Science.gov

Sample records for phosphatase shp-2 controls

  1. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 regulates recovery of endothelial adherens junctions through control of β-catenin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Ilse; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Bennett, Anton M.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2012-01-01

    Impaired endothelial barrier function results in a persistent increase in endothelial permeability and vascular leakage. Repair of a dysfunctional endothelial barrier requires controlled restoration of adherens junctions, comprising vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and associated β-, γ-, α-, and p120-catenins. Little is known about the mechanisms by which recovery of VE-cadherin–mediated cell–cell junctions is regulated. Using the inflammatory mediator thrombin, we demonstrate an important role for the Src homology 2-domain containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) in mediating recovery of the VE-cadherin–controlled endothelial barrier. Using SHP2 substrate-trapping mutants and an in vitro phosphatase activity assay, we validate β-catenin as a bona fide SHP2 substrate. SHP2 silencing and SHP2 inhibition both result in delayed recovery of endothelial barrier function after thrombin stimulation. Moreover, on thrombin challenge, we find prolonged elevation in tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin–associated β-catenin in SHP2-depleted cells. No disassembly of the VE-cadherin complex is observed throughout the thrombin response. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we show that loss of SHP2 reduces the mobility of VE-cadherin at recovered cell–cell junctions. In conclusion, our data show that the SHP2 phosphatase plays an important role in the recovery of disrupted endothelial cell–cell junctions by dephosphorylating VE-cadherin–associated β-catenin and promoting the mobility of VE-cadherin at the plasma membrane. PMID:22956765

  2. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 controls urokinase-dependent signaling and functions in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyan, Julia Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2009-04-01

    The urokinase (uPA)/urokinase receptor (uPAR) multifunctional system is an important mediator of functional behaviour of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). uPAR associates with platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} (PDGFR-{beta}), which serves as a transmembrane adaptor for uPAR in VSMC, to transduce intracellular signaling and initiate functional changes. The precise and rapid propagation of these signaling cascades demands both strict and flexible regulatory mechanisms that remain unexplored. We provide evidence that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 mediates these processes. uPA regulated SHP-2 phosphorylation, catalytic activity, and its co-localization and association with the PDGFR-{beta}. Active PDGFR-{beta} was required for the uPA-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation. uPAR-directed STAT1 pathway was disturbed in cells expressing SHP-2 inactive mutant. Both, cell proliferation and migration were impaired in VSMC with downregulated SHP-2. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we found that uPA induced SHP-2 recruitment to lipid rafts. Disruption of rafts abolished uPA-related control of SHP-2 phosphorylation, its association with PDGFR-{beta} and finally the VSMC functional responses. Our results demonstrate that SHP-2 plays an important role in uPA-directed signaling and functional control of human VSMC and suggest that this phosphatase might contribute to the pathogenesis of the uPA-related vascular remodeling.

  3. SHP-2 Phosphatase Prevents Colonic Inflammation by Controlling Secretory Cell Differentiation and Maintaining Host-Microbiota Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, Geneviève; Langlois, Ariane; De Palma, Giada; Langlois, Marie-Josée; McCarville, Justin L; Gagné-Sanfaçon, Jessica; Perreault, Nathalie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Bercik, Premysl; Boudreau, François; Verdu, Elena F; Rivard, Nathalie

    2016-11-01

    Polymorphisms in the PTPN11 gene encoding for the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 were described in patients with ulcerative colitis. We have recently demonstrated that mice with an intestinal epithelial cell-specific deletion of SHP-2 (SHP-2(IEC-KO) ) develop severe colitis 1 month after birth. However, the mechanisms by which SHP-2 deletion induces colonic inflammation remain to be elucidated. We generated SHP-2(IEC-KO) mice lacking Myd88 exclusively in the intestinal epithelium. The colonic phenotype was histologically analyzed and cell differentiation was determined by electron microscopy and lysozyme or Alcian blue staining. Microbiota composition was analyzed by 16S sequencing. Results show that innate defense genes including those specific to Paneth cells were strongly up-regulated in SHP-2-deficient colons. Expansion of intermediate cells (common progenitors of the Goblet and Paneth cell lineages) was found in the colon of SHP-2(IEC-KO) mice whereas Goblet cell number was clearly diminished. These alterations in Goblet/intermediate cell ratio were noticed 2 weeks after birth, before the onset of inflammation and were associated with significant alterations in microbiota composition. Indeed, an increase in Enterobacteriaceae and a decrease in Firmicutes were observed in the colon of these mice, indicating that dysbiosis also occurred prior to inflammation. Importantly, loss of epithelial Myd88 expression inhibited colitis development in SHP-2(IEC-KO) mice, rescued Goblet/intermediate cell ratio, and prevented NFκB hyperactivation and inflammation. These data indicate that SHP-2 is functionally important for the maintenance of appropriate barrier function and host-microbiota homeostasis in the large intestine. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2529-2540, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27100271

  4. SHP-2 phosphatase activity is required for PECAM-1-dependent cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Xu; Cao, Gaoyuan; Williams, James T; Delisser, Horace M

    2010-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) has been implicated in endothelial cell motility during angiogenesis. Although there is evidence that SHP-2 plays a role in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, the molecular basis of the activity of SHP-2 in this process has not been defined. To investigate the requirement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, studies were done in which various constructs of SHP-2 were expressed in cell transfectants expressing PECAM-1. We observed that the levels of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association with PECAM-1 were significantly increased in cells expressing a phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, suggesting that the level of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and thus SHP-2 binding are regulated in part by bound, catalytically active SHP-2. We subsequently found that expression of PECAM-1 stimulated wound-induced migration and the formation of filopodia (a morphological feature of motile cells). These activities were associated with increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and the dephosphorylation of paxillin (an event implicated in the activation of MAPK). The phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, however, suppressed these PECAM-1-dependent phenomena, whereas the activity of PECAM-1 expressing cells was not altered by expression of wild-type SHP-2 or SHP-2 in which the scaffold/adaptor function had been disabled. Pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 phosphatase activity also suppressed PECAM-1-dependent motility. Furthermore, PECAM-1 expression also stimulates tube formation, but none of the SHP-2 constructs affected this process. These findings therefore suggest a model for the involvement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent motility in which SHP-2, recruited by its interaction with PECAM-1, targets paxillin to ultimately activate the MAPK pathway and downstream events required for cell motility. PMID:20631249

  5. Specific inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 identified by high-throughput docking

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Klaus; Grosskopf, Stefanie; Lum, Ching Tung; Würtele, Martin; Röder, Nadine; von Kries, Jens Peter; Rosario, Marta; Rademann, Jörg; Birchmeier, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 is a positive regulator of growth factor signaling. Gain-of-function mutations in several types of leukemia define Shp2 as a bona fide oncogene. We performed a high-throughput in silico screen for small-molecular-weight compounds that bind the catalytic site of Shp2. We have identified the phenylhydrazonopyrazolone sulfonate PHPS1 as a potent and cell-permeable inhibitor, which is specific for Shp2 over the closely related tyrosine phosphatases Shp1 and PTP1B. PHPS1 inhibits Shp2-dependent cellular events such as hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF)-induced epithelial cell scattering and branching morphogenesis. PHPS1 also blocks Shp2-dependent downstream signaling, namely HGF/SF-induced sustained phosphorylation of the Erk1/2 MAP kinases and dephosphorylation of paxillin. Furthermore, PHPS1 efficiently inhibits activation of Erk1/2 by the leukemia-associated Shp2 mutant, Shp2-E76K, and blocks the anchorage-independent growth of a variety of human tumor cell lines. The PHPS compound class is therefore suitable for further development of therapeutics for the treatment of Shp2-dependent diseases. PMID:18480264

  6. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Nan P; LaMarche, Matthew J; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G; Dobson, Jason R; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J; Sellers, William R; Stams, Travis; Fortin, Pascal D

    2016-07-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27362227

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 promotes invadopodia formation through suppression of Rho signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-enriched membrane protrusions that are important for extracellular matrix degradation and invasive cell motility. Src homolog domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been shown to play an important role in promoting cancer metastasis, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we found that depletion of SHP2 by short-hairpin RNA suppressed invadopodia formation in several cancer cell lines, particularly in the SAS head and neck squamous cell line. In contrast, overexpression of SHP2 promoted invadopodia formation in the CAL27 head and neck squamous cell line, which expresses low levels of endogenous SHP2. The depletion of SHP2 in SAS cells significantly decreased their invasive motility. The suppression of invadopodia formation by SHP2 depletion was restored by the Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (a Rho GTPase inhibitor) or Y27632 (a specific inhibitor for Rho-associated kinase). Together, our results suggest that SHP2 may promote invadopodia formation through inhibition of Rho signaling in cancer cells. PMID:26204488

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 promotes invadopodia formation through suppression of Rho signaling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2015-09-15

    Invadopodia are actin-enriched membrane protrusions that are important for extracellular matrix degradation and invasive cell motility. Src homolog domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been shown to play an important role in promoting cancer metastasis, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we found that depletion of SHP2 by short-hairpin RNA suppressed invadopodia formation in several cancer cell lines, particularly in the SAS head and neck squamous cell line. In contrast, overexpression of SHP2 promoted invadopodia formation in the CAL27 head and neck squamous cell line, which expresses low levels of endogenous SHP2. The depletion of SHP2 in SAS cells significantly decreased their invasive motility. The suppression of invadopodia formation by SHP2 depletion was restored by the Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (a Rho GTPase inhibitor) or Y27632 (a specific inhibitor for Rho-associated kinase). Together, our results suggest that SHP2 may promote invadopodia formation through inhibition of Rho signaling in cancer cells. PMID:26204488

  9. A tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 gain-of-function mutation enhances malignancy of breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Haoshu; Liu, Yakun; Chen, Danlei; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Xia; Wei, Daoyan; Qu, Chengkui; Wang, Siying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that Src homologous protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (SHP2) mutations promote cancer development in several solid tumours. In this study, we focused on the in vivo and in vitro effects of an SHP2 mutation on the breast cancer phenotype to determine whether this mutation is correlated with a malignant phenotype. Methods: Mutant PTPN11 cDNA (D61G) was transduced into MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 cells. The effects of the D61G mutation on tumourigenesis and malignant behaviours, such as cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion, were examined. Potential underlying molecular mechanisms, i.e., activation of the Gab1-Ras-Erk axis, were also examined. Results: In vitro experiments revealed that tumour adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly increased in the SHP2 D61G mutant groups. Consistently, in vivo experiments also showed that the tumour sizes and weights were increased significantly in the SHP2 D61G-MB231 group (p < 0.001) in association with tumour metastasis. Mechanistically, the PTPN11 mutation resulted in activation of the Ras-ErK pathway. The binding between Gab1 and mutant SHP2 was significantly increased. Conclusion: Mutant SHP2 significantly promotes tumour migration and invasion at least partially through activation of the Gab1-Ras-Erk axis. This finding could have direct implications for breast cancer therapy. PMID:26673822

  10. Cytoplasmic Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2 Coordinates Hepatic Regulation of Bile Acid and FGF15/19 Signaling to Repress Bile Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangwei; Hsu, Diane D.F.; Li, Bing; Luo, Xiaolin; Alderson, Nazilla; Qiao, Liping; Ma, Lina; Zhu, Helen H.; He, Zhao; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Ji, Kaihong; Li, Jiefu; Shao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Eric; Li, Tiangang; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bile acid (BA) biosynthesis is tightly controlled by intrahepatic negative feedback signaling elicited by BA binding to farnesoid X receptor (FXR), and also by enterohepatic communication involving ileal BA reabsorption and FGF15/19 secretion. However, how these pathways are coordinated is poorly understood. We show here that non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 is a critical player that couples and regulates the intrahepatic and enterohepatic signals for repression of BA synthesis. Ablating Shp2 in hepatocytes suppressed signal relay from FGFR4, receptor for FGF15/19, and attenuated BA activation of FXR signaling, resulting in elevation of systemic BA levels and chronic hepatobiliary disorders in mice. Acting immediately downstream of FGFR4, Shp2 associates with FRS2α and promotes the receptor activation and signal relay to several pathways. These results elucidate a molecular mechanism for the control of BA homeostasis by Shp2 through orchestration of multiple signals in hepatocytes. PMID:24981838

  11. Alterations in the phosphoproteomic profile of cells expressing a non-functional form of the SHP2 phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Corallino, Salvatore; Iwai, Leo K; Payne, Leo S; Huang, Paul H; Sacco, Francesca; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa

    2016-09-25

    The phosphatase SHP-2 plays an essential role in growth factor signaling and mutations in its locus is the cause of congenital and acquired pathologies. Mutations of SHP-2 are known to affect the activation of the RAS pathway. Gain-of-function mutations cause the Noonan syndrome, the most common non-chromosomal congenital disorder. In order to obtain a holistic picture of the intricate regulatory mechanisms underlying SHP-2 physiology and pathology, we set out to characterize perturbations of the cell phosphorylation profile caused by an altered localization of SHP-2. To describe the proteins whose activity may be directly or indirectly modulated by SHP-2 activity, we identified tyrosine peptides that are differentially phosphorylated in wild type SHP-2 cells and isogenic cells expressing a non-functional SHP-2 variant that cannot dephosphorylate the physiological substrates due to a defect in cellular localization upon growth factor stimulation. By an iTRAQ based strategy coupled to mass spectrometry, we have identified 63 phosphorylated tyrosine residues in 53 different proteins whose phosphorylation is affected by SHP-2 activity. Some of these confirm already established regulatory mechanisms while many others suggest new possible signaling routes that may contribute to the modulation of the ERK and p38 pathways by SHP-2. Interestingly many new proteins that we found to be regulated by SHP-2 activity are implicated in the formation and regulation of focal adhesions. PMID:26316256

  12. Substrate Specificity of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases 1B, RPTPα, SHP-1, and SHP-2

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lige; Chen, Xianwen; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Selner, Nicholas G.; Meyer, Tiffany M.; Wavreille, Anne-Sophie; Chan, Richard; Iorio, Caterina; Zhou, Xiang; Neel, Benjamin G.; Pei, Dehua

    2011-01-01

    We determined the substrate specificities of the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) PTP1B, RPTPα, SHP-1, and SHP-2 by on-bead screening of combinatorial peptide libraries and solution-phase kinetic analysis of individually synthesized phosphotyrosyl (pY) peptides. These PTPs exhibit different levels of sequence specificity and catalytic efficiency. The catalytic domain of RPTPα has very weak sequence specificity and is approximately two orders of magnitude less active than the other three PTPs. The PTP1B catalytic domain has modest preference for acidic residues on both sides of pY, is highly active towards multiply phosphorylated peptides, but disfavors basic residues at any position, a Gly at the pY−1 position, or a Pro at the pY+1 position. By contrast, SHP-1 and SHP-2 share similar but much narrower substrate specificities, with a strong preference for acidic and aromatic hydrophobic amino acids on both sides of the pY residue. An efficient SHP-1/2 substrate generally contains two or more acidic residues on the N-terminal side and one or more acidic residues on the C-terminal side of pY, but no basic residues. Subtle differences exist between SHP-1 and SHP-2 in that SHP-1 has a stronger preference for acidic residues at the pY−1 and pY+1 positions and the two SHPs prefer acidic residues at different positions N-terminal to pY. A survey of the known protein substrates of PTP1B, SHP-1, and SHP-2 shows an excellent agreement between the in vivo dephosphorylation pattern and the in vitro specificity profiles derived from library screening. These results suggest that different PTPs have distinct sequence specificity profiles and the intrinsic activity/specificity of the PTP domain is an important determinant of the enzyme’s in vivo substrate specificity. PMID:21291263

  13. Salicylic Acid Based Small Molecule Inhibitor for the Oncogenic Src Homology-2 Domain Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 (SHP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xian; He, Yantao; Liu, Sijiu; Yu, Zhihong; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yang, Zhenyun; Dong, Yuanshu; Nabinger, Sarah C.; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Wang, Lina; Chan, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2010-08-13

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) plays a pivotal role in growth factor and cytokine signaling. Gain-of-function SHP2 mutations are associated with Noonan syndrome, various kinds of leukemias, and solid tumors. Thus, there is considerable interest in SHP2 as a potential target for anticancer and antileukemia therapy. We report a salicylic acid based combinatorial library approach aimed at binding both active site and unique nearby subpockets for enhanced affinity and selectivity. Screening of the library led to the identification of a SHP2 inhibitor II-B08 (compound 9) with highly efficacious cellular activity. Compound 9 blocks growth factor stimulated ERK1/2 activation and hematopoietic progenitor proliferation, providing supporting evidence that chemical inhibition of SHP2 may be therapeutically useful for anticancer and antileukemia treatment. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the structure of SHP2 in complex with 9 reveals molecular determinants that can be exploited for the acquisition of more potent and selective SHP2 inhibitors.

  14. Raft-mediated Src homology 2 domain-containing proteintyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) regulation in microglia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Park, Soo Jung; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo

    2006-04-28

    Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signals play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, and they recently have been considered as therapeutic targets for suppressing oncogenesis and inflammatory process. Phosphatases including Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatases (SHPs), are well known as negative regulators of the JAK-STAT pathway, but their precise mechanisms are largely unknown. Based on our previous finding that in cultured rat brain microglia, gangliosides induce rapid and transient activation of the JAK-STAT pathway, we hypothesized that raft-mediated SHP-2 activation is involved in transient activation of JAK-STAT signaling by gangliosides. We first used Western blot analysis to confirm that gangliosides rapidly induce the phosphorylation of SHP-2. This was inhibited by pretreatment with the lipid raft disrupter filipin and was restored following filipin removal. Immunostaining using antibodies directed against p-SHP-2 and flotillin-1 revealed ganglioside-induced clustering and polarization of p-SHP-2 in membrane rafts. Raft-associated regulation of SHP-2 was further demonstrated in fractionation experiments using detergent and detergent-free sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. Rapid SHP-2 recruitment to detergent-insoluble raft fractions by gangliosides was inhibited by filipin, further indicating the involvement of rafts. We also confirmed by immunoprecipitation that SHP-2 rapidly binds in a raft-dependent manner to JAK2 in response to gangliosides. Our study therefore showed that transient activation of the JAK-STAT pathway by gangliosides is accomplished by SHP-2 in a raft-dependent manner in brain microglia. PMID:16507579

  15. Eosinophil differentiation in the bone marrow is promoted by protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Xia, L-x; Hua, W; Jin, Y; Tian, B-p; Qiu, Z-w; Zhang, C; Che, L-q; Zhou, H-b; Wu, Y-f; Huang, H-q; Lan, F; Ke, Y-h; Lee, J J; Li, W; Ying, S-m; Chen, Z-h; Shen, H-h

    2016-01-01

    SHP2 participates in multiple signaling events by mediating T-cell development and function, and regulates cytokine-dependent granulopoiesis. To explore whether and how SHP2 can regulate bone-marrow eosinophil differentiation, we investigate the contribution of SHP2 in the bone-marrow eosinophil development in allergic mice. Blockade of SHP2 function by SHP2 inhibitor PHPS-1 or conditional shp2 knockdown by adenovirus-inhibited bone-marrow-derived eosinophil differentiation in vitro, with no detectable effects on the apoptosis of eosinophils. Furthermore, SHP2 induced eosinophil differentiation via regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. Myeloid shp2 conditional knockout mice (LysMcreshp2flox/flox) failed to induce eosinophilia as well as airway hyper-responsiveness. The SHP2 inhibitor PHPS-1 also alleviated eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness, accompanied by significantly reduced levels of systemic eosinophils and eosinophil lineage-committed progenitors in allergic mice. We demonstrate that inhibition of eosinophil development is SHP2-dependent and SHP2 is sufficient to promote eosinophil formation in vivo. Our data reveal SHP2 as a critical regulator of eosinophil differentiation, and inhibition of SHP2 specifically in myeloid cells alleviates allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27054330

  16. Regulation of interleukin-3-induced substrate phosphorylation and cell survival by SHP-2 (Src-homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2).

    PubMed

    Wheadon, Helen; Edmead, Christine; Welham, Melanie J

    2003-11-15

    The cytosolic SHP-2 (Src homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) has previously been implicated in IL-3 (interleukin-3) signalling [Bone, Dechert, Jirik, Schrader and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 14470 -14476; Craddock and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29281-29289; Welham, Dechert, Leslie, Jirik and Schrader (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 23764-23768; Qu, Nguyen, Chen and Feng (2001) Blood 97, 911-914]. To investigate the role of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling in greater detail, we have inducibly expressed WT (wild-type) or two potentially substrate-trapping mutant forms of SHP-2, generated by mutation of Asp-425 to Ala (D425A) or Cyst-459 to Ser (C459S), in IL-3-dependent BaF/3 cells. Effects on IL-3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, signal transduction and functional responses were examined. Expression of C459S SHP-2 protected the beta-chain of the murine IL-3R (IL-3 receptor), the adaptor protein Gab2 (Grb2-associated binder 2), and a cytosolic protein of 48 kDa from tyrosine dephosphorylation, consistent with them being bona fide substrates of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling. The tyrosine phosphorylation of a 135 kDa transmembrane protein was also protected upon expression of C459S SHP-2. We have identified the inhibitory immunoreceptor PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1)/CD31 (cluster determinant 31) as a component of this 135 kDa substrate and also show that IL-3 can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1. Expression of WT, C459S and D425A forms of SHP-2 had little effect on IL-3-driven proliferation or STAT5 (signal transduction and activators of transcription) phosphorylation or activation of protein kinase B. However, expression of WT SHP-2 increased ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) activation. Interestingly, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased ERK activation at later times after IL-3 stimulation, but potentiated IL-3-induced activation of Jun N-terminal kinases. In addition, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased cell survival in

  17. Regulation of interleukin-3-induced substrate phosphorylation and cell survival by SHP-2 (Src-homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2).

    PubMed Central

    Wheadon, Helen; Edmead, Christine; Welham, Melanie J

    2003-01-01

    The cytosolic SHP-2 (Src homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) has previously been implicated in IL-3 (interleukin-3) signalling [Bone, Dechert, Jirik, Schrader and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 14470 -14476; Craddock and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29281-29289; Welham, Dechert, Leslie, Jirik and Schrader (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 23764-23768; Qu, Nguyen, Chen and Feng (2001) Blood 97, 911-914]. To investigate the role of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling in greater detail, we have inducibly expressed WT (wild-type) or two potentially substrate-trapping mutant forms of SHP-2, generated by mutation of Asp-425 to Ala (D425A) or Cyst-459 to Ser (C459S), in IL-3-dependent BaF/3 cells. Effects on IL-3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, signal transduction and functional responses were examined. Expression of C459S SHP-2 protected the beta-chain of the murine IL-3R (IL-3 receptor), the adaptor protein Gab2 (Grb2-associated binder 2), and a cytosolic protein of 48 kDa from tyrosine dephosphorylation, consistent with them being bona fide substrates of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling. The tyrosine phosphorylation of a 135 kDa transmembrane protein was also protected upon expression of C459S SHP-2. We have identified the inhibitory immunoreceptor PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1)/CD31 (cluster determinant 31) as a component of this 135 kDa substrate and also show that IL-3 can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1. Expression of WT, C459S and D425A forms of SHP-2 had little effect on IL-3-driven proliferation or STAT5 (signal transduction and activators of transcription) phosphorylation or activation of protein kinase B. However, expression of WT SHP-2 increased ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) activation. Interestingly, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased ERK activation at later times after IL-3 stimulation, but potentiated IL-3-induced activation of Jun N-terminal kinases. In addition, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased cell survival in

  18. The major vault protein is a novel substrate for the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 and scaffold protein in epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Sivanagarani; Zito, Christina I; Mossink, Marieke H; Wiemer, Erik A C; Bennett, Anton M

    2004-07-01

    The catalytic activity of the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-2, is required for virtually all of its signaling effects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of SHP-2 signaling, therefore, rests upon the identification of its target substrates. In this report, we have used SHP-2 substrate-trapping mutants to identify the major vault protein (MVP) as a putative SHP-2 substrate. MVP is the predominant component of vaults that are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes of unknown function. We show that MVP is dephosphorylated by SHP-2 in vitro and it forms an enzyme-substrate complex with SHP-2 in vivo. In response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), SHP-2 associates via its SH2 domains with tyrosyl-phosphorylated MVP. MVP also interacts with the activated form of the extracellular-regulated kinases (Erks) in response to EGF and a constitutive complex between tyrosyl-phosphorylated MVP, SHP-2, and the Erks was detected in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Using MVP-deficient fibroblasts, we demonstrate that MVP cooperates with Ras for optimal EGF-induced Elk-1 activation and is required for cell survival. We propose that MVP functions as a novel scaffold protein for both SHP-2 and Erk. The regulation of MVP tyrosyl phosphorylation by SHP-2 may play an important role in cell survival signaling. PMID:15133037

  19. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulates phosphotyrosine phosphatase SHP2 in bovine adrenocortical cells: phosphorylation and activation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rocchi, S; Gaillard, I; van Obberghen, E; Chambaz, E M; Vilgrain, I

    2000-01-01

    During activation of adrenocortical cells by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), tyrosine dephosphorylation of paxillin is stimulated and this correlates with protrusion of filopodial structures and a decreased number of focal adhesions. These effects are inhibited by Na(3)VO(4), a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor [Vilgrain, Chinn, Gaillard, Chambaz and Feige (1998) Biochem. J. 332, 533-540]. However, the tyrosine phosphatases involved in these processes remain to be identified. In this study, we provide evidence that the Src homology domain (SH)2-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase (SHP)2, but not SHP1, is expressed in adrenocortical cells and is phosphorylated upon ACTH challenge. ACTH (10(-8) M) treatment of (32)P-labelled adrenocortical cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylated SHP2. By probing SHP2-containing immunoprecipitates with an antibody to phosphoserine we found that SHP2 was phosphorylated on serine in ACTH-treated cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, using an in vitro kinase assay, we showed that SHP2 was a target for cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Serine was identified as the only target amino acid phosphorylated in SHP2. Phosphorylation of SHP2 by PKA resulted in a dramatic stimulation of phosphatase activity measured either with insulin receptor substrate-1 or with the synthetic peptide [(32)P]poly(Glu/Tyr) as substrate. In an in-gel assay of SHP2-containing immunoprecipitates, phosphorylated in vitro by PKA or isolated from adrenocortical cells treated with 10 nM ACTH, a pronounced activation of SHP2 activity was shown. These observations clearly support the idea that a PKA-mediated signal transduction pathway contributes to SHP2 regulation in adrenocortical cells and point to SHP2 as a possible mediator of the effects of ACTH. PMID:11085942

  20. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signals through SHP2 to regulate primary mouse myoblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ju; Reed, Sarah A.; Johnson, Sally E.

    2009-08-01

    Niche localized HGF plays an integral role in G{sub 0} exit and the return to mitotic activity of adult skeletal muscle satellite cells. HGF actions are regulated by MET initiated intracellular signaling events that include recruitment of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The importance of SHP2 in HGF-mediated signaling was examined in myoblasts and primary cultures of satellite cells. Myoblasts stably expressing SHP2 (23A2-SHP2) demonstrate increased proliferation rates by comparison to controls or myoblasts expressing a phosphatase-deficient SHP2 (23A2-SHP2DN). By comparison to 23A2 myoblasts, treatment of 23A2-SHP2 cells with HGF does not further increase proliferation rates and 23A2-SHP2DN myoblasts are unresponsive to HGF. Importantly, the effects of SHP2 are independent of downstream ERK1/2 activity as inclusion of PD98059 does not blunt the HGF-induced proliferative response. SHP2 function was further evaluated in primary satellite cell cultures. Ectopic expression of SHP2 in satellite cells tends to decrease proliferation rates and siSHP2 causes an increase the percentage of dividing myogenic cells. Interestingly, treatment of satellite cells with high concentrations of HGF (50 ng/ml) inhibits proliferation, which can be overcome by knockdown of SHP2. From these results, we conclude that HGF signals through SHP2 in myoblasts and satellite cells to directly alter proliferation rates.

  1. Noonan Syndrome/Leukemia-associated Gain-of-function Mutations in SHP-2 Phosphatase (PTPN11) Enhance Cell Migration and Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siying; Yu, Wen-Mei; Zhang, Wanming; McCrae, Keith R.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in SHP-2 phosphatase (PTPN11) that cause hyperactivation of its catalytic activity have been identified in Noonan syndrome and various childhood leukemias. Recent studies suggest that the gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of SHP-2 play a causal role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GOF mutations of SHP-2 induce these phenotypes are not fully understood. Here, we show that GOF mutations in SHP-2, such as E76K and D61G, drastically increase spreading and migration of various cell types, including hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. More importantly, in vivo angiogenesis in SHP-2 D61G knock-in mice is also enhanced. Mechanistic studies suggest that the increased cell migration is attributed to the enhanced β1 integrin outside-in signaling. In response to β1 integrin cross-linking or fibronectin stimulation, activation of ERK and Akt kinases is greatly increased by SHP-2 GOF mutations. Also, integrin-induced activation of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases is elevated. Interestingly, mutant cells with the SHP-2 GOF mutation (D61G) are more sensitive than wild-type cells to the suppression of cell motility by inhibition of these pathways. Collectively, these studies reaffirm the positive role of SHP-2 phosphatase in cell motility and suggest a new mechanism by which SHP-2 GOF mutations contribute to diseases. PMID:19008228

  2. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  3. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-04-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis.

  4. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-01-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27101899

  5. A salicylic acid-based small molecule inhibitor for the oncogenic Src homology-2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; He, Yantao; Liu, Sijiu; Yu, Zhihong; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yang, Zhenyun; Dong, Yuanshu; Nabinger, Sarah C.; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Wang, Lina; Chan, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2010-01-01

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) plays a pivotal role in growth factor and cytokine signaling. Gain-of-function SHP2 mutations are associated with Noonan syndrome, various kinds of leukemias and solid tumors. Thus there is considerable interest in SHP2 as a potential target for anti-cancer and anti-leukemia therapy. We report a salicylic acid-based combinatorial library approach aimed to bind both active site and unique nearby sub-pockets for enhanced affinity and selectivity. Screening of the library led to the identification of a SHP2 inhibitor II-B08 (compound 9) with highly efficacious cellular activity. Compound 9 blocks growth factor stimulated ERK1/2 activation and hematopoietic progenitor proliferation, providing supporting evidence that chemical inhibition of SHP2 may be therapeutically useful for anti-cancer and anti-leukemia treatment. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the structure of SHP2 in complex with 9 reveals molecular determinants that can be exploited for the acquisition of more potent and selective SHP2 inhibitors. PMID:20170098

  6. Characterization of phosphotyrosine binding motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of B and T lymphocyte attenuator required for association with protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2.

    PubMed

    Gavrieli, Maya; Watanabe, Norihiko; Loftin, Susan K; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2003-12-26

    B and T lymphocytes express receptors providing positive and negative co-stimulatory signals. We recently identified a novel co-stimulatory molecule, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), which exerts inhibitory effects on B and T lymphocytes. The cytoplasmic domain of murine and human BTLA share three conserved tyrosine-based signaling motifs, a Grb-2 recognition consensus, and two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of BTLA induced the association with the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. Association of SHP-1 and SHP-2 to other receptors can involve recruitment to either a single receptor ITIM or to two receptor ITIMs. Here, we analyzed the requirements of BTLA interaction with SHP-1 and SHP-2 in a series of murine and human BTLA mutants. For human BTLA, mutations of either Y257 or Y282, but not Y226, abrogated association with both SHP-1 and SHP-2. For murine BTLA, mutation of either Y274 or Y299, but not Y245, also abrogated association with both SHP-1 and SHP-2. These results indicate that for both murine and human BTLA, association with SHP-1 or SHP-2 requires both of conserved ITIM motifs and does not involve the conserved Grb-2 consensus. Thus, similar to the bisphosphoryl tyrosine-based activation motif (BTAM) by which the Grb-2 associated binder (Gab1), PDGF receptor, and PECAM-1 recruit SHP-2, BTLA also relies on dual ITIMs for its association with the phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. PMID:14652006

  7. Shp2 suppresses the adipogenic differentiation of preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells at an early stage

    PubMed Central

    Tao, J; Zheng, L; Meng, M; Li, Y; Lu, Z

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatase protein Shp2 is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. However, the mechanism of Shp2 during adipogenesis is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of Shp2 in the terminal differentiation of preadipocytes. The results showed that Shp2 suppressed adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells; overexpression of Shp2 reduced lipid droplet production in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas Shp2 knockdown increased lipid droplet production in 3T3-L1 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Shp2 activity also enhanced adipocyte differentiation. Interestingly, Shp2 expression was specifically decreased early during differentiation in response to stimulation with the dexamethasone–methylisobutylxanthine–insulin (DMI) hormone cocktail. During the first 2 days of differentiation, Shp2 overexpression impaired the DMI-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in 3T3-L1 cells and blocked the peak expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins β and δ during preadipocyte differentiation. In conclusion, Shp2 downregulated the early stages of hormone-induced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and inhibited the expression of the first wave of transcription factors by suppressing the DMI-induced STAT3 signaling pathway. These discoveries point to a novel role of Shp2 during adipogenesis and support the hypothesis that Shp2 could be a therapeutic target for the control of obesity. PMID:27551539

  8. Molecular Mechanism for the Shp-2 Tyrosine Phosphatase Function in Promoting Growth Factor Stimulation of Erk Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Yu, De-Hua; Park, Morag; Marshall, Mark; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) by epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment was significantly decreased in mouse fibroblast cells expressing a mutant Shp-2 molecule lacking 65 amino acids in the SH2-N domain, Shp-2Δ46-110. To address the molecular mechanism for the positive role of Shp-2 in mediating Erk induction, we evaluated the activation of signaling components upstream of Erk in Shp-2 mutant cells. EGF-stimulated Ras, Raf, and Mek activation was significantly attenuated in Shp-2 mutant cells, suggesting that Shp-2 acts to promote Ras activation or to suppress the down-regulation of activated Ras. Biochemical analyses indicate that upon EGF stimulation, Shp-2 is recruited into a multiprotein complex assembled on the Gab1 docking molecule and that Shp-2 seems to exert its biological function by specifically dephosphorylating an unidentified molecule of 90 kDa in the complex. The mutant Shp-2Δ46-110 molecule failed to participate in the Gab1-organized complex for dephosphorylation of p90, correlating with a defective activation of the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk cascade in EGF-treated Shp-2 mutant cells. Evidence is also presented that Shp-2 does not appear to modulate the signal relay from EGF receptor to Ras through the Shc, Grb2, and Sos proteins. These results begin to elucidate the mechanism of Shp-2 function downstream of a receptor tyrosine kinase to promote the activation of the Ras-Erk pathway, with potential therapeutic applications in cancer treatment. PMID:10669730

  9. Programmed cell death 1 forms negative costimulatory microclusters that directly inhibit T cell receptor signaling by recruiting phosphatase SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Masako; Kobayashi-Imanishi, Wakana; Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2012-01-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is a negative costimulatory receptor critical for the suppression of T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Single cell imaging elucidated a molecular mechanism of PD-1–mediated suppression. PD-1 becomes clustered with T cell receptors (TCRs) upon binding to its ligand PD-L1 and is transiently associated with the phosphatase SHP2 (Src homology 2 domain–containing tyrosine phosphatase 2). These negative costimulatory microclusters induce the dephosphorylation of the proximal TCR signaling molecules. This results in the suppression of T cell activation and blockade of the TCR-induced stop signal. In addition to PD-1 clustering, PD-1–TCR colocalization within microclusters is required for efficient PD-1–mediated suppression. This inhibitory mechanism also functions in PD-1hi T cells generated in vivo and can be overridden by a neutralizing anti–PD-L1 antibody. Therefore, PD-1 microcluster formation is important for regulation of T cell activation. PMID:22641383

  10. Inhibition of SHP2 ameliorates the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianxun; Zeng, Li-Fan; Bronson, Roderick; Finnell, Michele; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Kontaridis, Maria I.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a devastating multisystemic autoimmune disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain elusive. Some patients with Noonan syndrome, a congenital disorder predominantly caused by gain-of-function mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase SH2 domain–containing PTP (SHP2), have been shown to develop SLE, suggesting a functional correlation between phosphatase activity and systemic autoimmunity. To test this directly, we measured SHP2 activity in spleen lysates isolated from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and found it was markedly increased compared with that in control mice. Similar increases in SHP2 activity were seen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from lupus patients relative to healthy patients. To determine whether SHP2 alters autoimmunity and related immunopathology, we treated MRL/lpr mice with an SHP2 inhibitor and found increased life span, suppressed crescentic glomerulonephritis, reduced spleen size, and diminished skin lesions. SHP2 inhibition also reduced numbers of double-negative T cells, normalized ERK/MAPK signaling, and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F, 2 cytokines involved in SLE-associated organ damage. Moreover, in cultured human lupus T cells, SHP2 inhibition reduced proliferation and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F, further implicating SHP2 in lupus-associated immunopathology. Taken together, these data identify SHP2 as a critical regulator of SLE pathogenesis and suggest targeting of its activity as a potent treatment for lupus patients. PMID:27183387

  11. Requirement of SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 for paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B)-mediated inhibitory signal.

    PubMed

    Maeda, A; Kurosaki, M; Ono, M; Takai, T; Kurosaki, T

    1998-04-20

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) (p91) molecule has been proposed to function as an inhibitory receptor in B cells and myeloid lineage cells. We demonstrate here that the cytoplasmic region of PIR-B is capable of inhibiting B cell activation. Mutational analysis of five cytoplasmic tyrosines indicate that tyrosine 771 in the motif VxYxxL plays the most crucial role in mediating the inhibitory signal. PIR-B-mediated inhibition was markedly reduced in the SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 double-deficient DT40 B cells, whereas this inhibition was unaffected in the inositol polyphosphate 5'-phosphatase SHIP-deficient cells. These data demonstrate that PIR-B can negatively regulate B cell receptor activation and that this PIR-B-mediated inhibition requires redundant functions of SHP-1 and SHP-2. PMID:9547347

  12. Induction of a tumor-associated activating mutation in protein tyrosine phosphatase Ptpn11 (Shp2) enhances mitochondrial metabolism, leading to oxidative stress and senescence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Shanhu; Hsu, Peter; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2013-09-01

    Activating mutations in Ptpn11 (Shp2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in diverse cell signaling pathways, are associated with pediatric leukemias and solid tumors. However, the pathogenic effects of these mutations have not been fully characterized. Here, we report that induction of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation, the most common and active Ptpn11 mutation found in leukemias and solid tumors, in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in proliferative arrest and premature senescence. As a result, apoptosis was markedly increased. These cellular responses were accompanied and mediated by up-regulation of p53 and p21. Moreover, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), byproducts of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, were elevated in Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells. Since Shp2 is also distributed to the mitochondria (in addition to the cytosol), the impact of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation on mitochondrial function was analyzed. These analyses revealed that oxygen consumption of Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells and the respiratory function of Ptpn11(E76K/+) mitochondria were significantly increased. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of mitochondrial Stat3, one of the substrates of Shp2 phosphatase, was greatly decreased in the mutant cells with the activating mutation Ptpn11(E76K/+). This study provides novel insights into the initial effects of tumor-associated Ptpn11 mutations. PMID:23884424

  13. Caveolin-1 is involved in reactive oxygen species-induced SHP-2 activation in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ji Hee; Park, Soo Jung; Jo, Ara; Jou, Ilo; Park, Jung Soo

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a neuroprotective role of Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) against ischemic brain injury. However, the molecular mechanisms of SHP-2 activation and those governing how SHP-2 exerts its function under oxidative stress conditions are not well understood. Recently we have reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress promotes the phosphorylation of endogenous SHP-2 through lipid rafts, and that this phosphorylation strongly occurs in astrocytes, but not in microglia. To investigate the molecules involved in events leading to phosphorylation of SHP-2, raft proteins were analyzed using astrocytes and microglia. Interestingly, caveolin-1 and -2 were detected only in astrocytes but not in microglia, whereas flotillin-1 was expressed in both cell types. To examine whether the H2O2-dependent phosphorylation of SHP-2 is mediated by caveolin-1, we used specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) to downregulate caveolin-1 expression. In the presence of caveolin-1 siRNA, the level of SHP-2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was significantly decreased, compared with in the presence of control siRNA. Overexpression of caveolin-1 effectively increased H2O2-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation in microglia. Lastly, H2O2 induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in astrocytes through caveolin-1. Our results suggest that caveolin-1 is involved in astrocyte-specific intracellular responses linked to the SHP-2-mediated signaling cascade following ROS-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21918362

  14. Shp2 SUMOylation promotes ERK activation and hepatocellular carcinoma development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Rong; Zhao, Xian; Qu, YingYing; Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Zhang, Hailong; Yuan, Haihua; Jin, Hui; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Chen, Qin; Huang, Jian; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Shp2, an ubiquitously expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase, is essential for regulation of Ras/ERK signaling pathway and tumorigenesis. Here we report that Shp2 is modified by SUMO1 at lysine residue 590 (K590) in its C-terminus, which is reduced by SUMO1-specific protease SENP1. Analysis of wild-type Shp2 and SUMOylation-defective Shp2K590R mutant reveals that SUMOylation of Shp2 promotes EGF-stimulated ERK signaling pathway and increases anchorage-independent cell growth and xenografted tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Furthermore, we find that mutant Shp2K590R reduces its binding with the scaffolding protein Gab1, and consistent with this, knockdown of SENP1 increased the interaction between Shp2 and Gab1. More surprisingly, we show that human Shp2 (hShp2) and mouse Shp2 (mShp2) have differential effects on ERK activation as a result of different SUMOylation level, which is due to the event of K590 at hShp2 substituted by R594 at mShp2. In summary, our data demonstrate that SUMOylation of Shp2 promotes ERK activation via facilitating the formation of Shp2-Gab1 complex and thereby accelerates HCC cell and tumor growth, which presents a novel regulatory mechanism underlying Shp2 in regulation of HCC development. PMID:25823821

  15. The Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP2 Associates with CUB Domain-Containing Protein-1 (CDCP1), Regulating Its Expression at the Cell Surface in a Phosphorylation-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Proust, Richard; Larue, Lionel; Gesbert, Franck

    2015-01-01

    CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is phosphorylated by SRC family kinases (SFK) before recruiting and activating PKCδ. CDCP1 is overproduced in many cancers. It promotes metastasis and resistance to anoïkis. The robust production of CDCP1 would be associated with stemness and has been proposed as a novel prognosis marker. The natural transmembrane location of CDCP1 makes it an ideal therapeutic target and treatments based on the use of appropriate antibodies are currently being evaluated. However, we still know very little about the molecular fate of CDCP1 and its downstream signaling events. Improvements in our understanding of the molecular events occurring downstream of CDCP1 are required to make use of changes of CDCP1 production or functions for therapeutic purposes. By the mean of co-immunoprecipitation and affinity precipitation we show here, for the first time, that CDCP1 interacts directly, with the cytosolic tyrosine phosphatase SHP2. Point mutants of CDCP1 show that residues Y734 and Y743 are responsible for its interaction with SHP2. It may therefore compete with SFK. We also demonstrate that a shRNA-mediated down regulation of SHP2 is associated with a stronger CDCP1 phosphorylation and an impairment of antibody-mediated CDCP1 internalization. PMID:25876044

  16. Shp2 Deficiency Impairs the Inflammatory Response Against Haemophilus influenzae by Regulating Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lifang; Xia, Jingyan; Li, Tiantian; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Wei; Hong, Zhuping; Ke, Yuehai; Qian, Jing; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-15

    Macrophages can polarize and differentiate to regulate initiation, development, and cessation of inflammation during pulmonary infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms driving macrophage phenotypic differentiation are largely unclear. Our study investigated the role of Shp2, a Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase, in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and bacterial clearance. Shp2 levels were increased upon NTHi stimulation. Selective inhibition of Shp2 in mice led to an attenuated inflammatory response by skewing macrophages toward alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Upon pulmonary NTHi infection, Shp2(-/-) mice, in which the gene encoding Shp2 in monocytes/macrophages was deleted, showed an impaired inflammatory response and decreased antibacterial ability, compared with wild-type controls. In vitro data demonstrated that Shp2 regulated activated macrophage (M1) gene expression via activation of p65-nuclear factor-κB signaling, independent of p38 and extracellular regulated kinase-mitogen-activated proteins kinase signaling pathways. Taken together, our study indicates that Shp2 is required to orchestrate macrophage function and regulate host innate immunity against pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27330052

  17. Reactive oxygen species induce reversible PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 binding.

    PubMed

    Maas, Matthias; Wang, Ronggang; Paddock, Cathy; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2003-12-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) functions to control the activation and survival of the cells on which it is expressed. Many of the regulatory functions of PECAM-1 are dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent recruitment of the Src homology (SH2) domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. The recent demonstration that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation occurs in cells exposed to the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggested that this form of oxidative stress may also support PECAM-1/SHP-2 complex formation. In the present study, we show that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in response to exposure of cells to H2O2 is reversible, involves a shift in the balance between kinase and phosphatase activities, and supports binding of SHP-2 and recruitment of this phosphatase to cell-cell borders. We speculate, however, that the unique ability of H2O2 to reversibly oxidize the reactive site cysteine residues of protein tyrosine phosphatases may result in transient inactivation of the SHP-2 that is bound to PECAM-1 under these conditions. Finally, we provide evidence that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 binding in endothelial cells requires exposure to an "oxidative burst" of H2O2, but that exposure of these cells to sufficiently high concentrations of H2O2 for a sufficiently long period of time abrogates binding of SHP-2 to tyrosine-phosphorylated PECAM-1. These findings support a role for PECAM-1 as a sensor of oxidative stress, perhaps most importantly during the process of inflammation. PMID:12893640

  18. Determination of the catalytic activity of LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutants toward parafibromin, a bona fide SHP2 substrate involved in Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Noda, Saori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takeru; Tanuma, Sei-ichi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-22

    SHP2, encoded by the PTPN11 gene, is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in the proliferation of cells via RAS-ERK activation. SHP2 also promotes Wnt signaling by dephosphorylating parafibromin. Germline missense mutations of PTPN11 are found in more than half of patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) and LEOPARD syndrome (LS), both of which are congenital developmental disorders with multiple common symptoms. However, whereas NS-associated PTPN11 mutations give rise to gain-of-function SHP2 mutants, LS-associated SHP2 mutants are reportedly loss-of-function mutants. To determine the phosphatase activity of LS-associated SHP2 more appropriately, we performed an in vitro phosphatase assay using tyrosine-phosphorylated parafibromin, a biologically relevant substrate of SHP2 and the positive regulator of Wnt signaling that is activated through SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation. We found that LS-associated SHP2 mutants (Y279C, T468M, Q506P, and Q510E) exhibited a substantially reduced phosphatase activity toward parafibromin when compared with wild-type SHP2. Furthermore, each of the LS-associated mutants displayed a differential degree of decrease in phosphatase activity. Deviation of the SHP2 catalytic activity from a certain range, either too strong or too weak, may therefore lead to similar clinical outcomes in NS and LS, possibly through an imbalanced Wnt signal caused by inadequate dephosphorylation of parafibromin. PMID:26742426

  19. Shp-2 contributes to anti-RSV activity in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with the IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Saisai; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Lifang; Xu, Feng; Qian, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including antiviral interferon signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the role of Shp-2 in the host cell interactions of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We report significant changes in the expression of Shp-2 in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (A549) upon RSV infection. We also report that blocking Shp-2 does not affect viral replication or virus-induced interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production. Interestingly, whereas A549 cells were activated by IFN-α, the blocking of Shp-2 resulted in increased viral replication that was associated with the reduced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes of 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetases and Mx1, and the concomitant inhibition of Stat1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that Shp-2 contributes to the control of RSV replication and progeny production in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway activation rather than by affecting the production of IFN-α itself. PMID:26119280

  20. SHP-2 expression negatively regulates NK cell function1,2

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, Amanda K.; Campbell, Kerry S.

    2009-01-01

    Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2)4 is required for full activation of Ras/ERK in many cytokine and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. In contrast, SHP-2 inhibits activation of human natural killer (NK) cells upon recruitment to killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR)4. To determine how SHP-2 impacts NK cell activation in KIR-dependent or KIR-independent signaling pathways, we employed knockdown and overexpression strategies in NK-like cell lines and analyzed the consequences on functional responses. In response to stimulation with susceptible target cells, SHP-2-silenced NK cells had elevated cytolytic activity and IFN-γ production, whereas cells overexpressing wild type or gain-of-function mutants of SHP-2 exhibited dampened activities. Increased levels of SHP-2 expression over this range significantly suppressed microtubule organizing center (MTOC)4 polarization and granzyme B release in response to target cells. Interestingly, NK-target cell conjugation was only reduced by overexpressing SHP-2, but not potentiated in SHP-2-silenced cells, indicating that conjugation is not influenced by physiological levels of SHP-2 expression. KIR-dependent inhibition of cytotoxicity was unaffected by significant reductions in SHP-2 levels, presumably because KIR were still capable of recruiting the phosphatase under these limiting conditions. In contrast, the general suppressive effect of SHP-2 on cytotoxicity and cytokine release was much more sensitive to changes in cellular SHP-2 levels. In summary, our studies have identified a new, KIR-independent role for SHP-2 in dampening NK cell activation in response to tumor target cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This suppression of activation impacts MTOC-based cytoskeletal rearrangement and granule release. PMID:19915046

  1. Molecular Basis of Gain-of-Function LEOPARD Syndrome-Associated SHP2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is a critical signal transducer downstream of growth factors that promotes the activation of the RAS-ERK1/2 cascade. In its basal state, SHP2 exists in an autoinhibited closed conformation because of an intramolecular interaction between its N-SH2 and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domains. Binding to pTyr ligands present on growth factor receptors and adaptor proteins with its N-SH2 domain localizes SHP2 to its substrates and frees the active site from allosteric inhibition. Germline mutations in SHP2 are known to cause both Noonan syndrome (NS) and LEOPARD syndrome (LS), two clinically similar autosomal dominant developmental disorders. NS-associated SHP2 mutants display elevated phosphatase activity, while LS-associated SHP2 mutants exhibit reduced catalytic activity. A conundrum in how clinically similar diseases result from mutations to SHP2 that have opposite effects on this enzyme’s catalytic functionality exists. Here we report a comprehensive investigation of the kinetic, structural, dynamic, and biochemical signaling properties of the wild type as well as all reported LS-associated SHP2 mutants. The results reveal that LS-causing mutations not only affect SHP2 phosphatase activity but also induce a weakening of the intramolecular interaction between the N-SH2 and PTP domains, leading to mutants that are more readily activated by competing pTyr ligands. Our data also indicate that the residual phosphatase activity associated with the LS SHP2 mutant is required for enhanced ERK1/2 activation. Consequently, catalytically impaired SHP2 mutants could display gain-of-function properties because of their ability to localize to the vicinity of substrates for longer periods of time, thereby affording the opportunity for prolonged substrate turnover and sustained RAS-ERK1/2 activation. PMID:24935154

  2. [The Biological Function of SHP2 in Human Disease].

    PubMed

    Li, S M

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl phosphorylation participates in various pathological and physiological processes, which are regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). The Src homology-2 domain containing phosphatase SHP2 (encoded by PTPN11) is an important phosphatase, which was found to be implicated in the regulation of genetic disease, development, metabolic, neurological, muscle, skeletal disease and cancer. Germline mutations in PTPN11 cause the Noonan Syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome and metachondromatosis. Somatic PTPN11 mutations occur in hematologic malignancies and in solid tumors. SHP2 is also an important component in oncogenic signaling pathways. It may play different roles in different stages and positions of human cancers. Whether SHP2 is an oncogene or cancer suppressor gene remains to be elucidated. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of SHP2 in human disease will provide new insights into disease and new targets for therapy. Here, we summarized the structural basis and recent research progression on SHP2 in various human disease, including genetic and cancer diseases. PMID:27028808

  3. SHP2 regulates osteoclastogenesis by promoting preosteoclast fusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes that regulate osteoclast development and function under physiological and disease conditions remain incompletely understood. Shp2, a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, was implicated in regulating M-CSF and RANKL-evoked signaling, its role in osteoclastogenesis an...

  4. PTPome profile of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes: a novel role for SHP-2 as a modulator of invasion and survival

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Stephanie M.; Maestre, Michael F.; Campbell, Amanda M.; Bartok, Beatrix; Kiosses, William B.; Boyle, David L.; Arnett, Heather A.; Mustelin, Tomas; Firestein, Gary S.; Bottini, Nunzio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in the synovial intimal lining of the joint are key mediators of inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In RA, these cells aggressively invade the extracellular matrix, producing cartilage-degrading proteases and inflammatory cytokines. The behavior of FLS is controlled by multiple interconnected signal transduction pathways involving reversible phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues. However, little is known about the role of the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in FLS function. The objective of this study was to explore the expression of all the PTP genes (PTPome) in FLS. METHODS A comparative screening was conducted of the expression of the PTPome in FLS from patients with RA or osteoarthritis (OA). The functional effect of a PTP up-regulated in RA, SHP-2, was then analyzed by knock-down using cell-permeable antisense oligonucleotides in RA FLS. RESULTS PTPN11 was over-expressed in RA compared to OA FLS. Knock-down of PTPN11, which encodes SHP-2, using a cell-permeable antisense oligonucleotide, decreased the invasion, migration, adhesion, spreading and survival of RA FLS. Additionally, signaling in response to growth factors and inflammatory cytokines was impaired by the knock-down of SHP-2. RA FLS deficient in SHP-2 displayed decreased activation of focal adhesion kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases. CONCLUSION These findings indicate a novel role for SHP-2 in mediating human FLS function, and suggest that SHP-2 promotes the invasiveness and survival of RA FLS. Further investigation may reveal SHP-2 to be a candidate therapeutic target for RA. PMID:23335101

  5. S-nitrosylated SHP-2 contributes to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Sunico, Carmen R.; McKercher, Scott R.; Cui, Jiankun; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) can cause neuronal damage, contributing to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases and stroke (i.e., focal cerebral ischemia). NO can mediate neurotoxic effects at least in part via protein S-nitrosylation, a reaction that covalently attaches NO to a cysteine thiol (or thiolate anion) to form an S-nitrosothiol. Recently, the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) and its downstream pathways have emerged as important mediators of cell survival. Here we report that in neurons and brain tissue NO can S-nitrosylate SHP-2 at its active site cysteine, forming S-nitrosylated SHP-2 (SNO–SHP-2). We found that NMDA exposure in vitro and transient focal cerebral ischemia in vivo resulted in increased levels of SNO–SHP-2. S-Nitrosylation of SHP-2 inhibited its phosphatase activity, blocking downstream activation of the neuroprotective physiological ERK1/2 pathway, thus increasing susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings suggest that formation of SNO–SHP-2 represents a key chemical reaction contributing to excitotoxic damage in stroke and potentially other neurological disorders. PMID:23382182

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides as inhibitors of cellular Shp2 activity.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xiao-Li; Yin, Wen-Hui; Tian, Xia; Ma, Zhen-Jie; Fan, Shi-Ming; Han, Jian-Rong; Liu, Shouxin

    2015-05-15

    A series of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides was designed and synthesized using sansalvamide A as a model compound. All compounds exhibited low antitumor activity. Furthermore, the evaluation of their inhibitory potency toward IMPDH, SHP2, ACHE, proteasome, MAGL, and cathepsin B showed that all of the compounds were potent against protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Specifically, compounds 1a, 1d, 2b, and 2f were found to inhibit SHP2 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good selectivity. Based on the molecular docking results, the binding modes of the chain cyclic peptides in the active center of SHP2 were discussed. PMID:25865131

  7. Selective activation of SHP2 activity by cisplatin revealed by a novel chemical probe-based assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chun-Chen; Chu, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is known to participate in several different signaling pathways to mediate cell growth, survival, migration, and differentiation. However, due to the lack of proper analytical tools, it is unclear whether the phosphatase activity of SHP2 is activated in most studies. We have previously developed an activity-based probe LCL2 that formed covalent linkage with catalytically active protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, by combining LCL2 with a SHP2 specific antibody, we established an assay system that enables the direct monitoring of SHP2 activity upon cisplatin treatment of cancer cells. The protocol is advantageous over conventional colorimetric or in-gel PTP assays as it is specific and does not require the use of radioisotope reagents. Using this assay, we found SHP2 activity was selectively activated by cisplatin. Moreover, the activation of SHP2 appeared to be specific for cisplatin as other DNA damage agents failed to activate the activity. Although the role of SHP2 activation by cisplatin treatments is still unclear to us, our results provide the first direct evidence for the activation of SHP2 during cisplatin treatments. More importantly, the concept of using activity-based probe in conjunction with target-specific antibodies could be extended to other enzyme classes.

  8. SHP-2 Mediates Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Eunice A.; Kasper, Susan; Anneken, Emily M.; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2015-01-01

    The parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, induces human gastroenteritis through infection of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. During the initial stage of infection, C. parvum is reported to engage host mechanisms at the host cell-parasite interface to form a parasitophorous vacuole. We determined that upon infection, the larger molecular weight proteins in human small intestinal epithelial host cells (FHs 74 Int) appeared to globally undergo tyrosine dephosphorylation. In parallel, expression of the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) increased in a time-dependent manner. SHP-2 co-localized with the C. parvum sporozoite and this interaction increased the rate of C. parvum infectivity through SH2-mediated SHP-2 activity. Furthermore, we show that one potential target that SHP-2 acts upon is the focal adhesion protein, paxillin, which undergoes moderate dephosphorylation following infection, with inhibition of SHP-2 rescuing paxillin phosphorylation. Importantly, treatment with an inhibitor to SHP-2 and with an inhibitor to paxillin and Src family kinases, effectively decreased the multiplicity of C. parvum infection in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our study reveals an important role for SHP-2 in the pathogenesis of C. parvum. Furthermore, while host proteins can be recruited to participate in the development of the electron dense band at the host cell-parasite interface, our study implies for the first time that SHP-2 appears to be recruited by the C. parvum sporozoite to regulate infectivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHP-2 and its down-stream target paxillin could serve as targets for intervention. PMID:26556238

  9. Inhibition of SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation of Ras suppresses oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Burrell, Kelly; Heir, Pardeep; Zeng, Lifan; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Kano, Yoshihito; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Zadeh, Gelareh; Ohh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ras is phosphorylated on a conserved tyrosine at position 32 within the switch I region via Src kinase. This phosphorylation inhibits the binding of effector Raf while promoting the engagement of GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GTP hydrolysis. Here we identify SHP2 as the ubiquitously expressed tyrosine phosphatase that preferentially binds to and dephosphorylates Ras to increase its association with Raf and activate downstream proliferative Ras/ERK/MAPK signalling. In comparison to normal astrocytes, SHP2 activity is elevated in astrocytes isolated from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-prone H-Ras(12V) knock-in mice as well as in glioma cell lines and patient-derived GBM specimens exhibiting hyperactive Ras. Pharmacologic inhibition of SHP2 activity attenuates cell proliferation, soft-agar colony formation and orthotopic GBM growth in NOD/SCID mice and decelerates the progression of low-grade astrocytoma to GBM in a spontaneous transgenic glioma mouse model. These results identify SHP2 as a direct activator of Ras and a potential therapeutic target for cancers driven by a previously ‘undruggable' oncogenic or hyperactive Ras. PMID:26617336

  10. Shp2 and Pten have antagonistic roles in myeloproliferation but cooperate to promote erythropoiesis in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Helen He; Luo, Xiaolin; Zhang, Kaiqing; Cui, Jian; Zhao, Huifang; Ji, Zhongzhong; Zhou, Zhicheng; Yao, Jufang; Zeng, Lifan; Ji, Kaihong; Gao, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Previous data suggested a negative role of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) and a positive function of SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (Shp2)/Ptpn11 in myelopoiesis and leukemogenesis. Herein we demonstrate that ablating Shp2 indeed suppressed the myeloproliferative effect of Pten loss, indicating directly opposing functions between pathways regulated by these two enzymes. Surprisingly, the Shp2 and Pten double-knockout mice suffered lethal anemia, a phenotype that reveals previously unappreciated cooperative roles of Pten and Shp2 in erythropoiesis. The lethal anemia was caused collectively by skewed progenitor differentiation and shortened erythrocyte lifespan. Consistently, treatment of Pten-deficient mice with a specific Shp2 inhibitor suppressed myeloproliferative neoplasm while causing anemia. These results identify concerted actions of Pten and Shp2 in promoting erythropoiesis, while acting antagonistically in myeloproliferative neoplasm development. This study illustrates cell type-specific signal cross-talk in blood cell lineages, and will guide better design of pharmaceuticals for leukemia and other types of cancer in the era of precision medicine. PMID:26460004

  11. The use of SHP-2 gene transduced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to promote osteogenic differentiation and bone defect repair in rat.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dapeng; Liu, Shen; Jiang, Shichao; Li, Zhiwei; Mo, Xiumei; Ruan, Hongjiang; Zou, Gang-Ming; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-08-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising approach for bone regeneration, in which growth factors play an important role. The tyrosine phosphatase Src-homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2), encoded by the PTPN11 gene, is essential for the differentiation, proliferation and metabolism of osteoblasts. However, SHP-2 has never been systematically studied for its effect in osteogenesis. We predicted that overexpression of SHP-2 could promote bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)osteogenic differentiation and SHP-2 transduced BMSCs could enhance new bone formation, determined using the following study groups: (1) BMSCs transduced with SHP-2 and induced with osteoblast-inducing liquid (BMSCs/SHP-2/OL); (2) BMSCs transduced with SHP-2 (BMSCs/-SHP-2); (3) BMSCs induced with osteoblast-inducing liquid (BMSCs/OL) and (4) pure BMSCs. Cells were assessed for osteogenic differentiation by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, western blot analysis, alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red S staining. For in vivo assessment, cells were combined with beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds and transplanted into rat calvarial defects for 8 weeks. Following euthanasia, skull samples were explanted for osteogenic evaluation, including micro-computed tomography measurement, histology and immunohistochemistry staining. SHP-2 and upregulation of its gene promoted BMSC osteogenic differentiation and therefore represents a potential new therapeutic approach to bone repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1871-1881, 2016. PMID:26999642

  12. Developmental SHP2 dysfunction underlies cardiac hypertrophy in Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.

    PubMed

    Lauriol, Jessica; Cabrera, Janel R; Roy, Ashbeel; Keith, Kimberly; Hough, Sara M; Damilano, Federico; Wang, Bonnie; Segarra, Gabriel C; Flessa, Meaghan E; Miller, Lauren E; Das, Saumya; Bronson, Roderick; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Kontaridis, Maria I

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a common cause of mortality in congenital heart disease (CHD). Many gene abnormalities are associated with cardiac hypertrophy, but their function in cardiac development is not well understood. Loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11, which encodes the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) SHP2, are implicated in CHD and cause Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), a condition that often presents with cardiac hypertrophic defects. Here, we found that NSML-associated hypertrophy stems from aberrant signaling mechanisms originating in developing endocardium. Trabeculation and valvular hyperplasia were diminished in hearts of embryonic mice expressing a human NSML-associated variant of SHP2, and these defects were recapitulated in mice expressing NSML-associated SHP2 specifically in endothelial, but not myocardial or neural crest, cells. In contrast, mice with myocardial- but not endothelial-specific NSML SHP2 expression developed ventricular septal defects, suggesting that NSML-associated mutations have both cell-autonomous and nonautonomous functions in cardiac development. However, only endothelial-specific expression of NSML-associated SHP2 induced adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy. Further, embryos expressing the NSML-associated SHP2 mutation exhibited aberrant AKT activity and decreased downstream forkhead box P1 (FOXP1)/FGF and NOTCH1/EPHB2 signaling, indicating that SHP2 is required for regulating reciprocal crosstalk between developing endocardium and myocardium. Together, our data provide functional and disease-based evidence that aberrant SHP2 signaling during cardiac development leads to CHD and adult-onset heart hypertrophy. PMID:27348588

  13. SHP-2 Mediates C-type Lectin Receptors-induced Syk Activation and Anti-fungal TH17 Responses

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zihou; Ma, Shixin; Zhou, Hao; Zang, Aiping; Fang, Yiyuan; Li, Tiantian; Shi, Huanjing; Liu, Mei; Du, Min; Taylor, Patricia R.; Zhu, Helen H.; Chen, Jiangye; Meng, Guangxun; Li, Fubin; Chen, Changbin; Zhang, Yan; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Pearlman, Eric; Li, Xiaoxia; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Xiao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fungal infection stimulates the canonical C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) signaling pathway via Syk activation. Here we show that SHP-2 plays a crucial role in mediating CLRs-induced Syk activation. Genetic ablation of Shp-2 (Ptpn11) in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages impaired Syk-mediated signaling and abrogated pro-inflammatory gene expression following fungal stimulation. Mechanistically, SHP-2 operates as a scaffold facilitating the recruitment of Syk to dectin-1 or FcRγ, through its N-SH2 domain and a previously unrecognized C-terminal ITAM motif. We demonstrate that DC-derived SHP-2 is crucial for the induction of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23, and anti-fungal TH17 cell responses to control Candida albicans infection. Together, these data reveal a mechanism by which SHP-2 mediates Syk activation in response to fungal infections PMID:25915733

  14. HER-2/neu raises SHP-2, stops IFN-{gamma} anti-proliferation in bladder cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Su, W.-P.; Tu, I-H.; Hu, S.-W.; Yeh, H.-H.; Shieh, D.-B.; Chen, T.-Y.; Su, W.-C. . E-mail: sunnysu@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2007-04-27

    Gene amplification or HER-2/neu protein overexpression signals a poor outcome for bladder cancer patients. We investigated the anti-proliferative effect of IFN-{gamma} in HER-2/neu-transfected human bladder cancer cells (TCC-N5 and TCC-N10). The cells continued growing after IFN-{gamma} stimulation but did not activate the Janus kinase (Jak)/Stat pathway. We found Jak/Stat protein phosphatase in TCC-N5 and TCC-N10 cells with upregulated Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2). After the cells had been treated with AG825, a HER-2/neu-specific inhibitor, SHP-2 expression declined, and Jak2/Stat1 reactivated. Similar results were reported in a mouse bladder cancer cell line, MBT2, with constitutive HER-2/neu overexpression. Further, AG825 pretreatment restored the anti-proliferation activity of IFN-{gamma} in TCC-N5 and TCC-N10 cells. Therefore, the suppression of IFN-{gamma} signaling in HER-2/neu-overexpressing bladder cancer cells might be due to SHP-2 upregulation. The regulation of SHP-2 by HER-2/neu provides a new target for blocking the HER-2/neu oncogenic pathwa000.

  15. Targeted Disruption of Shp2 in Chondrocytes Leads to Metachondromatosis With Multiple Cartilaginous Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Harry KW; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chen, Di; King, Philip D; Kamiya, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Metachondromatosis is a benign bone disease predominantly observed in the hands and feet of children or young adults demonstrating two different manifestations: a cartilage-capped bony outgrowth on the surface of the bone called exostosis and ectopic cartilaginous nodules inside the bone called enchondroma. Recently, it has been reported that loss-of-function mutations of the SHP2 gene, which encodes the SHP2 protein tyrosine phosphatase, are associated with metachondromatosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SHP2 in postnatal cartilage development, which is largely unknown. We disrupted Shp2 during the postnatal stage of mouse development in a chondrocyte-specific manner using a tamoxifen-inducible system. We found tumor-like nodules on the hands and feet within a month after the initial induction. The SHP2-deficient mice demonstrated an exostosis-like and enchondroma-like phenotype in multiple bones of the hands, feet, and ribs as assessed by X-ray and micro-computed tomography (CT). Histological assessment revealed the disorganization of the growth plate cartilage, a cartilaginous protrusion from the epiphyseal bone, and ectopic cartilage nodules within the bones, which is consistent with the pathological features of metachondromatosis in humans (ie, both exostosis and enchondroma). At molecular levels, we observed an abundant expression of Indian hedgehog protein (IHH) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and impaired expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in the affected cartilage nodules in the SHP2-deficient mice. In summary, we have generated a mouse model of metachondromatosis that includes manifestations of exostosis and enchondroma. This study provides a novel model for the investigation of the pathophysiology of the disease and advances the understanding of metachondromatosis. This model will be useful to identify molecular mechanisms for the disease cause and progression as well as to develop new therapeutic

  16. The Shp2-induced epithelial disorganization defect is reversed by HDAC6 inhibition independent of Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Sui-Chih; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Yang, Ya-Chi; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Shp2, a tyrosine phosphatase, critically influences the development of various diseases. Its role in epithelial lumenogenesis is not clear. Here we show that oncogenic Shp2 dephosphorylates Tuba to decrease Cdc42 activation, leading to the abnormal multi-lumen formation of epithelial cells. HDAC6 suppression reverses oncogenic Shp2-induced multiple apical domains and spindle mis-orientation during division in cysts to acquire normal lumenogenesis. Intriguingly, Cdc42 activity is not restored in this rescued process. We present evidence that simultaneous reduction in myosin II and ERK1/2 activity by HDAC6 inhibition is responsible for the reversion. In HER2-positive breast cancer cells, Shp2 also mediates Cdc42 repression, and HDAC6 inhibition or co-suppression of ERK/myosin II promotes normal epithelial lumen phenotype without increasing Cdc42 activity. Our data suggest a mechanism of epithelial disorganization by Shp2 deregulation, and reveal the cellular context where HDAC6 suppression is capable of establishing normal epithelial lumenogenesis independent of Cdc42. PMID:26783207

  17. LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutation confers leanness and protection from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Tajan, Mylène; Batut, Aurélie; Cadoudal, Thomas; Deleruyelle, Simon; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Saint Laurent, Céline; Vomscheid, Maëlle; Wanecq, Estelle; Tréguer, Karine; De Rocca Serra-Nédélec, Audrey; Vinel, Claire; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Pozzo, Joffrey; Kunduzova, Oksana; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Tauber, Maithé; Raynal, Patrick; Cavé, Hélène; Edouard, Thomas; Valet, Philippe; Yart, Armelle

    2014-10-21

    LEOPARD syndrome (multiple Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, sensorineural Deafness; LS), also called Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associating various developmental defects, notably cardiopathies, dysmorphism, and short stature. It is mainly caused by mutations of the PTPN11 gene that catalytically inactivate the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (Src-homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2). Besides its pleiotropic roles during development, SHP2 plays key functions in energetic metabolism regulation. However, the metabolic outcomes of LS mutations have never been examined. Therefore, we performed an extensive metabolic exploration of an original LS mouse model, expressing the T468M mutation of SHP2, frequently borne by LS patients. Our results reveal that, besides expected symptoms, LS animals display a strong reduction of adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity, associated with overall better metabolic profile. We provide evidence that LS mutant expression impairs adipogenesis, triggers energy expenditure, and enhances insulin signaling, three features that can contribute to the lean phenotype of LS mice. Interestingly, chronic treatment of LS mice with low doses of MEK inhibitor, but not rapamycin, resulted in weight and adiposity gains. Importantly, preliminary data in a French cohort of LS patients suggests that most of them have lower-than-average body mass index, associated, for tested patients, with reduced adiposity. Altogether, these findings unravel previously unidentified characteristics for LS, which could represent a metabolic benefit for patients, but may also participate to the development or worsening of some traits of the disease. Beyond LS, they also highlight a protective role of SHP2 global LS-mimicking modulation toward the development of obesity and associated disorders

  18. Phosphoproteomics-Mediated Identification of Fer Kinase as a Target of Mutant Shp2 in Noonan and LEOPARD Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paardekooper Overman, Jeroen; Preisinger, Christian; Prummel, Karin; Bonetti, Monica; Giansanti, Piero; Heck, Albert; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and LEOPARD syndrome (LS) cause congenital afflictions such as short stature, hypertelorism and heart defects. More than 50% of NS and almost all of LS cases are caused by activating and inactivating mutations of the phosphatase Shp2, respectively. How these biochemically opposing mutations lead to similar clinical outcomes is not clear. Using zebrafish models of NS and LS and mass spectrometry-based phosphotyrosine proteomics, we identified a down-regulated peptide of Fer kinase in both NS and LS. Further investigation showed a role for Fer during development, where morpholino-based knockdown caused craniofacial defects, heart edema and short stature. During gastrulation, loss of Fer caused convergence and extension defects without affecting cell fate. Moreover, Fer knockdown cooperated with NS and LS, but not wild type Shp2 to induce developmental defects, suggesting a role for Fer in the pathogenesis of both NS and LS. PMID:25184253

  19. Protein phosphatases and their regulation in the control of mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Satoru; Hunt, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle transitions depend on protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The discovery of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their mode of activation by their cyclin partners explained many important aspects of cell cycle control. As the cell cycle is basically a series of recurrences of a defined set of events, protein phosphatases must obviously be as important as kinases. However, our knowledge about phosphatases lags well behind that of kinases. We still do not know which phosphatase(s) is/are truly responsible for dephosphorylating CDK substrates, and we know very little about whether and how protein phosphatases are regulated. Here, we summarize our present understanding of the phosphatases that are important in the control of the cell cycle and pose the questions that need to be answered as regards the regulation of protein phosphatases. PMID:22482124

  20. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2.

    PubMed

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I; Cantley, Lewis C; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M

    2016-01-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26839216

  1. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26839216

  2. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  3. Novel mesenchymal and haematopoietic cell isoforms of the SHP-2 docking receptor, PZR: identification, molecular cloning and effects on cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zannettino, Andrew C W; Roubelakis, Maria; Welldon, Katie J; Jackson, Denise E; Simmons, Paul J; Bendall, Linda J; Henniker, Anthony; Harrison, Kate L; Niutta, Silvana; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Watt, Suzanne M

    2003-01-01

    SHP-2 (Src homology phosphatase type-2) is essential for haematopoietic skeletal and vascular development. Thus the identification of its binding partners is critically important. In the present study, we describe a unique monoclonal antibody, WM78, which interacts with PZR, a SHP-2 binding partner. Furthermore, we identify two novel isoforms of PZR, PZRa and PZRb, derived by differential splicing from a single gene transcription unit on human chromosome 1q24. All are type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins with identical extracellular and transmembrane domains, but differ in their cytoplasmic tails. The PZR intracellular domain contains two SHP-2 binding immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (VIY(246)AQL and VVY(263)ADI) which are not present in PZRa and PZRb. Using the WM78 monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the common extracellular domain of the PZR isoforms, we demonstrate that the PZR molecules are expressed on mesenchymal and haematopoietic cells, being present on the majority of CD34(+)CD38(+) and early clonogenic progenitors, and at lower levels on CD34(+)CD38(-) cells and the hierarchically more primitive pre-colony forming units. Interestingly, we show by reverse transcriptase-PCR that the PZR isoforms are differentially expressed in haematopoietic, endothelial and mesenchymal cells. Both PZR and PZRb are present in CD133(+) precursors and endothelial cells, PZRb predominates in mesenchymal and committed myelomonocytic progenitor cells, and all three isoforms occur in erythroid precursor cell lines. Importantly, using SHP-2 mutant (Delta 46-110) and SHP-2 rescue of embryonic fibroblasts stably expressing the PZR isoforms, we demonstrate for the first time that PZR, but not PZRa or PZRb, facilitates fibronectin- dependent migration of cells expressing a competent SHP-2 molecule. These observations will be instrumental in determining the mechanisms whereby PZR isoforms regulate cell motility. PMID:12410637

  4. Phosphoproteomics of collagen receptor networks reveals SHP-2 phosphorylation downstream of wild-type DDR2 and its lung cancer mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Leo K.; Payne, Leo S.; Luczynski, Maciej T.; Chang, Francis; Xu, Huifang; Clinton, Ryan W.; Paul, Angela; Esposito, Edward A.; Gridley, Scott; Leitinger, Birgit; Naegle, Kristen M.; Huang, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is an important extracellular matrix component that directs many fundamental cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation and motility. The signalling networks driving these processes are propagated by collagen receptors such as the β1 integrins and the DDRs (discoidin domain receptors). To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of collagen receptor signalling, we have performed a quantitative analysis of the phosphorylation networks downstream of collagen activation of integrins and DDR2. Temporal analysis over seven time points identified 424 phosphorylated proteins. Distinct DDR2 tyrosine phosphorylation sites displayed unique temporal activation profiles in agreement with in vitro kinase data. Multiple clustering analysis of the phosphoproteomic data revealed several DDR2 candidate downstream signalling nodes, including SHP-2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2), NCK1 (non-catalytic region of tyrosine kinase adaptor protein 1), LYN, SHIP-2 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2], PIK3C2A (phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit type 2α) and PLCL2 (phospholipase C-like 2). Biochemical validation showed that SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation is dependent on DDR2 kinase activity. Targeted proteomic profiling of a panel of lung SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) DDR2 mutants demonstrated that SHP-2 is tyrosine-phosphorylated by the L63V and G505S mutants. In contrast, the I638F kinase domain mutant exhibited diminished DDR2 and SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation levels which have an inverse relationship with clonogenic potential. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that SHP-2 is a key signalling node downstream of the DDR2 receptor which may have therapeutic implications in a subset of DDR2 mutations recently uncovered in genome-wide lung SCC sequencing screens. PMID:23822953

  5. Lack of SIRPα phosphorylation and concomitantly reduced SHP-2-PI3K-Akt2 signaling decrease osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Holm, Cecilia Koskinen; Engman, Sara; Sulniute, Rima; Matozaki, Takashi; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Lundberg, Pernilla

    2016-09-01

    Normal differentiation of bone forming osteoblasts is a prerequisite for maintenance of skeletal health and is dependent on intricate cellular signaling pathways, including the essential transcription factor Runx2. The cell surface glycoprotein CD47 and its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) have both been suggested to regulate bone cell differentiation. Here we investigated osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells from SIRPα mutant mice lacking the cytoplasmic signaling domain of SIRPα. An impaired osteoblastogenesis in SIRPα-mutant cell cultures was demonstrated by lower alkaline phosphatase activity and less mineral formation compared to wild-type cultures. This reduced osteoblastic differentiation potential in SIRPα-mutant stromal cells was associated with a significantly reduced expression of Runx2, osterix, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase mRNA, as well as a reduced phosphorylation of SHP-2 and Akt2, as compared with that in wild-type stromal cells. Addition of a PI3K-inhibitor to wild-type stromal cells could mimic the impaired osteoblastogenesis seen in SIRPα-mutant cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that SIRPα signaling through SHP-2-PI3K-Akt2 strongly influences osteoblast differentiation from bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:27422603

  6. Targeting SHP2 for EGFR inhibitor resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jie; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shen, Weihua; Turchi, John J.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •SHP2 is required for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC H1975 cell proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor blocks EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. •SHP2 inhibitor synergizes with PI3K inhibitor in suppressing cell growth. •Targeting SHP2 represents a novel strategy for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. -- Abstract: Targeted therapy with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has produced a noticeable benefit to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors carry activating mutations (e.g. L858R) in EGFR. Unfortunately, these patients develop drug resistance after treatment, due to acquired secondary gatekeeper mutations in EGFR (e.g. T790M). Given the critical role of SHP2 in growth factor receptor signaling, we sought to determine whether targeting SHP2 could have therapeutic value for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC. We show that SHP2 is required for EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation in EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC cell line H1975, which harbors the EGFR T790M/L858R double-mutant. We demonstrate that treatment of H1975 cells with II-B08, a specific SHP2 inhibitor, phenocopies the observed growth inhibition and reduced ERK1/2 activation seen in cells treated with SHP2 siRNA. Importantly, we also find that II-B08 exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. Finally, we observe that combined inhibition of SHP2 and PI3K impairs both the ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling axes and produces significantly greater effects on repressing H1975 cell growth than inhibition of either protein individually. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting SHP2 may represent an effective strategy for treatment of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs.

  7. SHP2E76K mutant promotes lung tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Valentina E.; Luetteke, Noreen; Ren, Yuan; Berns, Hartmut; Chen, Liwei; Foroutan, Parastou; Martinez, Gary V.; Haura, Eric B.; Chen, Jiandong; Coppola, Domenico; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major disease carrying heterogeneous molecular lesions and many of them remain to be analyzed functionally in vivo. Gain-of-function (GOF) SHP2 (PTPN11) mutations have been found in various types of human cancer, including lung cancer. However, the role of activating SHP2 mutants in lung cancer has not been established. We generated transgenic mice containing a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible activating SHP2 mutant (tetO-SHP2E76K) and analyzed the role of SHP2E76K in lung tumorigenesis in the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP)-reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA)/tetO-SHP2E76K bitransgenic mice. SHP2E76K activated Erk1/Erk2 (Erk1/2) and Src, and upregulated c-Myc and Mdm2 in the lungs of bitransgenic mice. Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and small adenomas were observed in CCSP-rtTA/tetO-SHP2E76K bitransgenic mice induced with Dox for 2–6 months and progressed to larger adenoma and adenocarcinoma by 9 months. Dox withdrawal from bitransgenic mice bearing magnetic resonance imaging-detectable lung tumors resulted in tumor regression. These results show that the activating SHP2 mutant promotes lung tumorigenesis and that the SHP2 mutant is required for tumor maintenance in this mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer. SHP2E76K was associated with Gab1 in the lung of transgenic mice. Elevated pGab1 was observed in the lung of Dox-induced CCSP-rtTA/tetO-SHP2E76K mice and in cell lines expressing SHP2E76K, indicating that the activating SHP2 mutant autoregulates tyrosine phosphorylation of its own docking protein. Gab1 tyrosine phosphorylation is sensitive to inhibition by the Src inhibitor dasatinib in GOF SHP2-mutant-expressing cells, suggesting that Src family kinases are involved in SHP2 mutant-induced Gab1 tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:24480804

  8. SHP2E76K mutant promotes lung tumorigenesis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Valentina E; Luetteke, Noreen; Ren, Yuan; Berns, Hartmut; Chen, Liwei; Foroutan, Parastou; Martinez, Gary V; Haura, Eric B; Chen, Jiandong; Coppola, Domenico; Wu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Lung cancer is a major disease carrying heterogeneous molecular lesions and many of them remain to be analyzed functionally in vivo. Gain-of-function (GOF) SHP2 (PTPN11) mutations have been found in various types of human cancer, including lung cancer. However, the role of activating SHP2 mutants in lung cancer has not been established. We generated transgenic mice containing a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible activating SHP2 mutant (tetO-SHP2(E76K)) and analyzed the role of SHP2(E76K) in lung tumorigenesis in the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP)-reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA)/tetO-SHP2(E76K) bitransgenic mice. SHP2(E76K) activated Erk1/Erk2 (Erk1/2) and Src, and upregulated c-Myc and Mdm2 in the lungs of bitransgenic mice. Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and small adenomas were observed in CCSP-rtTA/tetO-SHP2(E76K) bitransgenic mice induced with Dox for 2-6 months and progressed to larger adenoma and adenocarcinoma by 9 months. Dox withdrawal from bitransgenic mice bearing magnetic resonance imaging-detectable lung tumors resulted in tumor regression. These results show that the activating SHP2 mutant promotes lung tumorigenesis and that the SHP2 mutant is required for tumor maintenance in this mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer. SHP2(E76K) was associated with Gab1 in the lung of transgenic mice. Elevated pGab1 was observed in the lung of Dox-induced CCSP-rtTA/tetO-SHP2(E76K) mice and in cell lines expressing SHP2(E76K), indicating that the activating SHP2 mutant autoregulates tyrosine phosphorylation of its own docking protein. Gab1 tyrosine phosphorylation is sensitive to inhibition by the Src inhibitor dasatinib in GOF SHP2-mutant-expressing cells, suggesting that Src family kinases are involved in SHP2 mutant-induced Gab1 tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:24480804

  9. SHP2-Deficiency in Chondrocytes Deforms Orofacial Cartilage and Ciliogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shen, Jingling; Noda, Kazuo; Kitami, Megumi; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chen, Di; Komatsu, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Congenital orofacial abnormalities are clinically seen in human syndromes with SHP2 germline mutations such as LEOPARD and Noonan syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that SHP2-deficiency leads to skeletal abnormalities including scoliosis and cartilaginous benign tumor metachondromatosis, suggesting that growth plate cartilage is a key tissue regulated by SHP2. The role and cellular mechanism of SHP2 in the orofacial cartilage, however, remains unknown. Here, we investigated the postnatal craniofacial development by inducible disruption of Shp2 in chondrocytes. Shp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed severe deformity of the mandibular condyle accompanied by disorganized, expanded cartilage in the trabecular bone region, enhanced type X collagen, and reduced Erk production. Interestingly, the length of primary cilia, an antenna like organelle sensing environmental signaling, was significantly shortened, and the number of primary cilia was reduced in the cKO mice. The expression levels of intraflagellar transports (IFTs), essential molecules in the assembly and function of primary cilia, were significantly decreased. Taken together, lack of Shp2 in orofacial cartilage led to severe defects of ciliogenesis through IFT reduction, resulting in mandibular condyle malformation and cartilaginous expansion. Our study provides new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of SHP2-deficiency in cartilage and helps to understand orofacial and skeletal manifestations seen in patients with SHP2 mutations. PMID:25919282

  10. Angiotensin-II-induced apoptosis requires regulation of nucleolin and Bcl-xL by SHP-2 in primary lung endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young H; Mungunsukh, Ognoon; Tutino, Rebecca L; Marquez, Ana P; Day, Regina M

    2010-05-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a key proapoptotic factor in fibrotic tissue diseases. However, the mechanism of Ang-II-induced cell death in endothelial cells has not been previously elucidated. Using the neutral comet assay and specific receptor antagonists and agonists, we found that Ang-II-mediated apoptosis in primary pulmonary endothelial cells required the AT2 receptor. Ang II caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria concurrent with caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis was suppressed by an inhibitor of Bax-protein channel formation, implicating mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. There was no evidence that the extrinsic apoptotic pathway was involved, because caspase-9, but not caspase-8, was activated by Ang-II treatment. Apoptosis required phosphoprotein phosphatase activation, and inhibition of the SHP-2 phosphatase (encoded by Ptpn11) blocked cell death. Reduced levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family members can initiate intrinsic apoptosis, and we found that Ang-II treatment lowered cytosolic Bcl-x(L) protein levels. Because the protein nucleolin has been demonstrated to bind Bcl-x(L) mRNA and prevent its degradation, we investigated the role of nucleolin in Ang-II-induced loss of Bcl-x(L). RNA-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Ang II reduced the binding of nucleolin to Bcl-x(L) mRNA in an AU-rich region implicated in instability of Bcl-x(L) mRNA. Inhibition of SHP-2 prevented Ang-II-induced degradation of Bcl-x(L) mRNA. Taken together, our findings suggest that nucleolin is a primary target of Ang-II signaling, and that Ang-II-activated SHP-2 inhibits nucleolin binding to Bcl-x(L) mRNA, thus affecting the equilibrium between pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. PMID:20406888

  11. Conditional Knockout of Src Homology 2 Domain-containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 in Myeloid Cells Attenuates Renal Fibrosis after Unilateral Ureter Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Jing-Fei; Wang, Kai; Li, Yao; Qu, Fa-Jun; Yuan, Qing; Cui, Xin-Gang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Xu, Dan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) is a kind of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase. Studies have revealed its roles in various disease, however, whether SHP-2 involves in renal fibrosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the roles of myeloid cells SHP-2 in renal interstitial fibrosis. Methods: Myeloid cells SHP-2 gene was conditionally knocked-out (CKO) in mice using loxP-Cre system, and renal interstitial fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO). The total collagen deposition in the renal interstitium was assessed using picrosirius red stain. F4/80 immunostaing was used to evaluate macrophage infiltration in renal tubular interstitium. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were used to analyze the production of cytokines in the kidney. Transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling stain was used to assess the apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells. Results: Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 gene CKO in myeloid cells significantly reduced collagen deposition in the renal interstitium after UUO. Macrophage infiltration was evidently decreased in renal tubular interstitium of SHP-2 CKO mice. Meanwhile, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly suppressed in SHP-2 CKO mice. However, no significant difference was observed in the number of apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells between wild-type and SHP-2 CKO mice. Conclusions: Our observations suggested that SHP-2 in myeloid cells plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis, and that silencing of SHP-2 gene in myeloid cells may protect renal from inflammatory damage and prevent renal fibrosis after renal injury. PMID:25947403

  12. Itaconate and Inflammation, miRs in Zebrafish Embryos, and SHP2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    2016-07-21

    Every month the editors of Cell Chemical Biology bring you highlights of the most recent chemical biology literature. Our July 2016 selection includes reports on itaconate as a key metabolite that regulates inflammation, visualization of microRNA in living zebrafish embryos, and the development of a promising SHP2 inhibitor. PMID:27447041

  13. Inhibition of Phosphatase Activity Follows Decline in Sulfatase Activity and Leads to Transcriptional Effects through Sustained Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor MITF

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Arylsulfatase B (B-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Decline in ARSB has been shown in malignant prostate, colonic, and mammary cells and tissues, and decline in ARSB leads to transcriptional events mediated by galectin-3 with AP-1 and Sp1. Increased mRNA expression of GPNMB (transmembrane glycoprotein NMB) in HepG2 cells and in hepatic tissue from ARSB-deficient mice followed decline in expression of ARSB and was mediated by the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), but was unaffected by silencing galectin-3. Since GPNMB is increased in multiple malignancies, studies were performed to determine how decline in ARSB increased GPNMB expression. The mechanism by which decline in ARSB increased nuclear phospho-MITF was due to reduced activity of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase with Src homology (SH2) domains that regulates multiple cellular processes. SHP2 activity declined due to increased binding with chondroitin 4-sulfate when ARSB was reduced. When SHP2 activity was inhibited, phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-associated phosphokinase (MAPK) and of MITF increased, leading to GPNMB promoter activation. A dominant negative SHP2 construct, the SHP2 inhibitor PHSP1, and silencing of ARSB increased phospho-p38, nuclear MITF, and GPNMB. In contrast, constitutively active SHP2 and overexpression of ARSB inhibited GPNMB expression. The interaction between chondroitin 4-sulfate and SHP2 is a novel intersection between sulfation and phosphorylation, by which decline in ARSB and increased chondroitin 4-sulfation can inhibit SHP2, thereby regulating downstream tyrosine phosphorylations by sustained phosphorylations with associated activation of signaling and transcriptional events. PMID:27078017

  14. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  15. A human phospholipid phosphatase activated by a transmembrane control module[S

    PubMed Central

    Halaszovich, Christian R.; Leitner, Michael G.; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Le, Audrey; Frezza, Ludivine; Feuer, Anja; Schreiber, Daniela N.; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A.; Oliver, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    In voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), a transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) controls an intracellular phosphoinositide phosphatase domain, thereby enabling immediate initiation of intracellular signals by membrane depolarization. The existence of such a mechanism in mammals has remained elusive, despite the presence of VSP-homologous proteins in mammalian cells, in particular in sperm precursor cells. Here we demonstrate activation of a human VSP (hVSP1/TPIP) by an intramolecular switch. By engineering a chimeric hVSP1 with enhanced plasma membrane targeting containing the VSD of a prototypic invertebrate VSP, we show that hVSP1 is a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase whose predominant substrate is PI(4,5)P2. In the chimera, enzymatic activity is controlled by membrane potential via hVSP1’s endogenous phosphoinositide binding motif. These findings suggest that the endogenous VSD of hVSP1 is a control module that initiates signaling through the phosphatase domain and indicate a role for VSP-mediated phosphoinositide signaling in mammals. PMID:22896666

  16. Control of Sty1 MAPK activity through stabilisation of the Pyp2 MAPK phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Katarzyna M; Hartmuth, Sonya; Perera, David; Stansfield, Peter; Petersen, Janni

    2013-08-01

    In all eukaryotes tight control of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity plays an important role in modulating intracellular signalling in response to changing environments. The fission yeast MAPK Sty1 (also known as Spc1 or Phh1) is highly activated in response to a variety of external stresses. To avoid segregation of damaged organelles or chromosomes, strong Sty1 activation transiently blocks mitosis and cell division until such stresses have been dealt with. MAPK phosphatases dephosphorylate Sty1 to reduce kinase activity. Therefore, tight control of MAPK phosphatases is central for stress adaptation and for cell division to resume. In contrast to Pyp1, the fission yeast Pyp2 MAPK phosphatase is under environmental control. Pyp2 has a unique sequence (the linker region) between the catalytic domain and the N-terminal MAPK-binding site. Here we show that the Pyp2 linker region is a destabilisation domain. Furthermore, the linker region is highly phosphorylated to increase Pyp2 protein stability and this phosphorylation is Sty1 dependent. Our data suggests that Sty1 activation promotes Pyp2 phosphorylation to increase the stability of the phosphatase. This MAPK-dependent Pyp2 stabilisation allows cells to attenuate MAPK signalling and resume cell division, once stresses have been dealt with. PMID:23690545

  17. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26058329

  18. Insulin controls subcellular localization and multisite phosphorylation of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, lipin 1.

    PubMed

    Harris, Thurl E; Huffman, Todd A; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Kumar, Anil; Lawrence, John C

    2007-01-01

    Brain, liver, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle from fatty liver dystrophy (fld/fld) mice, which do not express lipin 1 (lipin), contained much less Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity than tissues from wild type mice. Lipin harboring the fld(2j) (Gly(84) --> Arg) mutation exhibited relatively little PAP activity. These results indicate that lipin is a major PAP in vivo and that the loss of PAP activity contributes to the fld phenotype. PAP activity was readily detected in immune complexes of lipin from 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the protein was found both as a microsomal form and a soluble, more highly phosphorylated, form. Fifteen phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometric analyses. Insulin increased the phosphorylation of multiple sites and promoted a gel shift that was due in part to phosphorylation of Ser(106). In contrast, epinephrine and oleic acid promoted dephosphorylation of lipin. The PAP-specific activity of lipin was not affected by the hormones or by dephosphorylation of lipin with protein phosphatase 1. However, the ratio of soluble to microsomal lipin was markedly increased in response to insulin and decreased in response to epinephrine and oleic acid. The results suggest that insulin and epinephrine control lipin primarily by changing localization rather than intrinsic PAP activity. PMID:17105729

  19. Controlling PTEN (Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog) Stability: A DOMINANT ROLE FOR LYSINE 66.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-08-26

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase and one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in many forms of cancer, with even small reductions in the expression levels of PTEN promoting cancer development. Although the post-translational ubiquitination of PTEN can control its stability, activity, and localization, a detailed understanding of how PTEN ubiquitination integrates with other cellular regulatory processes and may be dysregulated in cancer has been hampered by a poor understanding of the significance of ubiquitination at individual sites. Here we show that Lys(66) is not required for cellular activity, yet dominates over other PTEN ubiquitination sites in the regulation of protein stability. Notably, combined mutation of other sites (Lys(13), Lys(80), and Lys(289)) has relatively little effect on protein expression, protein stability, or PTEN polyubiquitination. The present work identifies a key role for Lys(66) in the regulation of PTEN expression and provides both an opportunity to improve the stability of PTEN as a protein therapy and a mechanistic basis for efforts to stabilize endogenous PTEN. PMID:27405757

  20. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  1. Controlling the Activity of a Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN) by Membrane Potential*

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Jérôme; Halaszovich, Christian R.; Schreiber, Daniela N.; Leitner, Michael G.; Bezanilla, Francisco; Oliver, Dominik; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    The recently discovered voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs) hydrolyze phosphoinositides upon depolarization of the membrane potential, thus representing a novel principle for the transduction of electrical activity into biochemical signals. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to confer voltage sensitivity to cytosolic enzymes. By fusing the tumor suppressor PTEN to the voltage sensor of the prototypic VSP from Ciona intestinalis, Ci-VSP, we generated chimeric proteins that are voltage-sensitive and display PTEN-like enzymatic activity in a strictly depolarization-dependent manner in vivo. Functional coupling of the exogenous enzymatic activity to the voltage sensor is mediated by a phospholipid-binding motif at the interface between voltage sensor and catalytic domains. Our findings reveal that the main domains of VSPs and related phosphoinositide phosphatases are intrinsically modular and define structural requirements for coupling of enzymatic activity to a voltage sensor domain. A key feature of this prototype of novel engineered voltage-sensitive enzymes, termed Ci-VSPTEN, is the novel ability to switch enzymatic activity of PTEN rapidly and reversibly. We demonstrate that experimental control of Ci-VSPTEN can be obtained either by electrophysiological techniques or more general techniques, using potassium-induced depolarization of intact cells. Thus, Ci-VSPTEN provides a novel approach for studying the complex mechanism of activation, cellular control, and pharmacology of this important tumor suppressor. Moreover, by inducing temporally precise perturbation of phosphoinositide concentrations, Ci-VSPTEN will be useful for probing the role and specificity of these messengers in many cellular processes and to analyze the timing of phosphoinositide signaling. PMID:21454672

  2. Arabidopsis DELLA Protein Degradation Is Controlled by a Type-One Protein Phosphatase, TOPP4

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway. PMID:25010794

  3. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  4. An okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase negatively controls the cyclin degradation pathway in amphibian eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, T; Fesquet, D; Zindy, F; Le Bouffant, F; Cerruti, M; Brechot, C; Devauchelle, G; Dorée, M

    1991-01-01

    Inhibition of okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatases released the cyclin degradation pathway from its inhibited state in extracts prepared from unfertilized Xenopus eggs arrested at the second meiotic metaphase. It also switched on cyclin protease activity in a permanent fashion in interphase extracts prepared from activated eggs. Even after cdc2 kinase inactivation, microinjection of okadaic acid-treated interphase extracts pushed G2-arrested recipient oocytes into the M phase, suggesting that the phosphatase inhibitor stabilizes the activity of an unidentified factor which shares in common with cdc2 kinase the maturation-promoting factor activity. Images PMID:1846666

  5. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatase oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe protein (OCRL) controls actin dynamics during early steps of Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Dambournet, Daphné; Echard, Arnaud; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier

    2012-04-13

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that induces its own entry into a broad range of mammalian cells through interaction of the bacterial surface protein InlB with the cellular receptor Met, promoting an actin polymerization/depolymerization process that leads to pathogen engulfment. Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PI[4,5]P(2)) and trisphosphate (PI[3,4,5]P(3)) are two major phosphoinositide species that function as molecular scaffolds, recruiting cellular effectors that regulate actin dynamics during L. monocytogenes infection. Because the phosphatidylinositol 5'-phosphatase OCRL dephosphorylates PI(4,5)P(2) and to a lesser extent PI(3,4,5)P(3), we investigated whether this phosphatase modulates cell invasion by L. monocytogenes. Inactivation of OCRL by small interfering RNA (siRNA) leads to an increase in the internalization levels of L. monocytogenes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, OCRL depletion does not increase but rather decreases the surface expression of the receptor Met, suggesting that OCRL controls bacterial internalization by modulating signaling cascades downstream of Met. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy reveals that endogenous and overexpressed OCRL are present at L. monocytogenes invasion foci; live-cell imaging additionally shows that actin depolymerization coincides with EGFP-OCRL-a accumulation around invading bacteria. Together, these observations suggest that OCRL promotes actin depolymerization during L. monocytogenes infection; in agreement with this hypothesis, OCRL depletion leads to an increase in actin, PI(4,5)P(2), and PI(3,4,5)P(3) levels at bacterial internalization foci. Furthermore, in cells knocked down for OCRL, transfection of enzymatically active EGFP-OCRL-a (but not of a phosphatase-dead enzyme) decreases the levels of intracellular L. monocytogenes and of actin associated with invading bacteria. These results demonstrate that through its phosphatase activity, OCRL restricts L. monocytogenes invasion by modulating

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 5-Phosphatase Oculocerebrorenal Syndrome of Lowe Protein (OCRL) Controls Actin Dynamics during Early Steps of Listeria monocytogenes Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Dambournet, Daphné; Echard, Arnaud; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that induces its own entry into a broad range of mammalian cells through interaction of the bacterial surface protein InlB with the cellular receptor Met, promoting an actin polymerization/depolymerization process that leads to pathogen engulfment. Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PI[4,5]P2) and trisphosphate (PI[3,4,5]P3) are two major phosphoinositide species that function as molecular scaffolds, recruiting cellular effectors that regulate actin dynamics during L. monocytogenes infection. Because the phosphatidylinositol 5′-phosphatase OCRL dephosphorylates PI(4,5)P2 and to a lesser extent PI(3,4,5)P3, we investigated whether this phosphatase modulates cell invasion by L. monocytogenes. Inactivation of OCRL by small interfering RNA (siRNA) leads to an increase in the internalization levels of L. monocytogenes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, OCRL depletion does not increase but rather decreases the surface expression of the receptor Met, suggesting that OCRL controls bacterial internalization by modulating signaling cascades downstream of Met. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy reveals that endogenous and overexpressed OCRL are present at L. monocytogenes invasion foci; live-cell imaging additionally shows that actin depolymerization coincides with EGFP-OCRL-a accumulation around invading bacteria. Together, these observations suggest that OCRL promotes actin depolymerization during L. monocytogenes infection; in agreement with this hypothesis, OCRL depletion leads to an increase in actin, PI(4,5)P2, and PI(3,4,5)P3 levels at bacterial internalization foci. Furthermore, in cells knocked down for OCRL, transfection of enzymatically active EGFP-OCRL-a (but not of a phosphatase-dead enzyme) decreases the levels of intracellular L. monocytogenes and of actin associated with invading bacteria. These results demonstrate that through its phosphatase activity, OCRL restricts L. monocytogenes invasion by modulating actin

  8. Development of conductometric biosensors based on alkaline phosphatases for the water quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhetskyy, A.

    2008-09-01

    Researches are focused on the elaboration of enzymatic microconductometric device for heavy metal ions detection in water solutions. The manuscript includes a general introduction, the first chapter contains bibliographic review, the second chapter described the fundamentals of conductometric transducers, the third chapter examining the possibility to create and to optimize conductometric biosensor based on bovine alkaline phosphatase for heavy metals ions detection, the fourth chapter devoted to creation and optimization of conductometric biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase active microalgae and sol gel technology, the last chapter described application of the proposed algal biosensor for measurements of heavy metal ions toxicity of waste water, general conclusions stating the progresses achieved in the field of environmental monitoring

  9. Shp2 regulates chlorogenic acid-induced proliferation and adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rong-Ping; Deng, Ming-Tao; Chen, Lan-Ying; Fang, Ning; Du, Chuan; Chen, Lin-Pan; Zou, Ye-Qing; Dai, Jiang-Hua; Zhu, Mei-Lan; Wang, Wei; Lin, Si-Jian; Liu, Rong-Hua; Luo, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) exhibits various biological properties, including the inhibition of oxidation, obesity, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. CGA is also able to promote cell survival and proliferation. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of CGA on the adipogenesis of bone marrow‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Treatment with CGA had a marginal effect on cell proliferation, by promoting the expression levels of phosphorylated Akt and cyclin D1. Furthermore, treatment with CGA also upregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (Erk) and inhibited the adipocyte differentiation of BMSCs by inhibiting the expression of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)γ and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α. However, knockdown of the expression of Shp2 attenuated CGA‑induced proliferation and inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and expression of cyclin D1. Furthermore, CGA treatment upregulated Erk phosphorylation and decreased the expression levels of PPARγ and CEBPα, which was inhibited by treatment with the Shp2 PTPase activity inhibitor, NSC‑87877. The results of the present study suggested that CGA‑induced Akt and Erk pathways regulate proliferation and differentiation and that Shp2 is important in the proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:25634525

  10. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Rémi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J; Shanklin, John; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, Jesse F; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F; Hanson, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), with subfamily II being split into stand-alone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metal-dependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg(2+) bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites. PMID:27322068

  11. An Unbiased Screen Identifies the DEP-1 Tumour Suppressor as a Phosphatase Controlling EGFR Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarcic, Gabi; Boguslavsky, Shlomit K.; Wakim, Jean; Kiuchi, Tai; Liu, Angela; Reinitz, Felicia; Nathanson, David; Takahashi, Takamune; Mischel, Paul S.; Ng, Tony; Yarden, Yosef

    2009-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF-receptor (EGFR). This event precedes signalling from both the plasma membrane and from endosomes, and it is essential for recruitment of an ubiquitin ligase, CBL, that sorts activated receptors to endosomes and degradation. Because hyper-phosphorylation of EGFR is involved in oncogenic pathways, we performed an unbiased screen of siRNA oilgonucleotides targeting all human tyrosine phosphatases. Results We report the identification of PTPRK and PTPRJ (DEP-1) as EGFR-targeting phosphatases. DEP-1 is a tumour suppressor that dephosphorylates, thereby stabilizes EGFR by hampering its ability to associate with the CBL-GRB2 ubiquitin ligase complex. DEP-1 silencing enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of endosomal EGFRs and, accordingly, increased cell proliferation. In line with functional interactions, EGFR and DEP-1 form physical associations, and EGFR phosphorylates a substrtae trapping mutant of DEP-1. Interestingly, the interactions of DEP-1 and EGFR are followed by physical segregation: whereas EGFR undergoes endocytosis, DEP-1 remains confined to the cell surface. Conclusions EGFR and DEP-1 physically interact at the cell surface and maitain bidirectional enzyme-substrate interactions, which are relevant to their respective oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions. These observations highlight the emerging roles of vesicular trafficking in malignant processes. PMID:19836242

  12. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Controls Responses to Aversive Stimuli: Implication for Ethanol Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents. PMID:25992601

  13. Specific control of BMP signaling and mesenchymal differentiation by cytoplasmic phosphatase PPM1H

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhengmao; Xu, Ningyi; Duan, Xueyan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the TGF-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins that regulate a wide array of cellular functions. The key step in BMP signal transduction is the BMP receptor-mediated phosphorylation of transcription factors Smad1, 5, and 8 (collectively Smad1/5/8), which leads to the subsequent activation of BMP-induced gene transcription in the nucleus. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of PPM1H as a novel cytoplasm-localized Smad1/5/8-specific phosphatase. PPM1H directly interacts with Smad1/5/8 through its Smad-binding domain, and dephosphorylates phospho-Smad1/5/8 (P-Smad1/5/8) in the cytoplasm. Ectopic expression of PPM1H attenuates BMP signaling, whereas loss of PPM1H activity or expression greatly enhances BMP-dependent gene regulation and mesenchymal differentiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that PPM1H acts as a gatekeeper to prevent excessive BMP signaling through dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear exclusion of P-Smad1/5/8 proteins. PMID:24732009

  14. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  15. Regulation of CDX4 gene transcription by HoxA9, HoxA10, the Mll-Ell oncogene and Shp2 during leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bei, L; Shah, C; Wang, H; Huang, W; Platanias, L C; Eklund, E A

    2014-01-01

    Cdx and Hox proteins are homeodomain transcription factors that regulate hematopoiesis. Transcription of the HOX and CDX genes decreases during normal myelopoiesis, but is aberrantly sustained in leukemias with translocation or partial tandem duplication of the MLL1 gene. Cdx4 activates transcription of the HOXA9 and HOXA10 genes, and HoxA10 activates CDX4 transcription. The events that break this feedback loop, permitting a decreased Cdx4 expression during normal myelopoiesis, were previously undefined. In the current study, we find that HoxA9 represses CDX4 transcription in differentiating myeloid cells, antagonizing activation by HoxA10. We determine that tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA10 impairs transcriptional activation of CDX4, but tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 facilitates repression of this gene. As HoxA9 and HoxA10 are phosphorylated during myelopoiesis, this provides a mechanism for differentiation stage-specific Cdx4 expression. HoxA9 and HoxA10 are increased in cells expressing Mll-Ell, a leukemia-associated MLL1 fusion protein. We find that Mll-Ell induces a HoxA10-dependent increase in Cdx4 expression in myeloid progenitor cells. However, Cdx4 decreases in a HoxA9-dependent manner on exposure of Mll-Ell-expressing cells to differentiating cytokines. Leukemia-associated, constitutively active mutants of Shp2 block cytokine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 and HoxA10. In comparison with myeloid progenitor cells that are expressing Mll-Ell alone, we find increased CDX4 transcription and Cdx4 expression in cells co-expressing Mll-Ell plus constitutively active Shp2. Increased Cdx4 expression is sustained on exposure of these cells to differentiating cytokines. Our results identify a mechanism for increased and sustained CDX4 transcription in leukemias co-overexpressing HoxA9 and HoxA10 in combination with constitutive activation of Shp2. This is clinically relevant, because MLL1 translocations and constitutive Shp2 activation co-exist in

  16. Prep1 Controls Insulin Glucoregulatory Function in Liver by Transcriptional Targeting of SHP1 Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Oriente, Francesco; Iovino, Salvatore; Cabaro, Serena; Cassese, Angela; Longobardi, Elena; Miele, Claudia; Ungaro, Paola; Formisano, Pietro; Blasi, Francesco; Beguinot, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We investigated the function of the Prep1 gene in insulin-dependent glucose homeostasis in liver. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prep1 action on insulin glucoregulatory function has been analyzed in liver of Prep1-hypomorphic mice (Prep1i/i), which express 2–3% of Prep1 mRNA. RESULTS Based on euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies and measurement of glycogen content, livers from Prep1i/i mice feature increased sensitivity to insulin. Tyrosine phosphorylation of both insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1/2 was significantly enhanced in Prep1i/i livers accompanied by a specific downregulation of the SYP and SHP1 tyrosine phosphatases. Prep1 overexpression in HepG2 liver cells upregulated SYP and SHP1 and inhibited insulin-induced IR and IRS1/2 phosphorylation and was accompanied by reduced glycogen content. Consistently, overexpression of the Prep1 partner Pbx1, but not of p160MBP, mimicked Prep1 effects on tyrosine phosphorylations, glycogen content, and on SYP and SHP1 expression. In Prep1 overexpressing cells, antisense silencing of SHP1, but not that of SYP, rescued insulin-dependent IR phosphorylation and glycogen accumulation. Both Prep1 and Pbx1 bind SHP1 promoter at a site located between nucleotides −2,113 and −1,778. This fragment features enhancer activity and induces luciferase function by 7-, 6-, and 30-fold, respectively, in response to Prep1, Pbx1, or both. CONCLUSIONS SHP1, a known silencer of insulin signal, is a transcriptional target of Prep1. In liver, transcriptional activation of SHP1 gene by Prep1 attenuates insulin signal transduction and reduces glucose storage. PMID:20864515

  17. Targeted nanoconjugate co-delivering siRNA and tyrosine kinase inhibitor to KRAS mutant NSCLC dissociates GAB1-SHP2 post oncogene knockdown.

    PubMed

    Srikar, R; Suresh, Dhananjay; Zambre, Ajit; Taylor, Kristen; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, Matthew; Upendran, Anandhi; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-01-01

    A tri-block nanoparticle (TBN) comprising of an enzymatically cleavable porous gelatin nanocore encapsulated with gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)) and surface functionalized with cetuximab-siRNA conjugate has been synthesized. Targeted delivery of siRNA to undruggable KRAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer cells would sensitize the cells to TKI drugs and offers an efficient therapy for treating cancer; however, efficient delivery of siRNA and releasing it in cytoplasm remains a major challenge. We have shown TBN can efficiently deliver siRNA to cytoplasm of KRAS mutant H23 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cells for oncogene knockdown; subsequently, sensitizing it to TKI. In the absence of TKI, the nanoparticle showed minimal toxicity suggesting that the cells adapt a parallel GAB1 mediated survival pathway. In H23 cells, activated ERK results in phosphorylation of GAB1 on serine and threonine residues to form GAB1-p85 PI3K complex. In the absence of TKI, knocking down the oncogene dephosphorylated ERK, and negated the complex formation. This event led to tyrosine phosphorylation at Tyr627 domain of GAB1 that regulated EGFR signaling by recruiting SHP2. In the presence of TKI, GAB1-SHP2 dissociation occurs, leading to cell death. The outcome of this study provides a promising platform for treating NSCLC patients harboring KRAS mutation. PMID:27530552

  18. Targeted nanoconjugate co-delivering siRNA and tyrosine kinase inhibitor to KRAS mutant NSCLC dissociates GAB1-SHP2 post oncogene knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Srikar, R.; Suresh, Dhananjay; Zambre, Ajit; Taylor, Kristen; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, Matthew; Upendran, Anandhi; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-01-01

    A tri-block nanoparticle (TBN) comprising of an enzymatically cleavable porous gelatin nanocore encapsulated with gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)) and surface functionalized with cetuximab-siRNA conjugate has been synthesized. Targeted delivery of siRNA to undruggable KRAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer cells would sensitize the cells to TKI drugs and offers an efficient therapy for treating cancer; however, efficient delivery of siRNA and releasing it in cytoplasm remains a major challenge. We have shown TBN can efficiently deliver siRNA to cytoplasm of KRAS mutant H23 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cells for oncogene knockdown; subsequently, sensitizing it to TKI. In the absence of TKI, the nanoparticle showed minimal toxicity suggesting that the cells adapt a parallel GAB1 mediated survival pathway. In H23 cells, activated ERK results in phosphorylation of GAB1 on serine and threonine residues to form GAB1-p85 PI3K complex. In the absence of TKI, knocking down the oncogene dephosphorylated ERK, and negated the complex formation. This event led to tyrosine phosphorylation at Tyr627 domain of GAB1 that regulated EGFR signaling by recruiting SHP2. In the presence of TKI, GAB1-SHP2 dissociation occurs, leading to cell death. The outcome of this study provides a promising platform for treating NSCLC patients harboring KRAS mutation. PMID:27530552

  19. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F.; Mori Sequeiros García, M. Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M.; Orlando, Ulises D.; Mele, Pablo G.; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the “classical” protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  20. Carboxyl-Terminal Receptor Domains Control the Differential Dephosphorylation of Somatostatin Receptors by Protein Phosphatase 1 Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β) as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs. PMID:24637622

  1. A method to control phosphoinositides and to analyze PTEN function in living cells using voltage sensitive phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Thallmair, Veronika; Leitner, Michael G.; Schreiber, Daniela N.; Oliver, Dominik; Halaszovich, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), including engineered voltage sensitive PTEN, are excellent tools to rapidly and reversibly alter the phosphoinositide (PI) content of the plasma membrane in vivo and study the tumor suppressor PTEN. However, widespread adoption of these tools is hampered by the requirement for electrophysiological instrumentation to control the activity of VSPs. Additionally, monitoring and quantifying the PI changes in living cells requires sophisticated microscopy equipment and image analysis. Here we present methods that bypass these obstacles. First, we explore technically simple means for activation of VSPs via extracellularly applied agents or light. Secondly, we characterize methods to monitor PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 levels using fluorescence microscopy or photometry in conjunction with translocation or FRET based PI probes, respectively. We then demonstrate the application of these techniques by characterizing the effect of known PTEN mutations on its enzymatic activity, analyzing the effect of PTEN inhibitors, and detecting in real time rapid inhibition of protein kinase B following depletion of PI(3,4,5)P3. Thus, we established an approach that does not only allow for rapidly manipulating and monitoring PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 levels in a population of cells, but also facilitates the study of PTEN mutants and pharmacological targeting in mammalian cells. PMID:25873899

  2. Protein phosphatase 2C is involved in the cAMP-dependent ciliary control in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Munenori; Sasaki, Jun-Ya; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Forward swimming of the Triton-extracted model of Paramecium is stimulated by cAMP. Backward swimming of the model induced by Ca(2+) is depressed by cAMP. Cyclic AMP and Ca(2+) act antagonistically in setting the direction of the ciliary beat. Some ciliary axonemal proteins from Paramecium caudatum are phosphorylated in a cAMP-dependent manner. In the presence of cAMP, axonemal 29- and 65-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by endogenous A-kinase in vitro. These phosphoproteins, however, were not dephosphorylated after in vitro phosphorylation, presumably because of the low endogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase activity associated with isolated axonemes. We purified the protein phosphatase that specifically dephosphorylated the 29- and 65-kDa phosphoproteins from Paramecium caudatum. The molecular weight of the protein phosphatase was 33 kDa. The protein phosphatase had common characteristics as protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). The characteristics of the protein phosphatase were the same as those of the PP2C from Paramecium tetraurelia (PtPP2C) [Grothe et al., 1998: J. Biol. Chem. 273:19167-19172]. We concluded that the phosphoprotein phosphatase is the PP2C from Paramecium caudatum (PcPP2C). The PcPP2C markedly accelerated the backward swimming of the Triton-extracted model in the presence of Ca(2+). On the other hand, the PcPP2C slightly depressed the forward swimming speed. This indicates that the PP2C plays a role in the cAMP-dependent regulation of ciliary movement in Paramecium caudatum through dephosphorylation of 29- and/or 65-kDa regulatory phosphoproteins by terminating the action of cAMP. PMID:12529856

  3. Fcp1 phosphatase controls Greatwall kinase to promote PP2A-B55 activation and mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Della Monica, Rosa; Visconti, Roberta; Cervone, Nando; Serpico, Angela Flavia; Grieco, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, progression through mitosis is driven by a protein phosphorylation wave. This wave namely depends on an activation-inactivation cycle of cyclin B-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1 while activities of major protein phosphatases, like PP1 and PP2A, appear directly or indirectly repressed by Cdk1. However, how Cdk1 inactivation is coordinated with reactivation of major phosphatases at mitosis exit still lacks substantial knowledge. We show here that activation of PP2A-B55, a major mitosis exit phosphatase, required the phosphatase Fcp1 downstream Cdk1 inactivation in human cells. During mitosis exit, Fcp1 bound Greatwall (Gwl), a Cdk1-stimulated kinase that phosphorylates Ensa/ARPP19 and converts these proteins into potent PP2A-B55 inhibitors during mitosis onset, and dephosphorylated it at Cdk1 phosphorylation sites. Fcp1-catalyzed dephosphorylation drastically reduced Gwl kinase activity towards Ensa/ARPP19 promoting PP2A-B55 activation. Thus, Fcp1 coordinates Cdk1 and Gwl inactivation to derepress PP2A-B55, generating a dephosphorylation switch that drives mitosis progression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10399.001 PMID:26653855

  4. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  5. Curcumin suppresses Janus kinase-STAT inflammatory signaling through activation of Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 in brain microglia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Park, Eun Jung; Joe, Eun-Hye; Jou, Ilo

    2003-12-01

    Curcumin has been strongly implicated as an anti-inflammatory agent, but the precise mechanisms of its action are largely unknown. In this study, we show that the inhibitory action of curcumin on Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT signaling can contribute to its anti-inflammatory activity in the brain. In both rat primary microglia and murine BV2 microglial cells, curcumin effectively suppressed the ganglioside-, LPS-, or IFN-gamma-stimulated induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase, important enzymes that mediate inflammatory processes. These anti-inflammatory effects appear to be due, at least in part, to the suppression of the JAK-STAT inflammatory signaling cascade. Curcumin markedly inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT1 and 3 as well as JAK1 and 2 in microglia activated with gangliosides, LPS, or IFN-gamma. Curcumin consistently suppressed not only NF binding to IFN-gamma-activated sequence/IFN-stimulated regulatory element, but also the expression of inflammation-associated genes, including ICAM-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, whose promoters contain STAT-binding elements. We further show that activation of Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases (SHP)-2, a negative regulator of JAK activity, is likely to be one of the mechanisms underlying the curcumin-mediated inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling. Treatment of microglial cells with curcumin led to an increase in phosphorylation and association with JAK1/2 of SHP-2, which inhibit the initiation of JAK-STAT inflammatory signaling in activated microglia. Taken together, these data suggest curcumin suppresses JAK-STAT signaling via activation of SHP-2, thus attenuating inflammatory response of brain microglial cells. PMID:14634121

  6. Tor proteins and protein phosphatase 2A reciprocally regulate Tap42 in controlling cell growth in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Y; Broach, J R

    1999-01-01

    Tor proteins, homologous to DNA-dependent protein kinases, participate in a signal transduction pathway in yeast that regulates protein synthesis and cell wall expansion in response to nutrient availability. The anti-inflammatory drug rapamycin inhibits yeast cell growth by inhibiting Tor protein signaling. This leads to diminished association of a protein, Tap42, with two different protein phosphatase catalytic subunits; one encoded redundantly by PPH21 and PPH22, and one encoded by SIT4. We show that inactivation of either Cdc55 or Tpd3, which regulate Pph21/22 activity, results in rapamycin resistance and that this resistance correlates with an increased association of Tap42 with Pph21/22. Furthermore, we show Tor-dependent phosphorylation of Tap42 both in vivo and in vitro and that this phosphorylation is rapamycin sensitive. Inactivation of Cdc55 or Tpd3 enhances in vivo phosphorylation of Tap42. We conclude that Tor phosphorylates Tap42 and that phosphorylated Tap42 effectively competes with Cdc55/Tpd3 for binding to the phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit. Furthermore, Cdc55 and Tpd3 promote dephosphorylation of Tap42. Thus, Tor stimulates growth-promoting association of Tap42 with Pph21/22 and Sit4, while Cdc55 and Tpd3 inhibit this association both by direct competition and by dephosphorylation of Tap42. These results establish Tap42 as a target of Tor and add further refinement to the Tor signaling pathway. PMID:10329624

  7. Phosphoinositide Phosphatases in Cell Biology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are essential signaling molecules linked to a diverse array of cellular processes in eukaryotic cells. The metabolic interconversions of these phospholipids are subject to exquisite spatial and temporal regulation executed by arrays of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. These include PtdIns- and phosphoinositide-kinases that drive phosphoinositide synthesis, and phospholipases and phosphatases that regulate phosphoinositide degradation. In the past decade, phosphoinositide phosphatases have emerged as topics of particular interest. This interest is driven by the recent appreciation that these enzymes represent primary mechanisms for phosphoinositide degradation, and because of their ever-increasing connections with human diseases. Herein, we review the biochemical properties of six major phosphoinositide phosphatases, the functional involvements of these enzymes in regulating phosphoinositide metabolism, the pathologies that arise from functional derangements of individual phosphatases, and recent ideas concerning the involvements of phosphoinositide phosphatases in membrane traffic control. PMID:20043944

  8. The Phosphatase PP4c Controls Spindle Orientation to Maintain Proliferative Symmetric Divisions in the Developing Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunli; Jüschke, Christoph; Esk, Christopher; Hirotsune, Shinji; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the developing neocortex, progenitor cells expand through symmetric division before they generate cortical neurons through multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindle plays a crucial role in regulating the transition between those two division modes. We demonstrate that the protein phosphatase PP4c regulates spindle orientation in early cortical progenitor cells. Upon removing PP4c, mitotic spindles fail to orient in parallel to the neuroepithelial surface and progenitors divide with random orientation. As a result, their divisions become asymmetric and neurogenesis starts prematurely. Biochemical and genetic experiments show that PP4c acts by dephosphorylating the microtubule binding protein Ndel1, thereby enabling complex formation with Lis1 to form a functional spindle orientation complex. Our results identify a key regulator of cortical development and demonstrate that changes in the orientation of progenitor division are responsible for the transition between symmetric and asymmetric cell division. PMID:23830831

  9. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is a negative regulator of CD40 and BAFF-R signaling and controls B cell autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hobeika, Elias; Biesen, Robert; Kollert, Florian; Taddeo, Adriano; Voll, Reinhard E.; Hiepe, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of signaling molecules that mediate B cell activation in response to various stimuli is tightly regulated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). PTP1B is a ubiquitously expressed tyrosine phosphatase with well-characterized functions in metabolic signaling pathways. We show here that PTP1B negatively regulates CD40, B cell activating factor receptor (BAFF-R), and TLR4 signaling in B cells. Specifically, PTP1B counteracts p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation by directly dephosphorylating Tyr182 of this kinase. Mice with a B cell–specific PTP1B deficiency show increased T cell–dependent immune responses and elevated total serum IgG. Furthermore, aged animals develop systemic autoimmunity with elevated serum anti-dsDNA, spontaneous germinal centers in the spleen, and deposition of IgG immune complexes and C3 in the kidney. In a clinical setting, we observed that B cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients have significantly reduced PTP1B expression. Our data suggest that PTP1B plays an important role in the control of B cell activation and the maintenance of immunological tolerance. PMID:24590766

  10. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade controls phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Di Sanza, Cristina; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Eramo, Adriana; Desideri, Marianna; Biagioni, Francesca; Passeri, Daniela; Falcone, Italia; Sette, Giovanni; Bergamo, Paola; Anichini, Andrea; Sabapathy, Kanaga; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Tafuri, Agostino; Blandino, Giovanni; Orlandi, Augusto; De Maria, Ruggero; Cognetti, Francesco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways are regulated by extensive crosstalk, occurring at different levels. In tumors, transactivation of the alternate pathway is a frequent "escape" mechanism, suggesting that combined inhibition of both pathways may achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Here we show that, in the M14 melanoma model, simultaneous inhibition of both MEK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) achieves synergistic effects at suboptimal concentrations, but becomes frankly antagonistic in the presence of relatively high concentrations of MEK inhibitors. This observation led to the identification of a novel crosstalk mechanism, by which either pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of constitutive MEK signaling restores phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibits downstream signaling through AKT and mTOR, thus bypassing the need for double pathway blockade. This appears to be a general regulatory mechanism and is mediated by multiple mechanisms, such as MAPK-dependent c-Jun and miR-25 regulation. Finally, PTEN upregulation appears to be a major effector of MEK inhibitors' antitumor activity, as cancer cells in which PTEN is inactivated are consistently more resistant to the growth inhibitory and anti-angiogenic effects of MEK blockade. PMID:22215152

  11. Molecular control of acid phosphatase secretion into the rhizosphere of proteoid roots from phosphorus-stressed white lupin.

    PubMed

    Miller, S S; Liu, J; Allan, D L; Menzhuber, C J; Fedorova, M; Vance, C P

    2001-10-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) grown under P deficiency displays a suite of highly coordinated adaptive responses. Included among these is secretion of copious amounts of acid phosphatase (APase). Although numerous reports document that plants secrete APases in response to P deficiency, little is known of the biochemical and molecular events involved in this process. Here we characterize the secreted APase protein, cDNA, and gene from white lupin. The secreted APase enzyme is a glycoprotein with broad substrate specificity. It is synthesized as a preprotein with a deduced M(r) of 52,000 containing a 31-amino acid presequence. Analysis of the presequence predicts that the protein is targeted to outside the cell. The processed protein has a predicted M(r) of 49,000 but migrates as a protein with M(r) of 70,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This is likely due to glycosylation. Enhanced expression is fairly specific to proteoid roots of P-stressed plants and involves enhanced synthesis of both enzyme protein and mRNA. Secreted APase appears to be encoded by a single gene containing seven exons interrupted by six introns. The 5'-upstream putative promoter of the white lupin-secreted APase contains a 50-base pair region having 72% identity to an Arabidopsis APase promoter that is responsive to P deficiency. The white lupin-secreted APase promoter and targeting sequence may be useful tools for genetically engineering important proteins from plant roots. PMID:11598233

  12. A complex between contactin-1 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRZ controls the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamprianou, Smaragda; Chatzopoulou, Elli; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Bouyain, Samuel; Harroch, Sheila

    2013-09-23

    The six members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural cell adhesion molecules are involved in the formation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been linked to mental retardation and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Five of the six CNTNs bind to the homologous receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ), but the biological roles of these interactions remain unclear. We report here the cocrystal structure of the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTPRZ bound to tandem Ig repeats of CNTN1 and combine these structural data with binding assays to show that PTPRZ binds specifically to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Furthermore, analyses of glial cell populations in wild-type and PTPRZ-deficient mice show that the binding of PTPRZ to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells inhibits their proliferation and promotes their development into mature oligodendrocytes. Overall, these results implicate the PTPRZ/CNTN1 complex as a previously unknown modulator of oligodendrogenesis.

  13. Calcineurin phosphatase as a negative regulator of fear memory in hippocampus: control on nuclear factor-κB signaling in consolidation and reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Fustiñana, María Sol; Zalcman, Gisela; Romano, Arturo

    2014-12-01

    Protein phosphatases are important regulators of neural plasticity and memory. Some studies support that the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) is, on the one hand, a negative regulator of memory formation and, on the other hand, a positive regulator of memory extinction and reversal learning. However, the signaling mechanisms by which CaN exerts its action in such processes are not well understood. Previous findings support that CaN negatively regulate the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway during extinction. Here, we have studied the role of CaN in contextual fear memory consolidation and reconsolidation in the hippocampus. We investigated the CaN control on the NF-κB signaling pathway, a key mechanism that regulates gene expression in memory processes. We found that post-training intrahippocampal administration of the CaN inhibitor FK506 enhanced memory retention one day but not two weeks after training. Accordingly, the inhibition of CaN by FK506 increased NF-κB activity in dorsal hippocampus. The administration of the NF-κB signaling pathway inhibitor sulfasalazine (SSZ) impeded the enhancing effect of FK506. In line with our findings in consolidation, FK506 administration before memory reactivation enhanced memory reconsolidation when tested one day after re-exposure to the training context. Strikingly, memory was also enhanced two weeks after training, suggesting that reinforcement during reconsolidation is more persistent than during consolidation. The coadministration of SSZ and FK506 blocked the enhancement effect in reconsolidation, suggesting that this facilitation is also dependent on the NF-κB signaling pathway. In summary, our results support a novel mechanism by which memory formation and reprocessing can be controlled by CaN regulation on NF-κB activity. PMID:25043904

  14. A novel double-negative feedback loop between miR-489 and the HER2-SHP2-MAPK signaling axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Shin; Markoutsa, Eleni; Jie, Chunfa; Liu, Shou; Botbyl, Rachel; Reisman, David; Xu, Peisheng; Chen, Hexin

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErBb2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancers and associated with poor prognosis and outcome. Dysregulation of several microRNAs (miRNAs) plays a key role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. In this study, we screened and identified miRNAs dysregualted in HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Our molecular study demonstrated that miR-489 was specifically downregulated by the HER2-downstream signaling, especially through the MAPK pathway. Restoration or overexpression of miR-489 in HER2-positive breast cancer cells significantly inhibited cell growth in vitro and decreased the tumorigenecity and tumor growth in xenograft mice. Mechanistically, we found that overexpression of miR-489 led to the decreased levels of HER2 and SHP2 and thus attenuated HER2-downstream signaling. Furthermore, we for the first time demonstrated that HER2 is a direct target of miR-489 and therefore HER2-SHP2-MAPK and miR-489 signaling pathways form a mutually inhibitory loop. Using quantitative real-time PCR analysis and Fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH), we found that miR-489 was expressed at significantly lower level in tumor tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues. Downregulation of miR-489 in breast cancers was associated with aggressive tumor phenotypes. Overall, our results define a double-negative feedback loop involving miR-489 and the HER2-SHP2-MAPK signaling axis that can regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and tumor progression and might have therapeutic relevance for HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26918448

  15. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  16. Control of Inflammatory Responses: a New Paradigm for the Treatment of Chronic Neuronal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joo Hong; Lee, Jee Hoon; Kim, Hyunmi; Park, Soo Jung; Joe, Eun-Hye; Jou, Ilo

    2015-06-01

    The term 'inflammation' was first introduced by Celsus almost 2000 years ago. Biological and medical researchers have shown increasing interest in inflammation over the past few decades, in part due to the emerging burden of chronic and degenerative diseases resulting from the increased longevity that has arisen thanks to modern medicine. Inflammation is believed to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of degenerative brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, researchers have sought to combat such diseases by controlling inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the endogenous inflammatory stimulators and signaling pathways in the brain. In particular, our group has focused on the JAK-STAT pathway, identifying anti-inflammatory targets and testing the effects of various anti-inflammatory drugs. This work has shown that the JAK-STAT pathway and its downstream are negatively regulated by phosphatases (SHP2 and MKP-1), inhibitory proteins (SOCS1 and SOCS3) and a nuclear receptor (LXR). These negative regulators are controlled at various levels (e.g. transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational). Future study of these proteins could facilitate the manipulation of the inflammatory response, which plays ubiquitous, diverse and ambivalent roles under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26113788

  17. Role for the PP2A/B56delta phosphatase in regulating 14-3-3 release from Cdc25 to control mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Seth S.; Perry, Jennifer A.; Forester, Craig M.; Nutt, Leta K.; Guo, Yanxiang; Jardim, Melanie J.; Thomenius, Michael J.; Freel, Christopher D.; Darbandi, Rashid; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck; Arroyo, Jason D.; Wang, Xiao-Fan; Shenolikar, Shirish; Nairn, Angus C.; Dunphy, William G.; Hahn, William C.; Virshup, David M.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Summary DNA-responsive checkpoints prevent cell cycle progression following DNA damage or replication inhibition. The mitotic activator Cdc25 is suppressed by checkpoints through inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser287 (Xenopus numbering) and docking of 14-3-3. S287 phosphorylation is a major locus of G2/M checkpoint control, though several checkpoint-independent kinases can phosphorylate this site. We reported previously that mitotic entry requires 14-3-3 removal and S287 dephosphorylation. We show here that DNA-responsive checkpoints activate PP2A/B56δ phosphatase complexes to dephosphorylate Cdc25 at a site (T138) whose phosphorylation is required for 14-3-3 release. However, phosphorylation of T138 is not sufficient for 14-3-3 release from Cdc25. Rather, our data suggest that creation of a 14-3-3 “sink”, consisting of phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding intermediate filament proteins, coupled with reduced Cdc25-14-3-3 affinity, contribute to Cdc25 activation. These observations identify PP2A/B56δ as a central checkpoint effector, and suggest a mechanism for controlling 14-3-3 interactions to promote mitosis. PMID:17110335

  18. The ceramide-activated protein phosphatase Sit4p controls lifespan, mitochondrial function and cell cycle progression by regulating hexokinase 2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, António Daniel; Pereira, Clara; Osório, Hugo; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Costa, Vítor

    2016-06-17

    Sit4p is the catalytic subunit of a ceramide-activated PP2A-like phosphatase that regulates cell cycle, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan in yeast. In this study, we show that hexokinase 2 (Hxk2p) is hyperphosphorylated in sit4Δ mutants grown in glucose medium by a Snf1p-independent mechanism and Hxk2p-S15A mutation suppresses phenotypes associated with SIT4 deletion, namely growth arrest at G1 phase, derepression of mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 resistance and lifespan extension. Consistently, the activation of Sit4p in isc1Δ mutants, which has been associated with premature aging, leads to Hxk2p hypophosphorylation, and the expression of Hxk2p-S15E increases the lifespan of isc1Δ cells. The overall results suggest that Hxk2p functions downstream of Sit4p in the control of cell cycle, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan. PMID:27163342

  19. The LIM domain only 4 protein is a metabolic responsive inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B that controls hypothalamic leptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Nihar R; Zhou, Xun; Qin, Zhaohong; Zaman, Tariq; Gomez-Smith, Mariana; Keyhanian, Kianoosh; Anisman, Hymie; Brunel, Jean Michel; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Chen, Hsiao-Huei

    2013-07-31

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) counteracts leptin signaling and is a therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes. Here we found that LIM domain only 4 (LMO4) inhibits PTP1B activity by increasing the oxidized inactive form of PTP1B. Mice with neuronal ablation of LMO4 have elevated PTP1B activity and impaired hypothalamic leptin signaling, and a PTP1B inhibitor normalized PTP1B activity and restored leptin control of circulating insulin levels. LMO4 is palmitoylated at its C-terminal cysteine, and deletion of this residue prevented palmitoylation and retention of LMO4 at the endoplasmic reticulum and abolished its inhibitory effect on PTP1B. Importantly, LMO4 palmitoylation is sensitive to metabolic stress; mice challenged with a brief high-fat diet or acute intracerebroventricular infusion of saturated fatty acid had less palmitoylated LMO4, less oxidized PTP1B, and increased PTP1B activity in the hypothalamus. Thus, unleashed PTP1B activity attributable to loss of LMO4 palmitoylation may account for rapid loss of central leptin signaling after acute exposure to saturated fat. PMID:23904601

  20. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    by G6PC (GSDIa) or SLC37A4 (GSDIb) gene analysis, and the indications of liver biopsy to measure G6P activity are getting rarer and rarer. Differential diagnoses include the other GSDs, in particular type III (see this term). However, in GSDIII, glycemia and lactacidemia are high after a meal and low after a fast period (often with a later occurrence than that of type I). Primary liver tumors and Pepper syndrome (hepatic metastases of neuroblastoma) may be evoked but are easily ruled out through clinical and ultrasound data. Antenatal diagnosis is possible through molecular analysis of amniocytes or chorionic villous cells. Pre-implantatory genetic diagnosis may also be discussed. Genetic counseling should be offered to patients and their families. The dietary treatment aims at avoiding hypoglycemia (frequent meals, nocturnal enteral feeding through a nasogastric tube, and later oral addition of uncooked starch) and acidosis (restricted fructose and galactose intake). Liver transplantation, performed on the basis of poor metabolic control and/or hepatocarcinoma, corrects hypoglycemia, but renal involvement may continue to progress and neutropenia is not always corrected in type Ib. Kidney transplantation can be performed in case of severe renal insufficiency. Combined liver-kidney grafts have been performed in a few cases. Prognosis is usually good: late hepatic and renal complications may occur, however, with adapted management, patients have almost normal life span. Disease name and synonyms Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency or G6P deficiency or glycogen storage disease type I or GSDI or type I glycogenosis or Von Gierke disease or Hepatorenal glycogenosis. PMID:21599942

  1. Protein phosphatases in pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Ortsäter, Henrik; Grankvist, Nina; Honkanen, Richard E.; Sjöholm1, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly world-wide. A cardinal feature of most forms of diabetes is the lack of insulin-producing capability, due to the loss of insulin-producing β-cells, impaired glucose-sensitive insulin secretion from the β-cell, or a combination thereof, the reasons for which largely remain elusive. Reversible phosphorylation is an important and versatile mechanism for regulating the biological activity of many intracellular proteins, which, in turn, controls a variety of cellular functions. For instance, significant changes in protein kinase activities and in protein phosphorylation patterns occur subsequent to stimulation of insulin release by glucose. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphorylation of proteins involved in the insulin secretory process by the β-cell have been extensively investigated. However, far less is known about the role and regulation of protein dephosphorylation by various protein phosphatases. Herein we review extant data implicating serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases in various aspects of healthy and diabetic islet biology, ranging from control of hormonal stimulus-secretion coupling to mitogenesis and apoptosis. PMID:24681827

  2. Molecular Analysis of Aedes aegypti Classical Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Uncovers an Ortholog of Mammalian PTP-1B Implicated in the Control of Egg Production in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Debora Monteiro; Ahuja, Lalima Gagan; Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato Oliveira; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Jablonka, Willy; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Senna, Raquel; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Hartfelder, Klaus; Capurro, Margareth; Atella, Georgia Correa; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that catalyze phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation and modulate cell differentiation, growth and metabolism. In mammals, PTPs play a key role in the modulation of canonical pathways involved in metabolism and immunity. PTP1B is the prototype member of classical PTPs and a major target for treating human diseases, such as cancer, obesity and diabetes. These signaling enzymes are, hence, targets of a wide array of inhibitors. Anautogenous mosquitoes rely on blood meals to lay eggs and are vectors of the most prevalent human diseases. Identifying the mosquito ortholog of PTP1B and determining its involvement in egg production is, therefore, important in the search for a novel and crucial target for vector control. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an analysis to identify the ortholog of mammalian PTP1B in the Aedes aegypti genome. We identified eight genes coding for classical PTPs. In silico structural and functional analyses of proteins coded by such genes revealed that four of these code for catalytically active enzymes. Among the four genes coding for active PTPs, AAEL001919 exhibits the greatest degree of homology with the mammalian PTP1B. Next, we evaluated the role of this enzyme in egg formation. Blood feeding largely affects AAEL001919 expression, especially in the fat body and ovaries. These tissues are critically involved in the synthesis and storage of vitellogenin, the major yolk protein. Including the classical PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate or the PTP substrate DiFMUP in the blood meal decreased vitellogenin synthesis and egg production. Similarly, silencing AAEL001919 using RNA interference (RNAi) assays resulted in 30% suppression of egg production. Conclusions/Significance The data reported herein implicate, for the first time, a gene that codes for a classical PTP in mosquito egg formation. These findings raise the possibility that this class of enzymes may be used as novel

  3. CONTROL OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN C3H10T1/2 CELLS: ROLE OF RETINOIC ACID AND CELL DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been shown to be lost or inappropriately expressed during carcinogenesis in some tissues. ecause retinoic acid (RA) appears to play a role in the normal regulation of the enzyme (RA up-regulates AP in a variety of cell types) we have sugge...

  4. Plant resistance against the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii is mediated by MPK3 and MPK6 kinases, which are controlled by the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sidonskaya, Ekaterina; Schweighofer, Alois; Shubchynskyy, Volodymyr; Kammerhofer, Nina; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Meskiene, Irute

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes infect plants and form highly sophisticated feeding sites in roots. It is not known which plant cell signalling mechanisms trigger plant defence during the early stages of nematode parasitism. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are central components of protein phosphorylation cascades transducing extracellular signals to plant defence responses. MAPK phosphatases control kinase activities and the signalling outcome. The involvement and the role of MPK3 and MPK6, as well as the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1, is demonstrated during parasitism of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis. Our data reveal notable activation patterns of plant MAPKs and the induction of AP2C1 suggesting the attenuation of defence signalling in plant cells during early nematode infection. It is demonstrated that the ap2c1 mutant that is lacking AP2C1 is more attractive but less susceptible to nematodes compared with the AP2C1-overexpressing line. This implies that the function of AP2C1 is a negative regulator of nematode-induced defence. By contrast, the enhanced susceptibility of mpk3 and mpk6 plants indicates a positive role of stress-activated MAPKs in plant immunity against nematodes. Evidence is provided that phosphatase AP2C1, as well as AP2C1-targeted MPK3 and MPK6, are important regulators of plant–nematode interaction, where the co-ordinated action of these signalling components ensures the timely activation of plant defence. PMID:26438412

  5. Plant resistance against the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii is mediated by MPK3 and MPK6 kinases, which are controlled by the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sidonskaya, Ekaterina; Schweighofer, Alois; Shubchynskyy, Volodymyr; Kammerhofer, Nina; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Meskiene, Irute

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes infect plants and form highly sophisticated feeding sites in roots. It is not known which plant cell signalling mechanisms trigger plant defence during the early stages of nematode parasitism. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are central components of protein phosphorylation cascades transducing extracellular signals to plant defence responses. MAPK phosphatases control kinase activities and the signalling outcome. The involvement and the role of MPK3 and MPK6, as well as the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1, is demonstrated during parasitism of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis. Our data reveal notable activation patterns of plant MAPKs and the induction of AP2C1 suggesting the attenuation of defence signalling in plant cells during early nematode infection. It is demonstrated that the ap2c1 mutant that is lacking AP2C1 is more attractive but less susceptible to nematodes compared with the AP2C1-overexpressing line. This implies that the function of AP2C1 is a negative regulator of nematode-induced defence. By contrast, the enhanced susceptibility of mpk3 and mpk6 plants indicates a positive role of stress-activated MAPKs in plant immunity against nematodes. Evidence is provided that phosphatase AP2C1, as well as AP2C1-targeted MPK3 and MPK6, are important regulators of plant-nematode interaction, where the co-ordinated action of these signalling components ensures the timely activation of plant defence. PMID:26438412

  6. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  7. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  8. Biogeochemical drivers of phosphatase activity in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Joana; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Although nitrogen has become a major concern for wetlands scientists dealing with eutrophication problems, phosphorous represents another key element, and consequently its biogeochemical cycling has a crucial role in eutrophication processes. Microbial communities are a central component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes on coastal systems, since most of the processes in sediments are microbial-mediated due to enzymatic action, including the mineralization of organic phosphorus carried out by acid phosphatase activity. In the present work, the authors investigate the biogeochemical sediment drivers that control phosphatase activities. Authors also aim to assess biogeochemical factors' influence on the enzyme-mediated phosphorous cycling processes in salt marshes. Plant rhizosediments and bare sediments were collected and biogeochemical features, including phosphatase activities, inorganic and organic phosphorus contents, humic acids content and pH, were assessed. Acid phosphatase was found to give the highest contribution for total phosphatase activity among the three pH-isoforms present in salt marsh sediments, favored by acid pH in colonized sediments. Humic acids also appear to have an important role inhibiting phosphatase activity. A clear relation of phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorous was also found. The data presented reinforces the role of phosphatase in phosphorous cycling.

  9. Metabolic Control of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated Caspase-2 Suppression by the B55β/Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bofu; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Wojton, Jeffrey; Huang, Nai-Jia; Chen, Chen; Soderblom, Erik J.; Zhang, Liguo; Kornbluth, Sally

    2014-01-01

    High levels of metabolic activity confer resistance to apoptosis. Caspase-2, an apoptotic initiator, can be suppressed by high levels of nutrient flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. This metabolic control is exerted via inhibitory phosphorylation of the caspase-2 prodomain by activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We show here that this activation of CaMKII depends, in part, on dephosphorylation of CaMKII at novel sites (Thr393/Ser395) and that this is mediated by metabolic activation of protein phosphatase 2A in complex with the B55β targeting subunit. This represents a novel locus of CaMKII control and also provides a mechanism contributing to metabolic control of apoptosis. These findings may have implications for metabolic control of the many CaMKII-controlled and protein phosphatase 2A-regulated physiological processes, because both enzymes appear to be responsive to alterations in glucose metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:25378403

  10. Dephosphorylation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin by latent phosphatase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.D.; Fong, Y.L.; Benovic, J.L.; Sibley, D.R.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1988-06-25

    Recent evidence suggests that the function of receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins may be controlled by highly specific protein kinases, e.g. rhodopsin kinase and the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. In order to investigate the nature of the phosphatases which might be involved in controlling the state of receptor phosphorylation we studied the ability of four highly purified well characterized protein phosphatases to dephosphorylate preparations of rhodopsin or beta 2-adrenergic receptor which had been highly phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. These included: type 1 phosphatase, calcineurin phosphatase, type 2A phosphatase, and the high molecular weight latent phosphatase 2. Under conditions in which all the phosphatases could dephosphorylate such common substrates as (/sup 32/P)phosphorylase a and (/sup 32/P)myelin basic protein at similar rates only the latent phosphatase 2 was active on the phosphorylated receptors. Moreover, a latent phosphatase activity was found predominantly in a sequestered membrane fraction of frog erythrocytes. This parallels the distribution of a beta-adrenergic receptor phosphatase activity recently described in these cells. These data suggest a potential role for the latent phosphatase 2 as a specific receptor phosphatase.

  11. Adamantyl-Substituted Retinoid-Derived Molecules That Interact with the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Small Heterodimer Partner: Effects of Replacing the 1-Adamantyl or Hydroxyl Group on Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth, Induction of Cancer Cell Apoptosis, and Inhibition of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin; Jiang, Tao; Ye, Mao; Fontana, Joseph A.; Farhana, Lulu; Patel, Bhaumik; Xue, Li Ping; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Nuti, Roberto; Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Han, Young-Hoon; Tautz, Lutz; Hobbs, Peter D.; Jong, Ling; Waleh, Nahid; Chao, Wan-ru; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Pang, Yuhong; Su, Ying

    2014-01-01

    (E)-4-[3-(1-Adamantyl)-4′-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3-Cl-AHPC) induces the cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia and cancer cells. Studies demonstrated that 3-Cl-AHPC bound to the atypical orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP). Although missing a DNA-binding domain, SHP heterodimerizes with the ligand-binding domains of other nuclear receptors to repress their abilities to induce or inhibit gene expression. 3-Cl-AHPC analogues having the 1-adamantyl and phenolic hydroxyl pharmacophoric elements replaced with isosteric groups were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibition of proliferation and induction of human cancer cell apoptosis. Structure–anticancer activity relationship studies indicated the importance of both groups to apoptotic activity. Docking of 3-Cl-AHPC and its analogues to an SHP computational model that was based on the crystal structure of ultraspiracle complexed with 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoylglycero-3-phosphoethanolamine suggested why these 3-Cl-AHPC groups could influence SHP activity. Inhibitory activity against Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) was also assessed. The most active Shp-2 inhibitor was found to be the 3′-(3,3-dimethylbutynyl) analogue of 3-Cl-AHPC. PMID:18759424

  12. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  13. Differential control of the hyperpolarization-activated current (i(f)) by cAMP gating and phosphatase inhibition in rabbit sino-atrial node myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Accili, E A; Redaelli, G; DiFrancesco, D

    1997-01-01

    1. The actions of the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A on the hyperpolarization-activated cardiac 'pacemaker' current (i(f)) were determined in single cells isolated from the sino-atrial (SA) node of the rabbit. 2. Cells were incubated for 8 min in Tyrode solution containing calyculin A (0.5 microM) and then superfused with normal Tyrode solution. The mean normalized i(f) measured in eight cells at mid-activation voltages during and after exposure to calyculin A increased maximally by 47% with a time constant of 466 s, a time much longer than that required for cAMP-mediated i(f) stimulation (about 8 s). 3. In two-pulse protocols, calyculin A treatment increased i(f) at full as well as at mid-activation voltages, indicating a higher i(f) conductance. 4. Measurement of the conductance-voltage (gf(V)) relation by voltage ramp protocols confirmed a conductance increase by calyculin A, with no significant change in the position of the activation curve on the voltage axis. Data pooled together from ramp and two-pulse protocols yielded a calyculin A-induced increase in fully activated i(f) conductance of 39.6 +/- 6.4% (n = 16 cells). 5. The positive and negative shift of i(f) voltage dependence in response to beta-adrenergic (1 microM isoprenaline) and muscarinic stimulation (1 microM acetylcholine), respectively, was preserved after the calyculin A-induced increase in conductance. The shift of the i(f) activation curve induced by 1 microM isoprenaline was significantly larger in calyculin A-treated cells (8.8 vs. 5.8 mV). 6. These data indicate that phosphatase inhibition increases i(f) in a manner distinct from the direct cAMP pathway and potentiates the beta-adrenergic-mediated i(f) modulation. PMID:9161982

  14. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  15. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  16. Protein phosphatase 1 is a key player in nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Sandra; Santos, Mariana; Martins, Filipa; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B

    2015-12-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation at serine (Ser), threonine (Thr) and tyrosine (Tyr) residues is among the major regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. The eukaryotic genome encodes many protein kinases and protein phosphatases. However, the localization, activity and specificity towards phosphatase substrates are dictated by a large array of phosphatase binding and regulatory subunits. For protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) more than 200 binding subunits have been described. The various PP1 isoforms and the binding subunits can be located throughout the cell, including in the nucleus. It follows that several nuclear specific PP1 binding proteins (PIPs) have been described and these will be discussed. Among them are PNUTS (phosphatase 1 nuclear targeting subunit), NIPP1 (nuclear inhibitor of PP1) and CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein), which have all been associated with transcription. In fact PP1 can associate with transcription factors fulfilling an important regulatory function, in this respect it can bind to Hox11, human factor C1 (HCF1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2). PP1 also regulates cell cycle progression and centrosome maturation and splitting, again by binding to specific regulatory proteins. Moreover, PP1 together with other protein phosphatases control the entry into mitosis by regulating the activity of mitotic kinases. Thus, PP1, its binding proteins and/or the phosphorylation states of both, directly control a vast array of cell nucleus associated functions, many of which are starting to be unraveled. PMID:26275498

  17. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  18. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR promotes R7 photoreceptor axon targeting by a phosphatase-independent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Kerstin; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) control many aspects of nervous system development. At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), regulation of synapse growth and maturation by the RPTP LAR depends on catalytic phosphatase activity and on the extracellular ligands Syndecan and Dally-like. We show here that the function of LAR in controlling R7 photoreceptor axon targeting in the visual system differs in several respects. The extracellular domain of LAR important for this process is distinct from the domains known to bind Syndecan and Dally-like, suggesting the involvement of a different ligand. R7 targeting does not require LAR phosphatase activity, but instead depends on the phosphatase activity of another RPTP, PTP69D. In addition, a mutation that prevents dimerization of the intracellular domain of LAR interferes with its ability to promote R7 targeting, although it does not disrupt phosphatase activity or neuromuscular synapse growth. We propose that LAR function in R7 is independent of its phosphatase activity, but requires structural features that allow dimerization and may promote the assembly of downstream effectors. PMID:19889974

  19. Association of Protein Phosphatase PPM1G With Alcohol Use Disorder and Brain Activity During Behavioral Control in a Genome-Wide Methylation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Barbara; Nymberg, Charlotte; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Wong, Cybele P.; Carvalho, Fabiana M.; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Macare, Christine; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J.; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Bakalkin, Georgy; Mill, Jonathan; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Rose, Richard J.; Yan, Jia; Aliev, Fazil; Dick, Danielle; Kaprio, Jaakko; Desrivières, Sylvane; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective The genetic component of alcohol use disorder is substantial, but monozygotic twin discordance indicates a role for nonheritable differences that could be mediated by epigenetics. Despite growing evidence associating epigenetics and psychiatric disorders, it is unclear how epigenetics, particularly DNA methylation, relate to brain function and behavior, including drinking behavior. Method The authors carried out a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation of 18 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for alcohol use disorder and validated differentially methylated regions. After validation, the authors characterized these differentially methylated regions using personality trait assessment and functional MRI in a sample of 499 adolescents. Results Hypermethylation in the 3′-protein-phosphatase-1G (PPM1G) gene locus was associated with alcohol use disorder. The authors found association of PPM1G hypermethylation with early escalation of alcohol use and increased impulsiveness. They also observed association of PPM1G hypermethylation with increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in the right subthalamic nucleus during an impulsiveness task. Conclusions Overall, the authors provide first evidence for an epigenetic marker associated with alcohol consumption and its underlying neurobehavioral phenotype. PMID:25982659

  20. Phosphorylation of Lipin 1 and Charge on the Phosphatidic Acid Head Group Control Its Phosphatidic Acid Phosphatase Activity and Membrane Association*

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, James M.; Mullins, Garrett R.; Brindley, David N.; Harris, Thurl E.

    2013-01-01

    The lipin gene family encodes a class of Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatases involved in the de novo synthesis of phospholipids and triglycerides. Unlike other enzymes in the Kennedy pathway, lipins are not integral membrane proteins, and they need to translocate from the cytosol to intracellular membranes to participate in glycerolipid synthesis. The movement of lipin 1 within the cell is closely associated with its phosphorylation status. Although cellular analyses have demonstrated that highly phosphorylated lipin 1 is enriched in the cytosol and dephosphorylated lipin 1 is found on membranes, the effects of phosphorylation on lipin 1 activity and binding to membranes has not been recapitulated in vitro. Herein we describe a new biochemical assay for lipin 1 using mixtures of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylethanolamine that reflects its physiological activity and membrane interaction. This depends on our observation that lipin 1 binding to PA in membranes is highly responsive to the electrostatic charge of PA. The studies presented here demonstrate that phosphorylation regulates the ability of the polybasic domain of lipin 1 to recognize di-anionic PA and identify mTOR as a crucial upstream signaling component regulating lipin 1 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate how phosphorylation of lipin 1 together with pH and membrane phospholipid composition play important roles in the membrane association of lipin 1 and thus the regulation of its enzymatic activity. PMID:23426360

  1. Protein phosphatase 1α is a Ras-activated Bad phosphatase that regulates interleukin-2 deprivation-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayllón, Verónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; García, Alphonse; Cayla, Xavier; Rebollo, Angelita

    2000-01-01

    Growth factor deprivation is a physiological mechanism to regulate cell death. We utilize an interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent murine T-cell line to identify proteins that interact with Bad upon IL-2 stimulation or deprivation. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins and co-immunoprecipitation techniques, we found that Bad interacts with protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α). Serine phosphorylation of Bad is induced by IL-2 and its dephosphorylation correlates with appearance of apoptosis. IL-2 deprivation induces Bad dephosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of a serine phosphatase. A serine/threonine phosphatase activity, sensitive to the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, was detected in Bad immunoprecipitates from IL-2-stimulated cells, increasing after IL-2 deprivation. This enzymatic activity also dephosphorylates in vivo 32P-labeled Bad. Treatment of cells with okadaic acid blocks Bad dephosphorylation and prevents cell death. Finally, Ras activation controls the catalytic activity of PP1α. These results strongly suggest that Bad is an in vitro and in vivo substrate for PP1α phosphatase and that IL-2 deprivation-induced apoptosis may operate by regulating Bad phosphorylation through PP1α phosphatase, whose enzymatic activity is regulated by Ras. PMID:10811615

  2. Protein Phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A controls the innate antiviral and antibacterial response of macrophages during HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jim; Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Speer, Alexander; Wagner, Frederic; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a major public health issue. While some research has described how each pathogen accelerates the course of infection of the other pathogen by compromising the immune system, very little is known about the molecular biology of HIV-1/Mtb co-infection at the host cell level. This is somewhat surprising, as both pathogens are known to replicate and persist in macrophages. We here identify Protein Phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A (PPM1A) as a molecular link between Mtb infection and increased HIV-1 susceptibility of macrophages. We demonstrate that both Mtb and HIV-1 infection induce the expression of PPM1A in primary human monocyte/macrophages and THP-1 cells. Genetic manipulation studies revealed that increased PPMA1 expression rendered THP-1 cells highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, while depletion of PPM1A rendered them relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. At the same time, increased PPM1A expression abrogated the ability of THP-1 cells to respond to relevant bacterial stimuli with a proper cytokine/chemokine secretion response, blocked their chemotactic response and impaired their ability to phagocytose bacteria. These data suggest that PPM1A, which had previously been shown to play a role in the antiviral response to Herpes Simplex virus infection, also governs the antibacterial response of macrophages to bacteria, or at least to Mtb infection. PPM1A thus seems to play a central role in the innate immune response of macrophages, implying that host directed therapies targeting PPM1A could be highly beneficial, in particular for HIV/Mtb co-infected patients. PMID:27004401

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae TORC1 Controls Histone Acetylation by Signaling Through the Sit4/PP6 Phosphatase to Regulate Sirtuin Deacetylase Nuclear Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Jason J.; Chen, Hongfeng; Laribee, R. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The epigenome responds to changes in the extracellular environment, yet how this information is transmitted to the epigenetic regulatory machinery is unclear. Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast model, we demonstrate that target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) signaling, which is activated by nitrogen metabolism and amino acid availability, promotes site-specific acetylation of histone H3 and H4 N-terminal tails by opposing the activity of the sirtuin deacetylases Hst3 and Hst4. TORC1 does so through suppression of the Tap42-regulated Sit4 (PP6) phosphatase complex, as sit4Δ rescues histone acetylation under TORC1-repressive conditions. We further demonstrate that TORC1 inhibition, and subsequent PP6 activation, causes a selective, rapid, nuclear accumulation of Hst4, which correlates with decreased histone acetylation. This increased Hst4 nuclear localization precedes an elevation in Hst4 protein expression, which is attributed to reduced protein turnover, suggesting that nutrient signaling through TORC1 may limit Hst4 nuclear accumulation to facilitate Hst4 degradation and maintain histone acetylation. This pathway is functionally relevant to TORC1 signaling since the stress sensitivity of a nonessential TORC1 mutant (tco89Δ) to hydroxyurea and arsenic can be reversed by combining tco89Δ with either hst3Δ, hst4Δ, or sit4Δ. Surprisingly, while hst3Δ or hst4Δ rescues the sensitivity tco89Δ has to low concentrations of the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, sit4Δ fails to do so. These results suggest Sit4 provides an additional function necessary for TORC1-dependent cell growth and proliferation. Collectively, this study defines a novel mechanism by which TORC1 suppresses a PP6-regulated sirtuin deacetylase pathway to couple nutrient signaling to epigenetic regulation. PMID:27343235

  4. Protein phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A controls the innate antiviral and antibacterial response of macrophages during HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jim; Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Speer, Alexander; Wagner, Frederic; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2016-03-29

    Co-infection with HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a major public health issue. While some research has described how each pathogen accelerates the course of infection of the other pathogen by compromising the immune system, very little is known about the molecular biology of HIV-1/Mtb co-infection at the host cell level. This is somewhat surprising, as both pathogens are known to replicate and persist in macrophages. We here identify Protein Phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A (PPM1A) as a molecular link between Mtb infection and increased HIV-1 susceptibility of macrophages. We demonstrate that both Mtb and HIV-1 infection induce the expression of PPM1A in primary human monocyte/macrophages and THP-1 cells. Genetic manipulation studies revealed that increased PPMA1 expression rendered THP-1 cells highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, while depletion of PPM1A rendered them relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. At the same time, increased PPM1A expression abrogated the ability of THP-1 cells to respond to relevant bacterial stimuli with a proper cytokine/chemokine secretion response, blocked their chemotactic response and impaired their ability to phagocytose bacteria. These data suggest that PPM1A, which had previously been shown to play a role in the antiviral response to Herpes Simplex virus infection, also governs the antibacterial response of macrophages to bacteria, or at least to Mtb infection. PPM1A thus seems to play a central role in the innate immune response of macrophages, implying that host directed therapies targeting PPM1A could be highly beneficial, in particular for HIV/Mtb co-infected patients. PMID:27004401

  5. PECAM-1-regulated signalling thresholds control tolerance in anergic transgenic B-cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mae-Xhum; Hayball, John D; Jackson, Denise E

    2008-03-01

    Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is an immunoglobulin (Ig)-immunoreceptor tyrosine based inhibitory motif (Ig-ITIM) superfamily member that recruits and activates protein-tyrosine phosphatases, predominantly SHP-2 and to a lesser extent, SHP-1. Previously, we have shown that deletion of PECAM-1 results in a hyper-proliferative B-cell phenotype. We wanted to test whether the Ig-ITIM superfamily member, PECAM-1 maintains peripheral tolerance by regulating signalling thresholds of B-cells that control autoantibody production or relaxed negative selection of autoreactive B-cells in bone marrow. In order to address this issue, we utilised the classical model of lysozyme/immunoglobulin transgenic mouse model that defines thresholds for eliminating or inactivating self-reactive B-cells. In this study, we show that breeding of double transgenes: soluble hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and its corresponding high-affinity receptor (HEL-Ig) onto PECAM-1 null background resulted in a spontaneous loss of B-cell tolerance in vivo. The resultant PECAM-1(-/-) Dbl Tg mice displayed elevated levels of anti-HEL immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in the serum compared to PECAM-1+/+ anergic counterparts. Dbl Tg B-cells lacking PECAM-1 showed enhanced B-cell proliferation and calcium flux responses to LPS, IL-4 alone, IgM cross-linking and IL-4 indicating augmentation of antigen-receptor signalling. Thus, PECAM-1 is important in maintaining peripheral tolerance in Dbl Tg B-cells. PMID:17977600

  6. Phosphatase regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Kozicky, Lisa K; Sly, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play critical roles in tissue homeostasis and the immune response to invading pathogens or tumor cells. A hallmark of macrophages is their "plasticity," that is, their ability to respond to cues in their local microenvironment and adapt their activation state or phenotype to mount an appropriate response. During the inflammatory response, macrophages may be required to mount a profound anti-bacterial or anti-tumor response, an anti-inflammatory response, an anti-parasitic response, or a wound healing response. To do so, macrophages express cell surface receptors for growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, as well pathogen and danger associated molecular patterns. Downstream of these cell surface receptors, cell signalling cascades are activated and deactivated by reversible and competing activities of lipid and protein kinases and phosphatases. While kinases drive the activation of cell signalling pathways critical for macrophage activation, the strength and duration of the signalling is regulated by phosphatases. Hence, gene knockout mouse models have revealed critical roles for lipid and protein phosphatases in macrophage activation. Herein, we describe our current understanding and the key roles of specific cellular phosphatases in the regulation of the quality of macrophage polarization as well as the quantity of cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:26216598

  7. New Functions of the Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatases in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Erneux, Christophe; Ghosh, Somadri; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Edimo, William's Elong

    2016-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases act on inositol phosphates and phosphoinositides as substrates. They are 10 different isoenzymes and several splice variants in the human genome that are involved in a series of human pathologies such as the Lowe syndrome, the Joubert and MORM syndromes, breast cancer, glioblastoma, gastric cancer and several other type of cancers. Inositol 5-phosphatases can be amplified in human cancer cells, whereas the 3- and 4- phosphatase tumor suppressor PTEN and INPP4B, repectively are often repressed or deleted. The inositol 5-phosphatases are critically involved in a complex network of higly regulated phosphoinositides, affecting the lipid content of PI(3, 4, 5)P3, PI(4, 5)P2 and PI(3, 4)P2. This has an impact on the normal behavior of many intracellular target proteins e.g. protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) or actin binding proteins and final biological responses. The production of PI(3, 4P)2 by dephosphorylation of the substrate PI(3, 4, 5)P3 is particularly important as it produces a new signal messenger in the control of cell migration, invasion and endocytosis. New inhibitors/activators of inositol 5- phosphatases have recently been identified for the possible control of their activity in several human pathologies such as inflamation and cancer. PMID:26916021

  8. The glucose-6-phosphatase system.

    PubMed Central

    van Schaftingen, Emile; Gerin, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), an enzyme found mainly in the liver and the kidneys, plays the important role of providing glucose during starvation. Unlike most phosphatases acting on water-soluble compounds, it is a membrane-bound enzyme, being associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. In 1975, W. Arion and co-workers proposed a model according to which G6Pase was thought to be a rather unspecific phosphatase, with its catalytic site oriented towards the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum [Arion, Wallin, Lange and Ballas (1975) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 6, 75--83]. Substrate would be provided to this enzyme by a translocase that is specific for glucose 6-phosphate, thereby accounting for the specificity of the phosphatase for glucose 6-phosphate in intact microsomes. Distinct transporters would allow inorganic phosphate and glucose to leave the vesicles. At variance with this substrate-transport model, other models propose that conformational changes play an important role in the properties of G6Pase. The last 10 years have witnessed important progress in our knowledge of the glucose 6-phosphate hydrolysis system. The genes encoding G6Pase and the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been cloned and shown to be mutated in glycogen storage disease type Ia and type Ib respectively. The gene encoding a G6Pase-related protein, expressed specifically in pancreatic islets, has also been cloned. Specific potent inhibitors of G6Pase and of the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been synthesized or isolated from micro-organisms. These as well as other findings support the model initially proposed by Arion. Much progress has also been made with regard to the regulation of the expression of G6Pase by insulin, glucocorticoids, cAMP and glucose. PMID:11879177

  9. Myosin light-chain phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M; Perry, S V; Ottaway, J

    1976-01-01

    1. A method for the isolation of a new enzyme, myosin light-chain phosphatase, from rabbit white skeletal muscle by using a Sepharose-phosphorylated myosin light-chain affinity column is described. 2. The enzyme migrated as a single component on electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel at pH7.0, with apparent mol.wt. 70000. 3. The enzyme was highly specific for the phosphorylated P-light chain of myosin, had pH optima at 6.5 and 8.0 and was not inhibited by NaF. 4. A Ca2+-sensitive 'ATPase' (adenosine triphosphatase) system consisting of myosin light-chain kinase, myosin light-chain phosphatase and the P-light chain is described. 5. Evidence is presented for a phosphoryl exchange between Pi, phosphorylated P-light chain and myosin light-chain phosphatase. 6. Heavy meromyosin prepared by chymotryptic digestion can be phosphorylated by myosin light-chain kinase. 7. The ATPase activities of myosin and heavy meromyosin, in the presence and absence of F-actin, were not significantly changed (+/- 10%) by phosphorylation of the P-light chain. Images PLATE 1 PMID:186030

  10. Post-Translational Regulation of the Glucose-6-Phosphatase Complex by Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Is a Crucial Determinant of Endogenous Glucose Production and Is Controlled by the Glucose-6-Phosphate Transporter.

    PubMed

    Soty, Maud; Chilloux, Julien; Delalande, François; Zitoun, Carine; Bertile, Fabrice; Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2016-04-01

    The excessive endogenous glucose production (EGP) induced by glucagon participates in the development of type 2 diabetes. To further understand this hormonal control, we studied the short-term regulation by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) enzyme, which catalyzes the last reaction of EGP. In gluconeogenic cell models, a 1-h treatment by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin increased G6Pase activity and glucose production independently of any change in enzyme protein amount or G6P content. Using specific inhibitors or protein overexpression, we showed that the stimulation of G6Pase activity involved the protein kinase A (PKA). Results of site-directed mutagenesis, mass spectrometry analyses, and in vitro phosphorylation experiments suggested that the PKA stimulation of G6Pase activity did not depend on a direct phosphorylation of the enzyme. However, the temperature-dependent induction of both G6Pase activity and glucose release suggested a membrane-based mechanism. G6Pase is composed of a G6P transporter (G6PT) and a catalytic unit (G6PC). Surprisingly, we demonstrated that the increase in G6PT activity was required for the stimulation of G6Pase activity by forskolin. Our data demonstrate the existence of a post-translational mechanism that regulates G6Pase activity and reveal the key role of G6PT in the hormonal regulation of G6Pase activity and of EGP. PMID:26958868

  11. The DenA/DEN1 Interacting Phosphatase DipA Controls Septa Positioning and Phosphorylation-Dependent Stability of Cytoplasmatic DenA/DEN1 during Fungal Development

    PubMed Central

    Schinke, Josua; Kolog Gulko, Miriam; Christmann, Martin; Valerius, Oliver; Stumpf, Sina Kristin; Stirz, Margarita; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2016-01-01

    DenA/DEN1 and the COP9 signalosome (CSN) represent two deneddylases which remove the ubiquitin-like Nedd8 from modified target proteins and are required for distinct fungal developmental programmes. The cellular DenA/DEN1 population is divided into a nuclear and a cytoplasmatic subpopulation which is especially enriched at septa. DenA/DEN1 stability control mechanisms are different for the two cellular subpopulations and depend on different physical interacting proteins and the C-terminal DenA/DEN1 phosphorylation pattern. Nuclear DenA/DEN1 is destabilized during fungal development by five of the eight CSN subunits which target nuclear DenA/DEN1 for degradation. DenA/DEN1 becomes stabilized as a phosphoprotein at S243/S245 during vegetative growth, which is necessary to support further asexual development. After the initial phase of development, the newly identified cytoplasmatic DenA/DEN1 interacting phosphatase DipA and an additional developmental specific C-terminal phosphorylation site at serine S253 destabilize DenA/DEN1. Outside of the nucleus, DipA is co-transported with DenA/DEN1 in the cytoplasm between septa and nuclei. Deletion of dipA resulted in increased DenA/DEN1 stability in a strain which is unresponsive to illumination. The mutant strain is dysregulated in cytokinesis and impaired in asexual development. Our results suggest a dual phosphorylation-dependent DenA/DEN1 stability control with stabilizing and destabilizing modifications and physical interaction partner proteins which function as control points in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PMID:27010942

  12. Structural Basis of Response Regulator Dephosphorylation by Rap Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    V Parashar; N Mirouze; D Dubnau; M Neiditch

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial Rap family proteins have been most extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis, where they regulate activities including sporulation, genetic competence, antibiotic expression, and the movement of the ICEBs1 transposon. One subset of Rap proteins consists of phosphatases that control B. subtilis and B. anthracis sporulation by dephosphorylating the response regulator Spo0F. The mechanistic basis of Rap phosphatase activity was unknown. Here we present the RapH-Spo0F X-ray crystal structure, which shows that Rap proteins consist of a 3-helix bundle and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. Extensive biochemical and genetic functional studies reveal the importance of the observed RapH-Spo0F interactions, including the catalytic role of a glutamine in the RapH 3-helix bundle that inserts into the Spo0F active site. We show that in addition to dephosphorylating Spo0F, RapH can antagonize sporulation by sterically blocking phosphoryl transfer to and from Spo0F. Our structure-function analysis of the RapH-Spo0F interaction identified Rap protein residues critical for Spo0F phosphatase activity. This information enabled us to assign Spo0F phosphatase activity to a Rap protein based on sequence alone, which was not previously possible. Finally, as the ultimate test of our newfound understanding of the structural requirements for Rap phosphatase function, a non-phosphatase Rap protein that inhibits the binding of the response regulator ComA to DNA was rationally engineered to dephosphorylate Spo0F. In addition to revealing the mechanistic basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap proteins, our studies support the previously proposed T-loop-Y allostery model of receiver domain regulation that restricts the aromatic 'switch' residue to an internal position when the {beta}4-{alpha}4 loop adopts an active-site proximal conformation.

  13. [Phosphoprotein phosphatase nonspecifically hydrolyzes CoA].

    PubMed

    Reziapkin, V I; Moiseenok, A G

    1988-01-01

    CoA hydrolysis was studied by a homogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase (EC 3.1 3.16) preparation from bovine spleen nuclei at pH 5.8. Phosphoprotein phosphatase catalyzed hydrolysis of the CoA 3'-phosphoester bond to form dephospho-CoA and Pi. The Km value for phosphoprotein phosphatase with CoA as substrate was 3.7 mM, the specific activity - 0.26 mmol Pi.min-1.mg-1. Phosphoprotein phosphatase did not essentially catalyze the calcium pantothenate hydrolysis (not more than 2% as compared with the CoA hydrolysis rate). PMID:2849829

  14. Okadaic acid-sensitive protein phosphatases constrain phrenic long-term facilitation after sustained hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Julia E R; Satriotomo, Irawan; Baker-Herman, Tracy L; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2008-03-12

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a serotonin-dependent form of pattern-sensitive respiratory plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia (IH), but not sustained hypoxia (SH). The mechanism(s) underlying pLTF pattern sensitivity are unknown. SH and IH may differentially regulate serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity, thereby inhibiting relevant protein phosphatases uniquely during IH and conferring pattern sensitivity to pLTF. We hypothesized that spinal protein phosphatase inhibition would relieve this braking action of protein phosphatases, thereby revealing pLTF after SH. Anesthetized rats received intrathecal (C4) okadaic acid (25 nm) before SH (25 min, 11% O(2)). Unlike (vehicle) control rats, SH induced a significant pLTF in okadaic acid-treated rats that was indistinguishable from rats exposed to IH (three 5 min episodes, 11% O(2)). IH and SH with okadaic acid may elicit pLTF by similar, serotonin-dependent mechanisms, because intravenous methysergide blocks pLTF in rats receiving IH or okadaic acid plus SH. Okadaic acid did not alter IH-induced pLTF. In summary, pattern sensitivity in pLTF may reflect differential regulation of okadaic acid-sensitive serine/threonine phosphatases; presumably, these phosphatases are less active during/after IH versus SH. The specific okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase(s) constraining pLTF and their spatiotemporal dynamics during and/or after IH and SH remain to be determined. PMID:18337426

  15. Identification of a selective small-molecule inhibitor series targeting the eyes absent 2 (Eya2) phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Aaron B; Dehdashti, Seameen J; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Li, Xueni; Ford, Heide L; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Eya proteins are essential coactivators of the Six family of homeobox transcription factors and also contain a unique protein tyrosine phosphatase activity, belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase family of phosphatases. The phosphatase activity of Eya is important for a subset of Six1-mediated transcription, making this a unique type of transcriptional control. It is also responsible for directing cells to the repair instead of apoptosis pathway upon DNA damage. Furthermore, the phosphatase activity of Eya is critical for transformation, migration, invasion, and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibitors of the Eya phosphatase activity may be antitumorigenic and antimetastatic, as well as sensitize cancer cells to DNA damage-inducing therapies. In this article, we identified a previously unknown chemical series using high-throughput screening that inhibits the Eya2 phosphatase activity with IC(50)s ranging from 1.8 to 79 µM. Compound activity was confirmed using an alternative malachite green assay and H2AX, a known Eya substrate. Importantly, these Eya2 phosphatase inhibitors show specificity and do not significantly inhibit several other cellular phosphatases. Our studies identify the first selective Eya2 phosphatase inhibitors that can potentially be developed into chemical probes for functional studies of Eya phosphatase or into anticancer drugs in the future. PMID:22820394

  16. HuPho: the human phosphatase portal.

    PubMed

    Liberti, Susanna; Sacco, Francesca; Calderone, Alberto; Perfetto, Livia; Iannuccelli, Marta; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Palma, Anita; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatases and kinases contribute to the regulation of protein phosphorylation homeostasis in the cell. Phosphorylation is a key post-translational modification underlying the regulation of many cellular processes. Thus, a comprehensive picture of phosphatase function and the identification of their target substrates would aid a systematic approach to a mechanistic description of cell signalling. Here we present a website designed to facilitate the retrieval of information about human protein phosphatases. To this end we developed a search engine to recover and integrate information annotated in several publicly available web resources. In addition we present a text-mining-assisted annotation effort aimed at extracting phosphatase related data reported in the scientific literature. The HuPho (human phosphatases) website can be accessed at http://hupho.uniroma2.it. PMID:22804825

  17. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  18. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using ({sup 32}P)phosphorylase {alpha} as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at {approx}5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase.

  19. Protein Phosphatases Decrease Their Activity during Capacitation: A New Requirement for This Event

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Janetti R.; Díaz, Emilce S.; Fara, Karla; Barón, Lina; Morales, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    There are few reports on the role of protein phosphatases during capacitation. Here, we report on the role of PP2B, PP1, and PP2A during human sperm capacitation. Motile sperm were resuspended in non-capacitating medium (NCM, Tyrode's medium, albumin- and bicarbonate-free) or in reconstituted medium (RCM, NCM plus 2.6% albumin/25 mM bicarbonate). The presence of the phosphatases was evaluated by western blotting and the subcellular localization by indirect immunofluorescence. The function of these phosphatases was analyzed by incubating the sperm with specific inhibitors: okadaic acid, I2, endothall, and deltamethrin. Different aliquots were incubated in the following media: 1) NCM; 2) NCM plus inhibitors; 3) RCM; and 4) RCM plus inhibitors. The percent capacitated sperm and phosphatase activities were evaluated using the chlortetracycline assay and a phosphatase assay kit, respectively. The results confirm the presence of PP2B and PP1 in human sperm. We also report the presence of PP2A, specifically, the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunits PR65 and B. PP2B and PP2A were present in the tail, neck, and postacrosomal region, and PP1 was present in the postacrosomal region, neck, middle, and principal piece of human sperm. Treatment with phosphatase inhibitors rapidly (≤1 min) increased the percent of sperm depicting the pattern B, reaching a maximum of ∼40% that was maintained throughout incubation; after 3 h, the percent of capacitated sperm was similar to that of the control. The enzymatic activity of the phosphatases decreased during capacitation without changes in their expression. The pattern of phosphorylation on threonine residues showed a sharp increase upon treatment with the inhibitors. In conclusion, human sperm express PP1, PP2B, and PP2A, and the activity of these phosphatases decreases during capacitation. This decline in phosphatase activities and the subsequent increase in threonine phosphorylation may be an important requirement for the

  20. Multiple Functions of the Eya Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eyes absent (Eya), a protein conserved from plants to humans and best characterized as a transcriptional coactivator, is also the prototype for a novel class of eukaryotic aspartyl protein tyrosine phosphatases. This minireview discusses recent breakthroughs in elucidating the substrates and cellular events regulated by Eya's tyrosine phosphatase function and highlights some of the complexities, new questions, and surprises that have emerged from efforts to understand how Eya's unusual multifunctionality influences developmental regulation and signaling. PMID:26667035

  1. The role of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Alistair T R; Baldwin, Monique L; Rostas, John A P; Holst, Jeff; Ludowyke, Russell I

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of exocytosis is integral to the regulation of cellular signalling, and a variety of disorders (such as epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma) are closely associated with pathological modulation of exocytosis. Emerging evidence points to protein phosphatases as key regulators of exocytosis in many cells and, therefore, as potential targets for the design of novel therapies to treat these diseases. Diverse yet exquisite regulatory mechanisms have evolved to direct the specificity of these enzymes in controlling particular cell processes, and functionally driven studies have demonstrated differential regulation of exocytosis by individual protein phosphatases. This Review discusses the evidence for the regulation of exocytosis by protein phosphatases in three major secretory systems, (1) mast cells, in which the regulation of exocytosis of inflammatory mediators plays a major role in the respiratory response to antigens, (2) insulin-secreting cells in which regulation of exocytosis is essential for metabolic control, and (3) neurons, in which regulation of exocytosis is perhaps the most complex and is essential for effective neurotransmission. PMID:12749763

  2. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  4. Analysis of Smad Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Qin, Lan; Lin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 at the C-terminal SXS motif by BMP type I receptors is one of the most critical events in BMP signaling. Conversely, protein phosphatases that dephosphorylate phospho-Smad1/5/8 can consequently prevent or terminate BMP signaling. PPM1H is an undercharacterized phosphatase in the PPM family. We recently demonstrated that PPM1H can dephosphorylate Smad1 in the cytoplasm and block BMP signaling responses in cellular assays. Here we describe in vitro method showing that PPM1H is a bona fide phosphatase for Smad1/5/8. PPM1H is produced as GST fusion protein in E. coli, and purified against glutathione sepharose beads. Bacterially purified recombinant PPM1H possesses phosphatase activity toward artificial substrate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Recombinant PPM1H also dephosphorylates immuno-purified phosphorylated Smad1 in test tubes. These direct in vitro phosphatase assays provide convincing evidence demonstrating the role of PPM1H as a specific phosphatase for P-Smad1. PMID:26520120

  5. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  6. Assessing the Biological Activity of the Glucan Phosphatase Laforin.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Raththagala, Madushi; Gentry, Mathew S; Sanz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered family of enzymes that dephosphorylate either starch or glycogen and are essential for proper starch metabolism in plants and glycogen metabolism in humans. Mutations in the gene encoding the only human glucan phosphatase, laforin, result in the fatal, neurodegenerative, epilepsy known as Lafora disease. Here, we describe phosphatase assays to assess both generic laforin phosphatase activity and laforin's unique glycogen phosphatase activity. PMID:27514803

  7. Testicular acid phosphatase induces odontoblast differentiation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwajung; Kim, Tak-Heun; Yun, Chi-Young; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-04-01

    Odontoblasts differentiate from dental mesenchyme during dentin formation and mineralization. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling odontoblast differentiation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that expression of testicular acid phosphatase (ACPT) is restricted in the early stage of odontoblast differentiation in proliferating dental mesenchymal cells and secretory odontoblasts. ACPT is expressed earlier than tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and partly overlaps with TNAP in differentiating odontoblasts. In MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells, expression of ACPT appears simultaneously with a decrease in β-catenin activity and is abolished with the expression of Phex and Dsp. Knockdown of ACPT in MDPC-23 cells stimulates cell proliferation together with an increase in active β-catenin and cyclin D1. In contrast, the overexpression of ACPT suppresses cell proliferation with a decrease in active β-catenin and cyclin D1. Expression of TNAP, Osx, Phex and Dsp is reduced by knockdown of ACPT but is enhanced by ACPT overexpression. When ACPT is blocked with IgG, alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited but cell proliferation is unchanged regardless of ACPT expression. These findings suggest that ACPT inhibits cell proliferation through β-catenin-mediated signaling in dental mesenchyme but elicits odontoblast differentiation and mineralization by supplying phosphate during dentin formation. Thus, ACPT might be a novel candidate for inducing odontoblast differentiation and mineralization for dentin regeneration. PMID:26547858

  8. Phosphatidate phosphatase, a key regulator of lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Florencia; Carman, George M

    2013-03-01

    Yeast Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol. PAP plays a crucial role in lipid homeostasis by controlling the relative proportions of its substrate phosphatidate and its product diacylglycerol. The cellular amounts of these lipid intermediates influence the synthesis of triacylglycerol and the pathways by which membrane phospholipids are synthesized. Physiological functions affected by PAP activity include phospholipid synthesis gene expression, nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane growth, lipid droplet formation, and vacuole homeostasis and fusion. Yeast lacking Pah1p PAP activity are acutely sensitive to fatty acid-induced toxicity and exhibit respiratory deficiency. PAP is distinguished in its cellular location, catalytic mechanism, and physiological functions from Dpp1p and Lpp1p lipid phosphate phosphatases that utilize a variety of substrates that include phosphatidate. Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is a major mechanism by which Pah1p PAP activity is regulated. Pah1p is phosphorylated by cytosolic-associated Pho85p-Pho80p, Cdc28p-cyclin B, and protein kinase A and is dephosphorylated by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated Nem1p-Spo7p phosphatase. The dephosphorylation of Pah1p stimulates PAP activity and facilitates the association with the membrane/phosphatidate allowing for its reaction and triacylglycerol synthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:22910056

  9. Searching for the role of protein phosphatases in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    da-Silva, A M; Zapella, P D; Andrioli, L P; Campanhã, R B; Fiorini, L C; Etchebehere, L C; da-Costa-Maia, J C; Terenzi, H F

    1999-07-01

    Preference for specific protein substrates together with differential sensitivity to activators and inhibitors has allowed classification of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs) into four major types designated types 1, 2A, 2B and 2C (PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP2C, respectively). Comparison of sequences within their catalytic domains has indicated that PP1, PP2A and PP2B are members of the same gene family named PPP. On the other hand, the type 2C enzyme does not share sequence homology with the PPP members and thus represents another gene family, known as PPM. In this report we briefly summarize some of our studies about the role of serine/threonine phosphatases in growth and differentiation of three different eukaryotic models: Blastocladiella emersonii, Neurospora crassa and Dictyostelium discoideum. Our observations suggest that PP2C is the major phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of amidotransferase, an enzyme that controls cell wall synthesis during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination. We also report the existence of a novel acid- and thermo-stable protein purified from Neurospora crassa mycelia, which specifically inhibits the PP1 activity of this fungus and mammals. Finally, we comment on our recent results demonstrating that Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene that codes for PP1, although this activity has never been demonstrated biochemically in this organism. PMID:10454741

  10. Cholesterol modulates alkaline phosphatase activity of rat intestinal microvillus membranes.

    PubMed

    Brasitus, T A; Dahiya, R; Dudeja, P K; Bissonnette, B M

    1988-06-25

    Experiments were conducted, using a nonspecific lipid transfer protein, to vary the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of rat proximal small intestinal microvillus membranes in order to assess the possible role of cholesterol in modulating enzymatic activities of this plasma membrane. Cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratios from 0.71 to 1.30 were produced from a normal value of 1.05 by incubation with the transfer protein and an excess of either phosphatidylcholine or cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Cholesterol loading or depletion of the membranes was accompanied by a decrease or increase, respectively, in their lipid fluidity, as assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the lipid-soluble fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Increasing the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio also decreased alkaline phosphatase specific activity by approximately 20-30%, whereas decreasing this ratio increased this enzymatic activity by 20-30%. Sucrase, maltase, and lactase specific activities were not affected in these same preparations. Since the changes in alkaline phosphatase activity could be secondary to alterations in fluidity, cholesterol, or both, additional experiments were performed using benzyl alcohol, a known fluidizer. Benzyl alcohol (25 mM) restored the fluidity of cholesterol-enriched preparations to control levels, did not change the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio, and failed to alter alkaline phosphatase activity. These findings, therefore, indicate that alterations in the cholesterol content and cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of microvillus membranes can modulate alkaline phosphatase but not sucrase, maltase, or lactase activities. Moreover, membrane fluidity does not appear to be an important physiological regulator of these enzymatic activities. PMID:3379034

  11. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  12. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, “bacterial-like” enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the “eukaryotic-like” phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research. PMID:24675170

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of the 3' Phosphatase Component of T4 Polynucleotide Kinase/phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,H.; Smith, P.; Wang, L.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer and ablated phosphatase activity.

  14. Isolation of Human Mitotic Protein Phosphatase Complexes: Identification of a Complex between Protein Phosphatase 1 and the RNA Helicase Ddx21

    PubMed Central

    De Wever, Veerle; Lloyd, David C.; Nasa, Isha; Nimick, Mhairi; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Gourlay, Robert; Morrice, Nick; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2012-01-01

    Metazoan mitosis requires remodelling of sub-cellular structures to ensure proper division of cellular and genetic material. Faults often lead to genomic instability, cell cycle arrests and disease onset. These key structural changes are under tight spatial-temporal and post-translational control, with crucial roles for reversible protein phosphorylation. The phosphoprotein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A are paramount for the timely execution of mitotic entry and exit but their interaction partners and substrates are still largely unresolved. High throughput, mass-spectrometry based studies have limited sensitivity for the detection of low-abundance and transient complexes, a typical feature of many protein phosphatase complexes. Moreover, the limited timeframe during which mitosis takes place reduces the likelihood of identifying mitotic phosphatase complexes in asynchronous cells. Hence, numerous mitotic protein phosphatase complexes still await identification. Here we present a strategy to enrich and identify serine/threonine protein phosphatase complexes at the mitotic spindle. We thus identified a nucleolar RNA helicase, Ddx21/Gu, as a novel, direct PP1 interactor. Furthermore, our results place PP1 within the toposome, a Topoisomerase II alpha (TOPOIIα) containing complex with a key role in mitotic chromatin regulation and cell cycle progression, possibly via regulated protein phosphorylation. This study provides a strategy for the identification of further mitotic PP1 partners and the unravelling of PP1 functions during mitosis. PMID:22761809

  15. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of P supply to ecosystems. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment of precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three forests of early-, mid- and advanced-successional stages in Southern China was carried out. Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, no precipitation treatment depressed soil acid phosphatase activity, while doubled precipitation treatment exerted no positive effects on it, and even significantly lowered it in the advanced forest. These indicate the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. The negative responses of soil acid phosphatase activity to precipitation suggest that P supply in subtropical ecosystems might be reduced if there was a drought in a whole year or more rainfall in the wet season in the future. NP, no precipitation; Control, natural precipitation; DP, double precipitation.

  16. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  17. Phosphatase activities as biosignatures of extant life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Itoh, Y.; Edazawa, Y.; Moroi, A.; Takano, Y.

    It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere high temperature hot springs and stratosphere Possible extraterrestrial biospheres in Mars Europa and Titan are being discussed Many biosignatures or biomarkers have been proposed to detect microbial activities in such extreme environments Phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life since they are constituents of nucleic acids and cell mebranes Thus all the terrestrial organisms have phosphatases that are enzymes catalyzing hydrolysis of phosphate esters We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in extreme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life Core samples and chimney samples were collected at the Suiyo Seamount Izu-Bonin Arc the Pacific Ocean in 2001 and 2002 and in South Mariana hydrothermal systems the Pacific Oceanas in 2003 both in a part of the Archaean Park Project Phosphatase activity in solid rock samples was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate pH 8 0 or pH 6 5 as a substrate as follows Pulverized samples were incuvated with substrate solution for an hour and then production rate of p-nitrophenol was calculated with absorbance at 410 nm Phosphatase activity in extracts was measured fluorometrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratio were determined by HPLC after HF digestion of the

  18. Lactoperoxidase-125I localization of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-01

    Previous histochemical and biochemical localizations of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis MC14 have shown that the membrane-associated form of the enzyme is located on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, and soluble forms are located in the periplasmic space and in the growth medium. The distribution of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the surfaces of the cytoplasmic membrane of B. licheniformis MC14 was determined by using lactoperoxidase-125I labeling techniques. Cells harvested during rapid alkaline phosphatase production were converted to protoplasts or lysed protoplasts and labeled. Analysis of the data obtained indicated that 30% of the salt-extractable, membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase was located on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas 70% of the membrane-associated enzyme was localized on the inner surface. Controls for protoplast integrity (release of tritiated thymidine or examination of cytoplasmic proteins for label content) indicated excellent protoplast stability. Controls indicated that chemical labeling was not a factor in the apparent distribution of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane. These results support the previously reported histochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane inner surface. The presence of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane outer surface is reasonable, considering the soluble forms of the enzyme found in the periplasmic region and in the culture medium. PMID:7462164

  19. Lactoperoxidase-125I localization of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Hulett, F M

    1981-01-01

    Previous histochemical and biochemical localizations of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis MC14 have shown that the membrane-associated form of the enzyme is located on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, and soluble forms are located in the periplasmic space and in the growth medium. The distribution of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the surfaces of the cytoplasmic membrane of B. licheniformis MC14 was determined by using lactoperoxidase-125I labeling techniques. Cells harvested during rapid alkaline phosphatase production were converted to protoplasts or lysed protoplasts and labeled. Analysis of the data obtained indicated that 30% of the salt-extractable, membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase was located on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas 70% of the membrane-associated enzyme was localized on the inner surface. Controls for protoplast integrity (release of tritiated thymidine or examination of cytoplasmic proteins for label content) indicated excellent protoplast stability. Controls indicated that chemical labeling was not a factor in the apparent distribution of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane. These results support the previously reported histochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane inner surface. The presence of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane outer surface is reasonable, considering the soluble forms of the enzyme found in the periplasmic region and in the culture medium. Images PMID:7462164

  20. Expression of neuron specific phosphatase, striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP) in reactive astrocytes after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Morioka, M; Goto, S; Korematsu, K; Okamura, A; Yano, S; Kai, Y; Hamada, J I; Ushio, Y

    2000-02-15

    We studied the distribution and change of striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP) in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia. STEP was expressed in the perikarya and in neuronal processes; it was not detected in non-neuronal cells of control animals. After 5-min forebrain ischemia, STEP immunoreactivity (STEP-IR) was preserved for 2 days; it disappeared 4 and more days after ischemia with completion of delayed neuronal death (DND) in the CA1 subfield. Furthermore, only in the CA1 after ischemia, STEP was expressed in reactive astrocytes for 4 to 28 days, showing different patterns of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive reactive astrocytes. After non-or less-than lethal ischemia, STEP expression in reactive astrocytes corresponded with the degree of neuronal degeneration. Immunoblot analysis of the CA1 subfield revealed the expression of three isoforms, STEP45, -56 and -61; their expression patterns changed with time after ischemia. These data suggest that neuronal STEP is preserved until cell degeneration after ischemia and that STEP is expressed in reactive astrocytes only after lethal ischemia, with different expression patterns for its isoforms. Of STEP45, -56 and -61, STEP61 was the most strongly expressed in the reactive astrocytes; both STEP45 and -61 were expressed in neurons and the expression of STEP56 was weak. STEP may play an important role not only in neurons but also in reactive astrocytes after ischemia, depending on neuronal degeneration. PMID:10652442

  1. Electron microscope histochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase(s) in Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, J M; Hulett, F M

    1977-01-01

    Sites of alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity in a facultative thermophilic strain of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 have been localized by electron microscope histochemistry, using a lead capture method. The effects of 3% glutaraldehyde and 3.0 mM lead on APase activity were investigated, and these compounds were found to significantly inhibit enzyme activity, 68 and 18%, respectively. A number of parameters were varied in studies to localize APase activity, including: growth temperature (55 and 37 degrees C); substrate concentration in the histochemical mixture (0.06, 0.15, 0.30, 1.00 mM); fixatives; protoplast preparations and whole cells; phosphate-repressed and -derepressed cells; and age of vegetative cells (mid-log and late log). These variations affected the number but not the location of lead phosphate deposits, which appeared at discrete sites along the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Control cells incubated in histochemical mixtures lacking substrate, lead, or both exhibited no lead phosphate depositis. The histochemical localization at membrane sites correlated well with biochemical localization data, which indicated that greater than 80% of the APase activity was associated with the membrane fraction in logarithmically growing cells. Images PMID:401501

  2. Electron microscope histochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase(s) in Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    McNicholas, J M; Hulett, F M

    1977-01-01

    Sites of alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity in a facultative thermophilic strain of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 have been localized by electron microscope histochemistry, using a lead capture method. The effects of 3% glutaraldehyde and 3.0 mM lead on APase activity were investigated, and these compounds were found to significantly inhibit enzyme activity, 68 and 18%, respectively. A number of parameters were varied in studies to localize APase activity, including: growth temperature (55 and 37 degrees C); substrate concentration in the histochemical mixture (0.06, 0.15, 0.30, 1.00 mM); fixatives; protoplast preparations and whole cells; phosphate-repressed and -derepressed cells; and age of vegetative cells (mid-log and late log). These variations affected the number but not the location of lead phosphate deposits, which appeared at discrete sites along the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Control cells incubated in histochemical mixtures lacking substrate, lead, or both exhibited no lead phosphate depositis. The histochemical localization at membrane sites correlated well with biochemical localization data, which indicated that greater than 80% of the APase activity was associated with the membrane fraction in logarithmically growing cells. PMID:401501

  3. Smooth-muscle caldesmon phosphatase is SMP-I, a type 2A protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Pato, M D; Sutherland, C; Winder, S J; Walsh, M P

    1993-07-01

    Caldesmon phosphatase was identified in chicken gizzard smooth muscle by using as substrates caldesmon phosphorylated at different sites by protein kinase C, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and cdc2 kinase. Most (approximately 90%) of the phosphatase activity was recovered in the cytosolic fraction. Gel filtration after (NH4)2SO4 fractionation of the cytosolic fraction revealed a single major peak of phosphatase activity which coeluted with calponin phosphatase [Winder, Pato and Walsh (1992) Biochem. J. 286, 197-203] and myosin LC20 phosphatase. Further purification of caldesmon phosphatase was achieved by sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel, omega-amino-octyl-agarose, aminopropyl-agarose and thiophosphorylated myosin LC20-Sepharose. A single peak of caldesmon phosphatase activity was detected at each step of the purification. The purified phosphatase was identified as SMP-I [Pato and Adelstein (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 6535-6538] by subunit composition (three subunits, of 60, 55 and 38 kDa) and Western blotting using antibodies against the holoenzyme which recognize all three subunits and antibodies specific for the 38 kDa catalytic subunit. SMP-I is a type 2A protein phosphatase [Pato, Adelstein, Crouch, Safer, Ingebritsen and Cohen (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 132, 283-287; Winder et al. (1992), cited above]. Consistent with the conclusion that SMP-I is the major caldesmon phosphatase of smooth muscle, purified SMP-I from turkey gizzard dephosphorylated all three phosphorylated forms of caldesmon, whereas SMP-II, -III and -IV were relatively ineffective. Kinetic analysis of dephosphorylation by chicken gizzard SMP-I of the three phosphorylated caldesmon species and calponin phosphorylated by protein kinase C indicates that calponin is a significantly better substrate of SMP-I than are any of the three phosphorylated forms of caldesmon. We therefore suggest that caldesmon phosphorylation in vivo can be maintained after kinase

  4. Lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein proteoforms analyzed using monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Filatov, Alexander; Kruglova, Natalia; Meshkova, Tatiana; Mazurov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase CD45 regulates the activation of lymphocytes by controlling the level of receptor and signal molecule phosphorylation. However, it remains unknown which molecules mediate the phosphatase activity of CD45. A candidate for such a molecule is a small transmembrane adapter protein called lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein (LPAP). LPAP forms a supramolecular complex that consists of not only CD45 molecule but also CD4 and Lck kinase. The function of LPAP has not been defined clearly. In our study, we determined the pattern of LPAP expression in various cell types and characterized its proteoforms using new monoclonal antibodies generated against the intracellular portion of the protein. We show that LPAP is a pan-lymphocyte marker, and its expression in cells correlates with the expression of CD45. The majority of T, B and NK cells express high levels of LPAP, whereas monocytes, granulocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, platelets and red blood cells are negative for LPAP. Using one- and two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis, we demonstrate that LPAP has at least four sites of phosphorylation. The resting cells express at least six different LPAP phosphoforms representing mono-, di- and tri-phosphorylated LPAP. T and B cells differ in the distribution of the protein between phosphoforms. The activation of lymphocytes with PMA reduces the diversity of phosphorylated forms. Our experiments on Lck-deficient Jurkat cells show that Lck kinase is not involved in LPAP phosphorylation. Thus, LPAP is a dynamically phosphorylated protein, the function of which can be understood, when all phosphosites and kinases involved in its phosphorylation will be identified. PMID:26682052

  5. An immunochemical approach to detect oxidized protein tyrosine phosphatases using a selective C-nucleophile tag.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Francisco J; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-05-24

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial regulators of signal transduction and function as antagonists towards protein tyrosine kinases to control reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating fundamental physiological processes. Growing evidence has supported the notion that reversible oxidative inactivation of the catalytic cysteine residue in protein tyrosine phosphatases serves as an oxidative post-translational modification that regulates its activity to influence downstream signaling by promoting phosphorylation and induction of the signaling cascade. The oxidation of cysteine to the sulfenic acid is often transient and difficult to detect, thus making it problematic in understanding the role that this oxidative post-translational modification plays in redox-biology and pathogenesis. Several methods to detect cysteine oxidation in biological systems have been developed, though targeted approaches to directly detect oxidized phosphatases are still lacking. Herein we describe the development of a novel immunochemical approach to directly profile oxidized phosphatases. This immunochemical approach consists of an antibody designed to recognize the conserved sequence of the PTP active site (VHCDMDSAG) harboring the catalytic cysteine modified with dimedone (CDMD), a nucleophile that chemoselectively reacts with cysteine sulfenic acids to form a stable thioether adduct. Additionally, we provide biochemical and mass spectrometry workflows to be used in conjugation with this newly developed immunochemical approach to assist in the identification and quantification of basal and oxidized phosphatases. PMID:26757830

  6. Root surface acid phosphatases and their role in phosphorus assimilation by Eriophorum vaginatum

    SciTech Connect

    Kroehler, C.J.; Linkins, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Eriophorum vaginatum is a dominant plant in much of the arctic tundra ecosystem where phosphorus is frequently a limiting nutrient. The mineralization of this organic phosphorus was thought to be principally controlled by microbial respiration, however, more recent work shows that extracellular soil phosphatases are the principal regulators. The existence of plant root and mycorrhizal surface phosphatases which are capable of hydrolyzing organic phosphorus compounds, suggests that soil organic phosphorus may be directly utilized by plants. Since E. vaginatum is a tussock forming sedge with a very dense annually produced rooting system which can exploit most of the tussock soil volume, its surface phosphatases may play a dominant role in organic phosphorus hydrolysis into inorganic phosphorus. Of equal significance would be the potential for this activity to contribute to the phosphorus nutrition through the coupling of phosphorus hydrolysis on the root and root uptake of the resultant inorganic phosphorus. Phosphatase activity was investigated and found to be uniformly distributed along the surface of the root. Kinetic analysis of the enzyme gave estimates of 9.23 mM for the apparent Km and 1.61 * 10/sup -3/ ..mu..moles mm-2 hr/sup -1/ for the apparent Vmax. Saturation values for E. vaginatum phosphatases are about 3 times higher than average soil solution organic phosphorus concentrations. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Assessment and kinetics of soil phosphatase in Brazilian Savanna systems.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adão S; Espíndola, Suéllen P; Campos, Maria Rita C

    2016-05-31

    The activity and kinetics of soil phosphatases are important indicators to evaluate soil quality in specific sites such as the Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna). This study aimed to determine the activity and kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase in Cerrado systems. Soil phosphatase activity was assessed in samples of native Cerrado (NC), no-tillage (NT), conventional tillage (CT) and pasture with Brachiaria brizantha (PBb) and evaluated with acetate buffer (AB), tris-HCl buffer (TB), modified universal buffer (MUB) and low MUB. The Michaelis-Menten equation and Eadie-Hofstee model were applied to obtain the kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase using different concentrations of p-nitrophenol phosphate (p-NPP). MUB showed the lowest soil phosphatase activity in all soils whereas AB in NC and NT presented the highest. Low MUB decreased interferences in the assessment of soil phosphatase activity when compared to MUB, suggesting that organic acids interfere on the soil phosphatase activity. In NC and NT, soil phosphatase activity performed with TB was similar to AB and low MUB. Km values from the Michaels-Menten equation were higher in NC than in NT, which indicate a lower affinity of phosphatase activity for the substrate in NC. Vmax values were also higher in NC than in NT. The Eadie-Hofstee model suggests that NC had more phosphatase isoforms than NT. The study showed that buffer type is of fundamental importance when assessing soil phosphatase activity in Cerrado soils. PMID:27254453

  8. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae. PMID:16350755

  9. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    precipitation of U(VI) must be mediated by biological activity as less than 3% soluble U(VI) was removed either from the abiotic or the heat-killed cell controls. Interestingly, the pH has a strong effect on growth and U(VI) biomineralization rates by Rahnella. Thermodynamic modeling identifies autunite-type minerals [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2] as the precipitate likely formed in the synthetic FRC groundwater conditions at all pH investigated. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements have recently confirmed that the precipitate found in these incubations is an autunite and meta-autunite-type mineral. A kinetic model of U biomineralization at the different pH indicates that hydrolysis of organophosphate can be described using simple Monod kinetics and that uranium precipitation is accelerated when monohydrogen phosphate is the main orthophosphate species in solution. Overall, these experiments and ongoing soil slurry incubations demonstrate that the biomineralization of U(VI) through the activity of phosphatase enzymes can be expressed in a wide range of geochemical conditions pertaining to the FRC site.

  10. Rhizobiales-like Phosphatase 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Novel Phospho-tyrosine-specific Phospho-protein Phosphatase (PPP) Family Protein Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Muhammad, Jamshed; Samuel, Marcus; Moorhead, Greg B

    2016-03-11

    Cellular signaling through protein tyrosine phosphorylation is well established in mammalian cells. Although lacking the classic tyrosine kinases present in humans, plants have a tyrosine phospho-proteome that rivals human cells. Here we report a novel plant tyrosine phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtRLPH2) that, surprisingly, has the sequence hallmarks of a phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase belonging to the PPP family. Rhizobiales/Rhodobacterales/Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases (RLPHs) are conserved in plants and several other eukaryotes, but not in animals. We demonstrate that AtRLPH2 is localized to the plant cell cytosol, is resistant to the classic serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin, but is inhibited by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate and is particularly sensitive to inhibition by the adenylates, ATP and ADP. AtRLPH2 displays remarkable selectivity toward tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides versus serine/threonine phospho-peptides and readily dephosphorylates a classic tyrosine phosphatase protein substrate, suggesting that in vivo it is a tyrosine phosphatase. To date, only one other tyrosine phosphatase is known in plants; thus AtRLPH2 represents one of the missing pieces in the plant tyrosine phosphatase repertoire and supports the concept of protein tyrosine phosphorylation as a key regulatory event in plants. PMID:26742850

  11. Effect of gingival application of melatonin on alkaline and acid phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin in patients with diabetes and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Valverde, Antonio; Gómez-de-Diego, Rafel; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; de Vicente-Jiménez, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of topical application of melatonin to the gingiva on salivary fluid concentrations of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. Study Design: Cross-sectional study of 30 patients with diabetes and periodontal disease and 30 healthy subjects. Diabetic patients were treated with topical application of melatonin (1% orabase cream formula) once daily for 20 days and controls with a placebo formulation. Results: Before treatment with melatonin, diabetic patients showed significantly higher mean salivary levels of alkaline and acid phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin than healthy subjects (P < 0.01). After treatment with melatonin, there was a statistically significant decrease of the gingival index (15.84± 10.3 vs 5.6 ± 5.1) and pocket depth (28.3 ± 19.5 vs 11.9 ± 9.0) (P < 0.001). Also, use of melatonin was associated with a significant reduction of the four biomarkers. Changes of salivary acid phosphatase and osteopontin correlated significantly with changes in the gingival index, whereas changes of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin correlated significantly with changes in the pocket depth. Conclusions: Treatment with topical melatonin was associated with an improvement in the gingival index and pocket depth, a reduction in salivary concentrations of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin. Key words:Melatonin, diabetes mellitus, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, osteopontin, osteocalcin. PMID:23524437

  12. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  13. Leishmanial phosphatase hydrolyzes phosphoproteins and inositol phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, A.K.; Das, S.; Glew, R.H.

    1986-05-01

    An extensively purified preparation of the predominant, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACP) from the external surface of Leishmania donovani promastigotes form catalyzes the dephosphorylation of several phosphoproteins; these include: pyruvate kinase, phosphorylase kinase and histones. However, the protein phosphatase activity of ACP is very low compared with that of other protein phosphates known to be involved in regulating various metabolic pathways. /sup 32/P-labelled inositoltriphosphate (IP3), a well-established second messenger derived from phosphatidylinositol-4,5-diphosphate (PIP2), was a substrate for the leishmanial acid phosphatase; incubation of the IP3 preparation with 13.2 milliunits (1 unit equals 1 ..mu..mol 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (MUP) cleaved per min at pH 5.5) of ACP at pH 5.5 for 4 hr resulted in hydrolysis of 75% of the radiolabelled substrate resulting in a mixture of inositoldiphosphate and inositolmonophosphate. In addition PIP2 was hydrolyzed rapidly by ACP at pH 5.5 (V/sub max/, 71 units/mg protein; k/sub m/, 4.16 ..mu..M). In contrast, to MUP which is hydrolzyed most rapidly at pH 5.5, PIP2 hydrolysis was optimal at pH 6.8. These observations raise the possibility that ACP could play a role in the host-phagocyte interaction by degrading the precursor of the second messenger, PIP2 or the second messenger itself, IP3.

  14. Regulatory Roles of MAPK Phosphatases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Low, Heng Boon

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators of cell growth and survival in physiological and pathological processes. Aberrant MAPK signaling plays a critical role in the development and progression of human cancer, as well as in determining responses to cancer treatment. The MAPK phosphatases (MKPs), also known as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs), are a family of proteins that function as major negative regulators of MAPK activities in mammalian cells. Studies using mice deficient in specific MKPs including MKP1/DUSP1, PAC-1/DUSP2, MKP2/DUSP4, MKP5/DUSP10 and MKP7/DUSP16 demonstrated that these molecules are important not only for both innate and adaptive immune responses, but also for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the consequences of the gain or loss of function of the MKPs in normal and malignant tissues have highlighted the importance of these phosphatases in the pathogenesis of cancers. The involvement of the MKPs in resistance to cancer therapy has also gained prominence, making the MKPs a potential target for anti-cancer therapy. This review will summarize the current knowledge of the MKPs in cancer development, progression and treatment outcomes. PMID:27162525

  15. PP2A Phosphatase as a Regulator of ROS Signaling in Plants.

    PubMed

    Rahikainen, Moona; Pascual, Jesús; Alegre, Sara; Durian, Guido; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) carry out vital functions in determining appropriate stress reactions in plants, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing, signaling and response to ROS as signaling molecules are not yet fully understood. Recent studies have underscored the role of Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ROS-dependent responses involved in light acclimation and pathogenesis responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies have demonstrated that trimeric PP2A phosphatases control metabolic changes and cell death elicited by intracellular and extracellular ROS signals. Associated with this, PP2A subunits contribute to transcriptional and post-translational regulation of pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. This review highlights the emerging role of PP2A phosphatases in the regulatory ROS signaling networks in plants. PMID:26950157

  16. Eya protein phosphatase activity regulates Six1-Dach-Eya transcriptional effects in mammalian organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Oghi, Kenneth A; Zhang, Jie; Krones, Anna; Bush, Kevin T; Glass, Christopher K; Nigam, Sanjay K; Aggarwal, Aneel K; Maas, Richard; Rose, David W; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2003-11-20

    The precise mechanistic relationship between gene activation and repression events is a central question in mammalian organogenesis, as exemplified by the evolutionarily conserved sine oculis (Six), eyes absent (Eya) and dachshund (Dach) network of genetically interacting proteins. Here, we report that Six1 is required for the development of murine kidney, muscle and inner ear, and that it exhibits synergistic genetic interactions with Eya factors. We demonstrate that the Eya family has a protein phosphatase function, and that its enzymatic activity is required for regulating genes encoding growth control and signalling molecules, modulating precursor cell proliferation. The phosphatase function of Eya switches the function of Six1-Dach from repression to activation, causing transcriptional activation through recruitment of co-activators. The gene-specific recruitment of a co-activator with intrinsic phosphatase activity provides a molecular mechanism for activation of specific gene targets, including those regulating precursor cell proliferation and survival in mammalian organogenesis. PMID:14628042

  17. PP2A Phosphatase as a Regulator of ROS Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rahikainen, Moona; Pascual, Jesús; Alegre, Sara; Durian, Guido; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) carry out vital functions in determining appropriate stress reactions in plants, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing, signaling and response to ROS as signaling molecules are not yet fully understood. Recent studies have underscored the role of Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ROS-dependent responses involved in light acclimation and pathogenesis responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies have demonstrated that trimeric PP2A phosphatases control metabolic changes and cell death elicited by intracellular and extracellular ROS signals. Associated with this, PP2A subunits contribute to transcriptional and post-translational regulation of pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. This review highlights the emerging role of PP2A phosphatases in the regulatory ROS signaling networks in plants. PMID:26950157

  18. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  19. New functional aspects of the atypical protein tyrosine phosphatase VHZ

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I.; Hengge, Alvan C.

    2013-01-01

    LDP3 (VHZ) is the smallest classical protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) known to date, and was originally misclassified as an atypical dual specificity phosphatase (DSP). Kinetic isotope effects with steady state and pre-steady state kinetics of VHZ and mutants with para-nitrophenol phosphate (pNPP) have revealed several unusual properties. VHZ is significantly more active than previously reported, but remains one of the least active PTPs. Highly unusual for a PTP, VHZ possesses two acidic residues (E134 and D65) in the active site. D65 occupies the position corresponding to the typical general acid in the PTP family. However, VHZ primarily utilizes E134 as the general acid, with D65 taking over this role when E134 is mutated. This unusual behavior is facilitated by two coexisting, but unequally populated, substrate binding modes. Unlike most classical PTPs, VHZ exhibits phosphotransferase activity. Despite the presence of the Q-loop that normally prevents alcoholysis of the phosphoenzyme intermediate in other classical PTPs, VHZ readily phosphorylates ethylene glycol. Although mutations to Q-loop residues affect this phosphotransferase activity, mutations on the IPD-loop that contains the general acid exert more control over this process. A single P68V substitution on this loop completely abolishes phosphotransferase activity. The ability of native VHZ to catalyze transphosphorylation may lead to an imbalance of intracellular phosphorylation, which could explain the correlation of its overexpression with several types of cancer. PMID:24073992

  20. Functional Analysis of Dual-Specificity Protein Phosphatases in Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amand, Mathieu; Erpicum, Charlotte; Gilles, Christine; Noël, Agnès; Rahmouni, Souad

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic perspectives targeting angiogenesis in cancer stimulated an intense investigation of the mechanisms triggering and governing angiogenic processes. Several publications have highlighted the importance of typical dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) or MKPs in endothelial cells and their role in controlling different biological functions implicated in angiogenesis such as migration, proliferation, apoptosis, tubulogenesis, and cell adhesion. However, among atypical DSPs, the only one investigated in angiogenesis was DUSP3. We recently identified this DSP as a new key player in endothelial cells and angiogenesis. In this chapter we provide with detailed protocols and models used to investigate the role of DUSP3 in endothelial cells and angiogenesis. We start the chapter with an overview of the role of several DSPs in angiogenesis. We continue with providing a full description of a highly efficient transfection protocol to deplete DUSP3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) in the primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We next describe the major assays used to investigate different processes involved in angiogenesis such as tube formation assay, proliferation assay and spheroids sprouting assay. We finish the chapter by validating our results in DUSP3-knockout mice using in vivo angiogenesis assays such as Matrigel plug and Lewis lung carcinoma cell subcutaneous xenograft model followed by anti-CD31 immunofluorescence and ex vivo aortic ring assay. All methods described can be adapted to other phosphatases and signaling molecules. PMID:27514814

  1. Networks of protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Mucic, Goran; Sase, Sunetra; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases have been reported to be involved in fear memory, information about these signalling molecules in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning (cFC) is limited. C57BL/6J mice were tested in cFC, sacrificed and hippocampi were used for screening of approximately 800 protein kinases and phosphatases by protein microarrays with subsequent Western blot confirmation of threefold higher or lower hippocampal levels as compared to foot shock controls. Immunoblotting of the protein kinases and phosphatases screened out was carried out by Western blotting. A network of protein kinases and phosphatases was generated (STRING 9.1). Animals learned the task in the paradigm and protein kinase and phosphatase levels were determined in the individual phases acquisition, consolidation and retrieval and compared to foot shock controls. Protein kinases discoidin containing receptor 2 (DDR2), mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1), protein phosphatases dual specificity protein phosphatase (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) were modulated in the individual phases of cFC. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3,4,5-triphosphate 3-phosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) that is interacting with PTEN were modulated as well. Freezing time was correlating with PP2A levels in the retrieval phase of cFC. The abovementioned protein kinases, phosphatases and inositol-signalling enzymes were not reported so far in cFC and the results are relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future studies in cFC or fear memory. Protein phosphatase PP2A was, however, the only signalling compound tested that was directly linked to retrieval in the cFC. PMID:25461266

  2. Alkaline phosphatase activity in normal and inflamed dental pulps.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C; Tripodi, D; Di Stilio, M; Piattelli, A

    2001-03-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) seems to be important in the formation of mineralized tissues. High levels of ALP have been demonstrated in dental pulp cells. In the present study ALP activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis, and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic ALP control values for the normal healthy pulps were 110.96+/-20.93. In the reversible pulpitis specimens the ALP activity increased almost eight times to 853.6+/-148.27. In the irreversible pulpitis specimens the values decreased sharply to 137.15+/-21.28 and were roughly equivalent to those seen in normal healthy pulps. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and reversible pulpitis vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of ALP in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:11487147

  3. Potential Role for Purple Acid Phosphatase in the Dephosphorylation of Wall Proteins in Tobacco Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaida, Rumi; Serada, Satoshi; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi; Neumetzler, Lutz; Pauly, Markus; Sampedro, Javier; Zarra, Ignacio; Hayashi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takako S.

    2010-01-01

    It is not yet known whether dephosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by phosphatases occurs in the apoplastic space. In this study, we found that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) purple acid phosphatase could dephosphorylate the phosphoryl residues of three apoplastic proteins, two of which were identified as α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase. The dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of recombinant α-xylosidase resulted in a decrease and an increase in its activity, respectively, when xyloglucan heptasaccharide was used as a substrate. Attempted overexpression of the tobacco purple acid phosphatase NtPAP12 in tobacco cells not only decreased the activity levels of the glycosidases but also increased levels of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the apoplast during the exponential phase. We suggest that purple acid phosphatase controls the activity of α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase, which are responsible for the degradation of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the cell walls. PMID:20357138

  4. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    SciTech Connect

    Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    A histidine acid phosphatase from the CDC Category A pathogen F. tularensis has been crystallized in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. A 1.75 Å resolution data set was collected at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a potential bioterrorism weapon. Here, the crystallization of a 37.2 kDa phosphatase encoded by the genome of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain is reported. This enzyme shares 41% amino-acid sequence identity with Legionella pneumophila major acid phosphatase and contains the RHGXRXP motif that is characteristic of the histidine acid phosphatase family. Large diffraction-quality crystals were grown in the presence of Tacsimate, HEPES and PEG 3350. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain one protein molecule, with a solvent content of 53%. A 1.75 Å resolution native data set was recorded at beamline 4.2.2 of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Molecular-replacement trials using the human prostatic acid phosphatase structure as the search model (28% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of F. tularensis histidine acid phosphatase will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  5. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of organic P mineralization potential in soils. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment with precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three successional forests in southern China was carried out. The three forests include Masson pine forest (MPF), coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF). Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, soil acid phosphatase activity was depressed by no precipitation treatment in the three forests. However, doubled precipitation treatment exerted a significantly negative effect on it only in MEBF. These results indicate that the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. A decrease in organic P turnover would occur in the three forests if there was a drought in a whole year in the future. More rainfall in the wet season would also be adverse to organic P turnover in MEBF due to its high soil moisture.

  6. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  7. Therapeutic strategies for anchored kinases and phosphatases: exploiting short linear motifs and intrinsic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Patrick J.; Scott, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation events that occur in response to the second messenger cAMP are controlled spatially and temporally by protein kinase A (PKA) interacting with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Recent advances in understanding the structural basis for this interaction have reinforced the hypothesis that AKAPs create spatially constrained signaling microdomains. This has led to the realization that the PKA/AKAP interface is a potential drug target for modulating a plethora of cell-signaling events. Pharmacological disruption of kinase–AKAP interactions has previously been explored for disease treatment and remains an interesting area of research. However, disrupting or enhancing the association of phosphatases with AKAPs is a therapeutic concept of equal promise, particularly since they oppose the actions of many anchored kinases. Accordingly, numerous AKAPs bind phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), calcineurin (PP2B), and PP2A. These multimodal signaling hubs are equally able to control the addition of phosphate groups onto target substrates, as well as the removal of these phosphate groups. In this review, we describe recent advances in structural analysis of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AKAPs, and suggest future possibilities for targeting these interactions for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26283967

  8. The extended human PTPome: a growing tyrosine phosphatase family.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Tyr phosphatases are, by definition, enzymes that dephosphorylate phospho-Tyr (pTyr) from proteins. This activity is found in several structurally diverse protein families, including the protein Tyr phosphatase (PTP), arsenate reductase, rhodanese, haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) and His phosphatase (HP) families. Most of these families include members with substrate specificity for non-pTyr substrates, such as phospho-Ser/phospho-Thr, phosphoinositides, phosphorylated carbohydrates, mRNAs, or inorganic moieties. A Cys is essential for catalysis in PTPs, rhodanese and arsenate reductase enzymes, whereas this work is performed by an Asp in HAD phosphatases and by a His in HPs, via a catalytic mechanism shared by all of the different families. The category that contains most Tyr phosphatases is the PTP family, which, although it received its name from this activity, includes Ser, Thr, inositide, carbohydrate and RNA phosphatases, as well as some inactive pseudophosphatase proteins. Here, we propose an extended collection of human Tyr phosphatases, which we call the extended human PTPome. The addition of new members (SACs, paladin, INPP4s, TMEM55s, SSU72, and acid phosphatases) to the currently categorized PTP group of enzymes means that the extended human PTPome contains up to 125 proteins, of which ~ 40 are selective for pTyr. We set criteria to ascribe proteins to the extended PTPome, and summarize the more important features of the new PTPome members in the context of their phosphatase activity and their relationship with human disease. PMID:26573778

  9. Establishing Quantitative Standards for Residual Alkaline Phosphatase in Pasteurized Milk.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Lim, Jong-Soo; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kang, Il-Byeong; Jeong, Dana; Song, Kwang-Young; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Kwang-Yup; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay is a rapid and convenient method for verifying milk pasteurization. Since colorimetric ALP assays rely on subjective visual assessments, their results are especially unreliable near the detection limits. In this study, we attempted to establish quantitative criteria for residual ALP in milk by using a more objective method based on spectrophotometric measurements. Raw milk was heat-treated for 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 min and then subjected to ALP assays. The quantitative criteria for residual ALP in the milk was determined as 2 μg phenol/mL of milk, which is just above the ALP value of milk samples heat-treated for 30 min. These newly proposed methodology and criteria could facilitate the microbiological quality control of milk. PMID:27194927

  10. Methods to monitor classical protein-tyrosine phosphatase oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Karisch, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2, act as intracellular second messengers in many signaling pathways. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are now believed to be important targets of ROS. PTPs contain a conserved catalytic cysteine with an unusually low pKa. This property allows PTPs to execute nucleophilic attack on substrate phosphotyrosyl residues, but also renders them highly susceptible to oxidation. Reversible oxidation, which inactivates PTPs, is emerging as an important cellular regulatory mechanism and might contribute to human diseases, including cancer. Given their potential toxicity, it seems likely that ROS generation is highly controlled within cells to restrict oxidation to those PTPs that must be inactivated for signaling to proceed. Thus, identifying ROS-inactivated PTPs could be tantamount to finding the PTP(s) that critically regulate a specific signaling pathway. This article provides an overview of the methods currently available to identify and quantify PTP oxidation and outlines future challenges in redox signaling. PMID:22577968

  11. The effect of sorbitol on acid phosphatase deactivation.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, L; Toscano, G; Pirozzi, D; Greco, G

    1991-12-01

    Acid phosphatase thermal deactivation follows a complex path: an initial decay toward an equilibrium distribution of at least two intermediate structures, mutually at the equilibrium, followed by a final breakdown toward a completely inactive enzyme configuration. The results obtained in the presence of sorbitol have been compared to those produced in the course of purely thermal deactivation of the native enzyme. For any sobitol concentration, an equivalent temperature is calculated that results in exactly the same activity-versus-time profile. This suggests enzyme deactivation to be controlled by a single, unchanging step. Immobilized enzyme runs have been performed, as well, by entrapping acid phosphates within a polymeric network formed onto the upstream surface of an ultrafiltration membrane. The stabilizing effect of entrapment cumulates with that produced by sorbitol. In this case, however, an equivalent temperature cannot be determined, thus indicating that a different deactivation mechanism is followed. PMID:18600710

  12. Establishing Quantitative Standards for Residual Alkaline Phosphatase in Pasteurized Milk

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Kwang-Yup

    2016-01-01

    The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay is a rapid and convenient method for verifying milk pasteurization. Since colorimetric ALP assays rely on subjective visual assessments, their results are especially unreliable near the detection limits. In this study, we attempted to establish quantitative criteria for residual ALP in milk by using a more objective method based on spectrophotometric measurements. Raw milk was heat-treated for 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 min and then subjected to ALP assays. The quantitative criteria for residual ALP in the milk was determined as 2 μg phenol/mL of milk, which is just above the ALP value of milk samples heat-treated for 30 min. These newly proposed methodology and criteria could facilitate the microbiological quality control of milk. PMID:27194927

  13. A New Fluorescence-Based Method Identifies Protein Phosphatases Regulating Lipid Droplet Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L.; Madeira, Juliana B.; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Montero-Lomeli, Mónica

    2010-01-01

    In virtually every cell, neutral lipids are stored in cytoplasmic structures called lipid droplets (LDs) and also referred to as lipid bodies or lipid particles. We developed a rapid high-throughput assay based on the recovery of quenched BODIPY-fluorescence that allows to quantify lipid droplets. The method was validated by monitoring lipid droplet turnover during growth of a yeast culture and by screening a group of strains deleted in genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. In both tests, the fluorimetric assay showed high sensitivity and good agreement with previously reported data using microscopy. We used this method for high-throughput identification of protein phosphatases involved in lipid droplet metabolism. From 65 yeast knockout strains encoding protein phosphatases and its regulatory subunits, 13 strains revealed to have abnormal levels of lipid droplets, 10 of them having high lipid droplet content. Strains deleted for type I protein phosphatases and related regulators (ppz2, gac1, bni4), type 2A phosphatase and its related regulator (pph21 and sap185), type 2C protein phosphatases (ptc1, ptc4, ptc7) and dual phosphatases (pps1, msg5) were catalogued as high-lipid droplet content strains. Only reg1, a targeting subunit of the type 1 phosphatase Glc7p, and members of the nutrient-sensitive TOR pathway (sit4 and the regulatory subunit sap190) were catalogued as low-lipid droplet content strains, which were studied further. We show that Snf1, the homologue of the mammalian AMP-activated kinase, is constitutively phosphorylated (hyperactive) in sit4 and sap190 strains leading to a reduction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. In conclusion, our fast and highly sensitive method permitted us to catalogue protein phosphatases involved in the regulation of LD metabolism and present evidence indicating that the TOR pathway and the SNF1/AMPK pathway are connected through the Sit4p-Sap190p pair in the control of lipid droplet biogenesis. PMID:21060891

  14. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  15. Bone alkaline phosphatase in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, C; Banks, R E; Thompson, D; Forbes, M A; Cooper, E H; Bird, H

    1995-07-01

    A double monoclonal immunoradiometric assay specific for bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) was used to determine whether the raised total alkaline phosphatase (TAP) often found in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is derived from bone or liver. Fifty-eight patients with RA were compared to 14 with AS and 14 with non-inflammatory rheumatic diseases (NI). None had clinical liver disease and only one had a slightly elevated aspartate transaminase activity. Elevated BAP concentrations were found in seven patients (5 RA, 1 AS, 1 NI), only two of whom also had abnormal TAP. Abnormal TAP activities were found in only three patients (all RA). BAP did not correlate with disease activity in RA or AS. In contrast, TAP correlated with disease activity (assessed by plasma viscosity) in RA (P < 0.002) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) also correlated with plasma viscosity in RA (P < 0.01). Both TAP and BAP were significantly correlated with GGT in RA (P < 0.001 and P < 0.02, respectively). These findings are discussed, together with possible reasons for the conflicting nature of some of the observations. PMID:7486797

  16. Histone II-A stimulates glucose-6-phosphatase and reveals mannose-6-phosphatase activities without permeabilization of liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    St-Denis, J F; Annabi, B; Khoury, H; van de Werve, G

    1995-01-01

    The effect of histone II-A on glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase activities was investigated in relation to microsomal membrane permeability. It was found that glucose-6-phosphatase activity in histone II-A-pretreated liver microsomes was stimulated to the same extent as in detergent-permeabilized microsomes, and that the substrate specificity of the enzyme for glucose 6-phosphate was lost in histone II-A-pretreated microsomes, as [U-14C]glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis was inhibited by mannose 6-phosphate and [U-14C]mannose 6-phosphate hydrolysis was increased. The accumulation of [U-14C]glucose from [U-14C]glucose 6-phosphate into untreated microsomes was completely abolished in detergent-treated vesicles, but was increased in histone II-A-treated microsomes, accounting for the increased glucose-6-phosphatase activity, and demonstrating that the microsomal membrane was still intact. The stimulation of glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase activities by histone II-A was found to be reversed by EGTA. It is concluded that the effects of histone II-A on glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase are not caused by the permeabilization of the microsomal membrane. The measurement of mannose-6-phosphatase latency to evaluate the intactness of the vesicles is therefore inappropriate. PMID:7646448

  17. Phosphatase Specificity and Pathway Insulation in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Michael A.; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase’s substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A’s adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  18. Golgi-mediated post-translational processing of secretory acid phosphatase by Leishmania donovani promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Bates, P A; Hermes, I; Dwyer, D M

    1990-03-01

    Monensin, an inhibitor of Golgi function, was used to investigate the role of this cell compartment in the glycosylation of Leishmania donovani promastigote secretory acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2). Monensin-treated cells demonstrated morphological changes in the Golgi complex and secreted enzyme with an altered electrophoretic mobility: two discrete bands of approximately 95 and 110 kDa were found, as compared to the heterodisperse nature of the enzyme from untreated controls. Chemical deglycosylation by mild acid hydrolysis resulted in a similar effect on the electrophoretic mobility of purified extracellular enzyme. Acid phosphatase was also treated with N-glycosidase F (EC 3.5.1.52) to remove N-linked oligosaccharides. The altered lectin-binding properties of the enzyme after these two treatments demonstrated that an unusual type of galactose-containing acid-labile carbohydrate was present in secretory acid phosphatase in addition to the N-linked oligosaccharides. Further, experiments with 32P-labelled enzyme indicated that phosphodiester bonds were the structural component responsible for the sensitivity of this carbohydrate to mild acid hydrolysis. Cumulatively, these results demonstrated that a novel form of Golgi-mediated posttranslational modification had occurred to the secretory acid phosphatase presumably by the addition of an acid-labile phosphoglycan. PMID:2320058

  19. The Phosphatase Ptc7 Induces Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis by Activating the Hydroxylase Coq7 in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; González-Mariscal, Isabel; Pomares-Viciana, Teresa; Padilla-López, Sergio; Ballesteros, Manuel; Vazquez-Fonseca, Luis; Gandolfo, Pablo; Brautigan, David L.; Navas, Placido; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The study of the components of mitochondrial metabolism has potential benefits for health span and lifespan because the maintenance of efficient mitochondrial function and antioxidant capacity is associated with improved health and survival. In yeast, mitochondrial function requires the tight control of several metabolic processes such as coenzyme Q biosynthesis, assuring an appropriate energy supply and antioxidant functions. Many mitochondrial processes are regulated by phosphorylation cycles mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases. In this study, we determined that the mitochondrial phosphatase Ptc7p, a Ser/Thr phosphatase, was required to regulate coenzyme Q6 biosynthesis, which in turn activated aerobic metabolism and enhanced oxidative stress resistance. We showed that Ptc7p phosphatase specifically activated coenzyme Q6 biosynthesis through the dephosphorylation of the demethoxy-Q6 hydroxylase Coq7p. The current findings revealed that Ptc7p is a regulator of mitochondrial metabolism that is essential to maintain proper function of the mitochondria by regulating energy metabolism and oxidative stress resistance. PMID:23940037

  20. Reduced expression of PNUTS leads to activation of Rb-phosphatase and caspase-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Gabriel; Sherry, Tara C; Krucher, Nancy A

    2008-06-01

    There is abundant evidence that Retinoblastoma (Rb) activity is important in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Reversible phosphorylation of the Rb protein that is carried out by cyclin dependent kinases and Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates its functions. A PP1 interacting protein, PNUTS (Phosphatase Nuclear Targeting Subunit) is proposed to be a regulator of Rb phosphorylation. In this study, PNUTS knockdown in MCF7, SKA and HCT116 cancer cells causes a reduction in viability due to increased apoptosis. However, normal cells (MCF10A breast and CCD-18Co colon) do not exhibit reduced viability when PNUTS expression is diminished. PNUTS knockdown has no effect in Rb-null Saos-2 cells. However, when Rb is stably expressed in Saos-2 cells, PNUTS knockdown reduces cell number. Knockdown of PNUTS in p53-/- HCT116 cells indicates that p53 is dispensable for the induction of apoptosis. Loss of PNUTS expression results in increased Rb-phosphatase activity and Rb dephosphorylation. E2F1 dissociates from Rb in cells depleted of PNUTS and the resulting apoptosis is dependent on caspase-8. These results indicate that Rb phosphorylation state can be manipulated by targeting Rb phosphatase activity and suggest that PNUTS may be a potential target for therapeutic pro-apoptotic strategies. PMID:18360108

  1. High osmolarity glycerol response PtcB phosphatase is important for Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    PubMed

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Brown, Neil Andrew; Rajendran, Ranjith; Ramage, Gordon; Bovier, Elodie; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Savoldi, Marcela; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that is capable of adapting to different host niches and to avoid host defenses. An enhanced understanding of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes is essential for the development of improved disease control strategies. Protein phosphatases are central to numerous signal transduction pathways. To comprehend the functions of protein phosphatases in A. fumigatus, 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit encoding genes were identified. We have recognized PtcB as one of the phosphatases involved in the high osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway. The ΔptcB mutant has both increased phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. The ΔptcB strain was more sensitive to cell wall damaging agents, had increased chitin and β-1,3-glucan, and impaired biofilm formation. The ΔptcB strain was avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results stress the importance of the HOG pathway in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in A. fumigatus. PMID:25597841

  2. Structural mechanisms of plant glucan phosphatases in starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Meekins, David A; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Gentry, Matthew S

    2016-07-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered class of enzymes that dephosphorylate starch and glycogen, thereby regulating energy metabolism. Plant genomes encode two glucan phosphatases, called Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2), that regulate starch metabolism by selectively dephosphorylating glucose moieties within starch glucan chains. Recently, the structures of both SEX4 and LSF2 were determined, with and without phosphoglucan products bound, revealing the mechanism for their unique activities. This review explores the structural and enzymatic features of the plant glucan phosphatases, and outlines how they are uniquely adapted to perform their cellular functions. We outline the physical mechanisms used by SEX4 and LSF2 to interact with starch glucans: SEX4 binds glucan chains via a continuous glucan-binding platform comprising its dual-specificity phosphatase domain and carbohydrate-binding module, while LSF2 utilizes surface binding sites. SEX4 and LSF2 both contain a unique network of aromatic residues in their catalytic dual-specificity phosphatase domains that serve as glucan engagement platforms and are unique to the glucan phosphatases. We also discuss the phosphoglucan substrate specificities inherent to SEX4 and LSF2, and outline structural features within the active site that govern glucan orientation. This review defines the structural mechanism of the plant glucan phosphatases with respect to phosphatases, starch metabolism and protein-glucan interaction, thereby providing a framework for their application in both agricultural and industrial settings. PMID:26934589

  3. Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue gene) haploinsufficiency promotes insulin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. T.; Kim, P. T. W.; Peacock, J. W.; Yau, T. Y.; Mui, A. L.-F.; Chung, S. W.; Sossi, V.; Doudet, D.; Green, D.; Ruth, T. J.; Parsons, R.; Verchere, C. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin controls glucose metabolism via multiple signalling pathways, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in muscle and adipose tissue. The protein/lipid phosphatase Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) attenuates PI3K signalling by dephosphorylating the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate generated by PI3K. The current study was aimed at investigating the effect of haploinsufficiency for Pten on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Materials and methods Insulin sensitivity in Pten heterozygous (Pten+/−) mice was investigated in i.p. insulin challenge and glucose tolerance tests. Glucose uptake was monitored in vitro in primary cultures of myocytes from Pten+/− mice, and in vivo by positron emission tomography. The phosphorylation status of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), a downstream signalling protein in the PI3K pathway, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a substrate of PKB/Akt, was determined by western immunoblotting. Results Following i.p. insulin challenge, blood glucose levels in Pten+/− mice remained depressed for up to 120 min, whereas glucose levels in wild-type mice began to recover after approximately 30 min. After glucose challenge, blood glucose returned to normal about twice as rapidly in Pten+/− mice. Enhanced glucose uptake was observed both in Pten+/− myocytes and in skeletal muscle of Pten+/− mice by PET. PKB and GSK3β phosphorylation was enhanced and prolonged in Pten+/− myocytes. Conclusions/interpretation Pten is a key negative regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. The partial reduction of Pten due to Pten haploinsufficiency is enough to elicit enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in Pten+/− mice. PMID:17195063

  4. Counteracting Protein Kinase Activity in the Heart: The Multiple Roles of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Silvio; Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Wagner, Michael; Dobrev, Dobromir; El-Armouche, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Decades of cardiovascular research have shown that variable and flexible levels of protein phosphorylation are necessary to maintain cardiac function. A delicate balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states of proteins is guaranteed by a complex interplay of protein kinases (PKs) and phosphatases. Serine/threonine phosphatases, in particular members of the protein phosphatase (PP) family govern dephosphorylation of the majority of these cardiac proteins. Recent findings have however shown that PPs do not only dephosphorylate previously phosphorylated proteins as a passive control mechanism but are capable to actively control PK activity via different direct and indirect signaling pathways. These control mechanisms can take place on (epi-)genetic, (post-)transcriptional, and (post-)translational levels. In addition PPs themselves are targets of a plethora of proteinaceous interaction partner regulating their endogenous activity, thus adding another level of complexity and feedback control toward this system. Finally, novel approaches are underway to achieve spatiotemporal pharmacologic control of PPs which in turn can be used to fine-tune misleaded PK activity in heart disease. Taken together, this review comprehensively summarizes the major aspects of PP-mediated PK regulation and discusses the subsequent consequences of deregulated PP activity for cardiovascular diseases in depth. PMID:26617522

  5. Acid phosphatase deactivation by a series mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, L; Marrucci, G; Grizzuti, N; Greco, G

    1984-05-01

    Acid phosphatase (E.C.3.1.3.2.) thermal deactivation at pH 3.77 has been investigated by monitoring the enzyme activity as a function of time in the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The experimental curves obtained show a two-slope behavior in a log (activity)versus-time plot, which indicates that deactivation occurs via a complex mechanism. From the dependence of the kinetic parameters on both deactivation and hydrolysis temperatures, it is inferred that the deactivation mechanism involves intermediate, temperature-dependent, less-active forms of the enzyme. This interpretation is confirmed by the results of additional tests in which the temperature was suddenly changed during the deactivation process. PMID:18553349

  6. Determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zak, B; Epstein, E; Baginski, E S

    1977-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase is described. Homogenization and ultracentrifrigation were used to prepare a precipitate whose character was defined by monitoring the desire enzyme activity which serves as a marker. Activity of the enzyme was determined by means of a sensitive colorimetric reaction for the product, inorganic phosphate. Non-enzymatic hydrolysis problems with the substrate are minimized in this procedure by the masking action of citrate. The final heteropoly blue color appears to be considerably sensitized by interaction of phosphomolybdous ion with arsenite. The stability of the relatively labile enzyme was ensured by chelating any metals present with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. The overall results obtained by the procedure appear to be useful as an aid in the diagnosis of Type I glycogenosis, a glycogen storage disease called Von Gierke's disease. PMID:192125

  7. Unique structural features of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Cashikar, A G; Rao, M N

    1995-06-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme is a homodimer of 60 kDa subunits each containing one atom of zinc and iron in the active site. Circular dichroism spectral studies on the purified enzyme reveals that a large portion of the peptide backbone is in the unordered and beta-turn conformation. A unique feature of the red kidney bean acid phosphatase, which we have found, is that one of the two cysteines of each subunit is involved in the formation of an inter-subunit disulphide. The thiol group of the other cysteine is not necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Western blot analysis with antibodies raised against kidney bean acid phosphatase could not recognize acid phosphatases from other sources except from potato. This paper emphasizes the fact that acid phosphatases are functionally, but not structurally, conserved enzymes. PMID:7590853

  8. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  9. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  10. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  11. Francisella DnaK Inhibits Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Chetty, Senthilnath Lakshmana; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Leonard, Sean; Klose, Karl; Seshu, Janakiram; Cap, Andrew; Valdes, James J.; Chambers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Following pulmonary infection with Francisella tularensis, we observed an unexpected but significant reduction of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme normally up-regulated following inflammation. However, no reduction was observed in mice infected with a closely related Gram-negative pneumonic organism (Klebsiella pneumoniae) suggesting the inhibition may be Francisella-specific. In similar fashion to in vivo observations, addition of Francisella lysate to exogenous alkaline phosphatase (tissue-nonspecific isozyme) was inhibitory. Partial purification and subsequent proteomic analysis indicated the inhibitory factor to be the heat shock protein DnaK. Incubation with increasing amounts of anti-DnaK antibody reduced the inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DnaK contains an adenosine triphosphate binding domain at its N terminus, and addition of adenosine triphosphate enhances dissociation of DnaK with its target protein, e.g. alkaline phosphatase. Addition of adenosine triphosphate resulted in decreased DnaK co-immunoprecipitated with alkaline phosphatase as well as reduction of Francisella-mediated alkaline phosphatase inhibition further supporting the binding of Francisella DnaK to alkaline phosphatase. Release of DnaK via secretion and/or bacterial cell lysis into the extracellular milieu and inhibition of plasma alkaline phosphatase could promote an orchestrated, inflammatory response advantageous to Francisella. PMID:22923614

  12. A Theileria parva type 1 protein phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Cayla, X; Garcia, A; Baumgartner, M; Ozon, R; Langsley, G

    2000-09-01

    The protozoan parasite Theileria (spp. parva and annulata) infects bovine leukocytes and provokes a leukaemia-like disease in vivo. In this study, we have detected a type 1 serine/threonine phosphatase activity with phosphorylase a as a substrate, in protein extracts of parasites purified from infected B lymphocytes. In contrast to this type 1 activity, dose response experiments with okadaic acid (OA), a well characterised inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, indicated that type 2A is the predominant activity detected in host B cells. Furthermore, consistent with polycation-specific activation of the type 2A phosphatase, protamine failed to activate the parasite-associated phosphorylase a phosphatase activity. Moreover, inhibition of phosphorylase a dephosphorylation by phospho-DARPP-32, a specific type 1 inhibitor, clearly demonstrated that a type 1 phosphatase is specifically associated with the parasite, while the type 2A is predominantly expressed in the host lymphocyte. Since an antibody against bovine catalytic protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) subunit only recognised the PP1 in B cells, but not in parasite extracts, we conclude that in parasites the PP1 activity is of parasitic origin. Intriguingly, since type 1 OA-sensitive phosphatase activity has been recently described in Plasmodium falciparum, we can conclude that these medically important parasites produce their one PP1. PMID:10989153

  13. DevS/DosS sensor is bifunctional and its phosphatase activity precludes aerobic DevR/DosR regulon expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kohinoor; Kumari, Priyanka; Sharma, Saurabh; Sehgal, Snigdha; Tyagi, Jaya Sivaswami

    2016-08-01

    Two-component systems, comprising histidine kinases and response regulators, empower bacteria to sense and adapt to diverse environmental stresses. Some histidine kinases are bifunctional; their phosphorylation (kinase) and dephosphorylation (phosphatase) activities toward their cognate response regulators permit the rapid reversal of genetic responses to an environmental stimulus. DevR-DevS/DosR-DosS is one of the best-characterized two-component systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The kinase function of DevS is activated by gaseous stress signals, including hypoxia, resulting in the induction of ~ 48-genes DevR dormancy regulon. Regulon expression is tightly controlled and lack of expression in aerobic Mtb cultures is ascribed to the absence of phosphorylated DevR. Here we show that DevS is a bifunctional sensor and possesses a robust phosphatase activity toward DevR. We used site-specific mutagenesis to generate substitutions in conserved residues in the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer domain of DevS and determined their role in kinase/phosphatase functions. In vitro and in vivo experiments, including a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, collectively establish that these conserved residues are critical for regulating kinase/phosphatase functions. Our findings establish DevS phosphatase function as an effective control mechanism to block aerobic expression of the DevR dormancy regulon. Asp-396 is essential for both kinase and phosphatase functions, whereas Gln-400 is critical for phosphatase function. The positive and negative functions perform opposing roles in DevS: the kinase function triggers regulon induction under hypoxia, whereas its phosphatase function prevents expression under aerobic conditions. A finely tuned balance in these opposing activities calibrates the dormancy regulon response output. PMID:27327040

  14. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A.; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q.; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response. PMID:26717153

  15. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  16. A study of substrate specificity for a CTD phosphatase, SCP1, by proteomic screening of binding partners.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Bahk, Young Yil

    2014-05-30

    RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain (RNAPII CTD) phosphatases are a newly emerging family of phosphatases. Recently a CTD-specific phosphatase, small CTD phosphatase 1 (SCP1), has shown to act as an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional corepressor for inhibiting neuronal gene transcription in non-neuronal cells. In this study, using the established NIH/3T3 and HEK293T cells, which are expressing human SCP1 proteins under the tight control of expression by doxycycline, a proteomic screening was conducted to identify the binding partners for SCP1. Although the present findings provide the possibility for new avenues to provide to a better understanding of cellular physiology of SCP1, now these proteomic and some immunological approaches for SCP1 interactome might not represent the accurate physiological relevance in vivo. In this presentation, we focus the substrate specificity to delineate an appearance of the dephosphorylation reaction catalyzed by SCP1 phosphatase. We compared the phosphorylated sequences of the immunologically confirmed binding partners with SCP1 searched in HPRD. We found the similar sequences from CdcA3 and validated the efficiency of enzymatic catalysis for synthetic phosphopeptides the recombinant SCP1. This approach led to the identification of several interacting partners with SCP1. We suggest that CdcA3 could be an enzymatic substrate for SCP1 and that SCP1 might have the relationship with cell cycle regulation through enzymatic activity against CdcA3. PMID:24769477

  17. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  18. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  19. Phosphatase activity of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pácová, Z; Kocur, M

    1978-10-01

    1115 strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were tested for phosphatase activity by a conventional plate method and a microtest. The microtest was devised to allow results to be read after 4 h cultivation. Phosphatase activity was found in wide range of species and strains. Besides staphylococci, where the test for phosphatase is successfully used, it may be applied as one of the valuable tests for the differentiation of the following species: Bacillus cereus, B. licheniformis, Aeromonas spp., Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Actinobacillus spp., Pasteurella spp., Xanthomonas spp., Flavobacterium spp., Alteromonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas maltophilia, Ps. cepacia, and some other species of Pseudomonas. The species which gave uniformly negative phosphatase reaction were as follows: Staph. saprophyticus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. PMID:216188

  20. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  1. Elevated Nitrogen Deposition from Alberta Oil Sands Development Stimulates Phosphatase Activity in Dominant Sphagnum Moss Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, N. N.; Wieder, R.; Vile, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Emissions of NOx associated with Alberta oil sands (AOS) development are leading to locally elevated atmospheric N deposition, in a region where background N deposition has been historically quite low (< 1 kg/ha/yr). This elevated N deposition has the potential to alter the ecosystem structure and function of nutrient-poor boreal peatlands. Nitrogen enrichment may alter soil microbial activity, which could be manifested in changes in extracellular enzyme activities. Since 2011, we have been experimentally adding N as NH4NO3 in simulated precipitation at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 kg N ha/yr/ plus no-water controls to a boreal bog and a poor fen (3 replicate plots per treatment). In 2013, acid phosphatase activities in living plant capitulum of Sphagnum angustifolium, Sphagnum fuscum, and Sphagnum magellanicum were quantified in June and July using 4-methyumbelliferylphosphate and fluorescence detection of the enzymatically released methylumbelliferone (MUF). Phosphatase activities did not differ with N treatment for S. angustifolium in the bog (p=0.3409) or the poor fen (p=0.0629), or for S. fuscum in the bog (p=0.1950), averaging 35.0 × 0.7, 61.6 × 1.2, and 41.6 × 0.9 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr, respectively. For S. fuscum in the poor fen, phosphatase activities differed between N treatments (p=0.0275), ranging 40.6 × 1.1 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in the control plots to 73.7 × 2.0 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in the 5 kg/ha/yr N treatment plots; increasing N deposition did not result in a gradual change in enzyme activity. On the other hand, S. magellanicum phosphatase activities differed between N treatments (p=0.0189) and showed a pattern of generally increasing activity with increasing N deposition (37.4 × 0.5 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in control plots; 97.9 × 4.5 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in the 25 kg/ha/yr N treatment plots). The differing phosphatase responses between these dominant Sphagnum species suggest unique differences in nutrient balance and/or microbial activity. Combining the

  2. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 acts in skin cells to promote sensory dendrite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianzhuang; Wang, Xiangming; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    Sensory dendrite morphogenesis is directed by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The extracellular environment plays instructive roles in patterning dendrite growth and branching. However, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the proprioceptive neuron PVD forms highly branched sensory dendrites adjacent to the hypodermis. We report that receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 functions in the hypodermis to pattern the PVD dendritic branches. Mutations in clr-1 lead to loss of quaternary branches, reduced secondary branches and increased ectopic branches. CLR-1 is necessary for the dendrite extension but not for the initial filopodia formation. Its role is dependent on the intracellular phosphatase domain but not the extracellular adhesion domain, indicating that it functions through dephosphorylating downstream factors but not through direct adhesion with neurons. Genetic analysis reveals that clr-1 also functions in parallel with SAX-7/DMA-1 pathway to control PVD primary dendrite development. We provide evidence of a new environmental factor for PVD dendrite morphogenesis. PMID:26968353

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  4. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  5. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine–threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  6. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  7. Circadian Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase Activity in Tomato by Protein Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. L.; Ort, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), a key enzyme in sucrose biosynthesis, is regulated by protein phosphorylation and shows a circadian pattern of activity in tomato. SPS is most active in its dephosphorylated state, which normally coincides with daytime. Applying okadaic acid, a potent protein phosphatase inhibitor, prevents SPS activation. More interesting is that a brief treatment with cycloheximide, a cytoplasmic translation inhibitor, also prevents the light activation of SPS without any effect on the amount of SPS protein. Cordycepin, an inhibitor of transcript synthesis and processing, has the same effect. Both of these inhibitors also prevent the activation phase of the circadian rhythm in SPS activity. Conversely, cycloheximide and cordycepin do not prevent the decline in circadian SPS activity that normally occurs at night. These observations indicate that SPS phosphatase activity but not SPS kinase activity is controlled, directly or indirectly, at the level of gene expression. Taken together, these data imply that there is a circadian rhythm controlling the transcription of a protein phosphatase that subsequently dictates the circadian rhythm in SPS activity via effects on this enzyme's phosphorylation state. PMID:12223667

  8. Conserved Residues in the N Terminus of Lipin-1 Are Required for Binding to Protein Phosphatase-1c, Nuclear Translocation, and Phosphatidate Phosphatase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Bernard P. C.; Skene-Arnold, Tamara D.; Ling, Ji; Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Dewald, Jay; Harris, Thurl E.; Holmes, Charles F. B.; Brindley, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Lipin-1 is a phosphatidate phosphatase in glycerolipid biosynthesis and signal transduction. It also serves as a transcriptional co-regulator to control lipid metabolism and adipogenesis. These functions are controlled partly by its subcellular distribution. Hyperphosphorylated lipin-1 remains sequestered in the cytosol, whereas hypophosphorylated lipin-1 translocates to the endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. The serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP-1c) is a major protein dephosphorylation enzyme. Its activity is controlled by interactions with different regulatory proteins, many of which contain conserved RVXF binding motifs. We found that lipin-1 binds to PP-1cγ through a similar HVRF binding motif. This interaction depends on Mg2+ or Mn2+ and is competitively inhibited by (R/H)VXF-containing peptides. Mutating the HVRF motif in the highly conserved N terminus of lipin-1 greatly decreases PP-1cγ interaction. Moreover, mutations of other residues in the N terminus of lipin-1 also modulate PP-1cγ binding. PP-1cγ binds poorly to a phosphomimetic mutant of lipin-1 and binds well to the non-phosphorylatable lipin-1 mutant. This indicates that lipin-1 is dephosphorylated before PP-1cγ binds to its HVRF motif. Importantly, mutating the HVRF motif also abrogates the nuclear translocation and phosphatidate phosphatase activity of lipin-1. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence of the importance of the lipin-1 N-terminal domain for its catalytic activity, nuclear localization, and binding to PP-1cγ. PMID:24558042

  9. 21 CFR 862.1050 - Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system... Test Systems § 862.1050 Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system. (a) Identification. An alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure alkaline phosphatase or its...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1050 - Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system... Test Systems § 862.1050 Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system. (a) Identification. An alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure alkaline phosphatase or its...