervention consisted of mobile phone text messages (Short Message Service or SMS) sent to a randomly assigned group of LCS who had been trained on the diarrhoea management protocols recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The SMS campaign comprised informational messages and interactive quizzes sent over an 8-week period. The study measured the impact of the SMS messages on both reported and actual practices. Analysis of data from both face-to-face interviews and mystery client visits shows that the SMS intervention improved providers' self-reported practices but not their actual practices. The study also finds that actual practices deviate substantially from reported practices. PMID:25759456

  5. With News Search Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  6. [Cardiology online: impact and pitfalls of Internet medical news].

    PubMed

    Wood, Shelley M; Topol, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the main sources for physicians seeking information on new procedures, drugs, or devices were meetings and medical journals. The dawn of the Internet radically transformed how news and information is delivered and absorbed, beginning with the launch of online journals back in the mid-1990s. A decade and a half later, physicians can learn about new innovations the moment they are made public, and they can get that news from their phones and tablets, their Twitter or Facebook accounts, or via their favorite blog or medical news web site. Along with the clear advantages of accessing new medical information any time of day comes the need for physicians to be aware of the pitfalls of online medical content and to have a heightened sense of responsibility when it comes to integrating information gleaned online into their medical practices. PMID:22322467

  7. The HAART cell phone adherence trial (WelTel Kenya1): a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Richard T; Mills, Edward J; Kariri, Antony; Ritvo, Paul; Chung, Michael; Jack, William; Habyarimana, James; Karanja, Sarah; Barasa, Samson; Nguti, Rosemary; Estambale, Benson; Ngugi, Elizabeth; Ball, T Blake; Thabane, Lehana; Kimani, Joshua; Gelmon, Lawrence; Ackers, Marta; Plummer, Francis A

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives are to compare the effectiveness of cell phone-supported SMS messaging to standard care on adherence, quality of life, retention, and mortality in a population receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nairobi, Kenya. Methods and Design A multi-site randomized controlled open-label trial. A central randomization centre provided opaque envelopes to allocate treatments. Patients initiating ART at three comprehensive care clinics in Kenya will be randomized to receive either a structured weekly SMS ('short message system' or text message) slogan (the intervention) or current standard of care support mechanisms alone (the control). Our hypothesis is that using a structured mobile phone protocol to keep in touch with patients will improve adherence to ART and other patient outcomes. Participants are evaluated at baseline, and then at six and twelve months after initiating ART. The care providers keep a weekly study log of all phone based communications with study participants. Primary outcomes are self-reported adherence to ART and suppression of HIV viral load at twelve months scheduled follow-up. Secondary outcomes are improvements in health, quality of life, social and economic factors, and retention on ART. Primary analysis is by 'intention-to-treat'. Sensitivity analysis will be used to assess per-protocol effects. Analysis of covariates will be undertaken to determine factors that contribute or deter from expected and determined outcomes. Discussion This study protocol tests whether a novel structured mobile phone intervention can positively contribute to ART management in a resource-limited setting. Trial Registration Trial Registration Number: NCT00830622 PMID:19772596

  8. No Phone Zone: Controlling Cell Phone Use in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Shelley; Master, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey of cell phone policies in university libraries conducted over a three-month period in 2005. The authors sought information about the libraries' problems regarding cell phone use and attendant noise by students and other library users. The authors began with an 18-question survey of one hundred…

  9. STS-30 crewmembers pose for informal portrait on JSC FB-SMS middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers pause briefly from their training schedule to pose for informal portrait in JSC fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). On FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Commander David M. Walker, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee, MS Mary L. Cleave, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, and MS Norman E. Thagard. FB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  10. The Origins of Borrowed News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    A study was conducted to assess the indications in print of news borrowing (reporting news distributed by second hand or government controlled sources) in the 1970s, and to examine the relationship between borrowed news and the restrictions and reductions in newspapers' overseas news staff. The "New York Times" and the "Chicago Tribune" were…

  11. It is good news that health journalism is striving to improve.

    PubMed

    2011-08-10

    To say that journalism is getting a bad press would be a major understatement. Practices exposed at the late News of the World may not be common, but just as stories of bad nursing cause widespread fear for patients, the phone hacking scandal taints every part of this industry. PMID:27316805

  12. Mobile Phone Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  13. Water Power Program News

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-19

    News stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Wind and Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

  14. National PKU News

    MedlinePlus

    ... and History Staff & Board How Much Phe Guthrie-Koch Scholarship Books Resources Support Us Contact Us Donors ... new Amino Acid Analysis Results This Year’s Guthrie-Koch PKU Scholarship Winners © 2016 National PKU News

  15. In the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Lauren

    2000-01-01

    A board member in an Iowa district explains the importance of presenting 4-minute summaries of educational news and trends at board meetings. In choosing items for presentation, she considers relevance, context, perspective, terminology, awareness, and national political developments. (MLH)

  16. Turning News into Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  17. Understanding Health News

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z Know the Science: The Facts About Health News Stories Understanding Health ... only on animals without explaining that such basic science may have little immediate significance to people. For ...

  18. The psychometric properties of cellular phone dependency questionnaire in students of Isfahan: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Jannatifard, Fereshte; Ojaghi, Rezvan; Rezapour, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: A number of diagnostic scales or questionnaires have been developed in recent years, to assess mobile phone dependency. A valid and reliable assessment instrument for correspondence of Iranian culture is essential. The aim of our study is to validate the Iranian version of the Cell Phone Dependency Questionnaire (CPDQ). Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from 784 students, who were studying in four main Isfahan Universities. The participants completed the demographic questionnaire, CPDQ, anonymously. To analyze the data we used concurrent validity, factor analysis, internal consistency, split-half, and test–retest. Results: We extracted three factors including Salience, Overusing of the cell phone, compulsive use of SMS. Cronbach's alpha of the CPDQ was. 88 (Cronbach's alpha of the factors were 0.85, 0.70, and 0.76, respectively). Conclusion: The CPDQ proved to be a reliable questionnaire to assess the extent of problems caused by the ‘misuse’ of the cell phone in Iranian society. PMID:25077164

  19. A forecasting method to reduce estimation bias in self-reported cell phone data.

    PubMed

    Redmayne, Mary; Smith, Euan; Abramson, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    There is ongoing concern that extended exposure to cell phone electromagnetic radiation could be related to an increased risk of negative health effects. Epidemiological studies seek to assess this risk, usually relying on participants' recalled use, but recall is notoriously poor. Our objectives were primarily to produce a forecast method, for use by such studies, to reduce estimation bias in the recalled extent of cell phone use. The method we developed, using Bayes' rule, is modelled with data we collected in a cross-sectional cluster survey exploring cell phone user-habits among New Zealand adolescents. Participants recalled their recent extent of SMS-texting and retrieved from their provider the current month's actual use-to-date. Actual use was taken as the gold standard in the analyses. Estimation bias arose from a large random error, as observed in all cell phone validation studies. We demonstrate that this seriously exaggerates upper-end forecasts of use when used in regression models. This means that calculations using a regression model will lead to underestimation of heavy-users' relative risk. Our Bayesian method substantially reduces estimation bias. In cases where other studies' data conforms to our method's requirements, application should reduce estimation bias, leading to a more accurate relative risk calculation for mid-to-heavy users. PMID:22805984

  20. Text or talk? Social anxiety, loneliness, and divergent preferences for cell phone use.

    PubMed

    Reid, Donna J; Reid, Fraser J M

    2007-06-01

    This paper investigates whether social anxiety and loneliness lead to contrasting beliefs and preferences among cell phone users towards texting and talking on their cell phones. Three hypotheses are examined: (1) that social anxiety and loneliness are differentially associated with generalized preferences either for texting or for talking on the cell phone, (2) that these preferences are linked to contrasting beliefs concerning the social functionality of the short message service (SMS), and (3) that these divergent beliefs mediate the effects of social anxiety and loneliness on cell phone users' generalized preferences for texting or talking. Results from an Internet questionnaire (N=158) showed that, whilst lonely participants preferred making voice calls and rated texting as a less intimate method of contact, anxious participants preferred to text, and rated it a superior medium for expressive and intimate contact. These divergent beliefs accounted for 36% and 16% of the variance in preference for texting and voice calls, respectively, and significantly attenuated the influence of loneliness and social anxiety when they were added to the regression equations for these measures. Results are discussed in terms of the hyperpersonal possibilities of mobile communications technologies. PMID:17594267

  1. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  2. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  3. Three-dimensional Camera Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2004-12-01

    An inexpensive technique for realizing a three-dimensional (3D) camera phone display is presented. Light from the liquid-crystal screen of a camera phone is linearly polarized, and its direction of polarization is easily manipulated by a cellophane sheet used as a half-waveplate. The novel 3D camera phone display is made possible solely by optical components without resorting to computation, so that the 3D image is displayed in real time. Quality of the original image is not sacrificed in the process of converting it into a 3D image.

  4. Feasibility and acceptability of mobile phone short message service as a support for patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Zhang, Wendy; Nyonyitono, Maureen; Lourenco, Lillian; Nanfuka, Mastula; Okoboi, Stephen; Birungi, Josephine; Lester, Richard T; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Munderi, Paula; Moore, David M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mobile phone technologies have been promoted to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We studied the receptiveness of patients in a rural Ugandan setting to the use of short messaging service (SMS) communication for such purposes. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis measuring mobile phone ownership and literacy amongst patients of The AIDS Support Organisation (TASO) in Jinja, Uganda. We performed bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine associations between explanatory variables and a composite outcome of being literate and having a mobile phone. Results From June 2012 to August 2013, we enrolled 895 participants, of whom 684 (76%) were female. The median age was 44 years. A total of 576 (63%) were both literate and mobile phone users. Of these, 91% (527/ 576) responded favourably to the potential use of SMS for health communication, while only 38.9% (124/319) of others were favourable to the idea (p<0.001). A lower proportion of literate mobile phone users reported optimal adherence to ART (86.4% vs. 90.6%; p=0.007). Male participants (AOR=2.81; 95% CI 1.83–4.30), sub-optimal adherence (AOR=1.76; 95% CI 1.12–2.77), those with waged or salaried employment (AOR=2.35; 95% CI 1.23–4.49), crafts/trade work (AOR=2.38; 95% CI 1.11–5.12), or involved in petty trade (AOR=1.85; 95% CI 1.09–3.13) (in comparison to those with no income) were more likely to report mobile phone ownership and literacy. Conclusions In a rural Ugandan setting, we found that over 60% of patients could potentially benefit from a mobile phone-based ART adherence support. However, support for such an intervention was lower for other patients. PMID:26654029

  5. 23 CFR 971.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... available for inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (c) The tri-party partnership shall... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal lands safety management system (SMS). 971.212... lands safety management system (SMS). In addition to the requirements provided in § 971.204, the...

  6. 23 CFR 973.212 - Indian lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (d) The BIA and ITGs shall utilize the SMSs to ensure... support the SMS. The minimum SMS database shall include: (i) Accident records; (ii) An inventory of safety... reporting requirements shall include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Accident types such...

  7. 23 CFR 973.212 - Indian lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (d) The BIA and ITGs shall utilize the SMSs to ensure... support the SMS. The minimum SMS database shall include: (i) Accident records; (ii) An inventory of safety... reporting requirements shall include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Accident types such...

  8. 23 CFR 970.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Federal lands safety management system (SMS). 970.212 Section 970.212 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.212 Federal lands safety management system (SMS)....

  9. 23 CFR 973.212 - Indian lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (d) The BIA and ITGs shall utilize the SMSs to ensure... support the SMS. The minimum SMS database shall include: (i) Accident records; (ii) An inventory of safety... reporting requirements shall include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Accident types such...

  10. Views of STS-4 crew during a training session in the SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Views of STS-4 crew during a training session in the Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) in bldg 5. Astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly, II. (left) and Henry W. Hartsfield, Jr., commander and pilot respectively for STS-4 get in some training time in the SMS.

  11. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, Commander Gibson on SMS forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Robert L. Gibson, wearing flight coveralls and communications kit assembly, sits at commanders station controls on JSC shuttle mission simulator (SMS) forward flight deck during training session. Gibson looks at crewmember on aft flight deck. SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  12. STS-41 MS Akers assisted by technician on SMS middeck at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is assisted by a technician on the middeck of JSC's Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Akers seated in the mission specialists chairis participating in a simulation of mission events. The SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  13. STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Ross during simulation in JSC's FB-SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross 'borrows' the pilots station to rehearse some of his scheduled duties for his upcoming mission. He is on the flight deck of the fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) during this unsuited simulation. The SMS is part of JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  14. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, Pilot Gardner on SMS forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Guy S. Gardner, wearing flight coveralls and communications kit assembly, sits at pilots station controls on JSC shuttle mission simulator (SMS) forward flight deck during training session. Gardner turns from forward controls to observe activity on aft flight deck. SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  15. 78 FR 66420 - Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... SMS On April 9, 2010, FMCSA announced the implementation of the SMS in the Federal Register (75 FR... stated in its March 27, 2012 Federal Register notice (77 FR 18298) (Docket No. FMCSA-2012-0074), FMCSA... them, was published in the Federal Register on August 28, 2012 (77 FR 52110) (Docket No. FMCSA-...

  16. 78 FR 76391 - Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ...: Background On November 5, 2013 (78 FR 66420), FMCSA published a notice in the Federal Register requesting... System (SMS) Public Web Site AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION... Safety Measurement System (SMS) public Web site. On December 6, 2013, Advocates ] for Highway and...

  17. 23 CFR 970.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal lands safety management system (SMS). 970.212 Section 970.212 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.212 Federal lands safety management system (SMS)....

  18. SMS power and grounding. CEI part 1: Detail specification, type 1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This specification establishes the requirements for performance, design, test, and qualification of the SMS total power and grounding system. This is defined as designing a new PDU to be useable for SMS adding FBCS and modifying and adding to the OAS power systems, the emergency off system and the overheat warning system. The above design considers all S.O.W. requirements.

  19. The Impact of Using SMS as Learning Support Tool on Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.; Aldalalah, Osamah M.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of using Short Message Service (SMS) as learning support tool on students' learning in an introductory programming course. In addition, the study examined students' perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of the use of SMS as a learning support tool in their class. The participants in this study…

  20. Texting Styles and Information Change of SMS Text Messages in Filipino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabatbat, Josephine Jill T.; Tapang, Giovanni A.

    2013-02-01

    We identify the different styles of texting in Filipino short message service (SMS) texts and analyze the change in unigram and bigram frequencies due to these styles. Style preference vectors for sample texts were calculated and used to identify the style combination used by an average individual. The change in Shannon entropy of the SMS text is explained in light of a coding process.

  1. How Can Mobile SMS Communication Support and Enhance a First Year Undergraduate Learning Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Geraldine; Edwards, Gabriele; Reid, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a case study investigating how the academic and personal development of first year students on an undergraduate sports education degree can be supported and enhanced with mobile SMS (Short Message Service) communication. SMS-based technologies were introduced in response to students' particular needs (in transition to…

  2. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall 1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact there is probably nearly as great as any

  3. A mobile telephone-based SMS and internet survey system for self-assessment in Australian anaesthesia: experience of a single practitioner.

    PubMed

    Belavy, D

    2014-11-01

    Self-assessment and audit in anaesthesia require a systematic approach to postoperative data collection. The increasing prevalence of mobile internet technology offers a new data collection method for anaesthetists. In this paper, a system for mobile internet data collection is described and the preliminary experience with its use is presented. The system was developed by the author and combined an open source survey application and a short message service (SMS) gateway to send SMS messages to patients after their anaesthesia and surgery. The messages requested patients to complete an online Quality of Recovery survey questionnaire if they had a smartphone. The results were immediately available. A preliminary survey of consenting patients with available mobile telephone numbers in a private practice was undertaken by the author. A total of 123 procedures were eligible for follow-up and survey requests were sent to 94 patients. Sixty-five surveys were completed. This represents 69% of surveys requested, demonstrating that mobile phone technology can be used to provide significant amounts of data for quality assurance. However, the implementation of a mobile internet data collection system requires consideration of privacy principles, security and ethical handling of data. PMID:25342410

  4. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights major science news stories of 1982 reported in "Science News." Categories include space/astronomy, biology, chemistry, medicine, energy, physics, anthropology/paleontology, earth sciences, technology, behavior, science/society, and the environment. (JN)

  5. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  6. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

  7. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    PubMed

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  8. Perplexity Analysis of Obesity News Coverage

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Delano J.; Elhadad, Noémie; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    An important task performed during the analysis of health news coverage is the identification of news articles that are related to a specific health topic (e.g. obesity). This is often done using a combination of keyword searching and manual encoding of news content. Statistical language models and their evaluation metric, perplexity, may help to automate this task. A perplexity study of obesity news was performed to evaluate perplexity as a measure of the similarity of news corpora to obesity news content. The results of this study showed that perplexity increased as news coverage became more general relative to obesity news (obesity news ≈ 187, general health news ≈ 278, general news ≈ 378, general news across multiple publishers ≈ 382). This indicates that language model perplexity can measure the similarity news content to obesity news coverage, and could be used as the basis for an automated health news classifier. PMID:20351893

  9. The Sources of Radio News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, D. Charles

    To examine the production of programing material in a radio newsroom, a study was undertaken of the sources presented to the newsroom, of sources within the sources, of sources actively sought by the news staff, of degrees of processing of news items, and of the sources comprising the news output. Information in each of these areas was collected…

  10. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  11. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories reported in Science News during 1976. Most items include a volume and page number reference to the issue of Science News in which the article appeared. Items are grouped under general major headings such as: space, astronomy, medicine, chemistry, etc. (SL)

  12. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  13. Breaking Bad News to Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan A.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the difficulty of breaking bad news to parents, whether the news pertains to center policy or a child's behavior. Provides strategies for presenting news and for helping parents to overcome difficult situations, including gathering facts in advance, arranging an appropriate time, and having resource materials available for parents. (MOK)

  14. Automatic Association of News Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Christina; Watters, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of electronic news delivery systems and the automatic generation of electronic editions focuses on the association of related items of different media type, specifically photos and stories. The goal is to be able to determine to what degree any two news items refer to the same news event. (Author/LRW)

  15. The Trouble with Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    1981-01-01

    Subjective comments from veteran news reporters, media critics, and the public give the impression that bad or negative news is becoming a major problem in this country. This impression raises major questions concerning how much is really known about bad news, including whether the media present an accurate or distorted picture of reality in…

  16. The Effectiveness of SMS Reminders on Appointment Attendance: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Boksmati, Nasim; Butler-Henderson, Kerryn; Anderson, Kevin; Sahama, Tony

    2016-04-01

    To identify the efficacy of short message service (SMS) reminders in health care appointment attendance. A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies published between 2005 and 2015 that compared the attendance rates of patients receiving SMS reminders compared to patients not receiving a reminder. Each article was examined for information regarding the study design, sample size, population demographics and intervention methods. A meta-analysis was used to calculate a pooled estimate odds ratio. Twenty-eight (28) studies were included in the review, including 13 (46 %) randomized controlled trials. The pooled odds ratio of the randomized control trials was 1.62 (1.35-1.94). Half of the studies reviewed sent the reminder within 48 h prior to the appointment time, yet no significant subgroups differences with respect to participant age, SMS timing, rate or type, setting or specialty was detectable. All studies, except one with a small sample size, demonstrated a positive OR, indicating SMS reminders were an effective means of improving appointment attendance. There was no significant difference in OR when controlling for when the SMS was sent, the frequency of the reminders or the content of the reminder. SMS appointment reminders are an effective and operative method in improving appointment attendance in a health care setting and this effectiveness has improved over the past 5 years. Further research is required to identify the optimal SMS reminder timing and frequency, specifically in relation to the length of time since the appointment. PMID:26852337

  17. Delivering bad news to patients.

    PubMed

    Monden, Kimberley R; Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model. PMID:26722188

  18. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  19. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  20. Smart Start News, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Monica, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Smart Start is a comprehensive public-private initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed, and provides children from birth to age five access to high-quality and affordable child care, health care, and other critical services. This document comprises the first two issues of "Smart Start News," a…

  1. Parent News Offline, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues published in volume 1 (1999) of "Parent News Offline," a newsletter of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN), designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The spring 1999 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Child Care: How…

  2. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  3. News & Issues, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This publication is comprised of the two 1999 issues of "News and Issues," a newsletter devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the young child poverty rate, and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The Winter/Spring issue includes the following articles: (1) "Innovative Strategies Help Families Cope…

  4. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  5. New Suncook News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanehl, Bob

    The newspaper program at the New Suncook School, Lovell, Maine, is a multi-level, language arts based unit designed to develop in students strong writing and interpersonal relationship skills, and to bring relevance to writing. The monthly newspaper features interviews, surveys, news, and some fiction stories written by students. The newspaper is…

  6. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This section includes three articles that review library news from the past year. Highlights include public library budgets, examined by geographic regions; government programs; flood damage; library school closings; school library media programs; publishing industry concerns, including mergers, broadening markets, and on-demand printing; and…

  7. Parent News Offline, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 2 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2000 issue contains the following articles: (1) "'Zero Tolerance': What Parents…

  8. Inexpensive News Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  9. What Do Mobiles Speak in Algeria? Evidence from SMS Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostari, Hind Amel

    2009-01-01

    When Algeria opened its markets to foreign investment starting from the early 2000s, a technological boom occurred, including the expansion of mobile phone use. New technologies have had a considerable impact on the Algerian diglossic situation, in recent decades, and have contributed in the democratisation of the local dialects, which are being…

  10. Long-term telemonitoring of mobility trends of elderly people using SMS messaging.

    PubMed

    Scanaill, Cliodhna Ni; Ahearne, Brian; Lyons, Gerard M

    2006-04-01

    A telemonitoring system, based on short message service (SMS), has been developed to remotely monitor the long-term mobility levels of elderly people in their natural environment. Mobility is measured by an accelerometer-based portable unit, worn by each monitored subject. Mobility level summaries are transmitted hourly, as an SMS message, directly from the portable unit to a remote server for long-term analysis. Each subject's mobility levels are monitored using custom-designed mobility alert software, and the appropriate medical personnel are alerted by SMS if the subject's mobility levels decrease. PMID:16617630

  11. The use of a bend singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fibre structure for vibration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Yang, Minwei; Yuan, Jinhui; Chan, Hau Ping; Ma, Youqiao; Semenova, Yuliya; Wang, Pengfei; Yu, Chongxiu; Farrell, Gerald

    2014-11-01

    A bend singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fibre structure based vibration sensor is proposed and developed. This sensor configuration is very simple and employs a bend SMS fibre structure and a broadband optical source. The vibration applied to the bend SMS fibre structure will change the bend radius and hence the intensity of the transmitted optical power will also vary. Experimental results show that the sensor can detect both vibration frequencies and amplitudes over a broad range with good sensitivity, from a hertz to 12 kHz.

  12. Study of few-mode fiber based SMS sensor for simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhide; Sakamoto, Taiji; Goto, Yukihiro; Fukai, Chisato; Matsui, Takashi; Yamamoto, Fumihiko; Kurashima, Toshio

    2015-09-01

    The applicability of few-mode fiber (FMF) as a single-multi-single (SMS) sensor is investigated. We examine experimentally the wavelength shift and/or visibility characteristics in an FMF based SMS sensor by changing the external temperature and longitudinal strain individually. We investigate numerically the temperature sensitivity of the fabricated sensor by considering the temperature dependence of the effective refractive index difference. Our results show that an FMF based SMS sensor can be used to measure the relative variation in temperature and strain simultaneously, and whose sensitivity can be tailored easily by designing two LP modes in an FMF.

  13. JSC Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) visual system payload bay video image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This video image is of the STS-2 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, payload bay (PLB) showing the Office of Space Terrestrial Applications 1 (OSTA-1) pallet (Shuttle Imaging Radar A (SIR-A) antenna (left) and SIR-A recorder, Shuttle Multispectral Infrared Radiometer (SMIRR), Feature Identification Location Experiment (FILE), Measurement of Air Pollution for Satellites (MAPS) (right)). The image is used in JSC's Fixed Based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). It is projected inside the FB-SMS crew compartment during mission simulation training. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  14. Cell phones: the psychosocial risks.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2013-01-01

    Cell phones are a relatively novel and evolving technology. While the potential benefits of this technology continue to emerge, so do the potential psychosocial risks. For example, one psychosocial risk is user stress, which appears to be related to feeling compelled to promptly respond to cell-phone activity in order to maintain spontaneity and access with others. Other potential psychosocial risks include disruptions in sleep; the user's risk of exposure to cyberbullying, particularly the unwanted exposure of photographs and/or videos of the victim; and overuse, particularly among adolescents. With regard to the latter phenomenon, the boundaries among overuse, misuse, dependence, and addiction are not scientifically clear. Therefore, while cell phones are a convenient and expedient technology, they are not without their potential psychosocial hazards. PMID:23439568

  15. Mobile phone and my health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, Aneta; Dabala, Dana; Neamtu, Camelia; Surducan, Vasile; Surducan, Emanoil

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  16. Dose reconstruction using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Beerten, K; Reekmans, F; Schroeyers, W; Lievens, L; Vanhavere, F

    2011-03-01

    Electronic components inside mobile phones are regarded as useful tools for accident and retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence. Components inside the devices with suitable properties for luminescence dosimetry include, amongst others, ceramic substrates in resistors, capacitors, transistors and antenna switches. Checking the performance of such devices in dosimetric experiments is a crucial step towards developing a reliable dosimetry system for emergency situations using personal belongings. Here, the results of dose assessment experiments using irradiated mobile phones are reported. It will be shown that simple regenerative dose estimates, derived from various types of components removed from different mobile phone models, are consistent with the given dose, after applying an average fading correction factor. PMID:21062806

  17. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect

    Surducan, Aneta; Dabala, Dana; Neamtu, Camelia Surducan, Vasile Surducan, Emanoil

    2013-11-13

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  18. A mobile phone enabled health promotion program for middle-aged males.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Karunanithi, M; Duncan, M; Ireland, D; Noakes, M; Hooker, C

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases among middle aged males outweigh their female counterparts in developed countries. To prevent this, delivery of health promotion programs targeting lifestyle modifications of physical activity and nutrition in middle-aged males has been essential, but often difficult. ManUp health promotion program was a recent initiative that uses current advances in information and communication technology (ICT) to reach the middle-aged males. One of the key components of the ICT approach was the development of smartphone application to enable middle-aged men to uptake the program with their own mobile phone. The smart phone application was aimed at providing varied level of challenges towards physical activity and healthy eating behavior, with interactive and motivational feedback SMS messages. The ManUp program was recently implemented and trialed in a randomized control trial in Gladstone and Rockhampton, Queens. This paper describes the components of the smart phone application integrated within the ManUp health promotion program. PMID:24109902

  19. Improving student learning via mobile phone video content: Evidence from the BridgeIT India project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wennersten, Matthew; Quraishy, Zubeeda Banu; Velamuri, Malathi

    2015-08-01

    Past efforts invested in computer-based education technology interventions have generated little evidence of affordable success at scale. This paper presents the results of a mobile phone-based intervention conducted in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu in 2012-13. The BridgeIT project provided a pool of audio-visual learning materials organised in accordance with a system of syllabi pacing charts. Teachers of Standard 5 and 6 English and Science classes were notified of the availability of new videos via text messages (SMS), which they downloaded onto their phones using an open-source application and showed, with suggested activities, to students on a TV screen using a TV-out cable. In their evaluation of this project, the authors of this paper found that the test scores of children who experienced the intervention improved by 0.36 standard deviations in English and 0.98 standard deviations in Science in Andhra Pradesh, relative to students in similar classrooms who did not experience the intervention. Differences between treatment and control schools in Tamil Nadu were less marked. The intervention was also cost-effective, relative to other computer-based interventions. Based on these results, the authors argue that is possible to use mobile phones to produce a strong positive and statistically significant effect in terms of teaching and learning quality across a large number of classrooms in India at a lower cost per student than past computer-based interventions.

  20. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under “impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified”. This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. Results: The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM–IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including “SMS pathological use” and “High monthly cost of using the mobile phone” were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test–retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (p<0. 01) respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder. PMID:27437008

  1. Mobile phone text messaging for improving the uptake of vaccinations: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kalan, Robyn; Wiysonge, Charles S; Ramafuthole, Tshepiso; Allie, Kurt; Ebrahim, Fatima; Engel, Mark Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low vaccine coverage is a major public health concern, the consequences of which contribute to around 1.5 million child deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases. Thus, innovative strategies to rapidly increase coverage and recall rates for vaccinations are urgently required. Mobile text messaging (or short messaging service, SMS) has the potential to help increase vaccination coverage and therefore we propose to conduct a review of the current best evidence for the use of SMS as an intervention to promote vaccination coverage. Methods and analysis This article describes the protocol for a systematic review of the effectiveness of SMS in improving the uptake of vaccination. Primary and secondary outcomes of interest are prespecified. We will preferably include randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, non-randomised studies (NRS) will be considered if there is an inadequate number of RCTs. We will search several bibliographic databases (eg,PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, Science Citation Index, Africa-Wide Information and WHOLIS electronic databases and search sources for grey literature. Following data extraction and assessment of risk of bias, we will meta-analyse studies and conduct subgroup analyses, according to intervention subtypes. We will assess clinical heterogeneity and statistical heterogeneity. For outcomes without quantitative data, a descriptive analysis will be used. This review protocol is registered in the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of systematic reviews, registration number 2014:CRD42014007531 Ethics and dissemination Ethics is not required for this study, given that this is a protocol for a systematic review, which uses published data. The findings of this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. We anticipate that the results could be used by researchers and policymakers to help inform them of the efficacy of mobile phone text messaging interventions to promote

  2. STS-26 MS Nelson on fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson trains on the middeck of the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Nelson, wearing communications assembly headset, adjusts camera mounting bracket.

  3. Preprocessing communication unit (PCU) with short message service (SMS) communication channels for AVL tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Andrew S.; Skobla, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    The Preprocessing GPS - SMS Communication Unit (PCU) is a mobile tracking device used within AVL tracking systems for determining the location of vehicles. It was designed primarily to utilize the SMS service of the GSM network for communicating. The use of SMS messages is part of an effort aimed at providing a cost effective alternative for tracking the location of vehicles. Its primary function is to send information about user location across a GSM network to a Central Base Station (CBS) from which assets are being tracked. Though SMS is the main bearer, the unit is also capable of using Circuit Switch Data Service (CSD) to send and receive data from the Base Station (BS). The PCU was developed as a small hardware unit based on the Microchip microcontroller, with a multiplexer switching two RS 232 serial inputs. One input is dedicated to the GPS receiver and the second one to the wireless modem.

  4. Load effect on an SMS fiber structure embedded in a high-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspita, Ika; Rahmah, Fitri; Hatta, Agus M.; Koentjoro, Sekartedjo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a load effect on a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure embedded in a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was investigated numerically and experimentally. It was modelled that the applied load induces a longitudinal strain on the HDPE and accordingly affects the SMS fiber structure's parameters. It was calculated the output power of the SMS fiber structure using a graded index multimode fiber (MMF) due to the applied strain from 0 to 4000 N. The experimental result shows that for the MMF length of 105 mm, the output power has monotonically increasing for an applied load range from 1700 to 4000 N with a sensitivity of 1.18 x 10-3 dBm/N. This configuration of SMS fiber structure embedded in the HDPE is potential for a load sensor.

  5. Design of diffractive optical surfaces within the nonimaging SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Lopes, João.; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.

    2015-09-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method was initially developed as a design method in Nonimaging Optics and later, the method was extended for designing Imaging Optics. We show an extension of the SMS method to diffractive surfaces. Using this method, diffractive kinoform surfaces are calculated simultaneously and through a direct method, i. e. it is not based in multi-parametric optimization techniques. Using the phase-shift properties of diffractive surfaces as an extra degree of freedom, only N/2 surfaces are needed to perfectly couple N one parameter wavefronts. Wavefronts of different wavelengths can also be coupled, hence chromatic aberration can be corrected in SMS-based systems. This method can be used by combining and calculating simultaneously both reflective, refractive and diffractive surfaces, through direct calculation of phase and refractive/reflective profiles. Representative diffractive systems designed by the SMS method are presented.

  6. 23 CFR 972.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (c) The FWS shall utilize the SMS to ensure that... HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems §...

  7. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  8. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  9. STS-26 crew during MB shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in Bldg 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in motion base (MB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Three of the five veteran astronauts in training for the STS-26 mission are seen in their ascent positions on MB SMS flight deck. Left to right are Pilot Richard O. Covey, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, and MS David C. Hilmers.

  10. STS-26 crew trains in JSC fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, mission specialists pose on aft flight deck in fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Left to right, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, MS George D. Nelson, and MS David C. Hilmers await start of FB-SMS simulation. The long simulation, part of the training for their anticipated June 1988 flight, began 10-20-87.

  11. STS-41 Pilot Cabana checks flight deck controls during training in JSC's SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Pilot Robert D. Cabana checks forward flight deck overhead control panel switches during a simulation in JSC's Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Cabana, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is seated at the pilots station and is surrounded by checklists, control panels, and various onboard equipment. The SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  12. STS-29 Commander Coats in JSC fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Michael L. Coats sits at commanders station forward flight deck controls in JSC fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Coats, wearing communications kit assembly headset and flight coveralls, looks away from forward control panels to aft flight deck. Pilots station seat back appears in foreground. FB-SMS is located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  13. STS-26 crew trains in JSC fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck (left) and Pilot Richard O. Covey train in JSC fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. On FB-SMS flight deck, Hauck and Covey man their respective stations. Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers is partially visible in the foreground. A simulation for their anticipated June 1988 flight began 10-20-87.

  14. STS-49 crew in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) during simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers participate in a simulation in JSC's Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Wearing launch and entry suits (LESs) and launch and entry helmets (LEH) and seated on the FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, MS Kathryn C. Thornton, and MS Pierre J. Thuot.

  15. STS-3 crewman Lousma and Fullerton in SMS, joined by Mrs. Fullerton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mrs. Marie Fullerton joins her husband in the Shuttle Mission Simulator, seated in a special chair behind STS-3 crewmembers in training. Husband C. Gordon Fullerton, right, gets into the pilot's seat in the SMS, while Jack R. Lousma (obscured at left) mans the commander's station (28533); close-up view of Lousma and Fullerton seated at the controls of the SMS (28534); Lousma and Fullerton look back at Mrs. Fullerton who is seated behind them (29535).

  16. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, Pilot Gardner on SMS forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Guy S. Gardner, wearing flight coveralls and communications kit assembly, sits at pilots station controls on JSC shuttle mission simulator (SMS) forward flight deck during training session. Gardner turns from forward controls to observe activity on aft flight deck. Portable laptop computer is set up on center console. SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  17. STS-48 MS Gemar uses laptop during training session in JSC's MB SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-48 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Charles D. Gemar, wearing lightweight headset, enters data into a portable laptop computer on the middeck of JSC's Motion Based (MB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Gemar is participating in a preflight familiarization session in the MB-SMS located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Visible to Gemar's right is a stowed extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and on his left are forward locker mockups.

  18. Thermo-optic coefficient dependent temperature sensitivity of FBG-in-SMS based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Quan; Zhang, JianZhong; Yang, Jun; Canning, John; Peng, GangDing; Chen, YuJin; Yuan, LiBo

    2015-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating in single-multi-single mode fiber structure (FBG-in-SMS) is proposed to be used as a sensor. It could realize temperature and strain measurement simultaneously because of the different responses of the different parts of the FBG-in-SMS transmission spectrum. The temperature response is decided by the thermo-optic coefficient of the multimode fiber mainly, which is focused on especially in order to optimize its performance.

  19. Mobile Phone Mood Charting for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Mark; Doherty, Gavin; Sharry, John; Fitzpatrick, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Mobile phones may provide a useful and engaging platform for supporting therapeutic services working with adolescents. This paper examines the potential benefits of the mobile phone for self-charting moods in comparison to existing methods in current practice. The paper describes a mobile phone application designed by the authors which allows…

  20. Cell Phones in the Classroom? Yes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaer, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The author has been using mobile phones actively in her adult education classes for the last two years. She has found that, with a bit of cell phone etiquette, students are responsible and will use phones as learning tools instead of just as toys. In this article, the author describes how she uses them and suggests effective techniques for…

  1. Mobile phone technologies improve adherence to antiretroviral treatment in a resource-limited setting: a randomized controlled trial of text message reminders

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Eleches, Cristian; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Habyarimana, James P.; Zivin, Joshua G.; Goldstein, Markus P.; de Walque, Damien; MacKeen, Leslie; Haberer, Jessica; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Sidle, John; Ngare, Duncan; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence on whether growing mobile phone availability in sub-Saharan Africa can be used to promote high adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study tested the efficacy of short message service (SMS) reminders on adherence to ART among patients attending a rural clinic in Kenya. Design A randomized controlled trial of four SMS reminder interventions with 48 weeks of follow-up. Methods Four hundred and thirty-one adult patients who had initiated ART within 3 months were enrolled and randomly assigned to a control group or one of the four intervention groups. Participants in the intervention groups received SMS reminders that were either short or long and sent at a daily or weekly frequency. Adherence was measured using the medication event monitoring system. The primary outcome was whether adherence exceeded 90% during each 12-week period of analysis and the 48-week study period. The secondary outcome was whether there were treatment interruptions lasting at least 48 h. Results In intention-to-treat analysis, 53% of participants receiving weekly SMS reminders achieved adherence of at least 90% during the 48 weeks of the study, compared with 40% of participants in the control group (P=0.03). Participants in groups receiving weekly reminders were also significantly less likely to experience treatment interruptions exceeding 48 h during the 48-week follow-up period than participants in the control group (81 vs. 90%, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results suggest that SMS reminders may be an important tool to achieve optimal treatment response in resource-limited settings. PMID:21252632

  2. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for SMS Exploration in Izena Cauldron, Okinawa-Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Mizohata, S.; Tara, K.

    2014-12-01

    The VCS survey is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by seismic sources. Because the VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed it for the SMS survey tool development program started by Japanese government. In 2010, we manufactured the autonomous VCS data acquisition systems. Through several experimental surveys, our VCS is successfully completed. In 2011 and 2013, we carried out the two VCS surveys using GI gun and high-voltage sparker respectively in the Izena Cauldron, Okinawa Trough, which is one of the most promising SMS areas around Japan. Because seismic survey is not proven to be effective for SMS exploration, no seismic surveys have been conducted there so far. Our strategy for SMS exploration consists of two stages. In the first stage, we carried out VCS survey with the lower frequency GI gun (but higher compared to the convebtional oil/gas exploration) and explored deeper (up to 1,500m) structure to obtain the fault system of hydrothermal flow. Next, using a high frequency (about 1 kHz higher) and high-voltage sparker, we explored very shallow (up to 200m) part to delineate the very thin SMS deposits. These two VCS dataset have been processed with 3D Prestack Depth Migration. These results are consistent with geological information from the borehole drilled nearby and give useful information to SMS exploration.

  3. ICAO safety management systems (SMS) development in environmental contexts: A field study of greater China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Steven M.

    This was a mixed-methods exploratory study to investigate association between environmental context and the implementation status of Safety Management Systems (SMS) at airports in Greater China. Using a framework of Institutional Theory, this study looked at three regions of Greater China and explored internal and external environments of SMS at airports within each region. It used ICAO standards to evaluate the implementation status of SMS at those airports based on the perceptions of 126 participants. This research also employed snowballing technique to spread a survey tool to participants in Greater China through several key gatekeepers, and then applied the Delphi method for interviews with key gatekeepers themselves. Analysis of the data suggested several associations between various sub-concepts of the external environment and different components of SMS in the three regions. In addition, the data suggested a relationship between the internal environment as a whole and the overall status of SMS implementation in each region. Lastly, the study makes several recommendations for future research regarding global standards implemented in local environments, the evaluation of SMS implementation status, and the theoretical implications of this study.

  4. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  5. Are MSM willing to SMS for HIV prevention?

    PubMed

    Khosropour, Christine M; Lake, Jason G; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    Text messaging is a potential HIV-prevention tool for men who have sex with men (MSM), specifically young MSM and MSM of color. To determine the willingness of MSM to receive text messages as part of an HIV-prevention intervention, we administered an online survey to MSM recruited from MySpace.com, which included questions about mobile phone ownership and willingness to participate in a future text message-based HIV research study. Of participants, 85% (n = 5,378) reported owning a mobile phone and 49% (n = 2,483) of mobile phone owners reported being willing to receive text messages in a future HIV research study. Black and Hispanic men were more willing than White non-Hispanic men to receive text messages. Men with a college degree were less willing to receive texts than men with a high school level of education, and men >22 years old were less likely to be willing to receive texts than those younger than 22 years of age. The authors' findings demonstrate that willingness to receive text messages as part of an HIV research study is moderate, and mirrors patterns of text message use in age and race. Variations in willingness should be taken into account when designing and implementing future interventions. PMID:23905653

  6. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial to improve cancer prevention behaviors in adolescents and adults using a web-based intervention supplemented with SMS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The overall number of cancer cases is increasing and, therefore, strengthening cancer prevention has become a priority. The institutions responsible for its control establish guidelines for primary prevention. These include recommendations, such as: not smoking, following a healthy diet, doing daily physical exercise or avoiding overweight. Adolescence is a period of adoption and/or consolidation of health behaviors, and both school- and family-based interventions have proven effective to improve them. Furthermore, online and mobile phone educational interventions are encouraging. Consequently, the main aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of an intervention in which these requirements (school, family, the Internet and SMS) are combined to prevent behavioral cancer risk. Methods This protocol describes the design and implementation of a complex online program that includes a randomized controlled trial put into practice in two countries: Spain and Mexico. Adolescents and adults of their environment (relatives and teachers) who voluntarily participate will be randomly assigned to the experimental group or to the control group once they have completed the online pre-test. The experimental group members will have free access to a tailor-made and interactive website (http://www.alertagrumete.com). During the academic year, this website will be periodically updated with different school and leisure activities related to the avoidance of risk behaviors. To encourage participation, the program includes a competition that gives rewards to the winners. SMS are also sent to students to stimulate the adoption of healthy behaviors and as a reminder of participation. Finished the intervention, an online post-test is performed in both groups and the impact on the risk behaviors is therefore assessed. Discussion The program is pioneer, since it combines many components which have already proven effective in previous researches. Moreover, it aims to compare

  7. Mobile Phone Usage and its Health Effects Among Adults in a Semi-Urban Area of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherin Billy; Kanimozhy, K.; Prasad, R. Vishnu; Singh, Zile; Purty, Anil J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, mobile phone usage has been increased dramatically which could affect the health of the people. India has the second largest number of mobile phone users. However there are only few studies conducted in India to assess its effects on health. Aim To determine the prevalence and pattern of mobile phone usage and to assess the relationship between certain selected health problems and mobile phone usage among adults. Settings and Design Community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Kottakuppam, a town panchayat in Villupuram district of Coastal Tamil Nadu, Southern India. It is a semi-urban area with a population of about 16,000. Majority of the residents are Muslim by religion and belong to different socio economic status. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. A total of 2121 study participants were interviewed by the pre-final medical students through house-to-house survey using a pretested structured questionnaire. The questionnaire included the variables such as socio demographic profile, mobile phone usage and pattern, selected health problems, perceived benefits and threats and blood pressure. Selected health problems included headache, earache, neck pain, tinnitus, painful fingers, restlessness, morning tiredness, tingling fingers, fatigue, eye symptoms, sleep disturbance and hypertension. Statistical Analysis Used Only 2054 were included for data analysis using SPSS 17 version. Proportions were calculated. Chi-square test was used to measure the p-value. The p-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The prevalence of mobile phone usage was 70%. Calling facility (94.2%) was used more than the SMS (67.6%). Health problems like headache, earache, tinnitus, painful fingers and restlessness etc., were found to be positively associated with mobile phone usage. There was negative association between hypertension and mobile phone usage. Conclusion The prevalence of

  8. International News Bowwowing: A Trend Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that the increased "borrowing" of news from foreign news agencies may not be due to the declining number of United States foreign correspondents but to Third World restrictions on access to news. (FL)

  9. A Survey of Electronic News Gathering and Television News Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.; DiCioccio, John P.

    A 1977 national survey of 216 television stations that use electronic news gathering (ENG) and of 224 stations that still use only film for camera reporting showed little difference in the types of news the two kinds of operations covered, although stations using ENG shot more stories than did those still using only film. The persons making…

  10. Pre-Survey Text Messages (SMS) Improve Participation Rate in an Australian Mobile Telephone Survey: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Dal Grande, Eleonora; Chittleborough, Catherine Ruth; Campostrini, Stefano; Dollard, Maureen; Taylor, Anne Winifred

    2016-01-01

    Mobile telephone numbers are increasingly being included in household surveys samples. As approach letters cannot be sent because many do not have address details, alternatives approaches have been considered. This study assesses the effectiveness of sending a short message service (SMS) to a random sample of mobile telephone numbers to increase response rates. A simple random sample of 9000 Australian mobile telephone numbers: 4500 were randomly assigned to be sent a pre-notification SMS, and the remaining 4500 did not have a SMS sent. Adults aged 18 years and over, and currently in paid employment, were eligible to participate. American Association for Public Opinion Research formulas were used to calculated response cooperation and refusal rates. Response and cooperation rate were higher for the SMS groups (12.4% and 28.6% respectively) than the group with no SMS (7.7% and 16.0%). Refusal rates were lower for the SMS group (27.3%) than the group with no SMS (35.9%). When asked, 85.8% of the pre-notification group indicated they remembered receiving a SMS about the study. Sending a pre-notification SMS is effective in improving participation in population-based surveys. Response rates were increased by 60% and cooperation rates by 79%. PMID:26919558

  11. Pre-Survey Text Messages (SMS) Improve Participation Rate in an Australian Mobile Telephone Survey: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Dal Grande, Eleonora; Chittleborough, Catherine Ruth; Campostrini, Stefano; Dollard, Maureen; Taylor, Anne Winifred

    2016-01-01

    Mobile telephone numbers are increasingly being included in household surveys samples. As approach letters cannot be sent because many do not have address details, alternatives approaches have been considered. This study assesses the effectiveness of sending a short message service (SMS) to a random sample of mobile telephone numbers to increase response rates. A simple random sample of 9000 Australian mobile telephone numbers: 4500 were randomly assigned to be sent a pre-notification SMS, and the remaining 4500 did not have a SMS sent. Adults aged 18 years and over, and currently in paid employment, were eligible to participate. American Association for Public Opinion Research formulas were used to calculated response cooperation and refusal rates. Response and cooperation rate were higher for the SMS groups (12.4% and 28.6% respectively) than the group with no SMS (7.7% and 16.0%). Refusal rates were lower for the SMS group (27.3%) than the group with no SMS (35.9%). When asked, 85.8% of the pre-notification group indicated they remembered receiving a SMS about the study. Sending a pre-notification SMS is effective in improving participation in population-based surveys. Response rates were increased by 60% and cooperation rates by 79%. PMID:26919558

  12. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories reported during 1984 in "Science News" magazine. These stories are in the categories of: anthropology and paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; computers; mathematics; earth science; the environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology. (JN)

  13. What Turns Events into News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  14. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of science news stories reported in "Science News" during 1987. References each item to the volume and page number in which the subject was addressed. Contains references on astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, mathematics and computers, paleontology and anthropology, physics, science…

  15. Mobile phones and sleep - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supe, Sanjay S.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing use of mobile phones has raised concerns regarding the potential health effects of exposure to the radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. An increasing amount research related to mobile phone use has focussed on the possible effects of mobile phone exposure on human brain activity and function. In particular, the use of sleep research has become a more widely used technique for assessing the possible effects of mobile phones on human health and wellbeing especially in the investigation of potential changes in sleep architecture resulting from mobile phone use. Acute exposure to a mobile phone prior to sleep significantly enhances electroencephalogram spectral power in the sleep spindle frequency range. This mobile phone-induced enhancement in spectral power is largely transitory and does not linger throughout the night. Furthermore, a reduction in rapid eye movement sleep latency following mobile phone exposure was also found, although interestingly, neither this change in rapid eye movement sleep latency or the enhancement in spectral power following mobile phone exposure, led to changes in the overall quality of sleep. In conclusion, a short exposure to the radiofrequency electromagnetic fields emitted by a mobile phone handset immediately prior to sleep is sufficient to induce changes in brain activity in the initial part of sleep. The consequences or functional significance of this effect are currently unknown and it would be premature to draw conclusions about possible health consequences.

  16. Large-amplitude moho reflections (SmS) from Landers aftershocks, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mori, J.; Helmberger, D.

    1996-01-01

    Closely spaced aftershocks of the 28 June 1992 Landers earthquake (Mw 7.3) were used to make event record sections that show the transverse components of 5 and SmS arrivals at a distance of 70 to 170 km. For the data recorded toward the north in the Mojave desert, large SmS phases are observed with amplitudes 2 to 5 times greater than the direct S. For similar distances to the south, the SmS arrival is comparable to or smaller than the S. Comparisons to synthetic seismograms indicate that the large-amplitude SmS phases are produced by the simple crustal structure of the Mojave desert that allows a large Moho reflection. In contrast, the more complex geologic structure to the south partitions the seismic energy into a more complicated set of seismic phases, so that the Moho reflection is diminished in amplitude. The large SmS phases observed in the Mojave enhance the overall ground motions by a factor of 2 to 3. This suggests that when damaging earthquakes occur in other regions of simple crustal structures, Moho reflections will produce amplified strong motions at distance ranges around 100 km depending on the local structure.

  17. Designing text-messaging (SMS) in HIV programs: ethics-framed recommendations from the field.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Guillermo Martínez; Hwang, Bella; Bygrave, Helen; Venables, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    Text messages (SMS) are being increasingly integrated into HIV programs across Southern Africa to improve patient adherence, linkage to care and provide psycho-social support. Careful attention needs to be paid to the design of SMS-based interventions for clients of HIV-care services to ensure that any potential harm, such as unwanted disclosure of HIV status, is minimized. In this article we propose a set of best practice recommendations to ensure that any SMS-based intervention considers ethical principles to safeguard safety, autonomy and confidentiality of its targeted HIV-positive beneficiaries. This analysis draws from our operational experience in Southern Africa in the design and conduct of mHealth interventions in the frame of HIV projects. The recommendations, framed in the context of the Belmont Report's three ethical pillars, may contribute to more safely operationalize any SMS service integrated into an HIV program if adopted by mHealth planners and implementers. We encourage actors to report on the ethical and methodological pathways followed when conducting SMS-based innovations to improve the wellbeing and quality provision of HIV-care for their targeted clients. PMID:26421096

  18. Is the black phase of SmS a topological Kondo insulator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Eric; Ghimire, N. J.; Ronning, F.; Batista, C.; Byler, D.; Thompson, J. D.; Rahmanisisan, A.; Fisk, Z.

    2015-03-01

    SmS is a prototypical Kondo insulator where electronic correlations drive a system insulating that would otherwise be metallic. Whether or not such a system is also a topological insulator that hosts a protected metallic surface state, depends on the parity of the wavefunction of the occupied states. However, unlike weakly correlated materials, it is unclear whether state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations accurately predict the parity of the occupied wavefunctions of correlated insulators. Nevertheless, Dzero and collaborators suggest that Kondo insulators such as SmB6 can be topological. Like SmB6, Cubic SmS is a non-magnetic semiconductor with an insulating behavior at ambient pressure and low temperatures driven by hybridization with the Sm f-electrons. At 6 kbar, SmS undergoes a phase transition into a valance fluctuating phase accompanied by a visible color change from black to gold. It then undergoes a second phase transition at about 20 kbar to an antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures. We will discuss whether electronic structure calculations indicate a topological state of SmS at P =0. We will also discuss whether or not the magnetic, thermal and transport properties of the black phase of SmS are consistent with the existence of a topological protected surface state.

  19. Designing text-messaging (SMS) in HIV programs: ethics-framed recommendations from the field

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Guillermo Martínez; Hwang, Bella; Bygrave, Helen; Venables, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    Text messages (SMS) are being increasingly integrated into HIV programs across Southern Africa to improve patient adherence, linkage to care and provide psycho-social support. Careful attention needs to be paid to the design of SMS-based interventions for clients of HIV-care services to ensure that any potential harm, such as unwanted disclosure of HIV status, is minimized. In this article we propose a set of best practice recommendations to ensure that any SMS-based intervention considers ethical principles to safeguard safety, autonomy and confidentiality of its targeted HIV-positive beneficiaries. This analysis draws from our operational experience in Southern Africa in the design and conduct of mHealth interventions in the frame of HIV projects. The recommendations, framed in the context of the Belmont Report's three ethical pillars, may contribute to more safely operationalize any SMS service integrated into an HIV program if adopted by mHealth planners and implementers. We encourage actors to report on the ethical and methodological pathways followed when conducting SMS-based innovations to improve the wellbeing and quality provision of HIV-care for their targeted clients. PMID:26421096

  20. Conditions for perfect focusing multiple point sources with the SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, P.; Miñano, Juan C.; Nikolic, Milena; Liu, Jiayao; Infante, Jose; Duerr, Fabian

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we demonstrate how it is possible to sharply image multiple object points. The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) design method has usually been presented as a method to couple N wave-front pairs with N surfaces, but recent findings show that when using N surfaces, we can obtain M image points when NSMS method, from its basics, to imaging two object points through one surface, the transition from two to three objet points obtained by increasing the parallelism, and getting to the designs of six surfaces imaging up to eight object points. These designs are limited with the condition that the surfaces cannot be placed at the aperture stop. In the process of maximizing the object points to sharp image, we try to exhaust the degrees of freedom of aspherics and free-forms. We conjecture that maximal SMS designs are very close to a good solution, hence using them as a starting point for the optimization will lead us faster to a final optical system. We suggest here different optimization strategies which combined with the SMS method are proven to give the best solution. Through the example of imaging with the high aspect ratio, we compare the results obtained optimizing the rotational lens and using a combination of SMS method and optimization, showing that the second approach is giving significantly smaller value of overall RMS spot diameter.

  1. Long period grating-based ocean pH sensor in an SMS fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Klimov, Denis; Kolber, Zbigniew

    2008-03-01

    A long period grating-based pH sensor has been designed in order to measure the pH in the ocean. The pH-sensitive hydrogel, which is made through the thermal crosslink of poly vinyl alcohol and poly acrylic acid, can swell or contract in response to the pH change in the surrounding environment. The sensor is designed in a single mode-multimode-single mode (SMS) fiber structure. The long period grating is written into the multimode fiber of the SMS structure using a focused CO II laser at the critical period (1 mm) of this particular multimode fiber. The hydrogel is glued underneath the SMS structure and will physically stretch or compress the long period grating hence change the phase matching condition in the SMS structure. Because of the different core sizes of the single mode fiber and the multimode fiber, only energy coupled in and out of the fundamental mode in the multimode fiber will be detected directly. The SMS structure has a higher sensitivity than using just the multimode sensing fiber. This sensor has been utilized in the seawater pH sensing in the range of 6 ~ 8. Experiments show that the sensor has a pH resolution of 0.0042.

  2. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  3. Quantitative Imaging with a Mobile Phone Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Skandarajah, Arunan; Reber, Clay D.; Switz, Neil A.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone–based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications. PMID:24824072

  4. CB-EMIS CELL PHONE CLIENT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-02

    The cell phone software allows any Java enabled cell phone to view sensor and meteorological data via an internet connection using a secure connection to the CB-EMIS Web Service. Users with appropriate privileges can monitor the state of the sensors and perform simple maintenance tasks remotely. All sensitive data is downloaded from the web service, thus protecting sensitive data in the event a cell phone is lost.

  5. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

  6. LATIN--Latin American Regional News Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John Spicer

    The establishment of a regional news agency for Latin America to improve the balance of news flow and increase the transmission of news more applicable to regional problems has often been proposed. Despite wide acceptance of the concept, the birth of the Third World's first regional news agency, Agencia Latinoamericana de Informacion (LATIN), has…

  7. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  8. Television News and the Miners' Strike.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Guy; And Others

    A content analysis was performed on all of the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) Nine O'Clock News and ITV (Independent Television) News at Ten programs that were broadcast during Britain's year-long miners' strike--March 1984-March 1985--and a four-month sample of Channel 4 news to examine how television news covered a protracted story of…

  9. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  10. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  11. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  12. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  13. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  14. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

  15. Scientific Sources' Perception of Network News Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Barbara; Singletary, Michael

    Recent polls seem to indicate that many Americans rely on television as a credible and primary source of news. To test the accuracy of this news, a study examined three networks' newscasts of science news, the attitudes of the science sources toward reporting in their field, and the factors related to accuracy. The Vanderbilt News Archives Index…

  16. The Diffusion of "Shocking" Good News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldsen, Edwin O.; Harvey, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    A study of the diffusion of news about the Mormon Church's approval of Blacks for the priesthood revealed that "shocking" good news can ignite the interpersonal communications system, that news has more credibility when obtained from media than when obtained interpersonally, and that people use mass media to verify news obtained interpersonally.…

  17. WADeG Cell Phone

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-09-01

    The on cell phone software captures the images from the CMOS camera periodically, stores the pictures, and periodically transmits those images over the cellular network to the server. The cell phone software consists of several modules: CamTest.cpp, CamStarter.cpp, StreamIOHandler .cpp, and covertSmartDevice.cpp. The camera application on the SmartPhone is CamStarter, which is “the” user interface for the camera system. The CamStarter user interface allows a user to start/stop the camera application and transfer files tomore » the server. The CamStarter application interfaces to the CamTest application through registry settings. Both the CamStarter and CamTest applications must be separately deployed on the smartphone to run the camera system application. When a user selects the Start button in CamStarter, CamTest is created as a process. The smartphone begins taking small pictures (CAPTURE mode), analyzing those pictures for certain conditions, and saving those pictures on the smartphone. This process will terminate when the user selects the Stop button. The camtest code spins off an asynchronous thread, StreamIOHandler, to check for pictures taken by the camera. The received image is then tested by StreamIOHandler to see if it meets certain conditions. If those conditions are met, the CamTest program is notified through the setting of a registry key value and the image is saved in a designated directory in a custom BMP file which includes a header and the image data. When the user selects the Transfer button in the CamStarter user interface, the covertsmartdevice code is created as a process. Covertsmartdevice gets all of the files in a designated directory, opens a socket connection to the server, sends each file, and then terminates.« less

  18. Non-Work-Related Use of Personal Mobile Phones by Hospital Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices (smartphones and tablet computers) provide users with an ever-increasing number and diversity of non-work-related activities while at work. In hospitals, where the vigilance of health care workers is essential for patient care, the potential distraction of these devices could be hazardous to patients. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of non-work-related use of personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices among hospital registered nurses. Methods In March 2014, a previously validated 30-question survey was emailed to the 10,978 members of the Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses. There were 825 respondents who met the inclusion criteria. Results The use of a personal mobile phone or other personal communication device while working (excluding meal times and breaks) was reported by 78.1% (644/825) of respondents. Nurses reported regularly (sometimes, often, or always) sending personal emails and text messages (38.6%, 318/825), reading news (25.7%, 212/825), checking/posting on social networking sites (20.8%, 172/825), shopping (9.6%, 79/825), and playing games (6.5%, 54/825) while working. Conclusions This study found that hospital nurses frequently use their personal mobile phones or other personal communication devices for non-work-related activities at work. The primary activity reported was to send personal emails and text messages to family and friends. PMID:25586982

  19. A comparison of cloud motion winds from ATS 6 images with coinciding SMS 1 winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlow, W. W.; Chatters, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology is developed for accurate measurement of cloud motion winds from the geosynchronous ATS 6 image data. Attitude changes between consecutive images (as a function of scan-line number) are accounted for in wind computations through measurement of the earth-edge displacements between the successive infrared images. Also, an image matching procedure is used to remove obvious and distracting image distortions. The availability of SMS imagery coinciding with ATS 6 imagery makes SMS an excellent reference against which the quality of ATS 6 winds can be tested. The resulting winds inferred from cloud displacement measurements taken from a sequence of the corrected images are found to agree better than 2 m/sec rms with winds measured from coincident SMS 1 imagery.

  20. SMS-Based Medical Diagnostic Telemetry Data Transmission Protocol for Medical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Ben; Abawajy, Jemal; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    People with special medical monitoring needs can, these days, be sent home and remotely monitored through the use of data logging medical sensors and a transmission base-station. While this can improve quality of life by allowing the patient to spend most of their time at home, most current technologies rely on hardwired landline technology or expensive mobile data transmissions to transmit data to a medical facility. The aim of this paper is to investigate and develop an approach to increase the freedom of a monitored patient and decrease costs by utilising mobile technologies and SMS messaging to transmit data from patient to medico. To this end, we evaluated the capabilities of SMS and propose a generic communications protocol which can work within the constraints of the SMS format, but provide the necessary redundancy and robustness to be used for the transmission of non-critical medical telemetry from data logging medical sensors. PMID:22163845

  1. SMS reminders to improve the tuberculosis cure rate in developing countries (TB-SMS Cameroon): a protocol of a randomised control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a public health problem in Cameroon, just like in many other countries in the world. The National Tuberculosis Control Programme (PNLT) put in place by the state, aims to fight tuberculosis through the implementation of international directives (Directly Observed Treatment Short, DOTS). Despite the deployment of this strategy across the world, its implementation is difficult in the context of low-resource countries. Some expected results are not achieved. In Cameroon, the cure rate for patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TPM+) after 6 months is only about 65%, 20% below the target. This is mainly due to poor patient adherence to treatment. By relying on the potential of mobile Health, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SMS reminders on the cure rate of TPM + patients, measured using 6-month bacilloscopy. Methods/design This is a blinded, randomised controlled multicentre study carried out in Cameroon. The research hypothesis is that sending daily SMS messages to remind patients to take their prescribed tuberculosis medication, together with the standard DOTS strategy, will increase the cure rate from 65% (control group: DOTS, no SMS intervention) to 85% (intervention group: DOTS, with SMS intervention) in a group of new TPM + patients. In accordance with each treatment centre, the participants will be randomly allocated into the two groups using a computer program: the intervention group and the control group. A member of the research team will send daily SMS messages. Study data will be collected by health professionals involved in the care of patients. Data analysis will be done by the intention-to-treat method. Discussion The achieving of expected outcomes by the PNLT through implementation of DOTS requires several challenges. Although it has been demonstrated that the DOTS strategy is effective in the fight against tuberculosis, its application remains difficult in developing countries

  2. Mobile Phone Usage for M-Learning: Comparing Heavy and Light Mobile Phone Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suki, Norbayah Mohd; Suki, Norazah Mohd

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. The objective of the study is to examine how the usage of mobile phones for m-learning differs between heavy and light mobile phone users. Heavy mobile phone users are hypothesized to have access to/subscribe to one type of mobile content than light…

  3. A Comparison of Two Delivery Modalities of a Mobile Phone-Based Assessment for Serious Mental Illness: Native Smartphone Application vs Text-Messaging Only Implementations

    PubMed Central

    Palmier-Claus, Jasper E; Machin, Matthew; Barrowclough, Christine; Dunn, Graham; Rogers, Anne; Buchan, Iain; Barkus, Emma; Kapur, Shitij; Wykes, Til; Hopkins, Richard S; Lewis, Shôn

    2013-01-01

    ), which also took significantly less time to complete (β =.78, SE= .09, P<.001). Although there were no significant differences in participants’ quantitative feedback for the two delivery modalities, most participants reported preferring the native smartphone application (67%; n=16) and found it easier to use (71%; n=16). 33% of participants reported that they would be willing to complete mobile phone assessment for 5 weeks or longer. Conclusions Native smartphone applications and SMS text are both valuable methods of delivering real-time assessment in individuals with schizophrenia. However, a more streamlined graphical user interface may lead to better compliance and shorter entry times. Further research is needed to test the efficacy of this technology within clinical services, to assess validity over longer periods of time and when delivered on patients’ own phones. PMID:23563184

  4. STS-26 crew during MB shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in Bldg 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in motion base (MB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Five veteran astronauts recently named to man the Discovery for the STS-26 mission are pictured prior to a training session in the nearby MB SMS. Commander Frederick H. Hauck (top right) stands next to Pilot Richard O. Covey with (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, MS David C. Hilmers, and MS John M. Lounge on front row.

  5. STS-30 crewmembers train on JSC shuttle mission simulator (SMS) flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Wearing headsets, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee (left), MS Mary L. Cleave (center), and MS Norman E. Thagard pose on aft flight deck in JSC's fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). In background, Commander David M. Walker and Pilot Ronald J. Grabe check data on forward flight deck CRT monitors. FB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Crewmembers are scheduled to fly aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, in April 1989 for NASA mission STS-30.

  6. STS-46 crewmembers participate in Fixed Base (FB) SMS training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman, standing at the interdeck access ladder, explains procedures to backup Italian Payload Specialist Umberto Guidoni (center) and Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba (right) on the middeck of JSC's fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Behind them, MS Marsha S. Ivins reviews a cheklist. Participants are wearing communications kit assembly lightweight headsets (HDSTs). FB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  7. STS-31 crewmembers during simulation on the flight deck of JSC's FB-SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    On the flight deck of JSC's fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS), Mission Specialist (MS) Steven A. Hawley (left), on aft flight deck, looks over the shoulders of Commander Loren J. Shriver, seated at the commanders station (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden, seated at the pilots station and partially blocked by the seat's headrest (right). The three astronauts recently named to the STS-31 mission aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, go through a procedures checkout in the FB-SMS. The training simulation took place in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  8. STS-57 crewmembers train in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Nancy J. Sherlock, holding computer diskettes and procedural checklist, discusses equipment operation with Commander Ronald J. Grabe on the middeck of JSC's fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low points to a forward locker location as MS3 Peter J.K. Wisoff switches controls on overhead panels MO42F and MO58F, and MS4 Janice E. Voss looks on. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  9. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve. PMID:26439917

  10. A Wireless Health Outcomes Monitoring System (WHOMS): development and field testing with cancer patients using mobile phones

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Emilia; Carminati, Fabio; La Capra, Stella; Lina, Micaela; Brunelli, Cinzia; Tamburini, Marcello

    2004-01-01

    Background Health-Related Quality of Life assessment is widely used in clinical research, but rarely in clinical practice. Barriers including practical difficulties administering printed questionnaires have limited their use. Telehealth technology could reduce these barriers and encourage better doctor-patient interaction regarding patient symptoms and quality-of-life monitoring. The aim of this study was to develop a new system for transmitting patients' self-reported outcomes using mobile phones or the internet, and to test whether patients can and will use the system via a mobile phone. Methods We have developed a prototype of a Wireless Health Outcomes Monitoring System, which allows structured questionnaires to be sent to the patient by their medical management team. The patients' answers are directly sent to an authorised website immediately accessible by the medical team, and are displayed in a graphic format that highlights the patient's state of health. In the present study, 97 cancer inpatients were asked to complete a ten-item questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered by display on a mobile phone, and was answered by the patients using the mobile phone keypad. Results Of the 97 patients, 56 (58%) attempted the questionnaire, and all of these 56 completed it. Only 6% of the total number of questions were left unanswered by patients. Forty-one (42%) patients refused to participate, mostly due to their lack of familiarity with mobile phone use. Compared with those who completed the questionnaire, patients who refused to participate were older, had fewer years of education and were less familiar with new communications technology (mobile phone calls, mobile phone SMS, internet, email). Conclusion More than half of the patients self-completed the questionnaire using the mobile phone. This proportion may increase with the use of multichannel communications which can be incorporated into the system. The proportion may also increase if the patient's partner

  11. Short message service (SMS) reminders and real-time adherence monitoring improve antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Haberer, Jessica E.; Musiimenta, Angella; Atukunda, Esther C.; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Wyatt, Monique A.; Ware, Norma C.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of four types of short message service (SMS) plus real-time adherence monitoring on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence: daily reminders, weekly reminders, reminders triggered after a late or missed dose (delivered to patients), and notifications triggered by sustained adherence lapses (delivered to patient-nominated social supporters). Design: Pilot randomized controlled trial. Methods: Sixty-three individuals initiating ART received a real-time adherence monitor and were randomized (1 : 1 : 1): (1) Scheduled SMS reminders (daily for 1 month, weekly for 2 months), then SMS reminders triggered by a late or missed dose (no monitoring signal within 2 h of expected dosing); SMS notifications to social supporters for sustained adherence lapses (no monitoring signal for >48 h) added after 3 months. (2) Triggered SMS reminders starting at enrolment; SMS notifications to social supporters added after 3 months. (3) Control: No SMS. HIV RNA was determined at 9 months. Percentage adherence and adherence lapses were compared by linear generalized estimating equations and Poisson regression, respectively. Results: Median age was 31 years, 65% were women, and median enrolment CD4+ cell count was 322 cells/μl 97% took once daily tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz. Compared to control, adherence was 11.1% higher (P = 0.04) and more than 48-h lapses were less frequent (IRR 0.6, P = 0.02) in the scheduled SMS arm. Adherence and more than 48-h lapses were similar in the triggered SMS arm and control. No differences in HIV RNA were seen. Conclusion: Scheduled SMS reminders improved ART in the context of real-time monitoring. Larger studies are needed to determine the impact of triggered reminders and role of social supporters in improving adherence. PMID:26760452

  12. Increasing Learning from TV News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perloff, Richard M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment that manipulated two variables, repetition and pausing for viewer "digestion" of information in a news telecast. Concludes that the use of repetition increased viewers' retention of information, but that pauses did not. (FL)

  13. Microbial Control News - November 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first of a column in the Society for Invertebrate Pathology Newsletter. Entitled "Microbial Control News" this article summarizes regulatory actions in the U.S. and Canada regarding microbial insect pest control agents....

  14. Good News About Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Good News About Childhood Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... 85 percent for the most common form of childhood cancer (acute lymphoblastic leukemia or ALL). During the ...

  15. The Myth of Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; White, Kathryn P.

    After critiquing the usual estimates of the importance of television as a source of news, the national audience for television news over a two-week period is identified from the 1974-1975 W.R. Simmons study (which uses a diary technique for gathering data). Analysis showed that, in the two-week period, 49% of the adult population did not watch a…

  16. Cell Phones and PDA's Hit K-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Richard; Mason, Christine Y.

    2005-01-01

    Although cell phones keep kids in touch with families and personal digital assistants (PDA's) help organize assignments and give Internet access, when they are added to the school climate, educators must reassess policies so technology does not interfere with instruction time. This article discusses the several effects of cell phones to K-6…

  17. Reading and Grammar Learning through Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shudong; Smith, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing language-learning project, three years into its development. We examine both the feasibility and the limitations of developing English reading and grammar skills through the interface of mobile phones. Throughout the project, reading and grammar materials were regularly sent to students' mobile phones. Students…

  18. The Use of Smart phones in Ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Zvornicanin, Edita; Zvornicanin, Jasmin; Hadziefendic, Bahrudin

    2014-01-01

    Smart phones are being increasingly used among health professionals. Ophthalmological applications are widely available and can turn smart phones into sophisticated medical devices. Smart phones can be useful instruments for the practice of evidence-based medicine, professional education, mobile clinical communication, patient education, disease self-management, remote patient monitoring or as powerful administrative tools. Several applications are available for different ophthalmological examinations that can assess visual acuity, color vision, astigmatism, pupil size, Amsler grid test and more. Smart phones can be useful ophthalmic devices for taking images of anterior and posterior eye segment. Professional literature and educational material for patients are easily available with use of smart phones. Smart phones can store great amount of informations and are useful for long term monitoring with caution for patient confidentiality. The use of smart phones especially as diagnostic tools is not standardized and results should be carefully considered. Innovative role of smartphone technology and its use in research, education and information sharing makes smart phones a future of ophthalmology and medicine. PMID:25132717

  19. The Use of Smart phones in Ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Zvornicanin, Edita; Zvornicanin, Jasmin; Hadziefendic, Bahrudin

    2014-06-01

    Smart phones are being increasingly used among health professionals. Ophthalmological applications are widely available and can turn smart phones into sophisticated medical devices. Smart phones can be useful instruments for the practice of evidence-based medicine, professional education, mobile clinical communication, patient education, disease self-management, remote patient monitoring or as powerful administrative tools. Several applications are available for different ophthalmological examinations that can assess visual acuity, color vision, astigmatism, pupil size, Amsler grid test and more. Smart phones can be useful ophthalmic devices for taking images of anterior and posterior eye segment. Professional literature and educational material for patients are easily available with use of smart phones. Smart phones can store great amount of informations and are useful for long term monitoring with caution for patient confidentiality. The use of smart phones especially as diagnostic tools is not standardized and results should be carefully considered. Innovative role of smartphone technology and its use in research, education and information sharing makes smart phones a future of ophthalmology and medicine. PMID:25132717

  20. Cell Phone Roulette and "Consumer Interactive" Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Under current policies, cell phone consumers face a lower probability of finding the best carrier for their usage patterns than winning at roulette. Corroborating survey data consistently show significant dissatisfaction among cell phone users, network performance is a major issue, and customer "churn" is high. This problem may be traced to a new…

  1. Cell Phones Transform a Science Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    A science methods instructor intentionally encouraged cell phone use for class work to discover how cell phones can be used as research tools to enhance the content and engage the students. The anecdotal evidence suggested that students who used their smartphones as research tools experienced the science content and pedagogical information…

  2. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    1999 EAS Awards The Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) announces the winners of their 1999 awards, which will be presented during their annual meeting, to be held November 14-19, 1999, at the Garden State Convention Center in Somerset, NJ. ACS Analytical Chemistry Division, Findeis Young Investigator Award

    • David Clemmer, Indiana University
    EAS Award for Achievements in Separation Science
    • Milton L. Lee, Brigham Young University
    EAS Award for Achievements in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
    • Phil Williams, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, Canada
    EAS Award for Achievements in Magnetic Resonance
    • Frank A. L. Anet, University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus)
    EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry
    • Catherine Fenselau, University of Maryland at College Park
    Galactic Industries Award for Achievements in Chemometrics
    • Harald Martens, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP)
    • Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999
    • Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

    The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants

    • News and Announcements

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      1999-04-01

      natural science for grades six through twelve. During her undergraduate years, she worked with the Chemical Education Group. Her undergraduate research and senior thesis were directed by John W. Moore and centered on the subject of HIV and its use as a topic in the chemistry curriculum. The research culminated in writing and publishing "HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work," a videotape and teacher/student guide offered by the Journal of Chemical Education Software. After graduation, Erica taught chemistry, AP chemistry, and physics for two years at a rural public high school in Minnesota. During her teaching, as a reader of the Journal, she was delighted to see the introduction of the Classroom Activities feature. She found the ready-made activities a great complement to her "hands-on, minds-on" curriculum. Due to her husband's job transfer, she has returned to Madison and is even more delighted to now be a part of the development of Classroom Activities. Her duties at Journal House include helping to test, research, and write Classroom Activities. She divides her time between working at Journal House, taking additional science coursework at the university for professional development, and tutoring chemistry students. She is settling in to her new life in Madison and she and her husband enjoy exploring the Wisconsin outdoors together. European Conference on Research in Chemical Education The 5th European Conference on Research in Chemical Education (5th ECRICE) will be held from September 21-25, 1999, at the University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. It will include plenary lectures, symposia, workshops, poster sessions, and social events. The working language of the conference will be English, but contributions in French are also invited. For more information contact Georgios Tsarparlis, University of Ioannina, Department of Chemistry, GR-451 10 Ioannina, Greece; phone: +30 651 98431; fax: +30 651 44989; email: gtsepar@cc.uoi.gr. The conference World Wide Web site is http

    • News and Announcements

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      1999-06-01

      1999 EAS Awards The Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) announces the winners of their 1999 awards, which will be presented during their annual meeting, to be held November 14-19, 1999, at the Garden State Convention Center in Somerset, NJ. ACS Analytical Chemistry Division, Findeis Young Investigator Award

      • David Clemmer, Indiana University
      EAS Award for Achievements in Separation Science
      • Milton L. Lee, Brigham Young University
      EAS Award for Achievements in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
      • Phil Williams, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, Canada
      EAS Award for Achievements in Magnetic Resonance
      • Frank A. L. Anet, University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus)
      EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry
      • Catherine Fenselau, University of Maryland at College Park
      Galactic Industries Award for Achievements in Chemometrics
      • Harald Martens, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
      Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
      • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
      • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP)
      • Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999
      • Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
      • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
      For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

      The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

  1. 23 CFR 972.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (c) The FWS shall utilize the SMS to ensure that... HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972... database that includes: (i) Accident records with sufficient detail for analysis such as accident...

  2. 23 CFR 972.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (c) The FWS shall utilize the SMS to ensure that... HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972... database that includes: (i) Accident records with sufficient detail for analysis such as accident...

  3. 23 CFR 972.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... inspection and copying as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. (c) The FWS shall utilize the SMS to ensure that... HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972... database that includes: (i) Accident records with sufficient detail for analysis such as accident...

  4. Exploring Gender Differences in SMS-Based Mobile Library Search System Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Tiong-Thye

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates differences in how male and female students perceived a short message service (SMS) library catalog search service when adopting it. Based on a sample of 90 students, the results suggest that there are significant differences in perceived usefulness and intention to use but no significant differences in self-efficacy and…

  5. L'Italiano al Telefonino: Using SMS to Support Beginners' Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Claire; Levy, Mike

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses an experiment in sending regular Short Message Service (SMS) messages to support language learning, and vocabulary learning in particular, at beginners' level in Italian at an Australian university. The approach we took built on the initiatives of Thornton and Houser (2005) and Dias (2002b), and was informed by the results…

  6. Does SMS Text Messaging Help or Harm Adults' Knowledge of Standard Spelling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, D.; Dixon, M.

    2011-01-01

    The recent increase in short messaging system (SMS) text messaging, often using abbreviated, non-conventional "textisms" (e.g. "2nite"), in school-aged children has raised fears of negative consequences of such technology for literacy. The current research used a paradigm developed by Dixon and Kaminska, who showed that exposure to phonetically…

  7. A starfish robot based on soft and smart modular structure (SMS) actuated by SMA wires.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hu; Dong, Erbao; Alici, Gursel; Mao, Shixin; Min, Xu; Liu, Chunshan; Low, K H; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and locomotion of a starfish robot whose locomotion principle is derived from a starfish. The starfish robot has a number of tentacles or arms extending from its central body in the form of a disk, like the topology of a real starfish. The arm, which is a soft and composite structure (which we call the smart modular structure (SMS)) generating a planar reciprocal motion with a high speed of response upon the actuation provided by the shape memory alloy (SMA) wires, is fabricated from soft and smart materials. Based on the variation in the resistance of the SMA wires during their heating, an adaptive regulation (AR) heating strategy is proposed to (i) avoid overheating of the SMA wires, (ii) provide bending range control and (iii) achieve a high speed of response favorable to successfully propelling the starfish robot. Using a finite-segment method, a thermal dynamic model of the SMS is established to describe its thermal behavior under the AR and a constant heating strategy. A starfish robot with five SMS tentacles was tested with different control parameters to optimize its locomotion speed. As demonstrated in the accompanying video file, the robot successfully propelled in semi-submerged and underwater environments show its locomotion ability in the multi-media, like a real starfish. The propulsion speed of the starfish robot is at least an order of magnitude higher than that of those reported in the literature-thanks to the SMS controlled with the AR strategy. PMID:27609700

  8. 23 CFR 972.212 - Federal lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal lands safety management system (SMS). 972.212 Section 972.212 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.212 Federal lands safety management system...

  9. 23 CFR 973.212 - Indian lands safety management system (SMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands safety management system (SMS). 973.212 Section 973.212 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS PERTAINING TO THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND THE INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Bureau of Indian Affairs...

  10. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, is up and running at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce. Organizers of symposia and workshops as well as proposers of papers are invited to submit their ideas over the Web or in writing to the Program Chair, Brian Coppola; phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu, or to the Workshop Coordinator, Evelyn Jackson; phone: 517/355-9715 ext 204; email: ejackson@argus.cem.msu.edu. For general information please contact Seyhan Ege, phone: 734/764-7340, email: snege@umich.edu. ChemCareers Debuts on ChemCenter The ACS ChemCenter website has recently launched a moderated career forum where chemists, chemical engineers, scientists in related fields, students, and other interested persons pose their questions related to career development in the chemical sciences. At the site you can hear what your peers think about preparing for, launching, maintaining, and advancing a career in chemistry. You can bring questions, share experiences, or offer advice. The forum is moderated by ACS career consultants who offer their expert opinions as a part of the discussion. The address is http://www.chemcenter.org. Click on the "discussions" hypertext link under "Discover Chemistry." Green Chemistry The closing date for grant funding from the EPA/NSF Technologies for a Sustainable Environment Solicitation is July 26, 1999. For specific grant information, visit the Web site www.nsf.gov/pubs/1999/nsf99108/nsf99108.txt. For general grant information about green chemistry, go to www.epa.gov/greenchemistry, es.epa.gov/ncerqa/grants, and www.nsf.gov; phone: 202/260-2659. Grad Resources Hotline A national crisis hotline sponsored by Grad Resources was set up effective April 1999. Graduate students who face overwhelming stress or despair may call 1/877-GRAD-HLP, toll-free, 24 hours a day, every day, to speak anonymously with a counselor specially trained in graduate issues. Grad Resources is a non-profit organization serving graduate students. For further references and

  11. Risk and benefit perceptions of mobile phone and base station technology in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    van Kleef, Ellen; Fischer, Arnout R H; Khan, Moin; Frewer, Lynn J

    2010-06-01

    Research in developed countries showed that many citizens perceive that radio signals transmitted by mobile phones and base stations represent potential health risks. Less research has been conducted in developing countries focused on citizen perceptions of risks and benefits, despite the recent and rapid introduction of mobile communication technologies. This study aims to identify factors that are influential in determining the tradeoffs that Bangladeshi citizens make between risks and benefits in terms of mobile phone technology acceptance and health concerns associated with the technology. Bangladesh was selected as representative of many developing countries inasmuch as terrestrial telephone infrastructure is insubstantial, and mobile phone use has expanded rapidly over the last decade, even among the poor. Issues of importance were identified in a small-scale qualitative study among Bangladeshi citizens (n = 13), followed by a survey within a sample of Bangladeshi citizens (n = 500). The results demonstrate that, in general, the perceived benefits of mobile phone technology outweigh the risks. The perceived benefits are primarily related to the social and personal advantages of mobile phone use, including the ability to receive emergency news about floods, cyclones, and other natural disasters. Base stations were seen as a symbol of societal advance. The results furthermore suggest that overall risk perceptions are relatively low, in particular health risks, and are primarily driven by perceptions that related to crime and social inconvenience. Perceived health risks are relatively small. These findings show that risk communication and management may be particularly effective when contextual factors of the society where the system is implemented are taken into consideration. PMID:20409037

  12. Use of short message service (SMS) to improve malaria chemoprophylaxis compliance after returning from a malaria endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, Lénaïck; Romand, Olivier; Marimoutou, Catherine; Michel, Rémy; Pognant, Corinne; Todesco, Alain; Migliani, René; Baudon, Dominique; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background Malaria chemoprophylaxis compliance is suboptimal among French soldiers despite the availability of free malaria chemoprophylaxis and repeated health education before, during and after deployment to malaria endemic areas. Methods In 2007, a randomized controlled study was performed among a cohort of French soldiers returning from Côte d'Ivoire to assess the feasibility and acceptability of sending a daily short message service (SMS) reminder message via mobile device to remind soldiers to take their malaria chemoprophylaxis, and to assess the impact of the daily reminder SMS on chemoprophylaxis compliance. Malaria chemoprophylaxis consisted of a daily dose of 100 mg doxycycline monohydrate, which began upon arrival in Côte d'Ivoire and was to be continued for 28 days following return to France. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed by questionnaire. Cohort members were followed for a 28 day period, with compliance assessed by use of an electronic medication monitoring device, from which several indicators were developed: daily proportion of compliant individuals, average number of pills taken, and early discontinuation. Results Among 424 volunteers randomized to the study, 47.6% were assigned to the SMS group and 52.3% to the control group. Approximately 90% of subjects assigned to the SMS group received a daily SMS at midday during the study. Persons of the SMS group agreed more frequently that SMS reminders were very useful and that the device was not annoying. Compliance did not vary significantly between groups across the compliance indicators. Conclusion SMS did not increase malaria chemoprophylaxis compliance above baseline, likely because the persons did not benefit from holidays after the return and stayed together. So the reminder by SMS was noted by all subjects of the study. Another study should be done to confirm these results on soldiers going on holidays from employment after return or with individual travellers. PMID:19852811

  13. PhoneSat - The Smartphone Nanosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James J.; Yost, Bruce; Petro, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    NASAs PhoneSat project will test whether spacecraft can be built using smartphones to launch the lowest-cost satellites ever flown in space. Each PhoneSat nanosatellite is one cubesat unit - a satellite in a 10 cm (approx. 4 inches) cube or about the size of a tissue box - and weighs approximately three pounds. Engineers believe PhoneSat technology will enable NASA to launch multiple new satellites capable of conducting science and exploration missions at a small fraction of the cost of conventional satellites.

  14. PhoneSat - The Smartphone Nanosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James J.; Yost, Bruce; Petro, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    NASA's PhoneSat project tests whether spacecraft can be built using smartphones to launch the lowest-cost satellites ever flown in space. Each PhoneSat nanosatellite is one cubesat unit - a satellite in a 10 cm (approx. 4 inches) cube or about the size of a tissue box - and weighs approximately 1 kg (2.2 pounds). Engineers believe PhoneSat technology will enable NASA to launch multiple new satellites capable of conducting science and exploration missions at a small fraction of the cost of conventional satellites.

  15. Biodegradation of news inks

    SciTech Connect

    Erhan, S.Z.; Bagby, M.O.

    1995-12-01

    Printing ink vehicles that require no petroleum components were prepared by modifying vegetable oil. Physical properties of inks formulated with these vehicles meet or exceed the industry standards for lithographic and letterpress newsprint applications. Elimination of petroleum-based resin and reduced pigment requirements, due to the light vehicle color, provide a competitively priced alternative to petroleum-based inks of equal quality. These ink vehicles, made exclusively from soybean oil, were subjected to biodegradation, and the results were compared with those obtained with commercial vehicles. Results show that they degrade faster and more completely than commercial hybrid (partial) soy or mineral oil based vehicles. Fermentations were allowed to proceed for 5, 12, and 25 days. Both mono-and mixed cultures of microorganisms commonly found in soil were used. In 25 days, commercial mineral oil based vehicles degraded 17-27%, while commercial hybrid soy oil based vehicles degraded 58-68% and our 100% soy oil based vehicles degrade 82-92%. Similar studies were conducted with commercial news inks consisting of soy or mineral oil with petroleum resins along with the four colored pigments and USDA`s 100% soy oil based ink consisting of modified soybean oil and pigment. Results show that pigment slowed the degradation of ink vehicles; however, neither time nor type of pigment played a significant role. Also these inks were degraded by using {open_quotes}Modified Sturm Test{close_quotes} (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). In this method, test organisms were obtained from activated sludge, and the extent of degradation was determined by measuring carbon dioxide evolution. In all cases USDA`s ink degraded faster and more completely (for all four colors) than either hybrid soy oil based or petroleum based inks.

  16. In the News: Current Events Websites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Greg; Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews Web sites for current events news that are appropriate for students of various ages. Discusses the possibilities for second language learning and curriculum connections and lists television sites, news magazines, classroom magazines, newspapers, and lesson plans. (LRW)

  17. Professionalism and Awards in Television News Photography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Conrad; Hubbard, Tom

    1987-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that photojournalists with high professionalism scores are more likely to win news photography awards. Suggests that television news photography awards recognize skills gained through experience rather than specific professional values. (MM)

  18. Society for the History of Psychology News.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shayna Fox

    2016-05-01

    Presents the Society for the History of Psychology News column. This column records miscellaneous publication news, announcements, research notes, reviews of books, and conference information, as well as references that support their writings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100928

  19. Cell phone based balance trainer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In their current laboratory-based form, existing vibrotactile sensory augmentation technologies that provide cues of body motion are impractical for home-based rehabilitation use due to their size, weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. Methods We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments. It comprises an iPhone with an embedded tri-axial linear accelerometer, custom software to estimate body tilt, a "tactor bud" accessory that plugs into the headphone jack to provide vibrotactile cues of body tilt, and a battery. Five young healthy subjects (24 ± 2.8 yrs, 3 females and 2 males) and four subjects with vestibular deficits (42.25 ± 13.5 yrs, 2 females and 2 males) participated in a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Healthy subjects used the system with eyes closed during Romberg, semi-tandem Romberg, and tandem Romberg stances. Subjects with vestibular deficits used the system with both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during semi-tandem Romberg stance. Vibrotactile feedback was provided when the subject exceeded either an anterior-posterior (A/P) or a medial-lateral (M/L) body tilt threshold. Subjects were instructed to move away from the vibration. Results The system was capable of providing real-time vibrotactile cues that informed corrective postural responses. When feedback was available, both healthy subjects and those with vestibular deficits significantly reduced their A/P or M/L RMS sway (depending on the direction of feedback), had significantly smaller elliptical area fits to their sway trajectory, spent a significantly greater mean percentage time within the no feedback zone, and showed a significantly greater A/P or M/L mean power frequency. Conclusion The results suggest that the real-time feedback provided by this system can be used to reduce body sway. Its

  20. Students using mobile phones in the classroom: Can the phones increase content learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, David Lee

    A study was conducted at a high-performing school in Southern California to explore the effects on learning content from students using their own smart phones in and out of the classroom. The study used a Switching Replications design format which allowed two independent analyses of posttest scores between a group using e-flash cards on smart phones and a group using paper flash cards. Quantitative data was collected via two tailed, t-tests and qualitative data was collected through observations and interviews. Results suggest that knowledge level learning may be increased with mobile phone use, but no effect on comprehension level learning was found. Students found the phones to be convenient in accessing flash cards anytime and anywhere. Enthusiasm for using the phones in class while initially high waned over the 1 month study duration. Students perceived the phones to not be a significant source of distraction outside of class.

  1. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Malbet, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share an interest in long baseline stellar interferometry. It was established in 1995 and is the focus of activity of the IAU Working Group on Optical/Infrared Interferometry. Here you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, news items, recent papers and preprints, and resources for further research. The email news forum was established in 2001 to complement the website and to facilitate exchanges and collaborations. The forum includes an email exploder and an archived list of discussions. You are invited to explore the forum and website at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov. Work by PRL was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Cell Phone Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryen, Diane Nelson; Carey, Allison; Friedman, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Although cell phone use has grown dramatically, there is a gap in cell phone access between people with disabilities and the general public. The importance of cell phone use among people with intellectual disabilities and studies about use of cell phones by adults with intellectual disabilities was described. Our goal was to determine the extent…

  3. 75 FR 26733 - Preventing Contraband Cell Phone Use in Prisons

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... inmates. As a tool to deal with contraband cell phone use, some of these systems employ passive technology that detects cell phone use and collects data from active cell phones. Some systems deny access to.... These systems can only detect a cell phone when it is in use--either placing or receiving a call....

  4. Smart Phones Permitted: How Teachers Use Text Messaging to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosier, Meghan; Gomez, Audri; McKee, Aja; Maghzi, Kimiya Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    The use of smart phones by teachers in K-12 education has been contentious. Although teachers are often instructed to put their phones away during instruction, teachers and students can benefit in many ways from using smart phones in the classroom. The use of information systems such as a smart phone can support knowledge sharing and collaboration…

  5. Smart Phones, a Powerful Tool in the Chemistry Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Antony J.; Pence, Harry E.

    2011-01-01

    Cell phones, especially "smart phones", seem to have become ubiquitous. Actually, it is misleading to call many of these devices phones, as they are actually a portable and powerful computer that can be very valuable in the chemistry classroom. Currently, there are three major ways in which smart phones can be used for education. Smart phones…

  6. Learning optics using a smart-phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Amparo; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Barreiro, Juan C.; Moreno, Ignacio

    2014-07-01

    We propose several ideas about how to teach Optics using smart-phones. We think that the almost addictive interest of students in smart-phone technology can be useful for the benefits of learning. Moreover as all of our students are from university level, it helps that mostly all of them own a device. In this work we review many possibilities that using a smart-phone offer from the teaching point of view. We begin with a search of different apps about Optics. Then we also use the device as a sensor for implementing some experiments, we analyze accessories such as telescope and microscope lenses and finally, when the smart-phone is over, we use different parts to teach diffraction or imaging.

  7. PhoneSat - The Smartphone Nanosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westley, Deborah; Yost, Bruce; Petro, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    PhoneSat 2.4, carried into space on November 19, 2013 aboard a Minotaur I rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASAs Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, is the first of the PhoneSat family to use a two-way S-band radio to allow engineers to command the satellite from Earth. This mission also serves as a technology demonstration for a novel attitude determination and control system (ADCS) that establishes and stabilizes the satellites attitude relative to Earth. Unlike the earlier PhoneSats that used a Nexus One, PhoneSat 2.4 uses the Nexus S smartphone, which runs Googles Android operating system, and is made by Samsung Electronics Co., Suwon, So. Korea. The smartphone provides many of the functions needed by the satellite such as a central computer, data memory, ready-made interfaces for communications, navigation and power all pre-assembled in a rugged electronics package.

  8. Consistency of color representation in smart phones.

    PubMed

    Dain, Stephen J; Kwan, Benjamin; Wong, Leslie

    2016-03-01

    One of the barriers to the construction of consistent computer-based color vision tests has been the variety of monitors and computers. Consistency of color on a variety of screens has necessitated calibration of each setup individually. Color vision examination with a carefully controlled display has, as a consequence, been a laboratory rather than a clinical activity. Inevitably, smart phones have become a vehicle for color vision tests. They have the advantage that the processor and screen are associated and there are fewer models of smart phones than permutations of computers and monitors. Colorimetric consistency of display within a model may be a given. It may extend across models from the same manufacturer but is unlikely to extend between manufacturers especially where technologies vary. In this study, we measured the same set of colors in a JPEG file displayed on 11 samples of each of four models of smart phone (iPhone 4s, iPhone5, Samsung Galaxy S3, and Samsung Galaxy S4) using a Photo Research PR-730. The iPhones are white LED backlit LCD and the Samsung are OLEDs. The color gamut varies between models and comparison with sRGB space shows 61%, 85%, 117%, and 110%, respectively. The iPhones differ markedly from the Samsungs and from one another. This indicates that model-specific color lookup tables will be needed. Within each model, the primaries were quite consistent (despite the age of phone varying within each sample). The worst case in each model was the blue primary; the 95th percentile limits in the v' coordinate were ±0.008 for the iPhone 4 and ±0.004 for the other three models. The u'v' variation in white points was ±0.004 for the iPhone4 and ±0.002 for the others, although the spread of white points between models was u'v'±0.007. The differences are essentially the same for primaries at low luminance. The variation of colors intermediate between the primaries (e.g., red-purple, orange) mirror the variation in the primaries. The variation in

  9. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

    2001-01-01

    Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

  10. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  11. Making Your News Service More Effective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Joel S., Ed.

    "CASE Currents" and "Techniques" articles, materials written especially for this manual, and papers from the 1976 CASE News/Information Special Conference make up this updated handbook on how to make a college news service more effective. Part I, "Managing the News Service" contains nine papers dealing with such issues as managing, staffing,…

  12. Network Evening News Coverage of Environmental Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Michael R.; And Others

    Focusing on ABC, NBC, and CBS's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986, a study examined network news coverage of environmental risk--defined as manmade chemical, biological, and physical agents that create risk in the indoor, outdoor, and occupational environments. Using the Vanderbilt University "Television News Index…

  13. An Economic Theory of News Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, John

    Over the years, journalists, social scientists, and government commissions have defined news in a variety of ways, but their definitions consistently lack the notion that, above all, news is a commodity and must sell. Within the journalism profession, and particularly in television news, the potential for conflict between a media corporation's…

  14. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short…

  15. News Resources on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes up-to-date news sources that are presently available on the Internet and World Wide Web. Highlights include electronic newspapers; AP (Associated Press) sources and Reuters; sports news; stock market information; New York Times; multimedia capabilities, including CNN Interactive; and local and regional news. (LRW)

  16. Cell phones and electromagnetic interference revisited.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Some media reports have inaccurately and incompletely interpreted recent studies, creating the impression that newer cell phone technology doesn't create enough electromagnetic interference (EMI) to affect medical equipment. As a result, hospitals are questioning whether existing restrictions on cell phone use can be eliminated. This article takes a closer look at the available evidence and explains that the evidence does, in fact, demonstrate an ongoing risk that EMI will affect medical devices. In addition, the article provides guidance on the impact that some newer communications technologies--namely, in-building cordless telephones, microcell systems, and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phones--may have on cell phone use and policies. Note that while this article focuses on cell phones--since they are the most common concern among hospitals--other types of wireless devices can also interfere with medical equipment. These include handheld messaging devices (e.g., BlackBerry products); multicommunication devices that combine the use of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and cellular communications; and cellular-capable computers. Healthcare facilities should apply the same policies to these devices as to cell phones. Two-way radios likewise present an interference risk, but require different policies, as we describe in a supplementary article within this Guidance Article. PMID:17300104

  17. MIDP-based Realization of a Simple Phone Contact Book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yan; Xia, Heng; Huan, Lele

    This paper describes the architecture of J2ME and MIDP specification, use the Java language to implement a simple cell phone contact book system, to complete a contact to add, delete, modify, query functions. Different from existing phone contacts, it can run any MIDP-enabled mobile phones, avoid the question of using tool software into and out of phone contact book after user change phone.

  18. Campus Child Care News, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Marion F., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of the three 1998 issues of a newsletter disseminating information on the National Coalition for Campus Child Care Centers (NCCCC) and providing a forum for news, research, and information concerning campus child care centers. The February issue contains stories on the White House Conference on Child Care, registration…

  19. Broadcast News: An Interdisciplinary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Carol; Sassi, Brenda

    Fourth graders in the Meroby School, Mexico, Maine, produce a weekly news program that is transmitted to all classrooms via closed circuit television. The classroom teacher is in charge of day-to-day preparation, working on the writing and the necessary skills with students. Teachers and students use their creativity to come up with new…

  20. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Highlights important 1985 science stories appearing in "Science News" under these headings: anthropology and paleontology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and mathematics, earth sciences, environment, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. Each entry includes the volume and page number in…

  1. Guess Who's in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassom, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Examines the power of positive publicity as cost-effective child-care marketing. Suggests that getting positive press can make marketing easier, less expensive, and fun. Notes that by creating news stories and developing a working relationship with targeted media, child-care-center directors can inform, educate, and create new prospects and…

  2. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents a review of important science articles of 1974 as reported in the pages of "Science News." References are given relating to the volume and page number in which the main article appeared. Life-sciences, physical sciences, earth science, environmental science, humanities and technology research are reviewed. (EB)

  3. How to Tell Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  4. Obtaining of SmS based semiconducting material and investigation of its electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminskii, V. V.; Hirai, Shinji; Kuzuya, Toshihiro; Solov'ev, S. M.; Stepanov, N. N.; Sharenkova, N. V.

    2013-10-15

    Semiconductor samarium monosulfide polycrystals obtained by reaction between samarium trihydride (SmH{sub 3}) and its sesquisulfide were studied. The temperature, baric and frequency dependences of the resistivity and structural features of the samples were investigated. It is shown that the value of X-ray coherent scattering region is extremely small for SmS samples, 320 A; critical pressure of semiconductor-metal phase transition is higher than in the samples, obtained by other methods, 0.88 GPa; the temperature dependence of the resistivity has metallic behavior. Hopping mechanism of electron transport was found. All these features are explained by more defective structure of the polycrystalline SmS samples.

  5. ZnO-coated SMS structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X. Y.; Huang, J.; Xiao, H.; Yang, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    A zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated single mode-multimode-single mode fiber (SMS) structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser has been developed as a chemical sensor. Response to relative humidity (RH) and ethanol volatilization was evaluated by tracking the wavelength shifts of the output laser line in different moisture environments and ethanol solutions, respectively. For humidity sensing a linear response with a measurement range of 4-96% RH, and a sensitivity of 0.06 nm per %RH were obtained. As for ethanol volatilization sensing obvious wavelength blue shift was observed for the sensor immersed in 50% and 62% ethanol solution, while no variation could be detected in pure ethanol solution (purity larger than 97%). With the advantages of low cost, ease of fabrication and sensitive response, ZnO-coated SMS interrogated with a fiber ring laser was demonstrated to be an effective sensor for humidity and ethanol volatilization sensing.

  6. Long-range displacement sensor based on SMS fiber structure and OTDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifin, A.; Hatta, A. M.; Sekartedjo; Muntini, M. S.; Rubiyanto, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a long-range displacement measurement method by using a single-multi-single mode (SMS) fiber structure, attached to a flexible plate between two permanent poles and the optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR)-based interrogator. The SMS fiber structure sensors are prepared with two different configurations, i.e. straight and sinusoidal configurations. It is demonstrated that the displacement sensor can perform a displacement measurement with a range from 0 mm to 150 mm with a resolution of 0.159 mm. The sinusoidal configuration provides a better sensitivity than the straight configuration. The proposed sensor offers a low cost, and it can be implemented for quasi-distributed displacement measurement which is suitable for civil structure monitoring.

  7. Information extraction from SMS text related to a reminder service for outpatients.

    PubMed

    Rubrichi, Stefania; Eku Ndam, Stéphanie; Battistotti, Andrea; Quaglini, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluates the users' satisfaction with an SMS-based reminder system that is being used since about six years by an Italian healthcare organization. The system was implemented for reducing dropouts. This goal has been achieved, as dropout decreased from 8% to 4%. During these years, a number of reminded citizens, even not required, sent an SMS message back, with comments about the service, further requirements, etc. We collected some thousands of them. Their analysis may represent a useful feedback to the healthcare organization. We used conditional random fields as the information extraction method for classifying messages into appreciation, critique, inappropriateness, etc. The classification system achieved a very good overall performance (F1-measure of 94%), thus it can be used from here on to monitor the users' satisfaction in time. PMID:22874188

  8. NEWS: Post-16 update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    .15 pm. Twelve hours travel by air will reach the other side of the world. Given such a change in the range of human activity, is it surprising that society has changed and adapted, and some historical incidents and lifestyles hardly make sense? The journals of Dorothy Wordsworth describe a life spent at walking pace. Jane Austen's novels take place at horse speed. Many modern novels are of the jet age, and world travel is part of the plot. Reading accounts of warfare, we must remember that an army perhaps moved 15 miles a day if it hurried (and arrived exhausted). It becomes very clear why Britain could be several independent kingdoms. Turning to another area of physics, we might even speculate how easy life for Romeo and Juliet would have been with a mobile phone each.

  9. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers participate in JSC FB-SMS training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Frederick D. Gregory and Pilot Terence T. Henricks are stationed at their appointed positions on the forward flight deck of the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Gregory (left) in the commanders seat and Henricks (right) in the pilots seat look back toward aft flight deck and the photographer. Seat backs appear in the foreground and forward flight deck control panels in the background.

  10. STS-26 Commander Hauck in fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, wearing comunications kit assembly headset, checks control panel data while seated in the commanders seat on forward flight deck. A flight data file (FDF) notebook rests on his lap. A portable computer (laptop) is positioned on the center console. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  11. STS-37 crewmembers train in JSC's FB shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Commander Steven R. Nagel (left) and Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross rehearse some of their scheduled duties on the flight deck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. During the unsuited simulation, Nagel reviews checklist while seated at the commanders station as Ross looks on from the pilots station.

  12. STS-36 crewmembers train in JSC's FB shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-36 Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, seated on the aft flight deck, discusses procedures with Commander John O. Creighton (left) and Pilot John H. Casper during a simulation in JSC's Fixed Based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Casper reviews a checklist at the pilots station on the forward flight deck. The crewmembers are rehearsing crew cabin activities for their upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  13. STS-26 crew trains in JSC fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers (left to right) Commander Frederick H. Hauck, Pilot Richard O. Covey, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, MS David C. Hilmers, and MS John M. Lounge pose on the middeck in fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. A simulation for their anticipated June 1988 flight began 10-20-87.

  14. STS-26 Commander Hauck in fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, wearing comunications kit assembly headset and seated in the commanders seat on forward flight deck, looks over his shoulder toward the aft flight deck. A flight data file (FDF) notebook rests on his lap. The STS-26 crew is training in the fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  15. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers participate in FB-SMS training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Frederick D. Gregory (left) and Pilot Terence T. Henricks, positioned at their appointed stations on the forward flight deck, are joined by Mission Specialist (MS) F. Story Musgrave (center) and MS James S. Voss (standing). The crewmembers are participating in a flight simulation in the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. A maze of panel switches appear overhead and in the background.

  16. STS-46 crewmembers participate in Fixed Base (FB) SMS training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Andrew M. Allen hands Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman checklists from middeck locker MF43E during training session in JSC's fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. European Space Agency (ESA) MS Claude Nicollier outfitted with communications kit assembly headset (HDST) and equipment looks beyond Hoffman to the opposite side of the middeck.

  17. Temporal and Cross Correlations in Business News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Takei, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Watanabe, T.

    We empirically investigate temporal and cross correlations inthe frequency of news reports on companies, using a dataset of more than 100 million news articles reported in English by around 500 press agencies worldwide for the period 2003--2009. Our first finding is that the frequency of news reports on a company does not follow a Poisson process, but instead exhibits long memory with a positive autocorrelation for longer than one year. The second finding is that there exist significant correlations in the frequency of news across companies. Specifically, on a daily time scale or longer the frequency of news is governed by external dynamics, while on a time scale of minutes it is governed by internal dynamics. These two findings indicate that the frequency of news reports on companies has statistical properties similar to trading volume or price volatility in stock markets, suggesting that the flow of information through company news plays an important role in price dynamics in stock markets.

  18. Costly Cell Phones: The Impact of Cell Phone Rings on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    End, Christian M.; Worthman, Shaye; Mathews, Mary Bridget; Wetterau, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    College students participated in a study on the "psychology of note taking" during which they took notes on video content and later completed a multiple-choice test on the material. Researchers assigned 71 participants to either the ringing condition (the video was disrupted by a ringing cell phone) or the control condition (no cell phone rings…

  19. Mobile Phone-Based Unobtrusive Ecological Momentary Assessment of Day-to-Day Mood: An Explorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruwaard, Jeroen; Ejdys, Michal; Schrader, Niels; Sijbrandij, Marit; Riper, Heleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is a useful method to tap the dynamics of psychological and behavioral phenomena in real-world contexts. However, the response burden of (self-report) EMA limits its clinical utility. Objective The aim was to explore mobile phone-based unobtrusive EMA, in which mobile phone usage logs are considered as proxy measures of clinically relevant user states and contexts. Methods This was an uncontrolled explorative pilot study. Our study consisted of 6 weeks of EMA/unobtrusive EMA data collection in a Dutch student population (N=33), followed by a regression modeling analysis. Participants self-monitored their mood on their mobile phone (EMA) with a one-dimensional mood measure (1 to 10) and a two-dimensional circumplex measure (arousal/valence, –2 to 2). Meanwhile, with participants’ consent, a mobile phone app unobtrusively collected (meta) data from six smartphone sensor logs (unobtrusive EMA: calls/short message service (SMS) text messages, screen time, application usage, accelerometer, and phone camera events). Through forward stepwise regression (FSR), we built personalized regression models from the unobtrusive EMA variables to predict day-to-day variation in EMA mood ratings. The predictive performance of these models (ie, cross-validated mean squared error and percentage of correct predictions) was compared to naive benchmark regression models (the mean model and a lag-2 history model). Results A total of 27 participants (81%) provided a mean 35.5 days (SD 3.8) of valid EMA/unobtrusive EMA data. The FSR models accurately predicted 55% to 76% of EMA mood scores. However, the predictive performance of these models was significantly inferior to that of naive benchmark models. Conclusions Mobile phone-based unobtrusive EMA is a technically feasible and potentially powerful EMA variant. The method is young and positive findings may not replicate. At present, we do not recommend the application of FSR-based mood

  20. Emerging aspects of mobile phone use.

    PubMed

    Samkange-Zeeb, F; Blettner, M

    2009-01-01

    The mobile phone is a modern-day invention, which has managed to reach many parts of the world enabling telecommunications across areas where it was not possible before. Although these devices have proved to be life saving in certain circumstances (e.g., after accidents) and helped improve the quality of life in some sectors, concerns continue to be raised about potential adverse health impacts associated with their use. These range from cancer and cognitive deficiencies to subjective effects, such as a feeling of warmth around the ear used, headache and fatigue. We provide an overview of the concerns raised and summarise what is known about them. We conducted a literature search in Pubmed/Medline to identify published papers on health effects of mobile phones, and an intensive search on the Internet to collect data on the global use of mobile phones. In the year 2000, there were an estimated 500 million mobile phone users worldwide. Today, there are about 3.3 billion users. The use of mobile phones among young children and adolescents is also increasing. Health-risk research has mainly focused on adults and on a single outcome, brain tumours. No significant relationship has been established between mobile phone use and the incidence or growth of brain tumours. Other research indicates emerging concerns, including hearing problems and self-reported health symptoms, such as tiredness, stress, headache, anxiety, concentration difficulties and sleep disturbances, but results remain inconclusive. Currently, there is little epidemiological evidence indicating that the use of mobile phones causes adverse health effects. PMID:22460286

  1. Low-energy/high-charge-state ions in the polar ionosphere observed by AKEBONO/SMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, E.; Watanabe, Shigeaki; Watanabe, Shigeto

    The suprathermal ion mass spectrometer (SMS) onboard the AKEBONO satellite has occasionally observed a broad mass peak in the ion mass spectrum at amu/ q ˜ 2.7. SMS is capable of measuring a wide range of ion mass (1-64 amu/ q) at low energy ( E < ˜100 eV) with good mass resolution (Δ M/ M ˜ 0.1). The events were observed at about 1 Re altitude, and mostly at the polar cusp region as identified by the on-board low-energy particle (LEP) instrument. The broad mass peak is consistent with high-charge state ions commonly seen in the solar wind such as C 6+, O 7+, and O 6+. Although it is difficult to identify the charge state of these ions definitively using SMS, which is a mass-per-charge analyzer, decomposition of the broad mass peak results in a reasonable ratio of O 7+/O 6+ to that in the solar wind. Statistical study shows that this type of events has been observed with an occurrence rate of about 10% near the dayside cusp region. Also, the occurrence rate is slightly higher when IMF Bz is positive, suggesting the entry of the solar wind plasma into the polar ionosphere with weaker acceleration during northward IMF compared with southward IMF.

  2. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Reformulation and interpretation of the SMS braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Edward; Tavakol, Reza

    2003-12-01

    We reformulate the Shiromizu, Maeda and Sasaki (SMS) braneworlds within the framework of the five-dimensional Einstein equations. In many applications of the braneworld Einstein field equations, the Weyl term is attributed to the bulk, thus splitting the non-Einsteinian terms into 'bulk' and 'brane' terms. Here by employing standard geometrical identities, we show that such a split is non-unique, since they get mixed up in different formulations. An important consequence of this non-uniqueness is that even though the full brane-bulk systems in all such formulations are completely equivalent, important differences can arise were one to truncate different formulations by throwing away the associated 'bulk' terms. This is particularly likely to be the case in more general anisotropic/inhomogeneous settings with non-AdS bulks, in which the common truncation of the SMS (which throws away the Weyl term) would not coincide with the full system. We emphasize that rather than providing support for any particular truncation, these differences show clearly the dangers of using any truncated equations and provide a strong argument in favour of studying the full brane bulk system. The different formulations we provide also permit different ways of approaching the full brane bulk system which may greatly facilitate its study. An example of this is the second-order nature of the formulations given here as opposed to SMS's formulation which is third order.

  3. Enabling Philippine Farmers to Adapt to Climate Variability Using Seasonal Climate and Weather Forecast with a Crop Simulation Model in an SMS-based Farmer Decision Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebardaloza, J. B. R.; Trogo, R.; Sabido, D. J.; Tongson, E.; Bagtasa, G.; Balderama, O. F.

    2015-12-01

    Corn farms in the Philippines are rainfed farms, hence, it is of utmost importance to choose the start of planting date so that the critical growth stages that are in need of water will fall on dates when there is rain. Most farmers in the Philippines use superstitions and traditions as basis for farming decisions such as when to start planting [1]. Before climate change, superstitions like planting after a feast day of a saint has worked for them but with the recent progression of climate change, farmers now recognize that there is a need for technological intervention [1]. The application discussed in this paper presents a solution that makes use of meteorological station sensors, localized seasonal climate forecast, localized weather forecast and a crop simulation model to provide recommendations to farmers based on the crop cultivar, soil type and fertilizer type used by farmers. It is critical that the recommendations given to farmers are not generic as each farmer would have different needs based on their cultivar, soil, fertilizer, planting schedule and even location [2]. This application allows the farmer to inquire about whether it will rain in the next seven days, the best date to start planting based on the potential yield upon harvest, when to apply fertilizer and by how much, when to water and by how much. Short messaging service (SMS) is the medium chosen for this application because while mobile penetration in the Philippines is as high as 101%, the smart phone penetration is only at 15% [3]. SMS has been selected as it has been identified as the most effective way of reaching farmers with timely agricultural information and knowledge [4,5]. The recommendations while derived from making use of Automated Weather Station (AWS) sensor data, Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) models and DSSAT 4.5 [9], are translated into the local language of the farmers and in a format that is easily understood as recommended in [6,7,8]. A pilot study has been started

  4. News from Online: Industrial Chemicals and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-02-01

    's end with information about making paper. Go to http://www.sci.fi /~saarives/pulpmfl.htm for Ahlstrom Machinery's Typical Offerings for Chemical Pulp Mills. Now this is a chemically rich plant that is worth the trip. Carolyn Sweeney Judd teaches at Houston Community College System, 1300 Holman, Houston, TX 77004; phone: 713/718-6315; email: cjudd@tenet.edu. World Wide Web Addresses The Macrogalleria http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/index.html Polymers Are Everywhere http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/floor1.html Natural Polymers http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/natupoly.html Nylon http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/nylon.html Carbon Fibers http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/carfib.html How They Work http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/floor3.html The Cross-linking Page http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/xlink.html Makin' Polymers http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/floor4.html Ziegler-Natta Vinyl Polymerization http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/ziegler.html Syndiotactic Ziegler-Natta Polymerization (movie, Shockwave plug-in required for viewing) at http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/movies/zns.html Metallocene Catalysis Polymerization http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/mcene.html POLYED Welcome Page http://chemdept.uwsp.edu/polyed/index.htm Ziegler Research Group Home Page http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/index.html Metallocene as Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: An Introduction at http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/met_intro.html The Why Files http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu Low-Temperature Metallocene Catalysts http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu/shorties/catalyst.html Environsense http://es.epa.gov/ Chemcylopedia 99 http://pubs.acs.org/chemcy99/ Ahlstrom Machinery's Typical Offerings for Chemical Pulp Mills at http://www.sci.fi/~saarives/pulpmfl.htm access date for all sites: December 1998

  5. Mobile phone based SCADA for industrial automation.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Engin; Karacor, Mevlut

    2006-01-01

    SCADA is the acronym for "Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition." SCADA systems are widely used in industry for supervisory control and data acquisition of industrial processes. Conventional SCADA systems use PC, notebook, thin client, and PDA as a client. In this paper, a Java-enabled mobile phone has been used as a client in a sample SCADA application in order to display and supervise the position of a sample prototype crane. The paper presents an actual implementation of the on-line controlling of the prototype crane via mobile phone. The wireless communication between the mobile phone and the SCADA server is performed by means of a base station via general packet radio service (GPRS) and wireless application protocol (WAP). Test results have indicated that the mobile phone based SCADA integration using the GPRS or WAP transfer scheme could enhance the performance of the crane in a day without causing an increase in the response times of SCADA functions. The operator can visualize and modify the plant parameters using his mobile phone, without reaching the site. In this way maintenance costs are reduced and productivity is increased. PMID:16480111

  6. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    natural science for grades six through twelve. During her undergraduate years, she worked with the Chemical Education Group. Her undergraduate research and senior thesis were directed by John W. Moore and centered on the subject of HIV and its use as a topic in the chemistry curriculum. The research culminated in writing and publishing "HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work," a videotape and teacher/student guide offered by the Journal of Chemical Education Software. After graduation, Erica taught chemistry, AP chemistry, and physics for two years at a rural public high school in Minnesota. During her teaching, as a reader of the Journal, she was delighted to see the introduction of the Classroom Activities feature. She found the ready-made activities a great complement to her "hands-on, minds-on" curriculum. Due to her husband's job transfer, she has returned to Madison and is even more delighted to now be a part of the development of Classroom Activities. Her duties at Journal House include helping to test, research, and write Classroom Activities. She divides her time between working at Journal House, taking additional science coursework at the university for professional development, and tutoring chemistry students. She is settling in to her new life in Madison and she and her husband enjoy exploring the Wisconsin outdoors together. European Conference on Research in Chemical Education The 5th European Conference on Research in Chemical Education (5th ECRICE) will be held from September 21-25, 1999, at the University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. It will include plenary lectures, symposia, workshops, poster sessions, and social events. The working language of the conference will be English, but contributions in French are also invited. For more information contact Georgios Tsarparlis, University of Ioannina, Department of Chemistry, GR-451 10 Ioannina, Greece; phone: +30 651 98431; fax: +30 651 44989; email: gtsepar@cc.uoi.gr. The conference World Wide Web site is http

  7. Anthropogenic Oxidation of Seafloor Massive Sulfide (SMS) deposits: Implications for Localized Seafloor Acid Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenker, L.; Romano, G. Y.; Mckibben, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    A rapid increase in the price of transition metals in recent years has piqued interest in deep sea in situ mining of seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits. There are important unanswered questions about the potential environmental effects of seafloor mining, particularly localized sulfuric acid generation. Currently there is a paucity of data on the oxidation kinetics of sulfide minerals in seawater. Seafloor massive sulfides oxidize rapidly via irreversible, acid-producing reactions. The oxidation kinetics of these minerals need to be quantified to estimate the significance of acid production. Laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the effects of pH, temperature, oxidant concentration, and mineral surface area on the rate of oxidation of chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) in seawater. Temperature controlled circulation baths, Teflon reaction vessels, synthetic seawater, and pure, hand sorted natural sulfide mineral crystals are used in experiments. Both batch and flow-through reactor methods are employed. Reaction products are analyzed using ICP-MS. The rate law is expressed as follows: R = k (MO2,aq)a(MH+)b where R is the specific mineral oxidation rate (moles/m2/sec), k is the rate constant (a function of temperature), and a and b are reaction orders for molar aqueous species' concentrations (M). The initial rate method is used to determine the reaction order of each variable. Chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite are being studied because as the slowest- and fastest-oxidizing of the common sulfide minerals found in SMS deposits, they bound the range of rates seen in seafloor settings and can be used to place lower and upper limits on abiotic rates of metal release and sulfuric acid production. Experiments to date indicate an oxidation rate of pyrrhotite several times faster than that of chalcopyrite. The rate laws, when incorporated into reactive-transport computer codes, will enable the prediction of localized anthropogenic sulfuric acid

  8. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall 1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact th

  9. Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) Survey for SMS exploration in Izena Cauldron, Okinawa-Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Murakami, Fumitoshi; Tsukahara, Hitoshi; Mizohata, Shigeharu; Tara, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, the Japanese government started the Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP), which includes 'New-generation Offshore Exploration Techniques' as an area of interest. We proposed the Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) survey technique for this program, especially for the exploration of Seafloor Massive Sulfides (SMS). VCS is a reflection seismic method that uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by various acoustic sources. This method is useful to delineate detailed structures in a spatially-limited area below the seabed in the deep sea where conventional surface seismic is not effective. We have been developing an autonomous VCS system with the financial support of the Japanese government since 2009. We have carried out several VCS surveys and completed our VCS system. Izena Cauldron, Okinawa Trough is one of the most promising SMS areas around Japan. There are two high potential areas, the north and south mound. We carried out the first VCS survey around the north mound in 2011 and the second survey around the south mound in 2013 respectively. The first VCS survey in Izena Cauldron was carried out using a GI gun in September, 2011, with the objective of surveying the large-scale and deeper structure of the hydrothermal system. The water depth was 1,500-1,600m. Four VCS systems were deployed. The shooting lines covered an area of 9 km x 9 km with a shooting interval of about 25m and line spacing of 200m to 400m. In the second survey, we used a high-voltage sparker. The objective is to explore very shallow parts to delineate very thin SMS deposits. The survey area was about 4 km x 4km with a 12.5 m shooting interval and 100m to 200m line spacing. Three VCS systems were deployed in this survey. The result of the first GI gun VCS survey was a 3D PSDM volume of the subsurface structure. It extends 2,000m horizontally and down to 1,500m in depth. Further, by re-processing the data with a

  10. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  11. Flow visualization by mobile phone cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cierpka, Christian; Hain, Rainer; Buchmann, Nicolas A.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile smart phones were completely changing people's communication within the last ten years. However, these devices do not only offer communication through different channels but also devices and applications for fun and recreation. In this respect, mobile phone cameras include now relatively fast (up to 240 Hz) cameras to capture high-speed videos of sport events or other fast processes. The article therefore explores the possibility to make use of this development and the wide spread availability of these cameras in the terms of velocity measurements for industrial or technical applications and fluid dynamics education in high schools and at universities. The requirements for a simplistic PIV (particle image velocimetry) system are discussed. A model experiment of a free water jet was used to prove the concept and shed some light on the achievable quality and determine bottle necks by comparing the results obtained with a mobile phone camera with data taken by a high-speed camera suited for scientific experiments.

  12. Elemental Compositions of Over 80 Cell Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Beverley; Romanov, Alexandre; Romanova, Irina; Turbini, Laura J.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last few years, 85 cell phones have been disassembled, ground up, dissolved, and analyzed for elemental content, mainly for information about the metals present in the phones, but also for some metalloids and nonmetals. The following list of 38 elements were detected in some or all of the phones: Be, B, Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Y, Nb, Pd, Ag, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ta, W, Pt, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Er. Cadmium was never detected. This paper discusses the methods used for carrying out the analysis, proposes possible sources in the telephones for the elements of interest, the reasons for the interest in most of the elements, and method repeatability.

  13. Promotion Assistance Tool for Mobile Phone Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intraprasert, P.; Jatikul, N.; Chantrapornchai, C.

    In this paper, we propose an application tool to help analyze the usage of a mobile phone for a typical user. From the past usage, the tool can analyze the promotion that is suitable for the user which may save the total expense. The application consists of both client and server side. On the server side, the information for each promotion package for a phone operator is stored as well as the usage database for each client. The client side is a user interface for both phone operators and users to enter their information. The analysis engine are based on KNN, ANN, decision tree and Naïve Bayes models. For comparison, it is shown that KNN and decision outperforms the others.

  14. Blind identification of cellular phone cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çeliktutan, Oya; Avcibas, Ismail; Sankur, Bülent

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we focus on blind source cell-phone identification problem. It is known various artifacts in the image processing pipeline, such as pixel defects or unevenness of the responses in the CCD sensor, black current noise, proprietary interpolation algorithms involved in color filter array [CFA] leave telltale footprints. These artifacts, although often imperceptible, are statistically stable and can be considered as a signature of the camera type or even of the individual device. For this purpose, we explore a set of forensic features, such as binary similarity measures, image quality measures and higher order wavelet statistics in conjunction SVM classifier to identify the originating cell-phone type. We provide identification results among 9 different brand cell-phone cameras. In addition to our initial results, we applied a set of geometrical operations to original images in order to investigate how much our proposed method is robust under these manipulations.

  15. Relationship between the spatial distribution of SMS messages reporting needs and building damage in 2010 Haiti disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbane, C.; Lemoine, G.; Kauffmann, M.

    2012-02-01

    Just 4 days after the M = 7.1 earthquake on 12 January 2010, Haitians could send SMS messages about their location and urgent needs through the on-line mapping platform Ushahidi. This real-time crowdsourcing of crisis information provided direct support to key humanitarian resources on the ground, including Search and Rescue teams. In addition to its use as a knowledge base for rescue operations and aid provision, the spatial distribution of geolocated SMS messages may represent an early indicator on the spatial distribution and on the intensity of building damage. This work explores the relationship between the spatial patterns of SMS messages and building damage. The latter is derived from the detailed damage assessment of individual buildings interpreted in post-earthquake airborne photos. The interaction between SMS messages and building damage is studied by analyzing the spatial structure of the corresponding bivariate patterns. The analysis is performed through the implementation of cross Ripley's K-function which is suitable for characterizing the spatial structure of a bivariate pattern, and more precisely the spatial relationship between two types of point sets located in the same study area. The results show a strong attraction between the patterns exhibited by SMS messages and building damages. The interactions identified between the two patterns suggest that the geolocated SMS can be used as early indicators of the spatial distribution of building damage pattern. Accordingly, a statistical model has been developed to map the distribution of building damage from the geolocated SMS pattern. The study presented in this paper is the first attempt to derive quantitative estimates on the spatial patterns of novel crowdsourced information and correlate these to established methods in damage assessment using remote sensing data. The consequences of the study findings for rapid damage detection in post-emergency contexts are discussed.

  16. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  17. To Kill a Messenger; Television News and the Real World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, William

    From his vantage point as News Director of CBS News in Washington, the author examines the role of television news in our society and gives an insider's view of the day-to-day process of selecting and presenting news. Highlighting the book are in-depth discussions of past and recent news events. The Nixon "Checkers" speech, John Kennedy's fight to…

  18. STS-99 Crew News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Shuttle Crew (Mission Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, Mission Specialists Janet L. Kavandi, Janice E. Voss, Mamoru Mohri, and Gerhard P.J. Thiele) are shown in a live news conference presenting the mission objectives of STS-99. The main objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth. This project is named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM).

  19. Using the News: An Examination of the Value and Use of News Sources in CMC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Investigates how members of a Usenet newsgroup value and use news sources. Finds that electronic news sources predominated and that media use was not tied to the user's geographic locale. Raises several questions for future research. (RS)

  20. Implicit Operational Definitions of Economic News Literacy in the Printed News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes study which focused on the economic vocabulary used in national and international news magazines and papers. Compares findings with definitions of economic literacy proposed by economists and suggests that economics courses include economic news literacy. (KC)

  1. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  2. Delivering difficult news in psychiatric settings.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Horsfall, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Communication research and investigations into the delivery of bad news are uncommon in psychiatry versus other medical specialties. The question of delivering "bad" diagnostic news in psychiatry has been focused on dementia rather than actual psychiatric disorders and their sequelae. Common problems are that psychiatrists avoid dealing with patients' emotional reactions to bad news and that they avoid providing a clear diagnosis for fear that patients or carers will be distressed. This article aims to provide an overview of key elements of the "breaking bad news" literature, teasing out factors that are relevant to psychiatric practice. Topics explored include: definitions; clinical considerations for delivering difficult news within medical and psychiatric settings; protocols and guidelines; evidence about patient information needs and communication preferences; research into actual delivery of such news; and areas for future education and research. PMID:19832045

  3. Patterns in wireless phone estimation data from a cross-sectional survey: what are the implications for epidemiology?

    PubMed Central

    Redmayne, Mary; Smith, Euan; Abramson, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Objective Self-reported recall data are often used in wireless phone epidemiological studies, which in turn are used to indicate relative risk of health outcomes from extended radiofrequency exposure. We sought to explain features commonly observed in wireless phone recall data and to improve analytical procedures. Setting Wellington Region, New Zealand. Participants Each of the 16 schools selected a year 7 and/or 8 class to participate, providing a representative regional sample based on socioeconomic school ratings, school type and urban/rural balance. There was an 85% participation rate (N=373). Main outcome measures Planned: the distribution of participants’ estimated extent of SMS-texting and cordless phone calls, and the extent of rounding to a final zero or five within the full set of recall data and within each order of magnitude. Unplanned: the distribution of the leading digits of these raw data, compared with that of billed data in each order of magnitude. Results The nature and extent of number-rounding, and the distribution of data across each order in recall data indicated a logarithmic (ratio-based) mental process for assigning values. Responses became less specific as the leading-digit increased from 1 to 9, and 69% of responses for weekly texts sent were rounded by participants to a single non-zero digit (eg, 2, 20 and 200). Conclusions Adolescents’ estimation of their cellphone use indicated that it was performed on a mental logarithmic scale. This is the first time this phenomenon has been observed in the estimation of recalled, as opposed to observed, numerical quantities. Our findings provide empirical justification for log-transforming data for analysis. We recommend the use of the geometric rather than arithmetic mean when a recalled numerical range is provided. A point of calibration may improve recall. PMID:22952160

  4. Health Issues: Do Cell Phones Pose a Health Hazard?

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems. Cell phones emit low levels of radiofrequency energy (RF). Over the past 15 years, scientists have ... looking at the biological effects of the radiofrequency energy emitted by cell phones. While some researchers have ...

  5. A Comparison of Sms 201-995 and Oesophageal Tamponade in the Control of Acute Variceal Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garden, O. J.; Anderson, J. R.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Forty endoscopically proven active variceal bleeds were entered in a prospective trial comparing oesophageal tamponade with SMS 201-995 infusion. Oesophageal tamponade controlled 19 of 20 bleeds over the first four hours and 14 of 18 bleeds over 48 hours. SMS 201-995 infusion controlled 18 of 20 bleeds over the first four hours and 10 of 20 bleeds over 48 hours (p = 0.15). No significant differences between the groups were seen in time to control of bleeding, amount of blood transfused or number of patients crossed over to the opposite treatment. Complications in the oesophageal tamponade group were discomfort due to the tube (17 patients) and chest infection (10 patients), while in the SMS 201-995 group 7 chest infections and one episode of hyperglycaemia occurred, with no symptomatic complaints. The patient survived the admission in 15 of the oesophageal tamponade bleeds and all of the SMS 201-995 bleeds (p = 0.047). An intravenous infusion of SMS 201-995 appears to have comparable efficacy to oesophageal tamponade in variceal bleeding. PMID:1467319

  6. News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

  7. Breaking the news on mobile TV: user requirements of a popular mobile content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoche, Hendrik O.; Sasse, M. Angela

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents the results from three lab-based studies that investigated different ways of delivering Mobile TV News by measuring user responses to different encoding bitrates, image resolutions and text quality. All studies were carried out with participants watching News content on mobile devices, with a total of 216 participants rating the acceptability of the viewing experience. Study 1 compared the acceptability of a 15-second video clip at different video and audio encoding bit rates on a 3G phone at a resolution of 176x144 and an iPAQ PDA (240x180). Study 2 measured the acceptability of video quality of full feature news clips of 2.5 minutes which were recorded from broadcast TV, encoded at resolutions ranging from 120x90 to 240x180, and combined with different encoding bit rates and audio qualities presented on an iPAQ. Study 3 improved the legibility of the text included in the video simulating a separate text delivery. The acceptability of News' video quality was greatly reduced at a resolution of 120x90. The legibility of text was a decisive factor in the participants' assessment of the video quality. Resolutions of 168x126 and higher were substantially more acceptable when they were accompanied by optimized high quality text compared to proportionally scaled inline text. When accompanied by high quality text TV news clips were acceptable to the vast majority of participants at resolutions as small as 168x126 for video encoding bitrates of 160kbps and higher. Service designers and operators can apply this knowledge to design a cost-effective mobile TV experience.

  8. From Cell Phone Skeptic to Evangelist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Liz Kolb started her education career as a teacher of middle and high school social studies in Wyoming City Schools in Cincinnati. She was also a teacher and technology coordinator at Grandview Heights City Schools in Columbus, where she adamantly opposed cell phones in school until she had an "ah-ha" moment. She then founded the Web site Cell…

  9. Using Mobile Phones for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahr-Hojland, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the EGO-TRAP project in which students' visits to the Experimentarium science centre in Copenhagen, Denmark, are structured via their mobile phones. EGO-TRAP, so called because it engages visitors in a personal investigation, has been developed with the aim of creating a structured learning experience for children visiting…

  10. Audio Frequency Analysis in Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía

    2016-01-01

    A new experiment using mobile phones is proposed in which its audio frequency response is analyzed using the audio port for inputting external signal and getting a measurable output. This experiment shows how the limited audio bandwidth used in mobile telephony is the main cause of the poor speech quality in this service. A brief discussion is…

  11. Multidimensional Human Dynamics in Mobile Phone Communications

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process. PMID:25068479

  12. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process. PMID:25068479

  13. Mobile phones and hearing - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanagowda, Preethi B.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Viswanath, Lokesh; Kunjar, Sathish

    2009-01-01

    Mobile phones are being widely used throughout the world. Although there is no clear evidence of harmful effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation at the levels used by these devices, there is widespread public concern that there may be potential for harm. Of all anatomical structures, the ear is closest to the mobile phone, which may lead to relatively high energy deposition in the ear compared to other parts of the body. Till the year 2000 only a few studies had addressed potential adverse effects of EMFs on the hearing system. The potential adverse effects of mobile phone exposure on the hearing system should be investigated, because mobile phones are usually held close to the ear. Until now, most studies have assessed the influence of RF radiation on the central or peripheral auditory system. However, clear conclusions cannot be drawn from these studies regarding the presence or absence of effects because of the limitations in the audiological and/or dosimetric approaches and limited sample sizes. results. Although the presence of possible effects on hearing threshold levels cannot be dismissed entirely, the evidence available is not sufficiently strong to conclude that there are adverse effects. A replication study with a shift in hearing threshold levels at high frequencies as the a priori hypothesis is desirable to resolve this issue.

  14. Wi-Fi Versus Cell Phone Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Regardless of whether cell phones remain the dominant platform or Wi-Fi becomes the prevalent platform, there are some things that libraries can do to improve patron service in light of evolving expectations, behaviors, and tools. People today are more nomadic, which leads to the very real possibility of having to deliver content not just to the…

  15. Using Mobile Phones to Increase Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Stephanie; Heaney, Rose; Corcoran, Olivia; Henderson-Begg, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the possible benefits of using mobile phones to increase interaction and promote active learning in large classroom settings. First year undergraduate students studying Cellular Processes at the University of East London took part in a trial of a new text-based classroom interaction system and evaluated their experience by…

  16. The American College Student Cell Phone Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emanuel, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study of cell phone use among college students. This group is considered particularly important because college students tend to be among the first to try new technology, are the group most likely to innovate new ways of using existing technology, and are most vocal about what they need and/or want to see changed…

  17. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  18. Mobile Phone Radiation: Physiological & Pathophysiologcal Considerations.

    PubMed

    K Sri, Nageswari

    2015-01-01

    It is documented that electromagnetic emissions from mobile phones can interfere with brain's signal processing activity due to their oscillatory similitude to the inherent rhythms of the brain, akin to "electromagnetic interference" observed while using mobile phones in aeroplanes. At high power density levels, thermal effects occur, some of which can be attributed to heat induced stress mechanisms. The less understood non-thermal effects occur at low radio frequency/microwave power density levels and are not accompanied by any body temperature rise. The safety standards set by international agencies are based on thermal effects. For the mobile phones, ICNIRP 1998 guidelines restrict spatial peak of microwave exposure to 2 W/Kg SAR values averaged over 10 g of tissue for 6 minutes. Some of the reported electromagnetic radiation (EMR) induced adverse effects are brain tumours, male infertility and immune dysfunction with increased susceptibility to infections. Pathophysiological mechanisms of interaction of EMR at plasma membrane are calcium efflux from cell membranes, increased expression of stress proteins, influence on channels/gap junctions in cell membrane, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, ornithine decarboxylase activation, reduction in melatonin levels, decrease in protein kinase C activity, damage to DNA and change in gene expression in brain cells and altered blood-brain barrier. There are equal number of conflicting reports in literature regarding EMR exposure and brain tumours. A comprehensive review concludes "overall the studies published to date do not demonstrate an increased risk within approximately 10 years of use for any tumour of the brain or any other head tumour." Another review summarises that there is "enough data to convince that long-term exposure to low intensity EMR below the ICNIRP guidelines can promote cancer development". However the time limit for exposure has been suggested as more than 10 years. For conducting

  19. Scaffolding Java Programming on a Mobile Phone for Novice Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbogo, Chao; Blake, Edwin; Suleman, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of mobile phones provides an opportunity to use them as a resource for construction of programs beyond the classroom. However, limitations of mobile phones impede their use as typical programming environments. This research proposes that programming environments on mobile phones should include scaffolding techniques specifically…

  20. From Toy to Tool: Audioblogging with Cell Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Liz

    2006-01-01

    Educators often reject cell phones in the classroom, considering them destructive and distractive "toys." As a former technology coordinator, the author used to think cell phones were harmful for the classroom environment. Over time, she has come to realize that cell phones are part of the students' everyday existence. Today, students use cell…

  1. Commonalities in Pedagogy Situating Cell Phone Use in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abend, Laurie Lafer

    2013-01-01

    Technology has become embedded in all aspects of students' lives as they increasingly rely on mobile technology devices such as cell phones to access and share information. Cell phones function as portable, affordable, and ubiquitous mini-computers, yet few teachers have leveraged the benefits of cell phone technology for teaching and learning…

  2. Electrocardiographic artifact due to a mobile phone mimicking ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xu

    2014-01-01

    A case of electrocardiographic artifact due to mobile a phone mimicking ventricular tachycardia was presented. The artifact was discriminated by close scrutiny of ECG and was attributed to a mobile phone because it was simultaneous with mobile phone game. PMID:24581928

  3. Camera/Video Phones in Schools: Law and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of mobile phones with built-in digital cameras is creating legal and ethical concerns for school systems throughout the world. Users of such phones can instantly email, print or post pictures to other MMS1 phones or websites. Local authorities and schools in Britain, Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and elsewhere have introduced…

  4. Making Connections: Using Mobile Phones as a Museum Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manabe, Makoto; Lydens, Lois

    2007-01-01

    Mobile phones have been steadily gaining appreciation among the museum community as a versatile tool. The new generation of mobile phones allows museums to imagine a whole new range of applications, including audiovisual personal tours and live-feed broadcasting. Personal tours using mobile phones are appealing to museum educators since patrons…

  5. Twenty Ideas for Using Mobile Phones in the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Hayo

    2010-01-01

    These days it seems mobile phones are used everywhere by everyone, which leads to the obvious question: How can mobile phone technology support learning in the second language classroom? The answer is "in a number of ways" because mobile phones come with ever-increasing functions that most students are adept at using. In this article the author…

  6. Cell Phones in the Classroom: Are We Dialing up Disaster?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, George; Green, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been a rapid diffusion of cellular technology. Though cell phone use began as a business tool, it has now become part of popular culture. Because of the near ubiquitous presence of cell phone technology among teens in the United States, schools are beginning to explore the use of cell phones as a learning tool. This…

  7. Student Impressions of Academic Cell Phone Use in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tessier, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Cell phones have become ubiquitous in society, but they are typically seen as a problem in the classroom. This study was designed to assess the perspective of students regarding the use of cell phones as academic tools in the classroom. The author encouraged students to use their cell phones in an environmental issues course to find data and other…

  8. Cell Phones in the Classroom: Preservice Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kevin; O'Bannon, Blanche

    2013-01-01

    This study employed a survey to examine the perceptions of 92 preservice teachers enrolled at a small Midwestern liberal arts university regarding their support of the use of cell phones in the classroom, the benefits of specific cell phone features for school-related work, and the instructional benefits of and barriers to using cell phones in the…

  9. Teaching the Fundamentals of Cell Phones and Wireless Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, Mark; Forrest, Rick; Pata, Don

    2010-01-01

    Wireless communications are ubiquitous. Students and teachers use iPhones[R], BlackBerrys[R], and other smart phones at home and at work. More than 275 million Americans had cell phones in June of 2009 and expanded access to broadband is predicted this year. Despite the plethora of users, most students and teachers do not understand "how they…

  10. Bacterial contamination of anaesthetists' hands by personal mobile phone and fixed phone use in the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Jeske, H-C; Tiefenthaler, W; Hohlrieder, M; Hinterberger, G; Benzer, A

    2007-09-01

    Following hand disinfection, 40 anaesthetists working in the operating room (OR) were asked to use their personal in-hospital mobile phone for a short phone call. After use of the cell phone, bacterial contamination of the physicians' hands was found in 38/40 physicians (4/40 with human pathogen bacteria). After repeating the same investigation with fixed phones in the OR anteroom 33/40 physicians showed bacterial contamination (4/40 with human pathogen bacteria). The benefit of using mobile phones in the OR should be weighed against the risk for unperceived contamination. The use of mobile phones may have more serious hygiene consequences, because, unlike fixed phones, mobile phones are often used in the OR close to the patient. PMID:17697216

  11. Stabilization of severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy by long-term treatment with SMS 201-995.

    PubMed

    Mallet, B; Vialettes, B; Haroche, S; Escoffier, P; Gastaut, P; Taubert, J P; Vague, P

    1992-01-01

    Growth hormone and growth factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Hypophysectomy has been proposed as a treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy unresolved by panretinal photocoagulation (PPC). SMS 201-995, a long acting somatostatin analogue which slows down growth hormone secretion, may provide a non-invasive therapy for these rare cases. To assess this possibility, we studied the feasibility and efficiency of long-term SMS 201-995 treatment in diabetics. SMS 201-995 was injected subcutaneously with a continuous pump system at a dose of 400 micrograms/d into 4 insulin dependent diabetic patients suffering from proliferative diabetic retinopathy progressing despite a pan-photocoagulation. The mean age of these patients was 29 +/- 3 years and mean disease duration 18 +/- 3 years. Treatment periods lasted from 6 to 20 months (mean 15 months). Mean 24-hour growth hormone levels decreased by 57% after only one month of treatment (7.4 +/- 1.9 mU/l to 3.2 +/- 0.9 mU/l). The decline continued up to the third month. After the sixth month, signs of resistance to the drug were noted. The frequency of 24-hour GH peaks over 10 mU/l followed a parallel pattern. No rebound was observed when the treatment was progressively discontinued. In 2 patients neovascularization stopped. In the other 2 the process regressed. In all treatment had beneficial effects on the retina. Overall visual acuity improved (7.8 +/- 0.8/10e vs 5.5 +/- 0.8/10e). These effects were obtained within 3 to 6 months. Glycosylated haemoglobin levels did not change (8.8 +/- 1.3% to 9.0 +/- 0.8%). Insulin doses decreased 41% (46.5 +/- 1.7 U/d to 27.3 +/- 3.0 U/d). No severe hypoglycaemia occurred.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1297600

  12. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students…

  13. The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite /SMS/ system. [subsystems and ground facilities design and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, D. V.; Wirth, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the fundamental design criteria and operational features of the spacecraft subsystems and ground facilities comprising the SMS program. The main objectives of the program are to provide day and night information on the earth's weather by means of earth imaging, retransmission of imaged data, data collection, data relay, and space environment monitoring. Attention is given to the launch and orbital station-keeping functions, onboard sensors used to provide remote imagery, data transmission from the satellite to command and regional ground stations, and examples of meteorological services resulting from use of this satellite.

  14. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, crewmembers participate in FB-SMS training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Commander Frederick D. Gregory (left) and Pilot Terence T. Henricks (right), positioned at their appointed stations on the forward flight deck, are joined by Mission Specialist (MS) F. Story Musgrave (center). The crewmembers are participating in a flight simulation in the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Gregory in the commanders seat, Musgrave sitting on center console, and Henricks in the pilots seat look back toward the aft flight deck and the photographer. Seat backs appear in the foreground and forward control panels in the background.

  15. Consumer acceptance of an SMS-assisted smoking cessation intervention: a multicountry study.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lynda; Cacho-Elizondo, Silvia; Drennan, Judy; Tossan, Vessélina

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses smokers' perceptions, motivations, and intentions towards using an SMS-assisted smoking cessation intervention in Australia, France, and Mexico through an extended technology acceptance model with mediating variables. Data was collected through online surveys. Results show that perceived usefulness and vicarious innovativeness predict use intentions for all three countries. Perceived ease of use is significant only for Mexico. Subjective norms are significant only for Mexico and Australia. Perceived monetary value and perceived annoyance are significant mediating variables for all three countries, whereas perceived enjoyment is significant only for Mexico and Australia. These results contribute to theory and practice. PMID:23458481

  16. Teaching the Benefits of Smart Phone Technology to Blind Consumers: Exploring the Potential of the iPhone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Meng Ee; Tan, Stacey S. K.

    2012-01-01

    Among the smart phones, the iPhone has emerged as one of the more popular smart phones. A feature that makes the iPhone popular to the user is the growing number of apps available through The App Store. Among the many apps, a number are designed for people with visual impairments. Some are free of charge, while others require payment. Compared to…

  17. Impact of distance education via mobile phone text messaging on knowledge, attitude, practice and self efficacy of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impacts of using SMS on improving laboratory test levels and Knowledge, Attitude, Practice (KAP) and Self Efficacy (SE) of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in Iran. Materials and methods In this randomized controlled trial study, a total of 81 type 2 diabetes patients were randomly assigned into two groups exp. group (n = 43) and cont. group (n = 38). Only exp. group received 4 messages weekly consisted of diet, exercise, medication taking and. The researchers provided the intervention for 12 weeks. Data were collected with results of laboratory tests and KAP, SE reliable and valid questionnaires and demographic characteristics list. Data gathering at the baseline of the study and after 3 months intervention and was analyzed by SPSS11.5 software using descriptive and inferential statistics methods. Results The results of this study showed that exp. group compared with cont. group improved significantly in HbA1C (p = 0.024), LDL (p = 0.019), cholesterol (p = 0.002), BUN (p ≤ 0.001), micro albumin (p ≤ 0.001), knowledge (p ≤ 0.001), practice (p ≤ 0.001) and self efficacy (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion The finding of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of intervention using SMS via mobile phone in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Thus, further studies are recommended for wide usage of distance education with mobile phone utilization. PMID:23497632

  18. SMS as Out-of-Class, Student-Instructor Interaction Tool: A Case Study of Jordanian Graduate Students' Perceptions and Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.; Qablan, Bassam Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the Jordanian university students' perceptions toward and use of Short Message Service (SMS) as out-of-class student-instructor interaction tool. The participants in this study were 33 graduate students who were enrolled in on-campus information technology course at a public Jordanian university. SMS was used in the…

  19. Listening to Monotony: All-News Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, Michael

    A study analyzed statistically the monotony of all-news radio listening and identified stylistic figures that elicit attention in listeners. Subjects were 30 graduate students whose experience with radio news ranged from occasional listening over several months to regular listening five or seven days per week for several years. Respondents were…

  20. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Delano J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently…

  1. TV News Analysis Project Motivates Broadcast Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the use of content analysis by a journalism class in studying television news. Indicates that the method is flexible, generates familiarity with quantitative approaches to the analysis of broadcast journalism, can result in increased awareness of the complexity of the broadcast news medium, and increases student motivation. (TJ)

  2. Television and the News: A Critical Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skornia, Harry J.

    This book contains a documented critical analysis of the state of broadcast journalism in the United States. It also examines the conditions that prevent news broadcasting as a practice from being a profession, and suggests steps needed to achieve professionalism in providing the kind of news service the nation needs but is not getting. Some of…

  3. Kids, Crime, and Local Television News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanich, Danilo

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of crime reporting occurs on local television news and in newspapers. Although crimes are extraordinary events, they assume an ordinariness that only daily reporting can give them. The obvious question is what does the news tell us about crime. This article compares the coverage of adult crime and the coverage of what the author…

  4. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program…

  5. Television and Its News: A Discrepancy Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Gary Warren

    This exploratory endeavor utilized a functional discrepancy model of mass communication research to examine the audience experience with television generally and its news in particular. Specifically, gratifications sought from television in general and gratifications perceived as being obtained from television news are analyzed for a random sample…

  6. Satellite News Feeds: Protecting a Transient Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwater, Tony; And Others

    Satellite news gathering (SNG) has been widely adopted in broadcast journalism in recent years, and appears likely to grow in importance as local television news operations increase their reliance on it. However, because the technology for SNG is so new, information transmitted through SNG systems is not adequately protected under current laws.…

  7. News Research for Better Newspapers, Volume Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Comp.

    The findings of research studies that come from a variety of sources and concern newspapers, some aspects of television news, and news media audiences are summarized briefly. Among the topics are audience characteristics, content of stories, readership, headlines and makeup, editorial policy, and editorial administration and personnel. Most of the…

  8. News Research for Better Newspapers. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Ed.

    This volume is a compilation of the summaries of news-editorial research reported in the American Newspaper Publishers Association News Research Bulletins during 1967. Of the 44 studies reported in this volume, twenty were done by universities, ten by individuals, nine by research agencies, and five by other organizations. The studies are arranged…

  9. Library Media Specialists: Doing the News!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Newspapers in Education (NIE) Week and how it can relate to school library media specialists. Highlights include the convergence of news media, including news on the Web; ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) resources, including lesson plans; relevant books; Web sites; and Web journalism. (LRW)

  10. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  11. Broadcast Journalism; An Introduction to News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mark W.

    The important features of writing news for radio and television are covered in this book. Ways to write colorful, accurate, and timely stories are explained with the emphasis on the differences between broadcast and newspaper stories. Other subjects treated are sources of news (including explanations of how the Associated Press copy works and how…

  12. Science News and the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  13. Creating Reality: How TV News Distorts Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altheide, David L.

    A three-year research project, including more than one year in a network affiliate station, provided the material for an analysis of current practices in television news programming. Based on the thesis that the organization of news encourages the oversimplification of events, this analysis traces the foundation of the bias called the "news…

  14. NIH News in Health: September 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wein, Harrison, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    News in Health, is a monthly newsletter that provides practical health news and information. As college students arrive on campus this fall, it is a time of new experiences, new friendships and making memories that will last a lifetime. Unfortunately for many, it can also be a time of excessive drinking and dealing with its aftermath--vandalism,…

  15. Mass News: Practices, Controversies, and Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroy, David J., Ed.; Sterling, Christopher H., Ed.

    This selection of readings, primarily intended for a college journalism course, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the major sources of the public news--the wire services, newspapers, and television. The first part of the book deals with the context of mass news and serves as an introduction to some of the crucial ideas shaping thinking…

  16. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  17. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News…

  18. Mobile Phone Use, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Hoffner, Cynthia A; Lee, Sangmi

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the use of mobile phones to regulate negative emotions, considering both the role of different aspects of phone use and individual differences in emotion regulation strategies. A total of 287 young adult smartphone users completed an online survey that addressed use of mobile phones for negative emotion regulation. They responded to a phone loss scenario by rating how much they would miss various uses/functions of the phone (which could be involved in emotion regulation). Habitual use of reappraisal to regulate emotion was associated with missing both interpersonal contact and social support, but not access to entertainment/information. In contrast, habitual use of emotion suppression was associated only with missing entertainment/information content. Regulating negative emotions via mobile phone was associated with missing all three uses/functions of the phone, but perception that the phone was effective in remediating negative emotion was associated only with missing social support. Well-being was related to greater use and perceived effectiveness of the mobile phone for emotion regulation. Overall, this study demonstrates that mobile phones can yield psychological benefits, depending on how they are used. Findings suggest that using the phone for social support is most likely to lead to effective remediation of negative emotion. Interpretations and implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:26167841

  19. Psychometric Properties of the "Sport Motivation Scale (SMS)" Adapted to Physical Education.

    PubMed

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Gómez-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Fuentes, José Antonio; Abraldes, J Arturo

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of a Spanish version of the Sport Motivation Scale adapted to physical education. A second aim was to test which one of three hypothesized models (three, five and seven-factor) provided best model fit. 758 Spanish high school students completed the Sport Motivation Scale adapted for Physical Education and also completed the Learning and Performance Orientation in Physical Education Classes Questionnaire. We examined the factor structure of each model using confirmatory factor analysis and also assessed internal consistency and convergent validity. The results showed that all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model (χ(2)/gl = 2.73; ECVI = 1.38) as it produces better values when adapted to physical education, that five-factor model (χ(2)/gl = 2.82; ECVI = 1.44) and three-factor model (χ(2)/gl = 3.02; ECVI = 1.53). Key PointsPhysical education research conducted in Spain has used the version of SMS designed to assess motivation in sport, but validity reliability and validity results in physical education have not been reported.Results of the present study lend support to the factorial validity and internal reliability of three alternative factor structures (3, 5, and 7 factors) of SMS adapted to Physical Education in Spanish.Although all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model. PMID:25435772

  20. Psychometric Properties of the “Sport Motivation Scale (SMS)” Adapted to Physical Education

    PubMed Central

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Gómez-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Fuentes, José Antonio; Abraldes, J. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of a Spanish version of the Sport Motivation Scale adapted to physical education. A second aim was to test which one of three hypothesized models (three, five and seven-factor) provided best model fit. 758 Spanish high school students completed the Sport Motivation Scale adapted for Physical Education and also completed the Learning and Performance Orientation in Physical Education Classes Questionnaire. We examined the factor structure of each model using confirmatory factor analysis and also assessed internal consistency and convergent validity. The results showed that all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.73; ECVI = 1.38) as it produces better values when adapted to physical education, that five-factor model (χ2/gl = 2.82; ECVI = 1.44) and three-factor model (χ2/gl = 3.02; ECVI = 1.53). Key Points Physical education research conducted in Spain has used the version of SMS designed to assess motivation in sport, but validity reliability and validity results in physical education have not been reported. Results of the present study lend support to the factorial validity and internal reliability of three alternative factor structures (3, 5, and 7 factors) of SMS adapted to Physical Education in Spanish. Although all three models in Spanish produce good indicators of fitness, but we suggest using the seven-factor model. PMID:25435772

  1. A clinical evaluation of a remote mobility monitoring system based on SMS messaging.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Anthony F; Ní Scanaill, Cliodhna; Carew, Sheila; Lyons, Declan; OLaighin, Gearóid

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and viability of a mobility telemonitoring system, based on the short message service (SMS), to monitor the functional mobility of elderly subjects in an unsupervised environment. A clinical trial was conducted consisting of 6 elderly subjects; 3 male, 3 female (mean: 81.7, SD: 5.09). Mobility was monitored using an accelerometer based portable unit worn by each monitored subject for eleven hours. Every 15 minutes the mobility of the subject was summarized and transmitted as an SMS message from the portable unit to a remote server for long term analysis. The activPAL Trio Professional physical activity logger was simultaneously used for comparison with the portable unit. On conclusion of the trial each subject completed a questionnaire detailing their satisfaction with the portable unit and any recommendations for improvements. Overall a percentage difference of 2.31% was found between the activPAL Trio and the portable unit for the detection of sitting. For the combined postures of standing and walking the percentage difference was calculated as 2.9%. A bivariate correlation and regression analysis was performed on the entire data set of one subject. Strong positive correlation's were found for the detection of sitting (r = 0.996) and for the combined postures of standing and walking (r = 0.994). Subjects suggested that a lighter, smaller and wireless unit would be more effective. PMID:18002458

  2. Using the 3D-SMS for finding starting configurations in imaging systems with freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satzer, Britta; Richter, Undine; Lippmann, Uwe; Metzner, Gerburg S.; Notni, Gunther; Gross, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    As the scientific field of the freeform optics is newly developing, there is only a small number of approved starting systems for the imaging lens design. We investigate the possibility to generate starting configurations of freeform lenses with the Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method. Surface fit and transfer to the ray tracing program are discussed in detail. Based on specific examples without rotational symmetry, we analyze the potential of such starting systems. The tested systems evolve from Scheimpflug configurations or have arbitrarily tilted image planes. The optimization behavior of the starting systems retrieved from the 3D-SMS is compared to classical starting configurations, like an aspheric lens. Therefore we evaluate the root mean square (RMS) spot radius before and after the optimization as well as the speed of convergence. In result the performance of the starting configurations is superior. The mean RMS spot diameter is reduced about up to 17.6 % in comparison to an aspheric starting configuration and about up to 28 % for a simple plane plate.

  3. Q-switched laser in an SMS cavity for inhibiting nonlinear effects.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiaqi; Lu, Yi; He, Bing; Gu, Xijia

    2015-07-01

    In the design of high-power Q-switched fiber lasers, nonlinear effects often become barriers that prevent the scale up of pulse energy and peak power. New designs and components that could inhibit or suppress nonlinear effects are in high demand, particularly in all-fiber configurations. In this paper, we demonstrated a Q-switched Yb-doped fiber laser in a single-mode multimode single-mode (SMS) structure to inhibit fiber nonlinear effects. The laser-generated Q-switched pulses with a peak power close to 1 kW (pulse width and energy of 100 ns and 92 μJ, respectively). The output spectrum of this laser was compared with that of a Q-switched Yb-doped fiber laser built in a conventional configuration with similar output peak power. The results showed, for the first time to our knowledge, that the SMS Q-switched laser completely inhibited the stimulated Raman scattering and significantly reduced self-phase modulation. PMID:26193155

  4. Space Shuttle Status News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  5. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  6. Audio frequency analysis in mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía Aguilar, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    A new experiment using mobile phones is proposed in which its audio frequency response is analyzed using the audio port for inputting external signal and getting a measurable output. This experiment shows how the limited audio bandwidth used in mobile telephony is the main cause of the poor speech quality in this service. A brief discussion is given about the relationship between voice bandwidth and voice quality.

  7. Communication cliques in mobile phone calling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Xia; Xie, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-11-01

    People in modern societies form different social networks through numerous means of communication. These communication networks reflect different aspects of human's societal structure. The billing records of calls among mobile phone users enable us to construct a directed calling network (DCN) and its Bonferroni network (SVDCN) in which the preferential communications are statistically validated. Here we perform a comparative investigation of the cliques of the original DCN and its SVDCN constructed from the calling records of more than nine million individuals in Shanghai over a period of 110 days. We find that the statistical properties of the cliques of the two calling networks are qualitatively similar and the clique members in the DCN and the SVDCN exhibit idiosyncratic behaviors quantitatively. Members in large cliques are found to be spatially close to each other. Based on the clique degree profile of each mobile phone user, the most active users in the two calling networks can be classified in to several groups. The users in different groups are found to have different calling behaviors. Our study unveils interesting communication behaviors among mobile phone users that are densely connected to each other.

  8. An imaging toolbox for smart phone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchul, Alexandr; Bhupathiraju, Deepthi; Agaian, Sos; Akopian, David

    2006-05-01

    The paper presents a Digital Image Processing toolbox for cellular phones. It is intended for users dealing with imaging algorithms and allows the processing of real images taken by the camera phones. For example, users are able to analyze the images and selected regions of interest using different transforms including Discrete Fourier, Hartley, and Cosine Transforms. One can apply different filters such as median and moving average. Simple image enhancement techniques are also included in the toolbox. A handy user interface allows a suitable browsing through the images and operators. The toolbox is designed to be expandable and more operations will be included in the future targeting military and security applications. The toolbox is implemented using Series 60 Platform SDK for Symbian tm OS, for C++. It allows developers to quickly and efficiently run and test applications for devices that are compatible with the Series 60 Platform. The algorithms are first implemented on Series 60 Platform device emulator on the PC and then installed on the cell phone.

  9. Rapid electrochemical detection on a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Peter B; Huang, Ming-Chun; Truong, Newton; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2013-08-01

    We present a compact mobile phone platform for rapid, quantitative biomolecular detection. This system consists of an embedded circuit for signal processing and data analysis, and disposable microfluidic chips for fluidic handling and biosensing. Capillary flow is employed for sample loading, processing, and pumping to enhance operational portability and simplicity. Graphical step-by-step instructions displayed on the phone assists the operator through the detection process. After the completion of each measurement, the results are displayed on the screen for immediate assessment and the data is automatically saved to the phone's memory for future analysis and transmission. Validation of this device was carried out by detecting Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), an important biomarker for malaria, with a lower limit of detection of 16 ng mL(-1) in human serum. The simple detection process can be carried out with two loading steps and takes 15 min to complete each measurement. Due to its compact size and high performance, this device offers immense potential as a widely accessible, point-of-care diagnostic platform, especially in remote and rural areas. In addition to its impact on global healthcare, this technology is relevant to other important applications including food safety, environmental monitoring and biosecurity. PMID:23689554

  10. Design of programmable intelligent cell phone jammer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Divya; Ravi, Aswin

    2011-12-01

    The usage of cell phones has increased enormously; at present silence and security is the need of the hour in many places. This can be done by using cell phone jammer, which blocks all the signals. This paper describes the design of an enhanced technique for jamming the cell phone signals. Our main objective is to concentrate on a specific band of frequency, which makes communication possible, by jamming this frequency we block out the specific signal that are responsible for making the call. This method enables the jammer to be more precise and effective, so precise that it can focus on specific area and allowing the programmer to define the area. The major advancement will be that emergency services can be availed which is very crucial in case of any calamity, they are intelligent devices as they act only after they receive signals and also it has a lesser power consumption than existing models. This technique has infinite potentials and sure can this be modified to match all our imaginations.

  11. Effect of Text Message, Phone Call, and In-Person Appointment Reminders on Uptake of Repeat HIV Testing among Outpatients Screened for Acute HIV Infection in Kenya: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wahome, Elizabeth W.; Gichuru, Evanson N.; Mwashigadi, Grace M.; Thiong’o, Alexander N.; Prins, Henrieke A. B.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Graham, Susan M.; Sanders, Eduard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following HIV-1 acquisition, many individuals develop an acute retroviral syndrome and a majority seek care. Available antibody testing cannot detect an acute HIV infection, but repeat testing after 2–4 weeks may detect seroconversion. We assessed the effect of appointment reminders on attendance for repeat HIV testing. Methods We enrolled, in a randomized controlled trial, 18–29 year old patients evaluated for acute HIV infection at five sites in Coastal Kenya (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01876199). Participants were allocated 1:1 to either standard appointment (a dated appointment card) or enhanced appointment (a dated appointment card plus SMS and phone call reminders, or in-person reminders for participants without a phone). The primary outcome was visit attendance, i.e., the proportion of participants attending the repeat test visit. Factors associated with attendance were examined by bivariable and multivariable logistic regression. Principal Findings Between April and July 2013, 410 participants were randomized. Attendance was 41% (85/207) for the standard group and 59% (117/199) for the enhanced group, for a relative risk of 1.4 [95% Confidence Interval, CI, 1.2–1.7].Higher attendance was independently associated with older age, study site, and report of transactional sex in past month. Lower attendance was associated with reporting multiple partners in the past two months. Conclusions Appointment reminders through SMS, phone calls and in-person reminders increased the uptake of repeat HIV test by forty percent. This low-cost intervention could facilitate detection of acute HIV infections and uptake of recommended repeat testing. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01876199 PMID:27077745

  12. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Microscopy: Schools to gain remote access to Oxford University-based SEM Canada: Perimeter Institute calls international applicants to its 2005 summer school ASE: ASE 2005 refreshes the teaching parts that other conferences cannot reach Scotland: Glasgow hosts Kelvin exhibition Climate Analysis: Met Office sets up project to predict climate change Wales: Welsh teachers meet at Christ College, Brecon ESERA: ESERA 2005 unveils its conference programme Higher Education: Educators address school-university transition Christmas Lecture Series: Royal Institution supports Christmas Lecture series with interactive CD-ROM Events: UK’s Science Week kicks off in March Grants: PPARC and IOP to provide grants worth up to £400 Camera Competition: Congratulations go to camera winners Teachers’ TV: Teachers’ channel hits the small screen Physics and Music: Foster and Liebeck presentation combines physics and music Science on Stage: SOS gears up for Geneva festival Nanoworld: Hirsch lecture at Oxford focuses on the nanoworld GIREP: GIREP conference aims to raise physics’ profile Course: STELAR offers free radio-communication course

  13. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Einstein year: Einstein is brought back to life for a year of educational events Workshop: Students reach out for the Moon Event: Masterclasses go with a bang Workshop: Students search for asteroids on Einstein's birthday Scotland: Curriculum for Excellence takes holistic approach Conference: Reporting from a mattress in Nachod Conference: 'Change' is key objective at ICPE conference 2005 Lecture: Institute of Physics Schools Lecture series Conference: Experience showcase science in Warwick National network: Science Learning Centre opens Meeting: 30th Stirling Physics Meeting breaks records Competition: Win a digital camera! Forthcoming Events

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Astronomy: Trust founder receives heavenly honour Africa: UK teaching methods make the difference in Rwandan schools Spaced Out: UK-based scale model places Jodrell Bank at the centre of our solar system Teaching Support: Teacher Network makes its mark in the classroom Correction Art on Stage: Galileo lacks momentum Meeting: Teachers are inspired by US gathering Online Study: PPLATO Foundation promotes new avenue to university study Conference: GIREP '04 creates atmosphere of 'curiosity and enthusiasm' Meeting: SonSD meeting allows exchange of teaching ideas Competition: Win a digital camera! Physics in Perspective: Events highlight how rewarding physics can be Meeting: ASE conference to deliver the best of Physics Education

  15. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    IRELAND New courses for high-tech Ireland; SCIENCE YEAR Science Year launched with a jump; THE NETHERLANDS School science teachers face uncertainty; KOREA Embedding physics in a cultural context; TEACHING RESOURCES Teacher, get your hook; ICT RESOURCES Stock-take of ICT progress; INTERNET Teachers to test-drive new physics gateway; NEW ZEALAND Physics is valued in New Zealand; JAPAN Advancing Physics in Japan; HIGHER EDUCATION Networking works in Cologne; INSTITUTE MATTERS IoP demands a better deal for physics teachers; AUSTRALIA Physics numbers decline: educators blame the low impact curriculum; SCIENCE FOR THE PUBLIC More than sixty seconds in Glasgow; INTERNET A gift selection of papers from IoP; TEACHING STYLES I know what you did last summer;

  16. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2010-07-01

    Webb-Share update; Astro-cymru update; Copernicus reburied; Tycho to be exhumed; Caledonian anniversary 1: chair of astronomy at Glasgow; Caledonian anniversary II: James Ferguson: Fifty years of weather satellites; H.G. Wells remembered.

  17. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    MASTERCLASSES Researchers help motivate school students; HIGHER EDUCATION Undergraduate physics inquiry launched Sir Peter; PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENCE Chemists take the lead to get science groups pulling together; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Spintronic Chips; LOWER SECONDARY CURRICULUM Why do we teach physics? TEACHING COMMUNITY e-Teachers; AWARDS Nobel Prize; HIGHER EDUCATION Project Phoenics; PARTICLE PHYSICS LEP Closure; TEACHER TRAINING Training salary fails to attract recruits; EVENTS Physics moves into the spotlight

  18. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2011-09-01

    Townsend Observatory destroyed; BAA Lunar Section archives; Astro-Cymru; Royal star identified; Formation of Johannes Kepler Working Group; Tycho Brahe exhumed; Ancient observatory discovered in Iran...; ... and in Mexico; Calling all ex-occupants of interplanetary craft.

  19. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Meetings: Physics Teachers@CERN 2003 Education Group Annual Conference: Observations by a first-time participant... Summer Workshop: Making Music Competition: Physics in the fast lane Bristol Festival of Physics: Ice cream ice-breakers Online Resources: Old favourites go online UK Curriculum: What does society want? UK Curriculum: Assessment of Science Learning 14-19 Forthcoming Events

  20. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    Physics on Stage: Física en Acción increases the public’s awareness of science Competition: Winner takes a trip to CERN Ireland: TruePhysics makes life simpler Czech Republic: Technology fun day highlights demand for new science centre Literary Festival: Physicists visit Hay while the Sun shines Science on Stage: Science takes stage in Germany National Convention: NSTA connects science to world Forthcoming Events

  1. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    International conference: GIREP conference welcomes all UK Symposium: Showcase Science opens its doors to sixth-formers from across the country Universities: Institute regrets the closure of physics department at Reading Scotland: Sun and exam success in Stirling CERN: Teachers to descend on CERN

  2. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Spain: ESERA conference debates the teacher researcher relationship Media: Teachers’ TV Associates now launched Slovenia: GIREP seminar: ‘formal’ and ‘informal’ educators work together in Ljubljana Award: Faculty honours rollercoaster designer OECD: Global survey to assess school leavers’ abilities Competition: Opportunity to win revision aid for your class Scotland: Annual meeting UK: Humour and controversy at energy day Training: Teachers get to grips with telescopes Scotland: Educators flock to Stirling 2005

  3. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    Resources: First Faulkes Telescope on its way! Events: Everything under the Sun - GIREP 2002 Experiments: The most beautiful experiment, your favourite demonstration Science year: Planet Science takes off Resources: New CD packages Lecture: Fantastic Plastic Summer workshop: The Wright Stuff Resources: Amazing Space 14-16 curriculum: 21st century science ASE conference: ASE 2003 South Africa: Sasol SciFest Earth sciences: JESEI: the answer to all your Earthly problems

  4. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    LINKS WITH PRIMARY SCIENCE SAD Physics; PHYSICS RESEARCH In a hurry...; PHYSICS COMMUNITY Scottish Stirling Meeting; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Global warming forecasts rise in skin cancer; EVENTS 2001 SET week; E-MAIL DISCUSSIONS Learning in science; STUDENT ACTIVITY Paperclip Physics; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Perspectives on Science; AWARDS Award for causing chaos; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Physics and public heath: Do electrical power lines cause cancer? HIGHER EDUCATION First-year course development; INTERSCHOOL COLLABORATION Monitoring geomagnetic storms; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT UK course goes international; PHYSICS IN SCIENCE YEAR Website launched

  5. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    Croatia: Rijeka’s 2005 science festival attracts an enthusiastic crowd The Middle East: METSMaC conference reaches out to teachers around the Gulf and beyond Spain: Física en Acción 5: a Spanish festival that will have you cycling the tightrope Czech Republic: Astronomy lessons for everyone Sussex Planetarium: Planetarium sets its sights high TV series: Einstein gets animated for C4 cartoon series Memorial: Honouring the great: memorial to Robert Hooke is unveiled at Westminster Abbey Awards: SHAP awards prizes for exceptional student work Group meeting: IOP’s Education Group to meet in September Forthcoming Events

  6. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    Physics on Stage: Physics on the political stage Women in Physics: Allez les girls! Curriculum: Students want ethics debate in school science Physics on Stage: Buzzing around the tulips Events: GIREP 2002 Competition: Schumacher in the shower! Higher Education: Universities consider conceptual physics courses Resources: Evaluation of Advancing Physics Research Frontiers: Physics Teachers @ CERN 2002 UK Curriculum: Preparing useful citizens China: Changing the approach NSTA Annual Convention: Innovations and simplicity Europe: European Community Science and Society Action Plan Citizenship: ASE-Wellcome Trust citizenship education initiative

  7. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Particle Physics: LHC switch-on inspires pupils Science Fair: Science takes centre stage in Spain Conference: Czech and Slovak physicists get together Curriculum: UK needs independent curriculum body Conference: Edmonton enjoys a physics-show treat

  8. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Radioactivity: Olympic Games: dirty and decaying? Awards: SciCast rewards the best in scientific short films Conference: Teachers conference is big in Boston Workshop: Experts and teachers mingle in Mexico Awards: Olympiad holds lavish ceremony Cinema: Indiana Jones has a skull full of physics Conference: ESERA announces Turkish delight for 2009 Forthcoming Events

  9. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Meeting: Brecon hosts 'alternative-style' Education Group Conference Meeting: Schools' Physics Group meeting delivers valuable teaching update Saturn Mission: PPARC’s Saturn school resource goes online Funding: Grant scheme supports Einstein Year activities Meeting: Liverpool Teachers’ Conference revives enthusiasm for physics Loan Scheme: Moon samples loaned to schools Awards: Schoolnet rewards good use of ICT in learning Funding: PPARC provides cash for science projects Workshop: Experts in physics education research share knowledge at international event Bulgaria: Transit of Venus comes to town Conference: CERN weekend provides lessons in particle physics Summer School: Teachers receive the summer-school treatment

  10. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Resources: Online schools video library GIREP Seminar: A seminar not a conference New Teaching Resource: Free living for teachers Space: NASA proposes MEER - Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic-Reboost Electronic Teaching Materials: Superconductivity motivates need for upper secondary curriculum subjects Gifted and Talented: Seminars seek challenges Space: Comet chasing Particle Physics: Playing with single electrons Physics on Stage: Teachers explore the meaning of life Physics on Stage: Greek national event Physics on Stage: Physics on the Slovak stage Physics on Stage: Clubbing in Germany Physics on Stage: The Sun's star performance Higher Education: Physics: so refreshing USA: Broadening the Base AAPT Summer Meeting: US teachers in good form Astronomy: High school astronomy in the Czech Republic Space: Express to Mars Particle Physics: Journey to the centre of the Earth? ASE 2004: Flight from the ASE Physics Songs: A powerful melody Teacher Training: European training looks for ideal model

  11. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    SHAP Awards: SHAP students come out on top APECS Seminar: Able Pupils Experience Challenging Science project gets support SHAP Awards : Teachers get awards too Institute Awards: Musical squares: musical pair continue to share their adventures in sound Meeting: Rugby School hosts Schools’ Physics Group Meeting Germany: German didactics group puts on a full programme for spring meeting Radio Communication: GB4FUN: mobile radio shack hits the airwaves and is a hit with schools Saturn: Cassini Huygens mission: Saturn here we come! World Year of Physics: Conference continues with its preparations for 2005 Resources: New resources on radioactive materials available JG was supported by KBN grant no 2 P03A 020 24.

  12. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2012-06-01

    Herschel papers catalogued and accessible; Maskelyne papers accepted for the nation; centenary of the Hamburg Observatory; oldest astrologer's board found; Groupe Flammarion sold; ancient sundial found; keeping time (modern folk song about John Harrison).

  13. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    Einstein Year: Argentina remembers Einstein’s visit Health and Beauty: The sweet smell of fragrant molecules Austria: Physics and society top the bill Canada: Innovative teaching strategies pave the way for modern physics Publications: New online journal lets young scientists speak for themselves Forthcoming Events

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    11-14 Curriculum: Supporting Physics Teaching (11-14) Europe: Sci-tech couldn't be without it! Art-Science: Makrolab in Mountain Year Digital Curriculum: Should the BBC learn from the past? Scotland: Teachers get Rocket Science Malaysia: Controversy over the language medium for science teaching UK Science: Next stage of Science Year announced Special Educational Needs: Science for special needs students Folk Physics: Good vibrations Environment: IoM3 - a move towards sustainability? UK Primary Science: The threat of afternoon science

  15. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  16. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  17. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  18. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  19. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  20. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...