Science.gov

Sample records for phosphatase gene mendelian

  1. Genes That Bias Mendelian Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Grognet, Pierre; Lalucque, Hervé; Malagnac, Fabienne; Silar, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Mendel laws of inheritance can be cheated by Meiotic Drive Elements (MDs), complex nuclear genetic loci found in various eukaryotic genomes and distorting segregation in their favor. Here, we identify and characterize in the model fungus Podospora anserina Spok1 and Spok2, two MDs known as Spore Killers. We show that they are related genes with both spore-killing distorter and spore-protecting responder activities carried out by the same allele. These alleles act as autonomous elements, exert their effects independently of their location in the genome and can act as MDs in other fungi. Additionally, Spok1 acts as a resistance factor to Spok2 killing. Genetical data and cytological analysis of Spok1 and Spok2 localization during the killing process suggest a complex mode of action for Spok proteins. Spok1 and Spok2 belong to a multigene family prevalent in the genomes of many ascomycetes. As they have no obvious cellular role, Spok1 and Spok2 Spore Killer genes represent a novel kind of selfish genetic elements prevalent in fungal genome that proliferate through meiotic distortion. PMID:24830502

  2. Lessons learned from gene identification studies in Mendelian epilepsy disorders.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Katia; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid

    2016-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are now routinely used for gene identification in Mendelian disorders. Setting up cost-efficient NGS projects and managing the large amount of variants remains, however, a challenging job. Here we provide insights in the decision-making processes before and after the use of NGS in gene identification studies. Genetic factors are thought to have a role in ~70% of all epilepsies, and a variety of inheritance patterns have been described for seizure-associated gene defects. We therefore chose epilepsy as disease model and selected 35 NGS studies that focused on patients with a Mendelian epilepsy disorder. The strategies used for gene identification and their respective outcomes were reviewed. High-throughput NGS strategies have led to the identification of several new epilepsy-causing genes, enlarging our knowledge on both known and novel pathomechanisms. NGS findings have furthermore extended the awareness of phenotypical and genetic heterogeneity. By discussing recent studies we illustrate: (I) the power of NGS for gene identification in Mendelian disorders, (II) the accelerating pace in which this field evolves, and (III) the considerations that have to be made when performing NGS studies. Nonetheless, the enormous rise in gene discovery over the last decade, many patients and families included in gene identification studies still remain without a molecular diagnosis; hence, further genetic research is warranted. On the basis of successful NGS studies in epilepsy, we discuss general approaches to guide human geneticists and clinicians in setting up cost-efficient gene identification NGS studies. PMID:26603999

  3. Identifying Mendelian disease genes with the Variant Effect Scoring Tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole exome sequencing studies identify hundreds to thousands of rare protein coding variants of ambiguous significance for human health. Computational tools are needed to accelerate the identification of specific variants and genes that contribute to human disease. Results We have developed the Variant Effect Scoring Tool (VEST), a supervised machine learning-based classifier, to prioritize rare missense variants with likely involvement in human disease. The VEST classifier training set comprised ~ 45,000 disease mutations from the latest Human Gene Mutation Database release and another ~45,000 high frequency (allele frequency >1%) putatively neutral missense variants from the Exome Sequencing Project. VEST outperforms some of the most popular methods for prioritizing missense variants in carefully designed holdout benchmarking experiments (VEST ROC AUC = 0.91, PolyPhen2 ROC AUC = 0.86, SIFT4.0 ROC AUC = 0.84). VEST estimates variant score p-values against a null distribution of VEST scores for neutral variants not included in the VEST training set. These p-values can be aggregated at the gene level across multiple disease exomes to rank genes for probable disease involvement. We tested the ability of an aggregate VEST gene score to identify candidate Mendelian disease genes, based on whole-exome sequencing of a small number of disease cases. We used whole-exome data for two Mendelian disorders for which the causal gene is known. Considering only genes that contained variants in all cases, the VEST gene score ranked dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) number 2 of 2253 genes in four cases of Miller syndrome, and myosin-3 (MYH3) number 2 of 2313 genes in three cases of Freeman Sheldon syndrome. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the potential power gain of aggregating bioinformatics variant scores into gene-level scores and the general utility of bioinformatics in assisting the search for disease genes in large-scale exome sequencing studies. VEST is

  4. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Rachel D.; Emmett, Kevin J.; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbor cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than five thousand patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate “pan-cancer” comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers. PMID:25926297

  5. The "Mendelian Gene" and the "Molecular Gene": Two Relevant Concepts of Genetic Units.

    PubMed

    Orgogozo, V; Peluffo, A E; Morizot, B

    2016-01-01

    We focus here on two prevalent meanings of the word gene in research articles. On one hand, the gene, named here "molecular gene," is a stretch of DNA that is transcribed and codes for an RNA or a polypeptide with a known or presumed function (as in "gene network"), whose exact spatial delimitation on the chromosome remains a matter of debate, especially in cases with alternative splicing, antisense transcripts, etc. On the other hand, the gene, called here "Mendelian gene," is a segregating genetic unit which is detected through phenotypic differences associated with different alleles at the same locus (as in "gene flow"). We show that the "Mendelian gene" concept is still extensively used today in biology research and is sometimes confused with the "molecular gene." We try here to clarify the distinction between both concepts. Efforts to delineate the beginning and the end of the DNA sequence corresponding to the "Mendelian gene" and the "molecular gene" reveal that both entities do not always match. We argue that both concepts are part of two relevant frameworks for explaining the biological world. PMID:27282022

  6. Extensive Variation in the Mutation Rate Between and Within Human Genes Associated with Mendelian Disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas; Ho, Gladys; Christodoulou, John; Price, Elizabeth Ann; Onadim, Zerrin; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Dehainault, Catherine; Houdayer, Claude; Parfait, Beatrice; van Minkelen, Rick; Lohman, Dietmar; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated whether the mutation rate varies between genes and sites using de novo mutations (DNMs) from three genes associated with Mendelian diseases (RB1, NF1, and MECP2). We show that the relative frequency of mutations at CpG dinucleotides relative to non-CpG sites varies between genes and relative to the genomic average. In particular we show that the rate of transition mutation at CpG sites relative to the rate of non-CpG transversion is substantially higher in our disease genes than amongst DNMs in general; the rate of CpG transition can be several hundred-fold greater than the rate of non-CpG transversion. We also show that the mutation rate varies significantly between sites of a particular mutational type, such as non-CpG transversion, within a gene. We estimate that for all categories of sites, except CpG transitions, there is at least a 30-fold difference in the mutation rate between the 10% of sites with the highest and lowest mutation rates. However, our best estimate is that the mutation rate varies by several hundred-fold variation. We suggest that the presence of hypermutable sites may be one reason certain genes are associated with disease. PMID:26857394

  7. Direct evidence for Mendelian inheritance of the variations in the ribosomal protein gene introns in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares).

    PubMed

    Chow, S; Scholey, V P; Nakazawa, A; Margulies, D; Wexler, J B; Olson, R J; Hazama, K

    2001-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism found in the S7 ribosomal protein gene introns of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) was compared between a single pair of parents and their offspring. The sizes of the first intron ( RP1) and second intron ( RP2) amplified by polymerase chain reaction were 810 bp and 1400 bp, respectively. The dam and sire had different restriction types from one another in HhaI and RsaI digestions for RP1 and in DdeI, HhaI, and ScrFI digestions for RP2. Putative genotypes in both introns of 64 larvae were found to be segregated in Mendelian proportions. Genotype distributions in a wild yellowfin tuna sample ( n = 34) were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.149 to 0.388. This study presents novel Mendelian markers, which are feasible for tuna population genetic study and pedigree analysis. PMID:14961386

  8. Clinical Diagnosis of Mendelian Disorders Using a Comprehensive Gene-Targeted Panel Test for Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Tetsuya; Murata, Megumi; Kai, Masachika; Adachi, Kaori; Nakagawa, Naoko; Kasagi, Noriko; Matsumura, Wataru; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Nanba, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic diagnoses provide beneficial information to patients and families. However, traditional genetic diagnoses are often difficult even for experienced clinicians and require recognition of characteristic patterns of signs or symptoms to guide targeted genetic testing for the confirmation of diagnoses. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful genetic diagnostic tool. However, whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing (WES) are expensive, and the interpretation of results is difficult. Hence, target gene capture sequencing of gene panels has recently been applied to genetic diagnoses. Herein, we demonstrate that targeted sequencing approaches using gene panel testing are highly efficient for the diagnosis of Mendelian disorders. Methods NGS using TruSight one gene panel was performed in 17 families and 20 patients, and we developed a bioinformatic pipeline at our institution for detecting mutations. Results We detected causative mutations in 6 of 17 (35%) families. In particular, 11 (65%) families had syndromic diagnosis and 6 (35%) had no syndromic diagnosis before NGS testing. The number of positive diagnoses was 5 of 11 (45%) in the syndromic group and were 1 of 6 (17%) among patients of the no syndromic diagnosis group. Conclusion Diagnostic yields in the present study were higher than in previous reports of genetic and chromosomal tests and WES. The present comprehensive gene-targeted panel test is a powerful diagnostic tool for Mendelian disorders. PMID:27493482

  9. How segmental duplications shape our genome: recent evolution of ABCC6 and PKD1 Mendelian disease genes.

    PubMed

    Symmons, Orsolya; Váradi, András; Arányi, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project has brought the understanding that our genome contains an unexpectedly large proportion of segmental duplications. This poses the challenge of elucidating the consequences of recent duplications on physiology. We have conducted an in-depth study of a subset of segmental duplications on chromosome 16. We focused on PKD1 and ABCC6 duplications because mutations affecting these genes are responsible for the Mendelian disorders autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and pseudoxanthoma elasticum, respectively. We establish that duplications of PKD1 and ABCC6 are associated to low-copy repeat 16a and show that such duplications have occurred several times independently in different primate species. We demonstrate that partial duplication of PKD1 and ABCC6 has numerous consequences: the pseudogenes give rise to new transcripts and mediate gene conversion, which not only results in disease-causing mutations but also serves as a reservoir for sequence variation. The duplicated segments are also involved in submicroscopic and microscopic genomic rearrangements, contributing to structural variation in human and chromosomal break points in the gibbon. In conclusion, our data shed light on the recent and ongoing evolution of chromosome 16 mediated by segmental duplication and deepen our understanding of the history of two Mendelian disorder genes. PMID:18791038

  10. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  11. OMIM.org: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM®), an online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Amberger, Joanna S.; Bocchini, Carol A.; Schiettecatte, François; Scott, Alan F.; Hamosh, Ada

    2015-01-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®, is a comprehensive, authoritative and timely research resource of curated descriptions of human genes and phenotypes and the relationships between them. The new official website for OMIM, OMIM.org (http://omim.org), was launched in January 2011. OMIM is based on the published peer-reviewed biomedical literature and is used by overlapping and diverse communities of clinicians, molecular biologists and genome scientists, as well as by students and teachers of these disciplines. Genes and phenotypes are described in separate entries and are given unique, stable six-digit identifiers (MIM numbers). OMIM entries have a structured free-text format that provides the flexibility necessary to describe the complex and nuanced relationships between genes and genetic phenotypes in an efficient manner. OMIM also has a derivative table of genes and genetic phenotypes, the Morbid Map. OMIM.org has enhanced search capabilities such as genome coordinate searching and thesaurus-enhanced search term options. Phenotypic series have been created to facilitate viewing genetic heterogeneity of phenotypes. Clinical synopsis features are enhanced with UMLS, Human Phenotype Ontology and Elements of Morphology terms and image links. All OMIM data are available for FTP download and through an API. MIMmatch is a novel outreach feature to disseminate updates and encourage collaboration. PMID:25428349

  12. Mendelian transmission of genes introduced into plants by the Ti plasmids of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Otten, L; De Greve, H; Hernalsteens, J P; Van Montagu, M; Schieder, O; Straub, J; Schell, J

    1981-01-01

    Insertion of the bacterial transposon Tn7 was used to obtain mutants of an octopine Ti plasmid. Crown gall tumours induced on tobacco by an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain carrying a particular mutant Ti plasmid (pGV2100) were found to give rise to shoots. These shoots were grown in vitro and one of them (rGV-1) was found to contain the T-DNA specific enzyme lysopine dehydrogenase (LpDH) and to form roots. After transfer to soil, rGV-1 developed into a morphologically and functionally normal tobacco plant. All cells of the regenerant and of vegetatively produced offspring were shown, by cloning of leaf protoplasts, to contain T-DNA and LpDH activity, rGV-1 and vegetatively produced offspring flowered normally. Plantlets obtained from haploid anther cultures were tested for LpDH activity. Forty-one percent of these plantlets were LpDH positive. Moreover, both self-pollination of rGV-1 and crosses between rGV-1 and normal tobacco plants showed that the LpDH character was transmitted both through the pollen and through the eggs of rGV-1 as a single dominant factor with Mendelian segregation ratios typical for monohybrid crosses. By repeated selfing, homozygous plants were obtained which bred true with respect to LpDH. The importance of these findings with respect to the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Ti plasmids for genetic engineering in plants is discussed. PMID:6948997

  13. Mendelian randomization supports causality between maternal hyperglycemia and epigenetic regulation of leptin gene in newborns.

    PubMed

    Allard, C; Desgagné, V; Patenaude, J; Lacroix, M; Guillemette, L; Battista, M C; Doyon, M; Ménard, J; Ardilouze, J L; Perron, P; Bouchard, L; Hivert, M F

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that acts in the central nervous system and regulates energy balance. Animal models and human observational studies have suggested that leptin surge in the perinatal period has a critical role in programming long-term risk of obesity. In utero exposure to maternal hyperglycemia has been associated with increased risk of obesity later in life. Epigenetic mechanisms are suspected to be involved in fetal programming of long term metabolic diseases. We investigated whether DNA methylation levels near LEP locus mediate the relation between maternal glycemia and neonatal leptin levels using the 2-step epigenetic Mendelian randomization approach. We used data and samples from up to 485 mother-child dyads from Gen3G, a large prospective population-based cohort. First, we built a genetic risk score to capture maternal glycemia based on 10 known glycemic genetic variants (GRS10) and showed it was an adequate instrumental variable (β = 0.046 mmol/L of maternal fasting glucose per additional risk allele; SE = 0.007; P = 7.8 × 10(-11); N = 467). A higher GRS10 was associated with lower methylation levels at cg12083122 located near LEP (β = -0.072 unit per additional risk allele; SE = 0.04; P = 0.05; N = 166). Direction and effect size of association between the instrumental variable GRS10 and methylation at cg12083122 were consistent with the negative association we observed using measured maternal glycemia. Lower DNA methylation levels at cg12083122 were associated with higher cord blood leptin levels (β = -0.17 log of cord blood leptin per unit; SE = 0.07; P = 0.01; N = 170). Our study supports that maternal glycemia is part of causal pathways influencing offspring leptin epigenetic regulation. PMID:25800063

  14. Few Mendelian Genes Underlie the Quantitative Response of a Forest Tree, Eucalyptus globulus, to a Natural Fungal Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jules S.; Potts, Brad M.; Vaillancourt, René E.

    2008-01-01

    Foliar fungal pathogens from the genus Mycosphaerella affect eucalypts in natural forests and plantations worldwide. QTL analysis was conducted to dissect the genetic control of resistance in Eucalyptus globulus to a natural infection by Mycosphaerella leaf disease, using a clonally replicated outbred F2 family (112 genotypes) planted in a field trial. Two major QTL, with high LOD support (20.2 and 10.9) and high genomewide significance, explained a large proportion (52%) of the phenotypic variance in the severity of damage by Mycosphaerella cryptica, which may be indicative of oligogenic control. Both QTL were validated in a second F2 family and one was validated in a third F2 family. The mean values of different genotype classes at both major QTL argue for Mendelian inheritance with resistance dominant over susceptibility. There were strong correlations between the levels of Mycosphaerella damage in related genetic material planted in three widely separated locations in Tasmania. These findings together provide evidence that the genes controlling resistance to Mycosphaerella damage are stable in different genetic backgrounds and across different environments. PMID:18202395

  15. Cloning of the canine glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kishnani, P.; Bao, Y.; Brix, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two Maltese puppies with massive hepatomegaly and failure to thrive were found to have a markedly reduced Glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) activity in the liver and kidney. Deficiency of G-6-Pase activity causes type 1a glycogen storage disease in humans. To further study the mutation responsible for the disease in dog, we cloned G-6-Pase canine cDNA from normal mixed breed dog liver RNA using reverse transcriptase and PCR amplification using primers derived from the published murine G-6-Pase gene sequence. Sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 1071 nucleotides that encodes a predicted 357 amino acid polypeptide in the canine G-6-Pase gene, same as mouse and human. We found more than 90% sequence homology between dog and human G-6-Pase sequence. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced canine G-6-Pase polypeptide shows six transmembrane-spanning segments similar to those seen in human and mouse. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localization is similarly predicted by the presence of the ER protein retention signal KK positioned 3 and 4 amino acids from the carboxy terminal. Potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are identified at positions 96, 203, and 276. Northern blot analysis revealed increased G-6-Pase mRNA in the deficient dog liver compared to control. This could possibly reflect upregulation of transcription due to the persistent hypoglycemic state. Further studies are directed at the identification of the mutation involved in this deficient dog strain. Characterization of the G-6-Pase gene and protein in the deficient dog model can pave the way for new understanding in the pathophysiology of this disease and for the trials of novel therapeutic approaches including gene therapy.

  16. NET-GE: a novel NETwork-based Gene Enrichment for detecting biological processes associated to Mendelian diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Enrichment analysis is a widely applied procedure for shedding light on the molecular mechanisms and functions at the basis of phenotypes, for enlarging the dataset of possibly related genes/proteins and for helping interpretation and prioritization of newly determined variations. Several standard and Network-based enrichment methods are available. Both approaches rely on the annotations that characterize the genes/proteins included in the input set; network based ones also include in different ways physical and functional relationships among different genes or proteins that can be extracted from the available biological networks of interactions. Results Here we describe a novel procedure based on the extraction from the STRING interactome of sub-networks connecting proteins that share the same Gene Ontology(GO) terms for Biological Process (BP). Enrichment analysis is performed by mapping the protein set to be analyzed on the sub-networks, and then by collecting the corresponding annotations. We test the ability of our enrichment method in finding annotation terms disregarded by other enrichment methods available. We benchmarked 244 sets of proteins associated to different Mendelian diseases, according to the OMIM web resource. In 143 cases (58%), the network-based procedure extracts GO terms neglected by the standard method, and in 86 cases (35%), some of the newly enriched GO terms are not included in the set of annotations characterizing the input proteins. We present in detail six cases where our network-based enrichment provides an insight into the biological basis of the diseases, outperforming other freely available network-based methods. Conclusions Considering a set of proteins in the context of their interaction network can help in better defining their functions. Our novel method exploits the information contained in the STRING database for building the minimal connecting network containing all the proteins annotated with the same GO term

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  19. Cloning and characterization of the Bacillus licheniformis gene coding for alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Hulett, F M

    1984-01-01

    The structural gene for alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.1) of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 was cloned into the Pst1 site of pMK2004 from chromosomal DNA. The gene was cloned on an 8.5-kilobase DNA fragment. A restriction map was developed, and the gene was subcloned on a 4.2-kilobase DNA fragment. The minimum coding region of the gene was localized to a 1.3-kilobase region. Western blot analysis was used to show that the gene coded for a 60,000-molecular-weight protein which cross-reacts with anti-alkaline phosphatase prepared against the salt-extractable membrane alkaline phosphatase of B. licheniformis MC14 . Images PMID:6327655

  20. Cloning and characterization of the Bacillus licheniformis gene coding for alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hulett, F M

    1984-06-01

    The structural gene for alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.1) of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 was cloned into the Pst1 site of pMK2004 from chromosomal DNA. The gene was cloned on an 8.5-kilobase DNA fragment. A restriction map was developed, and the gene was subcloned on a 4.2-kilobase DNA fragment. The minimum coding region of the gene was localized to a 1.3-kilobase region. Western blot analysis was used to show that the gene coded for a 60,000-molecular-weight protein which cross-reacts with anti-alkaline phosphatase prepared against the salt-extractable membrane alkaline phosphatase of B. licheniformis MC14 . PMID:6327655

  1. The Genetic Basis of Mendelian Phenotypes: Discoveries, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Boehm, Corinne; Sobreira, Nara; Smith, Joshua D.; Harrell, Tanya M.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Gambin, Tomasz; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep H.; Doheny, Kimberly; Scott, Alan F.; Avramopoulos, Dimitri; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Mathews, Debra; Witmer, P. Dane; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt; Watkins, Lee; Patterson, Karynne E.; Reinier, Frederic; Blue, Elizabeth; Muzny, Donna; Kircher, Martin; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Sutton, V. Reid; Tabor, Holly K.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gunel, Murat; Mane, Shrikant; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hamosh, Ada; Shendure, Jay; Lupski, James R.; Lifton, Richard P.; Valle, David; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Discovering the genetic basis of a Mendelian phenotype establishes a causal link between genotype and phenotype, making possible carrier and population screening and direct diagnosis. Such discoveries also contribute to our knowledge of gene function, gene regulation, development, and biological mechanisms that can be used for developing new therapeutics. As of February 2015, 2,937 genes underlying 4,163 Mendelian phenotypes have been discovered, but the genes underlying ∼50% (i.e., 3,152) of all known Mendelian phenotypes are still unknown, and many more Mendelian conditions have yet to be recognized. This is a formidable gap in biomedical knowledge. Accordingly, in December 2011, the NIH established the Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMGs) to provide the collaborative framework and infrastructure necessary for undertaking large-scale whole-exome sequencing and discovery of the genetic variants responsible for Mendelian phenotypes. In partnership with 529 investigators from 261 institutions in 36 countries, the CMGs assessed 18,863 samples from 8,838 families representing 579 known and 470 novel Mendelian phenotypes as of January 2015. This collaborative effort has identified 956 genes, including 375 not previously associated with human health, that underlie a Mendelian phenotype. These results provide insight into study design and analytical strategies, identify novel mechanisms of disease, and reveal the extensive clinical variability of Mendelian phenotypes. Discovering the gene underlying every Mendelian phenotype will require tackling challenges such as worldwide ascertainment and phenotypic characterization of families affected by Mendelian conditions, improvement in sequencing and analytical techniques, and pervasive sharing of phenotypic and genomic data among researchers, clinicians, and families. PMID:26166479

  2. Why is Mendelian segregation so exact?

    PubMed

    Crow, J F

    1991-06-01

    The precise 1:1 segregation of Mendelian heredity is ordinarily taken for granted, yet there are numerous examples of 'cheating' genes that perpetuate themselves in the population by biasing the Mendelian process in their favor. One example is the Segregation Distortion system of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the distorting gene causes its homologous chromosome to produce a nonfunctional sperm. This system depends on three closely linked components, whose molecular basis is beginning to be understood. The system is characterized by numerous modifiers changing the degree of distortion. Mathematical theory shows that unlinked modifiers that change the degree of distortion in the direction of Mendelism always increase in the population. This provides a mechanism for removing cheaters and preserving the honesty of the Mendelian gene-shuffle. PMID:1909864

  3. Arsenic metabolism efficiency has a causal role in arsenic toxicity: Mendelian randomization and gene-environment interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Argos, Maria; Gao, Jianjun; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Rahaman, Ronald; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Quasem, Iftekhar; Hore, Samar K; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Harjes, Judith; Sarwar, Golam; Slavkovich, Vesna; Gamble, Mary V; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mohammad; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Baron, John A; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-01-01

    Background Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a serious global health issue. Observational studies suggest that individuals who metabolize arsenic efficiently are at lower risk for toxicities such as arsenical skin lesions. Using two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 10q24.32 region (near AS3MT) that show independent associations with metabolism efficiency, Mendelian randomization can be used to assess whether the association between metabolism efficiency and skin lesions is likely to be causal. Methods Using data on 2060 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we estimated associations for two 10q24.32 SNPs with relative concentrations of three urinary arsenic species (representing metabolism efficiency): inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). SNP-based predictions of iAs%, MMA% and DMA% were tested for association with skin lesion status among 2483 cases and 2857 controls. Results Causal odds ratios for skin lesions were 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.87, 0.95), 1.19 (CI: 1.10, 1.28) and 1.23 (CI: 1.12, 1.36) for a one standard deviation increase in DMA%, MMA% and iAs%, respectively. We demonstrated genotype-arsenic interaction, with metabolism-related variants showing stronger associations with skin lesion risk among individuals with high arsenic exposure (synergy index: 1.37; CI: 1.11, 1.62). Conclusions We provide strong evidence for a causal relationship between arsenic metabolism efficiency and skin lesion risk. Mendelian randomization can be used to assess the causal role of arsenic exposure and metabolism in a wide array of health conditions. Developing interventions that increase arsenic metabolism efficiency are likely to reduce the impact of arsenic exposure on health. PMID:24536095

  4. Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue gene) haploinsufficiency promotes insulin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. T.; Kim, P. T. W.; Peacock, J. W.; Yau, T. Y.; Mui, A. L.-F.; Chung, S. W.; Sossi, V.; Doudet, D.; Green, D.; Ruth, T. J.; Parsons, R.; Verchere, C. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin controls glucose metabolism via multiple signalling pathways, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in muscle and adipose tissue. The protein/lipid phosphatase Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) attenuates PI3K signalling by dephosphorylating the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate generated by PI3K. The current study was aimed at investigating the effect of haploinsufficiency for Pten on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Materials and methods Insulin sensitivity in Pten heterozygous (Pten+/−) mice was investigated in i.p. insulin challenge and glucose tolerance tests. Glucose uptake was monitored in vitro in primary cultures of myocytes from Pten+/− mice, and in vivo by positron emission tomography. The phosphorylation status of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), a downstream signalling protein in the PI3K pathway, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a substrate of PKB/Akt, was determined by western immunoblotting. Results Following i.p. insulin challenge, blood glucose levels in Pten+/− mice remained depressed for up to 120 min, whereas glucose levels in wild-type mice began to recover after approximately 30 min. After glucose challenge, blood glucose returned to normal about twice as rapidly in Pten+/− mice. Enhanced glucose uptake was observed both in Pten+/− myocytes and in skeletal muscle of Pten+/− mice by PET. PKB and GSK3β phosphorylation was enhanced and prolonged in Pten+/− myocytes. Conclusions/interpretation Pten is a key negative regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. The partial reduction of Pten due to Pten haploinsufficiency is enough to elicit enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in Pten+/− mice. PMID:17195063

  5. Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase I gene with an extended COOH-terminus.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Peterson, T; Bee, G; Hulett, F M

    1998-02-01

    Bacterial alkaline phosphatases (APases), except those isolated from Bacillus licheniformis, are approximately 45-kDa proteins while eucaryotic alkaline phosphatases are 60 kDa. To answer the question of whether the apparent 60-kDa alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis accurately reflected the size of the protein, the entire gene was analyzed. DNA sequence analysis of the alkaline phosphatase I (APaseI) gene of B. licheniformis MC14 indicated that the gene could code for a 60-kDa protein of 553 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence of APaseI showed about 32% identity to those of B. subtilis APase III and IV and had apparent sequence homologies in the core structure and active sites that are conserved among APases of various sources. The extra carboxy-terminal sequence of APaseI, which made the enzyme bigger than other procaryotic APases, was not homologous to those of eucaryotic APases. The amino acid composition of APaseI was most similar to that of salt-dependent APase among the isozymes of B. licheniformis MC14. Another open reading frame of 261 amino acids was present 142 nucleotide upstream of the APaseI gene and its predicted amino acid sequence showed 68% identity to that of glucose dehydrogenase of B. megaterium. PMID:9485594

  6. The prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) gene is localized to human chromosome 3q21-q23

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.S.L.; Sharief, F.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) has been used as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. It is synthesized under androgen regulation and secreted by the epithelial cells of the prostate gland. The authors have confirmed the previous assignment of the ACPP gene to chromosome 3 by probing a panel of 25 human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, and they have further localized the ACPP gene to chromosome 3q21-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  7. [Mendelian randomisation - a genetic approach to an epidemiological method].

    PubMed

    Stensrud, Mats Julius

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic information is becoming more easily available, and rapid progress is being made in developing methods of illuminating issues of interest. Mendelian randomisation makes it possible to study causes of disease using observational data. The name refers to the random distribution of gene variants in meiosis. The methodology makes use of genes that influence a risk factor for a disease, without influencing the disease itself. In this review article I explain the principles behind Mendelian randomisation and present the areas of application for this methodology.MATERIAL AND METHOD Methodology articles describing Mendelian randomisation were reviewed. The articles were found through a search in PubMed with the combination «mendelian randomization» OR «mendelian randomisation», and a search in McMaster Plus with the combination «mendelian randomization». A total of 15 methodology articles were read in full text. Methodology articles were supplemented by clinical studies found in the PubMed search.RESULTS In contrast to traditional observational studies, Mendelian randomisation studies are not affected by two important sources of error: conventional confounding variables and reverse causation. Mendelian randomisation is therefore a promising tool for studying causality. Mendelian randomisation studies have already provided valuable knowledge on the risk factors for a wide range of diseases. It is nevertheless important to be aware of the limitations of the methodology. As a result of the rapid developments in genetics research, Mendelian randomisation will probably be widely used in future years.INTERPRETATION If Mendelian randomisation studies are conducted correctly, they may help to reveal both modifiable and non-modifiable causes of disease. PMID:27325033

  8. Rapid evolution and gene expression: a rapidly evolving Mendelian trait that silences field crickets has widespread effects on mRNA and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, S; Liu, X; Ly, T; Fang, Y; Rockliffe, N; Paterson, S; Shirran, S L; Botting, C H; Bailey, N W

    2016-06-01

    A major advance in modern evolutionary biology is the ability to start linking phenotypic evolution in the wild with genomic changes that underlie that evolution. We capitalized on a rapidly evolving Hawaiian population of crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) to test hypotheses about the genomic consequences of a recent Mendelian mutation of large effect which disrupts the development of sound-producing structures on male forewings. The resulting silent phenotype, flatwing, persists because of natural selection imposed by an acoustically orienting parasitoid, but it interferes with mate attraction. We examined gene expression differences in developing wing buds of wild-type and flatwing male crickets using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics. Most differentially expressed (DE) transcripts were down-regulated in flatwing males (625 up vs. 1716 down), whereas up- and down-regulated proteins were equally represented (30 up and 34 down). Differences between morphs were clearly not restricted to a single pathway, and we recovered annotations associated with a broad array of functions that would not be predicted a priori. Using a candidate gene detection test based on homology, we identified 30% of putative Drosophila wing development genes in the cricket transcriptome, but only 10% were DE. In addition to wing-related annotations, endocrine pathways and several biological processes such as reproduction, immunity and locomotion were DE in the mutant crickets at both biological levels. Our results illuminate the breadth of genetic pathways that are potentially affected in the early stages of adaptation. PMID:26999731

  9. ONLINE MENDELIAN INHERITANCE IN MAN (OMIM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Welcome to OMIM(TM), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. This database is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders authored and edited by Dr. Victor McKusick and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere, and developed for the World Wide Web by NCBI, the National Cent...

  10. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  11. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Fernanda dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W.; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  12. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Dolan, Stephen K; Fernanda Dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  13. Application of next generation sequencing technology in Mendelian movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumin; Pan, Xuya; Xue, Dan; Li, Yuwei; Zhang, Xueying; Kuang, Biao; Zheng, Jiabo; Deng, Hao; Li, Xiaoling; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Li, Guiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has developed very rapidly in the last decade. Compared with Sanger sequencing, NGS has the advantages of high sensitivity and high throughput. Movement disorders are a common type of neurological disease. Although traditional linkage analysis has become a standard method to identify the pathogenic genes in diseases, it is getting difficult to find new pathogenic genes in rare Mendelian disorders, such as movement disorders, due to a lack of appropriate families with high penetrance or enough affected individuals. Thus, NGS is an ideal approach to identify the causal alleles for inherited disorders. NGS is used to identify genes in several diseases and new mutant sites in Mendelian movement disorders. This article reviewed the recent progress in NGS and the use of NGS in Mendelian movement disorders from genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing. A perspective on how NGS could be employed in rare Mendelian disorders is also provided. PMID:26932219

  14. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of the gene for secreted alkaline phosphatase from Lysobacter enzymogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Au, S; Roy, K L; von Tigerstrom, R G

    1991-01-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes produces an alkaline phosphatase which is secreted into the medium. The gene for the enzyme (phoA) was isolated from a recombinant lambda library. It was identified within a 4.4-kb EcoRI-BamH1 fragment, and its sequence was determined by the chain termination method. The structural gene consists of an open reading frame which encodes a 539-amino-acid protein with a 29-residue signal sequence, followed by a 119-residue propeptide, the 281-residue mature phosphatase, and a 110-residue carboxy-terminal domain. The roles of the propeptide and the carboxy-terminal peptide remain to be determined. A molecular weight of 30,000 was determined for the mature enzyme from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid sequence was compared with sequences available in the current protein data base, and a region of the sequence was found to show considerable homology with sequences in mammalian type 5 iron-containing purple acid phosphatases. Images PMID:1856159

  15. Non-manifesting AHI1 truncations indicate localized loss-of-function tolerance in a severe Mendelian disease gene

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Solaf M.; Phillips, Jennifer B.; Heller, Raoul; Thoenes, Michaela; Elsobky, Ezzat; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Seland, Saskia; Ebermann, Inga; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Toliat, Mohammad; Körber, Friederike; Hu, Xue-Jia; Wu, Yun-Dong; Zaki, Maha S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Gleeson, Joseph; Boltshauser, Eugen; Westerfield, Monte; Bolz, Hanno J.

    2015-01-01

    Determination of variant pathogenicity represents a major challenge in the era of high-throughput sequencing. Erroneous categorization may result if variants affect genes that are in fact dispensable. We demonstrate that this also applies to rare, apparently unambiguous truncating mutations of an established disease gene. By whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous family with congenital non-syndromic deafness, we unexpectedly identified a homozygous nonsense variant, p.Arg1066*, in AHI1, a gene associated with Joubert syndrome (JBTS), a severe recessive ciliopathy. None of four homozygotes expressed any signs of JBTS, and one of them had normal hearing, which also ruled out p.Arg1066* as the cause of deafness. Homozygosity mapping and WES in the only other reported JBTS family with a homozygous C-terminal truncation (p.Trp1088Leufs*16) confirmed AHI1 as disease gene, but based on a more N-terminal missense mutation impairing WD40-repeat formation. Morpholinos against N-terminal zebrafish Ahi1, orthologous to where human mutations cluster, produced a ciliopathy, but targeting near human p.Arg1066 and p.Trp1088 did not. Most AHI1 mutations in JBTS patients result in truncated protein lacking WD40-repeats and the SH3 domain; disease was hitherto attributed to loss of these protein interaction modules. Our findings indicate that normal development does not require the C-terminal SH3 domain. This has far-reaching implications, considering that variants like p.Glu984* identified by preconception screening (‘Kingsmore panel’) do not necessarily indicate JBTS carriership. Genomes of individuals with consanguineous background are enriched for homozygous variants that may unmask dispensable regions of disease genes and unrecognized false positives in diagnostic large-scale sequencing and preconception carrier screening. PMID:25616960

  16. A Non-Degenerate Code of Deleterious Variants in Mendelian Loci Contributes to Complex Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Blair, David R.; Lyttle, Christopher S.; Mortensen, Jonathan M.; Bearden, Charles F.; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Khiabanian, Hossein; Melamed, Rachel; Rabadan, Raul; Bernstam, Elmer V.; Brunak, Søren; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nicolae, Dan; Shah, Nigam H.; Grossman, Robert L.; Cox, Nancy J.; White, Kevin P.; Rzhetsky, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Summary Whereas countless highly penetrant variants have been associated with Mendelian disorders, the genetic etiologies underlying complex diseases remain largely unresolved. Here, we examine the extent to which Mendelian variation contributes to complex disease risk by mining the medical records of over 110 million patients. We detect thousands of associations between Mendelian and complex diseases, revealing a non-degenerate, phenotypic code that links each complex disorder to a unique collection of Mendelian loci. Using genome-wide association results, we demonstrate that common variants associated with complex diseases are enriched in the genes indicated by this “Mendelian code.” Finally, we detect hundreds of comorbidity associations among Mendelian disorders, and we use probabilistic genetic modeling to demonstrate that Mendelian variants likely contribute non-additively to the risk for a subset of complex diseases. Overall, this study illustrates a complementary approach for mapping complex disease loci and provides unique predictions concerning the etiologies of specific diseases. PMID:24074861

  17. Essential, Overlapping and Redundant Roles of the Drosophila Protein Phosphatase 1α and 1β Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Jasmin; Gross, Sascha; Bennett, Daimark; Alphey, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Protein serine/threonine phosphatase type 1 (PP1) has been found in all eukaryotes examined to date and is involved in the regulation of many cellular functions, including glycogen metabolism, muscle contraction, and mitosis. In Drosophila, four genes code for the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1c), three of which belong to the PP1α subtype. PP1β9C (flapwing) encodes the fourth PP1c gene and has a specific and nonredundant function as a nonmuscle myosin phosphatase. PP1α87B is the major form and contributes ∼80% of the total PP1 activity. We describe the first mutant alleles of PP1α96A and show that PP1α96A is not an essential gene, but seems to have a function in the regulation of nonmuscle myosin. We show that overexpression of the PP1α isozymes does not rescue semilethal PP1β9C mutants, whereas overexpression of either PP1α96A or PP1β9C does rescue a lethal PP1α87B mutant combination, showing that the lethality is due to a quantitative reduction in the level of PP1c. Overexpression of PP1β9C does not rescue a PP1α87B, PP1α96A double mutant, suggesting an essential PP1α-specific function in Drosophila. PMID:17513890

  18. Asymmetric division triggers cell-specific gene expression through coupled capture and stabilization of a phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Niels; Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a division septum near a randomly chosen pole during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis creates unequal sized daughter cells with dissimilar programs of gene expression. An unanswered question is how polar septation activates a transcription factor (σF) selectively in the small cell. We present evidence that the upstream regulator of σF, the phosphatase SpoIIE, is compartmentalized in the small cell by transfer from the polar septum to the adjacent cell pole where SpoIIE is protected from proteolysis and activated. Polar recognition, protection from proteolysis, and stimulation of phosphatase activity are linked to oligomerization of SpoIIE. This mechanism for initiating cell-specific gene expression is independent of additional sporulation proteins; vegetative cells engineered to divide near a pole sequester SpoIIE and activate σF in small cells. Thus, a simple model explains how SpoIIE responds to a stochastically-generated cue to activate σF at the right time and in the right place. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08145.001 PMID:26465112

  19. MRI-based detection of alkaline phosphatase gene reporter activity using a porphyrin solubility switch

    PubMed Central

    Westmeyer, Gil G.; Emer, Elena G.; Lintelmann, Jutta; Jasanoff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to map patterns of gene expression noninvasively in living animals could have impact in many areas of biology. Reporter systems compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be particularly valuable, but existing strategies tend to lack sensitivity or specificity. Here we address the challenge of MRI-based gene mapping using the reporter enzyme secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), in conjunction with a water soluble metalloporphyrin contrast agent. SEAP cleaves the porphyrin into an insoluble product that accumulates at sites of enzyme expression and can be visualized by MRI and optical absorbance. The contrast mechanism functions in vitro, in brain slices, and in animals. The system also provides the possibility of readout both in the living animal and by post mortem histology, and it notably does not require intracellular delivery of the contrast agent. The solubility switch mechanism used to detect SEAP could be adapted for imaging of additional reporter enzymes or endogenous targets. PMID:24613020

  20. Using genetics to test the causal relationship of total adiposity and periodontitis: Mendelian randomization analyses in the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Dental Endpoints (GLIDE) Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Shungin, Dmitry; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Divaris, Kimon; Holtfreter, Birte; Shaffer, John R; Yu, Yau-Hua; Barros, Silvana P; Beck, James D; Biffar, Reiner; Boerwinkle, Eric A; Crout, Richard J.; Ganna, Andrea; Hallmans, Goran; Hindy, George; Hu, Frank B; Kraft, Peter; McNeil, Daniel W; Melander, Olle; Moss, Kevin L; North, Kari E; Orho-Melander, Marju; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ridker, Paul M; Rimm, Eric B; Rose, Lynda M; Rukh, Gull; Teumer, Alexander; Weyant, Robert J; Chasman, Daniel I; Joshipura, Kaumudi; Kocher, Thomas; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Marazita, Mary L; Nilsson, Peter; Offenbacher, Steve; Davey Smith, George; Lundberg, Pernilla; Palmer, Tom M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Johansson, Ingegerd; Franks, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Background: The observational relationship between obesity and periodontitis is widely known, yet causal evidence is lacking. Our objective was to investigate causal associations between periodontitis and body mass index (BMI). Methods: We performed Mendelian randomization analyses with BMI-associated loci combined in a genetic risk score (GRS) as the instrument for BMI. All analyses were conducted within the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Dental Endpoints (GLIDE) Consortium in 13 studies from Europe and the USA, including 49 066 participants with clinically assessed (seven studies, 42.1% of participants) and self-reported (six studies, 57.9% of participants) periodontitis and genotype data (17 672/31 394 with/without periodontitis); 68 761 participants with BMI and genotype data; and 57 871 participants (18 881/38 990 with/without periodontitis) with data on BMI and periodontitis. Results: In the observational meta-analysis of all participants, the pooled crude observational odds ratio (OR) for periodontitis was 1.13 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.24] per standard deviation increase of BMI. Controlling for potential confounders attenuated this estimate (OR = 1.08; 95% CI:1.03, 1.12). For clinically assessed periodontitis, corresponding ORs were 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.42) and 1.13 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.17), respectively. In the genetic association meta-analysis, the OR for periodontitis was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.03) per GRS unit (per one effect allele) in all participants and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.03) in participants with clinically assessed periodontitis. The instrumental variable meta-analysis of all participants yielded an OR of 1.05 (95% CI: 0.80, 1.38) per BMI standard deviation, and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.56, 1.46) in participants with clinical data. Conclusions: Our study does not support total adiposity as a causal risk factor for periodontitis, as the point estimate is very close to the null in the causal inference analysis, with wide

  1. Avirulence gene mapping in the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) reveals a protein phosphatase 2C effector gene family.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Shukle, Richard; Navarro-Escalante, Lucio; Chen, Mingshun; Richards, Stephen; Stuart, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    The genetic tractability of the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor) provides an opportunity to investigate the mechanisms insects use to induce plant gall formation. Here we demonstrate that capacity using the newly sequenced HF genome by identifying the gene (vH24) that elicits effector-triggered immunity in wheat (Triticum spp.) seedlings carrying HF resistance gene H24. vH24 was mapped within a 230-kb genomic fragment near the telomere of HF chromosome X1. That fragment contains only 21 putative genes. The best candidate vH24 gene in this region encodes a protein containing a secretion signal and a type-2 serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP2C) domain. This gene has an H24-virulence associated insertion in its promoter that appears to silence transcription of the gene in H24-virulent larvae. Candidate vH24 is a member of a small family of genes that encode secretion signals and PP2C domains. It belongs to the fraction of genes in the HF genome previously predicted to encode effector proteins. Because PP2C proteins are not normally secreted, our results suggest that these are PP2C effectors that HF larvae inject into wheat cells to redirect, or interfere, with wheat signal transduction pathways. PMID:26439791

  2. Kinetics of gene expression of alkaline phosphatase during healing of alveolar bone in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Willian Caetano; Fabris, André Luís da Silva; Hassumi, Jaqueline Suemi; Gonçalves, Alaíde; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Okamoto, Roberta

    2016-06-01

    Immunohistochemical studies and molecular biology have enabled us to identify numerous proteins that are involved in the metabolism of bone, and their encoding genes. Among these is alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that is responsible for the initiation of mineralisation of the extracellular matrix during alveolar bone repair. To evaluate the gene expression of ALP during this process, we studied nine healthy adult male rats, which had their maxillary central incisors extracted from the right side and were randomly divided into three groups. During three experimental periods, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days, the alveoli were curetted, the rats killed, and samples analysed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The RNAm that encodes the gene for the synthesis of ALP was expressed during the three periods analysed, but its concentration was significantly increased at 14 and 28 days compared with at 7 days. There was no significant difference between 14 and 28 days (p=0.0005). We conclude that genes related to ALP are expressed throughout the healing process and more intensively during the later periods (14 and 28 days), which coincides with the increased formation of mineralised bone. PMID:26935214

  3. The polymorphism of protein phosphatase Z1 gene in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kovács, László; Farkas, Ilona; Majoros, László; Miskei, Márton; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2010-12-01

    The gene of protein phosphatase Z1 (CaPPZ1) that codes a fungus specific regulatory enzyme was investigated in Candida albicans. After cloning and sequencing CaPPZ1 we revealed the heterozygous nature of the ATCC 10231 reference strain, and identified two new alleles termed CaPPZ1-2 and CaPPZ1-3. The genetic polymorphism in CaPPZ1 was extended by finding a fourth allele CaPPZ1-4 in a clinical isolate. Single nucleotide replacements and short in/del mutations were identified in the gene, some of which resulted in amino acid changes in the protein. The analysis of the hypervariable 3'-noncoding gene region in 27 DNA sequences obtained from reference strains and clinical samples confirmed the presence of four distinct DNA sequence-groups that correspond to the four main alleles of CaPPZ1. In addition to the allelic combinations, we detected individual mutations elevating genetic variability of the opportunistic pathogen. We utilized the hypervariable gene region for genotyping C. albicans in clinical isolates by sequencing the cloned amplified region, by direct sequencing of the PCR products, or by RFLP analysis. The comparison of the genotypes of the strains originating from different body parts of the same patient proved to be useful in delineating the origin of the infection. PMID:20473966

  4. The role of PTEN, a phosphatase gene, in inherited and sporadic nonmedullary thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Eng, C

    1999-01-01

    PTEN/MMACI/TEP1, a tumor suppressor gene located on 10q23.3, encodes an almost ubiquitously expressed dual-specificity phosphatase. Germline mutations in PTEN have been found in the majority of cases of sporadic and familial Cowden syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndrome characterised by multiple hamartomas and benign and malignant disease of the thyroid and breast. Interestingly, germline mutations in PTEN have also been found in about 50% of a related but distinct disorder, Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley syndrome (BRR), which is characterised by neonatal-onset macrocephaly, mental retardation, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, lipomatosis, haemangiomas, hamartomatous polyps, and pigmented macules of the glans penis. Somatic PTEN mutation has been described to a greater or lesser extent in various benign and malignant tumor types. Somatic deletions have been described in follicular adenomas of the thyroid and papillary thyroid carcinomas. PMID:10548886

  5. Psy2 Targets the PP4 Family Phosphatase Pph3 To Dephosphorylate Mth1 and Repress Glucose Transporter Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hui; Han, Bong-Kwan; Guaderrama, Marisela; Aslanian, Aaron; Yates, John R.; Hunter, Tony

    2014-01-01

    The reversible nature of protein phosphorylation dictates that any protein kinase activity must be counteracted by protein phosphatase activity. How phosphatases target specific phosphoprotein substrates and reverse the action of kinases, however, is poorly understood in a biological context. We address this question by elucidating a novel function of the conserved PP4 family phosphatase Pph3-Psy2, the yeast counterpart of the mammalian PP4c-R3 complex, in the glucose-signaling pathway. Our studies show that Pph3-Psy2 specifically targets the glucose signal transducer protein Mth1 via direct binding of the EVH1 domain of the Psy2 regulatory subunit to the polyproline motif of Mth1. This activity is required for the timely dephosphorylation of the downstream transcriptional repressor Rgt1 upon glucose withdrawal, a critical event in the repression of HXT genes, which encode glucose transporters. Pph3-Psy2 dephosphorylates Mth1, an Rgt1 associated corepressor, but does not dephosphorylate Rgt1 at sites associated with inactivation, in vitro. We show that Pph3-Psy2 phosphatase antagonizes Mth1 phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA), the major protein kinase activated in response to glucose, in vitro and regulates Mth1 function via putative PKA phosphorylation sites in vivo. We conclude that the Pph3-Psy2 phosphatase modulates Mth1 activity to facilitate precise regulation of HXT gene expression by glucose. PMID:24277933

  6. Psy2 targets the PP4 family phosphatase Pph3 to dephosphorylate Mth1 and repress glucose transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Han, Bong-Kwan; Guaderrama, Marisela; Aslanian, Aaron; Yates, John R; Hunter, Tony; Wittenberg, Curt

    2014-02-01

    The reversible nature of protein phosphorylation dictates that any protein kinase activity must be counteracted by protein phosphatase activity. How phosphatases target specific phosphoprotein substrates and reverse the action of kinases, however, is poorly understood in a biological context. We address this question by elucidating a novel function of the conserved PP4 family phosphatase Pph3-Psy2, the yeast counterpart of the mammalian PP4c-R3 complex, in the glucose-signaling pathway. Our studies show that Pph3-Psy2 specifically targets the glucose signal transducer protein Mth1 via direct binding of the EVH1 domain of the Psy2 regulatory subunit to the polyproline motif of Mth1. This activity is required for the timely dephosphorylation of the downstream transcriptional repressor Rgt1 upon glucose withdrawal, a critical event in the repression of HXT genes, which encode glucose transporters. Pph3-Psy2 dephosphorylates Mth1, an Rgt1 associated corepressor, but does not dephosphorylate Rgt1 at sites associated with inactivation, in vitro. We show that Pph3-Psy2 phosphatase antagonizes Mth1 phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA), the major protein kinase activated in response to glucose, in vitro and regulates Mth1 function via putative PKA phosphorylation sites in vivo. We conclude that the Pph3-Psy2 phosphatase modulates Mth1 activity to facilitate precise regulation of HXT gene expression by glucose. PMID:24277933

  7. The C. elegans sex-determining gene fem-2 encodes a putative protein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, D; McGregor, A; Jäckle, P; Johnson, T; Hansen, D

    1995-01-01

    The genetic and molecular analysis of genes involved in the regulation of sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans suggests that the gene fem-2 plays an important role in regulating a pathway transducing a non-cell-autonomous signal to a nuclear transcription factor. The wild-type fem-2 gene was cloned by identifying sequences from the C. elegans physical map that could restore normal Fem-2 function to homozygous mutant fem-2 transgenic animals. cDNA sequences mapping to the minimal rescuing region correspond to an open reading frame with a sequence similar to protein phosphatase 2C enzymes from systems as diverse as yeast, humans, and plants, but the alignments suggest that FEM-2 falls into a separate class of proteins than the canonical homologues. Several fem-2 mutant alleles were sequenced, and the mutations are predicted to cause protein changes consistent with their observed phenotypes, such as missense mutations in conditional alleles, and a nonsense mutation in a predicted null allele. This is the first evidence implicating phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation as a control mechanism in C. elegans sex determination. Images PMID:8534913

  8. Evidence for an indirect transcriptional regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression by liver X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Grempler, Rolf . E-mail: rolfgrempler@yahoo.de; Guenther, Susanne; Steffensen, Knut R.; Nilsson, Maria; Barthel, Andreas; Schmoll, Dieter

    2005-12-16

    Liver X receptor (LXR) paralogues {alpha} and {beta} (LXR{alpha} and LXR{beta}) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor family and have oxysterols as endogenous ligands. LXR activation reduces hepatic glucose production in vivo through the inhibition of transcription of the key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of G6Pase gene expression by LXR. Both T0901317, a synthetic LXR agonist, and the adenoviral overexpression of either LXR{alpha} or LXR{beta} suppressed G6Pase gene expression in H4IIE hepatoma cells. However, compared to the suppression of G6Pase expression seen by insulin, the decrease of G6Pase mRNA by LXR activation was delayed and was blocked by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These observations, together with the absence of a conserved LXR-binding element within the G6Pase promoter, suggest an indirect inhibition of G6Pase gene expression by liver X receptors.

  9. Chromosomal localization of the chicken and mammalian orthologues of the orphan phosphatase PHOSPHO1 gene.

    PubMed

    Houston, B; Paton, I R; Burt, D W; Farquharson, C

    2002-12-01

    PHOSPHO1 is a recently identified phosphatase expressed at high levels in the chicken growth plate and which may be involved in generating inorganic phosphate for skeletal matrix mineralization. Using a degenerate RT-PCR approach a fragment of human PHOSPHO1 was cloned. This enabled the identification of the human orthologue on HSA17q21, and the mouse orthologue on a region of MMU11 that exhibits conservation of synteny with HSA17q21. Chicken PHOSPHO1 was mapped by SSCP analysis to position 44 cM on GGA27, adjacent to the HOXB@ (44 cM) and COL1A1 (36 cM) loci. Comparison of genes on GGA27 with their orthologues on the preliminary draft of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny equivalent to 25 Mb on HSA17q21.2-23.3 and approximately 20 Mb on GGA27 in which the gene order appears to be conserved. Mapping of the PHOSPHO1 genes to regions of HSA17q21.3, MMU11 and GGA27 that exhibit conservation of synteny provides strong evidence that they are orthologous. PMID:12464021

  10. Identification of the genetic locus for the structural gene and a new regulatory gene for the synthesis of repressible alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Y.; Toh-e, A.; Oshima, Y.

    1982-02-01

    Two lines of evidence showed that the PHO8 gene encodes the structure of repressible, nonspecific alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: (I) the enzyme produced by a temperature-sensitive pho8 mutant at the permissive temperature (25/sup 0/C) was more thermolabile than that of the wild-type strain, and (II) the PHO8 gene showed a gene dosage effect on the enzyme activity. The pho8 locus has been mapped on chromosome IV, 8 centimorgans distal to rna3. A new mutant carrying the pho9 gene was isolated which lacks repressible alkaline phosphatase, but has the normal phenotype for the synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase. The pho9 gene segregated independently of all known pho-regulatory genes and did not show the gene dosage effect on repressible alkaline phosphatase activity. The pho9/pho9 diploid hardly sporulated and showed no commitment to intragenic recombination when it was inoculated on sporulation medium. Hence the pho9 mutant has a phenotype similar to the pep4 mutant, which was isolated as a pleiotropic mutant with reduced levels of proteinases A and B carboxypeptidase Y. An allelism test indicated that pho9 and pep4 are allelic.

  11. Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase. gamma. is a candidate tumor suppressor gene at human chromosome region 3p21

    SciTech Connect

    LaForgia, S.; Cannizzaro, L.A.; Boghosian-Sell, L.; Croce, C.M.; Huebner, K. ); Morse, B. ); Levy, J.; Barnea, G.; Schlessinger, J. ); Li, F. ); Nowell, P.C.; Glick, J. ); Weston, A.; Harris, C.C. ); Drabkin, H. ); Patterson, D. )

    1991-06-01

    PTPG, the gene for protein-tyrosine phosphatase {gamma} (PTP{gamma}), maps to a region of human chromosome 3, 3p21, that is frequently deleted in renal cell carcinoma and lung carcinoma. One of the functions of protein-tyrosine phosphatases is to reverse the effect of protein-tyrosine kinases, many of which are oncogenes, suggesting that some protein-tyrosine phosphatase genes may act as tumor suppressor genes. A hallmark of tumor suppressor genes is that they are deleted in tumors in which their inactivation contributes to the malignant phenotype. In this study, one PTP {gamma} allele was lost in 3 of 5 renal carcinoma cell lines and 5 of 10 lung carcinoma tumor samples tested. Importantly, one PTP {gamma} allele was lost in three lung tumors that had not lost flanking loci. PTP {gamma} mRNA was expressed in kidney cell lines and lung cell lines but not expressed in several hematopoietic cell lines tested. Thus, the PTP {gamma} gene has characteristics that suggest it as a candidate tumor suppressor gene at 3p21.

  12. Global Analysis of Serine/Threonine and Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Genes in Neurospora crassa Reveals Interplay Between Phosphatases and the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arit; Servin, Jacqueline A.; Park, Gyungsoon; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatases are integral components of the cellular signaling machinery in eukaryotes, regulating diverse aspects of growth and development. The genome of the filamentous fungus and model organism Neurospora crassa encodes catalytic subunits for 30 protein phosphatase genes. In this study, we have characterized 24 viable N. crassa phosphatase catalytic subunit knockout mutants for phenotypes during growth, asexual development, and sexual development. We found that 91% of the mutants had defects in at least one of these traits, whereas 29% possessed phenotypes in all three. Chemical sensitivity screens were conducted to reveal additional phenotypes for the mutants. This resulted in the identification of at least one chemical sensitivity phenotype for 17 phosphatase knockout mutants, including novel chemical sensitivities for two phosphatase mutants lacking a growth or developmental phenotype. Hence, chemical sensitivity or growth/developmental phenotype was observed for all 24 viable mutants. We investigated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation profiles in the phosphatase mutants and identified nine potential candidates for regulators of the p38 MAPK. We demonstrated that the PP2C class phosphatase pph-8 (NCU04600) is an important regulator of female sexual development in N. crassa. In addition, we showed that the Δcsp-6 (ΔNCU08380) mutant exhibits a phenotype similar to the previously identified conidial separation mutants, Δcsp-1 and Δcsp-2, that lack transcription factors important for regulation of conidiation and the circadian clock. PMID:24347630

  13. Women as Mendelians and Geneticists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Marsha L.

    2015-01-01

    After the rediscovery of Mendel's laws of heredity in 1900, the biologists who began studying heredity, variation, and evolution using the new Mendelian methodology--performing controlled hybrid crosses and statistically analyzing progeny to note the factorial basis of characters--made great progress. By 1910, the validity of Mendelism was…

  14. Yeast has homologs (CNA1 and CNA2 gene products) of mammalian calcineurin, a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, M S; Kunisawa, R; Kaim, D; Thorner, J

    1991-01-01

    Calcineurin, or phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2B (PP2B), is a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase. We isolated a gene encoding a yeast PP2B homolog (CNA1) by screening a yeast genomic DNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11, first with 125I-labeled yeast calmodulin and then with a human cDNA encoding the catalytic (or A) subunit of calcineurin. The predicted CNA1 gene product is 54% identical to its mammalian counterpart. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with oligonucleotide primers based on sequences conserved between CNA1 and mammalian PP2B genes, we isolated a second gene, CNA2. CNA2 is identical to PP2Bw, a partial cDNA clone previously described by others as originating from rabbit brain tissue. Our findings demonstrate that a unicellular eukaryote contains phosphoprotein phosphatases of the 2B class. Haploid cells containing a single cna1 or cna2 null mutation, or both mutations, were viable. MATa cna1 cna2 double mutants were more sensitive than wild-type cells or either single mutant to growth arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha factor and failed to resume growth during continuous exposure to alpha factor. Thus, calcineurin action antagonizes the mating-pheromone response pathway. Images PMID:1651503

  15. Responses of Phosphate Transporter Gene and Alkaline Phosphatase in Thalassiosira pseudonana to Phosphine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei; Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Liu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Phosphine, which is released continuously from sediment, can affect the eco-physiological strategies and molecular responses of phytoplankton. To examine the effects of phosphine on phosphorus uptake and utilization in Thalassiosira pseudonana, we examined the transcriptional level of the phosphate transporter gene (TpPHO) and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AKP) in relation to supplement of various concentrations of phosphine. TpPHO expression was markedly promoted by phosphine in both the phosphate-deficient and phosphate-4 µM culture. However, high phosphine concentrations can inhibit TpPHO transcription in the declining growth phase. AKP activity was also higher in the phosphine treatment groups than that of the control. It increased with increasing phosphine concentration in the range of 0 to 0.056 µM but was inhibited by higher levels of phosphine. These responses revealed that phosphine can affect phosphate uptake and utilization in T. pseudonana. This result was consistent with the effect of phosphine on algal growth, while TpPHO expression and AKP were even more sensitive to phosphine than algal growth. This work provides a basic understanding for further research about how phosphine affects phytoplankton. PMID:23544096

  16. Two alkaline phosphatase genes positioned in tandem in Bacillus licheniformis MC14 require different RNA polymerase holoenzymes for transcription.

    PubMed

    Hulett, F M; Wang, P Z; Sussman, M; Lee, J W

    1985-02-01

    Southern transfer analysis of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 DNA, using as probe a DNA fragment from within the coding region of a previously cloned alkaline phosphatase (APase) gene, revealed a second area of hybridization adjacent to the cloned APase gene. A second APase gene (APase II) was subcloned from the same plasmid clone, pMH8, from which the first APase gene (APase I) had been subcloned. The two genes are arranged in tandem with several hundred base pairs separating them. Immunoblot analysis showed that both code for Mr 60,000 proteins that crossreact with anti-APase. Both proteins enzymatically cleave 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate. In vitro transcription showed that APase I and APase II are transcribed in the same direction but that the two genes require different forms of Bacillus RNA polymerase: sigma 55- and sigma 37-containing RNA polymerase holoenzymes, respectively. PMID:3856244

  17. Two alkaline phosphatase genes positioned in tandem in Bacillus licheniformis MC14 require different RNA polymerase holoenzymes for transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Hulett, F M; Wang, P Z; Sussman, M; Lee, J W

    1985-01-01

    Southern transfer analysis of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 DNA, using as probe a DNA fragment from within the coding region of a previously cloned alkaline phosphatase (APase) gene, revealed a second area of hybridization adjacent to the cloned APase gene. A second APase gene (APase II) was subcloned from the same plasmid clone, pMH8, from which the first APase gene (APase I) had been subcloned. The two genes are arranged in tandem with several hundred base pairs separating them. Immunoblot analysis showed that both code for Mr 60,000 proteins that crossreact with anti-APase. Both proteins enzymatically cleave 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate. In vitro transcription showed that APase I and APase II are transcribed in the same direction but that the two genes require different forms of Bacillus RNA polymerase: sigma 55- and sigma 37-containing RNA polymerase holoenzymes, respectively. Images PMID:3856244

  18. MKP-7, a JNK phosphatase, blocks ERK-dependent gene activation by anchoring phosphorylated ERK in the cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Kouhei; Katagiri, Chiaki; Nomura, Miyuki; Sato, Masami; Kakumoto, Kyoko; Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Kunimi; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi

    2010-03-05

    MAPK phosphatase-7 (MKP-7) was identified as a JNK-specific phosphatase. However, despite its high specificity for JNK, MKP-7 interacts also with ERK. We previously showed that as a physiological consequence of their interaction, activated ERK phosphorylates MKP-7 at Ser-446, and stabilizing MKP-7. In the present study, we analyzed MKP-7 function in activation of ERK. A time-course experiment showed that both MKP-7 and its phosphatase-dead mutant prolonged mitogen-induced ERK phosphorylation, suggesting that MKP-7 functions as a scaffold for ERK. An important immunohistological finding was that nuclear translocation of phospho-ERK following PMA stimulation was blocked by co-expressed MKP-7 and, moreover, that phospho-ERK co-localized with MKP-7 in the cytoplasm. Reporter gene analysis indicated that MKP-7 blocks ERK-mediated transcription. Overall, our data indicate that MKP-7 down-regulates ERK-dependent gene expression by blocking nuclear accumulation of phospho-ERK.

  19. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  20. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase psi is required for Delta/Notch signalling and cyclic gene expression in the presomitic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Aerne, Birgit; Ish-Horowicz, David

    2004-07-01

    Segmentation in vertebrate embryos is controlled by a biochemical oscillator ('segmentation clock') intrinsic to the cells in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm, and is manifested in cyclic transcription of genes involved in establishing somite polarity and boundaries. We show that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase psi (RPTPpsi) gene is essential for normal functioning of the somitogenesis clock in zebrafish. We show that reduction of RPTPpsi activity using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides results in severe disruption of the segmental pattern of the embryo, and loss of cyclic gene expression in the presomitic mesoderm. Analysis of cyclic genes in RPTPpsi morphant embryos indicates an important requirement for RPTPpsi in the control of the somitogenesis clock upstream of or in parallel with Delta/Notch signalling. Impairing RPTPpsi activity also interferes with convergent extension during gastrulation. We discuss this dual requirement for RPTPpsi in terms of potential functions in Notch and Wnt signalling. PMID:15226256

  1. Identification of soybean purple acid phosphatase genes and their expression responses to phosphorus availability and symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are members of the metallo-phosphoesterase family and have been known to play important roles in phosphorus (P) acquisition and recycling in plants. Low P availability is a major constraint to growth and production of soybean, Glycine max. Comparat...

  2. Organization and alternate splice products of the gene encoding nuclear inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (NIPP-1).

    PubMed

    Van Eynde, A; Pérez-Callejón, E; Schoenmakers, E; Jacquemin, M; Stalmans, W; Bollen, M

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (NIPP-1) is one of two major regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase-1 in mammalian nuclei. We report here the cloning and structural characterization of the human NIPP-1 genes, designated PPP1R8P and PPP1R8 in human gene nomenclature. PPP1R8P (1.2 kb) is a processed pseudogene and was localized by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1p33-32. PPP1R8 is an authentic NIPP-1 gene and was localized to chromosome 1p35. PPP1R8 (25.2 kb) is composed of seven exons and encodes four different transcripts, as determined from cDNA library screening, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and/or EST (expressed sequence tag) database search analysis. NIPP-1alpha mRNA represents the major transcript in human tissues and various cell lines, and encodes a polypeptide of 351 residues that only differs from the previously cloned calf thymus NIPP-1 by a single residue. The other transcripts, termed NIPP-1beta, gamma and delta, are generated by alternative 5'-splice site usage, by exon skipping and/or by alternative polyadenylation. The NIPP-1beta/delta and NIPP-1gamma mRNAs are expected to encode fragments of NIPP-1alpha that differ from the latter by the absence of the first 142 and 224 residues, respectively. NIPP-1gamma corresponds to 'activator of RNA decay-1' (Ard-1) which, unlike NIPP-1alpha, displays in vitro and endoribonuclease activity and lacks an RVXF consensus motif for interaction with protein phosphatase-1. While the NIPP-1alpha/beta/delta-transcripts were found to be present in various human tissues, the NIPP-1gamma transcript could only be detected in human transformed B-lymphocytes. PMID:10103062

  3. Chromosomal mapping of the gene (INPP5A) encoding the 43-kDa membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase to 10q26.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.A.; Speed, C.J.; Nicholl, J.; Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the localization of a membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase gene to human chromosome 10q26.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This 43-kDa 5-phosphatase does not map to the same location as any other 5-phosphatase enzymes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Reduced L/B/K alkaline phosphatase gene expression in renal cell carcinoma: plausible role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ujjawal; Pal, Deeksha; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer in adults. Although several genes have been found to be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, more great efforts are needed to identify new genes which are responsible for the process. Clear cell RCC, originates from proximal tubule cells, is the most common pathological type of RCC. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a marker enzyme of brush border membrane of proximal tubular cells. Our previous studies showed a significant decreased activity of Liver/Bone/Kidney (L/B/K) alkaline phosphatase in RCC. In the present study, we explored the molecular basis of the decreased activity of ALP in RCC. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis showed decreased ALP protein in RCC. Additionally, real time PCR documented significantly reduced ALP gene expression (P = 0.009). Moreover, RCC cell lines (ACHN and A498) transfected with full length L/B/K cDNA showed decreased migratory property as well as viability of these cells as compared with controls (P = 0.000). Further, L/B/K ALP cDNA transfected cells (ACHN and A498) showed significant increased apoptosis as compared to control (P = 0.000). These findings suggest the new role of ALP in cell viability and apoptosis and involvement in RCC tumorigenesis. However, further studies are needed to explore the exact molecular mechanism. PMID:24909115

  5. Can we apply the Mendelian randomization methodology without considering epigenetic effects?

    PubMed Central

    Ogbuanu, Ikechukwu U; Zhang, Hongmei; Karmaus, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Instrumental variable (IV) methods have been used in econometrics for several decades now, but have only recently been introduced into the epidemiologic research frameworks. Similarly, Mendelian randomization studies, which use the IV methodology for analysis and inference in epidemiology, were introduced into the epidemiologist's toolbox only in the last decade. Analysis Mendelian randomization studies using instrumental variables (IVs) have the potential to avoid some of the limitations of observational epidemiology (confounding, reverse causality, regression dilution bias) for making causal inferences. Certain limitations of randomized controlled trials, such as problems with generalizability, feasibility and ethics for some exposures, and high costs, also make the use of Mendelian randomization in observational studies attractive. Unlike conventional randomized controlled trials (RCTs), Mendelian randomization studies can be conducted in a representative sample without imposing any exclusion criteria or requiring volunteers to be amenable to random treatment allocation. Within the last decade, epigenetics has gained recognition as an independent field of study, and appears to be the new direction for future research into the genetics of complex diseases. Although previous articles have addressed some of the limitations of Mendelian randomization (such as the lack of suitable genetic variants, unreliable associations, population stratification, linkage disequilibrium (LD), pleiotropy, developmental canalization, the need for large sample sizes and some potential problems with binary outcomes), none has directly characterized the impact of epigenetics on Mendelian randomization. The possibility of epigenetic effects (non-Mendelian, heritable changes in gene expression not accompanied by alterations in DNA sequence) could alter the core instrumental variable assumptions of Mendelian randomization. This paper applies conceptual considerations

  6. Women as Mendelians and Geneticists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Marsha L.

    2015-01-01

    After the rediscovery of Mendel's laws of heredity in 1900, the biologists who began studying heredity, variation, and evolution using the new Mendelian methodology—performing controlled hybrid crosses and statistically analyzing progeny to note the factorial basis of characters—made great progress. By 1910, the validity of Mendelism was widely recognized and the field William Bateson christened `genetics' was complemented by the chromosome theory of heredity of T. H. Morgan and his group in the United States. Historians, however, have largely overlooked an important factor in the early establishment of Mendelism and genetics: the large number of women who contributed to the various research groups. This article examines the social, economic, and disciplinary context behind this new wave of women's participation in science and describes the work of women Mendelians and geneticists employed at three leading experimental research institutes, 1900-1940. It argues that the key to more women working in science was the access to higher education and the receptivity of emerging interdisciplinary fields such as genetics to utilize the expertise of women workers, which not only advanced the discipline but also provided new opportunities for women's employment in science.

  7. Mendelian bases of myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, G; Aurino, S; Cacciottolo, M; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Lancioni, A; Rotundo, IL; Torella, A; Nigro, V

    2010-01-01

    Summary A second genetic revolution is approaching thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. In the next few years, the 1,000$-genome sequencing promises to reveal every individual variation of DNA. There is, however, a major problem: the identification of thousands of nucleotide changes per individual with uncertain pathological meaning. This is also an ethical issue. In the middle, there is today the possibility to address the sequencing analysis of genetically heterogeneous disorders to selected groups of genes with defined mutation types. This will be cost-effective and safer. We assembled an easy-to manage overview of most Mendelian genes involved in myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies. This was entirely put together using a number of open access web resources that are listed below. During this effort we realized that there are unexpected countless sources of data, but the confusion is huge. In some cases, we got lost in the validation of disease genes and in the difficulty to discriminate between polymorphisms and disease-causing alleles. In the table are the annotated genes, their associated disorders, genomic, mRNA and coding sizes. We also counted the number of pathological alleles so far reported and the percentage of single nucleotide mutations. PMID:22029103

  8. Localization of the mouse protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C{beta} gene to chromosome 17E 4-5

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Motoko; Kobayashi, Takayasu; Kato, Shunsuke

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the genetic mapping of the mouse serine/threonine phosphatase 2C{Beta} gene to chromosome 17E 4-5 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization is compared to predicted locations based on gene mapping in the rat. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  9. MicroRNA-21 promotes phosphatase gene and protein kinase B/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase expression in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei-Zhong; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Tu, Chuan-Tao; He, Juan; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the regulatory mechanism of the target gene of microRNA-21 (miR-21), phosphatase gene (PTEN), and its downstream proteins, protein kinase B (AKT) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. METHODS: Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot were used to detect the expression levels of miR-21 and PTEN in HCT116, HT29, Colo32 and SW480 CRC cell lines. Also, the expression levels of PTEN mRNA and its downstream proteins AKT and PI3K in HCT116 cells after downregulating miR-21 were investigated. RESULTS: Comparing the miR-21 expression in CRC cells, the expression levels of miR-21 were highest in HCT116 cells, and the expression levels of miR-21 were lowest in SW480 cells. In comparing miR-21 and PTEN expression in CRC cells, we found that the protein expression levels of miR-21 and PTEN were inversely correlated (P < 0.05); when miR-21 expression was reduced, mRNA expression levels of PTEN did not significantly change (P > 0.05), but the expression levels of its protein significantly increased (P < 0.05). In comparing the levels of PTEN protein and downstream AKT and PI3K in HCT116 cells after downregulation of miR-21 expression, the levels of AKT and PI3K protein expression significantly decreased (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: PTEN is one of the direct target genes of miR-21. Thus, phosphatase gene and its downstream AKT and PI3K expression levels can be regulated by regulating the expression levels of miR-21, which in turn regulates the development of CRC. PMID:27350731

  10. [Inactivation of pgsA gene affects biosynthesis and secretion of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase].

    PubMed

    Golovastov, V V; Anisimova, E V; Nesmeianova, M A

    2003-01-01

    Inactivation of pgsA, which is responsible for biosynthesis of anionic phospholipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG), was shown to affect biosynthesis and secretion of alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) in Escherichia coli. A decrease in PG, but not in total anionic phospholipids, correlated with reduction of PhoA secretion, suggesting the role of PG in this process. A dramatic decrease in PG (from 18 to 3, but not 8, percent of the total phospholipids) inhibited not only secretion, but also synthesis of PhoA. In addition, pgsA inactivation expedited repression of PhoA synthesis by exogenous orthophosphate. PMID:14593926

  11. Identification of Genes Required for Secretion of the Francisella Oxidative Burst-Inhibiting Acid Phosphatase AcpA.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ky Van; Chen, Carolyn G; Koopman, Jacob; Moshiri, Jasmine; Adcox, Haley E; Gunn, John S

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Tier 1 bioterror threat and the intracellular pathogen responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. Upon entry into the host, Francisella uses multiple mechanisms to evade killing. Our previous studies have shown that after entering its primary cellular host, the macrophage, Francisella immediately suppresses the oxidative burst by secreting a series of acid phosphatases including AcpA-B-C and HapA, thereby evading the innate immune response of the macrophage and enhancing survival and further infection. However, the mechanism of acid phosphatase secretion by Francisella is still unknown. In this study, we screened for genes required for AcpA secretion in Francisella. We initially demonstrated that the known secretion systems, the putative Francisella-pathogenicity island (FPI)-encoded Type VI secretion system and the Type IV pili, do not secrete AcpA. Using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA, Western blotting and acid phosphatase enzymatic assays, a transposon library of 5450 mutants was screened for strains with a minimum 1.5-fold decrease in secreted (culture supernatant) AcpA, but no defect in cytosolic AcpA. Three mutants with decreased supernatant AcpA were identified. The transposon insertion sites of these mutants were revealed by direct genomic sequencing or inverse-PCR and sequencing. One of these mutants has a severe defect in AcpA secretion (at least 85% decrease) and is a predicted hypothetical inner membrane protein. Interestingly, this mutant also affected the secretion of the FPI-encoded protein, VgrG. Thus, this screen identified novel protein secretion factors involved in the subversion of host defenses. PMID:27199935

  12. Identification of Genes Required for Secretion of the Francisella Oxidative Burst-Inhibiting Acid Phosphatase AcpA

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Ky Van; Chen, Carolyn G.; Koopman, Jacob; Moshiri, Jasmine; Adcox, Haley E.; Gunn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Tier 1 bioterror threat and the intracellular pathogen responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. Upon entry into the host, Francisella uses multiple mechanisms to evade killing. Our previous studies have shown that after entering its primary cellular host, the macrophage, Francisella immediately suppresses the oxidative burst by secreting a series of acid phosphatases including AcpA-B-C and HapA, thereby evading the innate immune response of the macrophage and enhancing survival and further infection. However, the mechanism of acid phosphatase secretion by Francisella is still unknown. In this study, we screened for genes required for AcpA secretion in Francisella. We initially demonstrated that the known secretion systems, the putative Francisella-pathogenicity island (FPI)-encoded Type VI secretion system and the Type IV pili, do not secrete AcpA. Using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA, Western blotting and acid phosphatase enzymatic assays, a transposon library of 5450 mutants was screened for strains with a minimum 1.5-fold decrease in secreted (culture supernatant) AcpA, but no defect in cytosolic AcpA. Three mutants with decreased supernatant AcpA were identified. The transposon insertion sites of these mutants were revealed by direct genomic sequencing or inverse-PCR and sequencing. One of these mutants has a severe defect in AcpA secretion (at least 85% decrease) and is a predicted hypothetical inner membrane protein. Interestingly, this mutant also affected the secretion of the FPI-encoded protein, VgrG. Thus, this screen identified novel protein secretion factors involved in the subversion of host defenses. PMID:27199935

  13. The Mendelian disorders of the epigenetic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Hans Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The Mendelian disorders of the epigenetic machinery are genetic disorders that involve disruption of the various components of the epigenetic machinery (writers, erasers, readers, and remodelers) and are thus expected to have widespread downstream epigenetic consequences. Studying this group may offer a unique opportunity to learn about the role of epigenetics in health and disease. Among these patients, neurological dysfunction and, in particular, intellectual disability appears to be a common phenotype; however, this is often seen in association with other more specific features in respective disorders. The specificity of some of the clinical features raises the question whether specific cell types are particularly sensitive to the loss of these factors. Most of these disorders demonstrate dosage sensitivity as loss of a single allele appears to be sufficient to cause the observed phenotypes. Although the pathogenic sequence is unknown for most of these disorders, there are several examples where disrupted expression of downstream target genes accounts for a substantial portion of the phenotype; hence, it may be useful to systematically map such disease-relevant target genes. Finally, two of these disorders (Rubinstein-Taybi and Kabuki syndromes) have shown post-natal rescue of markers of the neurological dysfunction with drugs that lead to histone deacetylase inhibition, indicating that some of these disorders may be treatable causes of intellectual disability. PMID:26430157

  14. The Mendelian disorders of the epigenetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Bjornsson, Hans Tomas

    2015-10-01

    The Mendelian disorders of the epigenetic machinery are genetic disorders that involve disruption of the various components of the epigenetic machinery (writers, erasers, readers, and remodelers) and are thus expected to have widespread downstream epigenetic consequences. Studying this group may offer a unique opportunity to learn about the role of epigenetics in health and disease. Among these patients, neurological dysfunction and, in particular, intellectual disability appears to be a common phenotype; however, this is often seen in association with other more specific features in respective disorders. The specificity of some of the clinical features raises the question whether specific cell types are particularly sensitive to the loss of these factors. Most of these disorders demonstrate dosage sensitivity as loss of a single allele appears to be sufficient to cause the observed phenotypes. Although the pathogenic sequence is unknown for most of these disorders, there are several examples where disrupted expression of downstream target genes accounts for a substantial portion of the phenotype; hence, it may be useful to systematically map such disease-relevant target genes. Finally, two of these disorders (Rubinstein-Taybi and Kabuki syndromes) have shown post-natal rescue of markers of the neurological dysfunction with drugs that lead to histone deacetylase inhibition, indicating that some of these disorders may be treatable causes of intellectual disability. PMID:26430157

  15. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei.

  16. Molecular Characterization of an Arabidopsis Gene Encoding a Phospholipid-Specific Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatase1[w

    PubMed Central

    Ercetin, Mustafa E.; Gillaspy, Glenda E.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are important molecules that serve as second messengers and bind to a complex array of proteins modulating their subcellular location and activity. The enzymes that metabolize phosphoinositides can in some cases serve to terminate the signaling actions of phosphoinositides. The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (5PTases) comprise a large protein family that hydrolyzes 5-phosphates from a variety of inositol phosphate and phosphoinositide substrates. We previously reported the identification of 15 putative 5PTase genes in Arabidopsis and have shown that overexpression of the At5PTase1 gene can alter abscisic acid signaling. At5PTase1 and At5PTase2 have been shown to hydrolyze the 5-phosphate from inositol phosphate substrates. We have examined the substrate specificity of the At5PTase11 protein, which is one of the smallest predicted 5PTases found in any organism. We report here that the At5PTase11 gene encodes an active 5PTase enzyme that can only dephosphorylate phosphoinositide substrates containing a 5-phosphate. In addition to hydrolyzing known substrates of 5PTase enzymes, At5PTase11 also hydrolyzes the 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol (3,5) bisphosphate. We also show that the At5PTase11 gene is regulated by abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, suggesting a role for phosphoinositide action in these signal transduction pathways. PMID:15181205

  17. MetaBlasts: tracing protein tyrosine phosphatase gene family roots from Man to Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes.

    PubMed

    Wälchli, S; Colinge, J; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, R

    2000-08-01

    At increasing speed, sequencing data are being made public from both complex and simple life forms. Although biomedical interests tend to focus on mammalian genes, only simple organisms allow rapid genetic manipulation and functional analysis. A prerequisite for the meaningful extrapolation of gene functional studies from invertebrates to man is that the orthologs under study are unambiguously linked. However, identifying orthologs is not trivial, especially where large gene families are involved. We present here an automated sequence analysis procedure that allows a rapid visualization of most likely ortholog pairs. We illustrate the utility of this approach for the human gene family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as compared with the full set of Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster conceptual ORFs. The approach is based on a reciprocal series of BLAST searches, which are automatically stored and represented in an HTML-formatted table. We have used this 'MetaBlast' approach to compile lists of human PTPs and their worm and fly orthologs. Many of these PTP orthologs had not been previously identified as such. PMID:10940550

  18. Osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations display minimal differences in gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C de Sá; Holmes, K E; Thompson, V; Piskun, C M; Lana, S E; Newton, M A; Stein, T J

    2016-06-01

    Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration is a prognostic factor for osteosarcoma in multiple studies, although its biological significance remains incompletely understood. To determine whether gene expression patterns differed in osteosarcoma from patients with differing serum ALP concentrations, microarray analysis was performed on 18 primary osteosarcoma samples and six osteosarcoma cell lines from dogs with normal and increased serum ALP concentration. No differences in gene expression patterns were noted between tumours or cell lines with differing serum ALP concentration using a gene-specific two-sample t-test. Using a more sensitive empirical Bayes procedure, defective in cullin neddylation 1 domain containing 1 (DCUN1D1) was increased in both the tissue and cell lines of the normal ALP group. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), differences in DCUN1D1 expression between the two groups failed to reach significance. The homogeneity of gene expression patterns of osteosarcoma associated differing serum ALP concentrations are consistent with previous studies suggesting serum ALP concentration is not associated with intrinsic differences of osteosarcoma cells. PMID:25643733

  19. Osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations display minimal differences in gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    de Sá Rodrigues, L. C.; Holmes, K. E.; Thompson, V.; Piskun, C. M.; Lana, S. E.; Newton, M. A.; Stein, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration is a prognostic factor for osteosarcoma in multiple studies, although its biological significance remains incompletely understood. To determine whether gene expression patterns differed in osteosarcoma from patients with differing serum ALP concentrations, microarray analysis was performed on 18 primary osteosarcoma samples and six osteosarcoma cell lines from dogs with normal and increased serum ALP concentration. No differences in gene expression patterns were noted between tumours or cell lines with differing serum ALP concentration using a gene-specific two-sample t-test. Using a more sensitive empirical Bayes procedure, defective in cullin neddylation 1 domain containing 1 (DCUN1D1) was increased in both the tissue and cell lines of the normal ALP group. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), differences in DCUN1D1 expression between the two groups failed to reach significance. The homogeneity of gene expression patterns of osteosarcoma associated differing serum ALP concentrations are consistent with previous studies suggesting serum ALP concentration is not associated with intrinsic differences of osteosarcoma cells. PMID:25643733

  20. In situ investigation of vitamin D receptor, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin gene expression in oro-facial mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Davideau, J L; Papagerakis, P; Hotton, D; Lezot, F; Berdal, A

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression pattern of 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor (VDR) and vitamin D-responsive gene expression during the steps of hard tissue formation in oro-facial development. In situ hybridization of VDR, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin transcripts was performed in the mandibles of growing rats. Osteoblasts were used as the internal positive control for in situ detection of VDR messenger RNAs. Transcripts were present throughout the stages of differentiation and in differentiated osteoblasts and osteocytes, and showed some anatomical specificities in their developmental expression pattern. In dental tissues, VDR was strongly expressed in the inner dental epithelium at the beginning of the presecretion stage and, after a transient decrease at the end of the presecretion stage, in secretion stage ameloblasts. VDR was continuously expressed in epithelial supraameloblastic cells. During dentin formation, VDR was mainly present in subodontoblastic cells and was down-regulated during the terminal differentiation of odontoblasts. In these cells, VDR expression appeared to be induced by 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 injection. These data confirm that VDR is expressed in cells directly involved in mineralized tissue formation: ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts. Furthermore, they extend the idea of vitamin D sensitivity to cells that are not directly involved in this process: supraameloblastic, subodontoblastic, and osteoprogenitor cells. The differential expression pattern of VDR in odontoblasts and osteoblasts together with the similarity in the expression of potential vitamin D-responsive genes (osteocalcin in odontoblasts and osteoblasts, and alkaline phosphatase in osteoprogenitor and subodontoblastic cells) suggest the existence of a tissue specificity for the genomic action of 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, which may involve co-operation with additional nuclear factors. PMID:8754789

  1. The Mathematical Basis of Mendelian Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, B.

    1972-01-01

    Applies set theory to the mono- and dihybrid Mendelian genetic crosses, multiple allelism, sex linkage, and linkage to show the application of mathematics to biology teaching (and of biology examples to mathematics instruction). (AL)

  2. A missense mutation in the human liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase gene causing a lethal form of hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, M J; Cole, D E; Ray, K; Whyte, M P; Lafferty, M A; Mulivor, R A; Harris, H

    1988-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia is an inherited disorder characterized by defective bone mineralization and a deficiency of serum and tissue liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase (L/B/K ALP) activity. Clinical severity is variable, ranging from death in utero (due to severe rickets) to pathologic fractures first presenting in adult life. Affected siblings, however, are phenotypically similar. Severe forms of the disease are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion; heterozygotes often show reduced serum ALP activity. The specific gene defects in hypophosphatasia are unknown but are thought to occur either at the L/B/K ALP locus or within another gene that regulates L/B/K ALP expression. We used the polymerase chain reaction to examine L/B/K ALP cDNA from a patient with a perinatal (lethal) form of the disease. We observed a guanine-to-adenine transition in nucleotide 711 of the cDNA that converts alanine-162 of the mature enzyme to threonine. The affected individual, whose parents are second cousins, is homozygous for the mutant allele. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise normal cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis abolishes the expression of active enzyme, demonstrating that a defect in the L/B/K ALP gene results in hypophosphatasia and that the enzyme is, therefore, essential for normal skeletal mineralization. Images PMID:3174660

  3. A Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant with a defective inositol monophosphate phosphatase gene homolog has altered cell envelope permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Parish, T; Liu, J; Nikaido, H; Stoker, N G

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage infection mutant (strain LIMP7) of Mycobacterium smegmatis was isolated following transposon mutagenesis. The mutant showed an unusual phenotype, in that all phages tested produced larger plaques on this strain compared to the parent strain. Other phenotypic characteristics of the mutant were slower growth, increased clumping in liquid culture, increased resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin, and increased sensitivity to isoniazid and several beta-lactam antibiotics. Permeability studies showed decreases in the accumulation of lipophilic molecules (norfloxacin and chenodeoxycholate) and a small increase with hydrophilic molecules (cephaloridine); taken together, these characteristics indicate an altered cell envelope. The DNA adjacent to the transposon in LIMP7 was cloned and was shown to be highly similar to genes encoding bacterial and mammalian inositol monophosphate phosphatases. Inositol is important in mycobacteria as a component of the major thiol mycothiol and also in the cell wall, with phosphatidylinositol anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in the cell envelope. In LIMP7, levels of phosphatidylinositol dimannoside, the precursor of LAM, were less than half of those in the wild-type strain, confirming that the mutation had affected the synthesis of inositol-containing molecules. The impA gene is located within the histidine biosynthesis operon in both M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, lying between the hisA and hisF genes. PMID:9401044

  4. Disruption in Candida albicans of the TPS2 gene encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase affects cell integrity and decreases infectivity.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; de Virgilio, Claudio; Pontón, José; Gancedo, Carlos

    2002-05-01

    The gene CaTPS2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) phosphatase from Candida albicans has been cloned and disrupted in this organism. The Catps2/Catps2 mutant did not accumulate trehalose but accumulated high levels of T6P. Disruption of the two copies of the CaTPS2 gene did not abolish growth even at 42 degrees C, but decreased the growth rate. In the stationary phase, the Catps2/Catps2 mutant aggregated, more than 50% of its cells became permeable to propidium iodide and a large amount of protein was found in the culture medium. Aggregation occurred only at pH values higher than 7 and was avoided by osmoprotectants; it was never observed during the exponential phase of growth. The mutant formed colonies with a smooth border on Spider medium. Mice inoculated with 1.5 x 10(6) c.f.u. of wild-type cells died after 8 days, while 80% of those inoculated with the same number of c.f.u. of the Catps2/Catps2 mutant survived for at least 1 month. Reintroduction of the wild-type CaTPS2 gene in the Catps2/Catps2 mutant abolished the phenotypes described. It is hypothesized that the accumulation of T6P interferes with the assembly of a normal cell wall. PMID:11988502

  5. The Acid Phosphatase-Encoding Gene GmACP1 Contributes to Soybean Tolerance to Low-Phosphorus Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Derong; Wang, Hui; Kan, Guizhen; Jin, Hangxia; Yu, Deyue

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is essential for all living cells and organisms, and low-P stress is a major factor constraining plant growth and yield worldwide. In plants, P efficiency is a complex quantitative trait involving multiple genes, and the mechanisms underlying P efficiency are largely unknown. Combining linkage analysis, genome-wide and candidate-gene association analyses, and plant transformation, we identified a soybean gene related to P efficiency, determined its favorable haplotypes and developed valuable functional markers. First, six major genomic regions associated with P efficiency were detected by performing genome-wide associations (GWAs) in various environments. A highly significant region located on chromosome 8, qPE8, was identified by both GWAs and linkage mapping and explained 41% of the phenotypic variation. Then, a regional mapping study was performed with 40 surrounding markers in 192 diverse soybean accessions. A strongly associated haplotype (P = 10−7) consisting of the markers Sat_233 and BARC-039899-07603 was identified, and qPE8 was located in a region of approximately 250 kb, which contained a candidate gene GmACP1 that encoded an acid phosphatase. GmACP1 overexpression in soybean hairy roots increased P efficiency by 11–20% relative to the control. A candidate-gene association analysis indicated that six natural GmACP1 polymorphisms explained 33% of the phenotypic variation. The favorable alleles and haplotypes of GmACP1 associated with increased transcript expression correlated with higher enzyme activity. The discovery of the optimal haplotype of GmACP1 will now enable the accurate selection of soybeans with higher P efficiencies and improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying P efficiency in plants. PMID:24391523

  6. Involvement of genes encoding ABI1 protein phosphatases in the response of Brassica napus L. to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Babula-Skowrońska, Danuta; Ludwików, Agnieszka; Cieśla, Agata; Olejnik, Anna; Cegielska-Taras, Teresa; Bartkowiak-Broda, Iwona; Sadowski, Jan

    2015-07-01

    In this report we characterized the Arabidopsis ABI1 gene orthologue and Brassica napus gene paralogues encoding protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C, group A), which is known to be a negative regulator of the ABA signaling pathway. Six homologous B. napus sequences were identified and characterized as putative PP2C group A members. To gain insight into the conservation of ABI1 function in Brassicaceae, and understand better its regulatory effects in the drought stress response, we generated transgenic B. napus plants overexpressing A. thaliana ABI1. Transgenic plants subjected to drought showed a decrease in relative water content, photosynthetic pigments content and expression level of RAB18- and RD19A-drought-responsive marker genes relative to WT plants. We present the characterization of the drought response of B. napus with the participation of ABI1-like paralogues. The expression pattern of two evolutionarily distant paralogues, BnaA01.ABI1.a and BnaC07.ABI1.b in B. napus and their promoter activity in A. thaliana showed differences in the induction of the paralogues under dehydration stress. Comparative sequence analysis of both BnaABI1 promoters showed variation in positions of cis-acting elements that are especially important for ABA- and stress-inducible expression. Together, these data reveal that subfunctionalization following gene duplication may be important in the maintenance and functional divergence of the BnaABI1 paralogues. Our results provide a framework for a better understanding of (1) the role of ABI1 as a hub protein regulator of the drought response, and (2) the differential involvement of the duplicated BnaABI1 genes in the response of B. napus to dehydration-related stresses. PMID:26059040

  7. Mutations in the Glucose-6-Phosphatase-α (G6PC) Gene that Cause Type Ia Glycogen Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Janice Y.; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6PC) is a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucose-6-phosphate to glucose and phosphate in the terminal step of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Mutations in the G6PC gene, located on chromosome 17q21, result in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder. GSD-Ia patients manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis, characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, lactic acidemia, and growth retardation. G6PC is a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein, anchored in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum with the active center facing into the lumen. To date, 54 missense, 10 nonsense, 17 insertion/deletion, and 3 splicing mutations in the G6PC gene have been identified in more than 550 patients. Of these, 50 missense, 2 nonsense, and 2 insertion/deletion mutations have been functionally characterized for their effects on enzymatic activity and stability. While GSD-Ia is not more prevalent in any ethnic group, mutations unique to Caucasian, oriental, and Jewish populations have been described. Despite this, GSD-Ia patients exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity and a stringent genotype-phenotype relationship does not exist. PMID:18449899

  8. High levels of glucose-6-phosphatase gene and protein expression reflect an adaptive response in proliferating liver and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Haber, B A; Chin, S; Chuang, E; Buikhuisen, W; Naji, A; Taub, R

    1995-01-01

    The regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy is one of the few physiologic models of cellular proliferation in the adult animal. During hepatic regeneration, the animal is able to maintain metabolic homeostasis despite the acute loss of two thirds of hepatic tissue. In examining the molecular mechanisms regulating hepatic regeneration, we isolated novel immediate-early genes that are rapidly induced as the remnant liver undergoes the transition from its normal quiescent state into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. One of the most rapidly and highly induced genes which we initially termed RL-1, encodes rat glucose-6-phosphatase (rG6Pase). G6Pase mRNA peaks at 30 min and 36-48 h after hepatectomy correlating with the first and second rounds of cell division. This finding is compatible with studies that showed that G6Pase enzyme activity increases during liver regeneration. However, the increase in G6Pase mRNA is much more dramatic, indicating that it is a more sensitive indicator of this regulation. G6Pase gene expression peaks in the perinatal time period in the liver and remains elevated during the first month of life. The expression of the G6Pase gene is also dramatically elevated in BB diabetic rats, again higher than the enzyme elevation, and its relative induction after partial hepatectomy is blunted in these animals. Insulin treatment of partially hepatectomized diabetic animals downregulates the expression of G6Pase mRNA. Using specific antibodies against G6Pase, we detect a 36-kD G6Pase protein, and its level is elevated in regenerating and diabetic livers. The pattern of G6Pase mRNA expression appears to reflect similar changes in insulin and glucagon levels which accompany diabetes and hepatic proliferation. The elevation of G6Pase expression in these conditions is indicative of its importance as a regulator of glucose homeostasis in normal and abnormal physiologic states. Images PMID:7860767

  9. New Tools for Mendelian Disease Gene Identification: PhenoDB Variant Analysis Module; and GeneMatcher, a Web-Based Tool for Linking Investigators with an Interest in the Same Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sobreira, Nara; Schiettecatte, François; Boehm, Corinne; Valle, David; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the causative variant from among the thousands identified by whole-exome sequencing or whole-genome sequencing is a formidable challenge. To make this process as efficient and flexible as possible, we have developed a Variant Analysis Module coupled to our previously described Web-based phenotype intake tool, PhenoDB (http://researchphenodb.net and http://phenodb.org). When a small number of candidate-causative variants have been identified in a study of a particular patient or family, a second, more difficult challenge becomes proof of causality for any given variant. One approach to this problem is to find other cases with a similar phenotype and mutations in the same candidate gene. Alternatively, it may be possible to develop biological evidence for causality, an approach that is assisted by making connections to basic scientists studying the gene of interest, often in the setting of a model organism. Both of these strategies benefit from an open access, online site where individual clinicians and investigators could post genes of interest. To this end, we developed GeneMatcher (http://genematcher.org), a freely accessible Website that enables connections between clinicians and researchers across the world who share an interest in the same gene(s). PMID:25684268

  10. New tools for Mendelian disease gene identification: PhenoDB variant analysis module; and GeneMatcher, a web-based tool for linking investigators with an interest in the same gene.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Nara; Schiettecatte, François; Boehm, Corinne; Valle, David; Hamosh, Ada

    2015-04-01

    Identifying the causative variant from among the thousands identified by whole-exome sequencing or whole-genome sequencing is a formidable challenge. To make this process as efficient and flexible as possible, we have developed a Variant Analysis Module coupled to our previously described Web-based phenotype intake tool, PhenoDB (http://researchphenodb.net and http://phenodb.org). When a small number of candidate-causative variants have been identified in a study of a particular patient or family, a second, more difficult challenge becomes proof of causality for any given variant. One approach to this problem is to find other cases with a similar phenotype and mutations in the same candidate gene. Alternatively, it may be possible to develop biological evidence for causality, an approach that is assisted by making connections to basic scientists studying the gene of interest, often in the setting of a model organism. Both of these strategies benefit from an open access, online site where individual clinicians and investigators could post genes of interest. To this end, we developed GeneMatcher (http://genematcher.org), a freely accessible Website that enables connections between clinicians and researchers across the world who share an interest in the same gene(s). PMID:25684268

  11. Genetic regulation of human brain development: lessons from Mendelian diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Salazar, Tracy J.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental goals in human genetics is to link gene function to phenotype, yet the function of the majority of the genes in the human body is still poorly understood. This is especially true for the developing human brain. The study of human phenotypes that result from inherited, mutated alleles is the most direct evidence for the requirement of a gene in human physiology. Thus, the study of Mendelian central nervous system(CNS) diseases can be an extremely powerful approach to elucidate such phenotypic/genotypic links and to increase our understanding of the key components required for development of the human brain. In this review, we highlight examples of how the study of inherited neurodevelopmental disorders contributes to our knowledge of both the “normal” and diseased human brain, as well as elaborate on the future of this type of research. Mendelian disease research has been, and will continue to be, key to understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie human brain function, and will ultimately form a basis for the design of intelligent, mechanism-specific treatments for nervous system disorders. PMID:21062301

  12. Structure and expression of phosphoglucan phosphatase genes of Like Sex Four1 and Like Sex Four2 in barley.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Gao, Shang; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Yang, Qiang; Sun, Min; Wang, Ji-Rui; Qi, Peng-Fei; Liu, Ya-Xi; Li, Wei; Pu, Zhi-En; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Wei, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chunji; Zheng, You-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Phosphoglucan phosphatases (Like-SEX4 1 and 2; LSF1 and LSF2) were reported to play roles in starch metabolism in leaves of Arabidopsis. In this study, we identified and mapped the LSF1 and LSF2 genes in barley (HvLSF1 and HvLSF2), characterized their gene and protein structures, predicted the cis-elements of their promoters, and analysed their expression patterns. HvLSF1 and HvLSF2 were mapped on the long arm of chromosome 1H (1HL) and 5H (5HL), respectively. Our results revealed varied exon-intron structures and conserved exon-intron junctions in both LSF1 and LSF2 from a range of analysed species. Alignment of protein sequences indicated that cTP and CT domains are much less varied than the functional domains (PDZ, DPS and CBM48). LSF2 was mainly expressed in anthers of barley and rice, and in leaf of Arabidopsis. LSF1 was mainly expressed in endosperm of barley and leaf of Arabidopsis and rice. The expression of LSF1 exhibited a diurnal pattern in rice only and that of LSF2 in both rice and Arabidopsis. Of the investigated stresses, only cold stress significantly reduced expression level of LSF1 and LSF2 in barley and LSF2 in Arabidopsis at late stages of the treatments. While heat treatment significantly decreased expression levels of LSF1 at middle stage (4 h) of a treatment in Arabidopsis only. The strong relationships detected between LSF2 and starch excess4 (SEX4), glucan, water dikinases or phosphoglucan, water dikinases were identified and discussed. Taken together, these results provide information of genetic manipulation of LSF1 and LSF2, especially in monocotyledon and further elucidate their regulatory mechanism in plant development. PMID:27154345

  13. The stpA gene form synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 encodes the glucosylglycerol-phosphate phosphatase involved in cyanobacterial osmotic response to salt shock.

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, M; Schoor, A; Jeanjean, R; Zuther, E; Joset, F

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in a gene, stpA, had been correlated with the loss of tolerance to high NaCl concentrations in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Genetic, biochemical, and physiological evidence shows that stpA encodes glucosylglycerol-phosphate phosphatase. stpA mutants are salt sensitive and accumulate glucosylglycerol-phosphate, the precursor of the osmoprotectant glucosylglycerol necessary for salt adaptation of Synechocystis. The consensus motif present in acid phosphatases was found in StpA; however, the homology with other sugar phosphatases is very poor. The amount of stpA mRNA was increased by growth of the cells in the presence of NaCl concentrations above 170 mM. Expression of stpA in Escherichia coli allowed the production of a 46-kDa protein which exhibited glucosylglycerol-phosphate phosphatase activity. The StpA-specific antibody revealed a protein of similar size in extracts of Synechiocystis, and the amount of this protein was increased in salt-adapted cells. The protein produced in E. coli had lost the requirement for activation by NaCl that was observed for the genuine cyanobacterial enzyme. PMID:9045835

  14. Analysis of 589,306 genomes identifies individuals resilient to severe Mendelian childhood diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Shi, Lisong; Hakenberg, Jörg; Naughton, Brian; Sklar, Pamela; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhou, Hanlin; Tian, Lifeng; Prakash, Om; Lemire, Mathieu; Sleiman, Patrick; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Chen, Wanting; Shah, Hardik; Shen, Yulan; Fromer, Menachem; Omberg, Larsson; Deardorff, Matthew A; Zackai, Elaine; Bobe, Jason R; Levin, Elissa; Hudson, Thomas J; Groop, Leif; Wang, Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wojcicki, Anne; Diaz, George A; Edelmann, Lisa; Schadt, Eric E; Friend, Stephen H

    2016-05-01

    Genetic studies of human disease have traditionally focused on the detection of disease-causing mutations in afflicted individuals. Here we describe a complementary approach that seeks to identify healthy individuals resilient to highly penetrant forms of genetic childhood disorders. A comprehensive screen of 874 genes in 589,306 genomes led to the identification of 13 adults harboring mutations for 8 severe Mendelian conditions, with no reported clinical manifestation of the indicated disease. Our findings demonstrate the promise of broadening genetic studies to systematically search for well individuals who are buffering the effects of rare, highly penetrant, deleterious mutations. They also indicate that incomplete penetrance for Mendelian diseases is likely more common than previously believed. The identification of resilient individuals may provide a first step toward uncovering protective genetic variants that could help elucidate the mechanisms of Mendelian diseases and new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27065010

  15. The effects of various kinase and phosphatase inhibitors on the transmission of the prolactin and extracellular matrix signals to rabbit alpha S1-casein and transferrin genes.

    PubMed

    Bayat-Sarmadi, M; Puissant, C; Houdebine, L M

    1995-07-01

    In all species, milk protein genes are specifically expressed in the mammary gland under the control of lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix. In rabbit, casein gene expression is induced by prolactin alone and this induction is amplified by extracellular matrix. Transferrin gene expression is induced by extracellular matrix in the absence of hormones. The transduction mechanisms of prolactin and extracellular matrix to milk protein genes is only partly known. The present study has been undertaken to determine if protein kinases and phosphatases are involved in these mechanisms. Rabbit primary mammary cells were cultured in three different conditions (i) directly on floating collagen I, (ii) on plastic after a trypsinization to remove endogenous extracellular matrix, and (iii) on floating collagen I after a trypsinization to restore a functional extracellular matrix. In these culture conditions, prolactin and several protein kinase and phosphatase inhibitors were added to the medium. The expression of alpha S1-casein and transferrin genes was evaluated using Northern blotting analysis. In cells cultured directly on collagen I, staurosporine, quercetin and 6-dimethylaminopurine strongly inhibited prolactin action of alpha S1-casein gene whereas herbimycin A was only partly inhibitory. An erbstatin analogue, tyrosine phosphate, 1(5 isoquinolylsulphonyl) 2-methylpiperazine and GF 109 203 X did not alter prolactin action. The inhibitors which inhibited prolactin action when cells were directly cultured on collagen I were also those which prevented the induction of alpha S1-casein gene expression when cells were cultured on plastic in the absence of extracellular matrix. The induction of transferrin gene by the extracellular matrix was inhibited slightly by quercetin. Okadaic acid, phenylarsine oxide and sodium pervanadate which inhibit Ser/Thr and Tyr phosphatase inhibitors were unable to mimic prolactin action on alpha S1-casein gene expression. On the contrary

  16. Teaching Mendelian Genetics with the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, James W., Jr.

    Students in general undergraduate courses in both biology and genetics seem to have great difficulty mastering the basic concepts of Mendelian Genetics and solving even simple problems. In an attempt to correct this situation, students in both courses at Rollins College were introduced to three simulation models of the genetics of the fruit…

  17. Linguistic Challenges in Mendelian Genetics: Teachers' Talk in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thörne, Karin; Gericke, Niklas M.; Hagberg, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates Swedish teachers' use of language when teaching Mendelian genetics in compulsory school. The primary objective of the study is to explore how teachers use the related concepts "gene," "allele," and "anlag" (a Swedish variant of the German word "anlage") and how these are related…

  18. Advances on the genetics of mendelian idiopathic epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Baulac, Stéphanie; Baulac, Michel

    2009-11-01

    Genetic factors play an increasingly recognized role in idiopathic epilepsies. Since 1995, positional cloning strategies in multi-generational families with autosomal dominant transmission have revealed 11 genes (KCNQ2, KCNQ3, CHRNA4, CHRNA2, CHRNB2, SCN1B, SCN1A, SCN2A, GABRG2, GABRA1, and LGI1) and numerous loci for febrile seizures and epilepsies. To date, all genes with the exception of LGI1 (leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1), encode neuronal ion channel or neurotransmitter receptor subunits. Molecular approaches have revealed great genetic heterogeneity, with the vast majority of genes remaining to be identified. One of the major challenges is now to understand phenotype-genotype correlations. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the molecular basis of these rare Mendelian autosomal dominant forms of idiopathic epilepsies. PMID:19853223

  19. Advances on the genetics of Mendelian idiopathic epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Baulac, Stéphanie; Baulac, Michel

    2010-12-01

    Genetic factors play an increasingly recognized role in idiopathic epilepsies. Since 1995, positional cloning strategies in multigenerational families with autosomal dominant transmission have revealed 11 genes (KCNQ2, KCNQ3, CHRNA4, CHRNA2, CHRNB2, SCN1B, SCN1A, SCN2A, GABRG2, GABRA1, and LGI1) and numerous loci for febrile seizures and epilepsies. To date, all genes with the exception of LGI1, encode neuronal ion channel or neurotransmitter receptor subunits. Molecular approaches have revealed great genetic heterogeneity, with most genes remaining to be identified. One of the major challenges is now to understand phenotype-genotype correlations. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the molecular basis of these rare mendelian autosomal dominant forms of idiopathic epilepsies. PMID:20832659

  20. The Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2C5 affects seed germination, stomatal aperture, and abscisic acid-inducible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brock, Anita K; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Grefen, Laure; Lajunen, Heini M; Bethke, Gerit; Lee, Justin; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2010-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone regulating various cellular processes in plants, including stomatal opening and seed germination. Although protein phosphorylation via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) has been suggested to be important in ABA signaling, the corresponding phosphatases are largely unknown. Here, we show that a member of the Protein Phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PP2C5, is acting as a MAPK phosphatase. The PP2C5 protein colocalizes and directly interacts with stress-induced MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6, predominantly in the nucleus. Importantly, altered PP2C5 levels affect MAPK activation. Whereas Arabidopsis plants depleted of PP2C5 show an enhanced ABA-induced activation of MPK3 and MPK6, ectopic expression of PP2C5 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) resulted in the opposite effect, with the two MAPKs salicylic acid-induced protein kinase and wound-induced protein kinase not being activated any longer after ABA treatment. Moreover, depletion of PP2C5, whose gene expression itself is affected by ABA treatment, resulted in altered ABA responses. Loss-of-function mutation in PP2C5 or AP2C1, a close PP2C5 homolog, resulted in an increased stomatal aperture under normal growth conditions and a partial ABA-insensitive phenotype in seed germination that was most prominent in the pp2c5 ap2c1 double mutant line. In addition, the response of ABA-inducible genes such as ABI1, ABI2, RD29A, and Erd10 was reduced in the mutant plants. Thus, we suggest that PP2C5 acts as a MAPK phosphatase that positively regulates seed germination, stomatal closure, and ABA-inducible gene expression. PMID:20488890

  1. Avirulence gene mapping in the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) reveals a protein phosphatase 2C effector gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic tractability of the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor) provides an opportunity to investigate the mechanisms insects use to induce plant gall formation. Here we demonstrate that capacity using the newly sequenced HF genome to identify the gene (vH24) that elicits the effector-trigger...

  2. Effects of Intercropping with Potato Onion on the Growth of Tomato and Rhizosphere Alkaline Phosphatase Genes Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Fengzhi; Zhou, Xingang; Fu, Xuepeng; Tao, Yue; Xu, Weihui; Pan, Kai; Liu, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: In China, excessive fertilization has resulted in phosphorus (P) accumulation in most greenhouse soils. Intercropping can improve the efficiency of nutrient utilization in crop production. In this study, pot experiments were performed to investigate the effects of intercropping with potato onion (Allium cepa L. var. aggregatum G. Don) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings growth and P uptake, the diversity of rhizosphere phosphobacteria and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) genes in phosphorus-rich soil. Methods: The experiment included three treatments, namely tomato monoculture (TM), potato onion monoculture (OM), and tomato/potato onion intercropping (TI-tomato intercropping and OI-potato onion intercropping). The growth and P uptake of tomato and potato onion seedlings were evaluated. The dilution plating method was used to determine the population of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and phosphate-mineralizing bacteria (PMB). The genomic DNAs of PSB and PMB in the rhizosphere of tomato and potato onions were extracted and purified, and then, with the primer set of 338f /518r, the PCR amplification of partial bacterial 16S rDNA sequence was performed and sequenced to determine the diversities of PSB and PMB. After extracting the total genomic DNAs from the rhizosphere, the copy numbers and diversities of ALP genes were investigated using real-time PCR and PCR-DGGE, respectively. Results: Intercropping with potato onion promoted the growth and P uptake of tomato seedlings, but inhibited those of potato onion. After 37 days of transplanting, compared to the rhizosphere of TM, the soil pH increased, while the electrolytic conductivity and Olsen P content decreased (p < 0.05) in the rhizosphere of TI. The populations and diversities of PSB, PMB, and ALP genes increased significantly in the rhizosphere of TI, compared to the rhizosphere of TM. Conclusion: The results indicated that intercropping with potato onion promoted the growth and P

  3. Arabidopsis phosphatase under-producer mutants pup1 and pup3 contain mutations in the AtPAP10 and AtPAP26 genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyue; Liu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Production and secretion of acid phosphatases (APases) is a hallmark adaptive response of plants to phosphate (Pi) deprivation. Researchers have long hypothesized that Pi starvation-induced APases are involved in internal Pi recycling and remobilization as well as in external Pi utilization. Two phosphatase under-producer (pup) mutants, pup1 and pup3, were previously isolated in Arabidopsis. Characterization of these 2 pup mutants provided the first genetic evidence for the above hypothesis. To date, however, the molecular lesions in these 2 pup mutants remain unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that pup1 and pup3 contain point mutations in the Arabidopsis purple acid phosphatase gene AtPAP10 and AtPAP26, respectively. Our results answer a long-standing question about the molecular identity of the PUP1 and PUP3 genes and corroborate the conclusions from previous studies regarding the function of AtPAP10 and AtPAP26 in plant acclimation to Pi deprivation. PMID:26251878

  4. Polyandry, life-history trade-offs and the evolution of imprinting at Mendelian loci.

    PubMed

    Mills, Walter; Moore, Tom

    2004-12-01

    Genomic imprinting causes parental origin-dependent differential expression of a small number of genes in mammalian and angiosperm plant embryos, resulting in non-Mendelian inheritance of phenotypic traits. The "conflict" theory of the evolution of imprinting proposes that reduced genetic relatedness of paternally, relative to maternally, derived alleles in offspring of polygamous females supports parental sex-specific selection at gene loci that influence maternal investment. While the theory's physiological predictions are well supported by observation, the requirement of polyandry in the evolution of imprinting from an ancestral Mendelian state has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we use diallelic models to examine the influence of various degrees of polyandry on the evolution of both Mendelian and imprinted autosomal gene loci that influence trade-offs between maternal fecundity and offspring viability. We show that, given a plausible assumption on the physiological relationship between maternal fecundity and offspring viability, low levels of polyandry are sufficient to reinforce exclusively the fixation of "greedy" paternally imprinted alleles that increase offspring viability at the expense of maternal fecundity and "thrifty" maternally imprinted alleles of opposite effect. We also show that, for all levels of polyandry, Mendelian alleles at genetic loci that influence the trade-off between maternal fecundity and offspring viability reach an evolutionary stable state, whereas pairs of reciprocally imprinted alleles do not. PMID:15611195

  5. Beyond the simplicity of Mendelian inheritance.

    PubMed

    Schacherer, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the underlying rules that govern the phenotypic diversity observed in natural populations is an old but still unaccomplished goal in biology. In 1865, Gregor Mendel paved the way for the dissection of the underlying genetic basis of traits by setting out to understand the principles of heredity. To date, we still lack a global overview of the spectrum and continuum existing between Mendelian and complex traits within any natural population. In this respect, we recently performed a species-wide survey of Mendelian traits across a large population of isolates using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By analyzing the distribution and the inheritance patterns of the trait, we have clearly shown that monogenic mutations can display a significant, variable, and continuous expressivity across different genetic backgrounds. Our study also demonstrated that combining the elegancy of both classical genetics and high-throughput genomics is more than valuable to dissect the genotype-phenotype relationship in natural populations. PMID:27344551

  6. Mendelian-mutationism: the forgotten evolutionary synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, Arlin; Cable, Kele

    2014-01-01

    According to a classical narrative, early geneticists, failing to see how Mendelism provides the missing pieces of Darwin's theory, rejected gradual changes and advocated an implausible yet briefly popular view of evolution-by-mutation; after decades of delay (in which synthesis was prevented by personal conflicts, disciplinary rivalries, and anti-Darwinian animus), Darwinism emerged on a new Mendelian basis. Based on the works of four influential early geneticists - Bateson, de Vries, Morgan and Punnett -, and drawing on recent scholarship, we offer an alternative that turns the classical view on its head. For early geneticists, embracing discrete inheritance and the mutation theory (for the origin of hereditary variation) did not entail rejection of selection, but rejection of Darwin's non-Mendelian views of heredity and variation, his doctrine of naturanon facitsaltum, and his conception of "natural selection" as a creative force that shapes features out of masses of infinitesimal differences. We find no evidence of a delay in synthesizing mutation, rules of discrete inheritance, and selection in a Mendelian-Mutationist Synthesis. Instead, before 1918, early geneticists had conceptualized allelic selection, the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the evolution of a quantitative trait under selection, the probability of fixation of a new mutation, and other key innovations. Contemporary evolutionary thinking seems closer to their more ecumenical view than to the restrictive mid-twentieth-century consensus known as the Modern Synthesis. PMID:24811736

  7. Antagonistic coevolution between quantitative and Mendelian traits.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Masato; Ellner, Stephen P

    2016-03-30

    Coevolution is relentlessly creating and maintaining biodiversity and therefore has been a central topic in evolutionary biology. Previous theoretical studies have mostly considered coevolution between genetically symmetric traits (i.e. coevolution between two continuous quantitative traits or two discrete Mendelian traits). However, recent empirical evidence indicates that coevolution can occur between genetically asymmetric traits (e.g. between quantitative and Mendelian traits). We examine consequences of antagonistic coevolution mediated by a quantitative predator trait and a Mendelian prey trait, such that predation is more intense with decreased phenotypic distance between their traits (phenotype matching). This antagonistic coevolution produces a complex pattern of bifurcations with bistability (initial state dependence) in a two-dimensional model for trait coevolution. Furthermore, with eco-evolutionary dynamics (so that the trait evolution affects predator-prey population dynamics), we find that coevolution can cause rich dynamics including anti-phase cycles, in-phase cycles, chaotic dynamics and deterministic predator extinction. Predator extinction is more likely to occur when the prey trait exhibits complete dominance rather than semidominance and when the predator trait evolves very rapidly. Our study illustrates how recognizing the genetic architectures of interacting ecological traits can be essential for understanding the population and evolutionary dynamics of coevolving species. PMID:27009218

  8. A STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1-Regulated Protein Phosphatase Gene Rice Protein Phosphatase18 Modulates Drought and Oxidative Stress Tolerance through Abscisic Acid-Independent Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging in Rice1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    You, Jun; Zong, Wei; Hu, Honghong; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses through a complexity of signaling pathways, and the dephosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase (PP) is an important event in this process. We identified a rice (Oryza sativa) PP2C gene, OsPP18, as a STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1 (SNAC1)-regulated downstream gene. The ospp18 mutant was more sensitive than wild-type plants to drought stress at both the seedling and panicle development stages. Rice plants with OsPP18 suppressed through artificial microRNA were also hypersensitive to drought stress. Microarray analysis of the mutant revealed that genes encoding reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes were down-regulated in the ospp18 mutant, and the mutant exhibited reduced activities of ROS scavenging enzymes and increased sensitivity to oxidative stresses. Overexpression of OsPP18 in rice led to enhanced osmotic and oxidative stress tolerance. The expression of OsPP18 was induced by drought stress but not induced by abscisic acid (ABA). Although OsPP18 is a typical PP2C with enzymatic activity, it did not interact with SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2 protein kinases, which function in ABA signaling. Meanwhile, the expression of ABA-responsive genes was not affected in the ospp18 mutant, and the ABA sensitivities of the ospp18 mutant and OsPP18-overexpressing plants were also not altered. Together, these findings suggest that OsPP18 is a unique PP2C gene that is regulated by SNAC1 and confers drought and oxidative stress tolerance by regulating ROS homeostasis through ABA-independent pathways. PMID:25318938

  9. Chromosomal and related Mendelian syndromes associated with Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2012-11-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a fairly frequent cause of intestinal obstruction in children. It is characterized as a sex-linked heterogonous disorder with variable severity and incomplete penetrance giving rise to a variable pattern of inheritance. Although Hirschsprung's disease occurs as an isolated phenotype in at least 70% of cases, it is not infrequently associated with a number of congenital abnormalities and associated syndromes, demonstrating a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Certain of these syndromic phenotypes have been linked to distinct genetic sites, indicating underlying genetic associations of the disease and probable gene-gene interaction, in its pathogenesis. These associations with HSCR include Down's syndrome and other chromosomal anomalies, Waardenburg syndrome and other Dominant sensorineural deafness, the Congenital Central Hypoventilation and Mowat-Wilson and other brain-related syndromes, as well as the MEN2 and other tumour associations. A number of other autosomal recessive syndromes include the Shah-Waardenburg, the Bardet-Biedl and Cartilage-hair hypoplasia, Goldberg-Shprintzen syndromes and other syndromes related to cholesterol and fat metabolism among others. The genetics of Hirschsprung's disease are highly complex with the majority of known genetic sites relating to the main susceptibility pathways (RET an EDNRB). Non-syndromic non-familial, short-segment HSCR appears to represent a non-Mendelian condition with variable expression and sex-dependent penetrance. Syndromic and familial forms, on the other hand, have complex patterns of inheritance and being reported as autosomal dominant, recessive and polygenic patterns of inheritance. The phenotypic variability and incomplete penetrance observed in Hirschsprung's disease could also be explained by the involvement of modifier genes, especially in its syndromic forms. In this review, we look at the chromosomal and Mendelian associations and their underlying signalling pathways

  10. Assessing the Biological Activity of the Glucan Phosphatase Laforin.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Raththagala, Madushi; Gentry, Mathew S; Sanz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered family of enzymes that dephosphorylate either starch or glycogen and are essential for proper starch metabolism in plants and glycogen metabolism in humans. Mutations in the gene encoding the only human glucan phosphatase, laforin, result in the fatal, neurodegenerative, epilepsy known as Lafora disease. Here, we describe phosphatase assays to assess both generic laforin phosphatase activity and laforin's unique glycogen phosphatase activity. PMID:27514803

  11. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  12. Dephosphorylation of Tyrosine 393 in Argonaute 2 by Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Regulates Gene Silencing in Oncogenic RAS-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Haase, Astrid D.; Huang, Fang-Ke; Coulis, Gérald; Rivera, Keith D.; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Chang, Christopher J.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Boivin, Benoit; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic RAS (H-RASV12) induces premature senescence in primary cells by triggering production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the molecular role of ROS in senescence remains elusive. We investigated whether inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by ROS contributed to H-RASV12-induced senescence. We identified protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a major target of H-RASV12-induced ROS. Inactivation of PTP1B was necessary and sufficient to induce premature senescence in H-RASV12-expressing IMR90 fibroblasts. We identified phospho-Tyr 393 of argonaute 2 (AGO2) as a direct substrate of PTP1B. Phosphorylation of AGO2 at Tyr 393 inhibited loading with microRNAs (miRNA) and thus miRNA-mediated gene silencing, which counteracted the function of H-RASV12-induced oncogenic miRNAs. Overall, our data illustrate that premature senescence in H-RASV12-transformed primary cells is a consequence of oxidative inactivation of PTP1B and inhibition of miRNA-mediated gene silencing. PMID:25175024

  13. Cloning of the gene and characterization of the enzymatic properties of the monomeric alkaline phosphatase (PhoX) from Pasteurella multocida strain X-73.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ru; Shien, Jui-Hung; Shieh, Happy K; Hu, Chung-Chi; Gong, Shuen-Rong; Chen, Ling-Yun; Chang, Poa-Chun

    2007-02-01

    We have identified a new phoX gene encoding the monomeric alkaline phosphatase from Pasteurella multocida X-73. This gene was not found in the published genome sequence of Pasteurella multocida pm70. Characterization of the recombinant PhoX of Pasteurella multocida X-73 showed that it is a monomeric enzyme, activated by Ca(2+) and possibly secreted by the Tat pathway. These features distinguish phosphatases of the PhoX family from those of the PhoA family. All proteins of the PhoX family were found to contain a conserved motif that shares significant sequence homology with the calcium-binding site of a phosphotriesterase known as diisopropylfluorophosphatase. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that D527 of PhoX might be the ligand bound to the catalytic calcium. This is the first report on identification of homologous sequences between PhoX and the phosphotriesterase and on the potential calcium-binding site of PhoX. PMID:17156125

  14. Genetic Interactions between Reg1/Hex2 and Glc7, the Gene Encoding the Protein Phosphatase Type 1 Catalytic Subunit in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D.; Chun, K. T.; Goebl, M. G.; Roach, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in GLC7, the gene encoding the type 1 protein phosphatase catalytic subunit, cause a variety of abberrant phenotypes in yeast, such as impaired glycogen synthesis and relief of glucose repression of the expression of some genes. Loss of function of the REG1/HEX2 gene, necessary for glucose repression of several genes, was found to suppress the glycogen-deficient phenotype of the glc7-1 allele. Deletion of REG1 in a wild-type background led to overaccumulation of glycogen as well as slow growth and an enlarged cell size. However, loss of REG1 did not suppress other phenotypes associated with GLC7 mutations, such as inability to sporulate or, in cells bearing the glc7(Y-170) allele, lack of growth at 14°. The effect of REG1 deletion on glycogen accumulation is not simply due to derepression of glucose-repressed genes, although it does require the presence of SNF1, which encodes a protein kinase essential for expression of glucose-repressed genes and for glycogen accumulation. We propose that REG1 has a role in controlling glycogen accumulation. PMID:8722767

  15. Functional analysis of the promoter region of the human phosphotyrosine phosphatase activator gene: Yin Yang 1 is essential for core promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V; Van Hoof, C; De Baere, I; Merlevede, W; Goris, J

    1999-01-01

    The phosphotyrosine phosphatase activator (PTPA) has been isolated as an in vitro regulator of protein phosphatase 2A. Human PTPA is encoded by a single gene, the structure and chromosomal localization of which have been determined in our previous work. Here we describe the further isolation, sequencing and functional characterization of the PTPA promoter region. In agreement with its ubiquitous expression, the PTPA promoter displays several characteristics of housekeeping genes: it lacks both a TATA-box and a CAAT-box, it is very GC-rich and it contains an unmethylated CpG island surrounding the transcription initiation site. Transient transfection experiments in different cell types with several truncated chimaeric luciferase reporter gene plasmids revealed the importance of the region between positions -67 and -39 for basal promoter activity. This region coincides remarkably well with the determined CpG island. Further analysis of this region demonstrated the presence of a Yin Yang 1 (YY1) binding motif at positions -52 to -44. Binding of YY1 to this sequence is demonstrated in bandshift and DNase I footprinting experiments. Another YY1 binding motif is found in the 5' untranslated region, at positions +27 to +35. Mutations in either of these sites, abolishing YY1 binding in vitro, have differential effects on promoter activity. Point mutations in both sites completely abolish promoter activity. Moreover, induction of promoter activity by co-transfection with a YY1 expression plasmid is fully dependent upon the presence of both intact YY1 binding sites. Thus YY1 apparently mediates basal transcription of the human PTPA gene through two binding sites within its proximal promoter. PMID:10585862

  16. The Hidden Complexity of Mendelian Traits across Natural Yeast Populations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Sigwalt, Anastasie; Fournier, Téo; Pflieger, David; Peter, Jackson; de Montigny, Jacky; Dunham, Maitreya J; Schacherer, Joseph

    2016-07-26

    Mendelian traits are considered to be at the lower end of the complexity spectrum of heritable phenotypes. However, more than a century after the rediscovery of Mendel's law, the global landscape of monogenic variants, as well as their effects and inheritance patterns within natural populations, is still not well understood. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed a species-wide survey of Mendelian traits across a large population of isolates. We generated offspring from 41 unique parental pairs and analyzed 1,105 cross/trait combinations. We found that 8.9% of the cases were Mendelian. Further tracing of causal variants revealed background-specific expressivity and modified inheritances, gradually transitioning from Mendelian to complex traits in 30% of the cases. In fact, when taking into account the natural population diversity, the hidden complexity of traits could be substantial, confounding phenotypic predictability even for simple Mendelian traits. PMID:27396326

  17. Common Variants at Putative Regulatory Sites of the Tissue Nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Influence Circulating Pyridoxal 5′-Phosphate Concentration in Healthy Adults123

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Tonia C; Pangilinan, Faith; Molloy, Anne M; Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Shane, Barry; Gibney, Eileen R; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per M; Cropp, Cheryl D; Kim, Yoonhee; Wilson, Alexander F; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Brody, Lawrence C; Mills, James L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin B-6 interconversion enzymes are important for supplying pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP), the co-enzyme form, to tissues. Variants in the genes for these enzymes [tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate oxidase, pyridoxal kinase, and pyridoxal phosphatase] could affect enzyme function and vitamin B-6 status. Objectives: We tested whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes influence vitamin B-6 status markers [plasma PLP, pyridoxal (PL), and 4-pyridoxic acid (PA)], and explored potential functional effects of the SNPs. Methods: Study subjects were young, healthy adults from Ireland (n = 2345). We measured plasma PLP, PL, and PA with liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and genotyped 66 tag SNPs in the 4 genes. We tested for associations with single SNPs in candidate genes and also performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) and gene-based analyses. Results: Seventeen SNPs in ALPL were associated with altered plasma PLP in candidate gene analyses (P < 1.89 × 10−4). In the GWAS, 5 additional ALPL SNPs were associated with altered plasma PLP (P < 5.0 × 10−8). Gene-based analyses that used the functional linear model β-spline (P = 4.04 × 10−15) and Fourier spline (P = 5.87 × 10−15) methods also showed associations between ALPL and altered plasma PLP. No SNPs in other genes were associated with plasma PLP. The association of the minor CC genotype of 1 ALPL SNP, rs1256341, with reduced ALPL expression in the HapMap Northern European ancestry population is consistent with the positive association between the CC genotype and plasma PLP in our study (P = 0.008). No SNP was associated with altered plasma PL or PA. Conclusions: In healthy adults, common variants in ALPL influence plasma PLP concentration, the most frequently used biomarker for vitamin B-6 status. Whether these associations are indicative of functional changes in vitamin B-6 status requires more investigation

  18. Segregation analysis of smoking-associated malignancies: Evidence for Mendelian inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, T.A.; Chen, Ping-Ling; Potter, J.D.; Bailey-Wilson, J.E.; Elston, R.C.; Rothschild, H.

    1994-09-01

    Tobacco consumption is an established risk factor for cancer at a number of sites: oral cavity, esophagus, nasopharynx, lung, larynx, pancreas, bladder, kidney, and uterine cervix. These sites also demonstrate familial aggregation. To determine if evidence exists for a major gene controlling susceptibility to smoking-associated cancers, maximum likelihood segregation analyses were performed on 337 families (3,276 individuals) ascertained through a decreased lung cancer proband. Models were fitted that allowed for personal tobacco use and variable age of onset. The hypotheses of environmental transmission and no major gene were rejected (P < 0.005), but none of the Mendelian models could be distinguished. According to Akaike`s Information Criterion, Mendelian dominant inheritance of an allele that produces cancer at an earlier age of onset provided the best fit to the data. The model suggests that 62% of the population are susceptible, and that the mean age-of-onset differs for men and women: at the mean level of tobacco exposure, female gene carriers are affected, on average, 24 years earlier than non-carriers (77 vs. 101), while in males the difference was 20 years (71 vs. 91). These findings extend our earlier observations on the genetic epidemiology of lung cancer and suggest that Mendelian factors may influence the risk of cancers that are known to be smoking associated. 48 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Replication-competent retroviral vectors encoding alkaline phosphatase reveal spatial restriction of viral gene expression/transduction in the chick embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, D M; Cepko, C L

    1993-01-01

    Replication-competent avian retroviruses, capable of transducing and expressing up to 2 kb of nonviral sequences, are now available to effect widespread gene transfer in chicken (chick) embryos (S. H. Hughes, J. J. Greenhouse, C. J. Petropoulos, and P. Sutrave, J. Virol. 61:3004-3012, 1987). We have constructed novel avian retroviral vectors that encode human placental alkaline phosphatase as a marker whose expression can be histochemically monitored. These vectors have been tested for expression by introducing them into the embryonic chick nervous system. They have revealed that the expression of retrovirally transduced genes can be spatially and temporally limited without the need for tissue-specific promoters. By varying the site and time of infection, targeted gene transfer can be confined to selected populations of neural cells over the course of several days, a time window that is sufficient for many key developmental processes. The capability of differentially infecting specific target populations may avoid confounding variables such as detrimental effects of a transduced gene on processes unrelated to the cells or tissue of interest. These vectors and methods thus should be useful in studies of the effect of transduced genes on the development of various organs and tissues during avian embryogenesis. In addition, the vectors will facilitate studies aimed at an understanding of viral infection and expression patterns. Images PMID:8455633

  20. Okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, blocks calcium changes, gene expression, and cell death induced by gibberellin in wheat aleurone cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, A; Cappelluti, S; Cervantes-Cervantes, M; Rodriguez, M; Bush, D S

    1996-01-01

    The cereal aleurone functions during germination by secreting hydrolases, mainly alpha-amylase, into the starchy endosperm. Multiple signal transduction pathways exist in cereal aleurone cells that enable them to modulate hydrolase production in response to both hormonal and environmental stimuli. Gibberellic acid (GA) promotes hydrolase production, whereas abscisic acid (ABA), hypoxia, and osmotic stress reduce amylase production. In an effort to identify the components of transduction pathways in aleurone cells, we have investigated the effect of okadaic acid (OA), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, on stimulus-response coupling for GA, ABA, and hypoxia. We found that OA (100 nM) completely inhibited all the GA responses that we measured, from rapid changes in cytosolic Ca2+ through changes in gene expression and accelerated cell death. OA (100 nM) partially inhibited ABA responses, as measured by changes in the level of PHAV1, a cDNA for an ABA-induced mRNA in barley. In contrast, OA had no effect on the response to hypoxia, as measured by changes in cytosolic Ca2+ and by changes in enzyme activity and RNA levels of alcohol dehydrogenase. Our data indicate that OA-sensitive protein phosphatases act early in the transduction pathway of GA but are not involved in the response to hypoxia. These data provide a basis for a model of multiple transduction pathways in which the level of cytosolic Ca2+ is a key point of convergence controlling changes in stimulus-response coupling. PMID:8742711

  1. Differential Expression of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Genes during Orchid Flower Senescence Induced by the Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor Okadaic Acid1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning Ning; Yang, Shang Fa; Charng, Yee-yung

    2001-01-01

    Applying 10 pmol of okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of type 1 or type 2A serine/threonine protein phosphatases, to the orchid (Phalaenopsis species) stigma induced a dramatic increase in ethylene production and an accelerated senescence of the whole flower. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine or silver thiosulfate, inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action, respectively, effectively inhibited the OA-induced ethylene production and retarded flower senescence, suggesting that the protein phosphatase inhibitor induced orchid flower senescence through an ethylene-mediated signaling pathway. OA treatment induced a differential expression pattern for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase multigene family. Accumulation of Phal-ACS1 transcript in the stigma, labelum, and ovary induced by OA were higher than those induced by pollination as determined by “semiquantitative” reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, the transcript levels of Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 induced by OA were much lower than those induced by pollination. Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, on the other hand, inhibited the OA-induced Phal-ACS1 expression in the stigma and delayed flower senescence. Our results suggest that a hyper-phosphorylation status of an unidentified protein(s) is involved in up-regulating the expression of Phal-ACS1 gene resulting in increased ethylene production and accelerated the senescence process of orchid flower. PMID:11351088

  2. The characteristic gene expressions of MAPK phosphatases 1 and 2 in hepatocarcinogenesis, rat ascites hepatoma cells, and regenerating rat liver.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, A; Karasaki, H; Urushibara, N; Nomoto, K; Imai, Y; Nakamura, K; Mizuno, Y; Ogawa, K; Kikuchi, K

    1997-10-29

    mRNA levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases, MKP-1 and MKP-2, were determined during chemical hepatocarcinogenesis and during regeneration of rat liver. In chemical hepatocarcinogenesis, the mRNA levels of MKP-1 were increased in primary hepatomas but decreased in rat ascites hepatomas as compared with normal liver. MKP-2 was undetectable in normal liver but strongly expressed in hepatomas. The MKP-2 mRNA level was increased with expression of malignant phenotypes in hepatomas. In regenerating liver, the mRNA level of MKP-1 increased immediately but transiently after partial hepatectomy, and peaked again on day 10, the time when hepatocytes cease proliferation. The elevated expression of MKP-1 on day 10 suggests some roles of MKP-1 as a negative regulator in hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:9367840

  3. Improving phosphorus acquisition of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) by transgenic expression of plant-derived phytase and acid phosphatase genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Wright, Elane; Ge, Yaxin; Bell, Jeremey; Xi, Yajun; Bouton, Joseph H; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2009-04-01

    Phosphate is one of the least available macronutrients restricting crop production in many ecosystems. A phytase gene (MtPHY1) and a purple acid phosphatase gene (MtPAP1), both isolated from the model legume Medicago truncatula, were introduced into white clover (Trifolium repens L.) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transgenes were driven by the constitutive CaMV35S promoter or the root-specific MtPT1 promoter. Transcripts were detected in roots of the transgenic plants. Phytase or acid phosphatase (APase) activities in root apoplasts of the transgenic plants were increased up to three-fold compared to the wild type control. After the plants were grown 80 days in sand pots supplied with organic phosphorus (Po) as the sole P source, dry weights of shoot tissues of the best performing transgenic plants almost doubled that of the control and were comparable to the counterparts supplied with inorganic phosphorus (Pi). Relative biomass production of the transgenics under Po treatment was over 90% and 80% of that from the Pi treatment when the plants were grown in hydroponics (40 days) and sand pots (80 days), respectively. In contrast, biomass of the wild type controls under Po treatment was only about 50% of the Pi treatment in either hydroponic cultures or sand pots. In addition, shoot P concentrations of the transgenic plants were significantly increased compared to the control. Transgenic plants accumulated much higher amounts of total P (up to 2.6-fold after 80 days of growth) than the control in Po supplied sand pots. The results showed that transgenic expression of MtPHY1 or MtPAP1 in white clover plants increased their abilities of utilizing organic phosphorus in response to P deficiency. PMID:26493137

  4. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 10q23 and mutation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 tumor suppressor gene in Korean hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jei-Jun; Rho, Jin-Woo; Lee, Tae-Jin; Yun, Sung-Su; Kim, Hong-Jin; Choi, Joon-Hyuk; Jeong, Daewon; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Lee, Tae-Yoon

    2007-10-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the 10q23 chromosomal region was analyzed in 18 tissue samples from Korean hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. LOH at the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) region (D10S215, AFMa086wg9 and D10S541) was found in 8 of the 18 (44.4%) HCCs. LOH (20%) and microsatellite instability (26.7%) were also frequently found at the D10S2177 locus, which is located on the telomere side of the PTEN region. LOH was found in other loci, such as AFM280we1 and D10S2281. The presence of LOH in regions other than the PTEN region on chromosome 10q23 suggested the presence of additional tumor suppressor gene(s). PTEN mutation was found in only a subset of HCCs: A single base insertion at the end of the 5'-end splice signal (AG-GUAAGUU) in intron 5 and a silent mutation in exon 6 (codon 188, CTG-Val to CTA). Our data collectively suggest that the genetic alterations of chromosome 10q23, including the PTEN gene, could be important in hepatocarcinogenesis in the Korean population. PMID:17786367

  5. High mature grain phytase activity in the Triticeae has evolved by duplication followed by neofunctionalization of the purple acid phosphatase phytase (PAPhy) gene

    PubMed Central

    Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The phytase activity in food and feedstuffs is an important nutritional parameter. Members of the Triticeae tribe accumulate purple acid phosphatase phytases (PAPhy) during grain filling. This accumulation elevates mature grain phytase activities (MGPA) up to levels between ~650 FTU/kg for barley and 6000 FTU/kg for rye. This is notably more than other cereals. For instance, rice, maize, and oat have MGPAs below 100 FTU/kg. The cloning and characterization of the PAPhy gene complement from wheat, barley, rye, einkorn, and Aegilops tauschii is reported here. The Triticeae PAPhy genes generally consist of a set of paralogues, PAPhy_a and PAPhy_b, and have been mapped to Triticeae chromosomes 5 and 3, respectively. The promoters share a conserved core but the PAPhy_a promoter have acquired a novel cis-acting regulatory element for expression during grain filling while the PAPhy_b promoter has maintained the archaic function and drives expression during germination. Brachypodium is the only sequenced Poaceae sharing the PAPhy duplication. As for the Triticeae, the duplication is reflected in a high MGPA of ~4200 FTU/kg in Brachypodium. The sequence conservation of the paralogous loci on Brachypodium chromosomes 1 and 2 does not extend beyond the PAPhy gene. The results indicate that a single-gene segmental duplication may have enabled the evolution of high MGPA by creating functional redundancy of the parent PAPhy gene. This implies that similar MGPA levels may be out of reach in breeding programs for some Poaceae, e.g. maize and rice, whereas Triticeae breeders should focus on PAPhy_a. PMID:23918958

  6. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  7. Assignment of Ptprn2, the gene encoding receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase IA-2beta, a major autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, to mouse chromosome region 12F.

    PubMed

    van den Maagdenberg, A M; Schepens, J T; Schepens, M T; Pepers, B; Wieringa, B; van Kessel, A G; Hendriks, W J

    1998-01-01

    The receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase IA-2beta gene (mouse gene symbol Ptprn2) encodes a major autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. We physically mapped Ptprn2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization to band F of mouse chromosome 12, a region that lacks diabetes susceptibility loci. The mapping confirms the proposed synteny of mouse 12F with band q36 of human chromosome 7. PMID:9858807

  8. Promotion of Cell Viability and Histone Gene Expression by the Acetyltransferase Gcn5 and the Protein Phosphatase PP2A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Petty, Emily L; Lafon, Anne; Tomlinson, Shannon L; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-08-01

    Histone modifications direct chromatin-templated events in the genome and regulate access to DNA sequence information. There are multiple types of modifications, and a common feature is their dynamic nature. An essential step for understanding their regulation, therefore, lies in characterizing the enzymes responsible for adding and removing histone modifications. Starting with a dosage-suppressor screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have discovered a functional interaction between the acetyltransferase Gcn5 and the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) complex, two factors that regulate post-translational modifications. We find that RTS1, one of two genes encoding PP2A regulatory subunits, is a robust and specific high-copy suppressor of temperature sensitivity of gcn5∆ and a subset of other gcn5∆ phenotypes. Conversely, loss of both PP2A(Rts1) and Gcn5 function in the SAGA and SLIK/SALSA complexes is lethal. RTS1 does not restore global transcriptional defects in gcn5∆; however, histone gene expression is restored, suggesting that the mechanism of RTS1 rescue includes restoration of specific cell cycle transcripts. Pointing to new mechanisms of acetylation-phosphorylation cross-talk, RTS1 high-copy rescue of gcn5∆ growth requires two residues of H2B that are phosphorylated in human cells. These data highlight the potential significance of dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these deeply conserved histone residues for cell viability. PMID:27317677

  9. Notch and TGF-β pathways cooperatively regulate receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-κ (PTPRK) gene expression in human primary keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiru; Xue, Siliang; Zhou, Jin; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-κ (PTPRK) specifically and directly dephosphorylates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thereby limiting EGFR function in primary human keratinocytes. PTPRK expression is increased by the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway and cell–cell contact. Because the Notch receptor pathway is responsive to cell–cell contact and regulates keratinocyte growth and differentiation, we investigated the interplay between Notch and TGF-β pathways in regulation of PTPRK expression in human keratinocytes. Suppression of Notch signaling by γ-secretase inhibitors substantially reduced cell contact induction of PTPRK gene expression. In sparse keratinocyte cultures, addition of soluble Notch-activating ligand jagged one peptide (Jag1) induced PTPRK. Of interest, cell contact–induced expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor inhibitor SB431542 inhibited contact-induced expression of PTPRK. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch signaling, via knockdown of Notch1 or by γ-secretase inhibitors, significantly reduced TGF-β–induced PTPRK gene expression, indicating that Notch and TGF-β pathways function together to regulate PTPRK. Of importance, the combination of Jag1 plus TGF-β results in greater PTPRK expression and lower EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation than either ligand alone. These data indicate that Notch and TGF-β act in concert to stimulate induction of PTPRK, which suppresses EGFR activation in human keratinocytes. PMID:25609089

  10. Exon redefinition by a point mutation within exon 5 of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is the major cause of glycogen storage disease type 1a in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kido, Keiko

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient`s liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient`s white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3{prime} splicing occurred 91 bp from the 5{prime} site of exon 5 (at position 732 in the coding region), causing a substitution of a single nucleotide (G to T) at position 727 in the coding region. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression of allelic minigene constructs into animal cells. Another eight unrelated families of nine Japanese patients were all found to have this mutation. This mutation is a new type of splicing mutation in the G6Pase gene, and 91% of patients and carriers suffering from GSD1a in Japan are detectable with this splicing mutation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. TaPP2C1, a Group F2 Protein Phosphatase 2C Gene, Confers Resistance to Salt Stress in Transgenic Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Yan, Yan; Hou, Xiaowan; He, Yanzhen; Wei, Yunxie; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan; Peng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Group A protein phosphatases 2Cs (PP2Cs) are essential components of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis; however, the function of group F2 subfamily PP2Cs is currently less known. In this study, TaPP2C1 which belongs to group F2 was isolated and characterized from wheat. Expression of the TaPP2C1-GFP fusion protein suggested its ubiquitous localization within a cell. TaPP2C1 expression was downregulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and NaCl treatments, but upregulated by H2O2 treatment. Overexpression of TaPP2C1 in tobacco resulted in reduced ABA sensitivity and increased salt resistance of transgenic seedlings. Additionally, physiological analyses showed that improved resistance to salt stress conferred by TaPP2C1 is due to the reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, the improved antioxidant system, and the increased transcription of genes in the ABA-independent pathway. Finally, transgenic tobacco showed increased resistance to oxidative stress by maintaining a more effective antioxidant system. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TaPP2C1 negatively regulates ABA signaling, but positively regulates salt resistance. TaPP2C1 confers salt resistance through activating the antioxidant system and ABA-independent gene transcription process. PMID:26057628

  12. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  13. Intelligence: shared genetic basis between Mendelian disorders and a polygenic trait.

    PubMed

    Franić, Sanja; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Dolan, Conor V; Kattenberg, Mathijs V; Pool, René; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul A; Ehli, Erik A; Davies, Gareth E; van der Sluis, Sophie; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hansell, Narelle K; Martin, Nicholas G; Hudziak, James J; van Beijsterveldt, Catherina E M; Swagerman, Suzanne C; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; de Geus, Eco J C; Bartels, Meike; Ropers, H Hilger; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-10-01

    Multiple inquiries into the genetic etiology of human traits indicated an overlap between genes underlying monogenic disorders (eg, skeletal growth defects) and those affecting continuous variability of related quantitative traits (eg, height). Extending the idea of a shared genetic basis between a Mendelian disorder and a classic polygenic trait, we performed an association study to examine the effect of 43 genes implicated in autosomal recessive cognitive disorders on intelligence in an unselected Dutch population (N=1316). Using both single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and gene-based association testing, we detected an association between intelligence and the genes of interest, with genes ELP2, TMEM135, PRMT10, and RGS7 showing the strongest associations. This is a demonstration of the relevance of genes implicated in monogenic disorders of intelligence to normal-range intelligence, and a corroboration of the utility of employing knowledge on monogenic disorders in identifying the genetic variability underlying complex traits. PMID:25712083

  14. Identification of new pisatin demethylase genes (PDA5 and PDA7) in Nectria haematococca and non-Mendelian segregation of pisatin demethylating ability and virulence on pea due to loss of chromosomal elements.

    PubMed

    Funnell, Deanna L; Matthews, Patty S; VanEtten, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that high virulence on pea in Nectria haematococca Mating Population VI is linked to the ability to detoxify the pea phytoalexin, pisatin, via demethylation (Pda). To test this linkage further, a highly virulent Pda(+) isolate (34-18) was used as the recurrent parent in backcrosses to Pda(-) isolates, but most of the progeny were low in virulence on pea, and tetrad analysis gave conflicting ratios for the genetic control of Pda. Southern analysis of 34-18 and progeny showed that 34-18 carries a gene similar to PDA1 (PDA1-2), two new PDA genes, PDA5 and PDA7, and that all three genes can be lost during meiosis. Southern analysis of electrophoretic karyotypes showed that PDA1-2 is on a 1.5-Mb dispensable chromosome in 34-18 and that PDA5 and PDA7 are on a 4.9-Mb chromosome in 34-18 but are found on variably sized chromosomes in progeny. Loss of PDA5 or PDA7 in progeny was not generally associated with morphological phenotypes, except in progeny from some crosses between PDA5 parents. Loss of PDA5 was associated with growth abnormalities in these crosses, suggesting that in some genetic backgrounds at least a portion of the PDA5/PDA7 chromosome is essential for normal growth. All highly virulent progeny had PDA1-2 or a combination of PDA5 and PDA7 while isolates that lacked the three genes were low in virulence, supporting the hypothesis that Pda, or genes linked to PDA genes, are necessary for virulence on pea. However, low virulence isolates with PDA genes were also identified, suggesting that there are pathogenicity genes that can segregate independently of PDA genes. PMID:12409098

  15. Calculating statistical power in Mendelian randomization studies.

    PubMed

    Brion, Marie-Jo A; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Visscher, Peter M

    2013-10-01

    In Mendelian randomization (MR) studies, where genetic variants are used as proxy measures for an exposure trait of interest, obtaining adequate statistical power is frequently a concern due to the small amount of variation in a phenotypic trait that is typically explained by genetic variants. A range of power estimates based on simulations and specific parameters for two-stage least squares (2SLS) MR analyses based on continuous variables has previously been published. However there are presently no specific equations or software tools one can implement for calculating power of a given MR study. Using asymptotic theory, we show that in the case of continuous variables and a single instrument, for example a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or multiple SNP predictor, statistical power for a fixed sample size is a function of two parameters: the proportion of variation in the exposure variable explained by the genetic predictor and the true causal association between the exposure and outcome variable. We demonstrate that power for 2SLS MR can be derived using the non-centrality parameter (NCP) of the statistical test that is employed to test whether the 2SLS regression coefficient is zero. We show that the previously published power estimates from simulations can be represented theoretically using this NCP-based approach, with similar estimates observed when the simulation-based estimates are compared with our NCP-based approach. General equations for calculating statistical power for 2SLS MR using the NCP are provided in this note, and we implement the calculations in a web-based application. PMID:24159078

  16. Phosphatase regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Kozicky, Lisa K; Sly, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play critical roles in tissue homeostasis and the immune response to invading pathogens or tumor cells. A hallmark of macrophages is their "plasticity," that is, their ability to respond to cues in their local microenvironment and adapt their activation state or phenotype to mount an appropriate response. During the inflammatory response, macrophages may be required to mount a profound anti-bacterial or anti-tumor response, an anti-inflammatory response, an anti-parasitic response, or a wound healing response. To do so, macrophages express cell surface receptors for growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, as well pathogen and danger associated molecular patterns. Downstream of these cell surface receptors, cell signalling cascades are activated and deactivated by reversible and competing activities of lipid and protein kinases and phosphatases. While kinases drive the activation of cell signalling pathways critical for macrophage activation, the strength and duration of the signalling is regulated by phosphatases. Hence, gene knockout mouse models have revealed critical roles for lipid and protein phosphatases in macrophage activation. Herein, we describe our current understanding and the key roles of specific cellular phosphatases in the regulation of the quality of macrophage polarization as well as the quantity of cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:26216598

  17. Evaluation of Anti-aging Compounds Using the Promoters of Elastin and Fibrillin-1 Genes Combined with a Secreted Alkaline Phosphatase Reporter in Normal Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chien; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Kuo, Wan-Ting; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Elastic fibers are major constituents of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in dynamic tissues in the human body, and regulation of elastin and fibrillin-1 expression mediates the formation of these fibers. Traditional assays for the measurement of elastin and fibrillin-1, such as western blotting, Luna staining and immunostaining, are relatively complex and time-consuming. Thus, a relatively simple assay system that also provides rational results is urgently needed. In the study, we aimed to develop a human cell-based assay system that can be used to analyze functional compounds using the promoters of elastin (ELN) and fibrillin-1 (FBN1) genes integrated with a secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter in normal human fibroblast cells. We used this system to assess anti-aging compounds. We used several regulators of elastinogenesis, including retinol, coenzyme Q10, deoxyArbutin and Elestan(TM) (Manilkara multinervis leaf extract), to verify the efficacy of this assay system. Our results demonstrate that this assay system can be used as a fast and realistic method for identifying anti-aging components for future use in foods, cosmetics and drugs. PMID:26306747

  18. A high-frequency polymorphism in exon 6 of the CD45 tyrosine phosphatase gene (PTPRC) resulting in altered isoform expression

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Tara; Boxall, Sally; Hirai, Kouzo; Dawes, Ritu; Tonks, Susan; Yasui, Tomoyo; Kanaoka, Yasushi; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Ishiko, Osamu; Bodmer, Walter; Beverley, Peter C. L.; Tchilian, Elma Z.

    2003-01-01

    CD45 (leukocyte common) antigen is a hemopoietic cell-specific tyrosine phosphatase essential for antigen receptor-mediated signaling in lymphocytes. The molecule undergoes complex alternative splicing in the extracellular domain, and different patterns of CD45 splicing are associated with distinct functions. Lack of CD45 leads to severe combined immunodeficiency, and alterations of CD45 splicing, because of a polymorphism in exon 4, have been associated with altered immune function. Here we describe a polymorphism in exon 6 (A138G) of the gene encoding CD45 that interferes with alternative splicing. The polymorphism results in an amino acid substitution of Thr-47 to Ala in exon 6, a potential O- and N-linked glycosylation site. This exon 6 A138G variant is present at a frequency of 23.7% in the Japanese population but is absent in Caucasoids. Peripheral blood T cells from individuals carrying the A138G variant show a significant decrease in the proportion of cells expressing the A, B, and C CD45 isoforms and a high frequency of CD45R0+ cells. These phenotypic alterations in the A138G carriers may lead to changes in ligand binding, homodimerization of CD45, and altered immune responses, suggesting the involvement of natural selection in controlling the A138G carrier frequency. PMID:12716971

  19. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class ("PP2C7s") which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key evolutionary

  20. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R. Glen; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class (“PP2C7s”) which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key

  1. Lactoferrin up-regulates intestinal gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factors BDNF, UCHL1 and alkaline phosphatase activity to alleviate early weaning diarrhea in postnatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changwei; Zhu, Xi; Liu, Ni; Chen, Yue; Gan, Hexia; Troy, Frederic A; Wang, Bing

    2014-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying how dietary lactoferrin (Lf) impacts gut development and maturation and protects against early weaning diarrhea are not well understood. In this study, we supplemented postnatal piglets with an Lf at a dose level of 155 and 285 mg/kg/day from 3 to 38 days following birth. Our findings show that the high dose of Lf up-regulated messenger RNA expression levels of genes encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (ubiquitin thiolesterase (UCHL1) and, to a lesser extent, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, in the duodenum (P<.05). Piglets in the high and low Lf group had 30% and 7% larger jejunal crypts compared with the control group (P<.05). Escherichia coli 16S rRNA copy number per gram of ascending colon contents was significantly reduced (P=.001), while the copy number of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus spp. was not affected. In addition, Lf increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity (P<.05) and delayed the onset of food transitional diarrhea, reducing its frequency and duration (P<.05). The incidence of diarrhea in the high and low Lf groups was decreased 54% and 15%, respectively, compared with the control group (P=.035). In summary, these findings provide new evidence that dietary Lf supplementation up-regulated gene expression of BDNF and UCHL1, decreased the colon microbiota of E. coli, improved gut maturation and reduced early weaning diarrhea in piglets. The molecular basis underlying these findings suggests that Lf may enhance gut development and immune function by providing new insight into the gut-brain-microbe axis that has not been previously reported. PMID:24824862

  2. Regulatory subunit (CNB1 gene product) of yeast Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatases is required for adaptation to pheromone.

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, M S; Thorner, J

    1992-01-01

    By using an assay specific for detection of calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase, this enzyme was purified approximately 5,000-fold from extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cna1p and Cna2p, the products of two yeast genes encoding the catalytic (A) subunits of calcineurin, were major constituents of the purified fraction. A third prominent component of apparent molecular mass 16 kDa displayed several properties, including ability to bind 45Ca2+, that are characteristic of the regulatory (B) subunit of mammalian calcineurin and was recognized by an antiserum raised against bovine calcineurin. These antibodies were used to isolate the structural gene (CNB1) encoding this protein from a yeast expression library in the vector lambda gt11. The nucleotide sequence of CNB1 predicted a polypeptide similar in length and highly related in amino acid sequence (56% identity) to the mammalian calcineurin B subunit. Like its counterpart in higher cells, yeast Cnb1p was myristoylated at its N terminus. Mutants lacking Cnb1p, or all three calcineurin subunits (Cna1p, Cna2p, and Cnb1p), were viable. Extracts of cnb1 delta mutants contained no detectable calcineurin activity, even though Cna1p and Cna2p were present at normal levels, suggesting that the B subunit is required for full enzymatic activity in vitro. As was observed previously for MATa cna1 cna2 double mutants, MATa cnb1 mutants were defective in their ability to recover from alpha-factor-induced growth arrest. Thus, the B subunit also is required for the function of calcineurin in promoting adaptation of haploid yeast cells to pheromone in vivo. Images PMID:1321337

  3. Size and sequence polymorphism in the isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase gene (aceK) and flanking regions in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K; Wang, F S; Boyd, E F; Selander, R K

    1997-12-01

    The sequence of aceK, which codes for the regulatory catalytic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase (IDH K/P), and sequences of the 5' flanking region and part or all of the 3' flanking region were determined for 32 strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. In E. coli, the aceK gene was 1734 bp long in 13 strains, but in three strains it was 12 bp shorter and the stop codon was TAA rather than TGA. Strains with the shorter aceK lacked an open reading frame (f728) downstream between aceK and iclR that was present, in variable length, in the other strains. Among the 72 ECOR strains, the truncated aceK gene was present in all isolates of the B2 group and half of those of the D group. Other variant conditions included the presence of IS1 elements in two strains and large deletions in two strains. The aceK-aceA intergenic region varied in length from 48 to 280 bp in E. coli, depending largely on the number of repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences present. Among the ECOR strains, the number of REP elements showed a high degree of phylogenetic association, and sequencing of the region in the ECOR strains permitted partial reconstruction of its evolutionary history. In S. entica, the normal length of aceK was 1752 bp, but three other length variants, ranging from 1746 to 1785 bp, were represented in five of the 16 strains examined. The flanking intergenic regions showed relatively minor variation in length and sequence. The occurrence of several nonrandom patterns of distribution of polymorphic synonymous nucleotide sites indicated that intragenic recombination of horizontally exchanged DNA has contributed to the generation of allelic diversity at the aceK locus in both species. PMID:9409817

  4. Targeting epidermal lipids for treatment of Mendelian disorders of cornification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited ichthyoses or Mendelian disorders of cornification (MeDOC) are clinically heterogeneous disorders with high unmet therapeutic needs, which are characterized by skin hyperkeratosis and scaling. Some MeDOC types are associated with defects of the epidermal lipid metabolism, resulting in perturbed barrier permeability and subsequent epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis and inflammation. An example is the CHILD (congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform nevus and limb defects) syndrome, an X-linked dominant multisystem MeDOC caused by mutations in the NSDHL (NAD(P)H steroid dehydrogenase-like protein) gene, which is involved in the distal cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. The skin manifestations of the CHILD syndrome have been attributed to two major mechanisms: deficiency of cholesterol, probably influencing the proper corneocyte membrane formation, and toxic accumulation of aberrant steroid precursors. Methods Here we addressed the efficacy of an ointment containing cholesterol and simvastatin, an agent inhibiting endogenous cholesterol synthesis in a compassionate-use treatment of three patients with CHILD syndrome. To test the specificity of this therapeutic approach, we applied the same topical treatment to two patients with other types of MeDOC with disturbed skin lipid metabolism. Results The therapy with simvastatin and cholesterol was highly effective and well-tolerated by the CHILD syndrome patients; only lesions in the body folds represented a therapeutic challenge. No improvement was noted in the patients with other types of MeDOC. Conclusions This therapy is inexpensive and accessible to every patient with CHILD syndrome, because both simvastatin and cholesterol are available worldwide. Our data provide initial evidence of the specificity of the therapeutic effect of the simvastatin-cholesterol ointment in CHILD syndrome in comparison to other types of MeDOC. PMID:24607067

  5. The glucose-6-phosphatase system.

    PubMed Central

    van Schaftingen, Emile; Gerin, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), an enzyme found mainly in the liver and the kidneys, plays the important role of providing glucose during starvation. Unlike most phosphatases acting on water-soluble compounds, it is a membrane-bound enzyme, being associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. In 1975, W. Arion and co-workers proposed a model according to which G6Pase was thought to be a rather unspecific phosphatase, with its catalytic site oriented towards the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum [Arion, Wallin, Lange and Ballas (1975) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 6, 75--83]. Substrate would be provided to this enzyme by a translocase that is specific for glucose 6-phosphate, thereby accounting for the specificity of the phosphatase for glucose 6-phosphate in intact microsomes. Distinct transporters would allow inorganic phosphate and glucose to leave the vesicles. At variance with this substrate-transport model, other models propose that conformational changes play an important role in the properties of G6Pase. The last 10 years have witnessed important progress in our knowledge of the glucose 6-phosphate hydrolysis system. The genes encoding G6Pase and the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been cloned and shown to be mutated in glycogen storage disease type Ia and type Ib respectively. The gene encoding a G6Pase-related protein, expressed specifically in pancreatic islets, has also been cloned. Specific potent inhibitors of G6Pase and of the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been synthesized or isolated from micro-organisms. These as well as other findings support the model initially proposed by Arion. Much progress has also been made with regard to the regulation of the expression of G6Pase by insulin, glucocorticoids, cAMP and glucose. PMID:11879177

  6. Use of haplotypes to predict selection limits and Mendelian sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling terms can be calculated using haplotypes, which are sums of individual additive effects on a chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43,385 actual markers of 3,765 Jerseys using the Fortran program findhap.f90, which combines population and pedigree haploty...

  7. The Application of Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning Method for Surveillance of Non-Mendelian Inheritance in F1 Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Takamiya, Tomoko; Hosobuchi, Saeko; Noguchi, Tomotsugu; Paterson, Andrew H.; Iijima, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yasufumi; Okuizumi, Hisato

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed inheritance of DNA methylation in reciprocal F1 hybrids (subsp. japonica cv. Nipponbare × subsp. indica cv. Kasalath) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) using restriction landmark genome scanning (RLGS), and detected differing RLGS spots between the parents and reciprocal F1 hybrids. MspI/HpaII restriction sites in the DNA from these different spots were suspected to be heterozygously methylated in the Nipponbare parent. These spots segregated in F1 plants, but did not segregate in selfed progeny of Nipponbare, showing non-Mendelian inheritance of the methylation status. As a result of RT-PCR and sequencing, a specific allele of the gene nearest to the methylated sites was expressed in reciprocal F1 plants, showing evidence of biased allelic expression. These results show the applicability of RLGS for scanning of non-Mendelian inheritance of DNA methylation and biased allelic expression. PMID:20148066

  8. Systematic large-scale study of the inheritance mode of Mendelian disorders provides new insight into human diseasome

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Dapeng; Wang, Guangyu; Yin, Zuojing; Li, Chuanxing; Cui, Yan; Zhou, Meng

    2014-01-01

    One important piece of information about the human Mendelian disorders is the mode of inheritance. Recent studies of human genetic diseases on a large scale have provided many novel insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, most successful analyses ignored the mode of inheritance of diseases, which severely limits our understanding of human disease mechanisms relating to the mode of inheritance at the large scale. Therefore, we here conducted a systematic large-scale study of the inheritance mode of Mendelian disorders, to bring new insight into human diseases. Our analyses include the comparison between dominant and recessive disease genes on both genomic and proteomic characteristics, Mendelian mutations, protein network properties and disease connections on both the genetic and the population levels. We found that dominant disease genes are more functionally central, topological central and more sensitive to disease outcome. On the basis of these findings, we suggested that dominant diseases should have higher genetic heterogeneity and should have more comprehensive connections with each other compared with recessive diseases, a prediction we confirm by disease network and disease comorbidity. PMID:24448549

  9. Circulating interleukin-6 and rheumatoid arthritis: A Mendelian randomization meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Xiao, Yu; Xing, Dan; Ma, Xin-Long; Liu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6), as a pleiotropic cytokine, has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the pathogenisis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, whether this association is causal or not remains unclear, because of the multifactorial role of IL-6 and related confounding factors. We aimed to evaluate the causal relevance between circulating IL-6 levels and the risk of RA through meta-analytical Mendelian randomization approach. IL-6 gene -174G/C variant was selected as an instrument in this Mendelian randomization meta-analysis. Article identification and data collection were conducted in duplicate and independently by 2 authors. The STATA software was used for data analysis. In total, 15 and 5 articles on the association of the -174G/C variant with RA risk and circulating IL-6 level, respectively, were included. The overall analysis showed that C allelic and GC+CC genotype were significantly with 1.59-fold (95% CI: 1.19-2.14) and 1.63-fold (95% CI: 1.17-2.26) increased risk of developing RA, respectively. Asian populations showed stronger association with 4.55-fold (95% CI: 1.62-12.75), 1.84-fold (95% CI: 1.13-2.99), and 4.69-fold (95% CI: 1.68-13.14) increased RA risk in carriers of -174C allelic, CC, and GC+CC genotype, respectively. Carriers of GC+CC genotype showed significant reduction in the circulating IL-6 level compared with GG carriers (WMD = -0.77; 95% CI: -1.16 to -0.38; P = 0.000) in overall populations. Mendelian randomization presented 6% and 22% increased risk of RA with 0.1 pg/mL reduction of circulating IL-6 level in overall and Asian populations, respectively. This Mendelian randomization meta-analysis demonstrated that the long-term genetically reduced circulating IL-6 level might be causally related to a higher risk of RA, especially in Asian populations. PMID:27281095

  10. Evaluation on the effectiveness of 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase (DOGR1) gene as a selectable marker for oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) embryogenic calli transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Izawati, Abang Masli Dayang; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Ismanizan, Ismail; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    DOGR1, which encodes 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase, has been used as a selectable marker gene to produce transgenic plants. In this study, a transformation vector, pBIDOG, which contains the DOGR1 gene, was transformed into oil palm embryogenic calli (EC) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Transformed EC were exposed to 400 mg l-1 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) as the selection agent. 2-DOG resistant tissues were regenerated into whole plantlets on various regeneration media containing the same concentration of 2-DOG. The plantlets were later transferred into soil and grown in a biosafety screenhouse. PCR and subsequently Southern blot analyses were carried out to confirm the integration of the transgene in the plantlets. A transformation efficiency of about 1.0% was obtained using DOGR1 gene into the genome of oil palm. This result demonstrates the potential of using combination of DOGR1 gene and 2-DOG for regenerating transgenic oil palm. PMID:26442041

  11. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  12. Identification of Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum genes encoding signal peptides and membrane-spanning sequences using a novel alkaline phosphatase expression vector.

    PubMed

    Blanco, D R; Giladi, M; Champion, C I; Haake, D A; Chikami, G K; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1991-10-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum is a pathogenic spirochaete for which there are no systems of genetic exchange. In order to provide a system for the identification of T. pallidum surface proteins and potential virulence factors, we have developed a novel expression vector which confers the utility of TnphoA transposition. The relevant features of this plasmid vector, termed pMG, include an inducible tac promoter, a polylinker with multiple cloning sites in three reading frames, and an alkaline phosphatase (AP) gene lacking the signal sequence-encoding region. Library construction with Sau3A-digested T. pallidum genomic DNA resulted in the creation of functional T. pallidum-AP fusion proteins. Analysis of fusion proteins and their corresponding DNA and deduced amino acid sequences demonstrated that they could be grouped into three categories: (i) those with signal peptides containing leader peptidase I cleavage sites, (ii) those with signal peptides containing leader peptidase II cleavage sites, and (iii) those with non-cleavable hydrophobic membrane-spanning sequences. Triton X-114 detergent phase partitioning of individual T. pallidum-AP fusions revealed several clones whose AP activity partitioned preferentially into the hydrophobic detergent phase. Several of these fusion proteins were subsequently shown to be acylated by Escherichia coli following [3H]-palmitate labelling, indicating their lipoproteinaceous nature. DNA and amino acid sequence analysis of one acylated fusion protein, Tp75, confirmed the presence of a hydrophobic N-terminal signal sequence containing a consensus leader peptidase II recognition site. The DNA sequence of Tp75 also indicates that this is a previously unreported T. pallidum lipoprotein. T. pallidum-AP fusion proteins which partitioned into the hydrophobic detergent phase but did not incorporate palmitate were also identified. DNA and amino acid analysis of one such clone, Tp70, showed no cleavable signal but had a significant

  13. Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent phosphatase 1A is involved in regulating pregnane X receptor-mediated cytochrome p450 3A4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pondugula, Satyanarayana R; Flannery, Patrick C; Apte, Udayan; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh; Geetha, Thangiah; Rege, Shraddha D; Chen, Taosheng; Abbott, Kodye L

    2015-03-01

    Variations in the expression of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-mediated cytochrome p450 3A4 (CYP3A4) in liver can alter therapeutic response to a variety of drugs and may lead to potential adverse drug interactions. We sought to determine whether Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent phosphatase 1A (PPM1A) regulates hPXR-mediated CYP3A4 expression. PPM1A was found to be coimmunoprecipitated with hPXR. Genetic or pharmacologic activation of PPM1A led to a significant increase in hPXR transactivation of CYP3A4 promoter activity. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous PPM1A not only attenuated hPXR transactivation, but also increased proliferation of HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells, suggesting that PPM1A expression levels regulate hPXR, and that PPM1A expression is regulated in a proliferation-dependent manner. Indeed, PPM1A expression and hPXR transactivation were found to be significantly reduced in subconfluent HepG2 cells compared with confluent HepG2 cells, suggesting that both PPM1A expression and hPXR-mediated CYP3A4 expression may be downregulated in proliferating livers. Elevated PPM1A levels led to attenuation of hPXR inhibition by tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclin-dependent kinase-2, which are known to be upregulated and essential during liver regeneration. In mouse regenerating livers, similar to subconfluent HepG2 cells, expression of both PPM1A and the mouse PXR target gene cyp3a11 was found to be downregulated. Our results show that PPM1A can positively regulate PXR activity by counteracting PXR inhibitory signaling pathways that play a major role in liver regeneration. These results implicate a novel role for PPM1A in regulating hPXR-mediated CYP3A4 expression in hepatocytes and may explain a mechanism for CYP3A repression in regenerating livers. PMID:25561723

  14. A universal carrier test for the long tail of Mendelian disease.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Balaji S; Evans, Eric A; Flannick, Jason; Patterson, A Scott; Chang, Christopher C; Pham, Tuan; Young, Sharon; Kaushal, Amit; Lee, James; Jacobson, Jessica L; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2010-10-01

    Mendelian disorders are individually rare but collectively common, forming a 'long tail' of genetic disease. A single highly accurate assay for this long tail would allow the scaling up of the Jewish community's successful campaign of population screening for Tay-Sachs disease to the general population, thereby improving millions of lives, greatly benefiting minority health and saving billions of dollars. This need has been addressed by designing a universal carrier test: a non-invasive, saliva-based assay for more than 100 Mendelian diseases across all major population groups. The test has been exhaustively validated with a median of 147 positive and 525 negative samples per variant, demonstrating a multiplex assay whose performance compares favourably with the previous standard of care, namely blood-based single-gene carrier tests. Because the test represents a dramatic reduction in the cost and complexity of large-scale population screening, an end to many preventable genetic diseases is now in sight. Moreover, given that the assay is inexpensive and requires only a saliva sample, it is now increasingly feasible to make carrier testing a routine part of preconception care. PMID:20729146

  15. The canonical equation of adaptive dynamics for Mendelian diploids and haplo-diploids

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Johan A. J.; de Kovel, Carolien G. F.

    2013-01-01

    One of the powerful tools of adaptive dynamics is its so-called canonical equation (CE), a differential equation describing how the prevailing trait vector changes over evolutionary time. The derivation of the CE is based on two simplifying assumptions, separation of population dynamical and mutational time scales and small mutational steps. (It may appear that these two conditions rarely go together. However, for small step sizes the time-scale separation need not be very strict.) The CE was derived in 1996, with mathematical rigour being added in 2003. Both papers consider only well-mixed clonal populations with the simplest possible life histories. In 2008, the CE's reach was heuristically extended to locally well-mixed populations with general life histories. We, again heuristically, extend it further to Mendelian diploids and haplo-diploids. Away from strict time-scale separation the CE does an even better approximation job in the Mendelian than in the clonal case owing to gene substitutions occurring effectively in parallel, which obviates slowing down by clonal interference. PMID:24516713

  16. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing for Clinical Diagnosis of 561 Mendelian Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangdong; Guo, Xueqin; Sun, Yan; Man, Jianfen; Du, Lique; Zhu, Hui; Qu, Zelan; Tian, Ping; Mao, Bing; Yang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a cost-effective approach for rapid and accurate detection of genetic mutations in patients with suspected genetic disorders, which can facilitate effective diagnosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a capture array to mainly capture all the coding sequence (CDS) of 2,181 genes associated with 561 Mendelian diseases and conducted NGS to detect mutations. The accuracy of NGS was 99.95%, which was obtained by comparing the genotypes of selected loci between our method and SNP Array in four samples from normal human adults. We also tested the stability of the method using a sample from normal human adults. The results showed that an average of 97.79% and 96.72% of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the sample could be detected stably in a batch and different batches respectively. In addition, the method could detect various types of mutations. Some disease-causing mutations were detected in 69 clinical cases, including 62 SNVs, 14 insertions and deletions (Indels), 1 copy number variant (CNV), 1 microdeletion and 2 microduplications of chromosomes, of which 35 mutations were novel. Mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Conclusions/Significance Results of the evaluation showed that targeted NGS enabled to detect disease-causing mutations with high accuracy, stability, speed and throughput. Thus, the technology can be used for the clinical diagnosis of 561 Mendelian diseases. PMID:26274329

  17. Exome sequencing reveals pathogenic mutations in 91 strains of mice with Mendelian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fairfield, Heather; Srivastava, Anuj; Ananda, Guruprasad; Liu, Rangjiao; Kircher, Martin; Lakshminarayana, Anuradha; Harris, Belinda S.; Karst, Son Yong; Dionne, Louise A.; Kane, Coleen C.; Curtain, Michelle; Berry, Melissa L.; Ward-Bailey, Patricia F.; Greenstein, Ian; Byers, Candice; Czechanski, Anne; Sharp, Jocelyn; Palmer, Kristina; Gudis, Polyxeni; Martin, Whitney; Tadenev, Abby; Bogdanik, Laurent; Pratt, C. Herbert; Chang, Bo; Schroeder, David G.; Cox, Gregory A.; Cliften, Paul; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Burgess, Robert; Bergstrom, David E.; Donahue, Leah Rae; Hamamy, Hanan; Masri, Amira; Santoni, Federico A.; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Shendure, Jay; Reinholdt, Laura G.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneously arising mouse mutations have served as the foundation for understanding gene function for more than 100 years. We have used exome sequencing in an effort to identify the causative mutations for 172 distinct, spontaneously arising mouse models of Mendelian disorders, including a broad range of clinically relevant phenotypes. To analyze the resulting data, we developed an analytics pipeline that is optimized for mouse exome data and a variation database that allows for reproducible, user-defined data mining as well as nomination of mutation candidates through knowledge-based integration of sample and variant data. Using these new tools, putative pathogenic mutations were identified for 91 (53%) of the strains in our study. Despite the increased power offered by potentially unlimited pedigrees and controlled breeding, about half of our exome cases remained unsolved. Using a combination of manual analyses of exome alignments and whole-genome sequencing, we provide evidence that a large fraction of unsolved exome cases have underlying structural mutations. This result directly informs efforts to investigate the similar proportion of apparently Mendelian human phenotypes that are recalcitrant to exome sequencing. PMID:25917818

  18. Instrumental variables and Mendelian randomization with invalid instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyunseung

    Instrumental variables (IV) methods have been widely used to determine the causal effect of a treatment, exposure, policy, or an intervention on an outcome of interest. The IV method relies on having a valid instrument, a variable that is (A1) associated with the exposure, (A2) has no direct effect on the outcome, and (A3) is unrelated to the unmeasured confounders associated with the exposure and the outcome. However, in practice, finding a valid instrument, especially those that satisfy (A2) and (A3), can be challenging. For example, in Mendelian randomization studies where genetic markers are used as instruments, complete knowledge about instruments' validity is equivalent to complete knowledge about the involved genes' functions. The dissertation explores the theory, methods, and application of IV methods when invalid instruments are present. First, when we have multiple candidate instruments, we establish a theoretical bound whereby causal effects are only identified as long as less than 50% of instruments are invalid, without knowing which of the instruments are invalid. We also propose a fast penalized method, called sisVIVE, to estimate the causal effect. We find that sisVIVE outperforms traditional IV methods when invalid instruments are present both in simulation studies as well as in real data analysis. Second, we propose a robust confidence interval under the multiple invalid IV setting. This work is an extension of our work on sisVIVE. However, unlike sisVIVE which is robust to violations of (A2) and (A3), our confidence interval procedure provides honest coverage even if all three assumptions, (A1)-(A3), are violated. Third, we study the single IV setting where the one IV we have may actually be invalid. We propose a nonparametric IV estimation method based on full matching, a technique popular in causal inference for observational data, that leverages observed covariates to make the instrument more valid. We propose an estimator along with

  19. Clinical application of next-generation sequencing for Mendelian diseases.

    PubMed

    Jamuar, Saumya Shekhar; Tan, Ene-Choo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to an exponential increase in our understanding of the genetic basis of Mendelian diseases. NGS allows for the analysis of multiple regions of the genome in one single reaction and has been shown to be a cost-effective and efficient tool in investigating patients with Mendelian diseases. More recently, NGS has been successfully deployed in the clinics, with a reported diagnostic yield of ~25 %. However, recommendations on clinical implementation of NGS are still evolving with numerous key challenges that impede the widespread use of genetics in everyday medicine. These challenges include when to order, on whom to order, what type of test to order, and how to interpret and communicate the results, including incidental findings, to the patient and family. In this review, we discuss these challenges and suggest guidelines on implementing NGS in the routine clinical workflow. PMID:26076878

  20. Walking the interactome for candidate prioritization in exome sequencing studies of Mendelian diseases

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Damian; Köhler, Sebastian; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Amberger, Joanna; Bocchini, Carol; Hamosh, Ada; Veldboer, Julian; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Robinson, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has opened up previously unheard of possibilities for identifying novel disease genes in Mendelian disorders, only about half of which have been elucidated to date. However, interpretation of WES data remains challenging. Results: Here, we analyze protein–protein association (PPA) networks to identify candidate genes in the vicinity of genes previously implicated in a disease. The analysis, using a random-walk with restart (RWR) method, is adapted to the setting of WES by developing a composite variant-gene relevance score based on the rarity, location and predicted pathogenicity of variants and the RWR evaluation of genes harboring the variants. Benchmarking using known disease variants from 88 disease-gene families reveals that the correct gene is ranked among the top 10 candidates in ≥50% of cases, a figure which we confirmed using a prospective study of disease genes identified in 2012 and PPA data produced before that date. We implement our method in a freely available Web server, ExomeWalker, that displays a ranked list of candidates together with information on PPAs, frequency and predicted pathogenicity of the variants to allow quick and effective searches for candidates that are likely to reward closer investigation. Availability and implementation: http://compbio.charite.de/ExomeWalker Contact: peter.robinson@charite.de PMID:25078397

  1. Non-Mendelian Mutation Allowing Ureidosuccinic Acid Uptake in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lacroute, Francois

    1971-01-01

    Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of growth on a minimal medium supplemented with ureidosuccinic and glutamic acids have been isolated from a pyrimidineless strain. One of these mutants consistently yielded a non-Mendelian meiotic segregation. Moreover, the mitotic transmission of the mutation was very high. It is suggested that the mutation is nonchromosomal and could be mitochondrial. However, this mutation behaves very differently from other mitochondrial mutations. PMID:5573734

  2. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify Mendelian randomization studies that examined potential causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. To replicate the findings of identified studies, data from two large-scale, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were used: DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D and the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted for the same genetic variants (or proxy variants), which were used in the original Mendelian randomization studies. Of the 21 biomarkers (from 28 studies), ten have been reported to be causally associated with T2D in Mendelian randomization. Most biomarkers were investigated in a single cohort study or population. Of the ten biomarkers that were identified, nominally significant associations with T2D or glycaemic traits were reached for those genetic variants related to bilirubin, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, delta-6 desaturase and dimethylglycine based on the summary data from DIAGRAMv3 or MAGIC. Several Mendelian randomization studies investigated the nature of associations of biomarkers with T2D. However, there were only a few biomarkers that may have causal effects on T2D. Further research is needed to broadly evaluate the causal effects of multiple biomarkers on T2D and glycaemic traits using data from large-scale cohorts or GWAS including many different genetic variants. PMID:26446360

  3. Mutation discovery for Mendelian traits in non-laboratory animals: a review of achievements up to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Frank W; Hobbs, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Within two years of the re-discovery of Mendelism, Bateson and Saunders had described six traits in non-laboratory animals (five in chickens and one in cattle) that show single-locus (Mendelian) inheritance. In the ensuing decades, much progress was made in documenting an ever-increasing number of such traits. In 1987 came the first discovery of a causal mutation for a Mendelian trait in non-laboratory animals: a non-sense mutation in the thyroglobulin gene (TG), causing familial goitre in cattle. In the years that followed, the rate of discovery of causal mutations increased, aided mightily by the creation of genome-wide microsatellite maps in the 1990s and even more mightily by genome assemblies and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips in the 2000s. With sequencing costs decreasing rapidly, by 2012 causal mutations were being discovered in non-laboratory animals at a rate of more than one per week. By the end of 2012, the total number of Mendelian traits in non-laboratory animals with known causal mutations had reached 499, which was half the number of published single-locus (Mendelian) traits in those species. The distribution of types of mutations documented in non-laboratory animals is fairly similar to that in humans, with almost half being missense or non-sense mutations. The ratio of missense to non-sense mutations in non-laboratory animals to the end of 2012 was 193:78. The fraction of non-sense mutations (78/271 = 0.29) was not very different from the fraction of non-stop codons that are just one base substitution away from a stop codon (21/61 = 0.34). PMID:24372556

  4. Genetic basis of common diseases: the general theory of Mendelian recessive genetics.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Michael; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Lebedev, Sergey; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Common diseases tend to appear sporadically, i.e., they appear in an individual who has no first or second degree relatives with the disease. Yet diseases are often associated with a slight but definite increase in risk to the children of an affected individual. This weak pattern of inheritability cannot be explained by conventional interpretations of Mendelian genetics, and it is therefore commonly held that there is "incomplete penetrance" of a gene, or that there are polygenic, or multifactorial modes of inheritance. However, such arguments are heuristic and lack predictive power. Here, we explore the possibility that "incomplete penetrance" means the existence of a second, disease-related, gene. By examining in detail a specific common condition, Parkinson's disease (PD), we show that the sporadic form of the disease can be fully explained by a compact fully penetrant genotype involving an interaction between two, and only two, genes. In this model, therefore PD is fundamentally genetic. Our digenic model is complementary to Mendelian recessive genetics, but taken together with the latter forms a complete description for recessive genetics on one chromosome. It explains the slight increase in risk to the children if one parent has sporadic PD, and makes strict predictions where both parents coincidentally have sporadic PD. These predictions were verified in two large and carefully selected kindred, where the data also argue against other genetic models, including oligogenic and polygenic schemes. Since the inheritance patterns of sporadic PD are reminiscent of what is seen in many common diseases, it is plausible that similar genetic forms could apply to other diseases. Seen in this light, diseases wash in and out of every family, so that in a sense, over time every human family is equally at risk for most diseases. PMID:15922101

  5. A testis-specific gene, TPTE, encodes a putative transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase and maps to the pericentromeric region of human chromosomes 21 and 13, and to chromosomes 15, 22, and Y.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Rossier, C; Morris, M A; Scott, H S; Gos, A; Bairoch, A; Antonarakis, S E

    1999-11-01

    To contribute to the creation of a transcription map of human chromosome 21 (HC21) and to the identification of genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, exon trapping was performed from HC21-specific cosmids covering the entire chromosome. More than 700 exons have been identified to date. One such exon, hmc01a06, maps to YAC 831B6 which contains marker D21Z1 (alphoid repeats) and had previously been localized to the pericentromeric region of HC21. Northern-blot analysis revealed a 2.5-kb mRNA species strongly and exclusively expressed in the testis. We cloned the corresponding full-length cDNA, which encodes a predicted polypeptide of 551 amino acids with at least two potential transmembrane domains and a tyrosine phosphatase motif. The cDNA has sequence homology to chicken tensin, bovine auxilin and rat cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK). The entire polypeptide sequence also has significant homology to tumor suppressor PTEN/MMAC1 protein. We termed this novel gene/protein TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology). Polymerase chain reaction amplification, fluorescent in situ hybridization, Southern-blot and sequence analysis using monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids showed that this gene has highly homologous copies on HC13, 15, 22, and Y, in addition to its HC21 copy or copies. The estimated minimum number of copies of the TPTE gene in the haploid human genome is 7 in male and 6 in female. Zoo-blot analysis showed that TPTE is conserved between humans and other species. The biological function of the TPTE gene is presently unknown; however, its expression pattern, sequence homologies, and the presence of a potential tyrosine phosphatase domain suggest that it may be involved in signal transduction pathways of the endocrine or spermatogenetic function of the testis. It is also unknown whether all copies of TPTE are functional or whether some are pseudogenes. TPTE is, to our knowledge, the gene located closest to the human

  6. Association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and incident type 2 diabetes: a mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Sharp, Stephen J; Burgess, Stephen; Scott, Robert A; Imamura, Fumiaki; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Forouhi, Nita G

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Low circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), a marker of vitamin D status, are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but whether this association is causal remains unclear. We aimed to estimate the unconfounded, causal association between 25(OH)D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes using a mendelian randomisation approach. Methods Using several data sources from populations of European descent, including type 2 diabetes cases and non-cases, we did a mendelian randomisation analysis using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within or near four genes related to 25(OH)D synthesis and metabolism: DHCR7 (related to vitamin D synthesis), CYP2R1 (hepatic 25-hydroxylation), DBP (also known as GC; transport), and CYP24A1 (catabolism). We assessed each SNP for an association with circulating 25(OH)D concentration (5449 non-cases; two studies), risk of type 2 diabetes (28 144 cases, 76 344 non-cases; five studies), and glycaemic traits (concentrations of fasting glucose, 2-h glucose, fasting insulin, and HbA1c; 46 368 non-cases; study consortium). We combined these associations in a likelihood-based mendelian randomisation analysis to estimate the causal association of 25(OH)D concentration with type 2 diabetes and the glycaemic traits, and compared them with that from a meta-analysis of data from observational studies (8492 cases, 89 698 non-cases; 22 studies) that assessed the association between 25(OH)D concentration and type 2 diabetes. Findings All four SNPs were associated with 25(OH)D concentrations (p<10−6). The mendelian randomisation-derived unconfounded odds ratio for type 2 diabetes was 1·01 (95% CI 0·75–1·36; p=0·94) per 25·0 nmol/L (1 SD) lower 25(OH)D concentration. The corresponding (potentially confounded) relative risk from the meta-analysis of data from observational studies was 1·21 (1·16–1·27; p=7·3 × 10−19). The mendelian randomisation-derived estimates for

  7. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato. PMID:27540389

  8. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato. PMID:27540389

  9. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, “bacterial-like” enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the “eukaryotic-like” phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research. PMID:24675170

  10. Gene expression in mental illness: a navigation chart to future progress.

    PubMed

    Matthysse, S; Levy, D L; Kinney, D; Deutsch, C; Lajonchere, C; Yurgelun-Todd, D; Woods, B; Holzman, P S

    1992-10-01

    An initial course in disentangling complex causal interactions in psychiatric illnesses, we suggest, is finding co-familial traits with classical Mendelian segregation. Starting with non-Mendelian traits, three methods can be used to find underlying Mendelian phenotypes. (1) Statistically-inferred latent traits, with more nearly Mendelian transmission than the measures from which they are derived, can serve as pointers to concrete Mendelian phenotypes. (2) Linkage of non-Mendelian traits to genetic markers, if it can be established, can be followed by searching for phenotypes that discriminate carriers from non-carriers of the imputed trait gene. (3) In the long run, the most successful method is likely to be direct refinement of non-Mendelian behavioral and physiological traits into more fundamental components. PMID:1491362

  11. A new oxygen-regulated operon in Escherichia coli comprises the genes for a putative third cytochrome oxidase and for pH 2.5 acid phosphatase (appA)

    PubMed

    Dassa, J; Fsihi, H; Marck, C; Dion, M; Kieffer-Bontemps, M; Boquet, P L

    1991-10-01

    The Escherichia coli acid phosphatase gene appA is expressed in response to oxygen deprivation and is positively controlled by the product of appR (katF) which encodes a putative new sigma transcription-initiation factor. However, transcription of appA from its nearest promoter (P1) did not account for total pH 2.5 acid phosphatase expression and was not subject to regulation. The cloned region upstream of appA was extended and analyzed by insertions of transposon TnphoA and by fusions with lacZ. It contains two new genes, appC and appB, which both encode extracytoplasmic proteins. appC and appB are expressed from a promoter (P2) lying just upstream of appC. Both genes are regulated by oxygen, as is appA, and by appR gene product exactly as previously shown for appA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence and of the origins of transcription have confirmed that the P2-appC-appB- (ORFX)-P1-appA region is organized on the chromosome as an operon transcribed clockwise from P2 and that P1 is a minor promoter for appA alone. Genes appC and appB encode proteins of Mr 58,133 and 42,377, respectively, which have the characteristics of integral membrane proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of appC and appB show 60% and 57% homology, respectively, with subunits I and II of the E. coli cytochrome d oxidase (encoded by genes cydA and cydB). The notion that the AppC and AppB proteins constitute a new cytochrome oxidase or a new oxygen-detoxifying system is supported by the observation of enhanced sensitivity to oxygen of mutants lacking all three genes, cyo (cytochrome o oxidase), cyd (cytochrome d oxidase) and appB, compared to that of cyo cyd double mutants. PMID:1658595

  12. Alcohol intake and cardiovascular risk factors: A Mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoonsu; Shin, So-Youn; Won, Sungho; Relton, Caroline L; Davey Smith, George; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Mendelian randomisation studies from Asia suggest detrimental influences of alcohol on cardiovascular risk factors, but such associations are observed mainly in men. The absence of associations of genetic variants (e.g. rs671 in ALDH2) with such risk factors in women – who drank little in these populations – provides evidence that the observations are not due to genetic pleiotropy. Here, we present a Mendelian randomisation study in a South Korean population (3,365 men and 3,787 women) that 1) provides robust evidence that alcohol consumption adversely affects several cardiovascular disease risk factors, including blood pressure, waist to hip ratio, fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels. Alcohol also increases HDL cholesterol and lowers LDL cholesterol. Our study also 2) replicates sex differences in associations which suggests pleiotropy does not underlie the associations, 3) provides further evidence that association is not due to pleiotropy by showing null effects in male non-drinkers, and 4) illustrates a way to measure population-level association where alcohol intake is stratified by sex. In conclusion, population-level instrumental variable estimation (utilizing interaction of rs671 in ALDH2 and sex as an instrument) strengthens causal inference regarding the largely adverse influence of alcohol intake on cardiovascular health in an Asian population. PMID:26687910

  13. Genomics and medicine: an anticipation. From Boolean Mendelian genetics to multifactorial molecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J C; Junien, C

    2000-12-01

    The major impact of the completion of the human genome sequence will be the understanding of diseases, with deduced therapy. In the field of genetic disorders, we will complete the catalogue of monogenic diseases, also called Mendelian diseases because they obey the Boolean logic of Mendel's laws. The major challenge now is to decipher the polygenic and multifactorial etiology of common diseases, such as cancer, cardio-vascular, nutritional, allergic, auto-immune and degenerative diseases. In fact, every gene, when mutated, is a potential disease gene, and we end up with the new concept of 'reverse medicine'; i.e., deriving new diseases or pathogenic pathways from the knowledge of the structure and function of every gene. By going from sequence to function (functional genomics and proteomics) we will gain insight into basic mechanisms of major functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and development, which are perturbed in many pathological processes. By learning the meaning of some non-coding and of regulatory sequences our understanding will gain in complexity, generating a molecular and supramolecular integrated physiology, helping to build a molecular patho-physiology of the different syndromes. Besides those cognitive advances, there are also other issues at stake, such as: progress in diagnostic and prediction (predictive medicine); progress in therapy (pharmacogenomics and gene-based therapy); ethical issues; impact on business. PMID:11147103

  14. Rare Mendelian Primary Immunodeficiency diseases associated to impaired NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paciolla, Mariateresa; Pescatore, Alessandra; Conte, Matilde Immacolata; Esposito, Elio; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Lioi, Maria Brigida; Fusco, Francesca; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mendelian Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (MPIDs) are rare disorders affecting distinct constituents of the innate and adaptive immune system. Although they are genetically heterogeneous a substantial group of MPIDs is due to mutations in genes affecting the NF-κB transcription pathway, essential for cell proliferation, cell survival, and involved in innate immunity and in inflammation. Many of these genes encode for crucial regulatory components of NF-κB pathway and their mutations are associated with immunological and developmental signs somehow overlapping in patients with MPIDs. At present nine different MPIDs listed in the OMIM are caused by mutations in at least nine different genes strictly involved in the NF-κB pathway that result in defects in immune responses. We will report here on the distinct function of each causative gene, on the impaired NF-κB step and more in general on the molecular mechanisms underlining the pathogenesis of the disease. Overall, the MPIDs affecting NF-κB signalosome require a careful integrated diagnosis and appropriate genetic tests to be molecularly identified. Their discovery at an ever-increasing rate will help to establish common therapeutic strategy for a subclass of immunodeficient patients. PMID:25764117

  15. Improved Student Linkage of Mendelian and Molecular Genetic Concepts through a Yeast-Based Laboratory Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolyniak, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A study of modern genetics requires students to successfully unite the principles of Mendelian genetics with the functions of DNA. Traditional means of teaching genetics are often successful in teaching Mendelian and molecular ideas but not in allowing students to see how the two subjects relate. The laboratory module presented here attempts to…

  16. Evaluation on the effectiveness of 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase (DOG(R)1) gene as a selectable marker for oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) embryogenic calli transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Izawati, Abang Masli Dayang; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Ismanizan, Ismail; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    DOG(R)1, which encodes 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase, has been used as a selectable marker gene to produce transgenic plants. In this study, a transformation vector, pBIDOG, which contains the DOG(R)1 gene, was transformed into oil palm embryogenic calli (EC) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Transformed EC were exposed to 400 mg l(-1) 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) as the selection agent. 2-DOG resistant tissues were regenerated into whole plantlets on various regeneration media containing the same concentration of 2-DOG. The plantlets were later transferred into soil and grown in a biosafety screenhouse. PCR and subsequently Southern blot analyses were carried out to confirm the integration of the transgene in the plantlets. A transformation efficiency of about 1.0% was obtained using DOG(R)1 gene into the genome of oil palm. This result demonstrates the potential of using combination of DOG(R)1 gene and 2-DOG for regenerating transgenic oil palm. PMID:26442041

  17. Identification and characterization of an essential family of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (INP51, INP52 and INP53 gene products) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, L E; Huynh, C V; Thorner, J; York, J D

    1998-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae INP51 locus (YIL002c) encodes an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase. Here we describe two related yeast loci, INP52 (YNL106c) and INP53 (YOR109w). Like Inp51p, the primary structures of Inp52p and Inp53p resemble the mammalian synaptic vesicle-associated protein, synaptojanin, and contain a carboxy-terminal catalytic domain and an amino-terminal SAC1-like segment. Inp51p (108 kD), Inp52p (136 kD) and Inp53p (124 kD) are membrane-associated. Single null mutants (inp51, inp52, or inp53) are viable. Both inp51 inp52 and inp52 inp53 double mutants display compromised cell growth, whereas an inp51 inp53 double mutant does not. An inp51 inp52 inp53 triple mutant is inviable on standard medium, but can grow weakly on media supplemented with an osmotic stabilizer (1 M sorbitol). An inp51 mutation, and to a lesser degree an inp52 mutation, confers cold-resistant growth in a strain background that cannot grow at temperatures below 15 degrees. Analysis of inositol metabolites in vivo showed measurable accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in the inp51 mutant. Electron microscopy revealed plasma membrane invaginations and cell wall thickening in double mutants and the triple mutant grown in sorbitol-containing medium. A fluorescent dye that detects endocytic and vacuolar membranes suggests that the vacuole is highly fragmented in inp51 inp52 double mutants. Our observations indicate that Inp51p, Inp52p, and Inp53p have distinct functions and that substrates and/or products of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases may have roles in vesicle trafficking, membrane structure, and/or cell wall formation. PMID:9560389

  18. Homozygous mutation in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha phosphatase gene, PPP1R15B, is associated with severe microcephaly, short stature and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Kernohan, Kristin D.; Tétreault, Martine; Liwak-Muir, Urszula; Geraghty, Michael T.; Qin, Wen; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Davila, Jorge; Holcik, Martin; Majewski, Jacek; Richer, Julie; Boycott, Kym M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is an essential cellular process initiated by the association of a methionyl–tRNA with the translation initiation factor eIF2. The Met-tRNA/eIF2 complex then associates with the small ribosomal subunit, other translation factors and mRNA, which together comprise the translational initiation complex. This process is regulated by the phosphorylation status of the α subunit of eIF2 (eIF2α); phosphorylated eIF2α attenuates protein translation. Here, we report a consanguineous family with severe microcephaly, short stature, hypoplastic brainstem and cord, delayed myelination and intellectual disability in two siblings. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation, c.1972G>A; p.Arg658Cys, in protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 15b (PPP1R15B), a protein which functions with the PPP1C phosphatase to maintain dephosphorylated eIF2α in unstressed cells. The p.R658C PPP1R15B mutation is located within the PPP1C binding site. We show that patient cells have greatly diminished levels of PPP1R15B–PPP1C interaction, which results in increased eIF2α phosphorylation and resistance to cellular stress. Finally, we find that patient cells have elevated levels of PPP1R15B mRNA and protein, suggesting activation of a compensatory program aimed at restoring cellular homeostasis which is ineffective due to PPP1R15B alteration. PPP1R15B now joins the expanding list of translation-associated proteins which when mutated cause rare genetic diseases. PMID:26307080

  19. Mendelian diseases and conditions in Croatian island populations: historic records and new insights.

    PubMed

    Saftić, Vanja; Rudan, Diana; Zgaga, Lina

    2006-08-01

    Among Croatian islands, there are several which are known for unusual autochthonous diseases and specific medical conditions that result from the reproductive isolation and specific population genetic structure. These populations are characterized by high degree of genetic isolation, consanguinity, and inbreeding. The reported diseases include Mal de Meleda on Mljet island, hereditary dwarfism on Krk island, familial learning disability on Susak island, familial ovarian cancer on Lastovo island, and several other rare diseases and conditions inherited in Mendelian fashion. We present a historical perspective on how these conditions were first described, interpreted, and assessed. We reviewed the information obtained through genetic research in the past several years, when the genetic etiology of some of these conditions was explained. The disease gene causing Mal de Meleda was first localized at 8q chromosome, and mutations in the ARS (component B) gene encoding SLURP-1 (secreted mammalian Ly-6/uPAR-related protein 1) protein were identified subsequently. The genetic etiology of dwarfism on the island of Krk is explained by a mutation in the PROP1 gene, responsible for the short stature. The search for mutations underlying other monogenic diseases in Croatian islands is under way. PMID:16909451

  20. A Bayesian Method for Simultaneously Detecting Mendelian and Imprinted Quantitative Trait Loci in Experimental Crosses of Outbred Species

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Awata, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is interpreted as a phenomenon, in which some genes inherited from one parent are not completely expressed due to modification of the genome caused during gametogenesis. Subsequently, the expression level of an allele at the imprinted gene is changed dependent on the parental origin, which is referred to as the parent-of-origin effect. In livestock, some QTL for reproductive performance and meat productivity have been reported to be imprinted. So far, methods detecting imprinted QTL have been proposed on the basis of interval mapping, where only a single QTL was tested at a time. In this study, we developed a Bayesian method for simultaneously mapping multiple QTL, allowing the inference about expression modes of QTL in an outbred F2 family. The inference about whether a QTL is Mendelian or imprinted was made using Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation by comparing the goodness-of-fits between models, assuming the presence and the absence of parent-of-origin effect at a QTL. We showed by the analyses of simulated data sets that the Bayesian method can effectively detect both Mendelian QTL and imprinted QTL. PMID:18202392

  1. Selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 displays recessive Mendelian inheritance: Assignment of a locus to chromosome 10 by linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Aminoff, M.; Tahvanainen, E.; Chapelle, A. de la

    1995-10-01

    Juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 has been considered a distinct condition displaying autosomal recessive inheritance. It appears to have a worldwide distribution, and comparatively high incidences were reported 30 years ago in Finland and Norway. More recently, the Mendelian inheritance of the condition has been questioned because almost no new cases have occurred in these populations. Here we report linkage studies assigning a recessive-gene locus for the disease to chromosome 10 in previously diagnosed multiplex families from Finland and Norway, proving the Mendelian mode of inheritance. The locus is tentatively assigned to the 6-cM interval between markers D10S548 and D10S466, with a multipoint maximum lod score (Z{sub max}) of 5.36 near marker D10S1477. By haplotype analysis, the healthy sibs in these families did not appear to constitute any examples of nonpenetrance. We hypothesize that the paucity of new cases in these populations is due either to a dietary effect on the gene penetrance that has changed with time, or to a drop in the birth rate in subpopulations showing enrichment of the mutation, or to both of these causes. 38 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  3. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  4. Increase in dual specificity phosphatase 1, TGF-beta stimulated gene 22, domain family protein 3 and Luc7 homolog (S. cerevisiae)-like messenger RNA after mechanical asphyxiation in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Tsuda, Ryouichi; Nakasono, Ichiro

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the transcriptome profile of mechanical asphyxia and decapitation at 60 min after death using serial analysis of gene expression. After comparing the results, 11 genes were significantly increased by the mechanical asphyxia treatment in the mouse lung. Of those genes, quantitative real-time PCR revealed that dual specificity phosphatase 1 (Dusp1), TGF-beta stimulated gene 22, domain family protein 3 (TSC22d3) and Luc7 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)-like (Luc7l) after asphyxia were more significantly increased than those after decapitation. Dusp1 inactivated mitogen activated protein kinase, which functions in cell proliferation. However, the consumption of oxygen had a disadvantageous effect on survival, because tissue or cells were not able to produce energy by internal respiration under the suddenly hypoxic condition following asphyxia. The increased transcripts of Dusp1 following asphyxia suppressed oxygen consumption. TSC22d3 was isolated as a TGF-beta-inducible gene and it is also identified as a glucocorticoid (GC)-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). GC was released from the adrenal gland via HPA axis under the hypoxic condition. Especially in acute suffocation, GC rapidly increased. Therefore, the increase in TSC22d3 may be induced by the increased GC following asphyxia. We were unable to clarify the Luc7l increase, because there are no reports in relation to asphyxia. In addition, GILZ mediates the antiproliferative activity of glucocorticoids. We thought that the increasing TSC22d3 may lead to the suppression of oxygen consumption to avoid wasting energy, as in proliferation, the same as the increase in Dusp1. Our data indicated that the determination of the protein product level in the lung could help in diagnosing asphyxia. In addition, these data may contribute to revealing the patho-physiology of asphyxia and to help diagnose asphyxia, including hanging. PMID:19364672

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B gene PTPN1: selection of tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and association with body fat, insulin sensitivity, and the metabolic syndrome in a normal female population.

    PubMed

    Spencer-Jones, Nicola J; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Carter, Nicholas D; O'Dell, Sandra D

    2005-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B negatively regulates leptin and insulin signaling, potentially contributing to hormonal resistance. We selected six tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing 18 common variants in the protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B gene (PTPN1) and tested their effect on serum leptin, body fat, and measures of insulin sensitivity and the metabolic syndrome in a large sample of normal female Caucasian twins (n = 2,777; mean age, 47.4 +/- 12.5 years) from the St. Thomas' U.K. Adult Twin Registry. SNP rs718049 was significantly associated with waist circumference (P = 0.008) and central fat (P = 0.035) and also with Avignon's insulin sensitivity index (SiM) (P = 0.007), fasting insulin (P = 0.004), fasting glucose (P = 0.022), triglyceride (P = 0.023), and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.046). SNPs rs2282146 and rs1885177 were associated with SiM (P = 0.049 and P = 0.013, respectively), and 1484insG was associated with triglyceride (P = 0.029). A risk haplotype (7.3%) was associated with lower SiM (P = 0.036) and a protective haplotype (5.2%) with higher SiM (P = 0.057), with mean values in homozygotes differing by >1 SD (P = 0.003). The protective haplotype also showed lower triglyceride (P = 0.045) and lower systolic blood pressure (P = 0.006). Fine mapping analyses predicted significant associations with SiM and fasting insulin for several ungenotyped SNPs. PTPN1 variants appear to contribute to central fat and metabolic syndrome traits, secondary to their effect on insulin sensitivity. PMID:16249458

  6. Mendelian Randomisation study of the influence of eGFR on coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Charoen, Pimphen; Nitsch, Dorothea; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; White, Jonathan; Zabaneh, Delilah; Jefferis, Barbara; Wannamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Mulick Cassidy, Amy; Gaunt, Tom; Day, Ian; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Brunner, Eric; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hingorani, Aroon; Whittaker, John; Pablo Casas, Juan; Dudbridge, Frank; Dale, Caroline; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Ong, Ken; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Sofat, Reecha; Schmidt, Floriaan; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Morris, Richard; Plagno, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Impaired kidney function, as measured by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), has been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in observational studies, but it is unclear whether this association is causal or the result of confounding or reverse causation. In this study we applied Mendelian randomisation analysis using 17 genetic variants previously associated with eGFR to investigate the causal role of kidney function on CHD. We used 13,145 participants from the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium and 194,427 participants from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis plus Coronary Artery Disease (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D) consortium. We observed significant association of an unweighted gene score with CHD risk (odds ratio = 0.983 per additional eGFR-increasing allele, 95% CI = 0.970–0.996, p = 0.008). However, using weights calculated from UCLEB, the gene score was not associated with disease risk (p = 0.11). These conflicting results could be explained by a single SNP, rs653178, which was not associated with eGFR in the UCLEB sample, but has known pleiotropic effects that prevent us from drawing a causal conclusion. The observational association between low eGFR and increased CHD risk was not explained by potential confounders, and there was no evidence of reverse causation, therefore leaving the remaining unexplained association as an open question. PMID:27338949

  7. Mendelian Randomisation study of the influence of eGFR on coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Charoen, Pimphen; Nitsch, Dorothea; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; White, Jonathan; Zabaneh, Delilah; Jefferis, Barbara; Wannamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Mulick Cassidy, Amy; Gaunt, Tom; Day, Ian; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Brunner, Eric; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hingorani, Aroon; Whittaker, John; Pablo Casas, Juan; Dudbridge, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Impaired kidney function, as measured by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), has been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in observational studies, but it is unclear whether this association is causal or the result of confounding or reverse causation. In this study we applied Mendelian randomisation analysis using 17 genetic variants previously associated with eGFR to investigate the causal role of kidney function on CHD. We used 13,145 participants from the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium and 194,427 participants from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis plus Coronary Artery Disease (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D) consortium. We observed significant association of an unweighted gene score with CHD risk (odds ratio = 0.983 per additional eGFR-increasing allele, 95% CI = 0.970-0.996, p = 0.008). However, using weights calculated from UCLEB, the gene score was not associated with disease risk (p = 0.11). These conflicting results could be explained by a single SNP, rs653178, which was not associated with eGFR in the UCLEB sample, but has known pleiotropic effects that prevent us from drawing a causal conclusion. The observational association between low eGFR and increased CHD risk was not explained by potential confounders, and there was no evidence of reverse causation, therefore leaving the remaining unexplained association as an open question. PMID:27338949

  8. The restructuring and future of {open_quotes}Mendelian Inheritance in Man{close_quotes} (MIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, P.L.; Francomano, C.; Antonarakis, S.

    1994-09-01

    Victor McKusick`s catalog {open_quotes}Mendelian Inheritance in Man{close_quotes} represents the most comprehensive compendum of human genetic disease information available today and has appeared as a series in book form for the last 30 years. The 11th edition will contain almost 7000 entries: approximately 2800 descriptions of human genetic disorders, 700 combined disorder/gene descriptions and 3500 pure gene descriptions. Until recently the content of the catalogs was maintained solely by McKusick with a support staff. However, a distributed editing system has now been established with the following primary components. New entries are initiated in Baltimore by science writers under the guidance of the senior editors and McKusick, following which the information is made immediately available to the public through online access. The subject editors can then review and edit the new or modified information without impeding the timeliness of entering new information. Entries are being reconstructured so that clinical disorder and gene information is divided into separate entries which will better represent the frequently complex relationship of gene mutations to individual clinical disorders in the data files. Further, each entry is being subdivided into logical topics which will enhance the power of electronic searching, making links between topics and improving readability. The old division of entries into autosomal dominant and recessive, etc., is being abandoned in favor of clinical disorder (phenotypes) and gene catalogs. The information is maintained in an SGML format which facilitates the production of many different types of output varying from the traditional book form to CD ROMs and various online formats including IRx, WAIS, Gopher and World Wide Web. This latter offers the exciting possibility of making hypertext links between entries and other data resources, including photographic, sound and video clips as part of the total MIM information.

  9. Exploring causal associations of alcohol with cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in a Chinese population using Mendelian randomization analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Amy E; Lu, Feng; Carslake, David; Hu, Zhibin; Qian, Yun; Liu, Sijun; Chen, Jiaping; Shen, Hongbing; Smith, George Davey

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may be protective for cardiovascular disease, but results may be biased by confounding and reverse causality. Mendelian randomization, which uses genetic variants as proxies for exposures, can minimise these biases and therefore strengthen causal inference. Using a genetic variant in the ALDH2 gene associated with alcohol consumption, rs671, we performed a Mendelian randomization analysis in 1,712 diabetes cases and 2,076 controls from Nantong, China. Analyses were performed using linear and logistic regression, stratified by sex and diabetes status. The A allele of rs671 was strongly associated with reduced odds of being an alcohol drinker in all groups, but prevalence of alcohol consumption amongst females was very low. The A allele was associated with reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure and decreased total and HDL cholesterol in males. The A allele was also associated with decreased triglyceride levels, but only robustly in diabetic males. There was no strong evidence for associations between rs671 and any outcomes in females. Our results suggest that associations of alcohol consumption with blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol are causal. Alcohol also appeared to have adverse effects on triglyceride levels, although this may be restricted to diabetics. PMID:26364564

  10. Exploring causal associations of alcohol with cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in a Chinese population using Mendelian randomization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Amy E.; Lu, Feng; Carslake, David; Hu, Zhibin; Qian, Yun; Liu, Sijun; Chen, Jiaping; Shen, Hongbing; Smith, George Davey

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may be protective for cardiovascular disease, but results may be biased by confounding and reverse causality. Mendelian randomization, which uses genetic variants as proxies for exposures, can minimise these biases and therefore strengthen causal inference. Using a genetic variant in the ALDH2 gene associated with alcohol consumption, rs671, we performed a Mendelian randomization analysis in 1,712 diabetes cases and 2,076 controls from Nantong, China. Analyses were performed using linear and logistic regression, stratified by sex and diabetes status. The A allele of rs671 was strongly associated with reduced odds of being an alcohol drinker in all groups, but prevalence of alcohol consumption amongst females was very low. The A allele was associated with reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure and decreased total and HDL cholesterol in males. The A allele was also associated with decreased triglyceride levels, but only robustly in diabetic males. There was no strong evidence for associations between rs671 and any outcomes in females. Our results suggest that associations of alcohol consumption with blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol are causal. Alcohol also appeared to have adverse effects on triglyceride levels, although this may be restricted to diabetics. PMID:26364564

  11. Resolution of quantitative traits into Mendelian factors by using a complete linkage map of restriction fragment length polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A H; Lander, E S; Hewitt, J D; Peterson, S; Lincoln, S E; Tanksley, S D

    1988-10-20

    The conflict between the Mendelian theory of particulate inheritance and the observation of continuous variation for most traits in nature was resolved in the early 1900s by the concept that quantitative traits can result from segregation of multiple genes, modified by environmental effects. Although pioneering experiments showed that linkage could occasionally be detected to such quantitative trait loci (QTLs), accurate and systematic mapping of QTLs has not been possible because the inheritance of an entire genome could not be studied with genetic markers. The use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) has made such investigations possible, at least in principle. Here, we report the first use of a complete RFLP linkage map to resolve quantitative traits into discrete Mendelian factors, in an interspecific back-cross of tomato. Applying new analytical methods, we mapped at least six QTLs controlling fruit mass, four QTLs for the concentration of soluble solids and five QTLs for fruit pH. This approach is broadly applicable to the genetic dissection of quantitative inheritance of physiological, morphological and behavioural traits in any higher plant or animal. PMID:2902517

  12. A Whole-Genome Analysis Framework for Effective Identification of Pathogenic Regulatory Variants in Mendelian Disease.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Damian; Schubach, Max; Jacobsen, Julius O B; Köhler, Sebastian; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Spielmann, Malte; Jäger, Marten; Hochheiser, Harry; Washington, Nicole L; McMurry, Julie A; Haendel, Melissa A; Mungall, Christopher J; Lewis, Suzanna E; Groza, Tudor; Valentini, Giorgio; Robinson, Peter N

    2016-09-01

    The interpretation of non-coding variants still constitutes a major challenge in the application of whole-genome sequencing in Mendelian disease, especially for single-nucleotide and other small non-coding variants. Here we present Genomiser, an analysis framework that is able not only to score the relevance of variation in the non-coding genome, but also to associate regulatory variants to specific Mendelian diseases. Genomiser scores variants through either existing methods such as CADD or a bespoke machine learning method and combines these with allele frequency, regulatory sequences, chromosomal topological domains, and phenotypic relevance to discover variants associated to specific Mendelian disorders. Overall, Genomiser is able to identify causal regulatory variants as the top candidate in 77% of simulated whole genomes, allowing effective detection and discovery of regulatory variants in Mendelian disease. PMID:27569544

  13. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  14. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Davey Smith, George; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established associations with HDL-C, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). For each trait, we constructed two scores. The first was unrestricted, including all independent SNPs associated with the lipid trait identified from a prior meta-analysis (threshold P < 2 × 10−6); and the second a restricted score, filtered to remove any SNPs also associated with either of the other two lipid traits at P ≤ 0.01. Mendelian randomization meta-analyses were conducted in 17 studies including 62,199 participants and 12,099 CHD events. Both the unrestricted and restricted allele scores for LDL-C (42 and 19 SNPs, respectively) associated with CHD. For HDL-C, the unrestricted allele score (48 SNPs) was associated with CHD (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.70), per 1 mmol/L higher HDL-C, but neither the restricted allele score (19 SNPs; OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.98) nor the unrestricted HDL-C allele score adjusted for triglycerides, LDL-C, or statin use (OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.46) showed a robust association. For triglycerides, the unrestricted allele score (67 SNPs) and the restricted allele score (27 SNPs) were both associated with CHD (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.11 and 1.61; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.59, respectively) per 1-log unit increment. However, the unrestricted triglyceride score adjusted for HDL-C, LDL-C, and statin use gave an OR for CHD of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.75). Conclusion The genetic findings support a causal effect of triglycerides on CHD risk, but a causal role for HDL-C, though possible, remains less certain. PMID:24474739

  15. The five glucose-6-phosphatase paralogous genes are differentially regulated by insulin alone or combined with high level of amino acids and/or glucose in trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucie, Marandel; Weiwei, Dai; Stéphane, Panserat; Sandrine, Skiba-Cassy

    2016-04-01

    A recent analysis of the newly sequenced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome suggested that duplicated gluconeogenic g6pc paralogues, fixed in this genome after the salmonid-specific 4th whole genome duplication, may have a role in the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in this carnivorous species. This should be due to the sub- or neo-functionalization of their regulation. In the present short communication we thus addressed the question of the regulation of these genes by insulin, hormone involved in the glucose homeostasis, and its interaction with glucose and amino acids in vitro. The stimulation of trout hepatocytes with insulin revealed an atypical up-regulation of g6pcb2 ohnologues and confirmed the sub- or neo-functionalization of the five g6pc genes at least at the regulatory level. Intriguingly, when hepatocytes were cultured with high levels of glucose and/or AAs in presence of insulin, most of the g6pc paralogues were up-regulated. It strongly suggested a cross-talk between insulin and nutrients for the regulation of these genes. Moreover these results strengthened the idea that g6pc duplicated genes may significantly contribute to the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout via their atypical regulation by insulin alone or in interaction with nutrients. These findings open new perspectives to better understand in vivo glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high carbohydrate diet. PMID:26896939

  16. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  17. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  18. The REG2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a type 1 protein phosphatase-binding protein that functions with Reg1p and the Snf1 protein kinase to regulate growth.

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, D L; Tatchell, K

    1996-01-01

    The GLC7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the catalytic subunit of type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1) and is essential for cell growth. We have isolated a previously uncharacterized gene, REG2, on the basis of its ability to interact with Glc7p in the two-hybrid system. Reg2p interacts with Glc7p in vivo, and epitope-tagged derivatives of Reg2p and Glc7p coimmunoprecipitate from cell extracts. The predicted protein product of the REG2 gene is similar to Reg1p, a protein believed to direct PP1 activity in the glucose repression pathway. Mutants with a deletion of reg1 display a mild slow-growth defect, while reg2 mutants exhibit a wild-type phenotype. However, mutants with deletions of both reg1 and reg2 exhibit a severe growth defect. Overexpression of REG2 complements the slow-growth defect of a reg1 mutant but does not complement defects in glycogen accumulation or glucose repression, two traits also associated with a reg1 deletion. These results indicate that REG1 has a unique role in the glucose repression pathway but acts together with REG2 to regulate some as yet uncharacterized function important for growth. The growth defect of a reg1 reg2 double mutant is alleviated by a loss-of-function mutation in the SNF1-encoded protein kinase. The snf1 mutation also suppresses the glucose repression defects of reg1. Together, our data are consistent with a model in which Reg1p and Reg2p control the activity of PP1 toward substrates that are phosphorylated by the Snf1p kinase. PMID:8649403

  19. Metabolic Signatures of Adiposity in Young Adults: Mendelian Randomization Analysis and Effects of Weight Change

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Peter; Wang, Qin; Kangas, Antti J.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Skarp, Joni; Tiainen, Mika; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Soininen, Pasi; Havulinna, Aki S.; Kaakinen, Marika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Savolainen, Markku J.; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Männistö, Satu; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Vanhala, Mauno; Elliott, Paul; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli T.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Smith, George Davey; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased adiposity is linked with higher risk for cardiometabolic diseases. We aimed to determine to what extent elevated body mass index (BMI) within the normal weight range has causal effects on the detailed systemic metabolite profile in early adulthood. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to estimate causal effects of BMI on 82 metabolic measures in 12,664 adolescents and young adults from four population-based cohorts in Finland (mean age 26 y, range 16–39 y; 51% women; mean ± standard deviation BMI 24±4 kg/m2). Circulating metabolites were quantified by high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics and biochemical assays. In cross-sectional analyses, elevated BMI was adversely associated with cardiometabolic risk markers throughout the systemic metabolite profile, including lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acid composition, amino acids, inflammatory markers, and various hormones (p<0.0005 for 68 measures). Metabolite associations with BMI were generally stronger for men than for women (median 136%, interquartile range 125%–183%). A gene score for predisposition to elevated BMI, composed of 32 established genetic correlates, was used as the instrument to assess causality. Causal effects of elevated BMI closely matched observational estimates (correspondence 87%±3%; R2 = 0.89), suggesting causative influences of adiposity on the levels of numerous metabolites (p<0.0005 for 24 measures), including lipoprotein lipid subclasses and particle size, branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, and inflammation-related glycoprotein acetyls. Causal analyses of certain metabolites and potential sex differences warrant stronger statistical power. Metabolite changes associated with change in BMI during 6 y of follow-up were examined for 1,488 individuals. Change in BMI was accompanied by widespread metabolite changes, which had an association pattern similar to that of the cross-sectional observations, yet with greater metabolic

  20. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Plasma Homocysteine and Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yang; Li, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Zhong-Qian; Teng, Zhi-Mei; Hu, Dao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies have demonstrated an association between elevated homocysteine (Hcy) level and risk of multiple myeloma (MM). However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is causal. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) study to evaluate whether genetically increased Hcy level influences the risk of MM. We used the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism as an instrumental variable, which affects the plasma Hcy levels. Estimate of its effect on plasma Hcy level was based on a recent genome-wide meta-analysis of 44,147 individuals, while estimate of its effect on MM risk was obtained through meta-analysis of case-control studies with 2,092 cases and 4,954 controls. By combining these two estimates, we found that per one standard-deviation (SD) increase in natural log-transformed plasma Hcy levels conferred a 2.67-fold increase in risk for MM (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-6.38; P = 2.7 × 10(-2)). Our study suggests that elevated Hcy levels are causally associated with an increased risk of developing MM. Whether Hcy-lowering therapy can prevent MM merits further investigation in long-term randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PMID:27126524

  1. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Plasma Homocysteine and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Yang; Li, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Zhong-Qian; Teng, Zhi-Mei; Hu, Dao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies have demonstrated an association between elevated homocysteine (Hcy) level and risk of multiple myeloma (MM). However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is causal. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) study to evaluate whether genetically increased Hcy level influences the risk of MM. We used the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism as an instrumental variable, which affects the plasma Hcy levels. Estimate of its effect on plasma Hcy level was based on a recent genome-wide meta-analysis of 44,147 individuals, while estimate of its effect on MM risk was obtained through meta-analysis of case-control studies with 2,092 cases and 4,954 controls. By combining these two estimates, we found that per one standard-deviation (SD) increase in natural log-transformed plasma Hcy levels conferred a 2.67-fold increase in risk for MM (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–6.38; P = 2.7 × 10−2). Our study suggests that elevated Hcy levels are causally associated with an increased risk of developing MM. Whether Hcy-lowering therapy can prevent MM merits further investigation in long-term randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PMID:27126524

  2. Body mass index and psychiatric disorders: a Mendelian randomization study

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Bowden, Jack; Loret de Mola, Christian; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Davey Smith, George; Horta, Bernardo Lessa

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases. Observational studies suggest that obesity is associated with psychiatric traits, but causal inference from such studies has several limitations. We used two-sample Mendelian randomization methods (inverse variance weighting, weighted median and MR-Egger regression) to evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) with three psychiatric traits using data from the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits and Psychiatric Genomics consortia. Causal odds ratio estimates per 1-standard deviation increment in BMI ranged from 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62; 1.25) to 1.23 (95% CI: 0.65; 2.31) for bipolar disorder; 0.93 (0.78; 1.11) to 1.41 (0.87; 2.27) for schizophrenia; and 1.15 (95% CI: 0.92; 1.44) to 1.40 (95% CI: 1.03; 1.90) for major depressive disorder. Analyses removing potentially influential SNPs suggested that the effect estimates for depression might be underestimated. Our findings do not support the notion that higher BMI increases risk of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Although the point estimates for depression were consistent in all sensitivity analyses, the overall statistical evidence was weak. However, the fact that SNP-depression associations were estimated in relatively small samples reduced power to detect causal effects. This should be re-addressed when SNP-depression associations from larger studies become available. PMID:27601421

  3. Body mass index and psychiatric disorders: a Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Bowden, Jack; Loret de Mola, Christian; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Davey Smith, George; Horta, Bernardo Lessa

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases. Observational studies suggest that obesity is associated with psychiatric traits, but causal inference from such studies has several limitations. We used two-sample Mendelian randomization methods (inverse variance weighting, weighted median and MR-Egger regression) to evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) with three psychiatric traits using data from the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits and Psychiatric Genomics consortia. Causal odds ratio estimates per 1-standard deviation increment in BMI ranged from 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62; 1.25) to 1.23 (95% CI: 0.65; 2.31) for bipolar disorder; 0.93 (0.78; 1.11) to 1.41 (0.87; 2.27) for schizophrenia; and 1.15 (95% CI: 0.92; 1.44) to 1.40 (95% CI: 1.03; 1.90) for major depressive disorder. Analyses removing potentially influential SNPs suggested that the effect estimates for depression might be underestimated. Our findings do not support the notion that higher BMI increases risk of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Although the point estimates for depression were consistent in all sensitivity analyses, the overall statistical evidence was weak. However, the fact that SNP-depression associations were estimated in relatively small samples reduced power to detect causal effects. This should be re-addressed when SNP-depression associations from larger studies become available. PMID:27601421

  4. Diabetes and Risk of Arterial Stiffness: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Huang, Ya; Xie, Lan; Peng, Kui; Ding, Lin; Lin, Lin; Wang, Po; Hao, Mingli; Chen, Yuhong; Sun, Yimin; Qi, Lu; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to explore the causal association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and increased arterial stiffness. We performed a Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis in 11,385 participants from a well-defined community study in Shanghai during 2011-2013. We genotyped 34 T2D-associated common variants identified in East Asians and created a genetic risk score (GRS). We assessed arterial stiffness noninvasively with the measurement of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). We used the instrumental variable (IV) estimator to qualify the causal relationship between T2D and increased arterial stiffness. We found each 1-SD increase in T2D_GRS was associated with 6% higher risk in increased arterial stiffness (95% CI 1.01, 1.12), after adjustment of other metabolic confounders. Using T2D_GRS as the IV, we demonstrated a causal relationship between T2D and arterial stiffening (odds ratio 1.24, 95% CI 1.06, 1.47; P = 0.008). When categorizing the genetic loci according to their effect on insulin secretion or resistance, we found genetically determined decrease in insulin secretion was associated with increase in baPWV (βIV = 122.3 cm/s, 95% CI 41.9, 204.6; P = 0.0005). In conclusion, our results provide evidence supporting a causal association between T2D and increased arterial stiffness in a Chinese population. PMID:26953161

  5. A Mendelian randomization study of testosterone and cognition in men

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie V.; Lam, Tai Hing; Jiang, Chaoqiang; Cherny, Stacey S.; Liu, Bin; Cheng, Kar Keung; Zhang, Weisen; Leung, Gabriel M.; Schooling, C Mary

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone replacement for older men is increasingly common, with some observations suggesting a protective effect on cognitive function. We examined the association of endogenous testosterone with cognitive function among older men in a Mendelian randomization study using a separate-sample instrumental variable (SSIV) analysis estimator to minimize confounding and reverse causality. A genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on selected testosterone-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). The association of genetically predicted testosterone with delayed 10-word recall score and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was assessed at baseline and follow-up using generalized estimating equation among 4,212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Predicted testosterone was not associated with delayed 10-word recall score (−0.02 per nmol/L testosterone, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.06–0.02) or MMSE score (0.06, 95% CI −0.002–0.12). These estimates were similar after additional adjustment for age, education, smoking, use of alcohol, body mass index and the Framingham score. Our findings do not corroborate observed protective effects of testosterone on cognitive function among older men. PMID:26864717

  6. Estimation of carrier frequencies of six autosomal-recessive Mendelian disorders in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Jung; Lee, Seung-Tae; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Ji, Yongick; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2012-02-01

    Although many studies have been performed to identify mutations in Korean patients with various autosomal-recessive Mendelian disorders (AR-MDs), little is known about the carrier frequencies of AR-MDs in the Korean population. Twenty common mutations from six AR-MDs, including Wilson disease (WD), non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL), glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia), phenylketonuria (PKU), congenital hypothyroidism (CH), and congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) were selected to screen for based on previous studies. A total of 3057 Koreans were genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by confirmation using the Sanger sequencing. We found 201 and 8 carriers with either one or two mutations in different genes, respectively, yielding a total carrier frequency of 1 in 15 (6.7%). Of the six AR-MDs, NSHL has the highest carrier frequency followed by WD, CH, CLAH, GSD Ia, and PKU. As carrier screening tests are becoming prevalent and the number of mutations known and tested is rising, a priori data on the carrier frequencies in different ethnic groups is mandatory to plan a population screening program and to estimate its efficiency. In light of this, the present results can be used as a basis to establish a screening policy for common AR-MRs in the Korean population. PMID:22170460

  7. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  8. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  9. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  10. Genotype-Phenotype Associations of the CD-Associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphism within the Gene Locus Encoding Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 22 in Patients of the Swiss IBD Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Luc; Rossel, Jean-Benoit; Sulz, Michael C.; Frei, Pascal; Scharl, Sylvie; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) plays an important role in immune cell function and intestinal homeostasis. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2476601 within the PTPN22 gene locus results in aberrant function of PTPN22 protein and protects from Crohn’s disease (CD). Here, we investigated associations of PTPN22 SNP rs2476601 in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients in the Swiss IBD Cohort Study (SIBDCS). Methods 2’028 SIBDCS patients (1173 CD and 855 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients) were included. The clinical characteristics were analysed for an association with the presence of the PTPN22 SNP rs2476601 genotypes ‘homozygous variant’ (AA), ‘heterozygous’ (GA) and ‘homozygous wild-type’ (GG). Results 13 patients (0.6%) were homozygous variant (AA) for the PTPN22 polymorphism, 269 (13.3%) heterozygous variant (GA) and 1’746 (86.1%) homozygous wild-type (GG). In CD, AA and GA genotypes were associated with less use of steroids and antibiotics, and reduced prevalence of vitamin D and calcium deficiency. In UC the AA and GA genotype was associated with increased use of azathioprine and anti-TNF antibodies, but significantly less patients with the PTPN22 variant featured malabsorption syndrome (p = 0.026). Conclusion Our study for the first time addressed how presence of SNP rs2476601 within the PTPN22 gene affects clinical characteristics in IBD-patients. Several factors that correlate with more severe disease were found to be less common in CD patients carrying the A-allele, pointing towards a protective role for this variant in affected CD patients. In UC patients however, we found the opposite trend, suggesting a disease-promoting effect of the A-allele. PMID:27467733

  11. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation. PMID:27414789

  12. Uric Acid and Cardiovascular Events: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Marcus E; Delgado, Graciela; Grammer, Tanja B; Silbernagel, Günther; Huang, Jie; Krämer, Bernhard K; Ritz, Eberhard; März, Winfried

    2015-11-01

    Obesity and diets rich in uric acid-raising components appear to account for the increased prevalence of hyperuricemia in Westernized populations. Prevalence rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, CKD, and cardiovascular disease are also increasing. We used Mendelian randomization to examine whether uric acid is an independent and causal cardiovascular risk factor. Serum uric acid was measured in 3315 patients of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study. We calculated a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) for uric acid concentration based on eight uric acid-regulating single nucleotide polymorphisms. Causal odds ratios and causal hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a two-stage regression estimate with the GRS as the instrumental variable to examine associations with cardiometabolic phenotypes (cross-sectional) and mortality (prospectively) by logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively. Our GRS was not consistently associated with any biochemical marker except for uric acid, arguing against pleiotropy. Uric acid was associated with a range of prevalent diseases, including coronary artery disease. Uric acid and the GRS were both associated with cardiovascular death and sudden cardiac death. In a multivariate model adjusted for factors including medication, causal HRs corresponding to each 1-mg/dl increase in genetically predicted uric acid concentration were significant for cardiovascular death (HR, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 2.81) and sudden cardiac death (HR, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 5.00). These results suggest that high uric acid is causally related to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, especially sudden cardiac death. PMID:25788527

  13. Blood lipids and prostate cancer: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    PubMed

    Bull, Caroline J; Bonilla, Carolina; Holly, Jeff M P; Perks, Claire M; Davies, Neil; Haycock, Philip; Yu, Oriana Hoi Yun; Richards, J Brent; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Doug; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G; MacInnis, Robert J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Micheal, Agnieszka; Pandha, Hardev; Smith, George Davey; Lewis, Sarah J; Martin, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    Genetic risk scores were used as unconfounded instruments for specific lipid traits (Mendelian randomization) to assess whether circulating lipids causally influence prostate cancer risk. Data from 22,249 prostate cancer cases and 22,133 controls from 22 studies within the international PRACTICAL consortium were analyzed. Allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be uniquely associated with each of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride (TG) levels, were first validated in an independent dataset, and then entered into logistic regression models to estimate the presence (and direction) of any causal effect of each lipid trait on prostate cancer risk. There was weak evidence for an association between the LDL genetic score and cancer grade: the odds ratio (OR) per genetically instrumented standard deviation (SD) in LDL, comparing high- (≥7 Gleason score) versus low-grade (<7 Gleason score) cancers was 1.50 (95% CI: 0.92, 2.46; P = 0.11). A genetically instrumented SD increase in TGs was weakly associated with stage: the OR for advanced versus localized cancer per unit increase in genetic risk score was 1.68 (95% CI: 0.95, 3.00; P = 0.08). The rs12916-T variant in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.00; P = 0.03). In conclusion, circulating lipids, instrumented by our genetic risk scores, did not appear to alter prostate cancer risk. We found weak evidence that higher LDL and TG levels increase aggressive prostate cancer risk, and that a variant in HMGCR (that mimics the LDL lowering effect of statin drugs) reduces risk. However, inferences are limited by sample size and evidence of pleiotropy. PMID:26992435

  14. Mendelian randomization study of height and risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thrift, Aaron P; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Slattery, Martha L; Chan, Andrew T; Esko, Tonu; Wood, Andrew R; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Gustafsson, Stefan; Pers, Tune H; Baron, John A; Bezieau, Stéphane; Küry, Sébastien; Ogino, Shuji; Berndt, Sonja I; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Du, Mengmeng; Harrison, Tabitha A; Thornquist, Mark; Duggan, David J; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Lindor, Noralane M; Seminara, Daniela; Song, Mingyang; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Cotterchio, Michelle; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Potter, John D; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; White, Emily; Hsu, Li; Campbell, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Background: For men and women, taller height is associated with increased risk of all cancers combined. For colorectal cancer (CRC), it is unclear whether the differential association of height by sex is real or is due to confounding or bias inherent in observational studies. We performed a Mendelian randomization study to examine the association between height and CRC risk. Methods: To minimize confounding and bias, we derived a weighted genetic risk score predicting height (using 696 genetic variants associated with height) in 10 226 CRC cases and 10 286 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for associations between height, genetically predicted height and CRC. Results: Using conventional methods, increased height (per 10-cm increment) was associated with increased CRC risk (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.02–1.15). In sex-specific analyses, height was associated with CRC risk for women (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.05–1.26), but not men (OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.92–1.05). Consistent with these results, carrying greater numbers of (weighted) height-increasing alleles (per 1-unit increase) was associated with higher CRC risk for women and men combined (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01–1.14) and for women (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.01–1.19). There was weaker evidence of an association for men (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.96–1.15). Conclusion: We provide evidence for a causal association between height and CRC for women. The CRC-height association for men remains unclear and warrants further investigation in other large studies. PMID:25997436

  15. Serum Iron Levels and the Risk of Parkinson Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Gögele, Martin; Lill, Christina M.; Bertram, Lars; Do, Chuong B.; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Myers, Richard H.; Nalls, Michael; Keller, Margaux F.; Benyamin, Beben; Whitfield, John B.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Thompson, John R.; Minelli, Cosetta

    2013-01-01

    Background Although levels of iron are known to be increased in the brains of patients with Parkinson disease (PD), epidemiological evidence on a possible effect of iron blood levels on PD risk is inconclusive, with effects reported in opposite directions. Epidemiological studies suffer from problems of confounding and reverse causation, and mendelian randomization (MR) represents an alternative approach to provide unconfounded estimates of the effects of biomarkers on disease. We performed a MR study where genes known to modify iron levels were used as instruments to estimate the effect of iron on PD risk, based on estimates of the genetic effects on both iron and PD obtained from the largest sample meta-analyzed to date. Methods and Findings We used as instrumental variables three genetic variants influencing iron levels, HFE rs1800562, HFE rs1799945, and TMPRSS6 rs855791. Estimates of their effect on serum iron were based on a recent genome-wide meta-analysis of 21,567 individuals, while estimates of their effect on PD risk were obtained through meta-analysis of genome-wide and candidate gene studies with 20,809 PD cases and 88,892 controls. Separate MR estimates of the effect of iron on PD were obtained for each variant and pooled by meta-analysis. We investigated heterogeneity across the three estimates as an indication of possible pleiotropy and found no evidence of it. The combined MR estimate showed a statistically significant protective effect of iron, with a relative risk reduction for PD of 3% (95% CI 1%–6%; p = 0.001) per 10 µg/dl increase in serum iron. Conclusions Our study suggests that increased iron levels are causally associated with a decreased risk of developing PD. Further studies are needed to understand the pathophysiological mechanism of action of serum iron on PD risk before recommendations can be made. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23750121

  16. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children.

    PubMed

    Sarrafzadeh, Shokouh Azam; Mahloojirad, Maryam; Nourizadeh, Maryam; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pourpak, Zahra; Bustamante, Jacinta; Moin, Mostafa

    2016-03-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ) or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI), from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients' leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. PMID:27141500

  17. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    SARRAFZADEH, Shokouh Azam; MAHLOOJIRAD, Maryam; NOURIZADEH, Maryam; CASANOVA, Jean-Laurent; POURPAK, Zahra; BUSTAMANTE, Jacinta; MOIN, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ) or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI), from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients’ leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. PMID:27141500

  18. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    SARRAFZADEH, Shokouh azam; MAHLOOJIRAD, Maryam; NOURIZADEH, Maryam; CASANOVA, Jean-Laurent; POURPAK, Zahra; BUSTAMANTE, Jacinta; MOIN, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ) or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI), from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN- γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients’ leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. PMID:27114990

  19. Morgan’s Legacy: Fruit Flies and the Functional Annotation of Conserved Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Yamamoto, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In 1915, “The Mechanism of Mendelian Heredity” was published by four prominent Drosophila geneticists. They discovered that genes form linkage groups on chromosomes inherited in a Mendelian fashion and laid the genetic foundation that promoted Drosophila as a model organism. Flies continue to offer great opportunities, including studies in the field of functional genomics. PMID:26406362

  20. An Alkaline Phosphatase Reporter for use in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; Pascual, Ricardo A.; Childress, Kevin O.; Nawrocki, Kathryn L.; Woods, Emily C.; McBride, Shonna M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes severe gastrointestinal disease in humans and other mammals. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to work with and, until recently, few tools were available for genetic manipulation and molecular analyses. Despite the recent advances in the field, there is no simple or cost-effective technique for measuring gene transcription in C. difficile other than direct transcriptional analyses (e.g., quantitative real-time PCR and RNA-seq), which are time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale-up. We describe the development of an in vivo reporter assay that can provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of C. difficile gene expression. Using the Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase gene, phoZ, we measured expression of C. difficile genes using a colorimetric alkaline phosphatase assay. We show that inducible alkaline phosphatase activity correlates directly with native gene expression. The ability to analyze gene expression using a standard reporter is an important and critically needed tool to study gene regulation and design genetic screens for C. difficile and other anaerobic clostridia. PMID:25576237

  1. Obesity and Multiple Sclerosis: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Davey Smith, George; Richards, J. Brent

    2016-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported an association between obesity, as measured by elevated body mass index (BMI), in early adulthood and risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, bias potentially introduced by confounding and reverse causation may have influenced these findings. Therefore, we elected to perform Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses to evaluate whether genetically increased BMI is associated with an increased risk of MS. Methods and Findings Employing a two-sample MR approach, we used summary statistics from the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium and the International MS Genetics Consortium (IMSGC), the largest genome-wide association studies for BMI and MS, respectively (GIANT: n = 322,105; IMSGC: n = 14,498 cases and 24,091 controls). Seventy single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genome-wide significant (p < 5 x 10−8) for BMI in GIANT (n = 322,105) and were investigated for their association with MS risk in the IMSGC. The effect of each SNP on MS was weighted by its effect on BMI, and estimates were pooled to provide a summary measure for the effect of increased BMI upon risk of MS. Our results suggest that increased BMI influences MS susceptibility, where a 1 standard deviation increase in genetically determined BMI (kg/m2) increased odds of MS by 41% (odds ratio [OR]: 1.41, 95% CI 1.20–1.66, p = 2.7 x 10−5, I2 = 0%, 95% CI 0–29). Sensitivity analyses, including MR-Egger regression, and the weighted median approach provided no evidence of pleiotropic effects. The main study limitations are that, while these sensitivity analyses reduce the possibility that pleiotropy influenced our results, residual pleiotropy is difficult to exclude entirely. Conclusion Genetically elevated BMI is associated with risk of MS, providing evidence for a causal role for obesity in MS etiology. While obesity has been associated with many late-life outcomes, these findings suggest an important consequence of

  2. Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuliang; Sedwick, David; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11 which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs. PMID:25263441

  3. Cellular phosphatases facilitate combinatorial processing of receptor-activated signals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Dua, Raina; Srikanth, Ravichandran; Jayaswal, Shilpi; Siddiqui, Zaved; Rao, Kanury VS

    2008-01-01

    Background Although reciprocal regulation of protein phosphorylation represents a key aspect of signal transduction, a larger perspective on how these various interactions integrate to contribute towards signal processing is presently unclear. For example, a key unanswered question is that of how phosphatase-mediated regulation of phosphorylation at the individual nodes of the signaling network translates into modulation of the net signal output and, thereby, the cellular phenotypic response. Results To address the above question we, in the present study, examined the dynamics of signaling from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) under conditions where individual cellular phosphatases were selectively depleted by siRNA. Results from such experiments revealed a highly enmeshed structure for the signaling network where each signaling node was linked to multiple phosphatases on the one hand, and each phosphatase to several nodes on the other. This resulted in a configuration where individual signaling intermediates could be influenced by a spectrum of regulatory phosphatases, but with the composition of the spectrum differing from one intermediate to another. Consequently, each node differentially experienced perturbations in phosphatase activity, yielding a unique fingerprint of nodal signals characteristic to that perturbation. This heterogeneity in nodal experiences, to a given perturbation, led to combinatorial manipulation of the corresponding signaling axes for the downstream transcription factors. Conclusion Our cumulative results reveal that it is the tight integration of phosphatases into the signaling network that provides the plasticity by which perturbation-specific information can be transmitted in the form of a multivariate output to the downstream transcription factor network. This output in turn specifies a context-defined response, when translated into the resulting gene expression profile. PMID:18798986

  4. Mendelian Randomization - the Key to Understanding Aspects of Parkinson's Disease Causation?

    PubMed

    Noyce, Alastair J; Nalls, Mike A

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease has multiple determinants and is associated with a wide range of exposures that appear to modify risk in traditional observational studies, including numerous lifestyle and environmental factors. Across other fields of medicine, Mendelian randomization has emerged as a powerful method to examine whether associations between exposures and disease outcomes are causal. Here we discuss the concept of Mendelian randomization, its potential relevance to Parkinson's disease, and suggest avenues through which the method could be employed to further understanding of the causal basis of Parkinson's disease. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26695521

  5. Insight into rheumatological cause and effect through the use of Mendelian randomization.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip C; Choi, Hyon K; Do, Ron; Merriman, Tony R

    2016-08-01

    Establishing causality of risk factors is important to determine the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying rheumatic diseases, and can facilitate the design of interventions to improve care for affected patients. The presence of unmeasured confounders, as well as reverse causation, is a challenge to the assignment of causality in observational studies. Alleles for genetic variants are randomly inherited at meiosis. Mendelian randomization analysis uses these genetic variants to test whether a particular risk factor is causal for a disease outcome. In this Review of the Mendelian randomization technique, we discuss published results and potential applications in rheumatology, as well as the general clinical utility and limitations of the approach. PMID:27411906

  6. Mendelian Randomization — the Key to Understanding Aspects of Parkinson's Disease Causation?

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has multiple determinants and is associated with a wide range of exposures that appear to modify risk in traditional observational studies, including numerous lifestyle and environmental factors. Across other fields of medicine, Mendelian randomization has emerged as a powerful method to examine whether associations between exposures and disease outcomes are causal. Here we discuss the concept of Mendelian randomization, its potential relevance to Parkinson's disease, and suggest avenues through which the method could be employed to further understanding of the causal basis of Parkinson's disease. © 2015 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26695521

  7. Maternal homocysteine in pregnancy and offspring birthweight: epidemiological associations and Mendelian randomization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Chandak, Giriraj R; Joglekar, Charudatta; Katre, Prachi; Bhat, Dattatray S; Singh, Suraj N; Janipalli, Charles S; Refsum, Helga; Krishnaveni, Ghattu; Veena, Sargoor; Osmond, Clive; Fall, Caroline HD

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disturbed one-carbon (1-C) metabolism in the mother is associated with poor fetal growth but causality of this relationship has not been established. Methods: We studied the association between maternal total homocysteine and offspring birthweight in the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study (PMNS, Pune, India) and Parthenon Cohort Study (Mysore, India). We tested for evidence of causality within a Mendelian randomization framework, using a methylenetetrahydrofolatereductase (MTHFR) gene variant rs1801133 (earlier known as 677C→T) by instrumental variable and triangulation analysis, separately and using meta-analysis. Results: Median (IQR) homocysteine concentration and mean (SD) birthweight were 8.6 µmol/l (6.7,10.8) and 2642 g (379) in the PMNS and 6.0 µmol/l (5.1,7.1) and 2871 g (443) in the Parthenon study. Offspring birthweight was inversely related to maternal homocysteine concentration—PMNS: –22 g/SD [95% confidence interval (CI): (–50, 5), adjusted for gestational age and offspring gender]; Parthenon: –57 g (–92, –21); meta-analysis: –40 g (–62, –17)]. Maternal risk genotype at rs1801133 predicted higher homocysteine concentration [PMNS: 0.30 SD/allele (0.14, 0.46); Parthenon: 0.21 SD (0.02, 0.40); meta-analysis: 0.26 SD (0.14, 0.39)]; and lower birthweight [PMNS: –46 g (–102, 11, adjusted for gestational age, offspring gender and rs1801133 genotype); Parthenon: –78 g (–170, 15); meta-analysis: –61 g (–111, –10)]. Instrumental variable and triangulation analysis supported a causal association between maternal homocysteine concentration and offspring birthweight. Conclusions: Our findings suggest a causal role for maternal homocysteine (1-C metabolism) in fetal growth. Reducing maternal homocysteine concentrations may improve fetal growth. PMID:25052622

  8. Why the Rediscoverer Ended up on the Sidelines: Hugo De Vries's Theory of Inheritance and the Mendelian Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamhuis, Ida H.

    2015-01-01

    Eleven years before the `rediscovery' in 1900 of Mendel's work, Hugo De Vries published his theory of heredity. He expected his theory to become a big success, but it was not well-received. To find supporting evidence for this theory De Vries started an extensive research program. Because of the parallels of his ideas with the Mendelian laws and because of his use of statistics, he became one of the rediscoverers. However, the Mendelian laws, which soon became the foundation of a new discipline of genetics, presented a problem. De Vries was the only one of the early Mendelians who had developed his own theory of heredity. His theory could not be brought in line with the Mendelian laws. But because his original theory was still very dear to him, something important was at stake and he was unwilling to adapt his ideas to the new situation. He belittled the importance of the Mendelian laws and ended up on the sidelines.

  9. Allosteric Inhibitors of the Eya2 Phosphatase Are Selective and Inhibit Eya2-mediated Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Aaron B.; Drasin, David J.; Lea, Wendy A.; Patrick, Aaron N.; Patnaik, Samarjit; Backos, Donald S.; Matheson, Christopher J.; Hu, Xin; Barnaeva, Elena; Holliday, Michael J.; Blevins, Melanie A.; Robin, Tyler P.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Ferrer, Marc; Simeonov, Anton; Southall, Noel; Reigan, Philip; Marugan, Juan; Ford, Heide L.; Zhao, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Eya proteins are essential co-activators of the Six family of transcription factors and contain a unique tyrosine phosphatase domain belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase family of phosphatases. The phosphatase activity of Eya is important for the transcription of a subset of Six1-target genes, and also directs cells to the repair rather than apoptosis pathway upon DNA damage. Furthermore, Eya phosphatase activity has been shown to mediate transformation, invasion, migration, and metastasis of breast cancer cells, making it a potential new drug target for breast cancer. We have previously identified a class of N-arylidenebenzohydrazide compounds that specifically inhibit the Eya2 phosphatase. Herein, we demonstrate that these compounds are reversible inhibitors that selectively inhibit the phosphatase activity of Eya2, but not Eya3. Our mutagenesis results suggest that this class of compounds does not bind to the active site and the binding does not require the coordination with Mg2+. Moreover, these compounds likely bind within a site on the opposite face of the active site, and function as allosteric inhibitors. We also demonstrate that this class of compounds inhibits Eya2 phosphatase-mediated cell migration, setting the foundation for these molecules to be developed into chemical probes for understanding the specific function of the Eya2 phosphatase and to serve as a prototype for the development of Eya2 phosphatase specific anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24755226

  10. Allosteric inhibitors of the Eya2 phosphatase are selective and inhibit Eya2-mediated cell migration.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Aaron B; Drasin, David J; Lea, Wendy A; Patrick, Aaron N; Patnaik, Samarjit; Backos, Donald S; Matheson, Christopher J; Hu, Xin; Barnaeva, Elena; Holliday, Michael J; Blevins, Melanie A; Robin, Tyler P; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Ferrer, Marc; Simeonov, Anton; Southall, Noel; Reigan, Philip; Marugan, Juan; Ford, Heide L; Zhao, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Eya proteins are essential co-activators of the Six family of transcription factors and contain a unique tyrosine phosphatase domain belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase family of phosphatases. The phosphatase activity of Eya is important for the transcription of a subset of Six1-target genes, and also directs cells to the repair rather than apoptosis pathway upon DNA damage. Furthermore, Eya phosphatase activity has been shown to mediate transformation, invasion, migration, and metastasis of breast cancer cells, making it a potential new drug target for breast cancer. We have previously identified a class of N-arylidenebenzohydrazide compounds that specifically inhibit the Eya2 phosphatase. Herein, we demonstrate that these compounds are reversible inhibitors that selectively inhibit the phosphatase activity of Eya2, but not Eya3. Our mutagenesis results suggest that this class of compounds does not bind to the active site and the binding does not require the coordination with Mg(2+). Moreover, these compounds likely bind within a site on the opposite face of the active site, and function as allosteric inhibitors. We also demonstrate that this class of compounds inhibits Eya2 phosphatase-mediated cell migration, setting the foundation for these molecules to be developed into chemical probes for understanding the specific function of the Eya2 phosphatase and to serve as a prototype for the development of Eya2 phosphatase specific anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24755226

  11. Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction: a mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Benjamin F; Peloso, Gina M; Orho-Melander, Marju; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Barbalic, Maja; Jensen, Majken K; Hindy, George; Hólm, Hilma; Ding, Eric L; Johnson, Toby; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Thompson, John F; Li, Mingyao; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Musunuru, Kiran; Pirruccello, James P; Saleheen, Danish; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Schillert, Arne; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Anand, Sonia; Engert, James C; Morgan, Thomas; Spertus, John; Stoll, Monika; Berger, Klaus; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; McKeown, Pascal P; Patterson, Christopher C; Epstein, Stephen E; Devaney, Joseph; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Mooser, Vincent; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Havulinna, Aki; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Ingelsson, Erik; Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp; de Bakker, Paul I W; Klungel, Olaf H; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Peters, Bas J M; de Boer, Anthonius; Grobbee, Diederick E; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Deneer, Vera H M; Elbers, Clara C; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Verschuren, WM Monique; Boer, Jolanda MA; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Rasheed, Asif; Frossard, Philippe; Demissie, Serkalem; Willer, Cristen; Do, Ron; Ordovas, Jose M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L; Daly, Mark J; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noël P; Surti, Aarti; Gonzalez, Elena; Purcell, Shaun; Gabriel, Stacey; Marrugat, Jaume; Peden, John; Erdmann, Jeanette; Diemert, Patrick; Willenborg, Christina; König, Inke R; Fischer, Marcus; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ziegler, Andreas; Buysschaert, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Van de Werf, Frans; Fox, Keith A; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Rubin, Diana; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schreiber, Stefan; Schäfer, Arne; Danesh, John; Blankenberg, Stefan; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Hall, Alistair S; Overvad, Kim; Rimm, Eric; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Cupples, L Adrienne; Reilly, Muredach P; Melander, Olle; Mannucci, Pier M; Ardissino, Diego; Siscovick, David; Elosua, Roberto; Stefansson, Kari; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; Rader, Daniel J; Peltonen, Leena; Schwartz, Stephen M; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background High plasma HDL cholesterol is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction, but whether this association is causal is unclear. Exploiting the fact that genotypes are randomly assigned at meiosis, are independent of non-genetic confounding, and are unmodified by disease processes, mendelian randomisation can be used to test the hypothesis that the association of a plasma biomarker with disease is causal. Methods We performed two mendelian randomisation analyses. First, we used as an instrument a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the endothelial lipase gene (LIPG Asn396Ser) and tested this SNP in 20 studies (20 913 myocardial infarction cases, 95 407 controls). Second, we used as an instrument a genetic score consisting of 14 common SNPs that exclusively associate with HDL cholesterol and tested this score in up to 12 482 cases of myocardial infarction and 41 331 controls. As a positive control, we also tested a genetic score of 13 common SNPs exclusively associated with LDL cholesterol. Findings Carriers of the LIPG 396Ser allele (2·6% frequency) had higher HDL cholesterol (0·14 mmol/L higher, p=8×10−13) but similar levels of other lipid and non-lipid risk factors for myocardial infarction compared with non-carriers. This difference in HDL cholesterol is expected to decrease risk of myocardial infarction by 13% (odds ratio [OR] 0·87, 95% CI 0·84–0·91). However, we noted that the 396Ser allele was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·99, 95% CI 0·88–1·11, p=0·85). From observational epidemiology, an increase of 1 SD in HDL cholesterol was associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·62, 95% CI 0·58–0·66). However, a 1 SD increase in HDL cholesterol due to genetic score was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·93, 95% CI 0·68–1·26, p=0·63). For LDL cholesterol, the estimate from observational epidemiology (a 1 SD increase in LDL cholesterol

  12. Association of vitamin D status with arterial blood pressure and hypertension risk: a mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Cavadino, Alana; Berry, Diane J; Jorde, Rolf; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Lu, Chen; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; Tikkanen, Emmi; Eriksson, Joel; Wong, Andrew; Mangino, Massimo; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Nolte, Ilja M; Houston, Denise K; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; van der Most, Peter J; Pasko, Dorota; Zgaga, Lina; Thiering, Elisabeth; Vitart, Veronique; Fraser, Ross M; Huffman, Jennifer E; de Boer, Rudolf A; Schöttker, Ben; Saum, Kai-Uwe; McCarthy, Mark I; Dupuis, Josée; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Sebert, Sylvain; Pouta, Anneli; Laitinen, Jaana; Kleber, Marcus E; Navis, Gerjan; Lorentzon, Mattias; Jameson, Karen; Arden, Nigel; Cooper, Jackie A; Acharya, Jayshree; Hardy, Rebecca; Raitakari, Olli; Ripatti, Samuli; Billings, Liana K; Lahti, Jari; Osmond, Clive; Penninx, Brenda W; Rejnmark, Lars; Lohman, Kurt K; Paternoster, Lavinia; Stolk, Ronald P; Hernandez, Dena G; Byberg, Liisa; Hagström, Emil; Melhus, Håkan; Ingelsson, Erik; Mellström, Dan; Ljunggren, Östen; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; McLachlan, Stela; Theodoratou, Evropi; Tiesler, Carla M T; Jula, Antti; Navarro, Pau; Wright, Alan F; Polasek, Ozren; Hayward, Caroline; Wilson, James F; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Heinrich, Joachim; Campbell, Harry; Price, Jacqueline F; Karlsson, Magnus; Lind, Lars; Michaëlsson, Karl; Bandinelli, Stefania; Frayling, Timothy M; Hartman, Catharina A; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Eriksson, Johan G; Florez, Jose C; Spector, Tim D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Cooper, Cyrus; Ohlsson, Claes; März, Winfried; de Borst, Martin H; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Wang, Thomas J; Power, Chris; Brenner, Hermann; Grimnes, Guri; van der Harst, Pim; Snieder, Harold; Hingorani, Aroon D; Pilz, Stefan; Whittaker, John C; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration is associated with high arterial blood pressure and hypertension risk, but whether this association is causal is unknown. We used a mendelian randomisation approach to test whether 25(OH)D concentration is causally associated with blood pressure and hypertension risk. Methods In this mendelian randomisation study, we generated an allele score (25[OH]D synthesis score) based on variants of genes that affect 25(OH)D synthesis or substrate availability (CYP2R1 and DHCR7), which we used as a proxy for 25(OH)D concentration. We meta-analysed data for up to 108 173 individuals from 35 studies in the D-CarDia collaboration to investigate associations between the allele score and blood pressure measurements. We complemented these analyses with previously published summary statistics from the International Consortium on Blood Pressure (ICBP), the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, and the Global Blood Pressure Genetics (Global BPGen) consortium. Findings In phenotypic analyses (up to n=49 363), increased 25(OH)D concentration was associated with decreased systolic blood pressure (β per 10% increase, −0·12 mm Hg, 95% CI −0·20 to −0·04; p=0·003) and reduced odds of hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 0·98, 95% CI 0·97−0·99; p=0·0003), but not with decreased diastolic blood pressure (β per 10% increase, −0·02 mm Hg, −0·08 to 0·03; p=0·37). In meta-analyses in which we combined data from D-CarDia and the ICBP (n=146 581, after exclusion of overlapping studies), each 25(OH)D-increasing allele of the synthesis score was associated with a change of −0·10 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure (−0·21 to −0·0001; p=0·0498) and a change of −0·08 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure (−0·15 to −0·02; p=0·01). When D-CarDia and consortia data for hypertension were meta-analysed together (n=142 255), the synthesis score was associated

  13. Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease: genetic, immunological, and clinical features of inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare condition characterized by predisposition to clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria, in otherwise healthy individuals with no overt abnormalities in routine hematological and immunological tests. MSMD designation does not recapitulate all the clinical features, as patients are also prone to salmonellosis, candidiasis and tuberculosis, and more rarely to infections with other intramacrophagic bacteria, fungi, or parasites, and even, perhaps, a few viruses. Since 1996, nine MSMD-causing genes, including seven autosomal (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12B, IL12RB1, ISG15, and IRF8) and two X-linked (NEMO, CYBB) genes have been discovered. The high level of allelic heterogeneity has already led to the definition of 18 different disorders. The nine gene products are physiologically related, as all are involved in IFN-γ-dependent immunity. These disorders impair the production of (IL12B, IL12RB1, IRF8, ISG15, NEMO) or the response to (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IRF8, CYBB) IFN-γ. These defects account for only about half the known MSMD cases. Patients with MSMD-causing genetic defects may display other infectious diseases, or even remain asymptomatic. Most of these inborn errors do not show complete clinical penetrance for the case-definition phenotype of MSMD. We review here the genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with inborn errors of IFN-γ-dependent immunity. PMID:25453225

  14. Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease: genetic, immunological, and clinical features of inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare condition characterized by predisposition to clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria, in otherwise healthy individuals with no overt abnormalities in routine hematological and immunological tests. MSMD designation does not recapitulate all the clinical features, as patients are also prone to salmonellosis, candidiasis and tuberculosis, and more rarely to infections with other intramacrophagic bacteria, fungi, or parasites, and even, perhaps, a few viruses. Since 1996, nine MSMD-causing genes, including seven autosomal (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12B, IL12RB1, ISG15, and IRF8) and two X-linked (NEMO, and CYBB) genes have been discovered. The high level of allelic heterogeneity has already led to the definition of 18 different disorders. The nine gene products are physiologically related, as all are involved in IFN-γ-dependent immunity. These disorders impair the production of (IL12B, IL12RB1, IRF8, ISG15, NEMO) or the response to (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IRF8, CYBB) IFN-γ. These defects account for only about half the known MSMD cases. Patients with MSMD-causing genetic defects may display other infectious diseases, or even remain asymptomatic. Most of these inborn errors do not show complete clinical penetrance for the case-definition phenotype of MSMD. We review here the genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with inborn errors of IFN-γ-dependent immunity. PMID:25453225

  15. Power and sample size calculations for Mendelian randomization studies using one genetic instrument.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Guy; Cowling, Benjamin J; Schooling, C Mary

    2013-08-01

    Mendelian randomization, which is instrumental variable analysis using genetic variants as instruments, is an increasingly popular method of making causal inferences from observational studies. In order to design efficient Mendelian randomization studies, it is essential to calculate the sample sizes required. We present formulas for calculating the power of a Mendelian randomization study using one genetic instrument to detect an effect of a given size, and the minimum sample size required to detect effects for given levels of significance and power, using asymptotic statistical theory. We apply the formulas to some example data and compare the results with those from simulation methods. Power and sample size calculations using these formulas should be more straightforward to carry out than simulation approaches. These formulas make explicit that the sample size needed for Mendelian randomization study is inversely proportional to the square of the correlation between the genetic instrument and the exposure and proportional to the residual variance of the outcome after removing the effect of the exposure, as well as inversely proportional to the square of the effect size. PMID:23934314

  16. Mendelian randomization in (epi)genetic epidemiology: an effective tool to be handled with care.

    PubMed

    Latvala, Antti; Ollikainen, Miina

    2016-01-01

    A study examining blood lipid traits takes epigenomics approaches to the next level by using carefully performed Mendelian randomization to assess causality rather than simply reporting associations.See related research article: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-1000-6. PMID:27418254

  17. Multivariable Mendelian randomization: the use of pleiotropic genetic variants to estimate causal effects.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G

    2015-02-15

    A conventional Mendelian randomization analysis assesses the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome by using genetic variants that are solely associated with the risk factor of interest as instrumental variables. However, in some cases, such as the case of triglyceride level as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it may be difficult to find a relevant genetic variant that is not also associated with related risk factors, such as other lipid fractions. Such a variant is known as pleiotropic. In this paper, we propose an extension of Mendelian randomization that uses multiple genetic variants associated with several measured risk factors to simultaneously estimate the causal effect of each of the risk factors on the outcome. This "multivariable Mendelian randomization" approach is similar to the simultaneous assessment of several treatments in a factorial randomized trial. In this paper, methods for estimating the causal effects are presented and compared using real and simulated data, and the assumptions necessary for a valid multivariable Mendelian randomization analysis are discussed. Subject to these assumptions, we demonstrate that triglyceride-related pathways have a causal effect on the risk of coronary heart disease independent of the effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:25632051

  18. Use of Haplotypes to Estimate Mendelian Sampling Effects and Selection Limits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling terms can be calculated using haplotypes, by summing the individual additive effects on each chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43,382 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 1,455 Brown Swiss, 40,351 Holstein, and 4,064 Jersey bulls and cows using th...

  19. Multivariable Mendelian Randomization: The Use of Pleiotropic Genetic Variants to Estimate Causal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    A conventional Mendelian randomization analysis assesses the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome by using genetic variants that are solely associated with the risk factor of interest as instrumental variables. However, in some cases, such as the case of triglyceride level as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it may be difficult to find a relevant genetic variant that is not also associated with related risk factors, such as other lipid fractions. Such a variant is known as pleiotropic. In this paper, we propose an extension of Mendelian randomization that uses multiple genetic variants associated with several measured risk factors to simultaneously estimate the causal effect of each of the risk factors on the outcome. This “multivariable Mendelian randomization” approach is similar to the simultaneous assessment of several treatments in a factorial randomized trial. In this paper, methods for estimating the causal effects are presented and compared using real and simulated data, and the assumptions necessary for a valid multivariable Mendelian randomization analysis are discussed. Subject to these assumptions, we demonstrate that triglyceride-related pathways have a causal effect on the risk of coronary heart disease independent of the effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:25632051

  20. Consistent Estimation in Mendelian Randomization with Some Invalid Instruments Using a Weighted Median Estimator

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Haycock, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Developments in genome‐wide association studies and the increasing availability of summary genetic association data have made application of Mendelian randomization relatively straightforward. However, obtaining reliable results from a Mendelian randomization investigation remains problematic, as the conventional inverse‐variance weighted method only gives consistent estimates if all of the genetic variants in the analysis are valid instrumental variables. We present a novel weighted median estimator for combining data on multiple genetic variants into a single causal estimate. This estimator is consistent even when up to 50% of the information comes from invalid instrumental variables. In a simulation analysis, it is shown to have better finite‐sample Type 1 error rates than the inverse‐variance weighted method, and is complementary to the recently proposed MR‐Egger (Mendelian randomization‐Egger) regression method. In analyses of the causal effects of low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol and high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol on coronary artery disease risk, the inverse‐variance weighted method suggests a causal effect of both lipid fractions, whereas the weighted median and MR‐Egger regression methods suggest a null effect of high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol that corresponds with the experimental evidence. Both median‐based and MR‐Egger regression methods should be considered as sensitivity analyses for Mendelian randomization investigations with multiple genetic variants. PMID:27061298

  1. Consistent Estimation in Mendelian Randomization with Some Invalid Instruments Using a Weighted Median Estimator.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Haycock, Philip C; Burgess, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Developments in genome-wide association studies and the increasing availability of summary genetic association data have made application of Mendelian randomization relatively straightforward. However, obtaining reliable results from a Mendelian randomization investigation remains problematic, as the conventional inverse-variance weighted method only gives consistent estimates if all of the genetic variants in the analysis are valid instrumental variables. We present a novel weighted median estimator for combining data on multiple genetic variants into a single causal estimate. This estimator is consistent even when up to 50% of the information comes from invalid instrumental variables. In a simulation analysis, it is shown to have better finite-sample Type 1 error rates than the inverse-variance weighted method, and is complementary to the recently proposed MR-Egger (Mendelian randomization-Egger) regression method. In analyses of the causal effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol on coronary artery disease risk, the inverse-variance weighted method suggests a causal effect of both lipid fractions, whereas the weighted median and MR-Egger regression methods suggest a null effect of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol that corresponds with the experimental evidence. Both median-based and MR-Egger regression methods should be considered as sensitivity analyses for Mendelian randomization investigations with multiple genetic variants. PMID:27061298

  2. Use of Haplotypes to Estimate Mendelian Sampling Effects and Selection Limits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haplotypes of 3,689 Jersey cattle were used to derive upper and lower bounds for Mendelian sampling (MS) effects and selection limits. Matings of the 25 best and poorest bulls to all genotyped cows were simulated to determine the impact of genomic selection on MS. Lower and upper bounds of MS were 2...

  3. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Methods Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP) genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF). Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT). The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL). All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Results Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL) identified 18 (22) additional inconsistent animals. Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error), were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error), were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Conclusions Tests to remove

  4. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease: a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    PubMed Central

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom R; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Whittaker, John C; Smith, George Davey; Dudbridge, Frank; Casas, Juan P; Holmes, Michael V; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease. We then used a conventional Mendelian randomisation approach to investigate the causal relevance using a genetic instrument based on 31 urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To account for potential pleiotropic associations of certain SNPs with risk factors other than urate, we additionally did both a multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis, in which the genetic associations of SNPs with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were included as covariates, and an Egger Mendelian randomisation (MR-Egger) analysis to estimate a causal effect accounting for unmeasured pleiotropy. Findings In the meta-analysis of 17 prospective observational studies (166 486 individuals; 9784 coronary heart disease events) a 1 SD higher urate concentration was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for coronary heart disease of 1·07 (95% CI 1·04–1·10). The corresponding OR estimates from the conventional, multivariable adjusted, and Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis (58 studies; 198 598 individuals; 65 877 events) were 1·18 (95% CI 1·08–1·29), 1·10 (1·00–1·22), and 1·05 (0·92–1·20), respectively, per 1 SD increment in plasma urate. Interpretation Conventional and multivariate Mendelian randomisation analysis implicates a causal role for urate in the development of coronary heart disease, but these estimates might be inflated by hidden pleiotropy. Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis, which accounts for

  5. Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of a Protein-Serine/Threonine Phosphatase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi TAG11

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Bianca; Frey, Gerhard; Swanson, Ronald V.; Mathur, Eric J.; Stetter, K. O.

    1998-01-01

    An open reading frame coding for a putative protein-serine/threonine phosphatase was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi TAG11 and named Py-PP1. Py-PP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified from inclusion bodies, and biochemically characterized. The phosphatase gene is part of an operon which may provide, for the first time, insight into a physiological role for archaeal protein phosphatases in vivo. PMID:9696747

  6. Myosin light-chain phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M; Perry, S V; Ottaway, J

    1976-01-01

    1. A method for the isolation of a new enzyme, myosin light-chain phosphatase, from rabbit white skeletal muscle by using a Sepharose-phosphorylated myosin light-chain affinity column is described. 2. The enzyme migrated as a single component on electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel at pH7.0, with apparent mol.wt. 70000. 3. The enzyme was highly specific for the phosphorylated P-light chain of myosin, had pH optima at 6.5 and 8.0 and was not inhibited by NaF. 4. A Ca2+-sensitive 'ATPase' (adenosine triphosphatase) system consisting of myosin light-chain kinase, myosin light-chain phosphatase and the P-light chain is described. 5. Evidence is presented for a phosphoryl exchange between Pi, phosphorylated P-light chain and myosin light-chain phosphatase. 6. Heavy meromyosin prepared by chymotryptic digestion can be phosphorylated by myosin light-chain kinase. 7. The ATPase activities of myosin and heavy meromyosin, in the presence and absence of F-actin, were not significantly changed (+/- 10%) by phosphorylation of the P-light chain. Images PLATE 1 PMID:186030

  7. Mendelian Genetics of Human Susceptibility to Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, Michail S.; Netea, Mihai G.; Holland, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    A recent surge in newly described inborn errors of immune function-related genes that result in susceptibility to fungal disease has greatly enhanced our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of antifungal immune responses. Characterization of single-gene defects that predispose to various combinations of superficial and deep-seated infections caused by yeasts, molds, and dimorphic fungi has unmasked the critical role of novel molecules and signaling pathways in mucosal and systemic antifungal host defense. These experiments of nature offer a unique opportunity for developing new knowledge in immunological research and form the foundation for devising immune-based therapeutic approaches for patients infected with fungal pathogens. PMID:24890837

  8. Three Phosphatidylglycerol-phosphate Phosphatases in the Inner Membrane of Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Guan, Ziqiang; Zhao, Jinshi; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2011-01-01

    The phospholipids of Escherichia coli consist mainly of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and cardiolipin. PG makes up ∼25% of the cellular phospholipid and is essential for growth in wild-type cells. PG is synthesized on the inner surface of the inner membrane from cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol and glycerol 3-phosphate, generating the precursor phosphatidylglycerol-phosphate (PGP). This compound is present at low levels (∼0.1% of the total lipid). Dephosphorylation of PGP to PG is catalyzed by several PGP-phosphatases. The pgpA and pgpB genes, which encode structurally distinct PGP-phosphatases, were identified previously. Double deletion mutants lacking pgpA and pgpB are viable and still make PG, suggesting the presence of additional phosphatase(s). We have identified a third PGP-phosphatase gene (previously annotated as yfhB but renamed pgpC) using an expression cloning strategy. A mutant with deletions in all three phosphatase genes is not viable unless covered by a plasmid expressing either pgpA, pgpB, or pgpC. When the triple mutant is covered with the temperature-sensitive plasmid pMAK705 expressing any one of the three pgp genes, the cells grow at 30 but not 42 °C. As growth slows at 42 °C, PGP accumulates to high levels, and the PG content declines. PgpC orthologs are present in many other bacteria. PMID:21148555

  9. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa; Silverwood, Richard J; Guo, Yiran; Ye, Zheng; Prieto-Merino, David; Dehghan, Abbas; Trompet, Stella; Wong, Andrew; Cavadino, Alana; Drogan, Dagmar; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Yesupriya, Ajay; Leusink, Maarten; Sundstrom, Johan; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Pikhart, Hynek; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Panayiotou, Andrie G; Borinskaya, Svetlana A; Finan, Chris; Shah, Sonia; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Folkersen, Lasse; Eriksson, Per; Ricceri, Fulvio; Melander, Olle; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Gamble, Dale M; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Ross, Owen A; McLachlan, Stela; Vikhireva, Olga; Sluijs, Ivonne; Scott, Robert A; Adamkova, Vera; Flicker, Leon; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Power, Christine; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meade, Tom; Marmot, Michael G; Ferro, Jose M; Paulos-Pinheiro, Sofia; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Leach, Irene Mateo; Verweij, Niek; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Doevendans, Pieter A; Cramer, Maarten J; van der Harst, Pim; Klungel, Olaf H; Dowling, Nicole F; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kumari, Meena; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Weikert, Cornelia; Boeing, Heiner; Ebrahim, Shah; Gaunt, Tom R; Price, Jackie F; Lannfelt, Lars; Peasey, Anne; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Malyutina, Sofia; Voevoda, Mikhail I; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; Norman, Paul E; Hankey, Graeme J; Bergmann, Manuela M; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Cooper, Jackie; Palmen, Jutta; Spiering, Wilko; de Jong, Pim A; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ikram, M Arfan; Ford, Ian; Hyppönen, Elina; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Hamsten, Anders; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Tjønneland, Anne; Tolstrup, Janne S; Rimm, Eric; Beulens, Joline W J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard; Vicente, Astrid M; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Jukema, J Wouter; Meschia, James; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sharp, Stephen J; Fornage, Myriam; Kooperberg, Charles; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Dai, James Y; Lanktree, Matthew B; Siscovick, David S; Jorgenson, Eric; Spring, Bonnie; Coresh, Josef; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Schreiner, Pamela J; Ellison, R Curtis; Tsai, Michael Y; Patel, Sanjay R; Redline, Susan; Johnson, Andrew D; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rotter, Jerome I; Boerwinkle, Eric; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Sattar, Naveed; Lawlor, Debbie A; Whittaker, John; Davey Smith, George; Mukamal, Kenneth; Psaty, Bruce M; Wilson, James G; Lange, Leslie A; Hamidovic, Ajna; Hingorani, Aroon D; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bobak, Martin; Leon, David A; Langenberg, Claudia; Palmer, Tom M; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Dudbridge, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Objective To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease. Design Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of 56 epidemiological studies. Participants 261 991 individuals of European descent, including 20 259 coronary heart disease cases and 10 164 stroke events. Data were available on ADH1B rs1229984 variant, alcohol phenotypes, and cardiovascular biomarkers. Main outcome measures Odds ratio for coronary heart disease and stroke associated with the ADH1B variant in all individuals and by categories of alcohol consumption. Results Carriers of the A-allele of ADH1B rs1229984 consumed 17.2% fewer units of alcohol per week (95% confidence interval 15.6% to 18.9%), had a lower prevalence of binge drinking (odds ratio 0.78 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.84)), and had higher abstention (odds ratio 1.27 (1.21 to 1.34)) than non-carriers. Rs1229984 A-allele carriers had lower systolic blood pressure (−0.88 (−1.19 to −0.56) mm Hg), interleukin-6 levels (−5.2% (−7.8 to −2.4%)), waist circumference (−0.3 (−0.6 to −0.1) cm), and body mass index (−0.17 (−0.24 to −0.10) kg/m2). Rs1229984 A-allele carriers had lower odds of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.90 (0.84 to 0.96)). The protective association of the ADH1B rs1229984 A-allele variant remained the same across all categories of alcohol consumption (P=0.83 for heterogeneity). Although no association of rs1229984 was identified with the combined subtypes of stroke, carriers of the A-allele had lower odds of ischaemic stroke (odds ratio 0.83 (0.72 to 0.95)). Conclusions Individuals with a genetic variant associated with non-drinking and lower alcohol consumption had a more favourable cardiovascular profile and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease than those without the genetic variant. This suggests that reduction of alcohol consumption, even for light to moderate drinkers, is beneficial for

  10. Searching for the role of protein phosphatases in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    da-Silva, A M; Zapella, P D; Andrioli, L P; Campanhã, R B; Fiorini, L C; Etchebehere, L C; da-Costa-Maia, J C; Terenzi, H F

    1999-07-01

    Preference for specific protein substrates together with differential sensitivity to activators and inhibitors has allowed classification of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs) into four major types designated types 1, 2A, 2B and 2C (PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP2C, respectively). Comparison of sequences within their catalytic domains has indicated that PP1, PP2A and PP2B are members of the same gene family named PPP. On the other hand, the type 2C enzyme does not share sequence homology with the PPP members and thus represents another gene family, known as PPM. In this report we briefly summarize some of our studies about the role of serine/threonine phosphatases in growth and differentiation of three different eukaryotic models: Blastocladiella emersonii, Neurospora crassa and Dictyostelium discoideum. Our observations suggest that PP2C is the major phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of amidotransferase, an enzyme that controls cell wall synthesis during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination. We also report the existence of a novel acid- and thermo-stable protein purified from Neurospora crassa mycelia, which specifically inhibits the PP1 activity of this fungus and mammals. Finally, we comment on our recent results demonstrating that Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene that codes for PP1, although this activity has never been demonstrated biochemically in this organism. PMID:10454741