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Sample records for phosphatidylserine targets single-walled

  1. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    To develop a therapeutic system with cancer cell selectivity, the present study evaluated a possible specific and localized tumor treatment. Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on the external face of the cell membrane is almost completely exclusive to cancer cells and endothelial cells in the tumor vasculature. The human protein annexin V is known to have strong calcium-dependent binding to anionic phospholipids such as PS. This protein was studied for targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the vasculature of breast tumors. The synthesis of the protein annexin V, by a pET vector in Escherichia coli, constitutes the first phase of this study. Recombinant annexin V was purified from the cell lysate supernatant by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The overall production of purified annexin V protein was 50 mg/L. The binding ability of the protein annexin V was evaluated by determining the dissociation constant when incubated with proliferating human endothelial cells in vitro. The dissociation constant, Kd, was measured to be 0.8 nM, indicating relatively strong binding. This value of Kd is within the range reported in the literature. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were functionalized with annexin V using two intermediate linkers (containing FMOC and DSPE) resulting in stable suspensions. The SWNT and protein concentrations were 202 mg/L and 515 mg/L, respectively, using the linker with DSPE (average of nine preparations). The conjugation method that used the DSPE-PEG-maleimide linker allowed to successfully conjugate the SWNTs with final concentrations approximately five times higher than the linker containing FMOC. The conjugation method used has a non-covalent nature, and therefore the optical properties of the nanotubes were preserved. The conjugate was also visually observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), allowing to verify the presence of the protein annexin V on the surface of the nanotubes, with an height ranging between 2

  2. Imaging of Brain Tumors With Paramagnetic Vesicles Targeted to Phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Patrick M.; Pearce, John; Chu, Zhengtao; McPherson, Christopher M.; Takigiku, Ray; Lee, Jing-Huei; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate paramagnetic saposin C and dioleylphosphatidylserine (SapC-DOPS) vesicles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed by glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Materials and Methods Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles were formulated, and the vesicle diameter and relaxivity were measured. Targeting of Gd-DTPA-BSA/ SapC-DOPS vesicles to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo was compared with nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles (lacking SapC). Mice with GBM brain tumors were imaged at 3, 10, 20, and 24 h postinjection to measure the relaxation rate (R1) in the tumor and the normal brain. Results The mean diameter of vesicles was 175 nm, and the relaxivity at 7 Tesla was 3.32 (s*mM)−1 relative to the gadolinium concentration. Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles targeted cultured cancer cells, leading to an increased R1 and gadolinium level in the cells. In vivo, Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles produced a 9% increase in the R1 of GBM brain tumors in mice 10 h postinjection, but only minimal changes (1.2% increase) in the normal brain. Nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles yielded minimal change in the tumor R1 at 10 h postinjection (1.3%). Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles can selectively target implanted brain tumors in vivo, providing noninvasive mapping of the cancer biomarker PS. PMID:24797437

  3. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Yating; Wang, Lili; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-01-01

    A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd)/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor. PMID:26213465

  4. Vascular targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for near-infrared light therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prickett, Whitney M.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2011-11-01

    A new approach for targeting carbon nanotubes to the tumor vasculature was tested using human endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with the F3 peptide using a polyethylene glycol linker to target nucleolin, a protein found on the surface of endothelial cells in the vasculature of solid tumors. Confocal microscopy and Raman analysis confirmed that the conjugate was internalized by actively dividing endothelial cells. Dividing endothelial cells were used to mimic these cells in the tumor vasculature. Incubation with the conjugate for 8 h or more caused significant cell death in both actively dividing endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, an effect that is hypothesized to be due to the massive uptake of the conjugate. This targeted cell killing was further enhanced when coupled with near-infrared laser treatment. For confluent (non-dividing) endothelial cells, no cytotoxic effect was seen for incubation alone or incubation coupled with laser treatment. These results are promising and warrant further studies using this conjugate for cancer treatment in vivo.

  5. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

    2008-11-14

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  6. Chinese medicine single-walled carbon nanotube targeting compound for antitumor therapy: a feasible way?

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-long; Li, Jie; Yan, Chun-yin; Lai, Ze-feng; Hu, Gui-jie

    2014-01-01

    Malignant cancer is the leading cause of death in man, exceeding cerebrovascular disease and heart disease. More than half of the total mortality due to malignant cancer is from lung, liver, intestinal and gastric cancer. Chemotherapy is one of the effective treatments for cancer. However, the great majority of Western anticancer medicines have considerable side effects. Herbal medicines offer many more advantages than synthesized compounds because they are made from purely natural compounds and have less adverse effects. However, the single administration methods used as standard in herbal medicine, and deficient drug targeting, severely limit their anticancer activity. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be used as drug carriers. They have been modified to form Chinese anticancer medicine-SWNT compounds which can specifically target tumors, thereby significantly increasing the therapeutic effectiveness of these medicines. Water-soluble SWNTs have high stability. As a drug carrier, SWNTs functional modification of the anticancer medicine may improve the targeting and killing of tumor cells. SWNTs have been attached to the Chinese antitumor medicines paclitaxel and plumbagin and have achieved excellent therapeutic effects. Furthermore, choosing the best administration methods such as internal iliac arterial infusion, intravesical infusion and embedment of a hypodermic chemotherapeutic pump, may also improve the anticancer effects of Chinese medicine. PMID:22370871

  7. Plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes on monolayer graphene for sensing target protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-05-01

    We developed plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on monolayer graphene as a biosensor to detect target antigen molecules, fc fusion protein without any treatment to generate binder groups for linker and antibody. This plasmonic welding induces atomic networks between SWCNTs as junctions containing carboxylic groups and improves the electrical sensitivity of a SWCNTs and the graphene membrane to detect target protein. We investigated generation of the atomic networks between SWCNTs by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after plasmonic welding process. We compared the intensity ratios of D to G peaks from the Raman spectra and electrical sheet resistance of welded SWCNTs with the results of normal SWCNTs, which decreased from 0.115 to 0.086 and from 10.5 to 4.12, respectively. Additionally, we measured the drain current via source/drain voltage after binding of the antigen to the antibody molecules. This electrical sensitivity of the welded SWCNTs was 1.55 times larger than normal SWCNTs.

  8. Functional single-walled carbon nanotubes/chitosan conjugate for tumor cells targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Baoyan; Ou, Zhongmin; Xing, Da

    2009-08-01

    The application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the field of biomedicine is becoming an exciting topic because of their flexible structure and propensity for chemical functionalization. In this assay, a novel noncovalently functional SWCNTs based on a natural biocompatible polymer chitosan has been developed for tumor cells targeting. First, SWCNTs were modified by chitosan (CHIT-SWCNT). Second, CHIT-SWCNT was coupled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), based on the reaction between the isothiocyanate group of FITC and the primary amino group of chitosan. Third, the FITC functionalized CHIT-SWCNT was conjugated with folic acid (FA) after activation with EDC/NHS, based on the reaction between the NHS group of FA and the primary free amino group of chitosan to construct the functional SWCNT/CHIT conjugate, CHIT-SWCNT-FA. The fluorescence CHIT-SWCNT-FA has been used to detect tumor cells with confocal microscopy imaging technology. Our experimental results indicate that the novel CHIT-SWCNT-FA is soluble and stable in PBS, and it can be readily transported inside tumor cells. Combining the intrinsic properties of carbon nanotubes and the versatility of chitosan, CHIT-SWCNT can be used as potential devices for targeted drug delivery and tumor cell sensing. The proposed assay could provide a feasible alternative to presently available functional SWCNTs in biological applications.

  9. Physical consequences of the mitochondrial targeting of single-walled carbon nanotubes probed computationally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakov, V. A.; Zolotukhin, P. V.; Prazdnova, E. V.; Alperovich, I.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Experiments by F. Zhou and coworkers (2010) [16] showed that mitochondria are the main target of the cellular accumulation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Our in silico experiments, based on geometrical optimization of the system consisting of SWCNT+proton within Density Functional Theory, revealed that protons can bind to the outer side of SWCNT so generating a positive charge. Calculation results allow one to propose the following mechanism of SWCNTs mitochondrial targeting. SWCNTs enter the space between inner and outer membranes of mitochondria, where the excess of protons has been formed by diffusion. In this compartment SWCNTs are loaded with protons and acquire positive charges distributed over their surface. Protonation of hydrophobic SWCNTs can also be carried out within the mitochondrial membrane through interaction with the protonated ubiquinone. Such "charge loaded" particles can be transferred as "Sculachev ions" through the inner membrane of the mitochondria due to the potential difference generated by the inner membrane. Physiological consequences of the described mechanism are discussed.

  10. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luís F. F.; Krais, John J.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on the targeting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the treatment of breast cancer with minimal side effects using photothermal therapy. The human protein annexin V (AV) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids expressed externally on the surface of tumour cells and endothelial cells that line the tumour vasculature. A 2 h incubation of the SWNT-AV conjugate with proliferating endothelial cells followed by washing and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation at a wavelength of 980 nm was enough to induce significant cell death; there was no significant cell death with irradiation or the conjugate alone. Administration of the same conjugate i.v. in BALB/c female mice with implanted 4T1 murine mammary at a dose of 0.8 mg SWNT kg-1 and followed one day later by NIR irradiation of the tumour at a wavelength of 980 nm led to complete disappearance of implanted 4T1 mouse mammary tumours for the majority of the animals by 11 days since the irradiation. The combination of the photothermal therapy with the immunoadjuvant cyclophosphamide resulted in increased survival. The in vivo results suggest the SWNT-AV/NIR treatment is a promising approach to treat breast cancer.

  11. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Neves, Luís F F; Krais, John J; Van Rite, Brent D; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Resasco, Daniel E; Harrison, Roger G

    2013-09-20

    This paper focuses on the targeting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the treatment of breast cancer with minimal side effects using photothermal therapy. The human protein annexin V (AV) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids expressed externally on the surface of tumour cells and endothelial cells that line the tumour vasculature. A 2 h incubation of the SWNT-AV conjugate with proliferating endothelial cells followed by washing and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation at a wavelength of 980 nm was enough to induce significant cell death; there was no significant cell death with irradiation or the conjugate alone. Administration of the same conjugate i.v. in BALB/c female mice with implanted 4T1 murine mammary at a dose of 0.8 mg SWNT kg(-1) and followed one day later by NIR irradiation of the tumour at a wavelength of 980 nm led to complete disappearance of implanted 4T1 mouse mammary tumours for the majority of the animals by 11 days since the irradiation. The combination of the photothermal therapy with the immunoadjuvant cyclophosphamide resulted in increased survival. The in vivo results suggest the SWNT-AV/NIR treatment is a promising approach to treat breast cancer. PMID:23975064

  12. Phosphatidylserine-selective targeting and anticancer effects of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles on brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Víctor M; Chu, Zhengtao; Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Kendler, Ady; Rixe, Olivier; Warnick, Ronald E; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-08-30

    Brain tumors, either primary (e.g., glioblastoma multiforme) or secondary (metastatic), remain among the most intractable and fatal of all cancers. We have shown that nanovesicles consisting of Saposin C (SapC) and dioleylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) are able to effectively target and kill cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These actions are a consequence of the affinity of SapC-DOPS for phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid abundantly present in the outer membrane of a variety of tumor cells and tumor-associated vasculature. In this study, we first characterize SapC-DOPS bioavailability and antitumor effects on human glioblastoma xenografts, and confirm SapC-DOPS specificity towards phosphatidylserine by showing that glioblastoma targeting is abrogated after in vivo exposure to lactadherin, which binds phosphatidylserine with high affinity. Second, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS selectively targets brain metastases-forming cancer cells both in vitro, in co-cultures with human astrocytes, and in vivo, in mouse models of brain metastases derived from human breast or lung cancer cells. Third, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS have cytotoxic activity against metastatic breast cancer cells in vitro, and prolong the survival of mice harboring brain metastases. Taken together, these results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors. PMID:25051370

  13. Phosphatidylserine-selective targeting and anticancer effects of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles on brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Víctor M.; Chu, Zhengtao; Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D.; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K.; Kendler, Ady; Rixe, Olivier; Warnick, Ronald E.; Franco, Robert S.; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumors, either primary (e.g., glioblastoma multiforme) or secondary (metastatic), remain among the most intractable and fatal of all cancers. We have shown that nanovesicles consisting of Saposin C (SapC) and dioleylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) are able to effectively target and kill cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These actions are a consequence of the affinity of SapC-DOPS for phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid abundantly present in the outer membrane of a variety of tumor cells and tumor-associated vasculature. In this study, we first characterize SapC-DOPS bioavailability and antitumor effects on human glioblastoma xenografts, and confirm SapC-DOPS specificity towards phosphatidylserine by showing that glioblastoma targeting is abrogated after in vivo exposure to lactadherin, which binds phosphatidylserine with high affinity. Second, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS selectively targets brain metastases-forming cancer cells both in vitro, in co-cultures with human astrocytes, and in vivo, in mouse models of brain metastases derived from human breast or lung cancer cells. Third, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS nanovesicles have cytotoxic activity against metastatic breast cancer cells in vitro, and prolong the survival of mice harboring brain metastases. Taken together, these results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors. PMID:25051370

  14. Deep, noninvasive imaging and surgical guidance of submillimeter tumors using targeted M13-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debadyuti; Bagley, Alexander F; Na, Young Jeong; Birrer, Michael J; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Belcher, Angela M

    2014-09-23

    Highly sensitive detection of small, deep tumors for early diagnosis and surgical interventions remains a challenge for conventional imaging modalities. Second-window near-infrared light (NIR2, 950-1,400 nm) is promising for in vivo fluorescence imaging due to deep tissue penetration and low tissue autofluorescence. With their intrinsic fluorescence in the NIR2 regime and lack of photobleaching, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are potentially attractive contrast agents to detect tumors. Here, targeted M13 virus-stabilized SWNTs are used to visualize deep, disseminated tumors in vivo. This targeted nanoprobe, which uses M13 to stably display both tumor-targeting peptides and an SWNT imaging probe, demonstrates excellent tumor-to-background uptake and exhibits higher signal-to-noise performance compared with visible and near-infrared (NIR1) dyes for delineating tumor nodules. Detection and excision of tumors by a gynecological surgeon improved with SWNT image guidance and led to the identification of submillimeter tumors. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the promise of targeted SWNT nanoprobes for noninvasive disease monitoring and guided surgery. PMID:25214538

  15. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Fuel Cell Benchmarked Against US DOE 2017 Technical Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Neetu; Ramesh, Palanisamy; Bekyarova, Elena; Tian, Xiaojuan; Wang, Feihu; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with varying degrees of functionalization were utilized for the fabrication of SWNT thin film catalyst support layers (CSLs) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), which were suitable for benchmarking against the US DOE 2017 targets. Use of the optimum level of SWNT -COOH functionality allowed the construction of a prototype SWNT-based PEMFC with total Pt loading of 0.06 mgPt/cm2 - well below the value of 0.125 mgPt/cm2 set as the US DOE 2017 technical target for total Pt group metals (PGM) loading. This prototype PEMFC also approaches the technical target for the total Pt content per kW of power (<0.125 gPGM/kW) at cell potential 0.65 V: a value of 0.15 gPt/kW was achieved at 80°C/22 psig testing conditions, which was further reduced to 0.12 gPt/kW at 35 psig back pressure. PMID:23877112

  16. Targeted delivery and controlled release of Paclitaxel for the treatment of lung cancer using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baodan; Tan, Li; Zheng, Runhui; Tan, Huo; Zheng, Lixia

    2016-11-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controlled-release of the anti-cancer drug Paclitaxel (PTX) was constructed in this study. Chitosan (CHI) was non-covalently attached to the SWNTs to improve biocompatibility. Biocompatible hyaluronan was also combined to the outer CHI layer to realise the specific targeting property. The results showed that the release of PTX was pH-triggered and was better at lower pH (pH5.5). The modified SWNTs showed a significant improvement in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may have enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and further promoted cell apoptosis. The results of western blotting indicated that the apoptosis-related proteins were abundantly expressed in A549 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and cell viability assay demonstrated that PTX-loaded SWNTs could destroy cell membrane integrity, thus inducing lower cell viability of the A549 cells. Thus, this targeting DDS could effectively inhibit cell proliferation and kill A549 cells, is a promising system for cancer therapy. PMID:27524057

  17. Octa-ammonium POSS-conjugated single-walled carbon nanotubes as vehicles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Naghmeh; Madani, Seyed Y.; Mosahebi, Afshin; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique physical and chemical properties. Furthermore, novel properties can be developed by attachment or encapsulation of functional groups. These unique properties facilitate the use of CNTs in drug delivery. We developed a new nanomedicine consisting of a nanocarrier, cell-targeting molecule, and chemotherapeutic drug and assessed its efficacy in vitro. Methods The efficacy of a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-based nanoconjugate system is assessed in the targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. SWCNTs were oxidized and reacted with octa-ammonium polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (octa-ammonium POSS) to render them biocompatible and water dispersable. The functionalized SWCNTs were loaded with PTX, a chemotherapeutic agent toxic to cancer cells, and Tn218 antibodies for cancer cell targeting. The nanohybrid composites were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared (UV–Vis–NIR). Additionally, their cytotoxic effects on Colon cancer cell (HT-29) and Breast cancer cell (MCF-7) lines were assessed in vitro. Results TEM, FTIR, and UV–Vis–NIR studies confirmed side-wall functionalization of SWCNT with COOH-groups, PTX, POSS, and antibodies. Increased cell death was observed with PTX–POSS–SWCNT, PTX–POSS–Ab–SWCNT, and free PTX compared to functionalized-SWCNT (f-SWCNT), POSS–SWCNT, and cell-only controls at 48 and 72 h time intervals in both cell lines. At all time intervals, there was no significant cell death in the POSS–SWCNT samples compared to cell-only controls. Conclusion The PTX-based nanocomposites were shown to be as cytotoxic as free PTX. This important finding indicates successful release of PTX from the nanocomposites and further reiterates the potential of SWCNTs to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. PMID:26356347

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of single-wall carbon nanotube-paclitaxel-folic acid conjugate as an anti-cancer targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Tavakolifard, Sara; Biazar, Esmaeil; Pourshamsian, Khalil; Moslemin, Mohammad H

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) represent a novel nanomaterial applied in various nanotechnology fields because of their surface chemistry properties and high drug cargo capacity. In this study, SWCNT are pre-functionalized covalently with paclitaxel (PTX) - an anticancer drug, and folic acid (FA), as a targeting agent for many tumors. The samples are investigated and evaluated by different analyses such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), absorption spectroscopic measurements (UV-Visible), elemental analysis, and cell analyses with cancer cell line cultures. The results show good conjugation of the targeting molecule and the anticancer drug on the surface of the carbon nanotubes (CNT). This work demonstrates that the SWCNT-PTX-FA system is a potentially useful system for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:25783856

  19. M13 phage-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as nanoprobes for second near-infrared window fluorescence imaging of targeted tumors

    PubMed Central

    HAM, MOON-HO; QI, JIFA; BARONE, PAUL W.; STRANO, MICHAEL S.; BELCHER, ANGELA M.

    2014-01-01

    Second near-infrared (NIR) window light (950-1,400 nm) is attractive for in vivo fluorescence imaging due to its deep penetration depth in tissues and low tissue autofluorescence. Here we show genetically engineered multifunctional M13 phage can assemble fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and ligands for targeted fluorescence imaging of tumors. M13-SWNT probe is detectable in deep tissues even at a low dosage of 2 μg/mL and up to 2.5 cm in tissue-like phantoms. Moreover, targeted probes show specific and up to four-fold improved uptake in prostate specific membrane antigen positive prostate tumors compared to control non-targeted probes. This M13 phage-based second NIR window fluorescence imaging probe has great potential for specific detection and therapy monitoring of hard-to-detect areas. PMID:22268625

  20. Global phospholipidomics analysis reveals selective pulmonary peroxidation profiles upon inhalation of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kisin, Elena R; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Kapralova, Valentina I; Sparvero, Louis J; Amoscato, Andrew A; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2011-09-27

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause nonspecific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in the two most abundant phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol, whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This nonrandom peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H(2)O(2)/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria-targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  1. Global Phospholipidomics Analysis Reveals Selective Pulmonary Peroxidation Profiles Upon Inhalation of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause non-specific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in two most abundant phospholipid classes – phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This non-random peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H2O2/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  2. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Hasumura, Takashi; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2013-01-01

    The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX) binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4) and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0), which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light–heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy. PMID:23926428

  3. Phosphatidylserine (PS) Is Exposed in Choroidal Neovascular Endothelium: PS-Targeting Antibodies Inhibit Choroidal Angiogenesis In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Aredo, Bogale; Zhang, Kaiyan; Zhong, Xin; Pulido, Jose S.; Wang, Shusheng; He, Yu-Guang; Huang, Xianming; Brekken, Rolf A.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) accounts for 90% of cases of severe vision loss in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration. Identifying new therapeutic targets for CNV may lead to novel combination therapies to improve outcomes and reduce treatment burden. Our goal was to test whether phosphatidylserine (PS) becomes exposed in the outer membrane of choroidal neovascular endothelium, and whether this could provide a new therapeutic target for CNV. Methods Choroidal neovascularization was induced in C57BL/6J mice using laser photocoagulation. Choroidal neovascularization lesions costained for exposed PS and for intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (or isolectin B4) were imaged in flat mounts and in cross sections. The laser CNV model and a choroidal sprouting assay were used to test the effect of PS-targeting antibodies on choroidal angiogenesis. Choroidal neovascularization lesion size was determined by intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (ICAM-2) staining of flat mounts. Results We found that PS was exposed in CNV lesions and colocalized with vascular endothelial staining. Treatment with PS-targeting antibodies led to a 40% to 80% reduction in CNV lesion area when compared to treatment with a control antibody. The effect was the same as that seen using an equal dose of an anti-VEGF antibody. Results were confirmed using the choroid sprouting assay, an ex vivo model of choroidal angiogenesis. Conclusions We demonstrated that PS is exposed in choroidal neovascular endothelium. Furthermore, targeting this exposed PS with antibodies may be of therapeutic value in CNV. PMID:26529048

  4. Melanoma cell surface-expressed phosphatidylserine as a therapeutic target for cationic anticancer peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Che; Chen, Yin-Wang; Zhang, Liang; Gong, Xian-Ge; Zhou, Yang; Shang, De-Jing

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that temporin-1CEa, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism for this cancer-selectivity is still largely unknown. Here, we found that the negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed on cancer cell surface serves as a target for temporin-1CEa. Our results indicate that human A375 melanoma cells express 50-fold more PS than non-cancerous HaCaT cells. The expression of cell surface PS in various cancer cell lines closely correlated with their ability to be recognized, bound and killed by temporin-1CEa. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of temporin-1CEa against A375 cells can be ameliorated by annexin V, which binds to cell surface PS with high affinity. Moreover, the data of isothermal titration calorimetry assay further confirmed a direct binding of temporin-1CEa to PS, at a ratio of 1:5 (temporin-1CEa:PS). Interestingly, the circular dichroism spectra analysis using artificial biomembrane revealed that PS not only provides electrostatic attractive sites for temporin-1CEa but also confers the membrane-bound temporin-1CEa to form α-helical structure, therefore, enhances the affinity and membrane disrupting ability of temporin-1CEa. In summary, these findings suggested that the melanoma cells expressed PS may serve as a promising target for temporin-1CEa or other cationic anticancer peptides. PMID:26596643

  5. Targeted detection of phosphatidylserine in biomimetic membranes and in vitro cell systems using annexin V-containing cubosomes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lake, Vanessa; Le Brun, Anton P; James, Michael; Duff, Anthony P; Peng, Yong; McLean, Keith M; Hartley, Patrick G

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have formulated Annexin V (ANX) decorated phosphatidylserine containing phytantriol (PSPhy) cubosomes to act as probes for the enhanced detection of apoptotic membranes in both model and in vitro cell systems. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) indicated that ANX-containing PSPhy (ANX-PSPhy) cubosomes retain the Pn3m cubic symmetry and cubic phase nanoparticle characteristics of PSPhy cubosomes. The interaction of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes with apoptotic model and cellular membranes was also investigated using both quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and confocal microscopy which confirmed that ANX-PSPhy cubosomes can selectively bind to apoptotic cells and model membranes. Neutron reflectometry has also been used to show strong binding of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes to a model apoptotic membrane, and in addition reveals changes in both the bilayer structure and in the internal structure of the cubosome in a region adjacent to the membrane as a result of material exchange. This material exchange between cubosome and apoptotic model bilayer was further demonstrated using Cryo-TEM. We have demonstrated that lipid bound protein, in this case Annexin V, can be used to target cubosome systems to biological surfaces in vitro. PMID:23899446

  6. Single wall penetration equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Five single plate penetration equations are compared for accuracy and effectiveness. These five equations are two well-known equations (Fish-Summers and Schmidt-Holsapple), two equations developed by the Apollo project (Rockwell and Johnson Space Center (JSC), and one recently revised from JSC (Cour-Palais). They were derived from test results, with velocities ranging up to 8 km/s. Microsoft Excel software was used to construct a spreadsheet to calculate the diameters and masses of projectiles for various velocities, varying the material properties of both projectile and target for the five single plate penetration equations. The results were plotted on diameter versus velocity graphs for ballistic and spallation limits using Cricket Graph software, for velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/s defined for the orbital debris. First, these equations were compared to each other, then each equation was compared with various aluminum projectile densities. Finally, these equations were compared with test results performed at JSC for the Marshall Space Flight Center. These equations predict a wide variety of projectile diameters at a given velocity. Thus, it is very difficult to choose the 'right' prediction equation. The thickness of a single plate could have a large variation by choosing a different penetration equation. Even though all five equations are empirically developed with various materials, especially for aluminum alloys, one cannot be confident in the shield design with the predictions obtained by the penetration equations without verifying by tests.

  7. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with (111)In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of (111)In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  8. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with 111In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of 111In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  9. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity. PMID:26239537

  10. Scalable dielectrophoresis of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzhugh, William A.

    Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) have attracted much attention as a candidate material for future nano-scale 'beyond silicon' devices. However industrial scale operations have been impeded by difficulties in separating the metallic and semiconducting species. This paper addresses the use of highly inhomogeneous alternating electric fields, dielectrophoresis, to isolate SWNT species in scaled systems. Both numerical and experimental methods will be discussed.

  11. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  12. Cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J.; Gu, Zhenning; Shaver, Jonah; Chen, Zheyi; Flor, Erica L.; Schmidt, Daniel J.; Chan, Candace; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2005-07-01

    A two-step process is utilized for cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The first step requires the breakage of carbon-carbon bonds in the lattice while the second step is aimed at etching at these damage sites to create short, cut nanotubes. To achieve monodisperse lengths from any cutting strategy requires control of both steps. Room-temperature piranha and ammonium persulfate solutions have shown the ability to exploit the damage sites and etch SWNTs in a controlled manner. Despite the aggressive nature of these oxidizing solutions, the etch rate for SWNTs is relatively slow and almost no new sidewall damage is introduced. Carbon-carbon bond breakage can be introduced through fluorination to ~C2F, and subsequent etching using piranha solutions has been shown to be very effective in cutting nanotubes. The final average length of the nanotubes is approximately 100 nm with carbon yields as high as 70-80%.

  13. Molecular Imaging with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Gao, Ting; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary field which involves physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique properties which make them suitable for applications in a variety of imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance, near-infrared fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and radionuclide-based imaging. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of SWCNTs in molecular imaging applications. Multifunctionality is the key advantage of nanoparticles over traditional approaches. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and many other agents can all be integrated into the nanoparticle to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy by encompassing many biological and biophysical barriers. A multifunctional, SWCNT-based nanoplatform holds great potential for clinical applications in the future. PMID:21754949

  14. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  15. Single Walled Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhuangchun

    2005-11-01

    Characterization of the electrical heterojunction between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and semiconductors is important for an array of potential applications. Thin, homogeneous, transparent, films of 100% SWNTs exhibiting good electrical conductivity [1] have already been demonstrated as the hole injection electrode in GaN light emitting diodes [2]. The simultaneous transparency and high electrical conductivity of these films makes them similarly promising for the light transmissive electrode in photovoltaic devices. SWNTs have moreover long been proposed as on-chip, device interconnects. To understand the electrical coupling between the nanotubes and semiconductors, likely to have relevance in such devices, we have begun a systematic exploration of the electrical properties of SWNT/silicon hetrojunctions. We will discuss findings as well as a novel test method made possible by the unique morphology of the nanotubes. 1. Z. Wu, Z. Chen, X. Du, J. M. Logan, J. Sippel, M. Nikolou, K. Kamaras, J. R. Reynolds, D. B. Tanner, A. F. Hebard, A. G. Rinzler, Science 305, 1273 (2004) 2. K. Lee, Z. Wu, Z. Chen, F. Ren, S. J. Pearton, A. G. Rinzler, Nano Lett. 4, 911 (2004)

  16. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:27331813

  17. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  18. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J

    2015-01-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product's relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth. PMID:26581125

  19. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-11-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth.

  20. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth. PMID:26581125

  1. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  2. Oxidized Phosphatidylserine: Production and Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Matsura, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Recent development of analytical methods for lipid hydroperoxides and preparation of highly pure lipid hydroperoxides have revealed the important new pathophysiological roles of oxidized phospholipids. Generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative stress leads to random oxidation of membrane phospholipids. However, recent studies have reported that anionic phospholipid molecules such as phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin are preferentially oxidized during apoptosis, resulting in efficient apoptosis execution and apoptotic cell clearance by phagocytes. This review is exclusively focused on selective production of oxidized PS (oxPS) during apoptosis as well as the novel roles of oxPS under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25901098

  3. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  4. Ion adsorption mechanism of bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tsutsui, M.; Al-zubaidi, A.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S.

    2016-07-01

    In order to elucidate ion adsorption mechanism of bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in situ synchrotron XRD measurements of SWCNT electrode in alkali halide aqueous electrolyte at several applied potentials were performed. It was found that the surface inside SWCNT is the important ion adsorption site.

  5. Chemical Sensing with Polyaniline Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Gou, Pingping; Reber, Michael J; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-25

    Single-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (SWNT/PAni) nanocomposite with controlled core/shell morphology was synthesized by a noncovalent functionalization approach. Unique electron interactions between the SWNT core and the PAni shell were studied electrochemically and spectroscopically, and superior sensor performance to chemical gases and vapors was demonstrated.

  6. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  7. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  8. Flame Synthesis Of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes And Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Berger, Gordon M.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely sought for a variety of applications including gas storage, intercalation media, catalyst support and composite reinforcing material [1]. Each of these applications will require large scale quantities of CNTs. A second consideration is that some of these applications may require redispersal of the collected CNTs and attachment to a support structure. If the CNTs could be synthesized directly upon the support to be used in the end application, a tremendous savings in post-synthesis processing could be realized. Therein we have pursued both aerosol and supported catalyst synthesis of CNTs. Given space limitations, only the aerosol portion of the work is outlined here though results from both thrusts will be presented during the talk. Aerosol methods of SWNT, MWNT or nanofiber synthesis hold promise of large-scale production to supply the tonnage quantities these applications will require. Aerosol methods may potentially permit control of the catalyst particle size, offer continuous processing, provide highest product purity and most importantly, are scaleable. Only via economy of scale will the cost of CNTs be sufficient to realize the large-scale structural and power applications on both earth and in space. Present aerosol methods for SWNT synthesis include laser ablation of composite metalgraphite targets or thermal decomposition/pyrolysis of a sublimed or vaporized organometallic [2]. Both approaches, conducted within a high temperature furnace, have produced single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The former method requires sophisticated hardware and is inherently limited by the energy deposition that can be realized using pulsed laser light. The latter method, using expensive organometallics is difficult to control for SWNT synthesis given a range of gasparticle mixing conditions along variable temperature gradients; multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are a far more likely end products. Both approaches require large energy expenditures and

  9. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors.

  10. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-16

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors. PMID:21828739

  11. Thermionic Emission of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Krainsky, Isay L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Elich, Jeffrey M.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology, have investigated the thermionic properties of high-purity, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for use as electron-emitting electrodes. Carbon nanotubes are a recently discovered material made from carbon atoms bonded into nanometer-scale hollow tubes. Such nanotubes have remarkable properties. An extremely high aspect ratio, as well as unique mechanical and electronic properties, make single-wall nanotubes ideal for use in a vast array of applications. Carbon nanotubes typically have diameters on the order of 1 to 2 nm. As a result, the ends have a small radius of curvature. It is these characteristics, therefore, that indicate they might be excellent potential candidates for both thermionic and field emission.

  12. Reinforcement of Epoxies Using Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Sharma, Jitendra; Chatterjee, Tirtha

    2008-03-01

    The reinforcement of bisphenol-A and bisphenol-F epoxies using single walled carbon nanotubes has been approached experimentally by understanding the nature of interactions between the matrices and nanotubes. Unassisted dispersions of single walled carbon nanotubes in epoxies were studied by a combination of radiation scattering (elastic small angle scattering and inelastic scattering), DSC based glass transition determination, melt rheology and solid-state mechanical testing in order to understand and correlate changes in local and global dynamics to the tailoring of composite mechanical properties. Significant changes in the glass transition temperature of the matrix can successfully account for changes in the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy dispersions for concentrations below the percolation threshold, while above the percolation threshold the network superstructure formed by the nanotubes controls the viscoelastic properties.

  13. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a graphene helix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kap; Lee, Sohyung; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Min, Bong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Kyung-Il; An, Kay Hyeok; John, Phillip

    2014-08-27

    Evidence is presented in this paper that certain single-wall carbon nanotubes are not seamless tubes, but rather adopt a graphene helix resulting from the spiral growth of a nano-graphene ribbon. The residual traces of the helices are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The analysis also shows that the tubular graphene material may exhibit a unique armchair structure and the chirality is not a necessary condition for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The description of the structure of the helical carbon nanomaterials is generalized using the plane indices of hexagonal space groups instead of using chiral vectors. It is also proposed that the growth model, via a graphene helix, results in a ubiquitous structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:24838196

  14. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  15. Synthesis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Diesel Soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Takashi; Ohashi, Ouji; Kawamoto, Hironori; Yoshimura, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Ken-ichi; Tanimura, Makoto; Fujikawa, Naohiro; Nishimoto, Tetsuro; Awata, Kazuhiko; Tachibana, Masaru; Kojima, Kenichi

    2006-10-01

    We show that diesel soot can be recycled as a carbon source for the synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The synthesis of SWNTs was carried out by the laser vaporization of diesel soot. The presence of SWNTs was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. SWNTs produced in this way should provide economic benefits and also contribute to a cleaner environment.

  16. Quantitative optical imaging of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Lihong H.

    The development and application of optical imaging tools and probing techniques have been the subject of exciting research. These tools and techniques allow for non-invasive, simple sample preparation and relatively fast measurement of electronic and optical properties. They also provided crucial information on optoelectronic device application and development. As the field of nanostructure research emerged, they were modified and employed to understand various properties of these structures at the diffraction limit of light. Carbon nanotubes, up to hundreds of micrometers long and several nanometers thin, are perfect for testing and demonstrating newly-developed optical measurement platforms for individual nanostructures, due to their heterogeneous nature. By employing two quantitative imaging techniques, wide-field on-chip Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy and spatial modulation confocal absorption microscopy, we investigate the optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes. These techniques allow us to obtain the Rayleigh scattering intensity, absolute absorption cross section, spatial resolution, and spectral information of single-walled carbon nanotubes. By probing the optical resonance of hundreds of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a single measurement, the first technique utilizes Rayleigh scattering mechanism to obtain the chirality of carbon nanotubes. The second technique, by using high numerical aperture oil immersion objective lenses, we measure the absolute absorption cross section of a single-walled carbon nanotube. Combining all the quantitative values obtained from these techniques, we observe various interesting and recently discovered physical behaviors, such as long range optical coupling and universal optical conductivity on resonance, and demonstrate the possibility of accurate quantitative absorption measurement for individual structures at nanometer scale.

  17. Dynamic terahertz polarization in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. L.; Parkinson, P.; Chuang, K.-C.; Johnston, M. B.; Nicholas, R. J.; Herz, L. M.

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated the anisotropic dynamic dielectric response of aligned and well-isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes using optical-pump terahertz (THz)-probe techniques. The polarization anisotropy measurements demonstrate that the THz radiation interacts only with radiation polarized parallel to the nanotubes which have been selectively excited by a polarized pump pulse thus allowing controlled THz polarization to be achieved from unaligned nanotubes.

  18. Reversible separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes in bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Sangeeta; Lastella, Sarah; Maranganti, Ravi; Sharma, Pradeep; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2008-08-25

    We show that electrostatic charging of nanotubes and the consequent repulsion can lead to reversible separation of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes in bundles. Low-energy electron beam irradiation leads to this completely reversible phenomenon. A simple semianalytical model is used to explain the observed separation mechanism. The reversibility of the separation process is attributed to discharging and thermal-fluctuation induced motion of the nanotubes in ambient air. Further, the separation impacts the electrical conductance of small nanotube bundled devices.

  19. Metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes for conductive nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fernando, K A Shiral; Lin, Yi; Meziani, Mohammed J; Veca, L Monica; Cao, Li; Zhang, Puyu; Kimani, Martin M; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2008-01-30

    This article reports an unambiguous demonstration that bulk-separated metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes offer superior performance (consistently and substantially better than the as-produced nanotube sample) in conductive composites with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and also in transparent conductive coatings based on PEDOT:PSS. The results serve as a validation on the widely held view that the carbon nanotubes are competitive in various technologies currently dominated by conductive inorganic materials (such as indium tin oxide). PMID:18173271

  20. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  1. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  2. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  3. Symmetry Properties of Single-Walled BC2N Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hui; Feng, Yuan Ping; Lin, Jainyi

    2009-06-01

    The symmetry properties of the single-walled BC2N nanotubes were investigated. All the BC2N nanotubes possess nonsymmorphic line groups. In contrast with the carbon and boron nitride nanotubes, armchair and zigzag BC2N nanotubes belong to different line groups, depending on the index n (even or odd) and the vector chosen. The number of Raman- active phonon modes is almost twice that of the infrared-active phonon modes for all kinds of BC2N nanotubes.

  4. Modified Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforce Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-COlon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    A significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the thermoplastic polyimide film was obtained by the addition of noncovalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Polyimide films were reinforced using pristine SWNTs and functionalized SWNTs (F-SWNTs). The tensile strengths of the polyimide films containing F-SWNTs were found to be approximately 1.4 times higher than those prepared from pristine SWNTs.

  5. Stamping single wall nanotubes for circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Viennot, J. J. Kontos, T.; Palomo, J.

    2014-03-17

    We report on a dry transfer technique for single wall carbon nanotube devices, which allows to embed them in high finesse microwave cavity. We demonstrate the ground state charge readout and a quality factor of about 3000 down to the single photon regime. This technique allows to make devices such as double quantum dots, which could be instrumental for achieving the strong spin photon coupling. It can easily be extended to generic carbon nanotube based microwave devices.

  6. Chromatographic size separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duesberg, G. S.; Muster, J.; Krstic, V.; Burghard, M.; Roth, S.

    The efficient purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. Carbon nanospheres, metal particles, and amorphous carbon could be successfully removed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) applied to surfactant stabilised dispersions of SWNT raw material. In addition, length separation of the tubes was achieved. The SWNTs obtained can be adsorbed in high densities onto chemically modified substrates. As determined by AFM investigations, the purified material consists of about equal fractions of both individual SWNTS and ropes of SWNTs.

  7. Selective uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes by circulating monocytes for enhanced tumour delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Rallapalli, Harikrishna; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Larson, Timothy; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-06-01

    In cancer imaging, nanoparticle biodistribution is typically visualized in living subjects using `bulk' imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography and whole-body fluorescence. Accordingly, nanoparticle influx is observed only macroscopically, and the mechanisms by which they target cancer remain elusive. Nanoparticles are assumed to accumulate via several targeting mechanisms, particularly extravasation (leakage into tumour). Here, we show that, in addition to conventional nanoparticle-uptake mechanisms, single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost exclusively taken up by a single immune cell subset, Ly-6Chi monocytes (almost 100% uptake in Ly-6Chi monocytes, below 3% in all other circulating cells), and delivered to the tumour in mice. We also demonstrate that a targeting ligand (RGD) conjugated to nanotubes significantly enhances the number of single-walled carbon nanotube-loaded monocytes reaching the tumour (P < 0.001, day 7 post-injection). The remarkable selectivity of this tumour-targeting mechanism demonstrates an advanced immune-based delivery strategy for enhancing specific tumour delivery with substantial penetration.

  8. Fabrication of Dense Horizontally Aligned Arrays of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Vertically Aligned Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xueshen; Li, Qunqing; Xie, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Zou, Yuan; Liu, Junku; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2011-01-01

    The as-grown vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) arrays are transferred from the original silicon substrate to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate, which acts as a stamp. Thin SWNT films can be applied from the stamp to the target substrate and subsequently treated by an ultrasonic process to reduce their thickness to 6.6 nm. The transferred SWNT thin film retains the advantageous super-alignment and high-density properties of the vertical SWNT arrays. The linear density, transmittance, and square resistance of the thin film are as high as 15 tubes per micrometer, 99% at 550 nm, and 16 kΩ, respectively.

  9. Robust cyclohexanone selective chemiresistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Kelvin M; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-08-01

    Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based chemiresistors are reported for a highly robust and sensitive gas sensor to selectively detect cyclohexanone, a target analyte for explosive detection. The trifunctional selector has three important properties: it noncovalently functionalizes SWCNTs with cofacial π-π interactions, it binds to cyclohexanone via hydrogen bond (mechanistic studies were investigated), and it improves the overall robustness of SWCNT-based chemiresistors (e.g., humidity and heat). Our sensors produced reversible and reproducible responses in less than 30 s to 10 ppm of cyclohexanone and displayed an average theoretical limit of detection (LOD) of 5 ppm. PMID:23886453

  10. Phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. I. Inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by exogenous phosphatidylserine and its efficient incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, M.; Kuge, O.; Akamatsu, Y.

    1986-05-05

    The effect of phosphatidylserine exogenously added to the medium on de novo biosynthesis of phosphatidylserine was investigated in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. When cells were cultured for several generations in medium supplemented with phosphatidylserine and /sup 32/Pi, the incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into cellular phosphatidylserine was remarkably inhibited, the degree of inhibition being dependent upon the concentration of added phosphatidylserine. /sup 32/Pi uptake into cellular phosphatidylethanolamine was also partly reduced by the addition of exogenous phosphatidylserine, consistent with the idea that phosphatidylethanolamine is biosynthesized via decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine. However, incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol was not significantly affected. In contrast, the addition of either phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylinositol to the medium did not inhibit endogenous biosynthesis of the corresponding phospholipid. Radiochemical and chemical analyses of the cellular phospholipid composition revealed that phosphatidylserine in cells grown with 80 microM phosphatidylserine was almost entirely derived from the added phospholipid. Phosphatidylserine uptake was also directly determined by using (/sup 3/H)serine-labeled phospholipid. Pulse and pulse-chase experiments with L-(U-/sup 14/C) serine showed that when cells were cultured with 80 microM phosphatidylserine, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylserine was reduced 3-5-fold. Enzyme assaying of extracts prepared from cells grown with and without phosphatidylserine indicated that the inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by the added phosphatidylserine appeared not to be caused by a reduction in the level of the enzyme involved in the base-exchange reaction between phospholipids and serine.

  11. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  12. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  13. Single Wall Nanotube Type-Specific Functionalization and Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter; Nikolaev, Pavel; Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes were selectively solubilized in THF and separated from semiconducting nanotubes. Once separated, the functionalized metallic tubes were de-functionalized to restore their metallic band structure. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy of the enriched samples support conclusions of the enrichment of nanotube samples by metallic type. A scalable method for enriching nanotube conductive type has been developed. Raman and UV-Vis data indicate SWCNT reaction with dodecylbenzenediazonium results in metallic enrichment. It is expected that further refinement of this techniques will lead to more dramatic separations of types and diameters.

  14. Phonon Density of States of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rols, S.; Benes, Z.; Anglaret, E.; Sauvajol, J. L.; Papanek, P.; Fischer, J. E.; Coddens, G.; Schober, H.; Dianoux, A. J.

    2000-12-11

    The vibrational density of states of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) was obtained from inelastic neutron scattering data from 0 to 225meV. The spectrum is similar to that of graphite above 40meV, while intratube features are clearly observed at 22 and 36meV. An unusual energy dependence below 10meV is assigned to contributions from intertube modes in the 2D triangular lattice of SWNT bundles, and from intertube coupling to intratube excitations. Good agreement between experiment and a calculated density of states for the SWNT lattice is found over the entire energy range.

  15. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  16. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/PMMA Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangming; Fisher, John; Winey, Karen

    2003-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have demonstrated unique mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Similar properties are expected for polymer/SWNT nanocomposites. A new processing method has been used to produce PMMA/SWNT composites, which provides better dispersion of SWNT in the polymer matrix. Optical microscopy of the samples show improved dispersion of SWNT in the PMMA matrix, which is the key factor of the composite performance. Aligned and unaligned composite samples have been made for both purified SWNT and functionalized SWNT with different SWNT loadings. The tensile, thermal conductivity, and electroconductivity measurements of these samples will be performed.

  17. Optical Characterization and Applications of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael S.

    2005-03-01

    Recent advances in the dispersion and separation of single walled carbon nanotubes have led to new methods of optical characterization and some novel applications. We find that Raman spectroscopy can be used to probe the aggregation state of single-walled carbon nanotubes in solution or as solids with a range of varying morphologies. Carbon nanotubes experience an orthogonal electronic dispersion when in electrical contact that broadens (from 40 meV to roughly 80 meV) and shifts the interband transition to lower energy (by 60 meV). We show that the magnitude of this shift is dependent on the extent of bundle organization and the inter-nanotube contact area. In the Raman spectrum, aggregation shifts the effective excitation profile and causes peaks to increase or decrease, depending on where the transition lies, relative to the excitation wavelength. The findings are particularly relevant for evaluating nanotube separation processes, where relative peak changes in the Raman spectrum can be confused for selective enrichment. We have also used gel electrophoresis and column chromatography conducted on individually dispersed, ultrasonicated single-walled carbon nanotubes to yield simultaneous separation by tube length and diameter. Electroelution after electrophoresis is shown to produce highly resolved fractions of nanotubes with average lengths between 92 and 435 nm. Separation by diameter is concomitant with length fractionation, and nanotubes that have been cut shortest also possess the greatest relative enrichments of large-diameter species. The relative quantum yield decreases nonlinearly as the nanotube length becomes shorter. These findings enable new applications of nanotubes as sensors and biomarkers. Particularly, molecular detection using near infrared (n-IR) light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole blood media. Carbon nanotubes

  18. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. Individual single-wall carbon nanotubes as quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tans, Sander J.; Devoret, Michel H.; Dai, Hongjie; Thess, Andreas; Smalley, Richard E.; Geerligs, L. J.; Dekker, Cees

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been regarded since their discovery1 as potential molecular quantum wires. In the case of multi-wall nanotubes, where many tubes are arranged in a coaxial fashion, the electrical properties of individual tubes have been shown to vary strongly from tube to tube2,3, and to be characterized by disorder and localization4. Single-wall nanotubes5,6 (SWNTs) have recently been obtained with high yields and structural uniformity7. Particular varieties of these highly symmetric structures have been predicted to be metallic, with electrical conduction occurring through only two electronic modes8-10. Because of the structural symmetry and stiffness of SWNTs, their molecular wavefunctions may extend over the entire tube. Here we report electrical transport measurements on individual single-wall nanotubes that confirm these theoretical predictions. We find that SWNTs indeed act as genuine quantum wires. Electrical conduction seems to occur through well separated, discrete electron states that are quantum-mechanically coherent over long distance, that is at least from contact to contact (140nm). Data in a magnetic field indicate shifting of these states due to the Zeeman effect.

  3. Structure-Controlled Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) present structure-determined outstanding properties and SWNTs with a single (n, m) type are needed in many advanced applications. However, the chirality-specific growth of SWNTs is always a great challenge. Carbon nanotubes and their caps or catalysts can all act as the structural templates to guide the formation of SWNTs with a specified chirality. SWNT growth via a catalyzed chemical vapor deposition CVD process is normally more efficient and therefore of great interest. We developed a new family of catalyst, tungsten-based intermetallic nanocrystals, to grow SWNTs with specified chiral structures. Such intermetallic nanocrystals present unique structure and atomic arrangements, which are distinctly different from the normal alloy nanoparticles or simple metal nanocrystals, therefore can act as the template to grow SWNTs with designed (n, m) structures. Using W6Co7 catalysts, we realized the selective growth of (12, 6), (16, 0), (14, 4) and other chiralities. By the cooperation of thermodynamic and kinetic factors, SWNTs with high chirality purity can be obtained. . Structure-Controlled Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

  4. General synthesis of inorganic single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Peng-Peng; He, Jie; Wang, Xun

    2015-10-01

    The single-walled nanotube (SWNT) is an interesting nanostructure for fundamental research and potential applications. However, very few inorganic SWNTs are available to date due to the lack of efficient fabrication methods. Here we synthesize four types of SWNT: sulfide; hydroxide; phosphate; and polyoxometalate. Each type of SWNT possesses essentially uniform diameters. Detailed studies illustrate that the formation of SWNTs is initiated by the self-coiling of the corresponding ultrathin nanostructure embryo/building blocks on the base of weak interactions between them, which is not limited to specific compounds or crystal structures. The interactions between building blocks can be modulated by varying the solvents used, thus multi-walled tubes can also be obtained. Our results reveal that the generalized synthesis of inorganic SWNTs can be achieved by the self-coiling of ultrathin building blocks under the proper weak interactions.

  5. General synthesis of inorganic single-walled nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Peng-peng; He, Jie; Wang, Xun

    2015-01-01

    The single-walled nanotube (SWNT) is an interesting nanostructure for fundamental research and potential applications. However, very few inorganic SWNTs are available to date due to the lack of efficient fabrication methods. Here we synthesize four types of SWNT: sulfide; hydroxide; phosphate; and polyoxometalate. Each type of SWNT possesses essentially uniform diameters. Detailed studies illustrate that the formation of SWNTs is initiated by the self-coiling of the corresponding ultrathin nanostructure embryo/building blocks on the base of weak interactions between them, which is not limited to specific compounds or crystal structures. The interactions between building blocks can be modulated by varying the solvents used, thus multi-walled tubes can also be obtained. Our results reveal that the generalized synthesis of inorganic SWNTs can be achieved by the self-coiling of ultrathin building blocks under the proper weak interactions. PMID:26510862

  6. General synthesis of inorganic single-walled nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Peng-peng; He, Jie; Wang, Xun

    2015-01-01

    The single-walled nanotube (SWNT) is an interesting nanostructure for fundamental research and potential applications. However, very few inorganic SWNTs are available to date due to the lack of efficient fabrication methods. Here we synthesize four types of SWNT: sulfide; hydroxide; phosphate; and polyoxometalate. Each type of SWNT possesses essentially uniform diameters. Detailed studies illustrate that the formation of SWNTs is initiated by the self-coiling of the corresponding ultrathin nanostructure embryo/building blocks on the base of weak interactions between them, which is not limited to specific compounds or crystal structures. The interactions between building blocks can be modulated by varying the solvents used, thus multi-walled tubes can also be obtained. Our results reveal that the generalized synthesis of inorganic SWNTs can be achieved by the self-coiling of ultrathin building blocks under the proper weak interactions. PMID:26510862

  7. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  8. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-07-31

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an {approx}1 {mu}m film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film ({approx}7 {mu}m) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35{+-}3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes as Transparent Electrodes for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, C.; Peltola, J.; Levitsky, I.; Glatkowski, P.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Rumbles, G.; Barnes, T.; Coutts, T.

    2006-01-01

    Transparent and electrically conductive coatings and films have a variety of uses in the fast-growing field of optoelectronic applications. Transparent electrodes typically include semiconductive metal oxides such as indium tin oxide (ITO), and conducting polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), doped and stabilized with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). In recent years, Eikos, Inc. has conceived and developed technologies to deliver novel alternatives using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). These technologies offer products having a broad range of conductivity, excellent transparency, neutral color tone, good adhesion, abrasion resistance as well as mechanical robustness. Additional benefits include ease of ambient processing and patterning capability. This paper reports our recent findings on achieving 2.6% and 1.4% efficiencies on nonoptimized organic photovoltaic cells employing SWNT as a transparent electrode.

  10. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Armchair Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroz, Erik; Rice, William; Lu, Benjamin; Hauge, Robert; Magana, Donny; Doorn, Stephen; Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram; Kono, Junichiro

    2009-03-01

    We performed resonance Raman spectroscopy studies of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), including armchair SWNTs from (6,6) through (10,10). The measurements were carried out with excitation of 440-850 nm on aqueous ensemble samples of SWNTs enriched in metallic species. From this, we generated Raman excitation profiles (REPs) of the radial breathing mode and compare the REPs of armchairs and other metallic species. Additionally, we measured REPs of the G-band mode and observed how the Breit-Wigner-Fano line shape of the G^- peak evolves in peak position, width and intensity relative to the G^+ peak as different metallic nanotubes are excited. By combining these studies with absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy studies, we present a comprehensive examination of the optical signatures of metallic SWNTs.

  11. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R.; Nanney, Warren A.; A. Maddux, Cassandra J.; Martínez, Hernán L.

    2014-01-01

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  12. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R. Nanney, Warren A.; Maddux, Cassandra J.A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Malone, Marvin A.; Coe, James V.

    2014-12-15

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  13. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R.; Malone, Marvin A.; Nanney, Warren A.; A. Maddux, Cassandra J.; Coe, James V.; Martínez, Hernán L.

    2014-12-01

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  14. Finely dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes for polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang Yu; Chen, Hailan; Li, Peng; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-09-26

    Here we demonstrate a polysaccharide hydrogel reinforced with finely dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using biocompatible dispersants O-carboxymethylchitosan (OC) and chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A) as a structural support. Both of the dispersants can disperse SWNTs in aqueous solutions and hydrogel matrix as individual tubes or small bundles. Additionally, we have found that compressive modulus and strain of the hydrogels reinforced with SWNTs were enhanced as much as two times by the addition of a few weight percent of SWNTs. Moreover, the SWNT-incorporated hydrogels exhibited lower impedance and higher charge capacity than the alginate/dispersant hydrogel without SWNTs. The OC and the CS-A demonstrated much higher reinforcing enhancement than a commercially available dispersant, sodium dodecyl sulfate. Combined with the experimental data on the mechanical and electrical properties, the biocompatibility of OC and CS-A can provide the possibility of biomedical application of the SWNT-reinforced hydrogels. PMID:22909447

  15. Diameter-dependent solubility of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Duque, Juan G; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Behabtu, Natnael; Green, Micah J; Higginbotham, Amanda L; Price, B Katherine; Leonard, Ashley D; Schmidt, Howard K; Lounis, Brahim; Tour, James M; Doorn, Stephen K; Cognet, Laurent; Pasquali, Matteo

    2010-06-22

    We study the solubility and dispersibility of as-produced and purified HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Variation in specific operating conditions of the HiPco process are found to lead to significant differences in the respective SWNT solubilities in oleum and surfactant suspensions. The diameter distributions of SWNTs dispersed in surfactant solutions are batch-dependent, as evidenced by luminescence and Raman spectroscopies, but are identical for metallic and semiconducting SWNTs within a batch. We thus find that small diameter SWNTs disperse at higher concentration in aqueous surfactants and dissolve at higher concentration in oleum than do large-diameter SWNTs. These results highlight the importance of controlling SWNT synthesis methods in order to optimize processes dependent on solubility, including macroscopic processing such as fiber spinning, material reinforcement, and films production, as well as for fundamental research in type selective chemistry, optoelectronics, and nanophotonics. PMID:20521799

  16. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  17. The electrochemical properties of bundles of single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Haridoss, P.; Uribe, F.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors studied electrochemical properties of single-walled fullerene nanotube bundles. The materials exhibited a highly anisotropic conductivity. Electrochemical cycling in solutions of alkyl ammonium salts in propylene carbonate revealed that the nanotubes are stable to at least {+-}1.5 V and have a fairly high accessible surface area. Double-layer charging currents of approximately 30 farads per gram were observed. This is on the same order of magnitude, though somewhat lower, than state-of-the-art values for ultra-capacitor materials. Electrochemical insertion of lithium was attempted. Though several features were observed in a slow cyclic voltammetric scan, these features were not reversible, indicating little reversible insertion. Several possible reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  18. Magnetic Fractionation and Alignment of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Yodh, A. G.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We study mechanisms of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) alignment in a magnetic field. Through magnetic fractionation, we create SWNT suspensions with varying quantities of magnetic catalyst particles. The degree of tube alignment in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla is quantified using polarized optical absorbance anisotropy. Continuous measurements of the nematic order parameter of these suspensions in variable magnetic fields provides a way to identify the origin of magnetic torques giving rise to nanotube alignment. Initial data suggests a transition from catalyst-driven to nanotube-anisotropy driven orientation as the catalyst fraction is reduced. We relate these results to observations of nanotube aggregation. This work has been supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  19. Single Wall Carbon Nano Tube Films and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, T. V.; Kumar, Satish; Ericson, Lars M.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-03-01

    Purified single wall carbon nano tubes (SWNTs) produced from the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPCO) process have been dissolved /dispersed in oleum. These solutions /dispersions were optically homogeneous and have been used to form stand-alone SWNT films. The washed, dried, and heat-treated films are isotropic. The scanning electron micrographs of the film surface shows that the nanotube ropes (or fibrils) of about 20 nm diameters are arranged just like macroscopic fibers in a non-woven fabric. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of the SWNT film confirms the isotropic nature of these films. The films are being characterized for their thermal, mechanical as well electrical properties. Thin nano tube coatings, including optically transparent coatings, have also been made on a variety of substrates such as glass, polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, silicon wafer, as well as stainless steel.

  20. Phonon sidebands of photoluminescence in single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guili; Liang, Qifeng; Jia, Yonglei; Dong, Jinming

    2010-01-01

    The multiphonon-assisted photoluminescence (PL) of the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied by solving the Schrödinger equation, showing a set of phonon sidebands, both the Stokes and anti-Stokes lines, which are induced by the longitudinal optical phonon and radial breathing mode phonon. All the calculated results are in a good agreement with the recent experimental PL spectra of the SWNTs [F. Plentz, H. B. Ribeiro, A. Jorio, M. S. Strano, and M. A. Pimenta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 247401 (2005)] and J. Lefebvre and P. Finnie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167406 (2007)]. In addition, it is very interesting to find in the calculated PL several additional phonon sidebands with rather weak intensities, which are caused by the exciton's coupling with two kinds of phonons, and expected to be observed in future experiments.

  1. Selective bundling of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Blum, Carolin; Stürzl, Ninette; Hennrich, Frank; Lebedkin, Sergei; Heeg, Sebastian; Dumlich, Heiko; Reich, Stephanie; Kappes, Manfred M

    2011-04-26

    A simple, high throughput fractionation procedure for aqueous/SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is presented, which yields thin bundles of semiconducting-SWNTs with small chiral angles. To demonstrate this we show the photoluminescence signatures of nanotube suspensions that contain almost exclusively zigzag and near-zigzag tubes. Starting suspensions and resulting fractions were characterized using optical absorption, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies as well as scanning force microscopy. Taken together with literature observations, our findings suggest that near zigzag edge tubes of similar diameters in a bundle are harder to separate from each other than for other chiral index combinations. We discuss the implications of these observations for SWNT growth and dispersion. PMID:21410134

  2. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  3. Characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes for environmental implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption capacities of N2 and various organic vapors (methyl-ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, and cyclohexane) on select electric-arc and HiPco produced single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were measured at 77 and 298 K, respectively. The amount of N2 adsorbed on a SWNT sample depended on the sample purity, methodology, and on the sample age. Adsorption capacities of organic vapors (100-1000 ppm vol) on SWNT in humid conditions were much higher than those for microporous activated carbons. These results established a foundation for additional studies related to potential environmental applications of SWNT. The MEK adsorption capacities of samples EA95 and CVD80 and mesoporous tire-derived activated carbon in humid conditions were lower than in dry conditions. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting (Austin, TX 11/7-12/2004).

  4. Charge-induced strains in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yu; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2006-09-28

    This paper investigates the electromechanical coupling in single-walled carbon nanotubes. In the model system, the extra electric charge of the nanotube is assumed to be uniformly distributed on carbon atoms. The electrostatic interactions between charged carbon atoms are calculated using the Coulomb law. The deformation of the charged nanotube is obtained by using the molecular structural mechanics method and considering the electrostatic interactions as an external loading acting on carbon atoms. The axial strain is found to be a symmetric function of applied charge, and our predictions are in very good agreement with those from ab initio calculations. The present results indicate that the nanotube aspect ratio has a strong effect on the axial strain when the ratio is less than 10 and the general trend is that the strain increases with the aspect ratio. The peak axial and radial strains occur at nanotube diameters of around 1.2-1.5 nm. PMID:21727586

  5. Shaping single walled nanotubes with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zobelli, A.; Gloter, A.; Colliex, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2008-01-15

    We show that electron irradiation in a dedicated scanning transmission microscope can be used as a nano-electron-lithography technique allowing the controlled reshaping of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. The required irradiation conditions have been optimized on the basis of total knock-on cross sections calculated within density functional based methods. It is then possible to induce morphological modifications, such as a local change of the tube chirality, by sequentially removing several tens of atoms with a nanometrical spatial resolution. We show that electron beam heating effects are limited. Thus, electron beam induced vacancy migration and nucleation might be excluded. These irradiation techniques could open new opportunities for nanoengineering a large variety of nanostructured materials.

  6. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  7. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Smits, Jan M.; Williams, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.

  8. Single wall carbon nanotubes: Separation and applications to biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Nyon

    Single wall carbon nanotubes uniquely exhibit one-dimensional quantum confined properties by being either semiconducting (sem-) or metallic (met-) depending on their atomic arrangements. The stochastic nature of SWNT growth renders met-:sem- ratio being 1:2 and diameter range being distributed in 0.4-2nm with a close-packed bundle configuration. For many high-performance devices using SWNTs, acquiring well-separated and/or isolated single-diameter, metallicity and/or chirality nanotubes is greatly in demand. Recently, the bulk separation and/or enrichment of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) according to type (or otherwise termed "metallicity") and diameter (dt) has become possible. This thesis presents a route to probe mechanisms in diameter and metallicity dependent separation of SWNTs. A systematic analysis tool, that enables the quantitative examination of resonance Raman spectra, is established from nanotube samples that have been separated according to metallicity and d t via an octadecylamine mediated protocol. This protocol uses the relative changes in the integrated intensities of the radial-breathing mode region for the quantitative evaluation. By further establishing the physicochemical properties of charge-stabilized SWNT dispersions in polar aprotic media (i.e. N,N-dimethylformide) a more detailed description of the underlying separation mechanism is given. Here, I use resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) as a tool to probe SWNT redox chemistry. The Gibbs free energy, modeled by calculating the charge-loss from the (n,m)-dependent integrated density of states across the corresponding jump in the redox potential, is utilized to support the separation mechanism. Additionally, the evaluation of SWNT forest platforms for amperometric protein immunoassays is presented. Horseradish peroxidase is used as the label and the sensing signals are acquired from electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Specific studies on human serum albumin and prostate

  9. Extracellular entrapment and degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrera, Consol; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Lazzaretto, Beatrice; Andón, Fernando T.; Hultenby, Kjell; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials.Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Suppl. Fig. 1 - length distribution of SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 2 - characterization of pristine vs. oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 3 - endotoxin evaluation; suppl. Fig. 4 - NET characterization; suppl. Fig. 5 - UV-Vis/NIR analysis of biodegradation of oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 6 - cytotoxicity of partially degraded SWCNTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06047k

  10. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  11. Uptake of poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes and decline of functions in mouse NK cells undergoing activation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Anwar; Puri, Niti; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNT) with NK cells undergoing activation was examined. Exposure to AF-SWCNT during NK activation in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2, and in vivo by Poly(I:C) significantly lowered cytotoxic activity generated against YAC-1 tumor cells. Recoveries of spleen NK1.1(+) cells as well as the activated subset of NK cells (NK1.1(+)CD69(+) cells) were significantly reduced by the AF-SWCNT exposure. The proportion of apoptotic NK cells (NK1.1(+) phosphatidylserine(+)) in the spleen cell preparations activated in vitro was also significantly elevated. Expression levels of CD107a [for assessing NK cell degranulation] as well as of FasL marker [mediating non-secretory pathway of NK cell killing] were significantly lower in cells exposed to AF-SWCNT during the activation phase. Intracellular levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the cells were also significantly reduced. Fluorescent AF-SWCNT (FAF-SWCNT) were internalized by the NK cells and uptake was significantly greater in activated cells. Confocal microscopy indicated the internalized FAF-SWCNT were localized to the cytoplasm of the NK cells. These results indicated that AF-SWCNT were internalized by NK cells and caused a general down-regulation of a variety of parameters associated with NK cell cytotoxicity and other cellular functions. PMID:27416475

  12. Electrochemical Redox Switchable Dispersion of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Water.

    PubMed

    Feng, Anchao; Peng, Liao; Liu, Bowen; Liu, Senyang; Wang, Shanfeng; Yuan, Jinying

    2016-05-01

    We present a new, efficient approach to achieve superior dispersibility of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water by integrating reversible host-guest interaction and π-π stacking. In this approach, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was first modified with a pyrene group to be adsorbed onto the wall of pristine SWNTs via π-π stacking, followed by further functionalization with ferrocene (Fc)-terminated water-soluble poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) through supramolecular host-guest interaction between β-CD and Fc. Upon alternate electrochemical oxidative/reductive stimuli, the reversible host-guest pair enabled the PEG-Fc@Py-CD@SWNTs to exhibit switchable conversion between dispersion and aggregation states. Electric field controllable PEG-Fc@Py-CD@SWNTs with good reversibility and intact nanotube structure may find potential applications in selective screening of SWNTs, biosensors, and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27025460

  13. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and peapods investigated by EPR.

    PubMed

    Corzilius, B; Dinse, K-P; Hata, K

    2007-12-14

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) prepared by the "super growth" method developed recently exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals, which can be attributed to itinerant spins. EPR results indicate very low defect and catalyst concentrations in this superior material. Under these conditions EPR can be used to study details of charge transport properties over a wide temperature range, although the material is still very "heterogeneous" with respect to tube diameter and chirality. Non-resonant microwave absorption in the temperature range below 20 K is indicative for the opening of a small gap at the Fermi energy for tubes of metallic character, which is indicative for a transition into a superconducting state. Using SWNT filled partially with an endohedral spin probe like N@C(60), such "peapods" can be investigated "from the inside". Continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed EPR was used to investigate localization dynamics within the tubes or to check for interaction with itinerant electrons. Using SWNT grown by different methods, the dominant influence of tube diameter on fullerene dynamics was revealed by temperature dependent pulsed EPR experiments. These differences can be correlated with the interactions between the endohedral observer spin and spins on the SWNT. PMID:18167581

  14. Low-temperature growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-M.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, X.; Teo, K. B. K.; Gangloff, L.; Milne, W. I.; Wu, J.; Eastman, M.; Jiao, J.

    2007-12-01

    The low-temperature synthesis (450-560 °C) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on a triple-layered catalyst, Al/Fe/Mo, was performed using aromatic hydrocarbon radicals which were produced from the pyrolysis of C2H2. Two approaches were used; in the first, these hydrocarbon radicals were produced using a high-temperature heater (830 °C), but the substrate where the SWCNTs were grown was placed on a thermal insulator above it such that the substrate was at a much lower temperature. In the second approach, a heated nozzle system operating at 830 °C was used to introduce the hydrocarbon radicals onto the substrate which was located a few centimetres below it. Both these approaches rely on the thermal dissociation and recombination of C2H2 for the formation of complex high-order radicals, i.e. C6H9, C5H9, C6H13, whose presence was confirmed by in situ mass spectroscopy. The density of SWCNTs deposited could be correlated directly with the concentration of these precursors.

  15. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p < 0.05) among all composites. Gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteopontin, Runx-2, and Bone Sialoprotein was observed on all composites. In conclusion, SWCNT/PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications. PMID:23629922

  16. Hypergolic fuel detection using individual single walled carbon nanotube networks

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, S. C.; Willitsford, A. H.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.; Tian, W. Q.

    2010-06-15

    Accurate and reliable detection of hypergolic fuels such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and its derivatives is vital to missile defense, aviation, homeland security, and the chemical industry. More importantly these sensors need to be capable of operation at low temperatures (below room temperature) as most of the widely used chemical sensors operate at high temperatures (above 300 deg. C). In this research a simple and highly sensitive single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network sensor was developed for real time monitoring of hydrazine leaks to concentrations at parts per million levels. Upon exposure to hydrazine vapor, the resistance of the air exposed nanotubes (p-type) is observed to increase rapidly while that of the vacuum-degassed nanotubes (n-type) is observed to decrease. It was found that the resistance of the sample can be recovered through vacuum pumping and exposure to ultraviolet light. The experimental results support the electrochemical charge transfer mechanism between the oxygen redox couple of the ambient and the Fermi level of the SWNT. Theoretical results of the hydrazine-SWNT interaction are compared with the experimental observations. It was found that a monolayer of water molecules on the SWNT is necessary to induce strong interactions between hydrazine and the SWNT by way of introducing new occupied states near the bottom of the conduction band of the SWNT.

  17. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-08-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 104–108 for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs.

  18. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  19. Endohedral Volume Control for Improved Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Jochen; Fagan, Jeffrey

    Liquid-phase processing of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) generally results in the exposure of their core volumes to the environment (opening) due to energy input necessary for purification and solubilization. For aqueous processing this results in SWCNTs routinely getting filled with water, which is detrimental to several properties. Importantly, water filling leads to significant redshifts to, and inhomogeneous broadening of, the electronic transitions of the SWCNTs, as well as a substantial decrease to their fluorescence quantum efficiency. Selection of (remaining) empty (end-capped) SWCNTs to avoid these adverse effects is possible by means of ultracentrifugation, but is a natively low yield process. In this work, SWCNTs are prefilled with linear alkanes or similar organic compounds, serving as a passive, highly homogeneous spacer, blocking the ingestion of water and hence preventing the detrimental consequences. Moreover, the low dielectric nature of the alkane core only weakly affects the local electronic wavefunction of the SWCNTs, effectively simulating empty core conditions and hence yielding much more resolved optical spectra with blue shifted peak positions compared to water filled SWCNTs. It is demonstrated that a wide variety of linear as well as cyclic alkanes can be applied for this purpose, in combination with various SWCNT materials.

  20. Optical properties of armchair (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gharbavi, K.; Badehian, H.

    2015-07-15

    Full potential linearized augmented plane waves method with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential was applied to calculate the optical properties of (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes. The both x and z directions of the incident photons were applied to estimate optical gaps, dielectric function, electron energy loss spectroscopies, optical conductivity, optical extinction, optical refractive index and optical absorption coefficient. The results predict that dielectric function, ε (ω), is anisotropic since it has higher peaks along z-direction than x-direction. The static optical refractive constant were calculated about 1.4 (z-direction) and 1.1 (x- direction). Moreover, the electron energy loss spectroscopy showed a sharp π electron plasmon peaks at about 6 eV and 5 eV for z and x-directions respectively. The calculated reflection spectra show that directions perpendicular to the tube axis have further optical reflection. Moreover, z-direction indicates higher peaks at absorption spectra in low range energies. Totally, increasing the diameter of armchair carbon nanotubes cause the optical band gap, static optical refractive constant and optical reflectivity to decrease. On the other hand, increasing the diameter cause the optical absorption and the optical conductivity to increase. Moreover, the sharp peaks being illustrated at optical spectrum are related to the 1D structure of CNTs which confirm the accuracy of the calculations.

  1. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Eosinophil Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Andón, Fernando T.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Feng, Weihong; Baygan, Arjang; Chambers, Benedict J.; Hultenby, Kjell; Ye, Fei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Brandner, Birgit D.; Fornara, Andrea; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the major oxidant-producing enzymes during inflammatory states in the human lung. The degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) upon incubation with human EPO and H2O2 is reported. Biodegradation of SWCNTs is higher in the presence of NaBr, but neither EPO alone nor H2O2 alone caused the degradation of nanotubes. Molecular modeling reveals two binding sites for SWCNTs on EPO, one located at the proximal side (same side as the catalytic site) and the other on the distal side of EPO. The oxidized groups on SWCNTs in both cases are stabilized by electrostatic interactions with positively charged residues. Biodegradation of SWCNTs can also be executed in an ex vivo culture system using primary murine eosinophils stimulated to undergo degranulation. Biodegradation is proven by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible-NIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal Raman imaging. Thus, human EPO (in vitro) and ex vivo activated eosinophils mediate biodegradation of SWCNTs: an observation that is relevant to pulmonary responses to these materials. PMID:23447468

  2. Buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes using two criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shakti S.; Agrawal, Pranav; Batra, Romesh C.

    2016-06-01

    We use molecular mechanics simulations with the MM3 potential to study instabilities in clamped-clamped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deformed in torsion and axial compression. The following are the two criteria employed to find the critical buckling strain: (i) a sudden drop in the potential energy and (ii) an eigenvalue of the mass weighted Hessian of the deformed configuration becoming zero. The instability under axial compression is investigated for zigzag and armchair SWCNTs, and that under torsional deformations is also studied for chiral tubes. In general, values of critical strains from the 2nd criterion are found to be substantially less than those from the 1st criterion. For chiral SWCNTs, the critical strains from the 2nd criterion and the potential energies at the onset of instability markedly depend upon the twisting direction. Values of buckling strains predicted from the column and the shell buckling theories are found to agree well with those obtained using the 2nd criterion.

  3. Bulk Mechanical Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Landi, Brian; Cress, Cory; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    The unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them especially well suited for use as electrodes in power devices such as lithium ion batteries, hydrogen fuel cells, solar cells, and supercapacitors. The performances of such devices are expected to be influenced, at least in part, by the mechanical properties of the SWNTs used in composites or in stand alone ``papers.'' Therefore, the elastic moduli and ultimate tensile strengths of SWNT papers were measured as functions of temperature, SWNT purity, SWNT length, and SWNT bundling. The SWNTs used to produce the papers were synthesized in an alexandrite laser vaporization reactor at 1100^oC and purified using conventional acid-reflux conditions. Characterization of the SWNTs was performed using SEM, BET, TGA, and optical and Raman spectroscopy. The purified material was filtered and dried to yield papers of bundled SWNTs which were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was observed that the mechanical properties of acid-refluxed SWNT papers were significantly improved by controlled thermal oxidation and strain-hardening. Elastic moduli of SWNT papers were measured between 3 and 6 GPa. Ultimate (breaking) tensile stresses were measured between 45 and 90 MPa at 1-3% strain. These results and their implications in regard to potential applications in power devices will be discussed.

  4. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Kumta, Prashant; Maranchi, Jeff; Heben, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In recent experiments, highly purified batches of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown promise as superior alternatives to the graphitic carbon-black anode materials heretofore used in rechargeable thin-film lithium power cells. The basic idea underlying the experiments is that relative to a given mass of graphitic carbon-black anode material, an equal mass of SWCNTs can be expected to have greater lithium-storage and charge/discharge capacities. The reason for this expectation is that whereas the microstructure and nanostructure of a graphitic carbon black is such as to make most of the interior of the material inaccessible for intercalation of lithium, a batch of SWCNTs can be made to have a much more open microstructure and nanostructure, such that most of the interior of the material is accessible for intercalation of lithium. Moreover, the greater accessibility of SWCNT structures can be expected to translate to greater mobilities for ion-exchange processes and, hence, an ability to sustain greater charge and discharge current densities.

  5. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits. PMID:26807948

  6. Fabrication of stretchable single-walled carbon nanotube logic devices.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jangyeol; Shin, Gunchul; Kim, Joonsung; Moon, Young Sun; Lee, Seung-Jung; Zi, Goangseup; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2014-07-23

    The fabrication of a stretchable single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) inverter array and ring oscillators is reported. The SWCNT CMOS inverter exhibits static voltage transfer characteristics with a maximum gain of 8.9 at a supply voltage of 5 V. The fabricated devices show stable electrical performance under the maximum strain of 30% via forming wavy configurations. In addition, the 3-stage ring oscillator demonstrates a stable oscillator frequency of ∼3.5 kHz at a supply voltage of 10 V and the oscillating waveforms are maintained without any distortion under cycles of pre-strain and release. The strains applied to the device upon deformation are also analyzed by using the classical lamination theory, estimating the local strain of less than 0.6% in the SWCNT channel and Pd electrode regions which is small enough to keep the device performance stable under the pre-strain up to 30%. This work demonstrates the potential application of stretchable SWCNT logic circuit devices in future wearable electronics. PMID:24700788

  7. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 10(4)-10(8) for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs. PMID:27476909

  8. Coarse-grained potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Wanlin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-11-01

    We develop the coarse-grained (CG) potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in CNT bundles and buckypaper for the study of the static and dynamic behaviors. The explicit expressions of the CG stretching, bending and torsion potentials for the nanotubes are obtained by the stick-spiral and the beam models, respectively. The non-bonded CG potentials between two different CG beads are derived from analytical results based on the cohesive energy between two parallel and crossing SWCNTs from the van der Waals interactions. We show that the CG model is applicable to large deformations of complex CNT systems by combining the bonded potentials with non-bonded potentials. Checking against full atom molecular dynamics calculations and our analytical results shows that the present CG potentials have high accuracy. The established CG potentials are used to study the mechanical properties of the CNT bundles and buckypaper efficiently at minor computational cost, which shows great potential for the design of micro- and nanomechanical devices and systems.

  9. Reinforced thermoplastic polyimide with dispersed functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lebrón-Colón, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A; Gaier, James R; Solá, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A; McCorkle, Linda S

    2010-03-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4-N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the T(g) of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 degrees C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(-4) Scm(-1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed. PMID:20356267

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube based molecular switch tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Michael R; Steuerman, David W; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Vignon, Scott A; Star, Alexander; Celestre, Paul C; Stoddart, J Fraser; Heath, James R

    2003-12-15

    This article describes two-terminal molecular switch tunnel junctions (MSTJs) which incorporate a semiconducting, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) as the bottom electrode. The nanotube interacts noncovalently with a monolayer of bistable, nondegenerate [2]catenane tetracations, self-organized by their supporting amphiphilic dimyristoylphosphatidyl anions which shield the mechanically switchable tetracations from a two-micrometer wide metallic top electrode. The resulting 0.002 micron 2 area tunnel junction addresses a nanometer wide row of approximately 2000 molecules. Active and remnant current-voltage measurements demonstrated that these devices can be reconfigurably switched and repeatedly cycled between high and low current states under ambient conditions. Control compounds, including a degenerate [2]catenane, were explored in support of the mechanical origin of the switching signature. These SWNT-based MSTJs operate like previously reported silicon-based MSTJs, but differently from similar devices incorporating bottom metal electrodes. The relevance of these results with respect to the choice of electrode materials for molecular electronics devices is discussed. PMID:14714382

  11. Methane storage on aluminum-doped single wall BNNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Khaled; Salabat, Kobra; Seif, Abdolvahab

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption of methane (CH4) on inside and outside of aluminum-doped (Al-doped) zigzag single-walled boron nitride nanotubes, BNNTs/Al, has been studied using density-functional theory (DFT) method. The effect of diameter and type of atom of BNNT replaced by the Al atom on the adsorption properties of CH4 were investigated. Our results indicate that, compared to pristine BNNTs, replacing both B atom by Al, BNNT/Al(B) and N atom by Al, BNNT/Al(N), can notably enhance the binding energy of CH4 on BNNTs and the latter case has been more superior. The average binding energy for the most stable configuration of CH4 on BNNTs/Al(N) and BNNTs/Al(B) are about -26.12 and -16.53 kJ mol-1, respectively, which are typical for the physisorption and suitable for technical applications. The results show that while the geometry of BNNT/Al(N or B)-CH4 complexes is determined by weak electrostatic forces, the binding energy mainly determines by dispersion forces. For all complexes, the energy gaps, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, dipole moments, natural charge and density of state (DOS) diagrams were extracted. Finally, the applicability of BNNTs/Al(N) both as a medium for storage and gas sensor for methane detection were confirmed.

  12. Resonance Raman Optical Activity of Single Walled Chiral Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter R; Koltai, János; Surján, Péter R; Kürti, Jenő; Szabados, Ágnes

    2016-07-21

    Resonance (vibrational) Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of six chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied by theoretical means. Calculations are performed imposing line group symmetry. Polarizability tensors, computed at the π-electron level, are differentiated with respect to DFT normal modes to generate spectral intensities. This computational protocol yields a ROA spectrum in good agreement with the only experiment on SWCNT, available at present. In addition to the conventional periodic electric dipole operator we introduce magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole operators, suitable for conventional k-space calculations. Consequences of the complex nature of the wave function on the scattering cross section are discussed in detail. The resonance phenomenon is accounted for by the short time approximation. Involvement of fundamental vibrations in the region of the intermediate frequency modes is found to be more notable in ROA than in Raman spectra. Calculations indicate exceptionally strong resonance enhancement of SWCNT ROA signals. Resonance ROA profile of the (6,5) tube shows an interesting sign change that may be exploited experimentally for SWCNT identification. PMID:27315548

  13. MINIMAL INFLAMMOGENICITY OF PRISTINE SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES

    PubMed Central

    TOYOKUNI, SHINYA; JIANG, LI; KITAURA, RYO; SHINOHARA, HISANORI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a novel synthetic material comprising only carbon atoms. Based on its rigidity, its electrical and heat conductivity and its applicability to surface manufacturing, this material is expected to have numerous applications in industry. However, due to the material’s dimensional similarity to asbestos fibers, its carcinogenicity was hypothesized during the last decade, and indeed, we have shown that multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs) of 50 nm in diameter are potently carcinogenic to mesothelial cells after intraperitoneal injection. Additionally, we suggested that inflammogenicity after intraperitoneal injection can predict mesothelial carcinogenesis. However, few data have been published on the intraperitoneal inflammogenicity of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs). Here, we conducted a series of studies on SWCNTs using both intraperitoneal injection into rats and MeT5A mesothelial cells. Intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg SWCNTs caused no remarkable inflammation in the abdominal cavity, and the exposure of MeT5A cells to up to 25 μg/cm2 SWCNTs did not alter proliferation. MWCNTs of 50 nm in diameter were used as a positive control, and tangled MWCNTs of 15 nm in diameter were used as a negative control. The results suggest that SWCNTs are a low-risk material with respect to mesothelial carcinogenesis. PMID:25797984

  14. Potassium-Decorated, Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Menon, M.; Subbaswamy, K. R.; Eklund, P. C.; Thess, A.; Smalley, R. E.

    1997-03-01

    Crystalline ropes of single-wall carbon nanotubes have been reacted in sealed glass tubes with potassium vapor and Raman scattering has been used to monitor the vibrational modes as a function of reaction time. An overall broadening and downshifting of the Raman bands is observed. For example, huge downshifts (40 cm-1) in the high frequency tangential modes observed near 1593 cm-1 in the pristine tubes are detected. These downshifts are attributed to significant charge transfer of K 4s electrons into antibonding pz states of the nanotube which should expand the tube diameter and soften the lattice. Presumably, the potassium ions are chemisorbed onto the walls of the nanotubes, rather than inside the nanotube, although no structural information to support this model has yet been collected. Theoretical results on electron doped armchair symmetry nanotubes using the Generalized Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics model will also be presented to help explain experimental results. The Kentucky group was supported by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and NSF Grant No. OSR-94-52895 and DOE Contract No. DE-F22-90PC90029. The work at Rice was supported by the Office of Naval Research Contract N0014-91-J1794.

  15. Third Harmonic Generation from Aligned Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Darius T., Jr.

    Optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been extensively studied during the last decade, and much basic knowledge has been accumulated on how light emission, scattering, and absorption occur in the realm of linear optics. However, their nonlinear optical properties remain largely unexplored. Here, we have observed strong third harmonic generation from highly aligned SWCNTs with intense mid-infrared radiation. Through power dependent experiments, we have determined the absolute value of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, chi(3), of our SWCNT film to be 6.92 x 10--12 esu, which is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the fused silica reference sample we used. Furthermore, through polarization-dependent third harmonic generation experiments, all the nonzero tensor elements of chi(3) have also been extracted. The contribution of the weaker tensor elements to the overall chi (3) signal has been calculated to be approximately 1/6 of that of the dominant c3z zzz component. These results open up new possibilities for application of carbon nanotubes in optoelectronics.

  16. Single-wall carbon nanotube chemical attachment at platinum electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contés-de-Jesús, Enid J.; Lebrón-Colón, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques were used to adsorb 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on platinum electrodes in order to obtain an amino-terminated SAM as the base for the chemical attachment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A physico-chemical, morphological and electrochemical characterizations of SWCNTs attached onto the modified Pt electrodes was done by using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The SWNTs/4-ATP/Pt surface had regions of small, medium, and large thickness of carbon nanotubes with heights of 100-200 nm, 700 nm to 1.5 μm, and 1.0-3.0 μm, respectively. Cyclic voltammetries (CVs) in sulfuric acid demonstrated that attachment of SWNTs on 4-ATP/Pt is markedly stable, even after 30 potential cycles. CV in ruthenium hexamine was similar to bare Pt electrodes, suggesting that SWNTs assembly is similar to a closely packed microelectrode array.

  17. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transporter for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Pu-Chun

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown great promises in integrating nanomaterials in biomedicine. To explore the feasibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as transporters for gene delivery, we have investigated the binding of SWNTs and RNA polymer poly(rU), and the diffusion and the translocation of the SWNT-poly(rU) complexes. Through single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we have found that the pi- stacking dominates the hydrophobic interactions between the carbon rings on tubes and the nitrogenous bases of RNA. Our diffusion study has further demonstrated the feasibility of tracking the motion of water soluble SWNT-poly(rU) complexes. The uptake of SWNT-poly(rU) by breast cancer cells MCF7 was observed using confocal scanning fluorescence microscopy. It was evident that the complexes could penetrate through cell membrane into cytoplasm and cell nucleus. Our cell culture, MTS assay, and radioisotope labeling showed the negligible cytotoxicity of surface modified SWNTs with RNA polymer and amino acids in cell growth medium. These studies have paved the way for gene transfection using SWNTs as transporters.

  18. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 104–108 for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs. PMID:27476909

  19. Chirality Characterization of Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Williams, Phillip A.; Mayweather, Candis D.; Wincheski, Buzz; Park, Cheol; Namkung, Juock S.

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for the chirality characterization of HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in aqueous solution with the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. Radial breathing mode (RBM) Raman peaks for semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are identified by directly comparing the Raman spectra with the Kataura plot. The SWNT diameters are calculated from these resonant peak positions. Next, a list of (n, m) pairs, yielding the SWNT diameters within a few percent of that obtained from each resonant peak position, is established. The interband transition energies for the list of SWNT (n, m) pairs are calculated based on the tight binding energy expression for each list of the (n, m) pairs, and the pairs yielding the closest values to the corresponding experimental optical absorption peaks are selected. The results reveal that (1, 11), (4, 11), and (0, 11) as the most probable chiralities of the semiconducting nanotubes. The results also reveal that (4, 16), (6, 12) and (8, 8) are the most probable chiralities for the metallic nanotubes. Directly relating the Raman scattering data to the optical absorption spectra, the present method is considered the simplest technique currently available. Another advantage of this technique is the use of the E(sup 8)(sub 11) peaks in the optical absorption spectrum in the analysis to enhance the accuracy in the results.

  20. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    PubMed

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states. PMID:27598112

  1. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  2. Nonlinear resonances of a single-wall carbon nanotube cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. K.; Lee, S. I.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of an electrostatically actuated carbon nanotube (CNT) cantilever are discussed by theoretical and numerical approaches. Electrostatic and intermolecular forces between the single-walled CNT and a graphene electrode are considered. The CNT cantilever is analyzed by the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, including its geometric and inertial nonlinearities, and a one-mode projection based on the Galerkin approximation and numerical integration. Static pull-in and pull-out behaviors are adequately represented by an asymmetric two-well potential with the total potential energy consisting of the CNT elastic energy, electrostatic energy, and the Lennard-Jones potential energy. Nonlinear dynamics of the cantilever are simulated under DC and AC voltage excitations and examined in the frequency and time domains. Under AC-only excitation, a superharmonic resonance of order 2 occurs near half of the primary frequency. Under both DC and AC loads, the cantilever exhibits linear and nonlinear primary and secondary resonances depending on the strength of the excitation voltages. In addition, the cantilever has dynamic instabilities such as periodic or chaotic tapping motions, with a variation of excitation frequency at the resonance branches. High electrostatic excitation leads to complex nonlinear responses such as softening, multiple stability changes at saddle nodes, or period-doubling bifurcation points in the primary and secondary resonance branches.

  3. Electrical characterization of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berliocchi, Marco; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Lugli, Paolo; Orlanducci, Silvia; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2003-04-01

    Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) based nanotechnology appears to be promising for future nanoelectronics. The SWCNT may be either metallic or semiconducting and both metallic and semiconducting types of SWCNTs have been observed experimentally. This gives rise to intriguing possibilities to put together semiconductor-semiconductor and semiconductor-metal junctions for diodes and transistors. The potential for nanotubes in nanoelectronics devices, displays and nanosensors is enormous. However, in order to realize the potential of SWCNTs, it is critical to understand the properties of charge transport and to control phase purity, elicity and arrangement according to specific architectures. We have investigated the electrical properties of various SWCNTs samples whit different organization: bundles of SWCNTs, SWCNT fibres and different membranes and tablets obtained using SWCNTs purified and characterized. Electrical characterizations were carried out by a 4155B Agilent Semiconductor Parameter Analyser. In order to give a mechanical stability to SWCNTs fibres and bundles we have used a nafion matrix coating, so an electrical characterization has been performed on samples with and without this layer. I-V measurements were performed in vacuum and in air using aluminium interdigitated coplanar-electrodes (width=20mm or 40mm) on glass substrates. The behaviour observed is generally supralinear with currents of the order of mA in vacuum and lower values in air with the exception of the tablet samples where the behaviour is ohmic, the currents are higher and similar values of current are detected in air and vacuum.

  4. Purification Procedures for Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorelik, Olga P.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the comparison of a variety of procedures used to purify carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotube material is produced by the arc process and laser oven process. Most of the procedures are tested using laser-grown, single-wall nanotube (SWNT) material. The material is characterized at each step of the purification procedures by using different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identified impurities are amorphous and graphitic carbon, catalyst particle aggregates, fullerenes, and hydrocarbons. Solvent extraction and low-temperature annealing are used to reduce the amount of volatile hydrocarbons and dissolve fullerenes. Metal catalysts and amorphous as well as graphitic carbon are oxidized by reflux in acids including HCl, HNO3 and HF and other oxidizers such as H2O2. High-temperature annealing in vacuum and in inert atmosphere helps to improve the quality of SWNTs by increasing crystallinity and reducing intercalation.

  5. Observation and Modeling of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bend Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Anantram, M. P.; Jaffe, R. L.; Kong, J.; Dai, H.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bends, with diameters from approx. 1.0 to 2.5 nm and bend angles from 18 deg. to 34 deg., are observed in catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons at 600 - 1200 C. An algorithm using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) techniques is developed to model these structures that are considered to be SWNT junctions formed by topological defects (i.e. pentagon-heptagon pairs). The algorithm is used to predict the tube helicities and defect configurations for bend junctions using the observed tube diameters and bend angles. The number and arrangement of the defects at the junction interfaces are found to depend on the tube helicities and bend angle. The structural and energetic calculations using the Brenner potential show a number of stable junction configurations for each bend angle with the 34 deg. bends being more stable than the others. Tight binding calculations for local density of state (LDOS) and transmission coefficients are carried out to investigate electrical properties of the bend junctions.

  6. Hypergolic fuel detection using individual single walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, S. C.; Willitsford, A. H.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Yu, M.; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate and reliable detection of hypergolic fuels such as hydrazine (N2H4) and its derivatives is vital to missile defense, aviation, homeland security, and the chemical industry. More importantly these sensors need to be capable of operation at low temperatures (below room temperature) as most of the widely used chemical sensors operate at high temperatures (above 300 °C). In this research a simple and highly sensitive single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network sensor was developed for real time monitoring of hydrazine leaks to concentrations at parts per million levels. Upon exposure to hydrazine vapor, the resistance of the air exposed nanotubes (p-type) is observed to increase rapidly while that of the vacuum-degassed nanotubes (n-type) is observed to decrease. It was found that the resistance of the sample can be recovered through vacuum pumping and exposure to ultraviolet light. The experimental results support the electrochemical charge transfer mechanism between the oxygen redox couple of the ambient and the Fermi level of the SWNT. Theoretical results of the hydrazine-SWNT interaction are compared with the experimental observations. It was found that a monolayer of water molecules on the SWNT is necessary to induce strong interactions between hydrazine and the SWNT by way of introducing new occupied states near the bottom of the conduction band of the SWNT.

  7. Ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube network framed graphene hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Tu; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2015-03-11

    Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown superior potential in electronics and optoelectronics because of their excellent thermal, mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. Here, a simple method is developed to synthesize ultrathin SWNT-graphene films through chemical vapor deposition. These novel two-dimensional hybrids show enhanced mechanical strength that allows them to float on water without polymer supporting layers. Characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that SWNTs can interlace as a concrete backbone for the subsequent growth of monolayer graphene. Optical and electrical transport measurements further show that SWNT-graphene hybrids inherit high optical transparency and superior electrical conductivity from monolayer graphene. We also explore the local optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids through spatially resolved photocurrent microscopy and find that the interactions between SWNTs and graphene can induce a strong photocurrent response in the areas where SWNTs link different graphene domains together. These fundamental studies may open a door for engineering optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids by controlling the morphologies of the SWNT frames. PMID:25686199

  8. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Chun; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Teng, I-Ju; Kuo, Cheng-Tzu; Ho, Cheng-Long; Kuo, Han-Wen; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Yang, Shang-Ren; Shi, Gia-Nan; Chang, Chang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3. PMID:22164044

  9. Tuning Thermoelectric Properties of Chirality Selected Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshimasa; Maniwa, Yutaka

    Thermoelectrics are a very important technology for efficiently converting waste heat into electric power. Hicks and Dresselhaus proposed an important approach to innovate the performance of thermoelectric devices, which involves using one-dimensional materials and properly tuning their Fermi level (PRB 1993). Therefore, understanding the relationship between the thermoelectric performance and the Fermi level of one-dimensional materials is of great importance to maximize their thermoelectric performance. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is an ideal model for one-dimensional materials. Previously we reported continuous p-type and n-type control over the Seebeck coefficients of semiconducting SWCNT networks with diameter of 1.4 nm through an electric double layer transistor setup using an ionic liquid as the electrolyte (Yanagi et al., Nano Lett. 14, 6437 2014). We clarified the thermoelectric properties of semiconducting SWCNTs with diameter of 1.4 nm as a function of Fermi level. In this study, we investigated how the chiralities or electronic structures of SWCNTs influence on the thermoelectric properties. We found the significant difference in the line-shape of Seebeck coefficient as a function of gate voltage between the different electronic structures of SWCNTs.

  10. Phosphatidylserine in the Brain: Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X.; Spector, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine in reactions are catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear. PMID:24992464

  11. Superemission in vertically-aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Presently we used two samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (VA SWCNTs) with parallelepiped geometry, sized 0.02 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm and 0.2 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm. We report absorption and emission properties of the VA SWCNTs, including strong anisotropy in both their absorption and emission spectra. We found that the emission spectra extend from the middle-IR range to the near-IR range, with such extended spectra being reported for the first time. Pumping the VA SWCNTs in the direction normal to their axis, superemission (SE) was observed in the direction along their axis. The SE band maximum is located at 7206 ± 0.4 cm-1. The energy and the power density of the superemission were estimated, along with the diffraction-limited divergence. At the pumping energy of 3 mJ/pulse, the SE energy measured by the detector was 0.74 mJ/pulse, corresponding to the total SE energy of 1.48 mJ/pulse, with the energy density of 18.5 mJ cm-2/pulse and the SE power density of 1.2 × 105 W cm-2/pulse. We report that a bundle of VA SWCNTs is an emitter with a relatively small divergence, not exceeding 3.9 × 10-3 rad. We developed a theoretical approach to explain such absorption and emission spectra. The developed theory is based on the earlier proposed SSH theory, which we extended to include the exchange interactions between the closest SWCNT neighbors. The developed theoretical ideas were implemented in a homemade FORTRAN code. This code was successfully used to calculate and reproduce the experimental spectra and to determine the SWCNT species that originate the respective absorption bands, with acceptable agreement between theory and experiment.

  12. Toroidal Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Fullerene Crop Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We investigate energetics and structure of circular and polygonal single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using large scale molecular simulations on NAS SP2, motivated by their unusual electronic and magnetic properties. The circular tori are formed by bending tube (no net whereas the polygonal tori are constructed by turning the joint of two tubes of (n, n), (n+1, n-1) and (n+2, n-2) with topological pentagon-heptagon defect, in which n =5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of circular tori relative to straight tube decreases by I/D(sup 2) where D is torus diameter. As D increases, these tori change from buckling to an energetically stable state. The stable tori are perfect circular in both toroidal and tubular geometry with strain less than 0. 03 eV/atom when D greater than 10, 20 and 40 nm for torus (5,5), (8,8) and (10, 10). Polygonal tori, whose strain is proportional to the number of defects and I/D are energetically stable even for D less than 10 nm. However, their strain is higher than that of perfect circular tori. In addition, the local maximum strain of polygonal tori is much higher than that of perfect circular tori. It is approx. 0.03 eV/atom or less for perfect circular torus (5,5), but 0.13 and 0.21 eV/atom for polygonal tori (6,4)/(5,5) and (7,3)/(5,5). Therefore, we conclude that the circular tori with no topological defects are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than the polygonal tori containing the pentagon-heptagon defects for the laser-grown SWNTs and Fullerene crop circles.

  13. Elastomer Filled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that composites of a silicone elastomer with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are significantly stronger and stiffer than is the unfilled elastomer. The large strengthening and stiffening effect observed in these experiments stands in contrast to the much smaller strengthening effect observed in related prior efforts to reinforce epoxies with SWNTs and to reinforce a variety of polymers with multiple-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The relative largeness of the effect in the case of the silicone-elastomer/SWNT composites appears to be attributable to (1) a better match between the ductility of the fibers and the elasticity of the matrix and (2) the greater tensile strengths of SWNTs, relative to MWNTs. For the experiments, several composites were formulated by mixing various proportions of SWNTs and other filling materials into uncured RTV-560, which is a silicone adhesive commonly used in aerospace applications. Specimens of a standard "dog-bone" size and shape for tensile testing were made by casting the uncured elastomer/filler mixtures into molds, curing the elastomer, then pressing the specimens from a "cookie-cutter" die. The results of tensile tests of the specimens showed that small percentages of SWNT filler led to large increases in stiffness and tensile strength, and that these increases were greater than those afforded by other fillers. For example, the incorporation of SWNTs in a proportion of 1 percent increased the tensile strength by 44 percent and the modulus of elasticity (see figure) by 75 percent. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases decreased with increasing nanotube percentages because more nanotubes made the elastomer/nanotube composites more brittle. At an SWNT content of 10 percent, the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were 125 percent and 562 percent, respectively, greater than the corresponding values for the unfilled elastomer.

  14. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks in conductive composite materials.

    PubMed

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leo G J; de With, G Bert

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive composite materials can be used for a wide range of applications because they combine the advantages of a specific polymeric material (e.g., thermal and mechanical properties) with the electrical properties of conductive filler particles. However, the overall electrical behaviour of these composite materials is usually much below the potential of the conductive fillers, mainly because by mixing two different components, new interfaces and interphases are created, changing the properties and behaviours of both. Our goal is to characterize and understand the nature and influence of these interfaces on the electrical properties of composite materials. We have improved a technique based on the use of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water, followed by coating glass substrates, and drying and removing the CMC with a nitric acid treatment. We used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques to characterize the SWCNT films, and developed an in situ resistance measurement technique to analyse the influence of both the individual components and the mixture of an epoxy/amine system on the electrical behaviour of the SWCNTs. The results showed that impregnating a SWCNT network with a polymer is not the only factor that affects the film resistance; air exposure, temperature, physical and chemical properties of the individual polymer components, and also the formation of a polymeric network, can all have an influence on the macroscopic electrical properties of the initial SWCNT network. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the effects that each of the components can have on each other before trying to prepare an efficient polymer composite material. PMID:25430670

  15. Spectroscopy-Based Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Namkung, Juock S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Seo, J.; Park, Cheol

    2003-01-01

    We present the initial results of our combined investigation of Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy in a batch of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNT diameters are first estimated from the four radial breathing mode (RBM) peaks using a simple relation of omega(sub RBM) = 248/cm nm/d(sub t)(nm). The calculated diameter values are related to the optical absorption peaks through the expressions of first interband transition energies, i.e., E(sup S)(sub 11) = 2a gamma/d(sub t) for semiconducting and E(sup S)(sub 11) = 6a gamma/d(sub t) for metallic SWNTs, respectively, where a is the carbon-carbon bond length (0.144 nm) and gamma is the energy of overlapping electrons from nearest neighbor atoms, which is 2.9 eV for a SWNT. This analysis indicates that three RBM peaks are from semiconducting tubes, and the remaining one is from metallic tubes. The detailed analysis in the present study is focused on these three peaks of the first absorption band by determining the values of the representative (n,m) pairs. The first step of analysis is to construct a list of possible (n,m) pairs from the diameters calculated from the positions of the RBM peaks. The second step is to compute the first interband transition energy, E(sub 11), by substituting the constructed list of (n,m) into the expression of Reich and Thomsen, and Saito et al. Finally, the pairs with the energies closest to the experimental values are selected.

  16. Self-assembling Functionalized Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising bottom-up building materials due to their superior properties. However, the lack of an effective method to arrange large quantities of SWCNTs poses an obstacle toward their applications. Existing studies to functionalize, disperse, position, and assemble SWCNTs provide a broad understandings regarding SWCNTs behavior, especially in aqueous electrolyte solution. Inspired by ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) materials, this dissertation envisions fabrication of orderly SWCNTs network structure via their ionic clustering-mediated self-assembly. SWCNTs tend to bundle together due to inter-nanotube VDW attractions, which increase with nanotube length. The author seeks short SWCNTs with long chain molecules bearing ionic termini to facilitate debundling and self-assembly in aqueous electrolyte solution through end-clustering. First, a simple model was applied based on essential physical factors. The results indicated that SWCNTs must be shorter than ˜100 nm to achieve stable network structures. Experiments were then carried out based upon the results. Short SWCNTs (50-100 nm) were end-functionalized with hexaethylene glycol (HEG) linkers bearing terminal carboxylate anions. Both 2D and 3D network structures were observed after placing the functionalized SWCNTs in aqueous electrolyte (sodium ion). The network structures were characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic methods. A novel approach was applied via electron tomography to study the 3D structures of SWCNTs structure in aqueous electrolyte. Free energy analysis of the SWCNTs network structure was implemented with the assistance of both analytical tools and molecular simulations. The results indicate that, when a cluster is formed by three functionalized SWCNTs ends, the resulting network structure is most stable. Indeed, 72% of the clusters/joints were formed by three nanotubes, as observed in experiments. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of coarse

  17. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  18. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  19. Regulation of singlet oxygen generation using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Tang, Zhiwen; Phillips, Joseph A; Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Hui; Tan, Weihong

    2008-08-20

    We have designed a novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent using protein binding aptamer, photosensitizer, and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). The PDT is based on covalently linking a photosensitizer with an aptamer then wrapping onto the surface of SWNTs, such that the photosensitizer can only be activated by light upon target binding. We have chosen the human alpha-thrombin aptamer and covalently linked it with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), which is a second generation photosensitizer. Our results showed that SWNTs are great quenchers to singlet oxygen generation (SOG). In the presence of its target, the binding of target thrombin will disturb the DNA interaction with the SWNTs and cause the DNA aptamer to fall off the SWNT surface, resulting in the restoration of SOG. This study validated the potential of our design as a novel PDT agent with regulation by target molecules, enhanced specificity, and efficacy of therapeutic function, which directs the development of photodynamic therapy to be safer and more selective. PMID:18661988

  20. Antimicrobial Biomaterials based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Seyma

    Biomaterials that inactivate bacteria are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) incorporated within biomedical polymers. In the first part, we focus on SWNT dispersed in the common biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a potential antimicrobial biomaterial. We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration. Up to 98 % of bacteria die within one hour of SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNT are found to be more toxic, possibly due to an increased density of open tube ends. In the second part, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of SWNT layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with the polyelectrolytes poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The dispersibility of SWNT in aqueous solution is significantly improved via the biocompatible nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and the amphiphilic polymer phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PL-PEG). Absorbance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show SWNT with either Tween 20 or PL-PEG in aqueous solution to be well dispersed. Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCMD) measurements show both SWNT-Tween and SWNT-PL-PEG to LbL assemble with PLL and PGA into multilayer films, with the PL-PEG system yielding the greater final SWNT content. Bacterial inactivation rates are significantly higher (up to 90%) upon 24 hour incubation with SWNT containing films, compared to control films (ca. 20%). In the third part, we study the influence of bundling on the LbL assembly of SWNT with charged polymers, and on the antimicrobial properties of the assembled film. QCMD measurements show the bundled SWNT system to adsorb in an unusually strong fashion—to an extent three times greater than that

  1. Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns as Photothermal Cancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John; Sarkar, Saugata; Zhang, Jianfei; Do, Thao; Manson, Mary kyle; Campbell, Tom; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren Leslie; Geohegan, David B; Rylander, Christopher; Dorn, Harry C; Rylander, Nichole M

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have significant potential as selective photo-absorbing agents for laser based cancer treatment. This study investigates the use of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as thermal enhancers when excited by near infrared (NIR) light for tumor cell destruction. Absorption spectra of SWNHs in deionized water at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.085, and 0.1 mg/ml were measured using a spectrophotometer for the wavelength range of 200-1,400 nm. Mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using spectrophotometer transmittance data. Cell culture media containing 0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml SWNHs was laser irradiated at 1,064 nm wavelength with an irradiance of 40 W/cm{sup 2} for 0-5 minutes. Temperature elevations of these solutions during laser irradiation were measured with a thermocouple 8 mm away from the incident laser beam. Cell viability of murine kidney cancer cells (RENCA) was measured 24 hours following laser treatment with the previously mentioned laser parameters alone or with SWNHs. Cell viability as a function of radial position was determined qualitatively using trypan blue staining and bright field microscopy for samples exposed to heating durations of 2 and 6 minutes alone or with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs. A Beckman Coulter Vi-Cell instrument quantified cell viability of samples treated with varying SWNH concentration (0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml) and heating durations of 0-6 minutes. Spectrophotometer measurements indicated inclusion of SWNHs increased light absorption and attenuation across all wavelengths. Utilizing SWNHs with laser irradiation increased temperature elevation compared to laser heating alone. Greater absorption and higher temperature elevations were observed with increasing SWNH concentration. No inherent toxicity was observed with SWNH inclusion. A more rapid and substantial viability decline was observed over time in samples exposed to SWNHs with laser treatment compared with samples experiencing laser

  2. Structural characterization of macroscopic single-walled carbon nanotube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei

    In this thesis, we studied the structural properties of macroscopic materials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the form of fibers, films and suspensions. We characterized the preferred orientations in partially aligned SWNT fibers and films, combining x-ray fiber diagram and polarized Raman scattering. Our texture model consists of an aligned fraction, characterized by the angular distribution width of tube axes, plus a completely unaligned fraction. For neat fibers extruded from SWNT/superacid suspensions through a small orifice, the distribution width and the aligned fraction both improve with decreasing orifice diameter. For magnetic field-aligned SWNT films deposited from surfactant suspensions, the aligning effects of deposition and external magnetic field force in the film plane are additive, the out-of-plane mosaic being narrower than the in-plane one. SWNTs dispersed in superacid or aqueous surfactant solutions are precursors for many applications. In oleum, SWNTs can be charged and protonated by H 2SO4 molecules. X-ray scattering indicates that H2SO 4 molecules align along nanotube axes to form cylindrical shells wrapped around nanotubes. This finding establishes the validity of a long-standing important but still debated physical chemistry concept, "structured solvent shells surrounding dissolved ions". Differential scanning calorimetry confirms that the partly ordered H2SO4 molecules are a new phase, with distinct freezing/melting behavior. X-ray scattering at low temperature further shows that crystallization of the bulk-like acid surrounding the structured shells is templated by the SWNTs. The specific orientation of the acid crystallites provides solid evidence for direct protonation of SWNT. We studied the morphologies of SWNT suspensions using small-angle neutron scattering. We observed rigid rod behavior from SWNTs dispersed in water using sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate surfactant, suggesting that SWNTs exist mainly as individual tube

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter

  4. Cytotoxic effect of poly-dispersed single walled carbon nanotubes on erythrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2011-01-01

    Single wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) are hydrophobic and do not disperse in aqueous solvents. Acid functionalization of SWCNTs results in attachment of carboxy and sulfonate groups to carbon atoms and the resulting acid functionalized product (AF-SWCNTs) is negatively charged and disperses easily in water and buffers. In the present study, effect of AF-SWCNTs on blood erythrocytes was examined. Incubation of mouse erythrocytes with AF-SWCNTs and not with control SWCNTs, resulted in a dose and time dependent lysis of erythrocyte. Using fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs, binding of AF-SWCNTs with erythrocytes could be demonstrated. Confocal microscopy results indicated that AF-SWCNTs could enter the erythrocytes. Treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in exposure of hydrophobic patches on erythrocyte membrane that is indicative of membrane damage. A time and dose dependent increase in externalization of phosphatidylserine on erythrocyte membrane bilayer was also found. Administration of AF-SWCNTs through intravenous route resulted in a transient anemia as seen by a sharp decline in blood erythrocyte count accompanied with a significant drop in blood haemoglobin level. Administration of AF-SWCNTs through intratracheal administration also showed significant decline in RBC count while administration through other routes (gavage and intra-peritoneal) was not effective. By using a recently developed technique of a two step in vivo biotinylation of erythrocytes that enables simultaneous enumeration of young (age <10 days) and old (age>40 days) erythrocytes in mouse blood, it was found that the in vivo toxic effect of AF-SWCNTs was more pronounced on older subpopulation of erythrocytes. Subpopulation of old erythrocytes fell after treatment with AF-SWCNTs but recovered by third day after the intravenous administration of AF-SWCNTs. Taken together our results indicate that treatment with AF-SWCNTs results in acute membrane damage and eventual lysis of erythrocytes. Intravenous

  5. Cytotoxic Effect of Poly-Dispersed Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Erythrocytes In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2011-01-01

    Single wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) are hydrophobic and do not disperse in aqueous solvents. Acid functionalization of SWCNTs results in attachment of carboxy and sulfonate groups to carbon atoms and the resulting acid functionalized product (AF-SWCNTs) is negatively charged and disperses easily in water and buffers. In the present study, effect of AF-SWCNTs on blood erythrocytes was examined. Incubation of mouse erythrocytes with AF-SWCNTs and not with control SWCNTs, resulted in a dose and time dependent lysis of erythrocyte. Using fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs, binding of AF-SWCNTs with erythrocytes could be demonstrated. Confocal microscopy results indicated that AF-SWCNTs could enter the erythrocytes. Treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in exposure of hydrophobic patches on erythrocyte membrane that is indicative of membrane damage. A time and dose dependent increase in externalization of phosphatidylserine on erythrocyte membrane bilayer was also found. Administration of AF-SWCNTs through intravenous route resulted in a transient anemia as seen by a sharp decline in blood erythrocyte count accompanied with a significant drop in blood haemoglobin level. Administration of AF-SWCNTs through intratracheal administration also showed significant decline in RBC count while administration through other routes (gavage and intra-peritoneal) was not effective. By using a recently developed technique of a two step in vivo biotinylation of erythrocytes that enables simultaneous enumeration of young (age <10 days) and old (age>40 days) erythrocytes in mouse blood, it was found that the in vivo toxic effect of AF-SWCNTs was more pronounced on older subpopulation of erythrocytes. Subpopulation of old erythrocytes fell after treatment with AF-SWCNTs but recovered by third day after the intravenous administration of AF-SWCNTs. Taken together our results indicate that treatment with AF-SWCNTs results in acute membrane damage and eventual lysis of erythrocytes. Intravenous

  6. Sequestration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) in a suitably chosen polymer is under investigation as a means of promoting the dissolution of the nanotubes into epoxies. The purpose of this investigation is to make it possible to utilize SWCNs as the reinforcing fibers in strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. SWCNs are especially attractive for use as reinforcing fibers because of their stiffness and strength-to-weight ratio: Their Young s modulus has been calculated to be 1.2 TPa, their strength has been calculated to be as much as 100 times that of steel, and their mass density is only one-sixth that of steel. Bare SWCNs cannot be incorporated directly into composite materials of the types envisioned because they are not soluble in epoxies. Heretofore, SWCNS have been rendered soluble by chemically attaching various molecular chains to them, but such chemical attachments compromise their structural integrity. In the method now under investigation, carbon nanotubes are sequestered in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV]. The strength of the carbon nanotubes is preserved because they are not chemically bonded to the PmPV. This method exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around carbon nanotubes: the wrapping occurs partly because there exists a favorable interface between the conjugated face of a nanotube and the conjugated backbone of the polymer and partly because of the helical molecular structure of PmPV. The constituents attached to the polymer backbones (the side chains) render the PmPV-wrapped carbon nanotubes PmPV soluble in organic materials that, in turn, could be used to suspend the carbon nanotubes in epoxy precursors. At present, this method is being optimized: The side chains on the currently available form of PmPV are very nonpolar and unable to react with the epoxy resins and/or hardeners; as a consequence, SWCN/PmPV composites have been

  7. Synthesis and Raman Characterization of Boron Doped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K.; Gothard, N.; Gai, P. L.; Chou, S. G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Rao, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    Boron-doped SWNTs were prepared by pulsed laser vaporization of carbon targets containing boron with concentrations ranging between 0.5 - 10 at%. As-prepared samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and HRTEM measurements. Above a threshold boron concentration of 3 at%, the growth of SWNT bundles ceases due to the low solubility of boron in carbon at ˜1200 ^oC. Interestingly, a few ˜0.5 nm diameter single walled tubes are found, along with nanographitic material in the soot generated from a target with a boron concentration of ˜7 at%. As expected, the intensity of the ˜1350 cm-1 D-band increases with increasing boron concentration due to boron substitution into the honeycomb lattice. Both the radial breathing mode and tangential G- bands were observed in the Raman spectra in samples with <3 at % boron at ˜186 cm-1 and ˜1591 cm-1, respectively. Implications of boron doping in the nanotube shell will be discussed.

  8. Synthesis and Raman Characterization of Boron Doped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K.; Gothard, N.; Gai, P. L.; Chao, S. G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Rao, A. M.

    2003-11-01

    Boron-doped SWNTs were prepared by pulsed laser vaporization of carbon targets containing boron with concentrations ranging between 0.5 - 10 at%. As-prepared samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and HRTEM measurements. Above a threshold boron concentration of 3 at%, the growth of SWNT bundles ceases due to the low solubility of boron in carbon at ˜1200 ^oC. Interestingly, a few ˜0.5 nm diameter single walled tubes are found, along with nanographitic material in the soot generated from a target with a boron concentration of ˜7 at%. As expected, the intensity of the ˜1350 cm-1 D-band increases with increasing boron concentration due to boron substitution into the honeycomb lattice. Both the radial breathing mode and tangential G- bands were observed in the Raman spectra in samples with <3 at % boron at ˜186 cm-1 and ˜1591 cm-1, respectively. Implications of boron doping in the nanotube shell will be discussed.

  9. Contributions of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets and leukocytes and microparticles to hypercoagulable state in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfa; Ma, Ruishuang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Muhua; Zhao, Liangliang; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Shi, Jialan; Zou, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    Hypercoagulability in gastric cancer is a common complication and a major contributor to poor prognosis. This study aimed to determine procoagulant activity of blood cells and microparticles (MPs) in gastric cancer patients. Phosphatidylserine-positive blood cells and MPs, and their procoagulant properties in particular, were assessed in 48 gastric cancer patients and 35 healthy controls. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in patients with tumor-node-metastasis stage III/IV gastric cancer were significantly higher than those in stage I/II patients or healthy controls. Moreover, procoagulant activity of platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in stage III/IV patients was significantly increased compared to the controls, as indicated by shorter clotting time, higher intrinsic and extrinsic factor tenase, and prothrombinase complex activity. Interestingly, lactadherin, which competes with factors V and VIII to bind phosphatidylserine, dramatically prolonged clotting time of the cells and MPs by inhibiting factor tenase and prothrombinase complex activity. Although anti-tissue factor antibody significantly attenuated extrinsic tenase complex activity of leukocytes and MPs, it only slightly prolonged clotting times. Meanwhile, treatment with radical resection reduced phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs, and prolonged the clotting times of the remaining cells and MPs. Our results suggest that phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs contribute to hypercoagulability and represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent coagulation in patients with stage III/IV gastric cancer. PMID:26700666

  10. Evidence for substitutional boron in doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, P.; Pichler, T.; Reppert, J.; Rao, A. M.; Grobosch, M.; Knupfer, M.

    2010-05-03

    Precise determination of acceptors in the laser ablation grown B doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been elusive. Photoemission spectroscopy finds evidence for subpercent substitutional B in this material, which leads to superconductivity in thin film SWNT samples.

  11. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications. PMID:24352224

  12. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Glow Discharge Fine Particle Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Imazato, N.; Imano, M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon fine particles were synthesized being negatively charged and confined in a glow discharge plasma. The deposited fine particles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were confirmed to include single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  13. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  14. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal — thermoacoustic and photoacoustic — contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Manojit; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Green, Danielle; Sitharaman, Balaji; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a novel carbon nanotube-based contrast agent for both thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison with de-ionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited more than two-fold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic tomography at 3 GHz. In comparison with blood, they exhibited more than six-fold signal enhancement for photoacoustic tomography at 1064 nm wavelength. The large contrast enhancement of single-walled carbon nanotubes was further corroborated by tissue phantom imaging studies. PMID:19566311

  15. Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Suzuki, J; Segawa, K; Fujii, T

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) is a phospholipid that is abundant in eukaryotic plasma membranes. An ATP-dependent enzyme called flippase normally keeps PtdSer inside the cell, but PtdSer is exposed by the action of scramblase on the cell's surface in biological processes such as apoptosis and platelet activation. Once exposed to the cell surface, PtdSer acts as an 'eat me' signal on dead cells, and creates a scaffold for blood-clotting factors on activated platelets. The molecular identities of the flippase and scramblase that work at plasma membranes have long eluded researchers. Indeed, their identity as well as the mechanism of the PtdSer exposure to the cell surface has only recently been revealed. Here, we describe how PtdSer is exposed in apoptotic cells and in activated platelets, and discuss PtdSer exposure in other biological processes. PMID:26891692

  16. Distribution of single wall carbon nanotubes in the Xenopus laevis embryo after microinjection.

    PubMed

    Holt, Brian D; Shawky, Joseph H; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A; Islam, Mohammad F

    2016-04-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are advanced materials with the potential for a myriad of diverse applications, including biological technologies and large-scale usage with the potential for environmental impacts. SWCNTs have been exposed to developing organisms to determine their effects on embryogenesis, and results have been inconsistent arising, in part, from differing material quality, dispersion status, material size, impurity from catalysts and stability. For this study, we utilized highly purified SWCNT samples with short, uniform lengths (145 ± 17 nm) well dispersed in solution. To test high exposure doses, we microinjected > 500 µg ml(-1) SWCNT concentrations into the well-established embryogenesis model, Xenopus laevis, and determined embryo compatibility and subcellular localization during development. SWCNTs localized within cellular progeny of the microinjected cells, but were heterogeneously distributed throughout the target-injected tissue. Co-registering unique Raman spectral intensity of SWCNTs with images of fluorescently labeled subcellular compartments demonstrated that even at regions of highest SWCNT concentration, there were no gross alterations to subcellular microstructures, including filamentous actin, endoplasmic reticulum and vesicles. Furthermore, SWCNTs did not aggregate and localized to the perinuclear subcellular region. Combined, these results suggest that purified and dispersed SWCNTs are not toxic to X. laevis animal cap ectoderm and may be suitable candidate materials for biological applications. PMID:26510384

  17. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions. PMID:27140495

  18. Large scale combustion synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and their characterization.

    PubMed

    Richter, Henning; Treska, Meri; Howard, Jack B; Wen, John Z; Thomasson, Sebastien B; Reading, Arthur A; Jardim, Paula M; Vander Sande, John B

    2008-11-01

    Since its invention in 1991, premixed combustion synthesis of fullerenic materials has been established as the major industrial process for manufacturing of these materials. Large-scale production of fullerenes such as C60, C70 and C84 has been implemented. More recently, combustion technology has been extended to the targeted synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). Addition of catalyst precursor and operation at well-controlled fuel-rich but non-sooting conditions are required. Extensive parametric studies have allowed for the optimization of the formation of high-quality SWCNT. Purification techniques previously reported in the literature have been adjusted and used successfully for the nearly complete removal of metal and metal oxide. Material has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy, scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Correlations between process conditions and nanotube properties such as length have been established. Product reproducibility and process scalability of the combustion process have been demonstrated. Sample preparation was found to affect significantly the apparent characteristics of nanotubes as seen in electron microscopy images. PMID:19198347

  19. Molecular simulation of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes and idealized carbon slit pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinyu; Johnson, J. Karl

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen gas into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and idealized carbon slit pores is studied by computer simulation. Hydrogen-hydrogen interactions are modeled with the Silvera-Goldman potential. The Crowell-Brown potential is used to model the hydrogen-carbon interactions. Calculations include adsorption inside the tubes, in the interstitial regions of tube arrays, and on the outside surface of isolated tubes. Quantum effects are included through implementation of the path integral formalism. Comparison with classical simulations gives an indication of the importance of quantum effects for hydrogen adsorption. Quantum effects are important even at 298 K for adsorption in tube interstices. We compare our simulations with experimental data for SWNTs, graphitic nanofibers, and activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms from simulations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data for activated carbon, but do not confirm the large uptake reported for SWNTs and nanofibers. Although the adsorption potential for hydrogen in SWNTs is enhanced relative to slit pores of the same size, our calculations show that the storage capacity of an array of tubes is less than that for idealized slit pore geometries, except at very low pressures. Ambient temperature isotherms indicate that an array of nanotubes is not a suitable sorbent material for achieving DOE targets for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of non-covalent single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization with surfactant peptides.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Mansouri, Alireza; Azamat, Jafar

    2016-03-01

    Non-covalent functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with improved solubility and biocompatibility can successfully transfer drugs, DNA, RNA, and proteins into the target cells. Theoretical studies such as molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations in fully atomistic scale were used to investigate the hydrophobic and aromatic π-π-stacking interaction of designing four novel surfactant peptides for non-covalent functionalization of SWCNTs. The results indicated that the designed peptides have binding affinity towards SWCNT with constant interactions during MD simulation times, and it can even be improved by increasing the number of tryptophan residues. The aromatic content of the peptides plays a significant role in their adsorption in SWCNT wall. The data suggest that π-π stacking interaction between the aromatic rings of tryptophan and π electrons of SWCNTs is more important than hydrophobic effects for dispersing carbon nanotubes; nevertheless SWCNTs are strongly hydrophobic in front of smooth surfaces. The usage of aromatic content of peptides for forming SWCNT/peptide complex was proved successfully, providing new insight into peptide design strategies for future nano-biomedical applications. PMID:26811869

  1. Gas dynamic and time resolved imaging studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes growth in the laser ablation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Rahul; Suzuki, S.; Kataura, H.; Achiba, Y.

    2001-10-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by laser ablation of Ni-Co-graphite composite targets at 1200 °C under flowing argon. The effects of the temperature gradient near the target and the gas flow rate on the diameter distribution of SWNTs were studied in order to understand their growth dynamics. The diameter distribution of the SWNTs, analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, was dependent on the gas flow rate when there was a temperature gradient around the target. Time resolved scattering images from the ablated species at different flow rates indicated that velocities of backward moving species increased with increasing flow rate. These findings are used to estimate the time required for nucleation and the growth of SWNTs.

  2. Internalization of paramagnetic phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays an important role in many pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases, neurological conditions and oncology, and is considered an important predictor for disease progression and outcome. In vivo imaging of inflammatory cells will improve diagnosis and provide a read-out for therapy efficacy. Paramagnetic phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing liposomes were developed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confocal microscopy imaging of macrophages. These nanoparticles also provide a platform to combine imaging with targeted drug delivery. Results Incorporation of PS into liposomes did not affect liposomal size and morphology up to 12 mol% of PS. Liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS showed the highest uptake by murine macrophages, while only minor uptake was observed in endothelial cells. Uptake of liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+. Furthermore, these 6 mol% PS-containing liposomes were mainly internalized into macrophages, whereas liposomes without PS only bound to the macrophage cell membrane. Conclusions Paramagnetic liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS for MR imaging of macrophages have been developed. In vitro these liposomes showed specific internalization by macrophages. Therefore, these liposomes might be suitable for in vivo visualization of macrophage content and for (visualization of) targeted drug delivery to inflammatory cells. PMID:22929153

  3. Current Progress in the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Type-Selected Horizontally Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Imad; Gemming, Thomas; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Liu, Zhongfan; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2016-08-23

    Exciting electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes show promise as a future class of electronic materials, yet the manufacturing challenges remain significant. The key challenges are to determine fabrication approaches for complex and flexible arrangements of nanotube devices that are reliable, rapid, and reproducible. Realizing regular array structures is an important step toward this goal. Considerable efforts have and are being made in this vein, although the progress to date is somewhat modest. However, there are reasons to be optimistic. Positive steps of being able to control not only the spatial location and diameter of the tubes but also their electronic type (chiral control) are being made. Two primary approaches are being exploited to address the challenges. Tube deposition techniques, on the one hand, and direct growth of the desired tube at the target location are being explored. While this review covers both approaches, the emphasis is on recent developments in the direct fabrication of type-selected horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition. PMID:27427780

  4. Analysis of Stress Responsive Genes Induced by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in BJ Foreskin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda; Yog, Rajeshwari; Periakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Thomas, Renard; Barrera, Enrique V.; Rice-Ficht, Allison C.; Wilson, Bobby L.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is finding its use as a potential technology in consumer products, defense, electronics, and medical applications by exploiting the properties of nanomaterials. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are novel forms of these nanomaterials with potential for large applications. However, the toxicity studies on this material are not explored in detail and therefore limiting its use. It has been earlier reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes induces oxidative stress and also dictates activation of specific signaling pathway in keratinocytes. The present study explores the effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on stress genes in human BJ Foreskin cells. The results show induction of oxidative stress in BJ Foreskin cells by single-walled carbon nanotubes and increase in stress responsive genes. The genes included inducible genes like HMOX1, HMOX2, and Cyp1B1. In addition we validated increase for four genes by SWCNT, namely ATM, CCNC, DNAJB4, and GADD45A by RT-PCR. Moreover results of the altered stress related genes have been discussed and that partially explains some of the toxic responses induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17450800

  5. Phosphatidylserine and FVa Regulate FXa Structure

    PubMed Central

    Srivasatava, Kinshuk Raj; Majumder, Rinku; Kane, William H.; Quinn-Allen, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Human coagulation factor Xa (FXa) plays a key role in blood coagulation by activating prothrombin to thrombin on “stimulated” platelet membranes in the presence of its cofactor factor Va (FVa). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on activated platelet membranes promotes prothrombin activation by FXa by allosterically regulating FXa. To identify the structural basis of this allosteric regulation, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to monitor changes in FXa length in response 1] to soluble PS (dicaproyl-phosphatidylserine; C6PS), 2] to PS membranes, and 3] to FVa in the presence of C6PS and membranes. We incorporated a FRET pair with donor (fluorescein) at the active site and acceptor (Alexa fluor 555) at FXa N-terminus near the membrane. The results demonstrated that FXa structure changes upon binding of C6PS to two sites, a regulatory site (Reg site) at the N-terminus (previously identified as involving the Gla and EGFN domains) and a presumptive protein-recognition site in the catalytic domain (Prot site). Binding of C6PS to the regulatory site increased the inter-probe distance by ~ 3 Å, while saturation of both sites further increased the distance by ~ 6.4 Å. FXa binding to a membrane produced a smaller length increase (~1.4 Å), indicating that FXa has a somewhat different structure on a membrane than when bound to C6PS in solution. However, when both FVa2 (a FVa glycoform) and either C6PS or PS-containing membranes bound to FXa, the overall change in length was comparable (~ 5.6–5.8 Å), indicating that C6PS and PS-containing membranes in conjunction with FVa2 have comparable regulatory effects on FXa. We conclude that the similar functional regulation of FXa by C6PS or membranes in conjunction with FVa2 correlates with similar structural regulation. The results demonstrate the usefulness of FRET in analyzing structure-function relationships in FXa and in the FXa.FVa2 complex. PMID:24467409

  6. Review of Laser Ablation Process for Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The original method developed by researchers at Rice University utilized a "double pulse laser oven" process. A graphite target containing about 1 atomic percent of metal catalysts is ablated inside a 1473K oven using laser pulses (10 ns pulse width) in slow flowing argon. Two YAG lasers with a green pulse (532 nm) followed by an IR pulse (1064 nm) with a 50 ns delay are used for ablation. This set up produced single wall carbon nanotube material with about 70% purity having a diameter distribution peaked around 1.4 nm. The impurities consist of fullerenes, metal catalyst clusters (10 to 100 nm diameter) and amorphous carbon. The rate of production with the initial set up was about 60 mg per hour with 10Hz laser systems. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to improve the rate, consistency and study effects of different process parameters on the quality and quantity of SWCNTs. These variations include one to three YAG laser systems (Green, Green and IR), different pulse widths (nano to microseconds as well as continuous) and different laser wavelengths (Alexandrite, CO, CO2, free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). It is noted that yield from the single laser (Green or IR) systems is only a fraction of the two laser systems. The yield seemed to scale up with the repetition rate of the laser systems (10 to 60 Hz) and depended on the beam uniformity and quality of the laser pulses. The shift to longer wavelength lasers (free electron, CO and CO2) did not improve the quality, but increased the rate of production because these lasers are either continuous (CW) or high repetition rate pulses (kHz to MHz). The average power and the peak power of the lasers seem to influence the yields. Very high peak powers (MegaWatts per square centimeter) are noted to increase ablation of bigger particles with reduced yields of SWCNTs. Increased average powers

  7. Systematic conversion of single walled carbon nanotubes into n-type thermoelectric materials by molecular dopants.

    PubMed

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. -4.4 eV and ca. -5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules. PMID:24276090

  8. Dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in alkanol-cholic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    A procedure for dispersing the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for preparing stable suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in various alcohols was described. The obtained suspensions were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The solubility of the single-walled carbon nanotubes in alcohols was found to depend on the concentration of cholic acid. The ethanol-surfactant mixture was shown to be the best solvent for all alkanol-cholic acid mixtures (0.018 mol/kg) under study used for preparing time-stable suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The dissolving ability of aliphatic alcohols was found to decrease in the series: ethanol-isopropanol- tert-butanol-butanol-propanol.

  9. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  10. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  11. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Weihua E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn; Cao, Jianshu; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2014-01-28

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  12. Phosphatidylserine exposure is required for ADAM17 sheddase function

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Anselm; Kordowski, Felix; Büch, Joscha; Maretzky, Thorsten; Evers, Astrid; Andrä, Jörg; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Michalek, Matthias; Lorenzen, Inken; Somasundaram, Prasath; Tholey, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Kunzelmann, Karl; Heinbockel, Lena; Nehls, Christian; Gutsmann, Thomas; Grötzinger, Joachim; Bhakdi, Sucharit; Reiss, Karina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17, a prominent member of the ‘Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase' (ADAM) family, controls vital cellular functions through cleavage of transmembrane substrates. Here we present evidence that surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) is pivotal for ADAM17 to exert sheddase activity. PS exposure is tightly coupled to substrate shedding provoked by diverse ADAM17 activators. PS dependency is demonstrated in the following: (a) in Raji cells undergoing apoptosis; (b) in mutant PSA-3 cells with manipulatable PS content; and (c) in Scott syndrome lymphocytes genetically defunct in their capacity to externalize PS in response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. Soluble phosphorylserine but not phosphorylcholine inhibits substrate cleavage. The isolated membrane proximal domain (MPD) of ADAM17 binds to PS but not to phosphatidylcholine liposomes. A cationic PS-binding motif is identified in this domain, replacement of which abrogates liposome-binding and renders the protease incapable of cleaving its substrates in cells. We speculate that surface-exposed PS directs the protease to its targets where it then executes its shedding function. PMID:27161080

  13. Phosphatidylserine exposure is required for ADAM17 sheddase function.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Anselm; Kordowski, Felix; Büch, Joscha; Maretzky, Thorsten; Evers, Astrid; Andrä, Jörg; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Michalek, Matthias; Lorenzen, Inken; Somasundaram, Prasath; Tholey, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Kunzelmann, Karl; Heinbockel, Lena; Nehls, Christian; Gutsmann, Thomas; Grötzinger, Joachim; Bhakdi, Sucharit; Reiss, Karina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17, a prominent member of the 'Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase' (ADAM) family, controls vital cellular functions through cleavage of transmembrane substrates. Here we present evidence that surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) is pivotal for ADAM17 to exert sheddase activity. PS exposure is tightly coupled to substrate shedding provoked by diverse ADAM17 activators. PS dependency is demonstrated in the following: (a) in Raji cells undergoing apoptosis; (b) in mutant PSA-3 cells with manipulatable PS content; and (c) in Scott syndrome lymphocytes genetically defunct in their capacity to externalize PS in response to intracellular Ca(2+) elevation. Soluble phosphorylserine but not phosphorylcholine inhibits substrate cleavage. The isolated membrane proximal domain (MPD) of ADAM17 binds to PS but not to phosphatidylcholine liposomes. A cationic PS-binding motif is identified in this domain, replacement of which abrogates liposome-binding and renders the protease incapable of cleaving its substrates in cells. We speculate that surface-exposed PS directs the protease to its targets where it then executes its shedding function. PMID:27161080

  14. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Bruce Weisman, R.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and

  15. Limits of the PECVD process for single wall carbon nanotubes growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, A. M.; Granier, A.; Dubosc, M.

    2006-04-01

    This Letter explores the capabilities of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition to grow vertical oriented single wall, double wall or multi walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our dual process uses high-density low-pressure plasma excited by electron cyclotron resonance using acetylene diluted in ammonia. The early stages of CNTs synthesis have been probed taking advantage of the low growth rate of our process. Two antagonist effects have been shown up: the formation of catalyzed carbon nanotubes against ion assisted bonds breaking. The limits of plasma single wall CNTs growth are discussed and transitory stages have been revealed for the first time.

  16. Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by in situ Polymerization Under Sonication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; St.Clair, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  17. Free vibration analysis of fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. D.; Lu, C.; Rajendran, S.; Liew, K. M.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of fluid flow on the free vibration and instability of fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotubes is studied. The possibility of developing a technique to measure the mass flow rate of fluid is examined. Atomistic simulations and the continuum beam model are used. Simulations are performed to quantify the inertial, stiffness, Coriolis, and centrifugal forces generated by flow during the free vibration. A numerical expression is developed to measure the mass flow rate of the fluid velocities up to 40% of the critical flow velocity. This observation is useful to quantify the mass flow measurement of fluid conveying single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  18. Collision-induced fusion of two single-walled carbon nanotubes: A quantitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Fei; Meng, Xiang-Rui; Wang, Dong-Qi; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence processes of two (6, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated via coaxial collision based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics method. According to the structure characteristics of the nanotubes, five impact cases are studied to explore the coalescence processes of the nanotubes. The simulation shows that various kinds of carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene sheets, graphene nanoribbons, and single-walled carbon nanotubes with larger diameters, are created after collision. Moreover, some defects formed in the carbon nanomaterials can be eliminated, and even the final configurations which are originally fragmented can almost become intact structures by properly quenching and annealing.

  19. Investigation on vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes by variational iteration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi Asoor, A. A.; Valipour, P.; Ghasemi, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the variational iteration method (VIM) has been used to investigate the non-linear vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based on the nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory. The accuracy of results is examined by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method. Comparison between VIM solutions with numerical results leads to highly accurate solutions. Also, the behavior of deflection and frequency in vibrations of SWCNTs are studied. The results show that frequency of single walled carbon nanotube versus amplitude increases by increasing the values of B.

  20. Bolometric detector on the basis of single-wall carbon nanotube/polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Ali E.

    2008-10-01

    Infrared imaging sensors that operate without cryogenic cooling have the potential to provide the military or civilian users with infrared vision capabilities packaged in a camera of extremely small size, weight and power consumption. We present here the uncooled bolometric sensor on the basis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) polymer composite with enhanced sensitivity. The voltage responsivity of device working at room temperatures exceeds 150 V/W. The absorption coefficient of single-wall carbon nanotubes was increased by involving Forster type energy transfer from polymer film to dispersed SWNT. The temperature gradient of resistivity was substantially improved by chemical functionalization of SWNT.

  1. Process for separating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for separating semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes is disclosed. The method utilizes separation agents that preferentially associate with semiconducting nanotubes due to the electrical nature of the nanotubes. The separation agents are those that have a planar orientation, .pi.-electrons available for association with the surface of the nanotubes, and also include a soluble portion of the molecule. Following preferential association of the separation agent with the semiconducting nanotubes, the agent/nanotubes complex is soluble and can be solubilized with the solution enriched in semiconducting nanotubes while the residual solid is enriched in metallic nanotubes.

  2. Temperature threshold and water role in CVD growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Junfeng; Motta, Marcelo; Angels, Volker; Luo, Jikui; Johnson, Brian

    2016-02-01

    An in-depth understanding of the growth process of single walled carbon nanotubes is of vital importance to the control of the yield of the material and its carbon structure. Using a nickel/silica (Ni/SiOx) catalyst we have conducted a series of growth experiments with a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) system. We find that there is a temperature threshold in the CVD process, and if the reaction temperature sets above this threshold there will be no growth of the nanotubes. In association with this temperature effect, water plays an important role in the promotion or termination of the growth of single walled carbon nanotubes.

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongho; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Ural, Ant

    2006-10-09

    The authors present experimental evidence that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be grown by chemical vapor deposition from ion implanted iron catalyst. They systematically characterize the effect of ion implantation dose and energy on the catalyst nanoparticles and nanotubes formed at 900 deg. C. They also fabricate a micromachined silicon grid for direct transmission electron microscopy characterization of the as-grown nanotubes. This work opens up the possibility of controlling the origin of single-walled nanotubes at the nanometer scale and of integrating them into nonplanar three-dimensional device structures with precise dose control.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of electron-irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Kimoto, Yoshihisa; Tada, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hideki; Akita, Seiji; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2007-05-15

    Molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate electron-irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes. We have proposed a simulation model which includes the interaction between a high-energy incident electron and a carbon atom, based on Monte Carlo method using the elastic-scattering cross section. The atomic level behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube under electron irradiation is demonstrated in nanosecond time scale. The incident electron energy, tube diameter, and tube temperature dependences of electron-irradiation effects are studied with the simulation.

  5. Heat-induced transformations in coronene-single-walled carbon nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Alexander I.; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Krylov, Alexander S.; Vtyurin, Alexander N.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2016-03-01

    Coronene molecules are used as filler for single-walled carbon nanotubes. Variation of the synthesis temperature regimes leads to formation of different types of carbon nanostructures inside the nanotubes. Accurate determination of the structures by optical spectroscopy methods remains an important issue in composite materials. Clear distinction between adsorbed organic molecules on the surface of the tubes and filled structures may be accessed by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. We perform additional heat treatment after the initial synthesis procedure and show the evolution of the optical spectral features corresponding to the filled structures and adsorbed materials on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  6. Single Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Junction Biosensor for Detection of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kara; Kim, Chong-Tai; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hyeon Gyu; Jun, Soojin

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne pathogen detection using biomolecules and nanomaterials may lead to platforms for rapid and simple electronic biosensing. Integration of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and immobilized antibodies into a disposable bio-nano combinatorial junction sensor was fabricated for detection of Escherichia coli K-12. Gold tungsten wires (50 µm diameter) coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and SWCNTs were aligned to form a crossbar junction, which was functionalized with streptavidin and biotinylated antibodies to allow for enhanced specificity towards targeted microbes. In this study, changes in electrical current (ΔI) after bioaffinity reactions between bacterial cells (E. coli K-12) and antibodies on the SWCNT surface were monitored to evaluate the sensor's performance. The averaged ΔI increased from 33.13 nA to 290.9 nA with the presence of SWCNTs in a 108 CFU/mL concentration of E. coli, thus showing an improvement in sensing magnitude. Electrical current measurements demonstrated a linear relationship (R2 = 0.973) between the changes in current and concentrations of bacterial suspension in range of 102–105 CFU/mL. Current decreased as cell concentrations increased, due to increased bacterial resistance on the bio-nano modified surface. The detection limit of the developed sensor was 102 CFU/mL with a detection time of less than 5 min with nanotubes. Therefore, the fabricated disposable junction biosensor with a functionalized SWCNT platform shows potential for high-performance biosensing and application as a detection device for foodborne pathogens. PMID:25233366

  7. Development of new techniques for functionalizing single-wall carbon nanotubes for composite and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Jared Lee

    Building from established methods of using diazonium salts to derivatize single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), new methodologies for achieving functionalized individual nanotubes that are compatible with a wide variety of materials have been developed. The use of aryl triazenes as diazonium precursors to functionalize surfactant stabilized suspensions of individual SWNTs has resulted in the ability to synthesize more complex molecules bearing a diazonium salt precursor. Prior to this work, such functionality was difficult to install in complex molecules due to the required linearity of diazonium salt synthesis. A protocol to access individualized SWNTs without the use of scale-limiting techniques such as high powered sonication and centrifugation was achieved by the use of oleum as a solvent for underivatized SWNTs. This disentangled suspension of SWNTs was then treated with a modification of an established in-situ diazonium functionalization protocol to yield alcohol and water-soluble, exfoliated, nonroping SWNTs. Functionalized SWNTs were used as polymerization initiators for both anionic and atom transfer radical polymerization. They were used to reinforce poly(dimethylsiloxane) and poly(propylene fumarate) based composites. The functionalized SWNTs were also used as a support for neuronal interface systems and to reinforce the collagen network in rat cervical tissue. Through continued functionalization and PEGylation (poly(ethylene glycol) attachment) of cut SWNTs, the development of a SWNT-based, viable nanovector core has been achieved. Continued functionalization provides one with the ability to further derivatize aqueous suspensions of previously functionalized SWNTs, while the PEGylation of cut SWNTs offers solubility in water, irrigation saline, and phosphate buffered saline. Using the developed SWNT-based nanovector core, molecules that are relevant for attachment to a nanovector were targeted. This includes a fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC

  8. Ab initio computational investigation of physisorption of molecular hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Vilaplana, A

    2005-06-01

    Using relatively approximated methods, physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a mechanism to develop hydrogen storage systems has been only partially investigated in literature. Here, we use ab initio molecular-orbital theory, at benchmark quality level, to provide a more complete description about the mentioned mechanism. Physisorption inside and outside achiral-armchair and zigzag-SWCNTs, in the range of diameters from about 6 A-chiral vectors (5,5) and (8,0)-to more than 30 A-chiral vectors (30,30) and (40,0)-was examined. Perpendicular, longitudinal, and transversal configurations, with the hydrogen molecule centered on an aromatic ring, were taken into account. SWCNTs were modeled as curved coronenelike (C24H12) graphene sheets. Local modeling strategies, using more complete basis sets for the adsorbate and for the nearest atoms to the adsorbate than for the lion's share of the substrate, at the Moller-Plesset second-order correlation level, were selected for numerical treatment. Basis-set superposition errors were corrected by means of the counterpoise method of Bois and Bernardi. It was found that physisorption of molecular hydrogen on SWCNTs would depend mainly on the diameter being virtually independent of the chirality. Lowest physisorption energies, up to 20% less than that on planar graphene, would be reached outside nanotubes in the range of diameters of 6-10 A. For hydrogen storage purposes, highest physisorption energies, up to 40% greater than that on planar graphene, but not more, would be reached inside nanotubes in the relatively narrow range of diameters of 10-20 A. Finally, for diameters from 20 A onwards physisorption of molecular hydrogen on SWCNTs would be in the range of +/-10% of that on planar graphene. To our knowledge, this would be the most complete and realistic theoretical investigation of the target physisorption mechanism to date. PMID:15974779

  9. Oxidative lipidomics of γ-radiation-induced lung injury: mass spectrometric characterization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Tyurina, Yulia Y; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Kapralova, Valentyna I; Wasserloos, Karla; Mosher, Mackenzie; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S; Pitt, Bruce R; Kagan, Valerian E

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative damage plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of γ-radiation-induced lung injury. Endothelium is a preferred target for early radiation-induced damage and apoptosis. Given the newly discovered role of oxidized phospholipids in apoptotic signaling, we performed oxidative lipidomics analysis of phospholipids in irradiated mouse lungs and cultured mouse lung endothelial cells. C57BL/6NHsd female mice were subjected to total-body irradiation (10 Gy, 15 Gy) and euthanized 24 h thereafter. Mouse lung endothelial cells were analyzed 48 h after γ irradiation (15 Gy). We found that radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by non-random oxidation of phospholipids. Cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine were the major oxidized phospholipids, while more abundant phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine) remained non-oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis revealed the formation of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine oxygenated molecular species in the irradiated lung and cells. Analysis of fatty acids after hydrolysis of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine by phospholipase A(2) revealed the presence of mono-hydroperoxy and/or mono-hydroxy/mono-epoxy, mono-hydroperoxy/mono-oxo molecular species of linoleic acid. We speculate that cyt c-driven oxidations of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine associated with the execution of apoptosis in pulmonary endothelial cells are important contributors to endothelium dysfunction in γ-radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:21338246

  10. Oxidative Lipidomics of γ-Radiation-Induced Lung Injury: Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Cardiolipin and Phosphatidylserine Peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentyna I.; Wasserloos, Karla; Mosher, Mackenzie; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of γ-radiation-induced lung injury. Endothelium is a preferred target for early radiation-induced damage and apoptosis. Given the newly discovered role of oxidized phospholipids in apoptotic signaling, we performed oxidative lipidomics analysis of phospholipids in irradiated mouse lungs and cultured mouse lung endothelial cells. C57BL/6NHsd female mice were subjected to total-body irradiation (10 Gy, 15 Gy) and euthanized 24 h thereafter. Mouse lung endothelial cells were analyzed 48 h after γ irradiation (15 Gy). We found that radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by non-random oxidation of phospholipids. Cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine were the major oxidized phospholipids, while more abundant phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine) remained non-oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis revealed the formation of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine oxygenated molecular species in the irradiated lung and cells. Analysis of fatty acids after hydrolysis of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine by phospholipase A2 revealed the presence of mono-hydroperoxy and/or mono-hydroxy/mono-epoxy, mono-hydroperoxy/mono-oxo molecular species of linoleic acid. We speculate that cyt c-driven oxidations of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine associated with the execution of apoptosis in pulmonary endothelial cells are important contributors to endothelium dysfunction in γ-radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:21338246

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Parathion, Malathion, Diazinon, and Pirimiphos Methyl in Dried Medicinal Plants Using Solid-Phase Microextraction Fibre Coated with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Salimi, Mona; Sarkhail, Parisa; Rastkari, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    A reliable and sensitive headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of different organophosphorus pesticides in dried medicinal plant samples is described. The analytes were extracted by single-walled carbon nanotubes as a new solid-phase microextraction adsorbent. The developed method showed good performance. For diazinon and pirimiphos methyl calibration, curves were linear (r2 ≥ 0.993) over the concentration ranges from 1.5 to 300 ng g−1, and the limit of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 ng g−1. For parathion and malathion, the linear range and limit of detection were 2.5–300 (r2 ≥ 0.991) and 0.5 ng g−1, respectively. In addition, a comparative study between the single-walled carbon nanotubes and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre for the determination of target analytes was carried out. Single-walled carbon nanotubes fibre showed higher extraction capacity, better thermal stability (over 350°C), and longer lifespan (over 250 times) than the commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre. The developed method was successfully applied to determine target organophosphorus pesticides in real samples. PMID:22645439

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene nanodelivery of gambogic acid increases its cytotoxicity in breast and pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Lamya M; Mahmood, Meena; Pyrek, Sebastian J.; Fahmi, Tariq; Xu, Yang; Mustafa, Thikra; Nima, Zeid A.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Casciano, Dan; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes were used to deliver the natural low-toxicity drug gambogic acid (GA) to breast and pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, and the effectiveness of this complex in suppressing cellular integrity was assessed. Cytotoxicity was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release, mitochondria dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation, intracellular lipid content, and membrane permeability/caspase activity. The nanomaterials showed no toxicity at the concentrations used, and the antiproliferative effects of GA were significantly enhanced by nanodelivery. The results suggest that these complexes inhibit human breast and pancreatic cancer cells grown in vitro. This analysis represents a first step toward assessing their effectiveness in more complex, targeted, nanodelivery systems. PMID:25220893

  13. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Niazi, Asad; Biradar, Ashok M.; Rajesh E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu; Mulchandani, Ashok E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu

    2014-10-13

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  14. Engineered Carbohydrate-Binding Module (CBM) Protein-Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,Q.; Song, Q.; Ai, X.; McDonald, T. J.; Long, H.; Ding. S. Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Rumbles, G.

    2009-01-01

    Engineered protein, CtCBM4, the first carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) protein is successfully used to debundle and suspend single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) effectively in aqueous solution, which opens up a new avenue in further functionalizing and potential selectively fractionating SWNTs for diverse biology- and/or energy-related applications.

  15. Chirality sensitive binding of tryptophan enantiomers with pristine single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Roy, Sarita; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-07-28

    We report the differential binding nature of pristine single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with tryptophan enantiomers. The differential co-operative response between the pristine SWNTs (topologically chiral) and L- and D-tryptophan (geometrically chiral) provides the insight that geometrical chirality itself manifests with topological chirality in a complex way. PMID:24921981

  16. One-step synthesis of fluorescently labelled, single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Guaragno, Michelle L; Gottardi, Riccardo; Fedorchak, Morgan V; Roy, Abhijit; Kumta, Prashant N; Little, Steven R

    2015-12-18

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be labelled with functional moieties that endow them with a number of unique characteristics, which can be applicable to biomedical applications such as imaging. Herein we describe a facile, one-step esterification process to functionalize SWNT with fluorescein. PMID:26458421

  17. MICROWAVE-INDUCED RAPID CHEMICAL FUNCTIONALIZATION OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES (R830901)

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract

    The microwave-induced chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. The major advantage of this high-energy procedure is that it reduced the reaction time to the order of minutes and the number of steps in the reac...

  18. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  19. Environmental Detection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Utilizing Near-Infrared Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a growing number of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) in modern technologies and, subsequently, growth in production of CNT has expanded rapidly. Single-walled CNT (SWCNT) consist of a graphene sheet rolled up into a tube. With growing manufacture and use, the ...

  20. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3− precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance. PMID:27025784

  1. Aqueous-phase synthesis of monodisperse plasmonic gold nanocrystals using shortened single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Moon, Hyung-Mo; Benamara, Mourad; Sakon, Joshua; Salamo, Gregory J; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2010-10-14

    Monodisperse gold nanocrystals with unique near-infrared optical properties were synthesized by simple mixing of highly shortened and well disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes and chloroauric acid in water at ambient conditions with a step-wise increase of gold ion concentration. PMID:20737105

  2. On the Likelihood of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Causing Adverse Marine Ecological Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief article discusses the ecological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)in the marine environment. Based on new research and a review of the scientific literature, the paper concludes that SWNTs are unlikely to cause adverse ecological effects in the marine ...

  3. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  4. Delivering Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to the Nucleus Using Engineered Nuclear Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Patrick D; Ganesh, Sairaam; Qin, Zhao; Holt, Brian D; Buehler, Markus J; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-02-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential for cell-based therapies due to their unique intrinsic optical and physical characteristics. Consequently, broad classes of dispersants have been identified that individually suspend SWCNTs in water and cell media in addition to reducing nanotube toxicity to cells. Unambiguous control and verification of the localization and distribution of SWCNTs within cells, particularly to the nucleus, is needed to advance subcellular technologies utilizing nanotubes. Here we report delivery of SWCNTs to the nucleus by noncovalently attaching the tail domain of the nuclear protein lamin B1 (LB1), which we engineer from the full-length LMNB1 cDNA. More than half of this low molecular weight globular protein is intrinsically disordered but has an immunoglobulin-fold composed of a central hydrophobic core, which is highly suitable for associating with SWCNTs, stably suspending SWCNTs in water and cell media. In addition, LB1 has an exposed nuclear localization sequence to promote active nuclear import of SWCNTs. These SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions in water and cell media display near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra with sharp van Hove peaks and an NIR fluorescence spectra, suggesting that LB1 individually disperses nanotubes. The dispersing capability of SWCNTs by LB1 is similar to that by albumin proteins. The SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions with concentrations ≥150 μg/mL (≥30 μg/mL) in water (cell media) remain stable for ≥75 days (≥3 days) at 4 °C (37 °C). Further, molecular dynamics modeling of association of LB1 with SWCNTs reveal that the exposure of the nuclear localization sequence is independent of LB1 binding conformation. Measurements from confocal Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, NIR fluorescence imaging of SWCNTs, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy show that millions of these SWCNTs-LB1 complexes enter HeLa cells, localize to the nucleus of cells, and interact with DNA. We postulate that the

  5. 40 CFR 721.10277 - Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (generic) (P-10-40).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... not intended to undergo further processing except for mechanical processing. (2) The significant new... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Single-walled and multi-walled carbon... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10277 Single-walled and multi-walled...

  6. An ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a copper oxide nanowires/single-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei; Hou, Changjun; Huo, Danqun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huanbao

    2016-02-01

    Here, we developed a novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor to detect specific-sequence target DNA. The biosensor was based on a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH). The resulting CuO NWs/SWCNTs layers exhibited a good differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) current response for the target DNA sequences, which we attributed to the properties of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. CuO NWs and SWCNTs hybrid composites with highly conductive and biocompatible nanostructure were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Immobilization of the probe DNA on the electrode surface was largely improved due to the unique synergetic effect of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. DPV was applied to monitor the DNA hybridization event, using adriamycin as an electrochemical indicator. Under optimal conditions, the peak currents of adriamycin were linear with the logarithm of target DNA concentrations (ranging from 1.0 × 10-14 to 1.0 × 10-8 M), with a detection limit of 3.5 × 10-15 M (signal/noise ratio of 3). The biosensor also showed high selectivity to single-base mismatched target DNA. Compared with other electrochemical DNA biosensors, we showed that the proposed biosensor is simple to implement, with good stability and high sensitivity.

  7. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed.

  8. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  9. Mass-spectrometric analysis of hydroperoxy- and hydroxy-derivatives of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine in cells and tissues induced by pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Tungekar, Muhammad A.; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Bayir, Hülya; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Shvedova, Anna A.; Pitt, Bruce; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidation of two anionic phospholipids - cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria and phosphatidylserine (PS) in extramitochondrial compartments - are important signaling events, particularly during the execution of programmed cell death and clearance of apoptotic cells. Quantitative analysis of CL and PS oxidation products is central to understanding their molecular mechanisms of action. We combined the identification of diverse phospholipid molecular species by ESI-MS with quantitative assessments of lipid hydroperoxides using a fluorescence HPLC-based protocol. We characterized CL and PS oxidation products formed in a model system (cyt c/H2O2), in apoptotic cells (neurons, pulmonary artery endothelial cells) and mouse lung under inflammatory/oxidative stress conditions (hyperoxia, inhalation of single walled carbon nanotubes). Our results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for quantitative assessments, identification of individual molecular species and structural characterization of anionic phospholipids that are involved in oxidative modification in cells and tissues. PMID:19328050

  10. Thin single-wall BN-nanotubes formed inside carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Warner, Jamie H.; Yamamoto, Yuta; Arai, Shigeo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2013-01-01

    We report a high yield synthesis of single-wall boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), a nano-templated reaction, using ammonia borane complexes (ABC) as a precursor. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), high angle annular dark field (HAADF)-scanning TEM (STEM), electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and high resolution EELS mapping using aberration-corrected TEM system clearly show the formation of thin SWBNNTs inside SWCNTs. We have found that the yield of the SWBNNT formation is high and that the most of ABC molecules decompose and fuse to form the thin BNNTs at a temperature of 1,673 K having a narrow diameter distribution of 0.7 ± 0.1 nm. Optical absorption measurements suggest that the band gap of the thin SWBNNTs is about 6.0 eV, which provide the ideal insulator nanotubes with very small diameters. PMID:23459405

  11. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  12. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2015-06-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp3 bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  13. A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Ishii, Juntaro; Kishida, Hideo; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Futaba, Don N.; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Among all known materials, we found that a forest of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes behaves most similarly to a black body, a theoretical material that absorbs all incident light. A requirement for an object to behave as a black body is to perfectly absorb light of all wavelengths. This important feature has not been observed for real materials because materials intrinsically have specific absorption bands because of their structure and composition. We found a material that can absorb light almost perfectly across a very wide spectral range (0.2–200 μm). We attribute this black body behavior to stem from the sparseness and imperfect alignment of the vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:19339498

  14. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Johansson, Leena-Sisko

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  15. Characterizing energy dissipation in single-walled carbon nanotube polycarbonate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.; Suhr, Jonghwan; Joshi, Amit; Kane, Ravi S.; Schadler, Linda S.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Bartolucci, Steve

    2005-08-01

    In this study, single-walled carbon nanotube and bisphenol-A-polycarbonate composite beams were fabricated by a solution mixing process and dynamic (cyclic) load tests were performed to characterize energy dissipation. We report up to an order of magnitude (>1000%) increase in loss modulus of the polycarbonate system with the addition of 2% weight fraction of oxidized single-walled nanotube fillers. We show that the increase in damping is derived from frictional sliding at the nanotube-polymer interfaces. The nanoscale dimensions of the tubes not only result in large interfacial contact area, thereby generating high damping efficiency, but also enable seamless integration of the filler materials into the composite structure.

  16. Electron backscattering on single-wall carbon nanotubes observed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauss, W.; Bergeron, D. J.; Freitag, M.; Kane, C. L.; Mele, E. J.; Johnson, A. T.

    1999-09-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes, seamless cylindrical molecules formed from a graphene sheet, are either conducting or semiconducting, depending on the particular "wrapping vector" that defines the waist of the tube. Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have tested this idea by simultaneously measuring a tube's lattice structure and electronic properties. Here we present a series of STM images of single-wall carbon nanotubes with a strikingly rich set of superstructures. The observed patterns can be understood as due to interference between propagating electron waves that are reflected from defects on the tube walls and ends, or as intrinsic to states propagating on semiconducting tubes. The measured broken symmetries can be used to directly probe electronic backscattering on the tube and provide a key element in the understanding of low-energy electron transport on these structures.

  17. Coalescence of parallel finite length single-walled carbon nanotubes by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xueming; Qiao, Fangwei; Zhu, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Pu; Chen, Dongci; To, Albert C.

    2013-03-01

    Fusion of parallel finite length single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without initially introducing structural defects is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Three different models that impose different constraints are adopted to simulate the heat welding and coalescence of the parallel SWCNTs. It is found that the ultrathin as well as some larger diameter, finite length SWCNTs, for example (8,0) and (10,0) SWCNTs can be coalesced to become a unique single-walled tube solely via high temperature heat treatment. It is observed that the ends of the nanotubes are prone to close at high temperature during the high temperature treatment. In addition, the fusion process and mechanism of parallel SWCNTs with different lengths and radii are discussed.

  18. Preferential syntheses of semiconducting vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes for direct use in FETs.

    PubMed

    Qu, Liangti; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2008-09-01

    We have combined fast heating with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for preferential growth of semiconducting vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs). Raman spectroscopic estimation indicated a high yield of up to 96% semiconducting SWNTs in the VA-SWNT array. The as-synthesized semiconducting SWNTs can be used directly for fabricating FET devices without the need for any postsynthesis purification or separation. PMID:18665651

  19. Wrinkling and strain softening in single-wall carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, E K; Simien, D O; Fagan, J A; Huh, J Y; Chung, J Y; Hudson, S D; Obrzut, J; Douglas, J F; Stafford, C M

    2010-03-26

    The nonlinear elasticity of thin supported membranes assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes is analyzed through the wrinkling instability that develops under uniaxial compression. In contrast with thin polymer films, pristine nanotube membranes exhibit strong softening under finite strain associated with bond slip and network fracture. We model the response as a shift in percolation threshold generated by strain-induced nanotube alignment in accordance with theoretical predictions. PMID:20366547

  20. Chirality-dependent boron-mediated growth of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire, Joseph G.; Li, Lain-Jong; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Glerup, Marianne; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2005-11-01

    A change in the relative abundance of single-walled carbon nanotubes, due to the presence of both nitrogen and boron during synthesis, has been identified through Raman and absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy shows that for two specific branches boron mediates the growth of smaller-diameter zigzag or near-zigzag nanotubes. We combine our experimental results with an improved Kataura model to identify two of the preferentially grown species as (16,0) and (14,1).

  1. Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, D. A.; Bulyarskii, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated with the use of AM1 quantum-chemical semiempirical method. It has been found that regular hydrogen chemisorption deforms nanotubes, in some cases leading to stable prismatic modifications. The dependence of the adsorption energy on the density of hydrogen coverage has been found. A procedure for determining the adsorption energy by the spectra of thermally stimulated desorption has been proposed.

  2. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Márquez, Francisco; López, Vicente; Morant, Carmen; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Domingo, Concepción; Elizalde, Eduardo; Zamora, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Arrmore » ays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800°C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.« less

  3. Atomic layer deposition on suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes via gas-phase noncovalent functionalization.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Damon B; Gordon, Roy G

    2006-04-01

    Alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide gas and trimethylaluminum vapor are shown to functionalize the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a self-limited monolayer. Functionalized nanotube surfaces are susceptible to atomic layer deposition of continuous, radially isotropic material. This allows for the creation of coaxial nanotube structures of multiple materials with precisely controlled diameters. Functionalization involves only weak physical bonding, avoiding covalent modification, which should preserve the unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. PMID:16608267

  4. Dispersionless propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Roberto; Rossi, Fausto; Dolcini, Fabrizio

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes via a Lindblad-based density-matrix approach that enables us to account for both dissipation and decoherence effects induced by various phonon modes. We show that, while in semiconducting nanotubes the wavepacket experiences the typical dispersion of conventional materials, in metallic nanotubes its shape remains essentially unaltered, even in the presence of the electron-phonon coupling, up to micron distances at room temperature.

  5. Below-gap excitation of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soavi, G.; Grupp, A.; Budweg, A.; Scotognella, F.; Hefner, T.; Hertel, T.; Lanzani, G.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Cerullo, G.; Brida, D.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the optoelectronic properties of the semiconducting (6,5) species of single-walled carbon nanotubes by measuring ultrafast transient transmission changes with 20 fs time resolution. We demonstrate that photons with energy below the lowest exciton resonance efficiently lead to linear excitation of electronic states. This finding challenges the established picture of a vanishing optical absorption below the fundamental excitonic resonance. Our result points towards below-gap electronic states as an intrinsic property of semiconducting nanotubes.

  6. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  7. Observation of elastic deformations in single-walled carbon nanotubes by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, Wilfried; Bergeron, David J.; Johnson, Alan T.

    1998-08-11

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy is used to obtain atomically resolved images of single-walled carbon nanotubes, in ropes of several tens to hundreds of tubes. The images confirm that in this environment strong elastic deformations of the tube lattice occur frequently. In particular, bent and twisted tubes have been identified. The observed distortions could play an important role in explaining the electronic transport properties of nanotubes.

  8. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  9. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Alignment Mechanisms for Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Seunghun

    2002-01-01

    As proposed in our original proposal, we developed a new innovative method to assemble millions of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based circuit components as fast as conventional microfabrication processes. This method is based on surface template assembly strategy. The new method solves one of the major bottlenecks in carbon nanotube based electrical applications and, potentially, may allow us to mass produce a large number of SWCNT-based integrated devices of critical interests to NASA.

  10. Tutorial: Linear surface conductivity of an achiral single-wall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemilentsau, Andrei M.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical consideration of electromagnetic scattering by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and SWNT arrays requires knowledge of the linear surface conductivity of an SWNT. An expression for the surface conductivity of an infinitely long SWNT was derived by Slepyan et al. [Phys. Rev. B 60, 17136-17149 (1999)]. The twin purposes of this tutorial are to succinctly discuss the derivation using the density matrix formalism and to provide ready-to-use expressions.