Science.gov

Sample records for phosphoenolpyruvate induced starvation

  1. Propionate induces the bovine cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Donkin, Shawn S

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) is a critical enzyme within the metabolic networks for gluconeogenesis, hepatic energy metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle function, and is controlled by several transcription factors including hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether propionate regulates bovine PCK1 transcription. The second objective was to determine the action of cyclic AMP (cAMP), glucocorticoids, and insulin, hormonal cues known to modulate glucose metabolism, on bovine PCK1 transcriptional activity. The proximal promoter of the bovine PCK1 gene was ligated to a Firefly luciferase reporter and transfected into H4IIE hepatoma cells. Cells were exposed to treatments for 23 h and luciferase activity was determined in cell lysates. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was linearly induced by propionate, and maximally increased 7-fold with 2.5 mM propionate, which was not muted by 100 nM insulin. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was increased 1-fold by either 1.0 mM cAMP or 5.0µM dexamethasone, and 2.2-fold by their combination. Induction by cAMP and dexamethasone was repressed 50% by 100 nM insulin. Propionate, cAMP, and dexamethasone acted synergistically to induce the PCK1 promoter activity. Propionate-responsive regions, identified by 5' deletion analysis, were located between -1,238 and -409 bp and between -85 and +221 bp. Deletions of the core sequences of the 2 putative HNF4α sites decreased the responsiveness to propionate by approximately 40%. These data indicate that propionate regulates its own metabolism through transcriptional stimulation of the bovine PCK1 gene. This induction is mediated, in part, by the 2 putative HNF4α binding sites in the bovine PCK1 promoter. PMID:27289145

  2. Postmortem biochemistry in suspected starvation-induced ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Tettamanti, Camilla; Augsburger, Marc; Burkhardt, Sandra; Sabatasso, Sara; Lardi, Christelle; Werner, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Significantly increased blood ketone body levels can be occasionally observed in the forensic setting in situations other than exposure to cold, diabetic or alcoholic ketoacidosis. Though infrequent, these cases do occur and deserve thorough evaluation in order to establish appropriate differential diagnoses and quantify the role that hyperketonemia may play in the death process. Starvation ketoacidosis is a rare cause of metabolic acidosis and is a phenomenon that occurs normally during fasting, as the body switches from carbohydrate to lipid energy sources. The levels of ketonemia in starvation ketoacidosis is usually mild in comparison to those seen in diabetic or alcoholic ketoacidosis. In the clinical setting, several cases of starvation-induced ketoacidosis mainly associated with gastric banding, pregnancy, malnutrition and low-carbohydrate diets have been reported. However, starvation ketosis causing severe metabolic acidosis has been rarely described in the medical literature. In the realm of forensic pathology, starvation-induced hyperketonemia has been rarely described. In this paper we present the postmortem biochemical results observed in situations of suspected starvation-induced hyperketonemia that underwent medico-legal examination. In all these cases, the diagnosis of starvation induced-hyperketonemia and the subsequent ketoacidosis was established per exclusionem based on all postmortem investigation findings. A review of the literature pertaining to the clinical diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis is also provided. PMID:27239954

  3. Starvation-induced dormancy in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    Isogenic bacterial populations can exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity. Phenotypic heterogeneity is often viewed as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with environmental fluctuations, and believed to be under genetic control. The experimental evidence of this view, however, is limited. Here, we report experimental evidence that prompts reconsideration of this view. Observing how starved E. coli cells resume growth upon nutrient upshift at the single-cell level in real time, we revealed that physiological and metabolic state of starved cells, as well as growth resumption kinetics, vary from cell to cell. Upon nutrient upshift, a majority of cells resume growth instantly, but a small fraction maintain a non-growth state for several hours or days (i.e., long lag time). Hence they are dormant cells. The fraction strongly depends on the duration of starvation. The dormancy does not confer resistance to starvation. Oxidative damage accumulated during starvation leads to the appearance of dormant cells. Taken together, our data suggests that a dormant subpopulation appears as an inevitable consequence of starvation, rather than cellular decision to cope with starvation. Hence, the existence of a genetic program and adaptive value as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with starvation stress may not be needed to explain the emergence of bacterial dormancy.

  4. Octopamine mediates starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Vivian; Tian, Yinjun; Qi, Wei; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Starved animals often exhibit elevated locomotion, which has been speculated to partly resemble foraging behavior and facilitate food acquisition and energy intake. Despite its importance, the neural mechanism underlying this behavior remains unknown in any species. In this study we confirmed and extended previous findings that starvation induced locomotor activity in adult fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. We also showed that starvation-induced hyperactivity was directed toward the localization and acquisition of food sources, because it could be suppressed upon the detection of food cues via both central nutrient-sensing and peripheral sweet-sensing mechanisms, via induction of food ingestion. We further found that octopamine, the insect counterpart of vertebrate norepinephrine, as well as the neurons expressing octopamine, were both necessary and sufficient for starvation-induced hyperactivity. Octopamine was not required for starvation-induced changes in feeding behaviors, suggesting independent regulations of energy intake behaviors upon starvation. Taken together, our results establish a quantitative behavioral paradigm to investigate the regulation of energy homeostasis by the CNS and identify a conserved neural substrate that links organismal metabolic state to a specific behavioral output. PMID:25848004

  5. STARVATION INDUCED PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL ATROPHY DIMINISHED WITH AGING

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Starvation induces small bowel atrophy with increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Here, we examined these parameters after starvation in aged animals. Methods Sixty-four 6 week-old and 26 month-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum fed or fasted group. The small bowel was harvested at 12, 48, and 72 hours following starvation. Proximal gut mucosal height was measured and epithelial cells counted. Apoptosis was identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Proliferation was determined by immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Comparison of fed vs. fasted and adult vs. old groups was done by one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s test and unpaired t-test. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results Aged mice had higher proximal gut weights, mucosal heights and cell numbers at baseline compared with the adult group (p<0.05). The rate of apoptosis was lower in the aged (p<0.05) while proliferation was not different between groups before starvation. After starvation, proximal gut wet weight decreased only in adult mice (p<0.05); Gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number decreased greater in adult than in aged mice (p<0.05). This was related to decreased proliferation only in the adult group (p<0.05). The fold of epithelial apoptosis increased was higher in the aged group than in the adult after starvation (p<0.05). Conclusions Gut mucosal kinetics change with age had lower rates of apoptosis and greater mucosal mass; the character of starvation-induced atrophy is diminished with aging. PMID:19126762

  6. Alternative scenarios of starvation-induced adaptation in Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Sergeeva, Iuliia; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Gogolev, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria have high adaptive potential that ensures their survival during various environmental challenges. To adapt, bacteria activate a physiological program of stress response that makes them able to persist under adverse conditions. The present study sought to examine the ability of a particular bacterial species to induce a stress response in alternative scenarios. Cells of the phytopathogenic microorganism Pectobacterium atrosepticum were taken as a model. The cells were exposed to starvation in different physiological states (actively growing exponential phase and stationary phase cells), and the resulting starving cultures were monitored using CFU counting, quantitative PCR and electron microscopy. When exponential phase cells were subjected to starvation, the nucleoids of the cells became condensed and their DNA was detected by qPCR less effectively than that of cells growing in nutrient-rich medium, or stationary phase cells after starvation. Exponential phase cells subjected to starvation showed increased expression of genes encoding DNA binding histone-like proteins, whereas, in cultures inoculated by stationary phase cells, cell-wall-deficient forms that were inefficient at colony forming and that had a non-culturable phenotype were formed. The cell-wall-deficient forms displayed reduced expression of genes encoding synthases of cell wall components. PMID:26912323

  7. Phosphate Starvation Induces the Sporulation Killing Factor of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Allenby, Nicholas E. E.; Watts, Carys A.; Homuth, Georg; Prágai, Zoltán; Wipat, Anil; Ward, Alan C.; Harwood, Colin R.

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces and exports a peptide sporulation killing factor (SkfA) that induces lysis of sibling cells. skfA is part of the skf operon (skfA-H), which is responsible for immunity to SkfA, as well as for production and export of SkfA. Here we report that transcription of skfA is markedly induced when cells of B. subtilis are subjected to phosphate starvation. The role of PhoP in regulation of the skf operon was confirmed by in vitro gel shift assays, which showed that this operon is a new member of the PhoP regulon. A putative stem-loop structure in the skfA-skfB intergenic region is proposed to act as a stabilizer of an skfA-specific transcript. PMID:16816204

  8. Phosphate starvation induces the sporulation killing factor of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Allenby, Nicholas E E; Watts, Carys A; Homuth, Georg; Prágai, Zoltán; Wipat, Anil; Ward, Alan C; Harwood, Colin R

    2006-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces and exports a peptide sporulation killing factor (SkfA) that induces lysis of sibling cells. skfA is part of the skf operon (skfA-H), which is responsible for immunity to SkfA, as well as for production and export of SkfA. Here we report that transcription of skfA is markedly induced when cells of B. subtilis are subjected to phosphate starvation. The role of PhoP in regulation of the skf operon was confirmed by in vitro gel shift assays, which showed that this operon is a new member of the PhoP regulon. A putative stem-loop structure in the skfA-skfB intergenic region is proposed to act as a stabilizer of an skfA-specific transcript. PMID:16816204

  9. Phosphorus starvation induces membrane remodeling and recycling in Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Shemi, Adva; Schatz, Daniella; Fredricks, Helen F; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Porat, Ziv; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-08-01

    Nutrient availability is an important factor controlling phytoplankton productivity. Phytoplankton contribute c. 50% of the global photosynthesis and possess efficient acclimation mechanisms to cope with nutrient stress. We investigate the cellular response of the bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi to phosphorus (P) scarcity, which is often a limiting factor in marine ecosystems. We combined mass spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and gene expression analyses in order to assess diverse cellular features in cells exposed to P limitation and recovery. Early starvation-induced substitution of phospholipids in the cells' membranes with galacto- and betaine lipids. Lipid remodeling was rapid and reversible upon P resupply. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin reduced phospholipid substitution, suggesting a possible involvement of PI3K- signaling in this process. In addition, P limitation enhanced the formation and acidification of membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm. Intracellular vesicles may facilitate the recycling of cytoplasmic content, which is engulfed in the vesicles and delivered to the main vacuole. Long-term starvation was characterized by a profound increase in cell size and morphological alterations in cellular ultrastructure. This study provides cellular and molecular basis for future ecophysiological assessment of natural E. huxleyi populations in oligotrophic regions. PMID:27111716

  10. Starvation-induced collective behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Yim, Joshua J.; Cheong Cheong, Mi; Avery, Leon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new type of collective behavior in C. elegans nematodes, aggregation of starved L1 larvae. Shortly after hatching in the absence of food, L1 larvae arrest their development and disperse in search for food. In contrast, after two or more days without food, the worms change their behavior—they start to aggregate. The aggregation requires a small amount of ethanol or acetate in the environment. In the case of ethanol, it has to be metabolized, which requires functional alcohol dehydrogenase sodh-1. The resulting acetate is used in de novo fatty acid synthesis, and some of the newly made fatty acids are then derivatized to glycerophosphoethanolamides and released into the surrounding medium. We examined several other Caenorhabditis species and found an apparent correlation between propensity of starved L1s to aggregate and density dependence of their survival in starvation. Aggregation locally concentrates worms and may help the larvae to survive long starvation. This work demonstrates how presence of ethanol or acetate, relatively abundant small molecules in the environment, induces collective behavior in C. elegans associated with different survival strategies. PMID:26013573

  11. Abiotic stresses affecting water balance induce phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase expression in roots of wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    González, María-Cruz; Sánchez, Rosario; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2003-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) plays an important role in CO(2) fixation in C4 and CAM plants. In C3 plants, PEPC is widely expressed in most organs; however, its function is not yet clearly established. With the aim of providing clues on the function of PEPC in C3 plants, we have analyzed its pattern of expression in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings. Roots showed almost double the level of PEPC activity of shoots. Further analysis of PEPC expression in roots by in situ localization techniques showed a high accumulation of PEPC transcripts and polypeptides in meristematic cells, whereas in the rest of the root PEPC localized preferentially to the vascular tissue. Treatment with NaCl and LiCl induced PEPC expression in roots. Similarly, other abiotic stresses affecting water status, such as drought or cold, induced PEPC expression. Induction was root-specific except for the cold treatment, which also induced PEPC in shoots, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, hypoxia, which does not affect water balance, did not promote any induction of PEPC expression. These results suggest an important role for this enzyme in the adaptation of plants to environmental changes. PMID:12687366

  12. Cholesterol starvation induces differentiation of human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, Carolina C; Dávalos, Alberto; Martín-Sánchez, Covadonga; de la Peña, Gema; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2007-04-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is particularly active in malignant, proliferative cells, whereas cholesterol starvation has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation. Inhibition of enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis at steps before the formation of 7-dehydrocholesterol has been shown to selectively affect cell cycle progression from G(2) phase in human promyelocytic HL-60 cells. In the present work, we explored whether cholesterol starvation by culture in cholesterol-free medium and treatment with different distal cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors induces differentiation of HL-60 cells. Treatment with SKF 104976, an inhibitor of lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, or with zaragozic acid, which inhibits squalene synthase, caused morphologic changes alongside respiratory burst activity and expression of cluster of differentiation antigen 11c (CD11c) but not cluster of differentiation antigen 14. These effects were comparable to those produced by all-trans retinoic acid, which induces HL-60 cells to differentiate following a granulocyte lineage. In contrast, they differed from those produced by vitamin D(3), which promotes monocyte differentiation. The specificity of the response was confirmed by addition of cholesterol to the culture medium. Treatment with PD 98059, an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, abolished both the activation of NADPH oxidase and the expression of the CD11c marker. In sharp contrast, BM 15766, which inhibits sterol Delta(7)-reductase, failed to induce differentiation or arrest cell proliferation. These results show that changes in the sterol composition may trigger a differentiation response and highlight the potential of cholesterol pathway inhibition as a possible tool for use in cancer therapy. PMID:17409448

  13. Infestation and Hydraulic Consequences of Induced Carbon Starvation1

    PubMed Central

    Anderegg, William R.L.; Callaway, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Drought impacts on forests, including widespread die-off, are likely to increase with future climate change, although the physiological responses of trees to lethal drought are poorly understood. In particular, in situ examinations of carbon starvation and its interactions with and effects on infestation and hydraulic vulnerability are largely lacking. In this study, we conducted a controlled, in situ, repeated defoliation experiment to induce carbon stress in isolated trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) ramets. We monitored leaf morphology, leaves per branch, and multitissue carbohydrate concentrations during canopy defoliation. We examined the subsequent effects of defoliation and defoliation-induced carbon stress on vulnerability to insect/fungus infestation and hydraulic vulnerability the following year. Defoliated ramets flushed multiple canopies, which coincided with moderate drawdown of nonstructural carbohydrate reserves. Infestation frequency greatly increased and hydraulic conductivity decreased 1 year after defoliation. Despite incomplete carbohydrate drawdown from defoliation and relatively rapid carbohydrate recovery, suggesting considerable carbohydrate reserves in aspen, defoliation-induced carbon stress held significant consequences for vulnerability to mortality agents and hydraulic performance. Our results indicate that multiyear consequences of drought via feedbacks are likely important for understanding forests’ responses to drought and climate change over the coming decades. PMID:22665446

  14. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  15. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  16. Pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine in fibroblasts and lymphoid cells: role of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Green, H; Chan, T

    1973-11-23

    In the presence of 10(-4) to 10(-5) molar adenosine, established cell lines of fibroblastic or lymphoid origin die of pyrimidine starvation. Less than lethal concentrations inhibit cell growth. Over a broad concentration range, the effects of adenosine are prevented by providing a suitable pyrimidine source. We suggest that the recently described immune deficiency disease associated with absence of adenosine deaminase may be the result of pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine nucleotides in cells of the lymphoid system. PMID:4795749

  17. Iron starvation induces apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with mucormycosis remains high despite current antifungals. Iron-starvation strategies have been shown to have promising activity against Mucorales. We hypothesized that iron starvation enhances apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae. Apoptosis was characterized in R. oryzae transformed with RNAi plasmid targeting FTR1 expression (iron permease mutant) or empty plasmid grown in iron rich (0.125% FeCl3) and iron depleted media (YNB+1mM ferrozine and 1 mM ascorbic acid). Increased apoptosis was observed with dihydrorhodamine-123 and rhodamine-123 staining in the iron starved mutant FTR1 when compared to empty plasmid, followed by increased extracellular ATP levels. In addition, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity were prominent in FTR1. In contrast, Rhizopus strains grown in iron-rich medium displayed minimal apoptosis. Our results demonstrate a metacaspase dependent apoptotic process in iron deprived condition and further support the role of iron starvation strategies as an adjunct treatment for mucormycosis, a mechanism by which iron starvation affects R. oryzae. PMID:25830548

  18. The Molecular Mechanism of Ethylene-Mediated Root Hair Development Induced by Phosphate Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Yu, Haopeng; Dong, Jinsong; Liu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced root hair production, which increases the root surface area for nutrient uptake, is a typical adaptive response of plants to phosphate (Pi) starvation. Although previous studies have shown that ethylene plays an important role in root hair development induced by Pi starvation, the underlying molecular mechanism is not understood. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, hps5, that displays constitutive ethylene responses and increased sensitivity to Pi starvation due to a mutation in the ethylene receptor ERS1. hps5 accumulates high levels of EIN3 protein, a key transcription factor involved in the ethylene signaling pathway, under both Pi sufficiency and deficiency. Pi starvation also increases the accumulation of EIN3 protein. Combined molecular, genetic, and genomic analyses identified a group of genes that affect root hair development by regulating cell wall modifications. The expression of these genes is induced by Pi starvation and is enhanced in the EIN3-overexpressing line. In contrast, the induction of these genes by Pi starvation is suppressed in ein3 and ein3eil1 mutants. EIN3 protein can directly bind to the promoter of these genes, some of which are also the immediate targets of RSL4, a key transcription factor that regulates root hair development. Based on these results, we propose that under normal growth conditions, the level of ethylene is low in root cells; a group of key transcription factors, including RSL4 and its homologs, trigger the transcription of their target genes to promote root hair development; Pi starvation increases the levels of the protein EIN3, which directly binds to the promoters of the genes targeted by RSL4 and its homologs and further increase their transcription, resulting in the enhanced production of root hairs. This model not only explains how ethylene mediates root hair responses to Pi starvation, but may provide a general mechanism for how ethylene regulates root hair development under both stress

  19. Nitrogen starvation induced oxidative stress in an oil-producing green alga Chlorella sorokiniana C3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Ming; Chen, Hui; He, Chen-Liu; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microalgal lipid is one of the most promising feedstocks for biodiesel production. Chlorella appears to be a particularly good option, and nitrogen (N) starvation is an efficient environmental pressure used to increase lipid accumulation in Chlorella cells. The effects of N starvation of an oil-producing wild microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana C3, on lipid accumulation were investigated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry (FCM). The results showed that N starvation resulted in lipid accumulation in C. sorokiniana C3 cells, oil droplet (OD) formation and significant lipid accumulation in cells were detected after 2 d and 8 d of N starvation, respectively. During OD formation, reduced photosynthetic rate, respiration rate and photochemistry efficiency accompanied by increased damage to PSII were observed, demonstrated by chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence, 77K fluorescence and oxygen evolution tests. In the mean time the rate of cyclic electron transportation increased correspondingly to produce more ATP for triacylglycerols (TAGs) synthesis. And 0.5 d was found to be the turning point for the early stress response and acclimation of cells to N starvation. Increased level of membrane peroxidation was also observed during OD formation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxide dismutase (POD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activity assays suggested impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. Significant neutral lipid accumulation was also observed by artificial oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment. These results suggested coupled neutral lipid accumulation and oxidative stress during N starvation in C. sorokiniana C3. PMID:23874918

  20. Nitrogen Starvation Induced Oxidative Stress in an Oil-Producing Green Alga Chlorella sorokiniana C3

    PubMed Central

    He, Chen-Liu; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microalgal lipid is one of the most promising feedstocks for biodiesel production. Chlorella appears to be a particularly good option, and nitrogen (N) starvation is an efficient environmental pressure used to increase lipid accumulation in Chlorella cells. The effects of N starvation of an oil-producing wild microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana C3, on lipid accumulation were investigated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry (FCM). The results showed that N starvation resulted in lipid accumulation in C. sorokiniana C3 cells, oil droplet (OD) formation and significant lipid accumulation in cells were detected after 2 d and 8 d of N starvation, respectively. During OD formation, reduced photosynthetic rate, respiration rate and photochemistry efficiency accompanied by increased damage to PSII were observed, demonstrated by chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence, 77K fluorescence and oxygen evolution tests. In the mean time the rate of cyclic electron transportation increased correspondingly to produce more ATP for triacylglycerols (TAGs) synthesis. And 0.5 d was found to be the turning point for the early stress response and acclimation of cells to N starvation. Increased level of membrane peroxidation was also observed during OD formation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxide dismutase (POD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activity assays suggested impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. Significant neutral lipid accumulation was also observed by artificial oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment. These results suggested coupled neutral lipid accumulation and oxidative stress during N starvation in C. sorokiniana C3. PMID:23874918

  1. Increased fatty acid synthesis inhibits nitrogen starvation-induced autophagy in lipid droplet-deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Régnacq, Matthieu; Voisin, Pierre; Sere, Yves Y; Wan, Bin; Soeroso, Venty M S; Bernard, Marianne; Camougrand, Nadine; Bernard, François-Xavier; Barrault, Christine; Bergès, Thierry

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy is a degradative pathway whereby cells encapsulate and degrade cytoplasmic material within endogenously-built membranes. Previous studies have suggested that autophagosome membranes originate from lipid droplets. However, it was recently shown that rapamycin could induce autophagy in cells lacking these organelles. Here we show that lipid droplet-deprived cells are unable to perform autophagy in response to nitrogen-starvation because of an accelerated lipid synthesis that is not observed with rapamycin. Using cerulenin, a potent inhibitor of fatty acid synthase, and exogenous addition of palmitic acid we could restore nitrogen-starvation induced autophagy in the absence of lipid droplets. PMID:27270031

  2. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; Price, Nathan D.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 min that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid accumulation

  3. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; et al

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 minmore » that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid

  4. Manipulation of oil synthesis in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 with a phosphorus starvation-inducible promoter from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Masako; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) under conditions of nutrient stress. Phosphorus (P) starvation induces the accumulation of TAGs, and the cells under P starvation maintain growth through photosynthesis. We recently reported that P starvation-dependent overexpression of type-2 diacylglycerol acyl-CoA acyltransferase (CrDGTT4) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol synthase 2 (SQD2) promoter, which has increased activity during P starvation, enhances TAG accumulation in C. reinhardtii cells. As a result, the content of C18:1 fatty acid, a preferred substrate of CrDGTT4, is increased in TAGs. Here we isolated genes encoding SQD2 from strain NIES-2145 of the eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis and showed that their expression, like that in C. reinhardtii, was up-regulated during P starvation. To enhance oil accumulation under P starvation, we transformed pCrSQD2-CrDGTT4 into Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145. The transformants had a fatty acid composition that was more similar to that of C. reinhardtii, which resulted in enhanced TAG accumulation and higher 18:1(9) content. The results indicated that the P starvation-inducible promoter of C. reinhardtii was able to drive expression of the CrDGTT4 gene in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 under P starvation. We conclude that the heterologous CrSQD2 promoter is effective in manipulating TAG synthesis in Nannochloropsis during P starvation. PMID:26441858

  5. Arabidopsis ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3 is involved in nitrogen starvation-induced anthocyanin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ju; Ma, Chunli; Zhang, Ying; Ge, Ting; Qi, Zhi; Kang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Anthocyanin accumulation is a common phenomenon seen in plants under environmental stress. In this study, we identified a new allele of ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3 (RHD3) showing an anthocyanin overaccumulation phenotype under nitrogen starvation conditions. It is known that ethylene negatively regulates light- and sucrose-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis. We hypothesized that RHD3 achieves its negative effect on anthocyanin biosynthesis via an ethylene-regulating pathway. In support of this, similar to rhd3 mutants, the Arabidopsis ethylene signaling mutants etr1, ein2, and ein3/eil1 showed an anthocyanin overaccumulation phenotype under nitrogen starvation conditions. The ethylene precursor ACC strongly suppressed anthocyanin accumulation, dependent on ETR1, EIN2, EIN3/EIL1, and, partially, RHD3. In addition, inactivating RHD3 partially reversed the suppressive effect of ETO1 inactivation-evoked endogenous ethylene production on anthocyanin accumulation. The expression of nitrogen starvation-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis genes was negatively regulated by RHD3, but ethylene response genes were positively regulated by RHD3. Wild-type seedlings overexpressing RHD3 showed similar phenotypes to rhd3 mutants, indicating the existence of a fine-tuned relationship between gene expression and function. RHD3 was initially identified as a gene involved in root hair development. This study uncovered a new physiological function of RHD3 in nitrogen starvation-induced anthocyanin accumulation and ethylene homeostasis. [Correction added on 6 August 2015, after first online publication: "RND3" corrected to "RHD3".]. PMID:25494721

  6. Elemene injection induced autophagy protects human hepatoma cancer cells from starvation and undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Keming; Hu, Chunping; Lin, Lin; Qin, Shukui; Cai, Xueting

    2014-01-01

    Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anticancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. In an in vivo experiment, we found that apatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits VEGFR2, combined with elemene injection (Ele) for the treatment of H22 solid tumor in mice resulted in worse effectiveness than apatinib alone. Moreover, Ele could protect HepG2 cells from death induced by serum-free starvation. Further data on the mechanism study revealed that Ele induced protective autophagy and prevented human hepatoma cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. Proapoptosis effect of Ele was enhanced when proautophagy effect was inhibited by hydroxychloroquine. Above all, Ele has the effect of protecting cancer cells from death either in apatinib induced nutrient deficient environment or in serum-free induced starvation. A combination of elemene injection with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25152762

  7. Glucose Starvation-Induced Dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Is cAMP and Energy Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tran T.; McDougald, Diane; Klebensberger, Janosch; Al Qarni, Budoor; Barraud, Nicolas; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Schleheck, David

    2012-01-01

    Carbon starvation has been shown to induce a massive dispersal event in biofilms of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, the molecular pathways controlling this dispersal response remain unknown. We quantified changes in the proteome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and planktonic cells during glucose starvation by differential peptide-fingerprint mass-spectrometry (iTRAQ). In addition, we monitored dispersal photometrically, as a decrease in turbidity/opacity of biofilms pre-grown and starved in continuous flow-cells, in order to evaluate treatments (e.g. inhibitors CCCP, arsenate, chloramphenicol, L-serine hydroxamate) and key mutants altered in biofilm development and dispersal (e.g. nirS, vfr, bdlA, rpoS, lasRrhlR, Pf4-bacteriophage and cyaA). In wild-type biofilms, dispersal started within five minutes of glucose starvation, was maximal after 2 h, and up to 60% of the original biomass had dispersed after 24 h of starvation. The changes in protein synthesis were generally not more than two fold and indicated that more than 100 proteins belonging to various classes, including carbon and energy metabolism, stress adaptation, and motility, were differentially expressed. For the different treatments, only the proton-ionophore CCCP or arsenate, an inhibitor of ATP synthesis, prevented dispersal of the biofilms. For the different mutants tested, only cyaA, the synthase of the intracellular second messenger cAMP, failed to disperse; complementation of the cyaA mutation restored the wild-type phenotype. Hence, the pathway for carbon starvation-induced biofilm dispersal in P. aeruginosa PAO1 involves ATP production via direct ATP synthesis and proton-motive force dependent step(s) and is mediated through cAMP, which is likely to control the activity of proteins involved in remodeling biofilm cells in preparation for planktonic survival. PMID:22905180

  8. Enhanced accumulation of carbohydrate and starch in Chlorella zofingiensis induced by nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunni; Wang, Yajie; Huang, Wei; Xu, Jin; Wang, Zhongming; Xu, Jingliang; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2014-12-01

    Though less attention has been paid to microalgae as a feedstock for bioethanol production, many microalgae seem to have this potential since they contain no lignin, minor hemicellulose, and abundant carbohydrate. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on carbohydrate and starch accumulation in green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis and assess the feasibility of using this microalga as a bioethanol feedstock. The results showed that the specific growth rate under nitrogen starvation (0.48 day(-1)) was much lower than that under nitrogen repletion (1.02 day(-1)). However, nitrogen starvation quickly induced the accumulation of carbohydrate, especially starch. After merely 1 day of nitrogen starvation, carbohydrate and starch increased 37 % and 4.7-fold, respectively. The highest carbohydrate content reached 66.9 % of dry weight (DW), and 66.7 % of this was starch. In order to obtain enough carbohydrate productivities for bioethanol production, two-stage cultivation strategy was implemented and found to be effective for enhancing biomass, carbohydrate, and starch simultaneously. The optimal biomass, carbohydrate, and starch productivities of C. zofingiensis were obtained after 5 days of cultivation, and their values were 699, 407, and 268 mg L(-1) day(-1), respectively. PMID:25209553

  9. Starvation reveals the cause of infection-induced castration and gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Cressler, Clayton E.; Nelson, William A.; Day, Troy; McCauley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Parasites often induce life-history changes in their hosts. In many cases, these infection-induced life-history changes are driven by changes in the pattern of energy allocation and utilization within the host. Because these processes will affect both host and parasite fitness, it can be challenging to determine who benefits from them. Determining the causes and consequences of infection-induced life-history changes requires the ability to experimentally manipulate life history and a framework for connecting life history to host and parasite fitness. Here, we combine a novel starvation manipulation with energy budget models to provide new insights into castration and gigantism in the Daphnia magna–Pasteuria ramosa host–parasite system. Our results show that starvation primarily affects investment in reproduction, and increasing starvation stress reduces gigantism and parasite fitness without affecting castration. These results are consistent with an energetic structure where the parasite uses growth energy as a resource. This finding gives us new understanding of the role of castration and gigantism in this system, and how life-history variation will affect infection outcome and epidemiological dynamics. The approach of combining targeted life-history manipulations with energy budget models can be adapted to understand life-history changes in other disease systems. PMID:25143034

  10. Transient overexpression of Werner protein rescues starvation induced autophagy in Werner syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Maity, Jyotirindra; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Laskar, Aparna; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-12-01

    Reduced autophagy may be associated with normal and pathological aging. Here we report a link between autophagy and Werner protein (WRNp), mutated in Werner syndrome, the human premature aging Werner syndrome (WS). WRN mutant fibroblast AG11395 and AG05229 respond weakly to starvation induced autophagy compared to normal cells. While the fusion of phagosomes with lysosome is normal, WS cells contain fewer autophagy vacuoles. Cellular starvation autophagy in WS cells is restored after transfection with full length WRN. Further, siRNA mediated silencing of WRN in the normal fibroblast cell line WI-38 results in decreased autophagy and altered expression of autophagy related proteins. Thus, our observations suggest that WRN may have a role in controlling autophagy and hereby cellular maintenance. PMID:25257404

  11. Purification and biochemical characterization of a vacuolar serine endopeptidase induced by glucose starvation in maize roots.

    PubMed Central

    James, F; Brouquisse, R; Suire, C; Pradet, A; Raymond, P

    1996-01-01

    An endopeptidase (designated RSIP, for root-starvation-induced protease) was purified to homogeneity from glucose-starved maize roots. The molecular mass of the enzyme was 59 kDa by SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions and 62 kDa by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-200 column. The isoelectric point of RSIP was 4.55. The purified enzyme was stable, with no auto-proteolytic activity. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by proteinaceous trypsin inhibitors, di-isopropylfluorophosphate, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin and PMSF, suggesting that the enzyme is a serine protease. The maximum proteolytic activity against different protein substrates occurred at pH 6.5. With the exception of succinyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methylcoumarin, no hydrolysis was detected with synthetic tryptic, chymotryptic or peptidylglutamate substrates. The determination of the cleavage sites in the oxidized B-Chain of insulin showed specificity for hydrophobic residues at the P2 and P3 positions, indicating that RSIP is distinct from other previously characterized maize endopeptidases. Both subcellular fractionation and immuno-detection in situ indicated that RSIP is localized in the vacuole of the root cells. RSIP is the first vacuolar serine endopeptidase to be identified. Glucose starvation induced RSIP: after 4 days of starvation, RSIP was estimated to constitute 80% of total endopeptidase activity in the root tip. These results suggest that RSIP is implicated in vacuolar autophagic processes triggered by carbon limitation. PMID:8947499

  12. Photoperiodism and crassulacean acid metabolism : I. Immunological and kinetic evidences for different patterns of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoforms in photoperiodically inducible and non-inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Müller, D; Kluge, M; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Plants of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom Thumb and Sedum morganianum E. Walth. were grown under controlled photoperiodic conditions under either short or long days. Gaz exchange measurements confirmed that in K. blossfeldiana Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was photoperiodically inducible and that S. morganianum performed CAM independently of photoperiod. With K. blossfeldiana, a comparison of catalytic and regulatory properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) from short-day and long-day grown plants showed differences, but not with S. morganianum. Ouchterlony double diffusion tests and immunotitration experiments (using a S. morganianum PEPC antibody) established that CAM is induced in K. blossfeldiana-but not in S. morganianum-through the synthesis of a new PEPC isoform; this form shows an immunological behavior different from that prevailing under non-inductive conditions and can be considered as specific for CAM performance. PMID:24276159

  13. Therapeutic inhibition of mitochondrial function induces cell death in starvation-resistant renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Takahiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Yonese, Junji; Yuasa, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) have two types of cells for carbon metabolism and for cell signaling under nutrient-deprivation conditions, namely starvation-resistant and starvation-sensitive cells. Here, we evaluated the mitochondrial characteristics of these cell types and found that the resistant type possessed higher activities for both mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis than the sensitive types. These higher activities were supported by the stored carbon, lipid and carbohydrate sources, and by a low level of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to sustained SOD2 expression in the resistant RCC cells. In metastatic RCC cases, higher SOD2 expression was associated with a significantly shorter survival period. We found that treatment with the drugs etomoxir and buformin significantly reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and induced cell death under glucose-deprivation conditions in starvation-resistant RCC cells. Our data suggest that inhibitory targeting of mitochondria might offer an effective therapeutic option for metastatic RCC that is resistant to current treatments. PMID:27157976

  14. Doxycyclin ameliorates a starvation-induced germline tumor in C. elegans daf-18/PTEN mutant background.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Tim; Qi, Wenjing; Schindler, Verena; Runkel, Eva Diana; Baumeister, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Managing available resources is a key necessity of each organism to cope with the environment. The nematode C. elegans responds to nutritional deprivation or harsh environmental conditions with a multitude of developmental adaptations, among them a starvation-induced quiescence at early larval development (L1). daf-18, the C. elegans homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN, is essential for the maintenance of survival and germline stem cell arrest during the L1 diapause. We show here that daf-18 mutants, independently to their failure to maintain G2 arrest of the primordial germ cells, develop a gonad phenotype after refeeding. This highly penetrant gonadal phenotype is further enhanced by a mutation in shc-1, encoding a protein homologous to the human adaptor ShcA. Features of this phenotype are a tumor-like phenotype encompassing hyper-proliferation of germ cell nuclei and disruption/invasion of the basement membrane surrounding the gonad. The penetrance of this phenotype is reduced by decreasing starvation temperature. In addition, it is also ameliorated in a dose-dependent way by exposure to the antibiotic doxycyclin either during starvation or during subsequent refeeding. Since, in eukaryotic cells, doxycyclin specifically blocks mitochondrial translation, our results suggest that daf-18 and shc-1;daf-18 mutants fail to adapt mitochondrial activity to reduced nutritional availability during early larval developing. PMID:24746511

  15. Nitrogen starvation-induced transcriptome alterations and influence of transcription regulator mutants in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As other bacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis needs adaption mechanisms to cope with changing nitrogen sources and to survive situations of nitrogen starvation. In the study presented here, transcriptome analyses were used to characterize the response of the bacterium to nitrogen starvation and to elucidate the role of specific transcriptional regulators. Results In response to nitrogen deprivation, a general starvation response is induced in M. smegmatis. This includes changes in the transcription of several hundred genes encoding e.g. transport proteins, proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism and regulation, energy generation and protein turnover. The specific nitrogen-related changes at the transcriptional level depend mainly on the presence of GlnR, while the AmtR protein controls only a small number of genes. Conclusions M. smegmatis is able to metabolize a number of different nitrogen sources and nitrogen control in M. smegmatis is similar to control mechanisms characterized in streptomycetes, while the master regulator of nitrogen control in corynebacteria, AmtR, is plays a minor role in this regulatory network. PMID:24266988

  16. Nucleostemin Knockdown Sensitizes Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells to Ultraviolet and Serum Starvation-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fuwen; Cheng, Qian; Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS) is a GTP-binding protein that is predominantly expressed in embryonic and adult stem cells but not in terminally differentiated cells. NS plays an essential role in maintaining the continuous proliferation of stem cells and some types of cancer cells. However, the role of NS in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify the role of NS in HCC. First, we demonstrated high expression of NS in most HCC cell lines and liver cancer tissues. NS knockdown induced a severe decline in cell viability of MHCC97H cells as detected by MTT and cell proliferation assays. Next, we used ultraviolet (UV) and serum starvation-induced apoptosis models to investigate whether NS suppression or up-regulation affects HCC cell apoptosis. After UV treatment or serum starvation, apoptosis was strongly enhanced in MHCC97H and Bel7402 cells transfected with small interfering RNA against NS, whereas NS overexpression inhibited UV- and serum-induced apoptosis of HCC cells. Furthermore, after UV irradiation, inhibition of NS increased the expression of pro-apoptosis protein caspase 3 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2. A caspase 3 inhibitor could obviously prevent NS knockdown-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrated overexpression of NS in most HCC tissues compared with their matched surrounding tissues, and silencing NS promoted UV- and serum starvation-induced apoptosis of MHCC97H and Bel7402 cells. Therefore, the NS gene might be a potential therapeutic target of HCC. PMID:26517370

  17. Nucleostemin Knockdown Sensitizes Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells to Ultraviolet and Serum Starvation-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS) is a GTP-binding protein that is predominantly expressed in embryonic and adult stem cells but not in terminally differentiated cells. NS plays an essential role in maintaining the continuous proliferation of stem cells and some types of cancer cells. However, the role of NS in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify the role of NS in HCC. First, we demonstrated high expression of NS in most HCC cell lines and liver cancer tissues. NS knockdown induced a severe decline in cell viability of MHCC97H cells as detected by MTT and cell proliferation assays. Next, we used ultraviolet (UV) and serum starvation-induced apoptosis models to investigate whether NS suppression or up-regulation affects HCC cell apoptosis. After UV treatment or serum starvation, apoptosis was strongly enhanced in MHCC97H and Bel7402 cells transfected with small interfering RNA against NS, whereas NS overexpression inhibited UV- and serum-induced apoptosis of HCC cells. Furthermore, after UV irradiation, inhibition of NS increased the expression of pro-apoptosis protein caspase 3 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2. A caspase 3 inhibitor could obviously prevent NS knockdown-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrated overexpression of NS in most HCC tissues compared with their matched surrounding tissues, and silencing NS promoted UV- and serum starvation-induced apoptosis of MHCC97H and Bel7402 cells. Therefore, the NS gene might be a potential therapeutic target of HCC. PMID:26517370

  18. BmATG5 and BmATG6 mediate apoptosis following autophagy induced by 20-hydroxyecdysone or starvation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kun; Tian, Ling; Guo, Xinyu; Li, Kang; Li, Jianping; Deng, Xiaojuan; Li, Qingrong; Xia, Qingyou; Zhong, Yangjin; Huang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiping; Li, Sheng; Yang, Wanying; Cao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis, which could be induced by common stimuli, play crucial roles in development and disease. The functional relationship between autophagy and apoptosis is complex, due to the dual effects of autophagy. In the Bombyx Bm-12 cells, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) treatment or starvation-induced cell death, with autophagy preceding apoptosis. In response to 20E or starvation, BmATG8 was rapidly cleaved and conjugated with PE to form BmATG8-PE; subsequently, BmATG5 and BmATG6 were cleaved into BmATG5-tN and BmATG6-C, respectively. Reduction of expression of BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 by RNAi decreased the proportion of cells undergoing both autophagy and apoptosis after 20E treatment or starvation. Overexpression of BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 induced autophagy but not apoptosis in the absence of the stimuli, but promoted both autophagy and apoptosis induced by 20E or starvation. Notably, overexpression of cleavage site-deleted BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 increased autophagy but not apoptosis induced by 20E or starvation, whereas overexpression of BmAtg5-tN and BmAtg6-C was able to directly trigger apoptosis or promote the induced apoptosis. In conclusion, being cleaved into BmATG5-tN and BmATG6-C, BmATG5 and BmATG6 mediate apoptosis following autophagy induced by 20E or starvation in Bombyx Bm-12 cells, reflecting that autophagy precedes apoptosis in the midgut during Bombyx metamorphosis. PMID:26727186

  19. Insights into How Longicorn Beetle Larvae Determine the Timing of Metamorphosis: Starvation-Induced Mechanism Revisited.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Yukio; Hoshizaki, Sugihiko

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of holometabolous insects must determine the timing of their metamorphosis. How they determine this timing has only been studied in detail for a few insect species. In a few species of Coleoptera, starvation is known to be a cue for metamorphosis, leading to the formation of smaller adults (starvation-induced pupation, SiP). We investigated the occurrence of SiP in the beetle Psacothea hilaris. When P. hilaris larvae were starved late in the feeding phase of the last (5th) instar, they exhibited typical SiP characterized by constancy of the time from food deprivation to pupation (TTP) irrespective of the body weight upon food deprivation or the length of prior feeding. In contrast, when larvae were starved early in the feeding phase, TTP decreased by roughly 1 day as the feeding became 1 day longer. The change in the response to starvation was estimated to occur on day 5.9 in the last instar. A series of refeeding experiments suggested that whereas SiP occurred readily in the larvae starved in the late feeding phase, activation of SiP was suspended until day 5.9 in the larvae starved early in the feeding phase. When P. hilaris larvae were fed continuously, they eventually ceased feeding spontaneously and pupated. The time length between spontaneous cessation of feeding and pupation was approximately equal to the TTP in SiP. This suggests that the same mechanism was activated by food deprivation in the late feeding phase and by spontaneous cessation of ad libitum feeding. PMID:27386861

  20. Insights into How Longicorn Beetle Larvae Determine the Timing of Metamorphosis: Starvation-Induced Mechanism Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Yukio; Hoshizaki, Sugihiko

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of holometabolous insects must determine the timing of their metamorphosis. How they determine this timing has only been studied in detail for a few insect species. In a few species of Coleoptera, starvation is known to be a cue for metamorphosis, leading to the formation of smaller adults (starvation-induced pupation, SiP). We investigated the occurrence of SiP in the beetle Psacothea hilaris. When P. hilaris larvae were starved late in the feeding phase of the last (5th) instar, they exhibited typical SiP characterized by constancy of the time from food deprivation to pupation (TTP) irrespective of the body weight upon food deprivation or the length of prior feeding. In contrast, when larvae were starved early in the feeding phase, TTP decreased by roughly 1 day as the feeding became 1 day longer. The change in the response to starvation was estimated to occur on day 5.9 in the last instar. A series of refeeding experiments suggested that whereas SiP occurred readily in the larvae starved in the late feeding phase, activation of SiP was suspended until day 5.9 in the larvae starved early in the feeding phase. When P. hilaris larvae were fed continuously, they eventually ceased feeding spontaneously and pupated. The time length between spontaneous cessation of feeding and pupation was approximately equal to the TTP in SiP. This suggests that the same mechanism was activated by food deprivation in the late feeding phase and by spontaneous cessation of ad libitum feeding. PMID:27386861

  1. Ca2+-regulated cyclic electron flow supplies ATP for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Hu, Jinlu; Qiao, Yaqin; Chen, Weixian; Rong, Junfeng; Zhang, Yunming; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that both the linear photosynthetic electron transportation rate and the respiration rate dropped significantly during N starvation-induced neutral lipid accumulation in an oil-producing microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, and proposed a possible role for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in ATP supply. In this study, we further exploited this hypothesis in both Chlorella sorokiniana C3 and the model green alga Chlamydomonas. We found that both the rate of CEF around photosystem I and the activity of thylakoid membrane-located ATP synthetase increased significantly during N starvation to drive ATP production. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Chlamydomonas mutant pgrl1, which is deficient in PGRL1-mediated CEF, accumulated less neutral lipids and had reduced rates of CEF under N starvation. Further analysis revealed that Ca2+ signaling regulates N starvation-induced neutral lipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas by increasing calmodulin activity and boosting the expression of the calcium sensor protein that regulates Pgrl1-mediated CEF. Thus, Ca2+-regulated CEF supplies ATP for N starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga. The increased CEF may re-equilibrate the ATP/NADPH balance and recycle excess light energy in photosystems to prevent photooxidative damage, suggesting Ca2+-regulated CEF also played a key role in protecting and sustaining photosystems. PMID:26450399

  2. Ca(2+)-regulated cyclic electron flow supplies ATP for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hu, Jinlu; Qiao, Yaqin; Chen, Weixian; Rong, Junfeng; Zhang, Yunming; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that both the linear photosynthetic electron transportation rate and the respiration rate dropped significantly during N starvation-induced neutral lipid accumulation in an oil-producing microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, and proposed a possible role for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in ATP supply. In this study, we further exploited this hypothesis in both Chlorella sorokiniana C3 and the model green alga Chlamydomonas. We found that both the rate of CEF around photosystem I and the activity of thylakoid membrane-located ATP synthetase increased significantly during N starvation to drive ATP production. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Chlamydomonas mutant pgrl1, which is deficient in PGRL1-mediated CEF, accumulated less neutral lipids and had reduced rates of CEF under N starvation. Further analysis revealed that Ca(2+) signaling regulates N starvation-induced neutral lipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas by increasing calmodulin activity and boosting the expression of the calcium sensor protein that regulates Pgrl1-mediated CEF. Thus, Ca(2+)-regulated CEF supplies ATP for N starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga. The increased CEF may re-equilibrate the ATP/NADPH balance and recycle excess light energy in photosystems to prevent photooxidative damage, suggesting Ca(2+)-regulated CEF also played a key role in protecting and sustaining photosystems. PMID:26450399

  3. Arabidopsis NRT1.5 Mediates the Suppression of Nitrate Starvation-Induced Leaf Senescence by Modulating Foliar Potassium Level.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shuan; Peng, Jia-Shi; He, Ya-Ni; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Yi, Hong-Ying; Fu, Yan-Lei; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen deficiency induces leaf senescence. However, whether or how nitrate might affect this process remains to be investigated. Here, we report an interesting finding that nitrate-instead of nitrogen-starvation induced early leaf senescence in nrt1.5 mutant, and present genetic and physiological data demonstrating that nitrate starvation-induced leaf senescence is suppressed by NRT1.5. NRT1.5 suppresses the senescence process dependent on its function from roots, but not the nitrate transport function. Further analyses using nrt1.5 single and nia1 nia2 nrt1.5-4 triple mutant showed a negative correlation between nitrate concentration and senescence rate in leaves. Moreover, when exposed to nitrate starvation, foliar potassium level decreased in nrt1.5, but adding potassium could essentially restore the early leaf senescence phenotype of nrt1.5 plants. Nitrate starvation also downregulated the expression of HAK5, RAP2.11, and ANN1 in nrt1.5 roots, and appeared to alter potassium level in xylem sap from nrt1.5. These data suggest that NRT1.5 likely perceives nitrate starvation-derived signals to prevent leaf senescence by facilitating foliar potassium accumulation. PMID:26732494

  4. p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced liver metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaoyue; Agostini, Massimiliano; Liu, He; Melino, Gerry; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-10-20

    As a member of the p53 gene family, p73 regulates cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, neurogenesis, immunity and inflammation. Recently, p73 has been shown to transcriptionally regulate selective metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase-2, resulting in significant effects on metabolism, including hepatocellular lipid metabolism, glutathione homeostasis and the pentose phosphate pathway. In order to further investigate the metabolic effect of p73, here, we compared the global metabolic profile of livers from p73 knockout and wild-type mice under both control and starvation conditions. Our results show that the depletion of all p73 isoforms cause altered lysine metabolism and glycolysis, distinct patterns for glutathione synthesis and Krebs cycle, as well as an elevated pentose phosphate pathway and abnormal lipid accumulation. These results indicate that p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced fuel metabolism in the liver, a finding that is likely to be highly relevant for metabolism-associated disorders, such as diabetes and cancer. PMID:26375672

  5. Atg1-mediated myosin II activation regulates autophagosome formation during starvation-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hong-Wen; Wang, Yu-Bao; Wang, Shiu-Lan; Wu, Mei-Hsuan; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2011-02-16

    Autophagy is a membrane-mediated degradation process of macromolecule recycling. Although the formation of double-membrane degradation vesicles (autophagosomes) is known to have a central role in autophagy, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. The serine/threonine kinase Atg1 has a key role in the induction of autophagy. In this study, we show that overexpression of Drosophila Atg1 promotes the phosphorylation-dependent activation of the actin-associated motor protein myosin II. A novel myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-like protein, Spaghetti-squash activator (Sqa), was identified as a link between Atg1 and actomyosin activation. Sqa interacts with Atg1 through its kinase domain and is a substrate of Atg1. Significantly, myosin II inhibition or depletion of Sqa compromised the formation of autophagosomes under starvation conditions. In mammalian cells, we found that the Sqa mammalian homologue zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) and myosin II had a critical role in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy and mammalian Atg9 (mAtg9) trafficking when cells were deprived of nutrients. Our findings provide evidence of a link between Atg1 and the control of Atg9-mediated autophagosome formation through the myosin II motor protein. PMID:21169990

  6. p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced liver metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Melino, Gerry; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the p53 gene family, p73 regulates cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, neurogenesis, immunity and inflammation. Recently, p73 has been shown to transcriptionally regulate selective metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase-2, resulting in significant effects on metabolism, including hepatocellular lipid metabolism, glutathione homeostasis and the pentose phosphate pathway. In order to further investigate the metabolic effect of p73, here, we compared the global metabolic profile of livers from p73 knockout and wild-type mice under both control and starvation conditions. Our results show that the depletion of all p73 isoforms cause altered lysine metabolism and glycolysis, distinct patterns for glutathione synthesis and Krebs cycle, as well as an elevated pentose phosphate pathway and abnormal lipid accumulation. These results indicate that p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced fuel metabolism in the liver, a finding that is likely to be highly relevant for metabolism-associated disorders, such as diabetes and cancer. PMID:26375672

  7. MIR181A regulates starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy through targeting of ATG5

    PubMed Central

    Tekirdag, Kumsal Ayse; Korkmaz, Gozde; Ozturk, Deniz Gulfem; Agami, Reuven; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2013-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy herein) is a cellular catabolic mechanism activated in response to stress conditions including starvation, hypoxia and misfolded protein accumulation. Abnormalities in autophagy were associated with pathologies including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, elucidation of the signaling pathways controlling autophagy is of utmost importance. Recently we and others described microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel and potent modulators of the autophagic activity. Here, we describe MIR181A (hsa-miR-181a-1) as a new autophagy-regulating miRNA. We showed that overexpression of MIR181A resulted in the attenuation of starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy in MCF-7, Huh-7 and K562 cells. Moreover, antagomir-mediated inactivation of endogenous miRNA activity stimulated autophagy. We identified ATG5 as an MIR181A target. Indeed, ATG5 cellular levels were decreased in cells upon MIR181A overexpression and increased following the introduction of antagomirs. More importantly, overexpression of ATG5 from a miRNA-insensitive cDNA construct rescued autophagic activity in the presence of MIR181A. We also showed that the ATG5 3′ UTR contained functional MIR181A responsive sequences sensitive to point mutations. Therefore, MIR181A is a novel and important regulator of autophagy and ATG5 is a rate-limiting miRNA target in this effect. PMID:23322078

  8. LIN-35/Rb Causes Starvation-Induced Germ Cell Apoptosis via CED-9/Bcl2 Downregulation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Láscarez-Lagunas, L. I.; Silva-García, C. G.; Dinkova, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism for maintaining germ line health. In Caenorhabditis elegans, germ cell apoptosis occurs under normal conditions to sustain gonad homeostasis and oocyte quality. Under stress, germ cell apoptosis can be triggered via different pathways, including the following: (i) the CEP-1/p53 pathway, which induces germ cell apoptosis when animals are exposed to DNA damage; (ii) the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) pathway, which triggers germ cell apoptosis when animals are exposed to heat shock, oxidative stress, or osmotic stress; and (iii) an unknown mechanism that triggers germ cell apoptosis during starvation. Here, we address how starvation induces germ cell apoptosis. Using polysomal profiling, we found that starvation for 6 h reduces the translationally active ribosomes, which differentially affect the mRNAs of the core apoptotic machinery and some of its regulators. During starvation, lin-35/Rb mRNA increases its expression, resulting in the accumulation of this protein. As a consequence, LIN-35 downregulates the expression of the antiapoptotic gene ced-9/Bcl-2. We observed that the reduced translation of ced-9/Bcl-2 mRNA during food deprivation together with its downregulation drastically affects its protein accumulation. We propose that CED-9/Bcl-2 downregulation via LIN-35/Rb triggers germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans in response to starvation. PMID:24752899

  9. Severe starvation-induced hepatocyte autophagy as a cause of acute liver injury in anorexia nervosa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Restellini, S; Spahr, L; Rubbia Brandt, L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Mild elevation of transaminase may be observed in anorexia nervosa, but acute liver injury is uncommon. A complex programmed cell death in response to starvation, called autophagy, has been described in experimental and human studies. Case Presentation. A 24-year-old woman suffering from anorexia nervosa was hospitalized for severe malnutrition. At admission, there were biological signs of acute liver injury but no electrolytic imbalance. After having ruled out the most common causes of liver injury, the patient was carefully refed. As liver tests remained abnormal, liver biopsy was performed. At histology and electron microscopy, numerous signs suggestive of starvation-induced hepatocyte autophagy were found. Discussion. Severe starvation can be associated with acute liver injury that is slowly reversible with careful enteral nutrition. In this clinical situation, profound hepatic glycogen depletion in association with autophagy appears as the leading cause of liver injury. PMID:25379300

  10. NAF-1 antagonizes starvation-induced autophagy through AMPK signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaohong; Xiao, Renjie; Xiao, Fan; Chen, Yong; Hua, Fuzhou; Yu, Shuchun; Xu, Guohai

    2015-07-01

    NAF-1 (nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1), an autophagy-related gene-related (ATG) protein, has been implicated in the autophagic pro-survival response. However, its role in autophagy has not been examined in the cardiomyocytes. In this study, we found that nutritional stress (NS) induced by glucose deprivation strongly induced autophagy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, which was associated with NAF-1 down-regulation in cardiomyocytes under NS conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of NAF-1 was sufficient to inhibit autophagy in cardiomyocytes under glucose deprivation conditions. Moreover, results of the co-immunoprecipitation assay indicate that NAF-1 antagonized autophagy by promoting the interaction between Beclin1 and Bcl-2 in NS-induced cardiomyocytes. Importantly, our results indicate that overexpression of NAF-1 significantly inhibited AMPK activity and protected cardiomyocytes from NS-induced cell death. Taken together, these data show that ectopic expression of NAF-1 antagonizes the degree of autophagy in cardiomyocytes and enhances cell survival during starvation conditions. PMID:25689847

  11. Clock and cycle limit starvation-induced sleep loss in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Alex C.; Duboué, Erik R.; McDonald, Daniel M.; Dus, Monica; Suh, Greg S.B.; Waddell, Scott; Blau, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neural systems controlling the vital functions of sleep and feeding in mammals are tightly inter-connected: sleep deprivation promotes feeding, while starvation suppresses sleep. Here we show that starvation in Drosophila potently suppresses sleep suggesting that these two homeostatically regulated behaviors are also integrated in flies. The sleep suppressing effect of starvation is independent of the mushroom bodies, a previously identified sleep locus in the fly brain, and therefore is regulated by distinct neural circuitry. The circadian clock genes Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) are critical for proper sleep suppression during starvation. However, the sleep suppression is independent of light cues and of circadian rhythms because starved period mutants sleep like wild type flies. By selectively targeting subpopulations of Clk-expressing neurons we localize the observed sleep phenotype to the dorsally located circadian neurons. These findings show that Clk and cyc act during starvation to modulate the conflict of whether flies sleep or search for food. PMID:20541409

  12. The stress-responsive kinases MAPKAPK2/MAPKAPK3 activate starvation-induced autophagy through Beclin 1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhongju; Sumpter, Rhea; Su, Minfei; Zang, Xiao; Sinha, Sangita; Gaestel, Matthias; Levine, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental adaptive response to amino acid starvation orchestrated by conserved gene products, the autophagy (ATG) proteins. However, the cellular cues that activate the function of ATG proteins during amino acid starvation are incompletely understood. Here we show that two related stress-responsive kinases, members of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway MAPKAPK2 (MK2) and MAPKAPK3 (MK3), positively regulate starvation-induced autophagy by phosphorylating an essential ATG protein, Beclin 1, at serine 90, and that this phosphorylation site is essential for the tumor suppressor function of Beclin 1. Moreover, MK2/MK3-dependent Beclin 1 phosphorylation (and starvation-induced autophagy) is blocked in vitro and in vivo by BCL2, a negative regulator of Beclin 1. Together, these findings reveal MK2/MK3 as crucial stress-responsive kinases that promote autophagy through Beclin 1 S90 phosphorylation, and identify the blockade of MK2/3-dependent Beclin 1 S90 phosphorylation as a mechanism by which BCL2 inhibits the autophagy function of Beclin 1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05289.001 PMID:25693418

  13. SIZ1 regulation of phosphate starvation-induced root architecture remodeling involves the control of auxin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kenji; Lee, Jiyoung; Gong, Qingqiu; Ma, Shisong; Jin, Jing Bo; Yoo, Chan Yul; Miura, Tomoko; Sato, Aiko; Bohnert, Hans J; Hasegawa, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Phosphate (Pi) limitation causes plants to modulate the architecture of their root systems to facilitate the acquisition of Pi. Previously, we reported that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 regulates root architecture remodeling in response to Pi limitation; namely, the siz1 mutations cause the inhibition of primary root (PR) elongation and the promotion of lateral root (LR) formation. Here, we present evidence that SIZ1 is involved in the negative regulation of auxin patterning to modulate root system architecture in response to Pi starvation. The siz1 mutations caused greater PR growth inhibition and LR development of seedlings in response to Pi limitation. Similar root phenotypes occurred if Pi-deficient wild-type seedlings were supplemented with auxin. N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux activity, reduced the Pi starvation-induced LR root formation of siz1 seedlings to a level equivalent to that seen in the wild type. Monitoring of the auxin-responsive reporter DR5::uidA indicated that auxin accumulates in PR tips at early stages of the Pi starvation response. Subsequently, DR5::uidA expression was observed in the LR primordia, which was associated with LR elongation. The time-sequential patterning of DR5::uidA expression occurred earlier in the roots of siz1 as compared with the wild type. In addition, microarray analysis revealed that several other auxin-responsive genes, including genes involved in cell wall loosening and biosynthesis, were up-regulated in siz1 relative to wild-type seedlings in response to Pi starvation. Together, these results suggest that SIZ1 negatively regulates Pi starvation-induced root architecture remodeling through the control of auxin patterning. PMID:21156857

  14. The roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose-starvation induced adaptive response in the zoonotic Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tengfei; Zhu, Jiawen; Wei, Shun; Luo, Qingping; Li, Lu; Li, Shengqing; Tucker, Alexander; Shao, Huabin; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The (p)ppGpp signal molecules play a central role in the stringent response (SR) to adapt to nutrient starvation in bacteria, yet the carbohydrate starvation induced adaptive response and the roles of SR in this response is not well characterized, especially in Gram-positives. Here, two (p)ppGpp synthetases RelA and RelQ are identified in Streptococcus suis, an important emerging zoonotic Gram-positive bacterium, while only RelA is functional under glucose starvation. To characterize the roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose starvation response in S. suis, the growth curves and transcriptional profiles were compared between the mutant strain ΔrelA [a (p)ppGpp0 strain under glucose starvation] and its parental strain SC-19 [(p)ppGpp+]. The results showed great difference between SC-19 and ΔrelA on adaptive responses when suffering glucose starvation, and demonstrated that RelA/(p)ppGpp plays important roles in adaptation to glucose starvation. Besides the classic SR including inhibition of growth and related macromolecular synthesis, the extended adaptive response also includes inhibited glycolysis, and carbon catabolite repression (CCR)-mediated carbohydrate-dependent metabolic switches. Collectively, the pheno- and genotypic characterization of the glucose starvation induced adaptive response in S. suis makes a great contribution to understanding better the mechanism of SR. PMID:27255540

  15. The roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose-starvation induced adaptive response in the zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tengfei; Zhu, Jiawen; Wei, Shun; Luo, Qingping; Li, Lu; Li, Shengqing; Tucker, Alexander; Shao, Huabin; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The (p)ppGpp signal molecules play a central role in the stringent response (SR) to adapt to nutrient starvation in bacteria, yet the carbohydrate starvation induced adaptive response and the roles of SR in this response is not well characterized, especially in Gram-positives. Here, two (p)ppGpp synthetases RelA and RelQ are identified in Streptococcus suis, an important emerging zoonotic Gram-positive bacterium, while only RelA is functional under glucose starvation. To characterize the roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose starvation response in S. suis, the growth curves and transcriptional profiles were compared between the mutant strain ΔrelA [a (p)ppGpp(0) strain under glucose starvation] and its parental strain SC-19 [(p)ppGpp(+)]. The results showed great difference between SC-19 and ΔrelA on adaptive responses when suffering glucose starvation, and demonstrated that RelA/(p)ppGpp plays important roles in adaptation to glucose starvation. Besides the classic SR including inhibition of growth and related macromolecular synthesis, the extended adaptive response also includes inhibited glycolysis, and carbon catabolite repression (CCR)-mediated carbohydrate-dependent metabolic switches. Collectively, the pheno- and genotypic characterization of the glucose starvation induced adaptive response in S. suis makes a great contribution to understanding better the mechanism of SR. PMID:27255540

  16. Kibra and aPKC regulate starvation-induced autophagy in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ahrum; Neufeld, Thomas P; Choe, Joonho

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation system that functions in response to cellular stresses such as metabolic stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, and developmental processes. During autophagy, cytoplasmic components are captured in double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. The autophagosome fuses with the lysosome, producing a vacuole known as an autolysosome. The cellular components are degraded by lysosomal proteases and recycled. Autophagy is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and the process is evolutionarily conserved. Kibra is an upstream regulator of the hippo signaling pathway, which controls organ size by affecting cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Kibra is mainly localized in the apical membrane domain of epithelial cells and acts as a scaffold protein. We found that Kibra is required for autophagy to function properly. The absence of Kibra caused defects in the formation of autophagic vesicles and autophagic degradation. We also found that the well-known cell polarity protein aPKC interacts with Kibra, and its activity affects autophagy upstream of Kibra. Constitutively active aPKC decreased autophagic vesicle formation and autophagic degradation. We confirmed the interaction between aPKC and Kibra in S2 cells and Drosophila larva. Taken together, our data suggest that Kibra and aPKC are essential for regulating starvation-induced autophagy. PMID:26551466

  17. Starvation Induces Vacuolar Targeting and Degradation of the Tryptophan Permease in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Thomas; Schmidt, Anja; Hall, Michael N.

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, amino acid permeases are divided into two classes. One class, represented by the general amino acid permease GAP1, contains permeases regulated in response to the nitrogen source. The other class, including the high affinity tryptophan permease, TAT2, consists of the so-called constitutive permeases. We show that TAT2 is regulated at the level of protein stability. In exponentially growing cells, TAT2 is in the plasma membrane and also accumulates in internal compartments of the secretory pathway. Upon nutrient deprivation or rapamycin treatment, TAT2 is transported to and degraded in the vacuole. The ubiquitination machinery and lysine residues within the NH2-terminal 31 amino acids of TAT2 mediate ubiquitination and degradation of the permease. Starvation-induced degradation of internal TAT2 is blocked in sec18, sec23, pep12, and vps27 mutants, but not in sec4, end4, and apg1 mutants, suggesting that, upon nutrient limitation, internal TAT2 is diverted from the late secretory pathway to the vacuolar pathway. Furthermore, our results suggest that TAT2 stability and sorting are controlled by the TOR signaling pathway, and regulated inversely to that of GAP1. PMID:10491387

  18. Energy-preserving effects of IGF-1 antagonize starvation-induced cardiac autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Troncoso, Rodrigo; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Parra, Valentina; Nemchenko, Andriy; Kawashima, Yuki; del Campo, Andrea; Toro, Barbra; Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Aranguiz, Pablo; Chiong, Mario; Yakar, Shoshana; Gillette, Thomas G.; Hill, Joseph A.; Abel, Evan Dale; LeRoith, Derek; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Aims Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is known to exert cardioprotective actions. However, it remains unknown if autophagy, a major adaptive response to nutritional stress, contributes to IGF-1-mediated cardioprotection. Methods and results We subjected cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, as well as live mice, to nutritional stress and assessed cell death and autophagic rates. Nutritional stress induced by serum/glucose deprivation strongly induced autophagy and cell death, and both responses were inhibited by IGF-1. The Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway mediated the effects of IGF-1 upon autophagy. Importantly, starvation also decreased intracellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption leading to AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation; IGF-1 increased mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and mitochondrial respiration in nutrient-starved cells. IGF-1 also rescued ATP levels, reduced AMPK phosphorylation and increased p70S6K phosphorylation, which indicates that in addition to Akt/mTOR, IGF-1 inhibits autophagy by the AMPK/mTOR axis. In mice harbouring a liver-specific igf1 deletion, which dramatically reduces IGF-1 plasma levels, AMPK activity and autophagy were increased, and significant heart weight loss was observed in comparison with wild-type starved animals, revealing the importance of IGF-1 in maintaining cardiac adaptability to nutritional insults in vivo. Conclusion Our data support the cardioprotective actions of IGF-1, which, by rescuing the mitochondrial metabolism and the energetic state of cells, reduces cell death and controls the potentially harmful autophagic response to nutritional challenges. IGF-1, therefore, may prove beneficial to mitigate damage induced by excessive nutrient-related stress, including ischaemic disease in multiple tissues. PMID:22135164

  19. Induction of fibroblast apolipoprotein E expression during apoptosis, starvation-induced growth arrest and mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M; Kågedal, Katarina; Terman, Alexei; Stroikin, Uri; Brunk, Ulf T; Jessup, Wendy; Garner, Brett

    2004-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) mediates the hepatic clearance of plasma lipoproteins, facilitates cholesterol efflux from macrophages and aids neuronal lipid transport. ApoE is expressed at high levels in hepatocytes, macrophages and astrocytes. In the present study, we identify nuclear and cytosolic pools of apoE in human fibroblasts. Fibroblast apoE mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated during staurosporine-induced apoptosis and this was correlated with increased caspase-3 activity and apoptotic morphological alterations. Because the transcription of apoE and specific pro-apoptotic genes is regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR (liver X receptor) alpha, we analysed LXRalpha mRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR and found it to be increased before apoE mRNA induction. The expression of ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) mRNA, which is also regulated by LXRalpha, was increased in parallel with apoE mRNA, indicating that LXRalpha probably promotes apoE and ABCA1 transcription during apoptosis. Fibroblast apoE levels were increased under conditions of serum-starvation-induced growth arrest and hyperoxia-induced senescence. In both cases, an increased nuclear apoE level was observed, particularly in cells that accumulated lipofuscin. Nuclear apoE was translocated to the cytosol when mitotic nuclear disassembly occurred and this was associated with an increase in total cellular apoE levels. ApoE amino acid sequence analysis indicated several potential sites for phosphorylation. In vivo studies, using 32P-labelling and immunoprecipitation, revealed that fibroblast apoE can be phosphorylated. These studies reveal novel associations and potential roles for apoE in fundamental cellular processes. PMID:14656220

  20. The regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis in pigeon liver

    PubMed Central

    Gevers, W.

    1967-01-01

    1. The intracellular location and maximal activities of enzymes involved in phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis have been investigated in pigeon liver. Enolase and pyruvate kinase were cytoplasmic, and the activities were 50–60 and 180–210μmoles/min./g. dry wt. at 25° respectively. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was present exclusively, and nucleoside diphosphokinase predominantly, in the mitochondria; the particles had to be disrupted to elicit maximal activities, which were 27–33 and 400–600μmoles/min./g. dry wt. at 25° respectively. The activities of all four enzymes did not change significantly during 48hr. of starvation. 2. Conditions for incubation of washed isolated mitochondria were established, to give high rates of synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate, linear with time and proportional to mitochondrial concentration. Inorganic phosphate and added adenine nucleotides were stimulatory, whereas added Mg2+ inhibited, partly owing to activation of contaminant pyruvate kinase. Phosphoenolpyruvate formation occurred from oxaloacetate, malate, fumarate, succinate, α-oxoglutarate and citrate, in decreasing order of effectiveness. 3. The steady-state ATP/ADP ratio of mitochondrial suspensions was decreased in the presence of added 2·5mm-Mg2+ (owing to stimulation of adenylate kinase and possibly of an adenosine triphosphatase), 0·5mm-Ca2+ or 0·4mm-dinitrophenol. In each case the rate of substrate removal and oxygen uptake was increased, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate synthesis was inhibited. Citrate formation was enhanced, owing to de-inhibition of citrate synthase. These effects were not primarily related to changes in the oxaloacetate concentration. 4. Both phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and nucleoside diphosphokinase were active within the atractylosidesensitive barrier to the mitochondrial metabolism of added adenine nucleotides. There was no correlation between the rate of substrate-level phosphorylation associated with the oxidation of

  1. Rice Phytochrome B (OsPhyB) Negatively Regulates Dark- and Starvation-Induced Leaf Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Weilan; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Su-Hyun; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Light regulates leaf senescence and light deprivation causes large-scale transcriptional reprogramming to dismantle cellular components and remobilize nutrients to sink organs, such as seeds and storage tissue. We recently reported that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Phytochrome-Interacting Factor4 (PIF4) and PIF5 promote dark-induced senescence and natural senescence by directly activating the expression of typical senescence-associated genes (SAGs), including ORESARA1 (ORE1) and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3). In contrast, phytochrome B (PhyB) inhibits leaf senescence by repressing PIF4 and PIF5 at the post-translational level. Although we found how red light signaling represses leaf senescence in Arabidopsis, it remains unknown whether PhyB and/or PhyA are involved in leaf senescence in rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that rice phyB knockout mutants (osphyB-1, -2, and -3) exhibited an early senescence phenotype during dark-induced senescence, but an osphyA knockout mutant (osphyA-3) senesced normally. The RT-qPCR analysis revealed that several senescence-associated genes, including OsORE1 and OsEIN3, were significantly up-regulated in osphyB-2 mutants, indicating that OsPhyB also inhibits leaf senescence, like Arabidopsis PhyB. We also found that leaf segments of osphyB-2 senesced faster even under light conditions. Supplementation with nitrogen compounds, such as KNO3 and NH4NO3, rescued the early senescence phenotype of osphyB-2, indicating that starvation is one of the major signaling factors in the OsPhyB-dependent leaf senescence pathway. PMID:27135344

  2. The glycolytic genes pfk and pyk from Lactobacillus casei are induced by sugars transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and repressed by CcpA.

    PubMed

    Viana, Rosa; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Deutscher, Josef; Monedero, Vicente

    2005-09-01

    In Lactobacillus casei BL23, phosphofructokinase activity was higher in cells utilizing sugars transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The phosphofructokinase gene (pfk) was cloned from L. casei and shown to be clustered with the gene encoding pyruvate kinase (pyk). pfk and pyk genes are cotranscribed and induced upon growth on sugars transported by the PTS. Contrarily to the model proposed for Lactococcus lactis, where the global catabolite regulator protein (CcpA) is involved in PTS-induced transcription of pfk and pyk, a ccpA mutation resulted in a slight increase in pfk-pyk expression in L. casei. This weak regulation was evidenced by CcpA binding to a region of the pfk-pyk promoter which contained two cre sequences significantly deviated from the consensus. The PTS induction of pfk-pyk seems to be counteracted by the CcpA-mediated repression. Our results suggest that the need to accommodate the levels of pfk-pyk mRNA to the availability of sugars is fulfilled in L. casei by a PTS/CcpA-mediated signal transduction different from L. lactis. PMID:16075200

  3. SUB1 Plays a Negative Role during Starvation Induced Sporulation Program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ritu; Vijayraghavan, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sub1 is involved in several cellular processes such as, transcription initiation, elongation, mRNA processing and DNA repair. It has also been reported to provide cellular resistance during conditions of oxidative DNA damage and osmotic stress. Here, we report a novel role of SUB1 during starvation stress-induced sporulation, which leads to meiosis and spore formation in diploid yeast cells. Deletion of SUB1 gene significantly increased sporulation efficiency as compared to the wild-type cells in S288c genetic background. Whereas, the sporulation functions of the sub1(Y66A) missense mutant were similar to Sub1. SUB1 transcript and protein levels are downregulated during sporulation, in highly synchronized and sporulation proficient wild-type SK1 cells. The changes in Sub1 levels during sporulation cascade correlate with the induction of middle sporulation gene expression. Deletion of SUB1 increased middle sporulation gene transcript levels with no effect on their induction kinetics. In wild-type cells, Sub1 associates with chromatin at these loci in a temporal pattern that correlates with their enhanced gene expression seen in sub1Δ cells. We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with HOS2, which led us to speculate that Sub1 might function with Set3 repressor complex during sporulation. Positive Cofactor 4, human homolog of Sub1, complemented the sub1Δ sporulation phenotype, suggesting conservation of function. Taken together, our results suggest that SUB1 acts as a negative regulator of sporulation. PMID:26147804

  4. Carbon dynamics in trees under induced lethal drought and carbon starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, H.; Trumbore, S.; Ziegler, W.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in precipitation patterns and more frequently occurring heat spells seem to be responsible for tree and forest mortality observed all over the globe. During drought, trees control water consumption by down-regulation stomatal conductance but this also narrows the pathway for diffusion of CO2 into leaves and hence reduces carbon assimilation. During longer droughts, the carbon balance becomes negative and trees have to rely on stored carbon (non-structural carbohydrates, NSC). At the same time, drought potentially decreases phloem functioning by causing declines in plant water potential and this may interfere with carbon storage remobilization and use. Hence, drought not only influences carbon acquisition but also post-photosynthesis carbon storage dynamics. We are currently investigating carbon dynamics in trees subjected to complete and cyclic drought in a field experiment and trees subjected to carbon starvation (partial CO2 withdrawal from atmosphere) in a greenhouse experiment. Both drought and CO2 withdrawal provoke a negative net carbon balance but the latter allows maintaining plant water potentials at adequate levels for carbon translocation. This approach will allow sorting out drought effects on carbon acquisition, remobilization and use. Completely droughted trees (young Norway spruce) died within 3 months. Drought caused a rapid decline in carbon assimilation while the sustained respirational demand forced trees into a negative carbon balance after ~6 weeks. The 13Cδ signature of root-respired CO2 indicated an early onset of carbon storage use (after ~ 2 weeks). Very low root sucrose and starch concentrations at the end of the experiment confirmed a strong decline in root NSC pools. In needles and branches sucrose and starch concentrations were not affected by either treatment but glucose and fructose concentrations increased early in the complete drought and at the end of the season in the cyclic drought. This increase may be interpreted as a

  5. Phosphorylation of the exchange factor DENND3 by ULK in response to starvation activates Rab12 and induces autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Fotouhi, Maryam; McPherson, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Unc-51-like kinases (ULKs) are the most upstream kinases in the initiation of autophagy, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying their function are poorly understood. We report a new role for ULK in the induction of autophagy. ULK-mediated phosphorylation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DENND3 at serines 554 and 572 upregulates its GEF activity toward the small GTPase Rab12. Through binding to LC3 and associating with LC3-positive autophagosomes, active Rab12 facilitates autophagosome trafficking, thus establishing a crucial role for the ULK/DENND3/Rab12 axis in starvation-induced autophagy. PMID:25925668

  6. Effector caspase Dcp-1 and IAP protein Bruce regulate starvation-induced autophagy during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying-Chen Claire; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Barbosa, Sharon González; McCall, Kimberly; Gorski, Sharon M

    2008-09-22

    A complex relationship exists between autophagy and apoptosis, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying their interactions are largely unknown. We conducted a systematic study of Drosophila melanogaster cell death-related genes to determine their requirement in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. We discovered that six cell death genes--death caspase-1 (Dcp-1), hid, Bruce, Buffy, debcl, and p53-as well as Ras-Raf-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway components had a role in autophagy regulation in D. melanogaster cultured cells. During D. melanogaster oogenesis, we found that autophagy is induced at two nutrient status checkpoints: germarium and mid-oogenesis. At these two stages, the effector caspase Dcp-1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Bruce function to regulate both autophagy and starvation-induced cell death. Mutations in Atg1 and Atg7 resulted in reduced DNA fragmentation in degenerating midstage egg chambers but did not appear to affect nuclear condensation, which indicates that autophagy contributes in part to cell death in the ovary. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that coordinately regulate autophagic and apoptotic events in vivo. PMID:18794330

  7. Effector caspase Dcp-1 and IAP protein Bruce regulate starvation-induced autophagy during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ying-Chen Claire; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Barbosa, Sharon González; McCall, Kimberly; Gorski, Sharon M.

    2008-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between autophagy and apoptosis, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying their interactions are largely unknown. We conducted a systematic study of Drosophila melanogaster cell death–related genes to determine their requirement in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. We discovered that six cell death genes—death caspase-1 (Dcp-1), hid, Bruce, Buffy, debcl, and p53—as well as Ras–Raf–mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway components had a role in autophagy regulation in D. melanogaster cultured cells. During D. melanogaster oogenesis, we found that autophagy is induced at two nutrient status checkpoints: germarium and mid-oogenesis. At these two stages, the effector caspase Dcp-1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Bruce function to regulate both autophagy and starvation-induced cell death. Mutations in Atg1 and Atg7 resulted in reduced DNA fragmentation in degenerating midstage egg chambers but did not appear to affect nuclear condensation, which indicates that autophagy contributes in part to cell death in the ovary. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that coordinately regulate autophagic and apoptotic events in vivo. PMID:18794330

  8. The putative HORMA domain protein Atg101 dimerizes and is required for starvation-induced and selective autophagy in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Krisztina; Nagy, Péter; Gáspári, Zoltán; Juhász, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale turnover of intracellular material including organelles is achieved by autophagy-mediated degradation in lysosomes. Initiation of autophagy is controlled by a protein kinase complex consisting of an Atg1-family kinase, Atg13, FIP200/Atg17, and the metazoan-specific subunit Atg101. Here we show that loss of Atg101 impairs both starvation-induced and basal autophagy in Drosophila. This leads to accumulation of protein aggregates containing the selective autophagy cargo ref(2)P/p62. Mapping experiments suggest that Atg101 binds to the N-terminal HORMA domain of Atg13 and may also interact with two unstructured regions of Atg1. Another HORMA domain-containing protein, Mad2, forms a conformational homodimer. We show that Drosophila Atg101 also dimerizes, and it is predicted to fold into a HORMA domain. Atg101 interacts with ref(2)P as well, similar to Atg13, Atg8a, Atg16, Atg18, Keap1, and RagC, a known regulator of Tor kinase which coordinates cell growth and autophagy. These results raise the possibility that the interactions and dimerization of the putative HORMA domain protein Atg101 play critical roles in starvation-induced autophagy and proteostasis, by promoting the formation of protein aggregate-containing autophagosomes. PMID:24895579

  9. Impairment by interleukin 1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha of the glucagon-induced increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression and gluconeogenesis in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, B; Nath, A

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the inflammatory mediators interleukin 1 beta (IL1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) on the glucagon-induced expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and on glucose formation via gluconeogenesis was investigated in cultured rat hepatocytes. Gene expression was monitored by determination of mRNA levels and of enzyme activity. Glucose formation was estimated with newly synthesized radioactive glucose derived from a radiolabelled lactate precursor. Glucagon (0.1 or 1 nM) induced PCK mRNA transiently to a maximum 2 h after its application. In the presence of recombinant human (rh) IL1 beta or rhTNF alpha the increase in PCK mRNA levels was totally inhibited at 0.1 nM glucagon, whereas at 1 nM glucagon the maximal increase was inhibited by only 25%. Glucagon (0.1 or 1 nM) induced PCK activity to a maximum after 4 h (4-fold and 6-fold over prestimulatory activity respectively). In the presence of rhIL1 beta or rhTNF alpha the maximal increase was inhibited by approx. 50%. Addition of rhIL1 beta or rhTNF alpha 2 h after glucagon, at the maximal glucagon-induced PCK mRNA levels, accelerated the decay of PCK mRNA. Glucagon (1 or 10 nM) [corrected] increased glucose formation from lactate by 1.3-fold and 1.7-fold respectively over unstimulated rates. In the presence of rhIL1 beta or rhTNF alpha this increase in glucose formation was inhibited by 60-90%. At 0.1 nM, glucagon doubled the intracellular cAMP concentration. This increase was prevented by rhIL1 beta or rhTNF alpha. At 1 nM, glucagon increased cAMP concentrations by 10-fold. In the presence of rhIL1 beta or rhTNF alpha this increase was inhibited by 70%. From the results it is suggested that rhIL1 beta and rhTNF alpha prevented glucagon-stimulated PCK gene expression and gluconeogenesis at least in part by inhibition of the glucagon-stimulated increase in cAMP concentrations. PMID:8947481

  10. Loss of the starvation-induced gene Rack1 leads to glycogen deficiency and impaired autophagic responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Érdi, Balázs; Nagy, Péter; Zvara, Ágnes; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Ménesi, Dalma; Puskás, László G.; Juhász, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic material for lysosomal degradation in eukaryotic cells. Starvation induces high levels of autophagy to promote survival in the lack of nutrients. We compared genome-wide transcriptional profiles of fed and starved control, autophagy-deficient Atg7 and Atg1 null mutant Drosophila larvae to search for novel regulators of autophagy. Genes involved in catabolic processes including autophagy were transcriptionally upregulated in all cases. We also detected repression of genes involved in DNA replication in autophagy mutants compared with control animals. The expression of Rack1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) increased 4.1- to 5.5-fold during nutrient deprivation in all three genotypes. The scaffold protein Rack1 plays a role in a wide range of processes including translation, cell adhesion and migration, cell survival and cancer. Loss of Rack1 led to attenuated autophagic response to starvation, and glycogen stores were decreased 11.8-fold in Rack1 mutant cells. Endogenous Rack1 partially colocalized with GFP-Atg8a and early autophagic structures on the ultrastructural level, suggesting its involvement in autophagosome formation. Endogenous Rack1 also showed a high degree of colocalization with glycogen particles in the larval fat body, and with Shaggy, the Drosophila homolog of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK-3B). Our results, for the first time, demonstrated the fundamental role of Rack1 in autophagy and glycogen synthesis. PMID:22562043

  11. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Kenrick A.; Mota-Peynado, Alina De-La; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy. PMID:26670610

  12. Mild Glucose Starvation Induces KDM2A-Mediated H3K36me2 Demethylation through AMPK To Reduce rRNA Transcription and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuji; Yano, Hirohisa; Ogasawara, Sachiko; Yoshioka, Sho-ichi; Imamura, Hiromi; Okamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions control rRNA transcription. Previously, we found that serum and glucose deprivation induces KDM2A-mediated H3K36me2 demethylation in the rRNA gene (rDNA) promoter and reduces rRNA transcription in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. However, the molecular mechanism and biological significance are still unclear. In the present study, we found that glucose starvation alone induced the KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription. The treatment of cells with 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glycolysis, reduced rRNA transcription and H3K36me2 in the rDNA promoter, both of which were completely dependent on KDM2A in low concentrations of 2-deoxy-d-glucose, that is, mild starvation conditions. The mild starvation induced these KDM2A activities through AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) but did not affect another AMPK effector of rRNA transcription, TIF-IA. In the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, the mild starvation also reduced rRNA transcription in a KDM2A-dependent manner. We detected KDM2A in breast cancer tissues irrespective of their estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 status, including triple-negative cancer tissues. In both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, mild starvation reduced cell proliferation, and KDM2A knockdown suppressed the reduction of cell proliferation. These results suggest that under mild glucose starvation AMPK induces KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription to control cell proliferation. PMID:26416883

  13. Bulk RNA degradation by nitrogen starvation-induced autophagy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hanghang; Kawamata, Tomoko; Horie, Tetsuro; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Yasumune; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process conserved among eukaryotes. Under nutrient starvation, a portion of the cytoplasm is non-selectively sequestered into autophagosomes. Consequently, ribosomes are delivered to the vacuole/lysosome for destruction, but the precise mechanism of autophagic RNA degradation and its physiological implications for cellular metabolism remain unknown. We characterized autophagy-dependent RNA catabolism using a combination of metabolome and molecular biological analyses in yeast. RNA delivered to the vacuole was processed by Rny1, a T2-type ribonuclease, generating 3′-NMPs that were immediately converted to nucleosides by the vacuolar non-specific phosphatase Pho8. In the cytoplasm, these nucleosides were broken down by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1. Most of the resultant bases were not re-assimilated, but excreted from the cell. Bulk non-selective autophagy causes drastic perturbation of metabolism, which must be minimized to maintain intracellular homeostasis. PMID:25468960

  14. Diarrhoea of famine and malnutrition--investigations using a rat model. 2--Ileal hypersecretion induced by starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Young, A; Levin, R J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of progressive starvation for up to three days on the basal and secretagogue stimulated secretory functions of the rat ileum were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The secretagogues used included agents acting via cyclic AMP (dibutyryl cyclic AMP, theophylline, forskolin, and PGE2) and those acting via Ca++ (acetylcholine, bethanecol, carbachol, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and A23187). Starving rats for 24 h (day 1) had no effect on the basal electrogenic secretion (measured as the short circuit current, Isc muamps/cm2) or on the stimulated maximum electrogenic secretion (measured as the delta Isc where delta Isc = maxIsc-basal Isc). By day 2 of starvation, however, both the basal Isc and the delta Isc induced by all the secretagogues were significantly greater than in the fed and increased even more on day 3. Replacement of all the chloride ions and inhibition by furosemide indicated that the enhanced secretion was due mainly to chloride ions. Cholinergic stimulation was blocked by atropine, indicating the stimulation was via muscarinic receptors while cholinergic dose - delta Isc response curves for fed and starved ilea showed significantly increased maximum electrogenic secretory response in the latter but no evidence of any change in the affinity (ED50) of the receptors mediating the response. The basal secretion and the secretory response to acetylcholine in both fed and starved ilea was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, revealing that the enhanced secretory response could be expressed via the muscarinic receptors on the enterocytes without the enteric neural network. Measurement of ileal fluid movement in vivo showed that in fed and day 1 starved rats the basal, unstimulated 'tone' of the ileum was absorptive. On day 2, however, the basal 'tone' had reversed to one of secretion which increased further on day 3. Stimulation of fluid secretion in vivo by bethanecol, carbachol, or PGE2 induced larger increases in the starved ilea by day 2 which increased even

  15. The biofilm environment offers a possible condition for inducing the competency of DNA recipient cells through nutritional starvation.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Motomu; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Onishi, Kyoko; Taya, Masahito

    2007-09-01

    Transformation phenomena occurring under conditions mimicking the biofilm environment were investigated using Escherichia coli IM302 (as DNA recipient cells) and Providencia sp. WW2 (as surrounding cells in the biofilm model). In the case of planktonic IM302 cells kept at 25 degrees C, the transformation took place exclusively in the absence of organic nutrients (COD = 0), and was not substantially observed in the range of COD = 30-1500 mg O2/L. On the other hand, in the case of biofilm IM302 cells, the transformation occurred at relatively high levels under the examined conditions (temperature = 5 or 25 degrees C and COD = 0-1500 mg O2/L). These results indicated that the competency of biofilm IM302 cells was induced even in the presence of organic nutrients owing to nutritional starvation caused by WW2 cells. PMID:17927052

  16. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals.

    PubMed

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senescing cvs. NPZ-2 and Capitol, respectively and grown in hydroponics. The senescence status of older leaves after 12 days of N starvation assessed by SPAD, photosynthesis and the expression of the senescence-specific cysteine protease gene SAG12-1 revealed that the stay-green phenotype of the cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex under N starvation was primarily under the control of leaf-inherent factors. The same four cultivars were submitted to N starvation for up to 12 days in a time-course experiment. The specific leaf contents of biologically active and inactive cytokinins (CKs) and the expression of genes involved in CK homeostasis revealed that under N starvation leaves of early-senescing cultivars were characterized by inactivation of biologically active CKs, whereas in stay-green cultivars synthesis, activation, binding of and response to biologically active CKs were favoured. These results suggest that the homeostasis of biologically active CKs was the predominant leaf-inherent factor for cultivar differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and thus N efficiency. PMID:25944925

  17. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals

    PubMed Central

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A.; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senescing cvs. NPZ-2 and Capitol, respectively and grown in hydroponics. The senescence status of older leaves after 12 days of N starvation assessed by SPAD, photosynthesis and the expression of the senescence-specific cysteine protease gene SAG12-1 revealed that the stay-green phenotype of the cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex under N starvation was primarily under the control of leaf-inherent factors. The same four cultivars were submitted to N starvation for up to 12 days in a time-course experiment. The specific leaf contents of biologically active and inactive cytokinins (CKs) and the expression of genes involved in CK homeostasis revealed that under N starvation leaves of early-senescing cultivars were characterized by inactivation of biologically active CKs, whereas in stay-green cultivars synthesis, activation, binding of and response to biologically active CKs were favoured. These results suggest that the homeostasis of biologically active CKs was the predominant leaf-inherent factor for cultivar differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and thus N efficiency. PMID:25944925

  18. Glucose Starvation Inhibits Autophagy via Vacuolar Hydrolysis and Induces Plasma Membrane Internalization by Down-regulating Recycling*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael J.; Martinez-Marquez, Jorge Y.; Prosser, Derek C.; Ganser, Laura R.; Buelto, Destiney; Wendland, Beverly; Duncan, Mara C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular energy influences all aspects of cellular function. Although cells can adapt to a gradual reduction in energy, acute energy depletion poses a unique challenge. Because acute depletion hampers the transport of new energy sources into the cell, the cell must use endogenous substrates to replenish energy after acute depletion. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glucose starvation causes an acute depletion of intracellular energy that recovers during continued glucose starvation. However, how the cell replenishes energy during the early phase of glucose starvation is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of pathways that deliver proteins and lipids to the vacuole during glucose starvation. We report that in response to glucose starvation, plasma membrane proteins are directed to the vacuole through reduced recycling at the endosomes. Furthermore, we found that vacuolar hydrolysis inhibits macroautophagy in a target of rapamycin complex 1-dependent manner. Accordingly, we found that endocytosis and hydrolysis are required for survival in glucose starvation, whereas macroautophagy is dispensable. Together, these results suggest that hydrolysis of components delivered to the vacuole independent of autophagy is the cell survival mechanism used by S. cerevisiae in response to glucose starvation. PMID:24753258

  19. SIZ1 Regulation of Phosphate Starvation-Induced Root Architecture Remodeling Involves the Control of Auxin Accumulation1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kenji; Lee, Jiyoung; Gong, Qingqiu; Ma, Shisong; Jin, Jing Bo; Yoo, Chan Yul; Miura, Tomoko; Sato, Aiko; Bohnert, Hans J.; Hasegawa, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) limitation causes plants to modulate the architecture of their root systems to facilitate the acquisition of Pi. Previously, we reported that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 regulates root architecture remodeling in response to Pi limitation; namely, the siz1 mutations cause the inhibition of primary root (PR) elongation and the promotion of lateral root (LR) formation. Here, we present evidence that SIZ1 is involved in the negative regulation of auxin patterning to modulate root system architecture in response to Pi starvation. The siz1 mutations caused greater PR growth inhibition and LR development of seedlings in response to Pi limitation. Similar root phenotypes occurred if Pi-deficient wild-type seedlings were supplemented with auxin. N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux activity, reduced the Pi starvation-induced LR root formation of siz1 seedlings to a level equivalent to that seen in the wild type. Monitoring of the auxin-responsive reporter DR5::uidA indicated that auxin accumulates in PR tips at early stages of the Pi starvation response. Subsequently, DR5::uidA expression was observed in the LR primordia, which was associated with LR elongation. The time-sequential patterning of DR5::uidA expression occurred earlier in the roots of siz1 as compared with the wild type. In addition, microarray analysis revealed that several other auxin-responsive genes, including genes involved in cell wall loosening and biosynthesis, were up-regulated in siz1 relative to wild-type seedlings in response to Pi starvation. Together, these results suggest that SIZ1 negatively regulates Pi starvation-induced root architecture remodeling through the control of auxin patterning. PMID:21156857

  20. Sestrin2 is induced by glucose starvation via the unfolded protein response and protects cells from non-canonical necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Boxiao; Parmigiani, Anita; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Archer, Kellie; Murphy, Anne N.; Budanov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a member of a family of stress responsive proteins, which controls cell viability via antioxidant activity and regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin protein kinase (mTOR). Sestrin2 is induced by different stress insults, which diminish ATP production and induce energetic stress in the cells. Glucose is a critical substrate for ATP production utilized via glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration as well as for glycosylation of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Thus, glucose starvation causes both energy deficiency and activation of ER stress followed by the unfolding protein response (UPR). Here, we show that UPR induces Sestrin2 via ATF4 and NRF2 transcription factors and demonstrate that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death. Sestrin2 inactivation sensitizes cells to necroptotic cell death that is associated with a decline in ATP levels and can be suppressed by Necrostatin 7. We propose that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death via regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26932729

  1. The TOR signaling pathway regulates starvation-induced pseudouridylation of yeast U2 snRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guowei; Radwan, Mohamed K; Xiao, Mu; Adachi, Hironori; Fan, Jason; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Pseudouridine (Ψ) has been identified in various types of RNAs, including mRNA, rRNA, tRNA, snRNA, and many other noncoding RNAs. We have previously shown that RNA pseudouridylation, like DNA and protein modifications, can be induced by stress. For instance, growing yeast cells to saturation induces the formation of Ψ93 in U2 snRNA. Here, we further investigate this inducible RNA modification. We show that switching yeast cells from nutrient-rich medium to different nutrient-deprived media (including water) results in the formation of Ψ93 in U2 snRNA. Using gene deletion/conditional depletion as well as rapamycin treatment, we further show that the TOR signaling pathway, which controls cell entry into stationary phase, regulates Ψ93 formation. The RAS/cAMP signaling pathway, which parallels the TOR pathway, plays no role in this inducible modification. PMID:27268497

  2. Angiotensin receptor blocker telmisartan suppresses renal gluconeogenesis during starvation.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Akihiro; Hatakeyama, Saaya; Kinugasa, Satoshi; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    The kidney plays an important role in gluconeogenesis during starvation. To clarify the anti-diabetic action of angiotensin receptor blockers, we examined the effects of telmisartan on the sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT) and the pathways of renal gluconeogenesis in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) rats. At 4 weeks, the DM rats treated with/without telmisartan for 2 weeks and normal control rats were used for the study after a 24-hour fast. SGLT2 expressed on the brush border membrane of the proximal convoluted tubules increased in the DM rats, but decreased in the rats treated with telmisartan. The expression of restriction enzymes of gluconeogenesis, glucose-6-phosphatase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase increased in the proximal tubules in the DM rats, whereas these enzymes decreased in the kidneys of the rats treated with telmisartan. The elevated cytoplasmic glucose-6-phosphate and glucose levels in the kidney of DM rats significantly decreased in those treated with telmisartan, whereas those levels in the liver did not show significant change. Meanwhile, the high plasma glucose levels in the DM rats during the intravenous insulin tolerance tests were ameliorated by telmisartan. The increased fasting plasma glucose levels after 24 hours of starvation in the DM rats thus returned to the control levels by telmisartan treatment. In conclusion, the increased renal SGLT2 expression, elevated renal gluconeogenesis enzymes and extent of insulin-resistance in the DM rats were ameliorated by telmisartan therapy, thus resulting in decreased plasma glucose levels after 24 hours of fasting. PMID:25709483

  3. Transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis glucose starvation-inducible genes: control of gsiA by the ComP-ComA signal transduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, J P; Bukusoglu, G; Sonenshein, A L

    1992-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis glucose starvation-inducible transcription units, gsiA and gsiB, were characterized by DNA sequencing, transcriptional mapping, mutational analysis, and expression in response to changes in environmental conditions. The gsiA operon was shown to consist of two genes, gsiAA and gsiAB, predicted to encode 44.9- and 4.8-kDa polypeptides, respectively. The gsiB locus contains a single cistron which encodes a protein of unusual structure; most of its amino acids are arranged in five highly conserved, tandemly repeated units of 20 amino acids. The 5' ends of gsiA and gsiB mRNAs were located by primer extension analysis; their locations suggest that both are transcribed by RNA polymerase containing sigma A. Expression of both gsiA and gsiB was induced by starvation for glucose or phosphate or by addition of decoyinine, but only gsiA was induced by exhaustion of nutrient broth or by amino acid starvation. Regulation of gsiA expression was shown to be dependent upon the two-component signal transduction system ComP-ComA, which also controls expression of genetic competence genes. Mutations in mecA bypassed the dependency of gsiA expression on ComA. Disruption of gsiA relieved glucose repression of sporulation but did not otherwise interfere with sporulation, development of competence, motility, or glucose starvation survival. We propose that gsiA and gsiB are members of an adaptive pathway of genes whose products are involved in responses to nutrient deprivation other than sporulation. Images PMID:1378051

  4. Phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Bari, Lidia; Valenti, Daniela; Pizzuto, Roberto; Atlante, Anna; Passarella, Salvatore

    2007-04-01

    We report here initial studies on phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in coupled mitochondria isolated from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. It was found that: (1) phosphoenolpyruvate can be metabolized by Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria by virtue of the presence of the mitochondrial pyruvate kinase, shown both immunologically and functionally, located in the inner mitochondrial compartments and distinct from the cytosolic pyruvate kinase as shown by the different pH and inhibition profiles. (2) Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria can take up externally added phosphoenolpyruvate in a proton compensated manner, in a carrier-mediated process which was investigated by measuring fluorimetrically the oxidation of intramitochondrial pyridine nucleotide which occurs as a result of phosphoenolpyruvate uptake and alternative oxidase activation. (3) The addition of phosphoenolpyruvate causes pyruvate and ATP production, as monitored via HPLC, with their efflux into the extramitochondrial phase investigated fluorimetrically. Such an efflux occurs via the putative phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate/ATP antiporters, which differ from each other and from the pyruvate and the adenine nucleotide carriers, in the light of the different sensitivity to non-penetrant compounds. These carriers were shown to regulate the rate of efflux of both pyruvate and ATP. The appearance of citrate and oxaloacetate outside mitochondria was also found as a result of phosphoenolpyruvate addition. PMID:17418088

  5. The THO/TREX Complex Active in miRNA Biogenesis Negatively Regulates Root-Associated Acid Phosphatase Activity Induced by Phosphate Starvation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Sibo; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyue; Xu, Le; Fang, Xiaofeng; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-01-01

    Induction and secretion of acid phosphatases (APases) is an adaptive response that plants use to cope with P (Pi) deficiency in their environment. The molecular mechanism that regulates this response, however, is poorly understood. In this work, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, hps8, which exhibits enhanced APase activity on its root surface (also called root-associated APase activity). Our molecular and genetic analyses indicate that this altered Pi response results from a mutation in the AtTHO1 gene that encodes a subunit of the THO/TREX protein complex. The mutation in another subunit of this complex, AtTHO3, also enhances root-associated APase activity under Pi starvation. In Arabidopsis, the THO/TREX complex functions in mRNA export and miRNA biogenesis. When treated with Ag+, an inhibitor of ethylene perception, the enhanced root-associated APase activity in hps8 is largely reversed. hpr1-5 is another mutant allele of AtTHO1 and shows similar phenotypes as hps8. ein2 is completely insensitive to ethylene. In the hpr1-5ein2 double mutant, the enhanced root-associated APase activity is also greatly suppressed. These results indicate that the THO/TREX complex in Arabidopsis negatively regulates root-associated APase activity induced by Pi starvation by inhibiting ethylene signaling. In addition, we found that the miRNA399-PHO2 pathway is also involved in the regulation of root-associated APase activity induced by Pi starvation. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the adaptive response of plants to Pi starvation. PMID:27329222

  6. Serum Starvation Induces DRAM Expression in Liver Cancer Cells via Histone Modifications within Its Promoter Locus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changqiang; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Xiangfan; Hu, Yiqun; Fan, Qishi; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Lu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    DRAM is a lysosomal membrane protein and is critical for p53-mediated autophagy and apoptosis. DRAM has a potential tumor-suppressive function and is downregulated in many human cancers. However, the regulation of DRAM expression is poorly described so far. Here, we demonstrated that serum deprivation strongly induces DRAM expression in liver cancer cells and a core DNA sequence in the DRAM promoter is essential for its responsiveness to serum deprivation. We further observed that euchromatin markers for active transcriptions represented by diacetyl-H3, tetra-acetyl-H4 and the trimethyl-H3K4 at the core promoter region of DRAM gene are apparently increased in a time-dependent manner upon serum deprivation, and concomitantly the dimethyl-H3K9, a herterochromatin marker associated with silenced genes, was time-dependently decreased. Moreover, the chromatin remodeling factor Brg-1 is enriched at the core promoter region of the DRAM gene and is required for serum deprivation induced DRAM expression. These observations lay the ground for further investigation of the DRAM gene expression. PMID:23251372

  7. Identification of BECN1 and ATG14 Coiled-Coil Interface Residues That Are Important for Starvation-Induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yang; Su, Minfei; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L; Sinha, Sangita C

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy, an essential eukaryotic homeostasis pathway, allows the sequestration of unwanted, damaged, or harmful cytoplasmic components in vesicles called autophagosomes, permitting subsequent lysosomal degradation and nutrient recycling. Autophagosome nucleation is mediated by class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase complexes that include two key autophagy proteins, BECN1/Beclin 1 and ATG14/BARKOR, which form parallel heterodimers via their coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Here we present the 1.46 Å X-ray crystal structure of the antiparallel, human BECN1 CCD homodimer, which represents BECN1 oligomerization outside the autophagosome nucleation complex. We use circular dichroism and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to show that the ATG14 CCD is significantly disordered but becomes more helical in the BECN1:ATG14 heterodimer, although it is less well-folded than the BECN1 CCD homodimer. SAXS also indicates that the BECN1:ATG14 heterodimer is more curved than other BECN1-containing CCD dimers, which has important implications for the structure of the autophagosome nucleation complex. A model of the BECN1:ATG14 CCD heterodimer that agrees well with the SAXS data shows that BECN1 residues at the homodimer interface are also responsible for heterodimerization, allowing us to identify ATG14 interface residues. Finally, we verify the role of BECN1 and ATG14 interface residues in binding by assessing the impact of point mutations of these residues on co-immunoprecipitation of the partner and demonstrate that these mutations abrogate starvation-induced upregulation of autophagy but do not impact basal autophagy. Thus, this research provides insights into structures of the BECN1 CCD homodimer and the BECN1:ATG14 CCD heterodimer and identifies interface residues that are important for BECN1:ATG14 heterodimerization and for autophagy. PMID:27383850

  8. The Critical Role of Arabidopsis Electron-Transfer Flavoprotein:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase during Dark-Induced StarvationW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Larson, Tony R.; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Graham, Ian A.; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETFQO) and electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) are functionally associated, and ETF accepts electrons from at least nine mitochondrial matrix flavoprotein dehydrogenases and transfers them to ubiquinone in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In addition, the mammalian ETF/ETFQO system plays a key role in β-oxidation of fatty acids and catabolism of amino acids and choline. By contrast, nothing is known of the function of ETF and ETFQO in plants. Sequence analysis of the unique Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of ETFQO revealed high similarity to the mammalian ETFQO protein. Moreover, green fluorescent protein cellular localization experiments suggested a mitochondrial location for this protein. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that Arabidopsis ETFQO transcripts accumulated in long-term dark-treated leaves. Analysis of three independent insertional mutants of Arabidopsis ETFQO revealed a dramatic reduction in their ability to withstand extended darkness, resulting in senescence and death within 10 d after transfer, whereas wild-type plants remained viable for at least 15 d. Metabolite profiling of dark-treated leaves of the wild type and mutants revealed a dramatic decline in sugar levels. In contrast with the wild type, the mutants demonstrated a significant accumulation of several amino acids, an intermediate of Leu catabolism, and, strikingly, high-level accumulation of phytanoyl-CoA. These data demonstrate the involvement of a mitochondrial protein, ETFQO, in the catabolism of Leu and potentially of other amino acids in higher plants and also imply a novel role for this protein in the chlorophyll degradation pathway activated during dark-induced senescence and sugar starvation. PMID:16055629

  9. Suppression of starvation-induced autophagy by recombinant toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Asano, Krisana; Asano, Yoshiya; Ono, Hisaya K; Nakane, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), a superantigen produced from Staphylococcus aureus, has been reported to bind directly to unknown receptor(s) and penetrate into non-immune cells but its function is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant TSST-1 suppresses autophagosomal accumulation in the autophagic-induced HeLa 229 cells. This suppression is shared by a superantigenic-deficient mutant of TSST-1 but not by staphylococcal enterotoxins, suggesting that autophagic suppression of TSST-1 is superantigenic-independent. Furthermore, we showed that TSST-1-producing S. aureus suppresses autophagy in the response of infected cells. Our data provides a novel function of TSST-1 in autophagic suppression which may contribute in staphylococcal persistence in host cells. PMID:25402468

  10. Evidence that severe acute stress and starvation induce rapid atresia of ovarian vitellogenic follicles in Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus (L.) (Osteichthyes: Scombridae).

    PubMed

    Corriero, A; Zupa, R; Bello, G; Mylonas, C C; Deflorio, M; Genovese, S; Basilone, G; Buscaino, G; Buffa, G; Pousis, C; De Metrio, G; Santamaria, N

    2011-11-01

    The effects of different stressors on the atretic degeneration of ovarian vitellogenic follicles, as well as on the ovarian mass, were examined in female Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus (L.), from the Mediterranean Sea. The stressors taken into consideration were short-term starvation (up to 14 days), long-term cage rearing (1 year) and crowding-induced severe panic frenzy. Wild-caught individuals were used as a control group. Fish subjected to either severe panic frenzy or starvation exhibited a decrease in gonad mass and had significantly higher intensity of α atresia in the vitellogenic follicles (means: 78% and 58%, respectively; range: 36-100%) than either wild or long-term caged individuals (means: 32% and 30%, respectively; range: 19-44%). The extensive atresia in fish stressed by severe panic frenzy was observed as early as 24 h after the stressing event. The present study represents the first evidence of the extreme susceptibility of Atlantic bluefin tuna to severe acute stress during vitellogenesis; it also shows that starvation is associated with progressive reabsorption of vitellogenic oocytes. PMID:21988357

  11. Glucose starvation induces mutation and lineage-dependent adaptive responses in a large collection of cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    He, Ningning; Kim, Nayoung; Jeong, Euna; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance of glucose deprivation is an important factor for cancer proliferation, survival, migration and progression. To systematically understand adaptive responses under glucose starvation in cancers, we analyzed reverse phase protein array (RPPA) data of 115 protein antibodies across a panel of approximately 170 heterogeneous cancer cell lines, cultured under normal and low glucose conditions. In general, glucose starvation broadly altered levels of many of the proteins and phosphoproteins assessed across the cell lines. Many mTOR pathway components were selectively sensitive to glucose stress, although the change in their levels still varied greatly across the cell line set. Furthermore, lineage- and genotype-based classification of cancer cell lines revealed mutation-specific variation of protein expression and phosphorylation in response to glucose starvation. Decreased AKT phosphorylation (S473) was significantly associated with PTEN mutation under glucose starvation conditions in lung cancer cell lines. The present study (see TCPAportal.org for data resource) provides insight into adaptive responses to glucose deprivation under diverse cellular contexts. PMID:26573869

  12. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) and serine biosynthetic pathway genes are co-ordinately increased during anabolic agent-induced skeletal muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. M.; Williams, H.; Ryan, K. J. P.; Wilson, T. L.; Daniel, Z. C. T. R.; Mareko, M. H. D.; Emes, R. D.; Harris, D. W.; Jones, S.; Wattis, J. A. D.; Dryden, I. L.; Hodgman, T. C.; Brameld, J. M.; Parr, T.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify novel molecular mechanisms for muscle growth during administration of anabolic agents. Growing pigs (Duroc/(Landrace/Large-White)) were administered Ractopamine (a beta-adrenergic agonist; BA; 20 ppm in feed) or Reporcin (recombinant growth hormone; GH; 10 mg/48 hours injected) and compared to a control cohort (feed only; no injections) over a 27-day time course (1, 3, 7, 13 or 27-days). Longissimus Dorsi muscle gene expression was analyzed using Agilent porcine transcriptome microarrays and clusters of genes displaying similar expression profiles were identified using a modified maSigPro clustering algorithm. Anabolic agents increased carcass (p = 0.002) and muscle weights (Vastus Lateralis: p < 0.001; Semitendinosus: p = 0.075). Skeletal muscle mRNA expression of serine/one-carbon/glycine biosynthesis pathway genes (Phgdh, Psat1 and Psph) and the gluconeogenic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-M (Pck2/PEPCK-M), increased during treatment with BA, and to a lesser extent GH (p < 0.001, treatment x time interaction). Treatment with BA, but not GH, caused a 2-fold increase in phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) protein expression at days 3 (p < 0.05) and 7 (p < 0.01), and a 2-fold increase in PEPCK-M protein expression at day 7 (p < 0.01). BA treated pigs exhibit a profound increase in expression of PHGDH and PEPCK-M in skeletal muscle, implicating a role for biosynthetic metabolic pathways in muscle growth. PMID:27350173

  13. Starvation-induced expression of SspA and SspB: the effects of a null mutation in sspA on Escherichia coli protein synthesis and survival during growth and prolonged starvation.

    PubMed

    Williams, M D; Ouyang, T X; Flickinger, M C

    1994-03-01

    Maxicell labelling and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) have identified the proteins encoded by sspA and sspB (SspA, SspB) as proteins D27.1 and A25.8, respectively, in the Escherichia coli gene-protein database. SspA expression increases with decreasing growth rate and is induced by glucose, nitrogen, phosphate or amino acid starvation. The promoter, Pssp, is similar to gearbox promoters. Inactivation of SspA (sspA::neo) blocks sspB expression. [35S]-methionine-labelled proteins synthesized during growth and during stationary phase are different in delta sspA strains compared to sspA+ strains. This difference is enhanced during extended stationary phase (24-72 h). Long-term (10 d) viability of arginine-starved isogenic strains shows that sspA+ cultures remain viable significantly longer than delta sspA mutants. 2-D PAGE of proteins expressed during exponential growth shows that expression of at least 11 proteins is altered in delta sspA strains. A functional relA gene is required for sspA to affect protein synthesis. PMID:8022275

  14. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Dioxin Targets Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) for ADP-ribosylation via 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (TiPARP)*

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Zhang, Sheng; Ram, Payal; Rifkind, Arleen B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) include a wasting syndrome associated with decreased gluconeogenesis. TCDD is a potent activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand activated transcription factor. The relationship between gene activation by the AHR and TCDD toxicities is not well understood. We recently identified a pathway by which the AHR target gene TiPARP (TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) contributes to TCDD suppression of transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key regulator of gluconeogenesis, by consuming NAD+ and decreasing Sirtuin 1 activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), a transcriptional activator of PEPCK. We report here that TCDD-induced TiPARP also targets PEPCK for ADP-ribosylation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of PEPCK were found to undergo ADP-ribosylation. Unexpectedly, AHR suppression also enhanced ADP-ribosylation and did so by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent mechanism. This report 1) identifies ADP-ribosylation as a new posttranslational modification for PEPCK, 2) describes a pathway by which transcriptional induction of TiPARP by the AHR can lead to a downstream posttranslational change in a TCDD target protein (PEPCK), and 3) reveals that the AHR exerts complex, previously unidentified modulatory effects on ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23770670

  15. Specific biomarkers for stochastic division patterns and starvation-induced quiescence under limited glucose levels in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Pluskal, Tomáš; Hayashi, Takeshi; Saitoh, Shigeaki; Fujisawa, Asuka; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Glucose as a source of energy is centrally important to our understanding of life. We investigated the cell division–quiescence behavior of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe under a wide range of glucose concentrations (0–111 mm). The mode of S. pombe cell division under a microfluidic perfusion system was surprisingly normal under highly diluted glucose concentrations (5.6 mm, 1/20 of the standard medium, within human blood sugar levels). Division became stochastic, accompanied by a curious division-timing inheritance, in 2.2–4.4 mm glucose. A critical transition from division to quiescence occurred within a narrow range of concentrations (2.2–1.7 mm). Under starvation (1.1 mm) conditions, cells were mostly quiescent and only a small population of cells divided. Under fasting (0 mm) conditions, division was immediately arrested with a short chronological lifespan (16 h). When cells were first glucose starved prior to fasting, they possessed a substantially extended lifespan (∼14 days). We employed a quantitative metabolomic approach for S. pombe cell extracts, and identified specific metabolites (e.g. biotin, trehalose, ergothioneine, S-adenosyl methionine and CDP-choline), which increased or decreased at different glucose concentrations, whereas nucleotide triphosphates, such as ATP, maintained high concentrations even under starvation. Under starvation, the level of S-adenosyl methionine increased sharply, accompanied by an increase in methylated amino acids and nucleotides. Under fasting, cells rapidly lost antioxidant and energy compounds, such as glutathione and ATP, but, in fasting cells after starvation, these and other metabolites ensuring longevity remained abundant. Glucose-starved cells became resistant to 40 mm H2O2 as a result of the accumulation of antioxidant compounds. PMID:21306563

  16. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity. In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged. Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes. PMID:27368034

  17. Transcript level coordination of carbon pathways during silicon starvation-induced lipid accumulation in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah R; Glé, Corine; Abbriano, Raffaela M; Traller, Jesse C; Davis, Aubrey; Trentacoste, Emily; Vernet, Maria; Allen, Andrew E; Hildebrand, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Diatoms are one of the most productive and successful photosynthetic taxa on Earth and possess attributes such as rapid growth rates and production of lipids, making them candidate sources of renewable fuels. Despite their significance, few details of the mechanisms used to regulate growth and carbon metabolism are currently known, hindering metabolic engineering approaches to enhance productivity. To characterize the transcript level component of metabolic regulation, genome-wide changes in transcript abundance were documented in the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana on a time-course of silicon starvation. Growth, cell cycle progression, chloroplast replication, fatty acid composition, pigmentation, and photosynthetic parameters were characterized alongside lipid accumulation. Extensive coordination of large suites of genes was observed, highlighting the existence of clusters of coregulated genes as a key feature of global gene regulation in T. pseudonana. The identity of key enzymes for carbon metabolic pathway inputs (photosynthesis) and outputs (growth and storage) reveals these clusters are organized to synchronize these processes. Coordinated transcript level responses to silicon starvation are probably driven by signals linked to cell cycle progression and shifts in photophysiology. A mechanistic understanding of how this is accomplished will aid efforts to engineer metabolism for development of algal-derived biofuels. PMID:26844818

  18. The mxd operon in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is induced in response to starvation and regulated by ArcS/ArcA and BarA/UvrY

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background S. oneidensis MR-1 is a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. Under anoxic conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 attaches to and uses insoluble minerals such as Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides as electron acceptors. In the laboratory, S. oneidensis MR-1 forms biofilms under hydrodynamic flow conditions on a borosilicate glass surface; formation of biofilms was previously found to be dependent on the mxd gene cluster (mxdABCD). Results This study revealed environmental and genetic factors regulating expression of the mxd genes in S. oneidensis MR-1. Physiological experiments conducted with a S. oneidensis MR-1 strain carrying a transcriptional lacZ fusion to the mxd promoter identified electron donor starvation as a key factor inducing mxd gene expression. Tn5 mutagenesis identified the ArcS/ArcA two-component signaling system as a repressor of mxd expression in S. oneidensis MR-1 under planktonic conditions. Biofilms of ∆arcS and ∆arcA strains carrying a transcriptional gfp -reporter fused to the mxd promoter revealed a reduced mxd expression, suggesting that ArcS/ArcA are necessary for activation of mxd expression under biofilm conditions. Biofilms of ∆arcS and ∆arcA mutants were unable to form a compact three-dimensional structure consistent with a low level of mxd expression. In addition, BarA/UvrY was identified as a major regulator of mxd expression under planktonic conditions. Interestingly, biofilms of ∆barA and ∆uvrY mutants were able to form three-dimensional structures that were, however, less compact compared to wild type biofilms. Conclusions We have shown here that the mxd genes in S. oneidensis MR-1 are controlled transcriptionally in response to carbon starvation and by the ArcS/ArcA and the BarA/UvrY signaling system. BarA might function as a sensor to assess the metabolic state of the cell, including carbon starvation, leading to expression of the mxd operon and therefore control biofilm formation. PMID:23705927

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, P.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has been found in significant activities in a number of plants exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thirty-five species were surveyed for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase (NAD). Plants which showed high activities of malic enzyme contained no detectable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, while plants with high activities of the latter enzyme contained little malic enzyme. It is proposed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase acts as a decarboxylase during the light period, furnishing CO2 for the pentose cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate for gluconeogenesis. Some properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in crude extracts of pineapple leaves were investigated. The enzyme required Mn2+, Mg2+, and ATP for maximum activity. About 60% of the activity could be pelleted, along with chloroplasts and mitochondria, in extracts from leaves kept in the dark overnight. PMID:16658562

  20. D-Xylose as a sugar complement regulates blood glucose levels by suppressing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats and by enhancing glucose uptake in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunju; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more frequently diagnosed and is characterized by hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. D-Xylose, a sucrase inhibitor, may be useful as a functional sugar complement to inhibit increases in blood glucose levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of D-xylose both in vitro and stretpozotocin (STZ)-nicotinamide (NA)-induced models in vivo. MATERIALS/METHODS Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: (i) normal control; (ii) diabetic control; (iii) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 5% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose; and (iv) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 10% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose. These groups were maintained for two weeks. The effects of D-xylose on blood glucose levels were examined using oral glucose tolerance test, insulin secretion assays, histology of liver and pancreas tissues, and analysis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) expression in liver tissues of a STZ-NA-induced experimental rat model. Levels of glucose uptake and insulin secretion by differentiated C2C12 muscle cells and INS-1 pancreatic β-cells were analyzed. RESULTS In vivo, D-xylose supplementation significantly reduced fasting serum glucose levels (P < 0.05), it slightly reduced the area under the glucose curve, and increased insulin levels compared to the diabetic controls. D-Xylose supplementation enhanced the regeneration of pancreas tissue and improved the arrangement of hepatocytes compared to the diabetic controls. Lower levels of PEPCK were detected in the liver tissues of D-xylose-supplemented rats (P < 0.05). In vitro, both 2-NBDG uptake by C2C12 cells and insulin secretion by INS-1 cells were increased with D-xylose supplementation in a dose-dependent manner compared to treatment with glucose alone. CONCLUSIONS In this study, D-xylose exerted anti-diabetic effects in vivo by

  1. Transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by phosphorus deficiency in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kentaro; Koizumi, Nozomu; Sato, Fumihiko

    2003-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which catalyses the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate using HCO(3)(-) to generate oxaloacetic acid, is an important enzyme in the primary metabolism of plants. Although the PEPC genes (ppc) comprise only a small gene family, the function of each gene is not clear, except for roles in C(4) photosynthesis and CAM. Three PEPC genes (Nsppc1-3) from the C(3) plant Nicotiana sylvestris were used to investigate their roles and regulation in a C(3) plant, and their regulation by phosphorus depletion in particular. First, the induction of PEPC by phosphorus depletion was confirmed. Next, Nsppc1 was determined to be mainly responsive to phosphorus deficiency at the transcriptional level. Further studies using transgenic tobacco harbouring a chimeric gene consisting of the 2.0 kb promoter region of Nsppc1 and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter showed that PEPC is transcriptionally induced. It was also found that sucrose had a synergistic effect on the induction of PEPC by phosphorus deficiency. A series of transgenic tobacco containing 5'-deletion mutants of Nsppc1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed that the -539 to -442 bp Nsppc1 promoter region, relative to the translation start site, was necessary for the response to phosphorus deficiency. Gain-of-function analysis using a construct containing three tandem repeats of the -539 to -442 bp region confirmed that this region was sufficient to induce the phosphorus-deficiency response in tobacco. PMID:12598567

  2. Glutathione, N-acetylcysteine and lipoic acid down-regulate starvation-induced apoptosis, RANKL/OPG ratio and sclerostin in osteocytes: involvement of JNK and ERK1/2 signalling.

    PubMed

    Fontani, Filippo; Marcucci, Gemma; Iantomasi, Teresa; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Vincenzini, Maria Teresa

    2015-04-01

    Osteocyte apoptosis due to microdamage and/or oxidative stress is related to increased local bone turnover and resorption observed in various bone diseases. Previous data on osteoblasts and osteoclasts have linked reactive oxygen species and antioxidants to bone remodelling. This study performs a comprehensive analysis on the effect of antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH), N-acetylcysteine and lipoic acid (LA) on starvation-induced osteocyte apoptosis and on cytokines involved in bone remodelling such as the receptor activator kB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and sclerostin. For this study, apoptosis was induced by serum starvation in a murine osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4; this condition mimics in part osteocyte apoptosis due to microdamage. The results show that starvation-induced apoptosis and expression of RANKL, OPG and sclerostin are redox regulated processes. All antioxidants are able to inhibit the apoptosis due to starvation. They down-regulate the expression and the release of RANKL, the expression of sclerostin and RANKL/OPG ratio, whereas they only in part up-regulate OPG expression. Antioxidants mediate their effect on starvation-induced apoptosis by JNK signalling and on cytokine expression by both JNK and ERK1/2 activities. This study shows the possible involvement of biological antioxidants such as GSH and LA on redox regulated mechanisms related to apoptosis and expression of cytokines involved in bone remodelling. Moreover, it suggests that both JNK and ERK1/2 may be useful biological targets for drugs affecting bone diseases associated with increased oxidative stress. PMID:25660312

  3. Nitrogen starvation-induced accumulation of triacylglycerol in the green algae: evidence for a role for ROC40, a transcription factor involved in circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Elton C; Koh, Jin; Zhu, Ning; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Chen, Sixue; Matsuo, Takuya; Johnson, Jodie V; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2016-03-01

    Microalgal triacylglycerol (TAG), a promising source of biofuel, is induced upon nitrogen starvation (-N), but the proteins and genes involved in this process are poorly known. We performed isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics to identify Chlorella proteins with modulated expression under short-term -N. Out of 1736 soluble proteins and 2187 membrane-associated proteins identified, 288 and 56, respectively, were differentially expressed under -N. Gene expression analysis on select genes confirmed the same direction of mRNA modulation for most proteins. The MYB-related transcription factor ROC40 was the most induced protein, with a 9.6-fold increase upon -N. In a previously generated Chlamydomonas mutant, gravimetric measurements of crude total lipids revealed that roc40 was impaired in its ability to increase the accumulation of TAG upon -N, and this phenotype was complemented when wild-type Roc40 was expressed. Results from radiotracer experiments were consistent with the roc40 mutant being comparable to the wild type in recycling membrane lipids to TAG but being impaired in additional de novo synthesis of TAG during -N stress. In this study we provide evidence to support the hypothesis that transcription factor ROC40 has a role in -N-induced lipid accumulation, and uncover multiple previously unknown proteins modulated by short-term -N in green algae. PMID:26920093

  4. Vitamin D fails to prevent serum starvation- or staurosporine-induced apoptosis in human and rat osteosarcoma-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Witasp, Erika; Gustafsson, Ann-Catrin; Cotgreave, Ian; Lind, Monica . E-mail: monica.lind@imm.ki.se; Fadeel, Bengt . E-mail: bengt.fadeel@imm.ki.se

    2005-05-13

    Previous studies have suggested that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, the active form of vitamin D{sub 3}, may increase the survival of bone-forming osteoblasts through an inhibition of apoptosis. On the other hand, vitamin D{sub 3} has also been shown to trigger apoptosis in human cancer cells, including osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. In the present study, we show that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces a time- and dose-dependent loss of cell viability in the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR-106, and the human osteosarcoma cell line, TE-85. We were unable, however, to detect nuclear condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, or other typical signs of apoptosis in this model. Moreover, 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} failed to protect against apoptosis induced by serum starvation or incubation with the protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine. These in vitro findings are thus at variance with several previous reports in the literature and suggest that induction of or protection against apoptosis of bone-derived cells may not be a primary function of vitamin D{sub 3}.

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  6. Bacillus subtilis PhoP binds to the phoB tandem promoter exclusively within the phosphate starvation-inducible promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W; Hulett, F M

    1997-01-01

    Several gene products, including three two-component systems, make up a signal transduction network that controls the phosphate starvation response in Bacillus subtilis. Epistasis experiments indicate that PhoP, a response regulator, is furthest downstream of the known regulators in the signaling pathway that regulates Pho regulon genes. We report the overexpression, purification, and use of PhoP in investigating its role in Pho regulon gene activation. PhoP was a substrate for both the kinase and phosphatase activities of its cognate sensor kinase, PhoR. It was not phosphorylated by acetyl phosphate. Purified phosphorylated PhoP (PhoPP) had a half-life of approximately 2.5 h, which was reduced to about 15 min by addition of the same molar amount of *PhoR (the cytoplasmic region of PhoR). ATP significantly increased phosphatase activity of *PhoR on PhoPP. In gel filtration and cross-linking studies, both PhoP and PhoPP were shown to be dimers. The dimerization domain was located within the 135 amino acids at the N terminus of PhoP. Phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PhoP bound to one of the alkaline phosphatase gene promoters, the phoB promoter. Furthermore, PhoP bound exclusively to the -18 to -73 region (relative to the transcriptional start site +1) of the phosphate starvation-inducible promoter (Pv) but not to the adjacent developmentally regulated promoter (Ps). These data corroborate the genetic data for phoB regulation and suggest that activation of phoB is via direct interaction between PhoP and the phoB promoter. Studies of the phosphorylation, oligomerization, and DNA binding activity of the PhoP protein demonstrate that its N-terminal phosphorylation and dimerization domain and its C-terminal DNA binding domain function independently of one another, distinguishing PhoP from other response regulators, such as PhoB (Escherichia coli) and NtrC. PMID:9335276

  7. Autosis is a Na+,K+-ATPase–regulated form of cell death triggered by autophagy-inducing peptides, starvation, and hypoxia–ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Shoji-Kawata, Sanae; Sumpter, Rhea M.; Wei, Yongjie; Ginet, Vanessa; Zhang, Liying; Posner, Bruce; Tran, Khoa A.; Green, Douglas R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Clarke, Peter G. H.; Puyal, Julien; Levine, Beth

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing controversy is whether autophagy is a bona fide cause of mammalian cell death. We used a cell-penetrating autophagy-inducing peptide, Tat-Beclin 1, derived from the autophagy protein Beclin 1, to investigate whether high levels of autophagy result in cell death by autophagy. Here we show that Tat-Beclin 1 induces dose-dependent death that is blocked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of autophagy, but not of apoptosis or necroptosis. This death, termed “autosis,” has unique morphological features, including increased autophagosomes/autolysosomes and nuclear convolution at early stages, and focal swelling of the perinuclear space at late stages. We also observed autotic death in cells during stress conditions, including in a subpopulation of nutrient-starved cells in vitro and in hippocampal neurons of neonatal rats subjected to cerebral hypoxia–ischemia in vivo. A chemical screen of ∼5,000 known bioactive compounds revealed that cardiac glycosides, antagonists of Na+,K+-ATPase, inhibit autotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, genetic knockdown of the Na+,K+-ATPase α1 subunit blocks peptide and starvation-induced autosis in vitro. Thus, we have identified a unique form of autophagy-dependent cell death, a Food and Drug Administration-approved class of compounds that inhibit such death, and a crucial role for Na+,K+-ATPase in its regulation. These findings have implications for understanding how cells die during certain stress conditions and how such cell death might be prevented. PMID:24277826

  8. Autosis is a Na+,K+-ATPase-regulated form of cell death triggered by autophagy-inducing peptides, starvation, and hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Shoji-Kawata, Sanae; Sumpter, Rhea M; Wei, Yongjie; Ginet, Vanessa; Zhang, Liying; Posner, Bruce; Tran, Khoa A; Green, Douglas R; Xavier, Ramnik J; Shaw, Stanley Y; Clarke, Peter G H; Puyal, Julien; Levine, Beth

    2013-12-17

    A long-standing controversy is whether autophagy is a bona fide cause of mammalian cell death. We used a cell-penetrating autophagy-inducing peptide, Tat-Beclin 1, derived from the autophagy protein Beclin 1, to investigate whether high levels of autophagy result in cell death by autophagy. Here we show that Tat-Beclin 1 induces dose-dependent death that is blocked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of autophagy, but not of apoptosis or necroptosis. This death, termed "autosis," has unique morphological features, including increased autophagosomes/autolysosomes and nuclear convolution at early stages, and focal swelling of the perinuclear space at late stages. We also observed autotic death in cells during stress conditions, including in a subpopulation of nutrient-starved cells in vitro and in hippocampal neurons of neonatal rats subjected to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. A chemical screen of ~5,000 known bioactive compounds revealed that cardiac glycosides, antagonists of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, inhibit autotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, genetic knockdown of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α1 subunit blocks peptide and starvation-induced autosis in vitro. Thus, we have identified a unique form of autophagy-dependent cell death, a Food and Drug Administration-approved class of compounds that inhibit such death, and a crucial role for Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in its regulation. These findings have implications for understanding how cells die during certain stress conditions and how such cell death might be prevented. PMID:24277826

  9. Forensic aspects of starvation.

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard; Ortmann, Jan; Doberentz, Elke

    2016-09-01

    Fatal starvation is a rare cause of death in industrialized countries. However, it may have major medicolegal importance if death results from the deliberate withholding of food, especially from infants. In such cases, the task of the forensic pathologist and the medical examiner, respectively, is to clarify the cause of death and give an expert opinion on the degree and duration of starvation. Several classification systems have been developed to estimate protein-energy malnutrition in developing countries. Simpler classifications, such as the Gomez classification, use the weight expected for the respective age group as the standard. However, smaller infants will be lighter, and therefore the classification may not be accurate in this case. Following the Waterlow classification, the extent of stunted growth (referring to growth retardation in cases of chronic malnutrition) is calculated using the ratio of the measured body height to that expected for the age. Using such classification systems, grading of stunting and wasting can be achieved and may greatly help in the assessment of a given child's nutritional status in legal cases. The application of the Waterlow classification to the authors' case material and previously published cases in the literature is herein demonstrated. The Waterlow classification is not only of importance for grading the final stage of fatal starvation, but also for the chronological development of the nutritional status if anthropometrical data have been repeatedly recorded from the affected individual in vivo. PMID:27145935

  10. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  11. Attenuation of Phosphate Starvation Responses by Phosphite in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Ticconi, Carla A.; Delatorre, Carla A.; Abel, Steffen

    2001-01-01

    When inorganic phosphate is limiting, Arabidopsis has the facultative ability to metabolize exogenous nucleic acid substrates, which we utilized previously to identify insensitive phosphate starvation response mutants in a conditional genetic screen. In this study, we examined the effect of the phosphate analog, phosphite (Phi), on molecular and morphological responses to phosphate starvation. Phi significantly inhibited plant growth on phosphate-sufficient (2 mm) and nucleic acid-containing (2 mm phosphorus) media at concentrations higher than 2.5 mm. However, with respect to suppressing typical responses to phosphate limitation, Phi effects were very similar to those of phosphate. Phosphate starvation responses, which we examined and found to be almost identically affected by both anions, included changes in: (a) the root-to-shoot ratio; (b) root hair formation; (c) anthocyanin accumulation; (d) the activities of phosphate starvation-inducible nucleolytic enzymes, including ribonuclease, phosphodiesterase, and acid phosphatase; and (e) steady-state mRNA levels of phosphate starvation-inducible genes. It is important that induction of primary auxin response genes by indole-3-acetic acid in the presence of growth-inhibitory Phi concentrations suggests that Phi selectively inhibits phosphate starvation responses. Thus, the use of Phi may allow further dissection of phosphate signaling by genetic selection for constitutive phosphate starvation response mutants on media containing organophosphates as the only source of phosphorus. PMID:11706178

  12. Nuclear localizations of phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinases α and β are dynamic and independently regulated during starvation-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Droubi, Alaa; Bulley, Simon J; Clarke, Jonathan H; Irvine, Robin F

    2016-07-15

    The chicken B-cell line DT40 has two isoforms of phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase (PI5P4K), α and β, which are likely to exist as a mixture of obligate homo- and hetero-dimers. Previous work has led us to speculate that an important role of the β isoform may be to target the more active PI5P4Kα isoform to the nucleus. In the present study we expand upon that work by genomically tagging the PI5P4Ks with fluorochromes in the presence or absence of stable or acute depletions of PI5P4Kβ. Consistent with our original hypothesis we find that PI5P4Kα is predominantly (possible entirely) cytoplasmic when PI5P4Kβ is stably deleted from cells. In contrast, when PI5P4Kβ is inducibly removed within 1 h PI5P4Kα retains its wild-type distribution of approximately 50:50 between cytoplasm and nucleus even through a number of cell divisions. This leads us to speculate that PI5P4Kα is chromatin-associated. We also find that when cells are in the exponential phase of growth PI5P4Kβ is primarily cytoplasmic but translocates to the nucleus upon growth into the stationary phase or upon serum starvation. Once again this is not accompanied by a change in PI5P4Kα localization and we show, using an in vitro model, that this is possible because the dimerization between the two isoforms is dynamic. Given this shift in PI5P4Kβ upon nutrient deprivation we explore the phenotype of PI5P4K B-null cells exposed to this stress and find that they can sustain a greater degree of nutrient deprivation than their wild-type counterparts possibly as a result of up-regulation of autophagy. PMID:27208178

  13. The antimalarial amodiaquine causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade sensitizing human melanoma cells to starvation- and chemotherapy-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shuxi; Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Park, Sophia L; Vonderfecht, Amanda A; Jacobs, Suesan L; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of autophagic-lysosomal function has recently emerged as a promising strategy for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting cancer cells. Repurposing approved and abandoned non-oncological drugs is an alternative approach to the identification and development of anticancer therapeutics, and antimalarials that target autophagic-lysosomal functions have recently attracted considerable attention as candidates for oncological repurposing. Since cumulative research suggests that dependence on autophagy represents a specific vulnerability of malignant melanoma cells, we screened a focused compound library of antimalarials for antimelanoma activity. Here we report for the first time that amodiaquine (AQ), a clinical 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial with unexplored cancer-directed chemotherapeutic potential, causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade in melanoma cells that surpasses that of its parent compound chloroquine. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (LAMP1, LC3-II, SQSTM1) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that AQ treatment caused autophagic-lysosomal blockade in malignant A375 melanoma cells, a finding substantiated by detection of rapid inactivation of lysosomal cathepsins (CTSB, CTSL, CTSD). AQ-treatment was associated with early induction of energy crisis (ATP depletion) and sensitized melanoma cells to either starvation- or chemotherapeutic agent-induced cell death. AQ displayed potent antiproliferative effects, and gene expression array analysis revealed changes at the mRNA (CDKN1A, E2F1) and protein level (TP53, CDKN1A, CCND1, phospho-RB1 [Ser 780]/[Ser 807/811], E2F1) consistent with the observed proliferative blockade in S-phase. Taken together, our data suggest that the clinical antimalarial AQ is a promising candidate for repurposing efforts that aim at targeting autophagic-lysosomal function and proliferative control in malignant melanoma cells. PMID:24113242

  14. Light Induction of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Etiolated Maize Leaf Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Kazumi; Sugiyama, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    An antibody for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was used to isolate and to quantitate the enzyme from greening maize (cv. KOU 6) leaves. The increase in enzyme activity during greening was due to de novo synthesis, which was paralleled by increases in enzyme protein and incorporation of leucine. The light-induced activity was due to one specific isoenzyme. The action spectrum for enzyme synthesis had red and blue peaks. Images PMID:16661613

  15. Mammalian autophagy is essential for hepatic and renal ketogenesis during starvation

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Kondo, Motoyuki; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Chano, Tokuhiro; Matsusaka, Taiji; Nagao, Kenji; Adachi, Yusuke; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system activated, across species, by starvation. Although accumulating evidence has shown that mammalian autophagy is involved in pathogenesis of several modern diseases, its physiological role to combat starvation has not been fully clarified. In this study, we analysed starvation-induced gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in mouse strains lacking autophagy in liver, skeletal muscle or kidney. Autophagy-deficiency in any tissue had no effect on gluconeogenesis during starvation. Though skeletal muscle- and kidney-specific autophagy-deficiency did not alter starvation-induced increases in blood ketone levels, liver-specific autophagy-deficiency significantly attenuated this effect. Interestingly, renal as well as hepatic expression of HMG-CoA synthase 2 increased with prolonged starvation. Furthermore, during starvation, mice lacking autophagy both in liver and kidney showed even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity than mice lacking autophagy only in liver. Starvation induced massive lipid droplet formation in extra-adipose tissues including liver and kidney, which was essential for ketogenesis. Moreover, this process was impaired in the autophagy-deficient liver and kidney. These findings demonstrate that hepatic and renal autophagy are essential for starvation-induced lipid droplet formation and subsequent ketogenesis and, ultimately, for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis. Our findings provide novel biological insights into adaptive mechanisms to combat starvation in mammals. PMID:26732653

  16. Mammalian autophagy is essential for hepatic and renal ketogenesis during starvation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Kondo, Motoyuki; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Chano, Tokuhiro; Matsusaka, Taiji; Nagao, Kenji; Adachi, Yusuke; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system activated, across species, by starvation. Although accumulating evidence has shown that mammalian autophagy is involved in pathogenesis of several modern diseases, its physiological role to combat starvation has not been fully clarified. In this study, we analysed starvation-induced gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in mouse strains lacking autophagy in liver, skeletal muscle or kidney. Autophagy-deficiency in any tissue had no effect on gluconeogenesis during starvation. Though skeletal muscle- and kidney-specific autophagy-deficiency did not alter starvation-induced increases in blood ketone levels, liver-specific autophagy-deficiency significantly attenuated this effect. Interestingly, renal as well as hepatic expression of HMG-CoA synthase 2 increased with prolonged starvation. Furthermore, during starvation, mice lacking autophagy both in liver and kidney showed even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity than mice lacking autophagy only in liver. Starvation induced massive lipid droplet formation in extra-adipose tissues including liver and kidney, which was essential for ketogenesis. Moreover, this process was impaired in the autophagy-deficient liver and kidney. These findings demonstrate that hepatic and renal autophagy are essential for starvation-induced lipid droplet formation and subsequent ketogenesis and, ultimately, for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis. Our findings provide novel biological insights into adaptive mechanisms to combat starvation in mammals. PMID:26732653

  17. Regulatory Response to Carbon Starvation in Caulobacter crescentus

    SciTech Connect

    Britos, Leticia C.; Abeliuk, Eduardo; Taverner, Thomas; Lipton, Mary S.; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2011-04-11

    Bacteria adapt to shifts from rapid to slow growth, and have developed strategies for long-term survival during prolonged starvation and stress conditions. We report the regulatory response of C. crescentus to carbon starvation, based on combined high-throughput proteome and transcriptome analyses. Our results identify cell cycle changes in gene expression in response to carbon starvation that involve the prominent role of the FixK FNR/CAP family transcription factor and the CtrA cell cycle regulator. Notably, the SigT ECF sigma factor mediates the carbon starvation-induced degradation of CtrA, while activating a core set of general starvation-stress genes that respond to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, and exposure to heavy metals. Comparison of the response of swarmer cells and stalked cells to carbon starvation revealed four groups of genes that exhibit different expression profiles. Also, cell pole morphogenesis and initiation of chromosome replication normally occurring at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition are uncoupled in carbon-starved cells.

  18. Quantitative trait loci affecting starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Susan T; Yamamoto, Akihiko H; Fanara, Juan J; Norga, Koenraad K; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2004-01-01

    The ability to withstand periods of scarce food resources is an important fitness trait. Starvation resistance is a quantitative trait controlled by multiple interacting genes and exhibits considerable genetic variation in natural populations. This genetic variation could be maintained in the face of strong selection due to a trade-off in resource allocation between reproductive activity and individual survival. Knowledge of the genes affecting starvation tolerance and the subset of genes that affect variation in starvation resistance in natural populations would enable us to evaluate this hypothesis from a quantitative genetic perspective. We screened 933 co-isogenic P-element insertion lines to identify candidate genes affecting starvation tolerance. A total of 383 P-element insertions induced highly significant and often sex-specific mutational variance in starvation resistance. We also used deficiency complementation mapping followed by complementation to mutations to identify 12 genes contributing to variation in starvation resistance between two wild-type strains. The genes we identified are involved in oogenesis, metabolism, and feeding behaviors, indicating a possible link to reproduction and survival. However, we also found genes with cell fate specification and cell proliferation phenotypes, which implies that resource allocation during development and at the cellular level may also influence the phenotypic response to starvation. PMID:15126400

  19. Estimation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation mediated by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) in engineered Escherichia coli having high ATP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hye-Jung; Seo, Jiyoon; Na, Yoon Ah; Lee, Jiyeon; Lee, Joo-Young; Kim, Pil

    2013-06-10

    We have previously reported that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) overexpression under glycolytic conditions enables Escherichia coli to harbor a high intracellular ATP pool resulting in enhanced recombinant protein synthesis. To estimate how much PCK-mediated phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is contributed to the ATP increase under engineered conditions, the kinetics of PEP carboxylation by PCK and substrate competing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) were measured using recombinant enzymes. The PEP carboxylation catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the recombinant PCK was 660mM(-1)min(-1), whereas that of the recombinant PPC was 1500mM(-1)min(-1). Under the presence of known allosteric effectors (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, acetyl-CoA, ATP, malate, and aspartate) close to in vivo conditions, the catalytic efficiency of PCK-mediated PEP carboxylation (84mM(-1)min(-1)) was 28-folds lower than that of PPC (2370mM(-1)min(-1)). To verify the above results, an E. coli strain expressing native PCK and PPC under control of identical promoter was constructed by replacing PCK promoter region with that of PPC in chromosome. The native PCK activity (33nmol/mg-proteinmin) was 5-folds lower than PPC activity (160nmol/mg-proteinmin) in the cell extract from the promoter-exchanged strain. Intracellular modifications of ATP concentration by PCK activity and the consequences for biotechnology are further discussed. PMID:23683699

  20. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity.In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged.Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes. PMID:27368034

  1. dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR Signaling Mediate Cell-Nonautonomous Effects of daf-16/FOXO on Starvation-Induced Developmental Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brad T.; Jordan, James M.; Maxwell, Colin S.; Schindler, Adam J.; Baugh, L. Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient availability has profound influence on development. In the nematode C. elegans, nutrient availability governs post-embryonic development. L1-stage larvae remain in a state of developmental arrest after hatching until they feed. This “L1 arrest” (or "L1 diapause") is associated with increased stress resistance, supporting starvation survival. Loss of the transcription factor daf-16/FOXO, an effector of insulin/IGF signaling, results in arrest-defective and starvation-sensitive phenotypes. We show that daf-16/FOXO regulates L1 arrest cell-nonautonomously, suggesting that insulin/IGF signaling regulates at least one additional signaling pathway. We used mRNA-seq to identify candidate signaling molecules affected by daf-16/FOXO during L1 arrest. dbl-1/TGF-β, a ligand for the Sma/Mab pathway, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase, an upstream component of the daf-12 steroid hormone signaling pathway, were up-regulated during L1 arrest in a daf-16/FOXO mutant. Using genetic epistasis analysis, we show that dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR steroid hormone signaling pathways are required for the daf-16/FOXO arrest-defective phenotype, suggesting that daf-16/FOXO represses dbl-1/TGF-β, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase. The dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways have not previously been shown to affect L1 development, but we found that disruption of these pathways delayed L1 development in fed larvae, consistent with these pathways promoting development in starved daf-16/FOXO mutants. Though the dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways are epistatic to daf-16/FOXO for the arrest-defective phenotype, disruption of these pathways does not suppress starvation sensitivity of daf-16/FOXO mutants. This observation uncouples starvation survival from developmental arrest, indicating that DAF-16/FOXO targets distinct effectors for each phenotype and revealing that inappropriate development during starvation does not cause the early demise of daf-16/FOXO mutants. Overall, this study

  2. dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR Signaling Mediate Cell-Nonautonomous Effects of daf-16/FOXO on Starvation-Induced Developmental Arrest.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Rebecca E W; Chen, Yutao; Moore, Brad T; Jordan, James M; Maxwell, Colin S; Schindler, Adam J; Baugh, L Ryan

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient availability has profound influence on development. In the nematode C. elegans, nutrient availability governs post-embryonic development. L1-stage larvae remain in a state of developmental arrest after hatching until they feed. This "L1 arrest" (or "L1 diapause") is associated with increased stress resistance, supporting starvation survival. Loss of the transcription factor daf-16/FOXO, an effector of insulin/IGF signaling, results in arrest-defective and starvation-sensitive phenotypes. We show that daf-16/FOXO regulates L1 arrest cell-nonautonomously, suggesting that insulin/IGF signaling regulates at least one additional signaling pathway. We used mRNA-seq to identify candidate signaling molecules affected by daf-16/FOXO during L1 arrest. dbl-1/TGF-β, a ligand for the Sma/Mab pathway, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase, an upstream component of the daf-12 steroid hormone signaling pathway, were up-regulated during L1 arrest in a daf-16/FOXO mutant. Using genetic epistasis analysis, we show that dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR steroid hormone signaling pathways are required for the daf-16/FOXO arrest-defective phenotype, suggesting that daf-16/FOXO represses dbl-1/TGF-β, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase. The dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways have not previously been shown to affect L1 development, but we found that disruption of these pathways delayed L1 development in fed larvae, consistent with these pathways promoting development in starved daf-16/FOXO mutants. Though the dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways are epistatic to daf-16/FOXO for the arrest-defective phenotype, disruption of these pathways does not suppress starvation sensitivity of daf-16/FOXO mutants. This observation uncouples starvation survival from developmental arrest, indicating that DAF-16/FOXO targets distinct effectors for each phenotype and revealing that inappropriate development during starvation does not cause the early demise of daf-16/FOXO mutants. Overall, this study shows

  3. Stable isotopes may provide evidence for starvation in reptiles.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Pollock, Erik D

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have attempted to correlate stable isotope signatures of tissues with the nutritional condition of birds, mammals, fishes, and invertebrates. Unfortunately, very little is known about the relationship between food limitation and the isotopic composition of reptiles. We examined the effects that starvation has on delta13C and delta15N signatures in the tissues (excreta, carcass, scales, and claws) of six, distantly related squamate reptiles (gaboon vipers, Bitis gabonica; ball pythons, Python regius; ratsnakes, Elaphe obsoleta; boa constrictors, Boa constrictor; western diamondback rattlesnakes, Crotalus atrox, and savannah monitor lizards, Varanus exanthematicus). Analyses revealed that the isotopic composition of reptile carcasses did not change significantly in response to bouts of starvation lasting up to 168 days. In contrast, the isotopic signatures of reptile excreta became significantly enriched in 15N and depleted in 13C during starvation. The isotopic signatures of reptile scales and lizard claws were less indicative of starvation time than those of excreta. We discuss the physiological mechanisms that might be responsible for the starvation-induced changes in 13C and 15N signatures in the excreta, and present a mixing model to describe the shift in excreted nitrogen source pools (i.e. from a labile source pool to a nonlabile source pool) that apparently occurs during starvation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that naturally occurring stable isotopes might ultimately have some utility for characterizing nitrogen and carbon stress among free-living reptiles. PMID:18613003

  4. Role of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylation in Acetobacter xylinum

    PubMed Central

    Benziman, Moshe

    1969-01-01

    Glucose-grown cells of Acetobacter xylinum oxidized acetate only when the reaction mixture was supplemented with catalytic quantities of glucose or intermediates of the citrate cycle. Extracts, prepared by sonic treatment, catalyzed the formation of oxalacetate when incubated with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and bicarbonate. Oxalacetate was not formed in the presence of pyruvate plus adenosine triphosphate. The ability to promote carboxylation of PEP was lower in succinate-grown cells than in glucose-grown cells. PEP carboxylase, partially purified from extracts by ammonium sulfate fractionation, catalyzed the stoichiometric formation of oxalacetate and inorganic phosphate from PEP and bicarbonate. The enzyme was not affected by acetyl-coenzyme A or inorganic phosphate. It was inhibited by adenosine diphosphate in a manner competitive with PEP (K1 = 1.3 mm) and by dicarboxylic acids of the citrate cycle; of these, succinate was the most potent inhibitor. It is suggested that the physiological role of PEP carboxylase in A. xylinum is to affect the net formation of C4 acids from C3 precursors, which are essential for the maintainance of the citrate cycle during growth on glucose. The relationship of PEP carboxylase to other enzyme systems metabolizing PEP and oxalacetate in A. xylinum is discussed. PMID:5788692

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase in developing rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F. J.; Hanson, R. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase were measured in foetal, newborn and adult rat liver extracts by a radiochemical assay involving the fixation of [14C]bicarbonate. 2. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both foetal and adult liver occurs mainly in mitochondrial and nuclear fractions, with about 10% of the activity in the cytoplasm. 3. Similar studies of the intracellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase show that more than 90% of the activity is in the cytoplasm. However, in the 17-day foetal liver about 90% of the activity is in mitochondria and nuclei. 4. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both particulate and soluble fractions is very low in the 17-day foetal liver and increases to near adult levels before birth. 5. Phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase activity in the soluble cell fraction increases 25-fold in the first 2 days after birth. This same enzyme in the mitochondria has considerable activity in the foetal and adult liver and is lower in the newborn. 6. Kinetic and other studies on the properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase have shown no differences between the soluble and mitochondrial enzymes. 7. It is suggested that the appearance of the soluble phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase at birth initiates the rapid increase in overall gluconeogenesis at this stage. PMID:6049928

  6. IL10 inhibits starvation-induced autophagy in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts via cross talk between the IL10-IL10R-STAT3 and IL10-AKT-mTOR pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Wang, H; Guan, H; Shi, S; Li, Y; Wu, X; Li, N; Yang, C; Bai, X; Cai, W; Yang, F; Wang, X; Su, L; Zheng, Z; Hu, D

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is a serious skin fibrotic disease characterized by excessive hypercellularity and extracellular matrix (ECM) component deposition. Autophagy is a tightly regulated physiological process essential for cellular maintenance, differentiation, development, and homeostasis. Previous studies show that IL10 has potential therapeutic benefits in terms of preventing and reducing HS formation. However, no studies have examined IL10-mediated autophagy during the pathological process of HS formation. Here, we examined the effect of IL10 on starvation-induced autophagy and investigated the molecular mechanism underlying IL10-mediated inhibition of autophagy in HS-derived fibroblasts (HSFs) under starvation conditions. Immunostaining and PCR analysis revealed that a specific component of the IL10 receptor, IL10 alpha-chain (IL10Rα), is expressed in HSFs. Transmission electron microscopy and western blot analysis revealed that IL10 inhibited starvation-induced autophagy and induced the expression of p-AKT and p-STAT3 in HSFs in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking IL10R, p-AKT, p-mTOR, and p-STAT3 using specific inhibitors (IL10RB, LY294002, rapamycin, and cryptotanshinone, respectively) showed that IL10 inhibited autophagy via IL10Rα-mediated activation of STAT3 (the IL10R-STAT3 pathway) and by directly activating the AKT-mTOR pathway. Notably, these results suggest that IL10-mediated inhibition of autophagy is facilitated by the cross talk between STAT3, AKT, and mTOR; in other words, the IL10-IL10R-STAT3 and IL10-AKT-mTOR pathways. Finally, the results also indicate that mTOR-p70S6K is the molecule upon which these two pathways converge to induce IL10-mediated inhibition of autophagy in starved HSFs. In summary, the findings reported herein shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying IL10-mediated inhibition of autophagy and suggest that IL10 is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of HS. PMID:26962683

  7. The carbon starvation response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus

    PubMed Central

    Ellström, Magnus; Shah, Firoz; Johansson, Tomas; Ahrén, Dag; Persson, Per; Tunlid, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The amounts of carbon allocated to the fungal partner in ectomycorrhizal associations can vary substantially depending on the plant growth and the soil nutrient conditions, and the fungus may frequently be confronted with limitations in carbon. We used chemical analysis and transcriptome profiling to examine the physiological response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus to carbon starvation during axenic cultivation. Carbon starvation induced a decrease in the biomass. Concomitantly, ammonium, cell wall material (chitin) and proteolytic enzymes were released into the medium, which suggest autolysis. Compared with the transcriptome of actively growing hyphae, about 45% of the transcripts analyzed were differentially regulated during C-starvation. Induced during starvation were transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes such as peptidases, chitinases and laccases. In parallel, transcripts of N-transporters were upregulated, which suggest that some of the released nitrogen compounds were re-assimilated by the mycelium. The observed changes suggest that the carbon starvation response in P. involutus is associated with complex cellular changes that involves autolysis, recycling of intracellular compounds by autophagy and reabsorption of the extracellular released material. The study provides molecular markers that can be used to examine the role of autolysis for the turnover and survival of the ectomycorrhizal mycelium in soils. PMID:25778509

  8. Phosphate differentially regulates 14-3-3 family members and GRF9 plays a role in Pi-starvation induced responses.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiqin; Jain, Ajay; Baldwin, James C; Raghothama, Kashchandra G

    2007-10-01

    The 14-3-3s are phosphoserine-binding proteins that act as key regulators of many metabolic pathways. Several biotic and abiotic stresses have been shown to modulate the expression of 14-3-3 genes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, 15 genes are known to code for 14-3-3 isoforms belonging to epsilon and non-epsilon groups. Since phosphorus is one of the essential macronutrients for plants, we examined its role in the regulation of the expression of 14-3-3 isoforms belonging to epsilon (GRF9, GRF10, GRF11, GRF13) and non-epsilon (GRF1, GRF3, GRF6, GRF8) groups. The effect of Pi deprivation was differential on the members of non-epsilon group ranging from a significant reduction in the transcripts of GRF3 to non-perceptible changes in the transcripts of other members. Suppressive effect of Pi-deficiency was more pronounced on some of the members of epsilon group with transcripts levels of GRF9 and GRF13 barely detectable. A concurrent increase in the transcript levels of GRF9 with an increase in the Pi concentration suggested a correlation between gene expression and Pi availability. However, neither Pi deficiency at low temperature nor Fe and K deficiency failed to suppress GRF9 expression. In planta role of GRF9 was elucidated by the analysis of the loss-of-function mutant under Pi-replete condition. The analyses revealed exaggerated Pi-starvation responses in the form of starch accumulation in the leaves and modulated root system architecture (RSA). An inverse relationship between the abundance of GRF9 transcripts and accumulation of starch in transgenic lines over-expressing this gene provided further evidence towards the role of GRF9 in modulation of metabolic pathways during Pi-starvation responses. PMID:17598127

  9. Vertical distribution and growth performance of Baltic cod larvae - Field evidence for starvation-induced recruitment regulation during the larval stage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwer, Bastian; Clemmesen, Catriona; Grønkjær, Peter; Köster, Friedrich W.

    2011-12-01

    Besides variable egg survival, previous studies suggested that the larval stage may be the most critical phase in determining Baltic cod recruitment variability, and that larvae need to conduct an ontogenetic vertical migration from hatching depths (>50 m) to upper layers with increased food availability in order to initiate first feeding, improve their nutritional condition and growth, and avoid starvation. Recently, detailed information on the stage-resolved vertical distribution of main Baltic copepod species, including the preferred larval Baltic cod prey species Pseudocalanus acuspes, has become available. Therefore, the vertical distribution of Baltic cod larvae in August 2007 and their depth-dependent nutritional condition and growth were investigated. RNA-DNA based methods were used to estimate growth, including a novel approach to estimate growth performance by relating observed specific growth rates (SGR) of field caught larvae to temperature-dependent reference growth rates (G ref) for fast-growing laboratory reared fish from the literature. This standardization to G ref was found to have a great potential to improve investigations on the growth and ecology of larval fish. The need for early larvae to migrate to shallower layers was corroborated, while larger size classes were found at increasingly greater depths. This may reflect a continuation of the ontogenetic vertical migration in order to follow increasingly larger prey items at greater depths and to save energy in cooler waters below the thermocline. Larval growth generally declined with increasing depth, but the decline in growth became less pronounced in larger size classes. This indicates that larger larvae were better in coping with the ambient environment and the available prey field at greater depths. Generally, Baltic cod larvae grew poorly compared to larvae from other studies, which is discussed in relation to differences in predation and a possible food-temperature trade-off for larvae

  10. Phosphate Starvation-Inducible Gene ushA Encodes a 5′ Nucleotidase Required for Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum on Media with Nucleotides as the Phosphorus Source

    PubMed Central

    Rittmann, Doris; Sorger-Herrmann, Ulrike; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential component of macromolecules, like DNA, and central metabolic intermediates, such as sugar phosphates, and bacteria possess enzymes and control mechanisms that provide an optimal supply of phosphorus from the environment. UDP-sugar hydrolases and 5′ nucleotidases may play roles in signal transduction, as they do in mammals, in nucleotide salvage, as demonstrated for UshA of Escherichia coli, or in phosphorus metabolism. The Corynebacterium glutamicum gene ushA was found to encode a secreted enzyme which is active as a 5′ nucleotidase and a UDP-sugar hydrolase. This enzyme was synthesized and secreted into the medium when C. glutamicum was starved for inorganic phosphate. UshA was required for growth of C. glutamicum on AMP and UDP-glucose as sole sources of phosphorus. Thus, in contrast to UshA from E. coli, C. glutamicum UshA is an important component of the phosphate starvation response of this species and is necessary to access nucleotides and related compounds as sources of phosphorus. PMID:16085822

  11. Serum starvation-induced voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.5 expression and its regulation by Sp1 in canine osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Hyung; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2014-01-01

    The KCNQ gene family, whose members encode Kv7 channels, belongs to the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel group. The roles of this gene family have been widely investigated in nerve and muscle cells. In the present study, we investigated several characteristics of Kv7.5, which is strongly expressed in the canine osteosarcoma cell line, CCL-183. Serum starvation upregulated Kv7.5 expression, and the Kv7 channel opener, flupirtine, attenuated cell proliferation by arresting cells in the G0/G1 phase. We also showed that Kv7.5 knockdown helps CCL-183 cells to proliferate. In an effort to find an endogenous regulator of Kv7.5, we used mithramycin A to reduce the level of the transcription factor Sp1, and it strongly inhibited the induction of Kv7.5 in CCL-183 cells. These results suggest that the activation of Kv7.5 by flupirtine may exert an anti-proliferative effect in canine osteosarcoma. Therefore, Kv7.5 is a possible molecular target for canine osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:24434641

  12. Serum Starvation-Induced Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Kv7.5 Expression and Its Regulation by Sp1 in Canine Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo Hyung; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2014-01-01

    The KCNQ gene family, whose members encode Kv7 channels, belongs to the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel group. The roles of this gene family have been widely investigated in nerve and muscle cells. In the present study, we investigated several characteristics of Kv7.5, which is strongly expressed in the canine osteosarcoma cell line, CCL-183. Serum starvation upregulated Kv7.5 expression, and the Kv7 channel opener, flupirtine, attenuated cell proliferation by arresting cells in the G0/G1 phase. We also showed that Kv7.5 knockdown helps CCL-183 cells to proliferate. In an effort to find an endogenous regulator of Kv7.5, we used mithramycin A to reduce the level of the transcription factor Sp1, and it strongly inhibited the induction of Kv7.5 in CCL-183 cells. These results suggest that the activation of Kv7.5 by flupirtine may exert an anti-proliferative effect in canine osteosarcoma. Therefore, Kv7.5 is a possible molecular target for canine osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:24434641

  13. Global Proteomics Analysis of the Response to Starvation in C. elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Wang, Bin; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Kent, Robert; Lamond, Angus I.; Gartner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Periodic starvation of animals induces large shifts in metabolism but may also influence many other cellular systems and can lead to adaption to prolonged starvation conditions. To date, there is limited understanding of how starvation affects gene expression, particularly at the protein level. Here, we have used mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to identify global changes in the Caenorhabditis elegans proteome due to acute starvation of young adult animals. Measuring changes in the abundance of over 5,000 proteins, we show that acute starvation rapidly alters the levels of hundreds of proteins, many involved in central metabolic pathways, highlighting key regulatory responses. Surprisingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of chromatin-associated proteins, including specific linker histones, histone variants, and histone posttranslational modifications associated with the epigenetic control of gene expression. To maximize community access to these data, they are presented in an online searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). PMID:25963834

  14. Activating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in combination for improvement of succinate production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zaigao; Zhu, Xinna; Chen, Jing; Li, Qingyan; Zhang, Xueli

    2013-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is an important step in the production of succinate by Escherichia coli. Two enzymes, PEP carboxylase (PPC) and PEP carboxykinase (PCK), are responsible for PEP carboxylation. PPC has high substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but wastes the high energy of PEP. PCK has low substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but can conserve the high energy of PEP for ATP formation. In this work, the expression of both the ppc and pck genes was modulated, with multiple regulatory parts of different strengths, in order to investigate the relationship between PPC or PCK activity and succinate production. There was a positive correlation between PCK activity and succinate production. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between PPC activity and succinate production only when PPC activity was within a certain range; excessive PPC activity decreased the rates of both cell growth and succinate formation. These two enzymes were also activated in combination in order to recruit the advantages of each for the improvement of succinate production. It was demonstrated that PPC and PCK had a synergistic effect in improving succinate production. PMID:23747698

  15. Nitrate Starvation Induced Changes in Root System Architecture, Carbon:Nitrogen Metabolism, and miRNA Expression in Nitrogen-Responsive Wheat Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar; Rani, Manju; Bansal, Niketa; Gayatri; Venkatesh, K; Mandal, P K

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of nutrient use efficiency in cereal crops is highly essential not only to reduce the cost of cultivation but also to save the environmental pollution, reduce energy consumption for production of these chemical fertilizers, improve soil health, and ultimately help in mitigating climate change. In the present investigation, we have studied the morphological (with special emphasis on root system architecture) and biochemical responses (in terms of assay of the key enzymes involved in N assimilation) of two N-responsive wheat genotypes, at the seedling stage, under nitrate-optimum and nitrate-starved conditions grown in hydroponics. Expression profile of a few known wheat micro RNAs (miRNAs) was also studied in the root tissue. Total root size, primary root length, and first- and second-order lateral root numbers responded significantly under nitrate-starved condition. Morphological parameters in terms of root and shoot length and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots have also been observed to be significant between N-optimum and N-starved condition for each genotypes. Nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthatase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity significantly decreased under N-starved condition. Glutamine oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) and pyruvate kinase (PK) activity was found to be genotype dependent. Most of the selected miRNAs were expressed in root tissues, and some of them showed their differential N-responsive expression. Our studies indicate that one of the N-responsive genotype (NP-890) did not get affected significantly under nitrogen starvation at seedling stage. PMID:26315134

  16. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Winters, Yaicha D; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea-microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  17. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Yaicha D.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  18. Survivorship During Starvation for Cimex lectularius L.

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Andrea M.; Miller, Dini M.; Brewster, Carlyle C.

    2011-01-01

    Four bed bug strains (Cimex lectularius) with different levels of pyrethroid resistance were evaluated to determine their ability to survive extended periods of starvation. First instar bed bugs of all strains were the most vulnerable to starvation (13.8–36.3 days mean survival time). Fifth instars and adults survived the longest during starvation (41.5–142.6 days). Significant differences in survivorship during starvation were observed between resistant and susceptible strains of bed bugs. Overall, all immature and adult stages of the resistant bed bug strains had significantly shorter survival times than those of the susceptible strains (P < 0.05). PMID:26467625

  19. Maintenance of Different Mannitol Uptake Systems during Starvation in Oxidative and Fermentative Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Claire L.; Robb, Frank T.

    1985-01-01

    The mannitol uptake systems in marine Vibrio and Pseudomonas isolates from the kelp beds off the South African west coast were examined. The fermentative Vibrio isolate possessed a constitutive rapid mannitol uptake system and also a soluble mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicative of a mannitol phosphotransferase system. An inducible, relatively less active mannitol uptake system was detected in the oxidative Pseudomonas isolate, and this strain possessed a mannitol dehydrogenase. The maintenance of these systems during starvation survival was studied. The Vibrio isolate maintained its initial uptake system for approximately 5 weeks of starvation, after which time the uptake system was replaced by one with a higher affinity for mannitol. The mannitol transport system of the Pseudomonas isolate was depressed early in starvation (30 h) but could be readily induced by exogenous mannitol after 6 weeks of starvation. The relative proportions of mannitol which was incorporated and respired were determined in starved Vibrio and Pseudomonas strains. PMID:16346909

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to carbon starvation in nongrowing Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Onur; Wels, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (μ = 0.0001 h(-1)) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a recovery period of another 24 h by reinitiating the medium supply to the retentostat culture. During starvation, the viability of the culture was largely retained, and the expression of genes involved in transcription and translational machineries, cell division, and cell membrane energy metabolism was strongly repressed. Expression of these genes was largely recovered following the reinitiation of the medium supply. Starvation triggered the elevated expression of genes associated with synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, histidine, purine, and riboflavin. The expression of these biosynthesis genes was found to remain at an elevated level after reinitiation of the medium supply. In addition, starvation induced the complete gene set predicted to be involved in natural competence in L. lactis KF147, and the elevated expression of these genes was sustained during the subsequent recovery period, but our attempts to experimentally demonstrate natural transformation in these cells failed. Mining the starvation response gene set identified a conserved cis-acting element that resembles the lactococcal CodY motif in the upstream regions of genes associated with transcription and translational machineries, purine biosynthesis, and natural transformation in L. lactis, suggesting a role for CodY in the observed transcriptome adaptations to starvation in nongrowing cells. PMID:25636846

  1. Structural and functional studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Singh, Mahavir; Tarábek, Ján; Vaněk, Ondřej; Bednárová, Lucie; Pichová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, the second leading infectious disease killer after HIV, remains a top public health priority. The causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which can cause both acute and clinically latent infections, reprograms metabolism in response to the host niche. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck) is the enzyme at the center of the phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate-oxaloacetate node, which is involved in regulating the carbon flow distribution to catabolism, anabolism, or respiration in different states of Mtb infection. Under standard growth conditions, Mtb Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis and catalyzes the metal-dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate. In non-replicating Mtb, Pck can catalyze anaplerotic biosynthesis of oxaloacetate. Here, we present insights into the regulation of Mtb Pck activity by divalent cations. Through analysis of the X-ray structure of Pck-GDP and Pck-GDP-Mn2+ complexes, mutational analysis of the GDP binding site, and quantum mechanical (QM)-based analysis, we explored the structural determinants of efficient Mtb Pck catalysis. We demonstrate that Mtb Pck requires presence of Mn2+ and Mg2+ cations for efficient catalysis of gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. The anaplerotic reaction, which preferably functions in reducing conditions that are characteristic for slowed or stopped Mtb replication, is also effectively activated by Fe2+ in the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+ cations. In contrast, simultaneous presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+ or Mg2+ inhibits the gluconeogenic reaction. These results suggest that inorganic ions can contribute to regulation of central carbon metabolism by influencing the activity of Pck. Furthermore, the X-ray structure determination, biochemical characterization, and QM analysis of Pck mutants confirmed the important role of the Phe triad for proper binding of the GDP-Mn2+ complex in the nucleotide binding site and efficient catalysis of the anaplerotic reaction. PMID:25798914

  2. Structural and Functional Studies of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Singh, Mahavir; Tarábek, Ján; Vaněk, Ondřej; Bednárová, Lucie; Pichová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, the second leading infectious disease killer after HIV, remains a top public health priority. The causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which can cause both acute and clinically latent infections, reprograms metabolism in response to the host niche. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck) is the enzyme at the center of the phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate-oxaloacetate node, which is involved in regulating the carbon flow distribution to catabolism, anabolism, or respiration in different states of Mtb infection. Under standard growth conditions, Mtb Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis and catalyzes the metal-dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate. In non-replicating Mtb, Pck can catalyze anaplerotic biosynthesis of oxaloacetate. Here, we present insights into the regulation of Mtb Pck activity by divalent cations. Through analysis of the X-ray structure of Pck-GDP and Pck-GDP-Mn2+ complexes, mutational analysis of the GDP binding site, and quantum mechanical (QM)-based analysis, we explored the structural determinants of efficient Mtb Pck catalysis. We demonstrate that Mtb Pck requires presence of Mn2+ and Mg2+ cations for efficient catalysis of gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. The anaplerotic reaction, which preferably functions in reducing conditions that are characteristic for slowed or stopped Mtb replication, is also effectively activated by Fe2+ in the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+ cations. In contrast, simultaneous presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+ or Mg2+ inhibits the gluconeogenic reaction. These results suggest that inorganic ions can contribute to regulation of central carbon metabolism by influencing the activity of Pck. Furthermore, the X-ray structure determination, biochemical characterization, and QM analysis of Pck mutants confirmed the important role of the Phe triad for proper binding of the GDP-Mn2+ complex in the nucleotide binding site and efficient catalysis of the anaplerotic reaction. PMID:25798914

  3. Role of starvation genes in the survival of deep subsurface bacterial communities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matin, A.; Schmidt, T.; Caldwell, D.

    1998-11-01

    The investigation dealt with several aspects of subsurface bacterial survival and their nature. Mutants of Pseudomonas putida, a common environmental bacterium with counterparts in the subsurface, were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. These mutants were highly sensitive to starvation stress. Reporter gene fusions also showed that these genes were starvation genes since they were induced several fold when the cultures were started. Since the regulatory religions (promoters) of starvation genes are of interest in bioremediation and in experiments designed to understand the roles of starvation genes in the maintenance of microbial community structure, the promoter of one of these genes (pstarv1, contained in strain MK107) was characterized in detail. As a preliminary to these studies, the growth characteristics of Pseudomonas putida MK1 and MK107 were compared for cells growing in batch cultures or as an attached monolayer in microstat cultures.

  4. Effect of starvation-refeeding and an exogenous glucocorticoid on carbohydrate metabolism in chick liver.

    PubMed

    Rosebrough, R W; McMurtry, J P; Richards, M P; Steele, N C

    1984-12-01

    Broiler chicks, 4 weeks of age, were subjected to a regimen of 48-hr starvation and 24-hr refeeding as a means of inducing hepatic glycogen supercompensation. A synthetic glucocorticoid (prednisolone) and transcription inhibitor (actinomycin D) treatment were superimposed on the starvation-refeeding regimen to examine the effect of an exogenous glucocorticoid and the necessity for de novo protein synthesis during glycogen supercompensation. Starvation decreased plasma glucose, immunoreactive insulin and liver glycogen. These parameters returned to, or overshot prefasting levels after a 48-hr refeeding period. Prednisolone magnified the overshoot response but some de novo protein synthesis was required. Glycogen synthase a activity was opposite that of liver glycogen content. A possible nonhormone stimulated glycogen synthetic mechanism in the starvation-refeeding response of the chick was noted. PMID:6442419

  5. Superoxide dismutase protects cultured neurons against death by starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, J C; Kessler, J A; Bennett, M V; Spray, D C

    1987-01-01

    Brief substrate deprivation resulted in high mortality of superior cervical ganglion neurons in culture, assayed 2 hr later by trypan blue exclusion. Involvement of superoxide anions was indicated by several observations. Survival was increased significantly by prior treatment that induced cells to take up superoxide dismutase. During starvation, neurons reduced nitroblue tetrazolium to form the blue precipitate formazan, and the color change was blocked in neurons preloaded with superoxide dismutase. The incidence of staining was comparable to the mortality. In many cells, brief starvation caused the appearance of fluorescence due to oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to dichlorofluorescein, which indicates that oxidants were generated intracellularly. In some cells fluorescence was transient, as would be caused by membrane breakdown, and these cells were then shown to be dead. Superoxide generation caused by substrate deprivation may contribute importantly to cell damage in a variety of pathological conditions. Images PMID:3472251

  6. Resistance of soil microorganisms to starvation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1972-01-01

    Most groups of soil microorganisms died when exposed to prolonged starvation in a carbon-free solution, but the relative abundance of Bacillus and actinomycetes increased with time. Certain nonspore-forming bacteria also persisted. The ability of individual soil isolates to endure starvation in solution was not correlated with their glycogen content or rate of endogenous respiration. However, cells of the resistant populations were rich in poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, whereas the starvation-susceptible bacteria generally contained little of this substance. Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate was used rapidly in cells deprived of exogenous sources of carbon.

  7. Why does starvation make bones fat?

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Maureen J.

    2011-01-01

    Body fat, or adipose tissue, is a crucial energetic buffer against starvation in humans and other mammals, and reserves of white adipose tissue (WAT) rise and fall in parallel with food intake. Much less is known about the function of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), which are fat cells found in bone marrow. BMAT mass actually increases during starvation, even as other fat depots are being mobilized for energy. Here I review the possible reasons for this poorly understood phenomenon. Is BMAT a passive filler that occupies spaces left by dying bone cells, a pathological consequence of suppressed bone formation, or potentially an adaptation for surviving starvation? To evaluate these possibilities, here I review what is known about the effects of starvation on the body, particularly the skeleton, and the mechanisms involved in storing and metabolizing BMAT during negative energy balance. PMID:21793093

  8. Mammalian ataxin-2 modulates translation control at the pre-initiation complex via PI3K/mTOR and is induced by starvation.

    PubMed

    Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Nonis, David; Eich, Florian; Klinkenberg, Michael; Gorospe, Myriam; Kötter, Peter; Klein, Fabrice A C; Kedersha, Nancy; Auburger, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Ataxin-2 is a cytoplasmic protein, product of the ATXN2 gene, whose deficiency leads to obesity, while its gain-of-function leads to neural atrophy. Ataxin-2 affects RNA homeostasis, but its effects are unclear. Here, immunofluorescence analysis suggested that ataxin-2 associates with 48S pre-initiation components at stress granules in neurons and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but is not essential for stress granule formation. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis showed associations of ataxin-2 with initiation factors, which were concentrated at monosome fractions of polysome gradients like ataxin-2, unlike its known interactor PABP. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking ataxin-2 showed increased phosphorylation of translation modulators 4E-BP1 and ribosomal protein S6 through the PI3K-mTOR pathways. Indeed, human neuroblastoma cells after trophic deprivation showed a strong induction of ATXN2 transcript via mTOR inhibition. Our results support the notion that ataxin-2 is a nutritional stress-inducible modulator of mRNA translation at the pre-initiation complex. PMID:27240544

  9. To die, or not to die: E2F1 never decides by itself during serum starvation

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuro, Daitoku; Folk, Watson P; Kumari, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    The adenovirus E2 promoter-binding factor-1 (E2F1) induces apoptosis in response to DNA damage and serum starvation. After DNA damage, E2F1 is phosphorylated by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase to promote apoptosis. However, precisely how serum starvation stimulates E2F1-induced apoptosis is unclear. We recently found that serum starvation reduces E2F1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, thereby releasing a proapoptotic protein, bridging integrator-1 (BIN1), into the cytoplasm. PMID:27308445

  10. Differentially expressed microRNA identification and target gene function analysis in starvation-induced autophagy of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Wang, Duanping; Sun, Wang; Meng, Xianzhi; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2016-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common acute digestive tract disease, with increased morbidity and mortality, and an unclear pathogenesis. Trypsinogen activation in pancreatic acinar cells may be the primary mechanism underlying the development of AP. Previous studies reported that autophagy participates in the formation of acinar cell vacuoles in AP and in the process of trypsinogen activation as an important cause of AP. Furthermore, microRNAs (miRNAs) maintain the autophagy process by regulating the expression of autophagy‑associated genes. In the present study, an in vitro pancreatic acinar cell autophagy model was established using the AR42J starvation‑induced pancreatic acinar cell line. Twenty differentially expressed microRNAs were identified using miRNA microarray. Bioinformatics analysis was used to predict the target genes of miRNAs and analyze the functions of differentially expressed miRNAs. The results demonstrated that only the downregulated miRNA rno‑miR‑148b‑3p predicted 593 target genes with a statistical significance (P<0.05), from which 10 genes were autophagy‑associated. The results of gene ontology and pathway analyses demonstrated that the target genes of miRNAs were enriched in the Response to insulin stimulus, Regulation of cell death and the Insulin signaling pathways (P<0.05, FDR<0.05). In addition, protein‑protein interaction network analysis demonstrated a widespread interaction among the 593 target genes. The results of the present study may provide novel targets for research on the mechanisms of autophagy-promoted AP and AP treatment. PMID:27175615

  11. Fermentation of Xylose Causes Inefficient Metabolic State Due to Carbon/Energy Starvation and Reduced Glycolytic Flux in Recombinant Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Matsushika, Akinori; Nagashima, Atsushi; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, comprehensive, quantitative metabolome analysis was carried out on the recombinant glucose/xylose-cofermenting S. cerevisiae strain MA-R4 during fermentation with different carbon sources, including glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures. Capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine the intracellular pools of metabolites from the central carbon pathways, energy metabolism pathways, and the levels of twenty amino acids. When xylose instead of glucose was metabolized by MA-R4, glycolytic metabolites including 3- phosphoglycerate, 2- phosphoglycerate, phosphoenolpyruvate, and pyruvate were dramatically reduced, while conversely, most pentose phosphate pathway metabolites such as sedoheptulose 7- phosphate and ribulose 5-phosphate were greatly increased. These results suggest that the low metabolic activity of glycolysis and the pool of pentose phosphate pathway intermediates are potential limiting factors in xylose utilization. It was further demonstrated that during xylose fermentation, about half of the twenty amino acids declined, and the adenylate/guanylate energy charge was impacted due to markedly decreased adenosine triphosphate/adenosine monophosphate and guanosine triphosphate/guanosine monophosphate ratios, implying that the fermentation of xylose leads to an inefficient metabolic state where the biosynthetic capabilities and energy balance are severely impaired. In addition, fermentation with xylose alone drastically increased the level of citrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and increased the aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, strongly supporting the view that carbon starvation was induced. Interestingly, fermentation with xylose alone also increased the synthesis of the polyamine spermidine and its precursor S-adenosylmethionine. Thus, differences in carbon substrates, including glucose and xylose in the fermentation medium, strongly influenced the dynamic metabolism of MA-R4

  12. Fermentation of xylose causes inefficient metabolic state due to carbon/energy starvation and reduced glycolytic flux in recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Nagashima, Atsushi; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, comprehensive, quantitative metabolome analysis was carried out on the recombinant glucose/xylose-cofermenting S. cerevisiae strain MA-R4 during fermentation with different carbon sources, including glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures. Capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine the intracellular pools of metabolites from the central carbon pathways, energy metabolism pathways, and the levels of twenty amino acids. When xylose instead of glucose was metabolized by MA-R4, glycolytic metabolites including 3- phosphoglycerate, 2- phosphoglycerate, phosphoenolpyruvate, and pyruvate were dramatically reduced, while conversely, most pentose phosphate pathway metabolites such as sedoheptulose 7- phosphate and ribulose 5-phosphate were greatly increased. These results suggest that the low metabolic activity of glycolysis and the pool of pentose phosphate pathway intermediates are potential limiting factors in xylose utilization. It was further demonstrated that during xylose fermentation, about half of the twenty amino acids declined, and the adenylate/guanylate energy charge was impacted due to markedly decreased adenosine triphosphate/adenosine monophosphate and guanosine triphosphate/guanosine monophosphate ratios, implying that the fermentation of xylose leads to an inefficient metabolic state where the biosynthetic capabilities and energy balance are severely impaired. In addition, fermentation with xylose alone drastically increased the level of citrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and increased the aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, strongly supporting the view that carbon starvation was induced. Interestingly, fermentation with xylose alone also increased the synthesis of the polyamine spermidine and its precursor S-adenosylmethionine. Thus, differences in carbon substrates, including glucose and xylose in the fermentation medium, strongly influenced the dynamic metabolism of MA-R4

  13. Transcriptional profile of a myotube starvation model of atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Eric J.; Koncarevic, Alan; Giresi, Paul G.; Jackman, Robert W.; Kandarian, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a pervasive phenomenon that can result from a wide range of pathological conditions as well as from habitual muscular inactivity. The present work describes a cell-culture condition that induces significant atrophy in skeletal muscle C2C12 myotubes. The failure to replenish differentiation media in mature myotubes leads to rapid atrophy (53% in diameter), which is referred to here as starvation. Affymetrix microarrays were used to develop a transcriptional profile of control (fed) vs. atrophied (nonfed) myotubes. Myotube starvation was characterized by an upregulation of genes involved in translational inhibition, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, and cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, among others. Downregulated genes included several structural and regulatory elements of the extracellular matrix as well as several elements of Wnt/frizzled and TGF-beta signaling pathways. Interestingly, the characteristic transcriptional upregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, calpains, and cathepsins known to occur in multiple in vivo models of atrophy were not seen during myotube starvation. With the exception of the downregulation of extracellular matrix genes, serine protease inhibitor genes, and the upregulation of the translation initiation factor PHAS-I, this model of atrophy in cell culture has a transcriptional profile quite distinct from any study published to date with atrophy in whole muscle. These data show that, although the gross morphology of atrophied muscle fibers may be similar in whole muscle vs. myotube culture, the processes by which this phenotype is achieved differ markedly.

  14. Spatial distribution of lipid droplets during starvation: Implications for lipophagy.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    Survival during starvation depends largely on metabolic energy, which is stored in the form of neutral lipids in specialized organelles known as lipid droplets. The precursors for the synthesis of neutral lipids are also used for membrane biogenesis, which is required for cell growth and proliferation. Therefore cells must possess mechanisms to preferentially channel lipid precursors toward either membrane synthesis or lipid droplet storage, in response to nutrient status. How this partitioning is spatially regulated within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where lipid droplets co-localize, remains poorly understood. We have recently shown that at the onset of starvation lipid droplets concentrate at a perinuclear ER subdomain flanking the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ) and that this is crucial for maintaining proper nuclear shape and ER membrane organization. Here we show that disruption of the NVJ does not block the translocation and internalization of lipid droplets into the vacuole for their degradation, which takes place at later stages of starvation. We propose that alternative pathways of lipid droplet translocation from the ER to the vacuole may exist to enable stationary phase-induced lipophagy. PMID:27574533

  15. Spatial distribution of lipid droplets during starvation: Implications for lipophagy

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Survival during starvation depends largely on metabolic energy, which is stored in the form of neutral lipids in specialized organelles known as lipid droplets. The precursors for the synthesis of neutral lipids are also used for membrane biogenesis, which is required for cell growth and proliferation. Therefore cells must possess mechanisms to preferentially channel lipid precursors toward either membrane synthesis or lipid droplet storage, in response to nutrient status. How this partitioning is spatially regulated within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where lipid droplets co-localize, remains poorly understood. We have recently shown that at the onset of starvation lipid droplets concentrate at a perinuclear ER subdomain flanking the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ) and that this is crucial for maintaining proper nuclear shape and ER membrane organization. Here we show that disruption of the NVJ does not block the translocation and internalization of lipid droplets into the vacuole for their degradation, which takes place at later stages of starvation. We propose that alternative pathways of lipid droplet translocation from the ER to the vacuole may exist to enable stationary phase-induced lipophagy. PMID:27574533

  16. Dynamic transition of transcription and chromatin landscape during fission yeast adaptation to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Oda, Arisa; Takemata, Naomichi; Hirata, Yoshito; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2015-05-01

    Shortage of glucose, the primary energy source for all organisms, is one of the most critical stresses influencing cell viability. Glucose starvation promptly induces changes in mRNA and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) transcription. We previously reported that glucose starvation induces long ncRNA (lncRNA) transcription in the 5' segment of a fission yeast gluconeogenesis gene (fbp1+), which leads to stepwise chromatin alteration around the fbp1+ promoter and to subsequent robust gene activation. Here, we analyzed genomewide transcription by strand-specific RNA sequencing, together with chromatin landscape by immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Clustering analysis showed that distinct mRNAs and ncRNAs are induced at the early, middle and later stages of cellular response to glucose starvation. The starvation-induced transcription depends substantially on the stress-responsive transcription factor Atf1. Using a new computer program that examines dynamic changes in expression patterns, we identified ncRNAs with similar behavior to the fbp1+ lncRNA. We confirmed that there are continuous lncRNAs associated with local reduction of histone density. Overlapping with the regions for transcription of these lncRNAs, antisense RNAs are antagonistically transcribed under glucose-rich conditions. These results suggest that Atf1-dependent integrated networks of mRNA and lncRNA govern drastic changes in cell physiology in response to glucose starvation. PMID:25728061

  17. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    PubMed

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:24476337

  18. Autophagy is required for G₁/G₀ quiescence in response to nitrogen starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    An, Zhenyi; Tassa, Amina; Thomas, Collin; Zhong, Rui; Xiao, Guanghua; Fotedar, Rati; Tu, Benjamin P; Klionsky, Daniel J; Levine, Beth

    2014-10-01

    In response to starvation, cells undergo increased levels of autophagy and cell cycle arrest but the role of autophagy in starvation-induced cell cycle arrest is not fully understood. Here we show that autophagy genes regulate cell cycle arrest in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during nitrogen starvation. While exponentially growing wild-type yeasts preferentially arrest in G₁/G₀ in response to starvation, yeasts carrying null mutations in autophagy genes show a significantly higher percentage of cells in G₂/M. In these autophagy-deficient yeast strains, starvation elicits physiological properties associated with quiescence, such as Snf1 activation, glycogen and trehalose accumulation as well as heat-shock resistance. However, while nutrient-starved wild-type yeasts finish the G₂/M transition and arrest in G₁/G 0₀ autophagy-deficient yeasts arrest in telophase. Our results suggest that autophagy is crucial for mitotic exit during starvation and appropriate entry into a G₁/G₀ quiescent state. PMID:25126732

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase of kidney. Subcellular distribution and response to acid–base changes

    PubMed Central

    Flores, H.; Alleyne, G. A. O.

    1971-01-01

    1. A method for the assay of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is presented, based on the enzymic determination of the phosphoenolpyruvate produced by the enzyme reaction. 2. The subcellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the kidney of several animal species resembled the distribution in the liver. 3. The rise in enzyme activity in the kidney cortex of rats made acidotic by feeding with ammonium chloride was not prevented by administration of ethionine or actinomycin. 4. The possibility is suggested that in the kidney acidosis causes activation of an inactive form of the enzyme already present. PMID:5128664

  20. Metabolite Regulation of Partially Purified Soybean Nodule Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Turpin, David H.; Plaxton, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was purified 40-fold from soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules to a specific activity of 5.2 units per milligram per protein and an estimated purity of 28%. Native and subunit molecular masses were determined to be 440 and 100 kilodaltons, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is a homotetramer. The response of enzyme activity to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentration and to various effectors was influenced by assay pH and glycerol addition to the assay. At pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, the Km (PEP) was about twofold greater than at pH 7 in the presence of glycerol or at pH 8. At pH 7 or pH 8 the Km (MgPEP) was found to be significantly lower than the respective Km (PEP) values. Glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and dihydroxyacetone phosphate activated PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but had no effect under the other assay conditions. Malate, aspartate, glutamate, citrate, and 2-oxoglutarate were potent inhibitors of PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but their effectiveness was decreased by raising the pH to 8 and/or by adding glycerol. In contrast, 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate were less effective inhibitors at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol than under the other assay conditions. Inorganic phosphate (up to 20 millimolar) was an activator at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol but an inhibitor under the other assay conditions. The possible significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is discussed in relation to the proposed functions of this enzyme in legume nodule metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667849

  1. Analysis and elucidation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shylajanaciyar, Mohandass; Dineshbabu, Gnanasekaran; Rajalakshmi, Ramamoorthy; Subramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Prabaharan, Dharmar; Uma, Lakshmanan

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) a cytosolic enzyme of higher plants is also found in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Genetic and biochemical investigations have indicated that there are several isoforms of PEPC belonging to C3; C3/C4 and C4 groups but, the evolution of PEPC in cyanobacteria is not yet understood. The present study opens up an opportunity to understand the isoforms and functions of PEPC in cyanobacteria. The variations observed in PEPC among lower and higher orders of cyanobacteria, suggests convergent evolution of PEPC. There is a specific PEPC phosphorylation residue 'serine' at the N-terminus and PEPC determinant residue 'serine' at the C-terminal that facilitates high affinity for substrate binding. These residues were unique to higher orders of cyanobacteria, but, not in lower orders and other prokaryotes. The different PEPC forms of cyanobacteria were investigated for their kinetic properties with phosphoenolpyruvate as the substrate and the findings corroborated well with the in silico findings. In vitro enzymatic study of cyanobacteria belonging to three different orders demonstrated the role of aspartate as an allosteric effector, which inhibited PEPC by interacting with the highly conserved residues in the active site. The differences in mode of inhibition among the different order, thus, give a fair picture about the cyanobacterial PEPCs. The higher orders appear to possess the sequence coordinates and functionally conserved residues similar to isoforms of C4 type higher plants, whereas isoforms of PEPC of the lower orders did not resemble either that of C3 or C4 plants. PMID:25586080

  2. Evolution of Dispersal with Starvation Measure and Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Jung; Kwon, Ohsang

    2016-02-01

    Many biological species increase their dispersal rate if starvation starts. To model such a behavior, we need to understand how organisms measure starvation and response to it. In this paper, we compare three different ways of measuring starvation by applying them to starvation-driven diffusion. The evolutional selection and coexistence of such starvation measures are studied within the context of Lotka-Volterra-type competition model of two species. We will see that, if species have different starvation measures and different motility functions, both the coexistence and selection are possible. PMID:26817757

  3. Ciliate cryptobiosis: a microbial strategy against environmental starvation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J C; Callejas, S; Borniquel, S; Benítez, L; Martín-González, A

    2001-09-01

    This review outlines the main features of ciliate resting-cyst formation or encystment. It represents a strategy against several environmental stresses (such as starvation), which involves a highly gene-regulated cell differentiation process and originates a more resistant, differentiated form or resting cyst. This process is mainly characterized by drastic cytoplasmic dehydration that induces a general metabolic rate decrease, intense autophagic activity, the formation of a permeable cyst wall protecting the cell against the adverse environmental conditions, and a gene-silencing mechanism after opening the specific encystment genes. PMID:11820433

  4. miR-71b regulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling during starvation in planarians.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Zhao, J M; Liu, Q; Guo, Q; Liu, Z; Wang, X X; Wang, C Y; Li, R Y; Zhang, Y Z; Zhang, S T

    2015-01-01

    Planarians, which have a large population of stem cells called neoblasts, are molecularly tractable model systems used in the study of regeneration. However, planarians have strong resistance to hunger and have developed growth arrest strategies. For example, they can change their size and undergo growth regression during starvation periods. The results of the current study show that the microRNA, miR-71b, and the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway have important functions in the development of starvation-induced planarians. We demonstrate tissue-specific expression of miR-71b using in situ hybridization. By employing real-time polymerase chain reaction, we provide evidence that miR-71b is upregulated in starvation-induced planarians. Furthermore, we validate and verify the target genes of miR-71b. PMID:26505338

  5. Geometry and starvation effects in hydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-film-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  6. Larval starvation improves metabolic response to adult starvation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Campbell, Jacob B; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-04-01

    Environmental changes during development have long-term effects on adult phenotypes in diverse organisms. Some of the effects play important roles in helping organisms adapt to different environments, such as insect polymorphism. Others, especially those resulting from an adverse developmental environment, have a negative effect on adult health and fitness. However, recent studies have shown that those phenotypes influenced by early environmental adversity have adaptive value under certain (anticipatory) conditions that are similar to the developmental environment, though evidence is mostly from morphological and behavioral observations and it is still rare at physiological and molecular levels. In the companion study, we applied a short-term starvation treatment to fifth instar honey bee larvae and measured changes in adult morphology, starvation resistance, hormonal and metabolic physiology and gene expression. Our results suggest that honey bees can adaptively respond to the predicted nutritional stress. In the present study, we further hypothesized that developmental starvation specifically improves the metabolic response of adult bees to starvation instead of globally affecting metabolism under well-fed conditions. Here, we produced adult honey bees that had experienced a short-term larval starvation, then we starved them for 12 h and monitored metabolic rate, blood sugar concentrations and metabolic reserves. We found that the bees that experienced larval starvation were able to shift to other fuels faster and better maintain stable blood sugar levels during starvation. However, developmental nutritional stress did not change metabolic rates or blood sugar levels in adult bees under normal conditions. Overall, our study provides further evidence that early larval starvation specifically improves the metabolic responses to adult starvation in honey bees. PMID:27030776

  7. Glucose Starvation Boosts Entamoeba histolytica Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Tovy, Ayala; Hertz, Rivka; Siman-Tov, Rama; Syan, Sylvie; Faust, Daniela; Guillen, Nancy; Ankri, Serge

    2011-01-01

    The unicellular parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, during its life cycle stages in the human host. In the present study, we examined whether the parasite virulence could be influenced by glucose starvation (GS). The migratory behaviour of the parasite and its capability to kill mammalian cells and to lyse erythrocytes is strongly enhanced following GS. In order to gain insights into the mechanism underlying the GS boosting effects on virulence, we analyzed differences in protein expression levels in control and glucose-starved trophozoites, by quantitative proteomic analysis. We observed that upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP), a transcription factor that modulates E.histolytica virulence, and the lysine-rich protein 1 (KRiP1) which is induced during liver abscess development, are upregulated by GS. We also analyzed E. histolytica membrane fractions and noticed that the Gal/GalNAc lectin light subunit LgL1 is up-regulated by GS. Surprisingly, amoebapore A (Ap-A) and cysteine proteinase A5 (CP-A5), two important E. histolytica virulence factors, were strongly down-regulated by GS. While the boosting effect of GS on E. histolytica virulence was conserved in strains silenced for Ap-A and CP-A5, it was lost in LgL1 and in KRiP1 down-regulated strains. These data emphasize the unexpected role of GS in the modulation of E.histolytica virulence and the involvement of KRiP1 and Lgl1 in this phenomenon. PMID:21829737

  8. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Maria Tereza; Nascimento, Antônio Galvão; Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Tótola, Marcos Rogério

    2008-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified), Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation. PMID:24031246

  9. The intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starvation not only affects the nutritional and health status of the animals, but also the microbial composition in the host’s intestine. Next-generation sequencing provides a unique opportunity to explore gut microbial communities and their interactions with hosts. However, studies on gut microbiomes have been conducted predominantly in humans and land animals. Not much is known on gut microbiomes of aquatic animals and their changes under changing environmental conditions. To address this shortcoming, we determined the microbial gene catalogue, and investigated changes in the microbial composition and host-microbe interactions in the intestine of Asian seabass in response to starvation. Results We found 33 phyla, 66 classes, 130 orders and 278 families in the intestinal microbiome. Proteobacteria (48.8%), Firmicutes (15.3%) and Bacteroidetes (8.2%) were the three most abundant bacteria taxa. Comparative analyses of the microbiome revealed shifts in bacteria communities, with dramatic enrichment of Bacteroidetes, but significant depletion of Betaproteobacteria in starved intestines. In addition, significant differences in clusters of orthologous groups (COG) functional categories and orthologous groups were observed. Genes related to antibiotic activity in the microbiome were significantly enriched in response to starvation, and host genes related to the immune response were generally up-regulated. Conclusions This study provides the first insights into the fish intestinal microbiome and its changes under starvation. Further detailed study on interactions between intestinal microbiomes and hosts under dynamic conditions will shed new light on how the hosts and microbes respond to the changing environment. PMID:24708260

  10. Effects of Infant Starvation on Learning Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Pnina S.

    Explored were the effects of starvation during infancy on the learning abilities of 50 children when evaluated between 5 and 14 years of age. All Ss had suffered from pyloric stenosis, a condition which prevents passage of food from the stomach, in infancy for periods ranging from 2 days to 3 weeks. Ss were given five tests of various learning…

  11. Molecular characteristics of phosphoenolpyruvate: mannose phosphotransferase system in Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Narito; Yoshii, Takahiro; Hino, Tsuneo

    2004-07-01

    To elucidate the regulatory mechanism of catabolite control in Streptococcus bovis, we investigated the molecular properties and gene expression of the mannose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar: phosphotransferase system (PTS). The mannose PTS gene cluster (man) was found to comprise a gene encoding enzyme (E) II AB (manL) and genes encoding EIIC (manM), EIID (manN), and a putative regulator (manO). The gene cluster (man operon) was transcribed from one transcriptional start site, which was located 40 bp upstream of the manL start codon. However, two transcriptional start sites were found between manN and manO in primer extension analysis, and the manO may be transcribed independently from the man operon. The man operon and manO were constitutively transcribed without being affected by culture conditions, such as the sugar supplied (glucose, galactose, fructose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, or mannose), growth rate, or pH. PMID:15297922

  12. Experimental evidence of phosphoenolpyruvate resynthesis from pyruvate in illuminated leaves.

    PubMed

    Tcherkez, Guillaume; Mahé, Aline; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Gout, Elisabeth; Guérard, Florence; Bligny, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Day respiration is the cornerstone of nitrogen assimilation since it provides carbon skeletons to primary metabolism for glutamate (Glu) and glutamine synthesis. However, recent studies have suggested that the tricarboxylic acid pathway is rate limiting and mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenation is partly inhibited in the light. Pyruvate may serve as a carbon source for amino acid (e.g. alanine) or fatty acid synthesis, but pyruvate metabolism is not well documented, and neither is the possible resynthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Here, we examined the capacity of pyruvate to convert back to PEP using (13)C and (2)H labeling in illuminated cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) leaves. We show that the intramolecular labeling pattern in Glu, 2-oxoglutarate, and malate after (13)C-3-pyruvate feeding was consistent with (13)C redistribution from PEP via the PEP-carboxylase reaction. Furthermore, the deuterium loss in Glu after (2)H(3)-(13)C-3-pyruvate feeding suggests that conversion to PEP and back to pyruvate washed out (2)H atoms to the solvent. Our results demonstrate that in cocklebur leaves, PEP resynthesis occurred as a flux from pyruvate, approximately 0.5‰ of the net CO(2) assimilation rate. This is likely to involve pyruvate inorganic phosphate dikinase and the fundamental importance of this flux for PEP and inorganic phosphate homeostasis is discussed. PMID:21730197

  13. Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent protein kinase from skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Khandelwal, R.L.; Bhanot, P.; Waygood, E.B.

    1986-05-01

    Soluble extracts of skeletal muscle from rat, rabbit and hamster when incubated with 0.1 mM (/sup 32/P)phosphoenolpyruvate give rise to a similar set of phosphoproteins as resolved by SDS-PAGE with Mr 25,000, 35,000, 37,000, 43,000 and 59,000. The phosphorylation of these proteins is neither inhibited by excess ATP nor achieved by incubation with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. Except for the Mr 43,000 phosphoprotein, the phosphorylation of the other proteins dramatically increased in the presence of 0.1 mM CTP. Although phosphatase inhibits such as NaF and PPi were not effective, CTP may act to inhibit phosphatase activity rather than activating a protein kinase. The phosphoamino acids produced in these phosphoproteins were acid stable and only phosphoserine has been routinely identified. Using DEAE-cellulose, CM-Sephadex and Ultrogel AcA44 chromatography, the Mr 37,000 phosphoprotein has been purified from rabbit skeletal muscle to near homogeneity. No physiological role for either the protein kinase or its substrates has yet been found.

  14. Exploring biochemical and functional features of Leishmania major phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Máximo Hernán; Giordana, Lucila; Nowicki, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    This work reports the first functional characterization of leishmanial PEPCK. The recombinant Leishmania major enzyme (Lmj_PEPCK) exhibits equivalent kcat values for the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and oxaloacetate (OAA) forming reactions. The apparent Km towards OAA is 10-fold lower than that for PEP, while the Km values for ADP and ATP are equivalent. Mutagenesis studies showed that D241, D242 and H205 of Lmj_PEPCK like the homologous residues of all known PEPCKs are implicated in metal ions binding. In contrast, the replacement of R43 for Q nearly abolishes Lmj_PEPCK activity. Moreover, the Y180F variant exhibits unchanged Km values for PEP, Mn(2+), and [Formula: see text] , being the kcat for PEP- but not that for OAA-forming reaction more notably decreased. Instead, the Y180A mutant displays an increase in the Km value towards Mn(2+). Therefore in Lmj_PEPCK, Y180 seems to exert different functions to those of the analogous residue in ATP- and GTP-dependant enzymes. Besides, the guanidinium group of R43 appears to play an essential but yet unknown role. These findings promote the need for further structural studies to disclose whether Y180 and R43 participate in the catalytic mechanism or/and in the transitions between the open and the catalytically competent (closed) forms of Lmj_PEPCK. PMID:26271440

  15. Isoleucine starvation caused by sulfometuron methyl in Salmonella typhimurium measured by translational frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Kaplun, Alexander; Chipman, David M; Barak, Ze'ev

    2002-03-01

    The authors have developed a tool for the study of inhibitor-induced amino acid starvation in bacteria which exploits the phenomenon of translational frameshifting. The inhibition of acetohydroxyacid synthase II by the herbicide sulfometuron methyl (SMM) has complex effects on branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Experiments were done with Salmonella typhimurium containing a plasmid with an isoleucine codon in a 'shifty' region, prone to translational frameshifting. SMM did not cause translational frameshifting in minimal medium under conditions that inhibit growth. A 20-fold higher concentration of SMM was required to cause starvation for isoleucine, e.g. in the presence of valine. This starvation was reflected in translational frameshifting correlated with inhibition of growth. These observations support the authors' previous suggestions based on other techniques. The method used here could be generalized for the study of complex metabolic effects related to amino acids. PMID:11882705

  16. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in neuronal steroidogenesis under acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Mohanraj; Ramatchandirin, Balamurugan; Balakrishnan, Sivasangari; Selvaraj, Karthikeyan; Prahalathan, Chidambaram

    2014-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key gluconeogenic enzyme found in many tissues throughout the body including brain. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on PEPCK and its role in neuronal steroidogenesis. Adult female albino rats were administered LPS (5mg/kg body weight) to induce acute inflammation. LPS administration resulted in a significant increase of PEPCK mRNA expression with concomitant increase in mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and other steroidogenic enzymes including 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) and aromatase in brain tissue. Further, the inhibition of PEPCK expression by glipizide significantly decreased the mRNA expression of steroidogenic proteins and concurrently increased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines under LPS administration. The results of this study suggest a novel finding that PEPCK may have an important role in neuronal steroidogenesis; which serves as an adaptive response under inflammation. PMID:25256278

  17. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Induction in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. by Cytokinin 1

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Piepenbrock, Mechtild

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), the key enzyme of Crassulacean acid metabolism, is induced by water stress in leaves of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. In water-stressed plants or excised leaves, exogenous cytokinin suppresses PEPCase transcript accumulation in the leaves. Cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) used in concentrations from 5 to 500 micromolar (a) inhibits the upregulation of PEPCase transcripts, enzyme activity, and Crassulacean acid metabolism induction in salt-stressed intact plants when sprayed once daily during the stress period, (b) inhibits the accumulation of PEPCase mRNA in leaves from well-watered plants, (c) down-regulates PEPCase transcripts within 8 hours in prestressed, intact plants after a single spraying of an individual leaf, (d) inhibits accumulation of PEPCase transcripts in excised, wilting leaves, and (e) accelerates the net decrease of PEPCase transcripts in excised leaves from prestressed plants under rehydration conditions. When roots, the main site of cytokinin biosynthesis, are excised, PEPCase induction under drought stress is intensified. We propose that roots, acting as sensors of soil water status, may regulate PEPCase gene expression in the leaves with cytokinin as a signal transducer. ImagesFigure 2Figure 7 PMID:16669088

  18. A glucose-starvation response regulates the diffusion of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Ryan P; Tang, Jeffrey H; Helenius, Jonne; Dultz, Elisa; Brune, Christiane; Holt, Liam J; Huet, Sebastien; Müller, Daniel J; Weis, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The organization and biophysical properties of the cytosol implicitly govern molecular interactions within cells. However, little is known about mechanisms by which cells regulate cytosolic properties and intracellular diffusion rates. Here, we demonstrate that the intracellular environment of budding yeast undertakes a startling transition upon glucose starvation in which macromolecular mobility is dramatically restricted, reducing the movement of both chromatin in the nucleus and mRNPs in the cytoplasm. This confinement cannot be explained by an ATP decrease or the physiological drop in intracellular pH. Rather, our results suggest that the regulation of diffusional mobility is induced by a reduction in cell volume and subsequent increase in molecular crowding which severely alters the biophysical properties of the intracellular environment. A similar response can be observed in fission yeast and bacteria. This reveals a novel mechanism by which cells globally alter their properties to establish a unique homeostasis during starvation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09376.001 PMID:27003290

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of sucrose by Clostridium tyrobutyricum ZJU 8235: evidence for the phosphotransferase transport system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Cai, Jin; Wang, Jufang; Liang, Shizhong; Xu, Zhinan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2010-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of sucrose, the major sugar in industrial cane molasses, by Clostridium tyrobutyricum ZJU 8235 was investigated and this study provided the first definitive evidence for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity in butyric acid-producing bacteria. Glucose was utilized preferentially to sucrose when both substrates were present in the medium. The PEP-dependent sucrose: PTS was induced by growing C. tyrobutyricum on sucrose (but not glucose) as the sole carbon source. Extract fractionation and PTS reconstitution experiments revealed that both soluble and membrane components were required for bioactivity. Sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase and fructokinase activities were also detected in sucrose-grown cultures. Based on these findings, a pathway of sucrose metabolism in this organism was proposed that includes the forming of sucrose-6-phosphate via the PTS and its further degradation into glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. PMID:19726178

  20. Liver and kidney metabolism during prolonged starvation

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Oliver E.; Felig, Philip; Morgan, Alfred P.; Wahren, John; Cahill, George F.

    1969-01-01

    This study quantifies the concentrations of circulating insulin, growth hormone, glucose, free fatty acids, glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and alpha amino nitrogen in 11 obese subjects during prolonged starvation. The sites and estimated rates of gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis after 5-6 wk of fasting were investigated in five of the subjects. Blood glucose and insulin concentrations fell acutely during the 1st 3 days of fasting, and alpha amino nitrogen after 17 days. The concentration of free fatty acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate did not reach a plateau until after 17 days. Estimated glucose production at 5-6 wk of starvation is reduced to approximately 86 g/24 hr. Of this amount the liver contributes about one-half and the kidney the remainder. Approximately all of the lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and amino acid carbons which are removed by liver and kidney are converted into glucose, as evidenced by substrate balances across these organs. Images PMID:5773093

  1. OsWRKY74, a WRKY transcription factor, modulates tolerance to phosphate starvation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family has 109 members in the rice genome, and has been reported to be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress in plants. Here, we demonstrated that a rice OsWRKY74 belonging to group III of the WRKY transcription factor family was involved in tolerance to phosphate (Pi) starvation. OsWRKY74 was localized in the nucleus and mainly expressed in roots and leaves. Overexpression of OsWRKY74 significantly enhanced tolerance to Pi starvation, whereas transgenic lines with down-regulation of OsWRKY74 were sensitive to Pi starvation. Root and shoot biomass, and phosphorus (P) concentration in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants were ~16% higher than those of wild-type (WT) plants in Pi-deficient hydroponic solution. In soil pot experiments, >24% increases in tiller number, grain weight and P concentration were observed in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants compared to WT plants when grown in P-deficient medium. Furthermore, Pi starvation-induced changes in root system architecture were more profound in OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants than in WT plants. Expression patterns of a number of Pi-responsive genes were altered in the OsWRKY74-overexpressing and RNA interference lines. In addition, OsWRKY74 may also be involved in the response to deficiencies in iron (Fe) and nitrogen (N) as well as cold stress in rice. In Pi-deficient conditions, OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants exhibited greater accumulation of Fe and up-regulation of the cold-responsive genes than WT plants. These findings highlight the role of OsWRKY74 in modulation of Pi homeostasis and potential crosstalk between P starvation and Fe starvation, and cold stress in rice. PMID:26663563

  2. Osteoporosis in survivors of early life starvation.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M; Albury, William R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide evidence for the association of early life nutritional deprivation and adult osteoporosis, in order to suggest that a history of such deprivation may be an indicator of increased risk of osteoporosis in later life. The 'fetal programming' of a range of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in adults was first proposed in the 1990s and more recently extended to disorders of bone metabolism. Localised famines during World War II left populations in whom the long-term effects of maternal, fetal and infantile nutritional deprivation were studied. These studies supported the original concept of 'fetal programming' but did not consider bone metabolism. The present paper offers clinical data from another cohort of World War II famine survivors - those from the Holocaust. The data presented here, specifically addressing the issue of osteoporosis, report on 11 Holocaust survivors in Australia (five females, six males) who were exposed to starvation in early life. The cases show, in addition to other metabolic disorders associated with early life starvation, various levels of osteoporosis, often with premature onset. The cohort studied is too small to support firm conclusions, but the evidence suggests that the risk of adult osteoporosis in both males and females is increased by severe starvation early in life - not just in the period from gestation to infancy but also in childhood and young adulthood. It is recommended that epidemiological research on this issue be undertaken, to assist planning for the future health needs of immigrants to Australia coming from famine affected backgrounds. Pending such research, it would be prudent for primary care health workers to be alert to the prima facie association between early life starvation and adult osteoporosis, and to take this factor into account along with other indicators when assessing a patient's risk of osteoporosis in later life. PMID:22951115

  3. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from pennywort (Umbilicus rupestris). Changes in properties after exposure to water stress.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, P P; Bryant, J A; Woodward, F I

    1984-01-01

    Umbilicus rupestris (pennywort) switches from C3 photosynthesis to an incomplete form of crassulacean acid metabolism (referred to as 'CAM-idling') when exposed to water stress (drought). This switch is accompanied by an increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. This enzyme also shows several changes in properties, including a marked decrease in sensitivity to acid pH, a lower Km for phosphoenolpyruvate, very much decreased sensitivity to the allosteric inhibitor malate, and increased responsiveness to the allosteric effector glucose 6-phosphate. The Mr of the enzyme remains unchanged, at approx. 185 000. These changes in properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase are discussed in relation to the roles of the enzyme in C3 and in CAM plants. Images Fig. 5. PMID:6712622

  4. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1. PMID:26149570

  5. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1. PMID:26149570

  6. Evidence for Light-stimulated Synthesis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Leaves of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Hague, Donald R.; Sims, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01

    Illumination (22,000 lumens per meter2) of etiolated maize plants for 80 hours brings about a 5-fold increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity per unit of protein. An increase in carboxylase protein and incorporation of [35S]methionine into the protein occurs simultaneously with the activity increase. In green plants, the level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein and enzyme activity is dependent on the intensity of light during growth. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the activity increase results from light-stimulated de novo synthesis of phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase protein. Images PMID:16661464

  7. Global gene expression profiling of Bacillus subtilis in response to ammonium and tryptophan starvation as revealed by transcriptome and proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Le Thi; Eymann, Christine; Antelmann, Haike; Albrecht, Dirk; Hecker, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The global gene expression profile of Bacillus subtilis in response to ammonium and tryptophan starvation was analyzed using transcriptomics and proteomics which gained novel insights into these starvation responses. The results demonstrate that both starvation conditions induce specific, overlapping and general starvation responses. The TnrA regulon, the glutamine synthetase (glnA) as well as the sigma(L)-dependent bkd and roc operons were most strongly and specifically induced after ammonium starvation. These are involved in the uptake and utilization of ammonium and alternative nitrogen sources such as amino acids, gamma-aminobutyrate, nitrate/nitrite, uric acid/urea and oligopeptides. In addition, several carbon catabolite-controlled genes (e.g. acsA, citB), the alpha-acetolactate synthase/-decarboxylase alsSD operon and several aminotransferase genes were specifically induced after ammonium starvation. The induction of sigma(F)- and sigma(E)-dependent sporulation proteins at later time points in ammonium-starved cells was accompanied by an increased sporulation frequency. The specific response to tryptophan starvation includes the TRAP-regulated tryptophan biosynthesis genes, some RelA-dependent genes (e.g. adeC, ald) as well as spo0E. Furthermore, we recognized overlapping responses between ammonium and tryptophan starvation (e.g. dat, maeN) as well as the common induction of the CodY and sigma(H) general starvation regulons and the RelA-dependent stringent response. Many genes encoding proteins of so far unknown functions could be assigned to specifically or commonly induced genes. PMID:17183219

  8. PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL EPITHELIAL HOMEOSTASIS IN AGED IL-1 TYPE I RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER STARVATION

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that starvation induces small bowel atrophy, and that atrophy diminishes with aging. In this experiment, we assessed whether starvation-induced atrophy of proximal gut mucosa is associated with the Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling pathway in aged mice. Materials and Methods Thirty 26-month-old IL-1R knockout mice and age-matched wild-type C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: ad libitum fed and fasted. Mice were euthanized 12 or 48 hours after starvation. The proximal small bowel was harvested for morphologic analysis. Gut epithelial cell proliferation was detected using immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and apoptosis was identified using terminal deoxyuridine nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Results Aged IL-1R knockout mice were larger than aged-matched wild-type mice (p<0.05). Proximal gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number were not different between aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups. The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells was higher in fed IL-1R knockout versus wild-type mice (p<0.05), while no significant difference in cell proliferation between both groups. Mucosal atrophy was induced in both aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups by starvation (p<0.05), however, aged IL-1R knockout mice experienced greater losses in proximal gut weight, mucosal length, and corresponding cell number than did wild-type mice at the 12-hour time point (p<0.05). The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells significantly increased in both groups after starvation (p<0.05). Starvation decreased cell proliferation in IL-1R knockout mice (p<0.05), but not in wild-type mice. Conclusions The response in aged IL-1R knockout mice differs from wild-type mice in that starvation increases atrophy and is associated with decreased cell proliferation rather than increased apoptosis. PMID:20605606

  9. Nutrient Starvation Decreases Cx43 Levels and Limits Intercellular Communication in Primary Bovine Corneal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    D'hondt, Catheleyne; Iyyathurai, Jegan; Welkenhuyzen, Kirsten; Himpens, Bernard; Leybaert, Luc; Bultynck, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Connexin (Cx) proteins form large conductance channels which function as regulators of communication between neighboring cells via gap junctions and/or hemichannels. Intercellular communication is essential to coordinate cellular responses in tissues and organs, thereby fulfilling an essential role in the spreading of signaling, survival and death processes. Connexin 43 (Cx43), a major connexin isoform in brain and heart, is rapidly turned over. Recent studies implicated that autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway induced upon nutrient starvation, mediates connexins, including Cx43, degradation. Here, we examined the impact of nutrient starvation on endogenous Cx43-protein levels and endogenous Cx43-driven intercellular communication in primary bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs). Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) was used as a starvation condition that induces autophagic flux without impacting the survival of the BCECs. Nutrient starvation of BCECs caused a rapid decline in Cx43-protein levels, both as gap junctions and as hemichannels. The time course of the decline in Cx43-protein levels coincided with the time course of the decline in intercellular communication, assessed as intercellular Ca(2+)-wave propagation in BCECs exposed to a single-cell mechanical stimulus. The decline in Cx43-protein levels, both as gap junctions and as hemichannels, could be prevented by the addition of bafilomycin A1, a lysosomal inhibitor, during the complete nutrient starvation period. Consistent with this, bafilomycin A1 significantly alleviated the decrease in intercellular Ca(2+)-wave propagation. This study further underpins the importance of autophagy as an important degradation pathway for Cx43 proteins during periods of nutrient deprivation, thereby impacting the ability of cells to perform intercellular communication. PMID:26873723

  10. Death from drought in tropical forests is triggered by hydraulics not carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Rowland, L; da Costa, A C L; Galbraith, D R; Oliveira, R S; Binks, O J; Oliveira, A A R; Pullen, A M; Doughty, C E; Metcalfe, D B; Vasconcelos, S S; Ferreira, L V; Malhi, Y; Grace, J; Mencuccini, M; Meir, P

    2015-12-01

    Drought threatens tropical rainforests over seasonal to decadal timescales, but the drivers of tree mortality following drought remain poorly understood. It has been suggested that reduced availability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) critically increases mortality risk through insufficient carbon supply to metabolism ('carbon starvation'). However, little is known about how NSC stores are affected by drought, especially over the long term, and whether they are more important than hydraulic processes in determining drought-induced mortality. Using data from the world's longest-running experimental drought study in tropical rainforest (in the Brazilian Amazon), we test whether carbon starvation or deterioration of the water-conducting pathways from soil to leaf trigger tree mortality. Biomass loss from mortality in the experimentally droughted forest increased substantially after >10 years of reduced soil moisture availability. The mortality signal was dominated by the death of large trees, which were at a much greater risk of hydraulic deterioration than smaller trees. However, we find no evidence that the droughted trees suffered carbon starvation, as their NSC concentrations were similar to those of non-droughted trees, and growth rates did not decline in either living or dying trees. Our results indicate that hydraulics, rather than carbon starvation, triggers tree death from drought in tropical rainforest. PMID:26595275

  11. Mild Nutrient Starvation Triggers the Development of a Small-Cell Survival Morphotype in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mu-Lu; Gengenbacher, Martin; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria, generally believed to be non-sporulating, are well known to survive shock starvation in saline for extended periods of time in a non-replicating state without any apparent morphological changes. Here, we uncover that mycobacteria can undergo cellular differentiation by exposing Mycobacterium smegmatis to mild starvation conditions. Traces of various carbon sources in saline triggered the development of a novel small resting cell (SMRC) morphotype. Development of SMRCs could also be observed for other mycobacteria, suggesting evolutionary conservation of this differentiation pathway. Fluorescence microscopic analyses showed that development of SMRCs progresses via septated, multi-nucleoided cell intermediates, which divide to generate mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Intriguingly, saline shock-starved large resting cells (LARCs), which did not show cell size or surface changes when observed by scanning electron microscopy, remodeled their internal structure to septated, multi-nucleoided cells, similar to the intermediates seen during differentiation to SMRCs. Our results suggest that mycobacteria harbor a starvation-induced differentiation program in which at first septated, multi-nucleoided cells are generated. Under zero-nutrient conditions bacteria terminate development at this stage as LARCs. In the presence of traces of a carbon source, these multi-nucleoided cells continue differentiation into mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Both SMRCs and LARCs exhibited extreme antibiotic tolerance. SMRCs showed increased long-term starvation survival, which was associated with the presence of lipid inclusion bodies. PMID:27379076

  12. Effects of amino acid starvation on RelA diffusive behavior in live Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenting; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Kuanqing; Wang, Jue D.; Weisshaar, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary During amino acid starvation, bacterial cells rapidly synthesize the nucleotides (p)ppGpp, causing a massive re-programming of the transcriptional profile known as the stringent response. The (p)ppGpp synthase RelA is activated by ribosomes harboring an uncharged tRNA at the A site. It is unclear whether synthesis occurs while RelA is bound to the ribosome or free in the cytoplasm. We present a study of three E. coli strains, each expressing a different RelA-fluorescent protein (RelA-FP) construct: RelA-YFP, RelA-mEos2, and RelA-Dendra2. Single-molecule localization and tracking studies were carried out under normal growth conditions and during amino acid starvation. Study of three labeling schemes enabled us to assess potential problems with FP labeling of RelA. The diffusive trajectories and axial spatial distributions indicate that amino acid starvation induces net binding of all three RelA-FP constructs to 70S ribosomes. The data are most consistent with a model in which RelA synthesizes (p)ppGpp while bound to the 70S ribosome. We suggest a “short hopping time” model of RelA activity during starvation. Our results contradict an earlier study of RelA-Dendra2 diffusion that inferred off-ribosome synthesis of (p)ppGpp. The reasons for the discrepancy remain unclear. PMID:26480956

  13. Cofilin Phosphorylation Decreased by Serum-free Starvation with Low Glucose in the L6 Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee-Young; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Park, Byoung-Sun; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Tae-Whan; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] Many studies have been using cell culture models of muscle cells with exogenous cytokines or glucocorticoids to mimic atrophy in in vivo and in vitro tests. However, the changes in the phosphorylation of atrophy-related cofilin are still poorly understood in starved skeletal muscle cells. In this study, we first examined whether or not phosphorylation of cofilin is altered in L6 myoblasts after 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours of serum-free starvation with low glucose. [Methods] We used Western blotting to exam protein expression and phosphorylation in atrophied L6 myoblasts. [Results] L6 cell sizes and numbers were diminished as a result of serum-free starvation in a time-dependent manner. Serum-free starvation for 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours significantly decreased the phosphorylation of cofilin, respectively. [Conclusion] These results suggest that starvation-induced atrophy may be in part related to changes in the phosphorylation of cofilin in L6 myoblasts. PMID:25364107

  14. Identification and transcription control of fission yeast genes repressed by an ammonium starvation growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, C; Perret, E; Dumont, X; Picard, A; Caput, D; Lenaers, G

    2000-01-15

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ammonium starvation induces a growth arrest, a cell cycle exit in G(1) and a further switch to meiosis. This process is regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase cascade, and downstream transcription factors. In order to understand how cells adapt their genetic programme to the switch from mitotic cycling to starvation, a differential transcript analysis comparing mRNA from exponentially growing and ammonium-starved cells was performed. Genes repressed by this stimulus mainly concern cell growth, i.e. protein synthesis and global metabolism. Comparison of the expression of two of them, the ribosomal proteins Rps6 and TCTP, in many different growing conditions, evidenced a strong correlation, suggesting that their transcriptions are coordinately regulated. Nevertheless, by repeating the ammonium starvation on strains constitutively activated for the PKA pathway (Deltacgs1), or unable to activate the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase pathway (Deltawis1), or with both characteristics (Deltacgs1+Deltawis1), the transcriptional inhibition was found to be governed either by the PKA pathway, or by the Wis1 pathway, or by both. These results suggest that during the switch from exponential growth to ammonium starvation, cell homeostasis is maintained by downregulating the transcription of the most expressed genes by a PKA and a Wis1-dependent process. Accession Nos for the S30 and L14 ribosomal protein cDNA sequences are AJ2731 and AJ2732, respectively. PMID:10620772

  15. NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis of Physiological Responses to Starvation and Refeeding in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Contreras, José I; García-Pérez, Isabel; Meléndez-Camargo, María E; Zepeda, L Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    Starvation is a postabsorptive condition derived from a limitation on food resources by external factors. Energy homeostasis is maintained under this condition by using sources other than glucose via adaptive mechanisms. After refeeding, when food is available, other adaptive processes are linked to energy balance. However, less has been reported about the physiological mechanisms present as a result of these conditions, considering the rat as a supraorganism. Metabolic profiling using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize the physiological metabolic differences in urine specimens collected under starved, refed, and recovered conditions. In addition, because starvation induced lack of faecal production and not all animals produced faeces during refeeding, 24 h pooled faecal water samples were also analyzed. Urinary metabolites upregulated by starvation included 2-butanamidoacetate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, ketoleucine, methylmalonate, p-cresyl glucuronide, p-cresyl sulfate, phenylacetylglycine, pseudouridine, creatinine, taurine, and N-acetyl glycoprotein, which were related to renal and skeletal muscle function, β-oxidation, turnover of proteins and RNA, and host-microbial interactions. Food-derived metabolites, including gut microbial cometabolites, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were upregulated under refed and recovered conditions, which characterized anabolic urinary metabotypes. The upregulation of creatine and pantothenate indicated an absorptive state after refeeding. Fecal short chain fatty acids, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionate, lactate, and acetoin provided additional information about the combinatorial metabolism between the host and gut microbiota. This investigation contributes to allow a deeper understanding of physiological responses associated with starvation and refeeding. PMID:27518853

  16. Fatty acid analyses may provide insight into the progression of starvation among squamate reptiles.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-10-01

    Fasting-induced changes in fatty acid composition have been reported to occur within the body lipids of several types of animals; however, little is known about the changes in fatty acid profiles exhibited by reptiles subjected to prolonged fasting. This study characterizes the fatty acid profiles of six reptile species subjected to sublethal periods of fasting lasting 0, 56, 112, and 168 days. Analyses of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) conducted on the total body lipids of rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox), ratsnakes (Elaphe obsoleta), pythons (Python regius), boas (Boa constrictor), true vipers (Bitis gabonica), and monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus) revealed that all of the species exhibited similar characteristic changes in their fatty acid profiles during starvation stress. According to ANOVAs, the four most effective indicators of the onset of starvation were significant increases in the [1] fatty acid unsaturation index as well as ratios of [2] linoleic to palmitoleic acid, [3] oleic to palmitic, and [4] arachidonic to total fatty acid concentrations. The results of this study suggest that FAME analyses might be useful for identifying nutritional stress and/or starvation among squamate reptiles; however, forthcoming studies will be required to validate the generality of these responses. I also review the potential limitations of this approach, and suggest experiments that will be important for future applications of FAME analyses. Ultimately, it is hoped that FAME analyses can be used in conjunction with current practices as an additional tool to characterize the prevalence of starvation experienced by free-living reptiles. PMID:18657629

  17. Macronutrient Metabolism in Starvation and Stress.

    PubMed

    Soeters, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    In starvation and to a lesser extent in stress starvation, the loss of protein mass is spared as much as possible. This metabolic arrangement must have developed under the influence of evolutionary pressure in view of the importance of protein mass for function and longevity. Peripheral adipose tissue mass is only limiting when its mass is extremely small. Protein is the predominant precursor of glucose in (stress) starvation and glucose is an essential substrate for the synthesis and maintenance of cells and matrix and for the control of the redox state. To spare protein, glucose should be used efficiently only for those purposes that cannot be achieved by fat. It is suggested that this is achieved by limiting full glucose oxidation and increasing fatty acid and ketone body oxidation, which most likely can also largely cover energy needs of the central nervous system. In stress states, net negative nitrogen balance (catabolism) largely results from net losses of peripheral protein mass, predominantly muscles, whereas central organs (e.g. the liver), the immune system and wound healing are anabolic. A number of factors are responsible for a net negative nitrogen balance which may ultimately lead to death if stress persists. In stress, the amino acid mix derived from peripheral (predominantly muscle) tissues is modified in interplay with the liver and to a minor extent the kidney. This mix is different in nonstressed conditions, containing substantially increased amounts of the nonessential amino acids glutamine, alanine, glycine and (hydroxy)proline. Part of the amino acid skeletons released by muscles are substrates to produce glucose in the liver and kidney. Glucose and the amino acids produced especially serve as substrates for cell proliferation and matrix deposition. The catabolic processes in peripheral tissues cannot be countered completely by adequate nutritional support as long as stress persists. This metabolic arrangement dictates a nutritional mix

  18. TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in sake yeast Kyokai no. 7, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Nobushige; Sato, Aya; Hosaka, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Industrial yeasts are generally unable to sporulate but treatment with the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin restores this ability in a sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7), Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding suggests that TORC1 is active under sporulation conditions. Here, using a reporter gene assay, Northern and Western blots, we tried to gain insight into how TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells. Similarly to a laboratory strain, RPS26A transcription was repressed and Npr1 was dephosphorylated in K7 cells, indicative of the expected loss of TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation. The expression of nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive genes, however, was not induced, the level of Cln3 remained constant, and autophagy was more slowly induced than in a laboratory strain, all suggestive of active TORC1. We conclude that TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells. PMID:26272416

  19. Starvation injury after gastric reduction for obesity.

    PubMed

    Mason, E E

    1998-09-01

    Gastric reduction operations are designed to control body weight by establishing a small, meal-size juxtaesophageal, gastric pouch that empties into the jejunum (gastric bypass) or the larger portion of the stomach (gastroplasty). If the outlet of the pouch is too small, a patient may be limited to ingesting clear liquids. Vomiting then occurs if heavier liquids or normal foods are taken. An occasional patient has difficulty eating properly and vomits even though the pouch volume and outlet are of optimum size. For a patient who reports vomiting, a distinction must be made between episodic improper eating and uncontrolled starvation. Three types of starvation injury are described: (1) sudden death from protein malnutrition; (2) refeeding syndrome; and (3) Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. The mechanisms of the development, manifestations, prevention, and treatment of these complications are explained. Surgeons who treat severe obesity should be aware of these complications and be prepared to manage patients who have uncontrolled vomiting so that such complications either do not develop or are recognized and treated as early as possible before serious and irreversible injury occurs. PMID:9717429

  20. Induction of Arabidopsis tryptophan pathway enzymes and camalexin by amino acid starvation, oxidative stress, and an abiotic elicitor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Williams, C C; Last, R L

    1998-01-01

    The tryptophan (Trp) biosynthetic pathway leads to the production of many secondary metabolites with diverse functions, and its regulation is predicted to respond to the needs for both protein synthesis and secondary metabolism. We have tested the response of the Trp pathway enzymes and three other amino acid biosynthetic enzymes to starvation for aromatic amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, or methionine. The Trp pathway enzymes and cytosolic glutamine synthetase were induced under all of the amino acid starvation test conditions, whereas methionine synthase and acetolactate synthase were not. The mRNAs for two stress-inducible enzymes unrelated to amino acid biosynthesis and accumulation of the indolic phytoalexin camalexin were also induced by amino acid starvation. These results suggest that regulation of the Trp pathway enzymes under amino acid deprivation conditions is largely a stress response to allow for increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatments with the oxidative stress-inducing herbicide acifluorfen and the abiotic elicitor alpha-amino butyric acid induced responses similar to those induced by the amino acid starvation treatments. The role of salicylic acid in herbicide-mediated Trp and camalexin induction was investigated. PMID:9501110

  1. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Leishmania donovani under Spermidine Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shalini; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We have earlier reported antileishmanial activity of hypericin by spermidine starvation. In the current report, we have used label free proteome quantitation approach to identify differentially modulated proteins after hypericin treatment. A total of 141 proteins were found to be differentially regulated with ANOVA P value less than 0.05 in hypericin treated Leishmania promastigotes. Differentially modulated proteins have been broadly classified under nine major categories. Increase in ribosomal protein S7 protein suggests the repression of translation. Inhibition of proteins related to ubiquitin proteasome system, RNA binding protein and translation initiation factor also suggests altered translation. We have also observed increased expression of Hsp 90, Hsp 83–1 and stress inducible protein 1. Significant decreased level of cyclophilin was observed. These stress related protein could be cellular response of the parasite towards hypericin induced cellular stress. Also, defective metabolism, biosynthesis and replication of nucleic acids, flagellar movement and signalling of the parasite were observed as indicated by altered expression of proteins involved in these pathways. The data was analyzed rigorously to get further insight into hypericin induced parasitic death. PMID:27123864

  2. Spatio-Temporal Transcript Profiling of Rice Roots and Shoots in Response to Phosphate Starvation and Recovery[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Secco, David; Jabnoune, Mehdi; Walker, Hayden; Shou, Huixia; Wu, Ping; Poirier, Yves; Whelan, James

    2013-01-01

    Using rice (Oryza sativa) as a model crop species, we performed an in-depth temporal transcriptome analysis, covering the early and late stages of Pi deprivation as well as Pi recovery in roots and shoots, using next-generation sequencing. Analyses of 126 paired-end RNA sequencing libraries, spanning nine time points, provided a comprehensive overview of the dynamic responses of rice to Pi stress. Differentially expressed genes were grouped into eight sets based on their responses to Pi starvation and recovery, enabling the complex signaling pathways involved in Pi homeostasis to be untangled. A reference annotation-based transcript assembly was also generated, identifying 438 unannotated loci that were differentially expressed under Pi starvation. Several genes also showed induction of unannotated splice isoforms under Pi starvation. Among these, PHOSPHATE2 (PHO2), a key regulator of Pi homeostasis, displayed a Pi starvation–induced isoform, which was associated with increased translation activity. In addition, microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles after long-term Pi starvation in roots and shoots were assessed, identifying 20 miRNA families that were not previously associated with Pi starvation, such as miR6250. In this article, we present a comprehensive spatio-temporal transcriptome analysis of plant responses to Pi stress, revealing a large number of potential key regulators of Pi homeostasis in plants. PMID:24249833

  3. Thioautotrophic bacterial endosymbionts are degraded by enzymatic digestion during starvation: Case study of two lucinids Codakia orbicularis and C. orbiculata.

    PubMed

    König, Sten; Le Guyader, Hervé; Gros, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    The Caribbean bivalves Codakia orbicularis (Linné, 1758) and C. orbiculata (Montagu, 1808) live in seagrass beds of Thalassia testudinum and harbor intracellular sulfur-oxidizing gamma-proteobacteria. These bacterial symbionts fix CO2 via the Calvin Benson cycle and provide organic compounds to the bivalve. During experimentally induced starvation, no reduced sulfur compounds and no organic particle food are available; the symbionts could be considered as the sole nutrient source of the host bivalve. A previous study has shown that the intracellular bacterial population decreased considerably during starvation and that bacterial endosymbionts were not released by the bivalves. In this study, the activity of two lysosomal marker enzymes (acid phosphatase and arylsulfatase) was detected using cytochemical experiments coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray transmission electron microscopy during sulfide and organic particle starvation. The degradation of bacterial endosymbionts began after 2 weeks of starvation in C. orbiculata and after 3 weeks in C. orbicularis. Degradation processes seem to be continuous over several months and could be responsible for the disappearance of the bacterial endosymbionts within the gills during starvation. These data suggest that the host use symbionts as a nutrient source to survive a hunger crisis. The carbon transfer from the symbionts to the host could be flexible and could consist in transfer of organic matter, "milking," under normal feeding conditions and digestion of the symbionts under starved conditions. PMID:25429862

  4. Starvation marrow - gelatinous transformation of bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  5. Comparative Characterization of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in C3, C4, and C3-C4 Intermediate Panicum Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Holaday, A. Scott; Black, Clanton C.

    1981-01-01

    Various properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases were compared in leaf preparations from C3-C4 intermediate, C3, and C4Panicum species. Values of Vmax in micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour at pH 8.3 were 57 to 75 for the enzyme from Panicum milioides, Panicum schenckii, and Panicum decipiens (all C3-C4). The values for Panicum laxum (C3) and Panicum prionitis (C4) were 20 to 40 and 952 to 1374, respectively. The Vmax values did not change at pH 7.3 except for the C4 value, which increased about 24%. At pH 8.3, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from C3 and C3-C4 species had slightly higher Km HCO3− and lower K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values than did the C4 enzyme. With each species at pH 7.3, all K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values were 2- to 4-fold greater. The enzyme from all species was inhibited 85 to 90% by 1 millimolar malate at rate-limiting phosphoenolpyruvate and Mg2+ levels. With low levels of malate, 0.2 millimolar, the rate curve with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate was distinctly sigmoidal, and the inhibition was not eliminated at 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate. Malate at 10 millimolar protected all phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from inactivation at 55 C at pH 5.5, but not at pH 8.3. Aspartate did not protect well. When incubated at 37 C at pH 8.3 without phosphoenolpyruvate, but with HCO3−, the enzyme from several C4 grasses lost 92 to 98% of the initial activity after 4 minutes, whereas the enzymes from C3 and C3-C4Panicum species retained 60 to 70% of their activities. In contrast, 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate stabilized the enzyme at 37 C in all plant extracts. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from C3-C4 intermediate Panicum species has properties most similar to the enzyme from C3Panicum species. The higher leaf activity of the enzyme from the intermediate plants than from C3 species is not due to any unusual property assayed other than a higher Vmax. PMID:16661669

  6. Starvation resistance in lake trout fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Manny, Bruce A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    2003-01-01

    Newly hatched fry were acclimated to 7 or 12A?C and either fed daily (controls) or denied food for varying lengths of time and then fed daily until the end of the study (day 91 at 7A?C and day 43 at 12A?C). Growth was reduced by delays in the onset of feeding of 27 or more days at 7A?C and 7 or more days at 12A?C. Mortality of fry unfed for more than 34 days at 7A?C, or more than 21 days at 12A?C, was higher than among controls. Daily mortality increased with the length of the food deprivation period and did not cease immediately when food was made available, but reached zero by the end of the study. Mortality among unfed fry reached 50% in about 59 days at 7A?C and 32 days at 12A?C. Study results permitted calculation of the 'point-of-no-return' (PNR) mortality, which included the mortality that occurred during the period of food deprivation, and also the delayed component of mortality that was directly attributable to starvation and that occurred after food was made available. The PNR for 50% mortality for food-deprived fry occurred after 52 days at 7A?C and 24 days at 12A?C. Thus, both measures of mortality indicate that lake trout fry would be highly resistant to death by starvation in the thermal habitat they would be expected to occupy in the Great Lakes. We conclude that a more likely adverse effect of reduced food availability would result from a reduction in growth rate that extends the length of time fry remain small and vulnerable to predation by adult alewives and other non-native fishes with which they associate.

  7. Increased bioplastic production with an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE during nitrogen starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Numata, Keiji; Oikawa, Akira; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Kan; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-12-01

    Because cyanobacteria directly harvest CO2 and light energy, their carbon metabolism is important for both basic and applied sciences. Here, we show that overexpression of the sigma factor sigE in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 widely changes sugar catabolism and increases production of the biodegradable polyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during nitrogen starvation. sigE overexpression elevates the levels of proteins implicated in glycogen catabolism, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis. PHB accumulation is enhanced by sigE overexpression under nitrogen-limited conditions, yet the molecular weights of PHBs synthesized by the parental glucose-tolerant and sigE overexpression strain are similar. Although gene expression induced by nitrogen starvation is changed and other metabolites (such as GDP-mannose and citrate) accumulate under sigE overexpression, genetic engineering of this sigma factor altered the metabolic pathway from glycogen to PHB during nitrogen starvation. PMID:23861321

  8. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM kinase regulates mitochondrial function, glucose uptake and the carbon starvation response.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  9. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM Kinase Regulates Mitochondrial Function, Glucose Uptake and the Carbon Starvation Response

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  10. Cloning and expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from a cestode parasite and its solubilization from inclusion bodies using l-arginine.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Asim K; Ramnath; Dkhar, Barilin; Tandon, Veena; Das, Bidyadhar

    2016-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is an essential regulatory enzyme of glycolysis in the cestode parasite, Raillietina echinobothrida, and is considered a potential target for anthelmintic action because of its differential activity from that of its avian host. However, due to the unavailability of its structure, the mechanism of regulation of PEPCK from R. echinobothrida (rePEPCK) and its interaction with possible modulators remain unclear. Hence, in this study, the rePEPCK gene was cloned into pGEX-4T-3 and overexpressed for its characterization. On being induced by IPTG, the recombinant rePEPCK was expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs); hence, various agents, like different inducer concentrations, temperature, time, host cell types, culture media, pH, and additives, were used to bring the protein to soluble form. Finally, a significant amount (∼46%) of rePEPCK was solubilized from IBs by adding 2M l-arginine. Near-UV circular dichroism spectra analysis indicated that l-arginine (2M) had no effect on the conformation of the protein. In this study, we have reported a yield of ∼73mg of purified rePEPCK per 1L of culture. The purified rePEPCK retained its biological activity, and Km of the enzyme for its substrate was determined and discussed. The availability of recombinant rePEPCK may help in biochemical- and biophysical-studies to explore its molecular mechanisms and regulations. PMID:26363119

  11. Transgenic plants that express the phytoplasma effector SAP11 show altered phosphate starvation and defense responses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Ting; Li, Meng-Ying; Cheng, Kai-Tan; Tan, Choon Meng; Su, Li-Wen; Lin, Wei-Yi; Shih, Hsien-Tzung; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen; Yang, Jun-Yi

    2014-03-01

    Phytoplasmas have the smallest genome among bacteria and lack many essential genes required for biosynthetic and metabolic functions, making them unculturable, phloem-limited plant pathogens. In this study, we observed that transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing the secreted Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom protein11 shows an altered root architecture, similarly to the disease symptoms of phytoplasma-infected plants, by forming hairy roots. This morphological change is paralleled by an accumulation of cellular phosphate (Pi) and an increase in the expression levels of Pi starvation-induced genes and microRNAs. In addition to the Pi starvation responses, we found that secreted Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom protein11 suppresses salicylic acid-mediated defense responses and enhances the growth of a bacterial pathogen. These results contribute to an improved understanding of the role of phytoplasma effector SAP11 and provide new insights for understanding the molecular basis of plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:24464367

  12. FGF21 and the late adaptive response to starvation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Lun, Mingyue; Kim, Soo M.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Wright, Spenser; Zhang, Yang; Lee, Hang; Catana, Ciprian; Klibanski, Anne; Patwari, Parth; Steinhauser, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    In mice, FGF21 is rapidly induced by fasting, mediates critical aspects of the adaptive starvation response, and displays a number of positive metabolic properties when administered pharmacologically. In humans, however, fasting does not consistently increase FGF21, suggesting a possible evolutionary divergence in FGF21 function. Moreover, many key aspects of FGF21 function in mice have been identified in the context of transgenic overexpression or administration of supraphysiologic doses, rather than in a physiologic setting. Here, we explored the dynamics and function of FGF21 in human volunteers during a 10-day fast. Unlike mice, which show an increase in circulating FGF21 after only 6 hours, human subjects did not have a notable surge in FGF21 until 7 to 10 days of fasting. Moreover, we determined that FGF21 induction was associated with decreased thermogenesis and adiponectin, an observation that directly contrasts with previous reports based on supraphysiologic dosing. Additionally, FGF21 levels increased after ketone induction, demonstrating that endogenous FGF21 does not drive starvation-mediated ketogenesis in humans. Instead, a longitudinal analysis of biologically relevant variables identified serum transaminases — markers of tissue breakdown — as predictors of FGF21. These data establish FGF21 as a fasting-induced hormone in humans and indicate that FGF21 contributes to the late stages of adaptive starvation, when it may regulate the utilization of fuel derived from tissue breakdown. PMID:26529252

  13. UCP2 Regulates the Glucagon Response to Fasting and Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Allister, Emma M.; Robson-Doucette, Christine A.; Prentice, Kacey J.; Hardy, Alexandre B.; Sultan, Sobia; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Kong, Dong; Gilon, Patrick; Herrera, Pedro L.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon is important for maintaining euglycemia during fasting/starvation, and abnormal glucagon secretion is associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes; however, the mechanisms of hypoglycemia-induced glucagon secretion are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that global deletion of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2−/−) in mice impaired glucagon secretion from isolated islets. Therefore, UCP2 may contribute to the regulation of hypoglycemia-induced glucagon secretion, which is supported by our current finding that UCP2 expression is increased in nutrient-deprived murine and human islets. Further to this, we created α-cell–specific UCP2 knockout (UCP2AKO) mice, which we used to demonstrate that blood glucose recovery in response to hypoglycemia is impaired owing to attenuated glucagon secretion. UCP2-deleted α-cells have higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to enhanced mitochondrial coupling, which translated into defective stimulus/secretion coupling. The effects of UCP2 deletion were mimicked by the UCP2 inhibitor genipin on both murine and human islets and also by application of exogenous ROS, confirming that changes in oxidative status and electrical activity directly reduce glucagon secretion. Therefore, α-cell UCP2 deletion perturbs the fasting/hypoglycemic glucagon response and shows that UCP2 is necessary for normal α-cell glucose sensing and the maintenance of euglycemia. PMID:23434936

  14. Enhancement of Na+ Uptake Currents, Time-Dependent Inward-Rectifying K+ Channel Currents, and K+ Channel Transcripts by K+ Starvation in Wheat Root Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Buschmann, Peter H.; Vaidyanathan, Rama; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2000-01-01

    Excessive low-affinity Na+ uptake is toxic to the growth of glycophytic plants. Recently, several reports have suggested that the interaction between K+ and Na+ uptake might represent a key factor in determining the Na+ tolerance of plants. We investigated the effects of K+ starvation on Na+ and K+ uptake mechanisms in the plasma membrane of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) root cortex cells using the patch-clamp technique. Unexpectedly, K+ starvation of wheat seedlings was found to enhance the magnitude and frequency of occurrence of time-dependent inward-rectifying K+ channel currents (IK+in). We examined whether the transcription of a wheat root K+in channel gene is induced by K+ starvation. A cDNA coding for a wheat root K+ channel homolog, TaAKT1 (accession no. AF207745), was isolated. TaAKT1 mRNA levels were up-regulated in roots in response to withdrawal of K+ from the growth medium. Furthermore, K+ starvation caused an enhancement of instantaneous Na+ currents (INa+). Electrophysiological analyses suggested that IK+in and INa+ are not mediated by the same transport protein based on: (a) different activation curves, (b) different time dependencies, (c) different sensitivities to external Ca2+, and (d) different cation selectivities. These data implicate a role for INa+ in Na+ uptake and stress during K+ starvation, and indicate that K+in channels may contribute to K+-starvation-induced K+ uptake in wheat roots. PMID:10759535

  15. Identification of Genes Associated with Resilience/Vulnerability to Sleep Deprivation and Starvation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Thimgan, Matthew S.; Seugnet, Laurent; Turk, John; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: Flies mutant for the canonical clock protein cycle (cyc01) exhibit a sleep rebound that is ∼10 times larger than wild-type flies and die after only 10 h of sleep deprivation. Surprisingly, when starved, cyc01 mutants can remain awake for 28 h without demonstrating negative outcomes. Thus, we hypothesized that identifying transcripts that are differentially regulated between waking induced by sleep deprivation and waking induced by starvation would identify genes that underlie the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation and/or protect flies from the negative consequences of waking. Design: We used partial complementary DNA microarrays to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between cyc01 mutants that had been sleep deprived or starved for 7 h. We then used genetics to determine whether disrupting genes involved in lipid metabolism would exhibit alterations in their response to sleep deprivation. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation and starvation. Measurements and Results: We identified 84 genes with transcript levels that were differentially modulated by 7 h of sleep deprivation and starvation in cyc01 mutants and were confirmed in independent samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Several of these genes were predicted to be lipid metabolism genes, including bubblegum, cueball, and CG4500, which based on our data we have renamed heimdall (hll). Using lipidomics we confirmed that knockdown of hll using RNA interference significantly decreased lipid stores. Importantly, genetically modifying bubblegum, cueball, or hll resulted in sleep rebound alterations following sleep deprivation compared to genetic background controls. Conclusions: We have identified a set of genes that may confer resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation and demonstrate that genes involved in lipid metabolism modulate sleep homeostasis. Citation: Thimgan MS

  16. Complete and Voluntary Starvation of 50 days

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Bradley; Mina, Michelle; Ferrier, Chrystalla

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old obese male (96.8 kg; BMI, 30.2 kg m−1) volitionally undertook a 50-day fast with the stated goal of losing body mass. During this time, only tea, coffee, water, and a daily multivitamin were consumed. Severe and linear loss of body mass is recorded during these 50 days (final 75.4 kg; BMI, 23.5 kg m−1). A surprising resilience to effects of fasting on activity levels and physical function is noted. Plasma samples are suggestive of early impairment of liver function, and perturbations to cardiovascular dynamics are also noted. One month following resumption of feeding behavior, body weight was maintained (75.0 kg; BMI, 23.4 kg m−1). Evidence-based decision-making with the fasting or hunger striking patient is limited by a lack of evidence. This case report suggests that total body mass, not mass lost, may be a key observation in clinical decision-making during fasting and starvation. PMID:27547044

  17. Complete and Voluntary Starvation of 50 days.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Bradley; Mina, Michelle; Ferrier, Chrystalla

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old obese male (96.8 kg; BMI, 30.2 kg m(-1)) volitionally undertook a 50-day fast with the stated goal of losing body mass. During this time, only tea, coffee, water, and a daily multivitamin were consumed. Severe and linear loss of body mass is recorded during these 50 days (final 75.4 kg; BMI, 23.5 kg m(-1)). A surprising resilience to effects of fasting on activity levels and physical function is noted. Plasma samples are suggestive of early impairment of liver function, and perturbations to cardiovascular dynamics are also noted. One month following resumption of feeding behavior, body weight was maintained (75.0 kg; BMI, 23.4 kg m(-1)). Evidence-based decision-making with the fasting or hunger striking patient is limited by a lack of evidence. This case report suggests that total body mass, not mass lost, may be a key observation in clinical decision-making during fasting and starvation. PMID:27547044

  18. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Chao, Michael C.; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIAGlc protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  19. Induction of Rhizopus oryzae germination under starvation using host metabolites increases spore susceptibility to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Turgeman, Tidhar; Kakongi, Nathan; Schneider, Avishai; Vinokur, Yakov; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Carmeli, Shmuel; Levy, Maggie; Skory, Christopher D; Lichter, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2014-03-01

    Sweetpotato is a nutritional source worldwide. Soft rot caused by Rhizopus spp. is a major limiting factor in the storage of produce, rendering it potentially unsafe for human consumption. In this study, Rhizopus oryzae was used to develop a concept of postharvest disease control by weakening the pathogen through induction of spore germination under starvation conditions. We isolated the sweetpotato active fractions (SPAFs) that induce spore germination and used them at a low dose to enhance spore weakening caused by starvation. Germination in SPAF at 1 mg/ml weakened the pathogen spores by delaying their ability to form colonies on rich media and by increasing their sensitivity to heat stress. The weakening effect was also supported by reduced metabolic activity, as detected by Alarmar Blue fluorescent dye assays. Spores incubated with SPAF at 1 mg/ml showed DNA fragmentation in some of their nuclei, as observed by TUNEL assay. In addition, these spores exhibited changes in ultrastructural morphology (i.e., shrinkage of germ tubes, nucleus deformation, and vacuole formation) which are hallmarks of programmed cell death. We suggest that induction of spore germination under starvation conditions increases their susceptibility to stress and, therefore, might be considered a new strategy for pathogen control. PMID:24093921

  20. The putative sigma factor KatF is regulated posttranscriptionally during carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    McCann, M P; Fraley, C D; Matin, A

    1993-04-01

    Transcriptional and translational 'lacZ reporter fusions were constructed to the katF gene, which encodes a putative sigma factor centrally involved in starvation-mediated general resistance in Escherichia coli. Transcription of katF was found to increase ca. twofold after carbon starvation in minimal medium. The protein fusion containing the longest fragment of katF induced ca. eightfold under the same conditions, whereas fusions to shorter segments showed only a twofold increase in expression. The protein fusion was expressed at higher levels in a strain containing a katF::Tn10 mutation, indicating katF autoregulation. The posttranscriptional regulation of katF by starvation did not require a component of the spent minimal medium. katF was also posttranscriptionally regulated during entry into late log phase in complex medium. This induction was coincident with an increase in katE transcription, suggesting that the cellular concentration of KatF directly followed the induction of the katF protein fusion. PMID:8458856

  1. Death from drought in tropical forests is triggered by hydraulics not carbon starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, L.; da Costa, A. C. L.; Galbraith, D. R.; Oliveira, R. S.; Binks, O. J.; Oliveira, A. A. R.; Pullen, A. M.; Doughty, C. E.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Vasconcelos, S. S.; Ferreira, L. V.; Malhi, Y.; Grace, J.; Mencuccini, M.; Meir, P.

    2015-12-01

    Drought threatens tropical rainforests over seasonal to decadal timescales, but the drivers of tree mortality following drought remain poorly understood. It has been suggested that reduced availability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) critically increases mortality risk through insufficient carbon supply to metabolism (‘carbon starvation’). However, little is known about how NSC stores are affected by drought, especially over the long term, and whether they are more important than hydraulic processes in determining drought-induced mortality. Using data from the world’s longest-running experimental drought study in tropical rainforest (in the Brazilian Amazon), we test whether carbon starvation or deterioration of the water-conducting pathways from soil to leaf trigger tree mortality. Biomass loss from mortality in the experimentally droughted forest increased substantially after >10 years of reduced soil moisture availability. The mortality signal was dominated by the death of large trees, which were at a much greater risk of hydraulic deterioration than smaller trees. However, we find no evidence that the droughted trees suffered carbon starvation, as their NSC concentrations were similar to those of non-droughted trees, and growth rates did not decline in either living or dying trees. Our results indicate that hydraulics, rather than carbon starvation, triggers tree death from drought in tropical rainforest.

  2. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2016-06-28

    The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2(L-/-)), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2(L-/-) mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2(L-/-) mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting. PMID:27320917

  3. Phosphate Starvation Responses and Gibberellic Acid Biosynthesis Are Regulated by the MYB62 Transcription Factor in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Devaiah, Ballachanda N.; Madhuvanthi, Ramaiah; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S.; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2009-01-01

    The limited availability of phosphate (Pi) in most soils results in the manifestation of Pi starvation responses in plants. To dissect the transcriptional regulation of Pi stress-response mechanisms, we have characterized the biological role of MYB62, an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor that is induced in response to Pi deficiency. The induction of MYB62 is a specific response in the leaves during Pi deprivation. The MYB62 protein localizes to the nucleus. The overexpression of MYB62 resulted in altered root architecture, Pi uptake, and acid phosphatase activity, leading to decreased total Pi content in the shoots. The expression of several Pi starvation-induced (PSI) genes was also suppressed in the MYB62 overexpressing plants. Overexpression of MYB62 resulted in a characteristic gibberellic acid (GA)-deficient phenotype that could be partially reversed by exogenous application of GA. In addition, the expression of SOC1 and SUPERMAN, molecular regulators of flowering, was suppressed in the MYB62 overexpressing plants. Interestingly, the expression of these genes was also reduced during Pi deprivation in wild-type plants, suggesting a role for GA biosynthetic and floral regulatory genes in Pi starvation responses. Thus, this study highlights the role of MYB62 in the regulation of phosphate starvation responses via changes in GA metabolism and signaling. Such cross-talk between Pi homeostasis and GA might have broader implications on flowering, root development and adaptive mechanisms during nutrient stress. PMID:19529828

  4. Depletion of p18/LAMTOR1 promotes cell survival via activation of p27(kip1) -dependent autophagy under starvation.

    PubMed

    Zada, Sahib; Noh, Hae Sook; Baek, Seon Mi; Ha, Ji Hye; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Kim, Deok Ryong

    2015-11-01

    The MAPK and mTOR signal pathways in endosomes or lysosomes play a crucial role in cell survival and death. They are also closely associated with autophagy, a catabolic process highly regulated under various cellular stress or nutrient deprivation. Recently we have isolated a protein, named p18/LAMTOR1, that specifically regulates the ERK or mTOR pathway in lysosomes. p18/LAMTOR1 also interacts with p27(kip1) . Here we examined how p18/LAMTOR1 plays a role in autophagy under nutrient deprivation. The p18(+/+) MEF cells were more susceptible to cell death under starvation or in the presence of AICAR in comparison with p18(-/-) MEF cells. Cleavage of caspase-3 was increased in p18(+/+) MEF cells under starvation, and phosphorylation at the threonine 198 of p27(kip1) was highly elevated in starved p18(-/-) MEF cells. Furthermore, LC3-II formation and other autophagy-associated proteins were largely increased in p18-deficient cells, and suppression of p27(kip1) expression in p18(-/-) MEF cells mitigated starvation-induced cell death. These data suggest that ablation of p18/LAMTOR1 suppresses starvation-induced cell death by stimulating autophagy through modulation of p27(kip1) activity. PMID:26032166

  5. Inactivation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by the Binding to Chloroplast Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Xian; Wedding, Randolph T.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) purified from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves associates with maize leaf chloroplast membrane in vitro. The binding of PEPC to the membrane results in enzyme inactivation. A protein isolated from a maize leaf chloroplast membrane preparation inactivated PEPC. Treatment with membrane preparation or with partially purified inactivating protein accelerates PEPC inactivation at low temperature (4°C). Interaction of PEPC with chloroplast membrane or inactivating protein may inactivate the enzyme by influencing dissociation of the enzyme active tetramer. PMID:16652972

  6. [Effects of different growth rates in weaned piglets, starvation and hormonal action, on various metabolic parameters in the blood plasma].

    PubMed

    Dvorák, M

    1979-05-01

    Changes in concentrations of metabolites of the main nutrients in the blood plasma, caused by weaning and by different body weight gains, by starvation, exogenous adrenaline and ASTH administration were studied in 141 weaned piglets of the Large White breed at an age of 26 to 69 days. After weaning, the total protein level showed a faster decrease in the intensively growing piglets than in those with lower growth rates. This rapid decrease was induced by adrenaline. The post-weaning levels of glucose decreased irrespective of the growth rate of the piglets. Adrenaline caused hyperglycaemia and, after 48 hours of starvation, hypoglycaemia. Urea levels significantly increased after weaning. During starvation they remained unchanged, even under exposure to hormonal effects. Cholesterol concentration decreased after weaning, after ACTH and adrenaline administration also showed a decrease. The concentration of non-esterified fatty acids decreased after weaning, the decrease being more pronounced in the piglets with less intensive growth. The action of adrenaline, ACTH, together with an increased level of glucocorticoids, increased the concentration of these acids even in the state of starvation. It is assumed that early piglet weaning implies great metabolic changes which need not impair growth if their character is transient. The author evaluates the suitability of the starter used and parameters chosen for the determination of the metabolic profile of pigs. PMID:223271

  7. The role of carbon starvation in the induction of enzymes that degrade plant-derived carbohydrates in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Daly, Paul; Delmas, Stéphane; Pullan, Steven T.; Blythe, Martin J.; Malla, Sunir; Kokolski, Matthew; Noltorp, Emelie C.M.; Wennberg, Kristin; Fetherston, Richard; Beniston, Richard; Yu, Xiaolan; Dupree, Paul; Archer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are an important source of enzymes for saccharification of plant polysaccharides and production of biofuels. Understanding of the regulation and induction of expression of genes encoding these enzymes is still incomplete. To explore the induction mechanism, we analysed the response of the industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger to wheat straw, with a focus on events occurring shortly after exposure to the substrate. RNA sequencing showed that the transcriptional response after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw was very different from the response at 24 h of exposure to the same substrate. For example, less than half of the genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes that were induced after 24 h of exposure to wheat straw, were also induced after 6 h exposure. Importantly, over a third of the genes induced after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw were also induced during 6 h of carbon starvation, indicating that carbon starvation is probably an important factor in the early response to wheat straw. The up-regulation of the expression of a high number of genes encoding CAZymes that are active on plant-derived carbohydrates during early carbon starvation suggests that these enzymes could be involved in a scouting role during starvation, releasing inducing sugars from complex plant polysaccharides. We show, using proteomics, that carbon-starved cultures indeed release CAZymes with predicted activity on plant polysaccharides. Analysis of the enzymatic activity and the reaction products, indicates that these proteins are enzymes that can degrade various plant polysaccharides to generate both known, as well as potentially new, inducers of CAZymes. PMID:24792495

  8. Phosphate starvation enhances the pathogenesis of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Somya; Somani, Vikas Kumar; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the factors responsible for survival and virulence of Bacillus anthracis within the host is prerequisite for the development of therapeutics against anthrax. Host provides several stresses as well as many advantages to the invading pathogen. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation within the host has been considered as one of the major contributing factors in the establishment of infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Here, we report for the first time that Pi fluctuation encountered by B. anthracis at different stages of its life cycle within the host, contributes significantly in its pathogenesis. In this study, Pi starvation was found to hasten the onset of infection cycle by promoting spore germination. After germination, it was found to impede cell growth. In addition, phosphate starved bacilli showed more antibiotic tolerance. Interestingly, phosphate starvation enhanced the pathogenicity of B. anthracis by augmenting its invasiveness in macrophages in vitro. B. anthracis grown under phosphate starvation were also found to be more efficient in establishing lethal infections in mouse model as well. Phosphate starvation increased B. anthracis virulence by promoting the secretion of primary virulence factors like protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Thus, this study affirms that besides other host mediated factors, phosphate limitation may also contribute B. anthracis for successfully establishing itself within the host. This study is a step forward in delineating its pathophysiology that might help in understanding the pathogenesis of anthrax. PMID:26143397

  9. Adaptive response to starvation in the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: cell viability and ultrastructural changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ecology of columnaris disease, caused by Flavobacterium columnare, is poorly understood despite the economic losses that this disease inflicts on aquaculture farms worldwide. Currently, the natural reservoir for this pathogen is unknown but limited data have shown its ability to survive in water for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to describe the ultrastructural changes that F. columnare cells undergo under starvation conditions. Four genetically distinct strains of this pathogen were monitored for 14 days in media without nutrients. Culturability and cell viability was assessed throughout the study. In addition, cell morphology and ultrastructure was analyzed using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Revival of starved cells under different nutrient conditions and the virulence potential of the starved cells were also investigated. Results Starvation induced unique and consistent morphological changes in all strains studied. Cells maintained their length and did not transition into a shortened, coccus shape as observed in many other Gram negative bacteria. Flavobacterium columnare cells modified their shape by morphing into coiled forms that comprised more than 80% of all the cells after 2 weeks of starvation. Coiled cells remained culturable as determined by using a dilution to extinction strategy. Statistically significant differences in cell viability were found between strains although all were able to survive in absence of nutrients for at least 14 days. In later stages of starvation, an extracellular matrix was observed covering the coiled cells. A difference in growth curves between fresh and starved cultures was evident when cultures were 3-months old but not when cultures were starved for only 1 month. Revival of starved cultures under different nutrients revealed that cells return back to their original elongated rod shape upon encountering nutrients. Challenge

  10. Analysis of starvation effects on hydrodynamic lubrication in nonconforming contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-fill-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  11. The Response of Acinetobacter baumannii to Zinc Starvation.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Brittany L; Lonergan, Zachery R; Wang, Jiefei; Braymer, Joseph J; Zhang, Yaofang; Calcutt, M Wade; Lisher, John P; Gilston, Benjamin A; Chazin, Walter J; de Crécy-Lagard, Valerie; Giedroc, David P; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-06-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential metal that vertebrates sequester from pathogens to protect against infection. Investigating the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii's response to Zn starvation, we identified a putative Zn metallochaperone, ZigA, which binds Zn and is required for bacterial growth under Zn-limiting conditions and for disseminated infection in mice. ZigA is encoded adjacent to the histidine (His) utilization (Hut) system. The His ammonia-lyase HutH binds Zn very tightly only in the presence of high His and makes Zn bioavailable through His catabolism. The released Zn enables A. baumannii to combat host-imposed Zn starvation. These results demonstrate that A. baumannii employs several mechanisms to ensure bioavailability of Zn during infection, with ZigA functioning predominately during Zn starvation, but HutH operating in both Zn-deplete and -replete conditions to mobilize a labile His-Zn pool. PMID:27281572

  12. Discovery of PPi-type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Genes in Eukaryotes and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoko; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is one of the pivotal enzymes that regulates the carbon flow of the central metabolism by fixing CO2 to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to produce oxaloacetate or vice versa. Whereas ATP- and GTP-type PEPCKs have been well studied, and their protein identities are established, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi)-type PEPCK (PPi-PEPCK) is poorly characterized. Despite extensive enzymological studies, its protein identity and encoding gene remain unknown. In this study, PPi-PEPCK has been identified for the first time from a eukaryotic human parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, by conventional purification and mass spectrometric identification of the native enzyme, followed by demonstration of its enzymatic activity. A homolog of the amebic PPi-PEPCK from an anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii also exhibited PPi-PEPCK activity. The primary structure of PPi-PEPCK has no similarity to the functional homologs ATP/GTP-PEPCKs and PEP carboxylase, strongly suggesting that PPi-PEPCK arose independently from the other functional homologues and very likely has unique catalytic sites. PPi-PEPCK homologs were found in a variety of bacteria and some eukaryotes but not in archaea. The molecular identification of this long forgotten enzyme shows us the diversity and functional redundancy of enzymes involved in the central metabolism and can help us to understand the central metabolism more deeply. PMID:26269598

  13. Carbon dioxide metabolism by Capnocytophaga ochracea: identification, characterization, and regulation of a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed Central

    Kapke, P A; Brown, A T; Lillich, T T

    1980-01-01

    Cell suspensions of Capnocytophaga ochracea incorporated [14C]NaHCO3 into a major four-carbon fermentation product, succinate, and cell-free extracts from this organism contained high levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). PEPCK is the major, if not the only, CO2(HCO-3)-fixing enzyme in C. ochracea since cell-free extracts were devoid of pyruvate-dependent and other phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent CO2(HCO-3)-fixing enzymes. The reaction products of the enzyme, which was partially purified by diethylaminoethylcellulose column chromatography, were identified as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and oxalacetate. The enzyme showed maximum activity when manganese (Mn2+) was the divalent cation in the incubation mixture, and it had an absolute requirement for the nucleoside 5-'diphosphate adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP). PEPCK showed a sigmoidal kinetic response to the Mn2+ concentration and homotropic interactions in its kinetic responses to each of its three substrates PEP, ADP, and CO2(HCO-3). The (S)0.5v values for Mn2+, PEP, ADP, and CO2(CHO-3) were approximately 0.08, 0.3, 0.1, and 10 mM, respectively, and Hill coefficients for these same ligands were 2.60, 1.7, 1.9, and 3.0, respectively. In addition, C. ochracea PEPCK is under metabolic control by the nucleoside -5'-triphosphate ATP, and it also showed a sigmoidal kinetic response to this allosteric effector. The Hill coefficient for ATP was 2.70. PMID:6769807

  14. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from the Green Alga Selenastrum minutum1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Plaxton, William C.; Turpin, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Two isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) with very different regulatory properties were partially purified from the green alga Selenastrum minutum. They were designated PEPC1 and PEPC2. PEPC1 showed sigmoidal kinetics with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) whereas PEPC2 exhibited a typical Michaelis-Menten response. The S0.5(PEP) of PEPC1 was 2.23 millimolar. This was fourfold greater than the S0.5(PEP) of PEPC2, which was 0.57 millimolar. PEPC1 was activated more than fourfold by 2.0 millimolar glutamine and sixfold by 2.0 millimolar dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) at a subsaturating PEP concentration of 0.625 millimolar. In contrast, PEPC2 showed only 8% and 52% activation by glutamine and DHAP, respectively. The effects of glutamine and DHAP were additive. PEPC1 was more sensitive to inhibition by glutamate, 2-oxoglutarate, and aspartate than PEPC2. Both isoforms were equally inhibited by malate. All of these metabolites affected only the S0.5(PEP) not the Vmax. The regulatory properties of S. minutum PEPC in vitro are discussed in terms of (a) increased rates of dark carbon fixation (shown to be catalyzed predominantly by PEPC) and (b) changes in metabolite levels in vivo during enhanced NH4+ assimilation. Finally, a model is proposed for the regulation of PEPC in vivo in relation to its role in replenishing tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates consumed in NH4+ assimilation. PMID:16667617

  15. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C. PMID:27391465

  16. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C. PMID:27391465

  17. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) is a pro-survival, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response gene involved in tumor cell adaptation to nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Hyroššová, Petra; Novellasdemunt, Laura; Viñals, Francesc; Perales, Jose C

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M), encoded by the nuclear PCK2 gene, links TCA cycle intermediates and glycolytic pools through the conversion of mitochondrial oxaloacetate into phosphoenolpyruvate. In the liver PEPCK-M adjoins its profusely studied cytosolic isoform (PEPCK-C) potentiating gluconeogenesis and TCA flux. However, PEPCK-M is present in a variety of non-gluconeogenic tissues, including tumors of several origins. Despite its potential relevance to cancer metabolism, the mechanisms responsible for PCK2 gene regulation have not been elucidated. The present study demonstrates PEPCK-M overexpression in tumorigenic cells as well as the mechanism for the modulation of PCK2 abundance under several stress conditions. Amino acid limitation and ER stress inducers, conditions that activate the amino acid response (AAR) and the unfolded protein response (UPR), stimulate PCK2 gene transcription. Both the AAR and UPR lead to increased synthesis of ATF4, which mediates PCK2 transcriptional up-regulation through its binding to a putative ATF/CRE composite site within the PCK2 promoter functioning as an amino acid response element. In addition, activation of the GCN2-eIF2α-ATF4 and PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 signaling pathways are responsible for increased PEPCK-M levels. Finally, PEPCK-M knockdown using either siRNA or shRNA were sufficient to reduce MCF7 mammary carcinoma cell growth and increase cell death under glutamine deprivation or ER stress conditions. Our data demonstrate that this enzyme has a critical role in the survival program initiated upon stress and shed light on an unexpected and important role of mitochondrial PEPCK in cancer metabolism. PMID:24973213

  18. Heat and phosphate starvation effects on the proteome, morphology and chemical composition of the biomining bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela A; Maretto, Danilo A; Nogueira, Fábio C S; Silva, Márcio J; Campos, Francisco A P; Domont, Gilberto B; Poppi, Ronei J; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2011-06-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a Gram negative, acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that plays an important role in metal bioleaching. During bioleaching, the cells are subjected to changes in the growth temperature and nutrients starvation. The aim of this study was to gather information about the response of the A.ferrooxidans Brazilian strain LR to K2HPO4 starvation and heat stress through investigation of cellular morphology, chemical composition and differential proteome. The scanning electron microscopic results showed that under the tested stress conditions, A. ferrooxidans cells became elongated while the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis showed alterations in the wavenumbers between 850 and 1,275 cm(-1), which are related to carbohydrates, phospholipids and phosphoproteins. These findings indicate that the bacterial cell surface is affected by the tested stress conditions. A proteomic analysis, using 2-DE and tandem mass spectrometry, enabled the identification of 44 differentially expressed protein spots, being 30 due to heat stress (40°C) and 14 due to K2HPO4 starvation. The identified proteins belonged to 11 different functional categories, including protein fate, energy metabolism and cellular processes. The upregulated proteins were mainly from protein fate and energy metabolism categories. The obtained results provide evidences that A. ferrooxidans LR responds to heat stress and K2HPO4 starvation by inducing alterations in cellular morphology and chemical composition of the cell surface. Also, the identification of several proteins involved in protein fate suggests that the bacteria cellular homesostasis was affected. In addition, the identification of proteins from different functional categories indicates that the A. ferrooxidans response to higher than optimal temperatures and phosphate starvation involves global changes in its physiology. PMID:25187146

  19. The pepper phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CaPEPCK1 is involved in plant immunity against bacterial and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a member of the lyase family, is involved in the metabolic pathway of gluconeogenesis in organisms. Although the major function of PEPCK in gluconeogenesis is well established, it is unclear whether this enzyme is involved in plant immunity. Here, we isolated and identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) PEPCK (CaPEPCK1) gene from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPEPCK1 was strongly expressed in pepper leaves during the incompatible interaction with avirulent Xcv and in response to environmental stresses, especially salicylic acid (SA) treatment. PEPCK activity was low in healthy leaves but dramatically increased in avirulent Xcv-infected leaves. Knock-down expression of CaPEPCK1 by virus-induced gene silencing resulted in high levels of susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. CaPEPCK1 silencing in pepper compromised induction of the basal defense-marker genes CaPR1 (pathogenesis-related 1 protein), CaPR10 (pathogenesis-related 10 protein) and CaDEF1 (defensin) during Xcv infection. SA accumulation was also significantly suppressed in the CaPEPCK1-silenced pepper leaves infected with Xcv. CaPEPCK1 in an Arabidopsis overexpression (OX) line inhibited the proliferation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa). CaPEPCK1-OX plants developed more rapidly, with enlarged leaves, compared to wild-type plants. The T-DNA insertion Arabidopsis orthologous mutants pck1-3 and pck1-4 were more susceptible to the bacterial Pst and oomycete Hpa pathogens than the wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPEPCK positively contributes to plant innate immunity against hemibiotrophic bacterial and obligate biotrophic oomycete pathogens. PMID:26233534

  20. Fibroblast growth factor rescues brain endothelial cells lacking presenilin 1 from apoptotic cell death following serum starvation

    PubMed Central

    Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; De Gasperi, Rita; Hof, Patrick R.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (Psen1) is important for vascular brain development and is known to influence cellular stress responses. To understand the role of Psen1 in endothelial stress responses, we investigated the effects of serum withdrawal on wild type (wt) and Psen1−/− embryonic brain endothelial cells. Serum starvation induced apoptosis in Psen1−/− cells but did not affect wt cells. PI3K/AKT signaling was reduced in serum-starved Psen1−/− cells, and this was associated with elevated levels of phospho-p38 consistent with decreased pro-survival AKT signaling in the absence of Psen1. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF1 and FGF2), but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) rescued Psen1−/− cells from serum starvation induced apoptosis. Inhibition of FGF signaling induced apoptosis in wt cells under serum withdrawal, while blocking γ-secretase activity had no effect. In the absence of serum, FGF2 immunoreactivity was distributed diffusely in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles of wt and Psen1−/− cells, as levels of FGF2 in nuclear and cytosolic fractions were not significantly different. Thus, sensitivity of Psen1−/− cells to serum starvation is not due to lack of FGF synthesis but likely to effects of Psen1 on FGF release onto the cell surface and impaired activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway. PMID:27443835

  1. Fibroblast growth factor rescues brain endothelial cells lacking presenilin 1 from apoptotic cell death following serum starvation.

    PubMed

    Gama Sosa, Miguel A; De Gasperi, Rita; Hof, Patrick R; Elder, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (Psen1) is important for vascular brain development and is known to influence cellular stress responses. To understand the role of Psen1 in endothelial stress responses, we investigated the effects of serum withdrawal on wild type (wt) and Psen1-/- embryonic brain endothelial cells. Serum starvation induced apoptosis in Psen1-/- cells but did not affect wt cells. PI3K/AKT signaling was reduced in serum-starved Psen1-/- cells, and this was associated with elevated levels of phospho-p38 consistent with decreased pro-survival AKT signaling in the absence of Psen1. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF1 and FGF2), but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) rescued Psen1-/- cells from serum starvation induced apoptosis. Inhibition of FGF signaling induced apoptosis in wt cells under serum withdrawal, while blocking γ-secretase activity had no effect. In the absence of serum, FGF2 immunoreactivity was distributed diffusely in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles of wt and Psen1-/- cells, as levels of FGF2 in nuclear and cytosolic fractions were not significantly different. Thus, sensitivity of Psen1-/- cells to serum starvation is not due to lack of FGF synthesis but likely to effects of Psen1 on FGF release onto the cell surface and impaired activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway. PMID:27443835

  2. Calnexin Is Essential for Survival under Nitrogen Starvation and Stationary Phase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Rokeach, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell fate is determined by the balance of conserved molecular mechanisms regulating death (apoptosis) and survival (autophagy). Autophagy is a process by which cells recycle their organelles and macromolecules through degradation within the vacuole in yeast and plants, and lysosome in metazoa. In the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, autophagy is strongly induced under nitrogen starvation and in aging cells. Previously, we demonstrated that calnexin (Cnx1p), a highly conserved transmembrane chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), regulates apoptosis under ER stress or inositol starvation. Moreover, we showed that in stationary phase, Cnx1p is cleaved into two moieties, L_Cnx1p and S_Cnx1p. Here, we show that the processing of Cnx1p is regulated by autophagy, induced by nitrogen starvation or cell aging. The cleavage of Cnx1p involves two vacuolar proteases: Isp6, which is essential for autophagy, and its paralogue Psp3. Blocking autophagy through the knockout of autophagy-related genes (atg) results in inhibition of both, the cleavage and the trafficking of Cnx1p from the ER to the vacuole. We demonstrate that Cnx1p is required for cell survival under nitrogen-starvation and in chronological aging cultures. The death of the mini_cnx1 mutant (overlapping S_cnx1p) cells is accompanied by accumulation of high levels of reactive-oxygen species (ROS), a slowdown in endocytosis and severe cell-wall defects. Moreover, mutant cells expressing only S_Cnx1p showed cell wall defects. Co-expressing mutant overlapping the L_Cnx1p and S_Cnx1p cleavage products reverses the death, ROS phenotype and cell wall defect to wild-type levels. As it is involved in both apoptosis and autophagy, Cnx1p could be a nexus for the crosstalk between these pro-death and pro-survival mechanisms. Ours, and observations in mammalian systems, suggest that the multiple roles of calnexin depend on its sub-cellular localization and on its cleavage. The use of S. pombe should assist in further

  3. Long Term Effects of Infant Starvation on Learning Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Pnina S.; And Others

    This study investigated the specific learning abilities and general adjustment of 50 children, 5-14 years of age, who had pyloric stenosis (PS) in infancy, compared to 44 siblings and 50 matched control children. PS involves a period of brief starvation in early infancy, unrelated to socioeconomic conditions and is surgically correctable. The…

  4. Proteomic Adaptations to Starvation Prepare Escherichia coli for Disinfection Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. PMID:25463932

  5. Transcriptome and metabolome analysis of plant sulfate starvation and resupply provides novel information on transcriptional regulation of metabolism associated with sulfur, nitrogen and phosphorus nutritional responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka, Monika; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Morcuende, Rosa; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Hesse, Holger; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Reaching a thorough understanding of the molecular basis for changes in plant metabolism depending on the sulfur-nutritional status at the systems level will advance our basic knowledge and help target future crop improvement. Although the transcriptional responses induced by sulfate starvation have been studied in the past, knowledge of the regulation of sulfur metabolism is still fragmentary. This work focuses on the discovery of candidates for regulatory genes such as transcription factors (TFs) using ‘omics technologies. For this purpose a short term sulfate-starvation/re-supply approach was used. ATH1 microarray studies and metabolite determinations yielded 21 TFs which responded more than 2-fold at the transcriptional level to sulfate starvation. Categorization by response behaviors under sulfate-starvation/re-supply and other nutrient starvations such as nitrate and phosphate allowed determination of whether the TF genes are specific for or common between distinct mineral nutrient depletions. Extending this co-behavior analysis to the whole transcriptome data set enabled prediction of putative downstream genes. Additionally, combinations of transcriptome and metabolome data allowed identification of relationships between TFs and downstream responses, namely, expression changes in biosynthetic genes and subsequent metabolic responses. Effect chains on glucosinolate and polyamine biosynthesis are discussed in detail. The knowledge gained from this study provides a blueprint for an integrated analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics and application for the identification of uncharacterized genes. PMID:25674096

  6. [Effect of starvation and acetone on the enzyme systems of biotransformation and toxicity of xenobiotics--CYP2E1 substrates in rats].

    PubMed

    Kachula, S O; Pentiuk, O O

    2004-01-01

    In experiments on 205 rats it was fixed, that starvation during 2-3 days, as well as introduction of acetone (250 and 1000 mg/kg) considerably increases CYP2E1-dependent aniline and p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity in the liver, kidneys, lungs and CYP3A dependent erythromycin N-demethylase activity, at the same time, suppress in a liver activity enzymes, dependent CYP2D, CYP1A2 and CYP2C as well as of activity UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase, sulfotransferase and glutathione-S-transferase. The starvation causes accumulation of KoA and increases activity of N-acetyltransferase in the liver. Starvation induces the change of enzymes activity and correlates with the intensifying of the processes of lipolysis, glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis and, especially, ketogenesis which are appreciably initiated by introduction of acetone. The starvation and introduction of acetone increases metabolism of acetanilide and brombenzene, and, increasing the formation of toxic metabolites, raise its hepato-, nephro- and pulmotoxicity. The starvation attenuates elimination of indometacin from blood plasma, but intensifies conjugation of sulfadimidine with acetic acid. PMID:15909426

  7. Comparison of starvation and elastase models of emphysema in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Mauderly, J.L.; Gregory, R.E.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Starvation and elastase-induced changes in rat lung structure, biochemistry, and function were compared as models of human pulmonary emphysema. Ten-week-old male rats were instilled intratracheally with either porcine pancreatic elastase in saline (E) or with saline alone. A group of the saline-instilled rats were fed one third of their normal food intake until a 45% loss of body weight occurred (S). The remaining saline-instilled rats served as control animals (C). Post-treatment evaluations included in vivo respiratory function, lung histopathologic and morphometric analyses, lung tissue proteinolytic activity, and lung collagen. The E rats had in vivo respiratory function changes more similar to human emphysema than those of S rats. All lung volume subdivisions were decreased in S rats and increased in E rats. The volume-pressure curve of S rats was shifted to the right of the C curve, whereas that of E rats was shifted to the left. Forced expiratory flow rates of E rats were decreased at all lung volumes, but those of S rats were not. Both E and S rats had larger terminal air spaces and less alveolar surface area than did C rats. The S rats had more collagen per gram lung and higher proteinolytic activity than did C or E rats. These results show that, although starvation induces some changes characteristic of human emphysema, elastase-treatment provides a model more similar to the human disease. 44 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Effect of nitrogen starvation on desiccation tolerance of Arctic Microcoleus strains (cyanobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Tashyreva, Daria; Elster, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although desiccation tolerance of Microcoleus species is a well-known phenomenon, there is very little information about their limits of desiccation tolerance in terms of cellular water content, the survival rate of their cells, and the environmental factors inducing their resistance to drying. We have discovered that three Microcoleus strains, isolated from terrestrial habitats of the High Arctic, survived extensive dehydration (to 0.23 g water g-1 dry mass), but did not tolerate complete desiccation (to 0.03 g water g-1 dry mass) regardless of pre-desiccation treatments. However, these treatments were critical for the survival of incomplete desiccation: cultures grown under optimal conditions failed to survive even incomplete desiccation; a low temperature enabled only 0–15% of cells to survive, while 39.8–65.9% of cells remained alive and intact after nitrogen starvation. Unlike Nostoc, which co-exists with Microcoleus in Arctic terrestrial habitats, Microcoleus strains are not truly anhydrobiotic and do not possess constitutive desiccation tolerance. Instead, it seems that the survival strategy of Microcoleus in periodically dry habitats involves avoidance of complete desiccation, but tolerance to milder desiccation stress, which is induced by suboptimal conditions (e.g., nitrogen starvation). PMID:25904909

  9. CREB1-driven expression of miR-320a promotes mitophagy by down-regulating VDAC1 expression during serum starvation in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The altered expression of miRNAs in response to stresses contributes to cancer pathogenesis. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which cellular stresses drive alterations in miRNA expression. Here, we found that serum starvation enhanced mitophagy by downregulating the mitophagy-associated protein voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and by inducing the expression of miR-320a and the transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding protein 1(CREB1). Furthermore, we cloned the promoter of miR-320a and identified the core promoter of miR-320a in the upstream −16 to −130 region of pre-miR-320a. Moreover, CREB1 was found to bind to the promoter of miR-320a to activate its expression and to induce mitophagy during serum starvation. Collectively, our results reveal a new mechanism underlying serum starvation-induced mitophagy in which serum starvation induces CREB1 expression, in turn activating miR-320a expression, which then down-regulates VDAC1 expression to facilitate mitophagy. These findings may provide new insights into cancer cell survival in response to environmental stresses. PMID:26472185

  10. Immunolocalization of carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in developing seeds of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Aivalakis, Georgios; Dimou, Maria; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Plati, Fotini; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Drossopoulos, J B

    2004-03-01

    To investigate the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) during Medicago sativa seed development, the distribution of both proteins was examined using an immunohistological approach. Both enzymes are co-localized in most ovular and embryonic tissues. In early stages of seed development, both proteins were abundant in embryo and integuments, while at subsequent stages both proteins are accumulated in endosperm, nucellus and integuments. At late stages of seed development when both endosperm and nucellus are degraded, significant accumulation of both proteins was observed in the embryo proper. Chlorophyll was found to accumulate in embryos after the heart stage and reached a maximum at mature stage. It is suggested that CA and PEPC play a role in respiratory carbon dioxide refixation while generating malate to support amino acid and/or fatty acids biosynthesis. PMID:15051041

  11. The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is involved in sensitivity to the glucosylated bacteriocin sublancin.

    PubMed

    Garcia De Gonzalo, C V; Denham, E L; Mars, R A T; Stülke, J; van der Donk, W A; van Dijl, J M

    2015-11-01

    The mode of action of a group of glycosylated antimicrobial peptides known as glycocins remains to be elucidated. In the current study of one glycocin, sublancin, we identified the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus species as a key player in bacterial sensitivity. Sublancin kills several Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus species and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Unlike other classes of bacteriocins for which the PTS is involved in their mechanism of action, we show that the addition of PTS-requiring sugars leads to increased resistance rather than increased sensitivity, suggesting that sublancin has a distinct mechanism of action. Collectively, our present mutagenesis and genomic studies demonstrate that the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) and domain A of enzyme II (PtsG) in particular are critical determinants for bacterial sensitivity to sublancin. PMID:26282429

  12. Expression of Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in a cyanobacterium. Functional complementation of Synechococcus PCC 7942 ppc.

    PubMed Central

    Luinenburg, I; Coleman, J R

    1993-01-01

    The gene (ppc) coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 has been inactivated via insertional mutagenesis while being functionally complemented by Escherichia coli ppc. Cyanobacterial cells functionally complemented by E. coli ppc showed decreased PEPCase activity in crude cell lysates and detergent-permeabilized whole cell assays. Decreased rates of growth, reduced levels of chlorophyll a, and decreased photosynthetic O2 evolution capacity per cell when compared to wild-type cyanobacterial cells were also observed. Phycobiliprotein levels were not affected. The results are discussed in terms of the impact of reduced PEPCase activity on cyanobacterial cell metabolism and the regulatory properties of the E. coli gene product. PMID:8278492

  13. The Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System Is Involved in Sensitivity to the Glucosylated Bacteriocin Sublancin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia De Gonzalo, C. V.; Denham, E. L.; Mars, R. A. T.; Stülke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The mode of action of a group of glycosylated antimicrobial peptides known as glycocins remains to be elucidated. In the current study of one glycocin, sublancin, we identified the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus species as a key player in bacterial sensitivity. Sublancin kills several Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus species and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Unlike other classes of bacteriocins for which the PTS is involved in their mechanism of action, we show that the addition of PTS-requiring sugars leads to increased resistance rather than increased sensitivity, suggesting that sublancin has a distinct mechanism of action. Collectively, our present mutagenesis and genomic studies demonstrate that the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) and domain A of enzyme II (PtsG) in particular are critical determinants for bacterial sensitivity to sublancin. PMID:26282429

  14. Lack of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction in the rat liver by starvation without coprophagy.

    PubMed

    Chung, H C; Sung, S H; Kim, J S; Kim, Y C; Kim, S G

    2001-03-01

    Starvation potentiates the hepatotoxicity of a variety of small molecules, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and nitrosamines, through the induction of CYP2E1. A change in CYP2E1 expression during starvation may also alter the pharmacokinetic profiles of xenobiotics. Northern blot and Western blot analyses revealed that hepatic CYP2E1 was not induced during starvation in rats placed in metabolic or wire-bottom cages in contrast to the induction of CYP2E1 in animals housed in solid-bottom cages. We studied the effect of coprophagy on the expression of hepatic CYP2E1 during starvation. The extent of coprophagy was 24% in fed rats. Fecal matter of starving rats was reduced to 14% of control and starving rats re-ingested ~1.6 g of feces per day. The effect of fecal matter on CYP2E1 expression (i.e., 1.6 g/kg/day for 3 days) was assessed in fed or starving rats. Starving rats gavaged with fecal matter for 3 days resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in the level of CYP2E1 mRNA, while fed rats gavaged with feces failed to show an increase in the mRNA. The increase in the CYP2E1 mRNA level accompanied the induction of CYP2E1. Starving rats gavaged with methanol extract of feces (500 mg/kg/day for 3 days) showed a 3.3-fold increase in CYP2E1 mRNA level in the liver. These results provide evidence that CYP2E1 is not induced by starvation without coprophagy, raising the contention that the mechanistic basis for CYP2E1 induction by starvation should be reevaluated. PMID:11181486

  15. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Michal

    2016-01-01

    In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism. PMID:26978071

  16. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michal

    2016-01-01

    In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism. PMID:26978071

  17. The effect of ram-pressure stripping and starvation on the star formation properties of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.

    2009-12-01

    We have combined UV to radio centimetric observations of resolved galaxies in the Virgo cluster with multizone, chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution especially tailored to take into account the effects of the cluster environment (ram pressure stripping and starvation). This exercise has shown that anemic spirals with truncated radial profiles of the gas component and of the young stellar populations, typical in rich clusters of galaxies, have been perturbed by a recent (˜100 Myr) ram pressure stripping event induced by their interaction with the cluster intergalactic medium. Starvation is not able to reproduce the observed truncated radial profiles. Both ram pressure and starvation induce a decrease of the stellar surface brightness of the perturbed disc, and thus can hardly be invoked to explain the formation of lenticular galaxies inhabiting rich clusters, which are characterised by higher surface brightnesses than early type spirals of similar luminosity. In dwarfs the ram pressure stripping event is so efficient to totally remove their gas thus stopping on short time scales (<2 Gyr) their star formation activity. Low luminosity star forming discs can be transformed in dE galaxies.

  18. The effect of starvation on the larval behavior of two forensically important species of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder; Bala, Madhu

    2009-12-15

    The postfeeding larval stage in blow flies is generally an irreversible condition when the fully grown third instar larvae stop feeding and give no response towards food. The larvae of most species then disperse away from their feeding medium and pupariate. There are several cases reported about the use of postfeeding larvae as forensic evidence. It is a matter of common observation that the postfeeding stage can be reached earlier than the expected time if food becomes unavailable. However, no information is available on whether postfeeding stage induced by scarcity of food is also irreversible. Similarly, the minimum period of development required by the larvae of different blow flies species to enable their survival as postfeeding larvae and pupariation in the absence of food is unknown. It was observed during the present studies that the larvae of two Chrysomya species must feed for at least 35 h at 28 degrees C in order to be capable of reaching the postfeeding stage and subsequent pupariation. Duration of the starvation period required to induce postfeeding behavior decreases with increasing age of larvae. In the case of Chrysomya megacephala, 35, 45, 55 and 65 h old larvae attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 30, 20, 12 and 2 h of starvation, respectively. Similarly, larvae of Chrysomya rufifacies that were 35, 45, 55 and 60 h old attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 25, 16, 6 and 2 h of starvation, respectively. PMID:19892500

  19. SIRT1 and circadian gene expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Effect of starvation.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Francesca; Pazienza, Valerio; Fontana, Andrea; Burbaci, Francesca Paola; Panebianco, Concita; Saracino, Chiara; Lombardi, Lucia; De Bonis, Antonio; di Mola, Fabio Francesco; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Piepoli, Ada; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Fracavilla, Massimo; Giuliani, Francesco; Rubino, Rosa; Andriulli, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC), the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths, is characterized by high aggressiveness and resistance to chemotherapy. Pancreatic carcinogenesis is kept going by derangement of essential cell processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism and autophagy, characterized by rhythmic variations with 24-h periodicity driven by the biological clock. We assessed the expression of the circadian genes ARNLT, ARNLT2, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, PER3, CRY1, CRY2 and the starvation-activated histone/protein deacetylase SIRT1 in 34 matched tumor and non-tumor tissue specimens of PC patients, and evaluated in PC derived cell lines if the modulation of SIRT1 expression through starvation could influence the temporal pattern of expression of the circadian genes. We found a significant down-regulation of ARNLT (p = 0.015), CRY1 (p = 0.013), CRY2 (p = 0.001), PER1 (p < 0.0001), PER2 (p < 0.001), PER3 (p = 0.001) and SIRT1 (p = 0.017) in PC specimens. PER3 and CRY2 expression levels were lower in patients with jaundice at diagnosis ( < 0.05). Having adjusted for age, adjuvant therapy and tumor stage, we evidenced that patients with higher PER2 and lower SIRT1 expression levels showed lower mortality (p = 0.028). Levels and temporal patterns of expression of many circadian genes and SIRT1 significantly changed upon serum starvation in vitro, with differences among four different PC cell lines examined (BXPC3, CFPAC, MIA-PaCa-2 and PANC-1). Serum deprivation induced changes of the overall mean level of the wave and amplitude, lengthened or shortened the cycle time and phase-advanced or phase-delayed the rhythmic oscillation depending on the gene and the PC cell line examined. In conclusion, a severe deregulation of expression of SIRT1 and circadian genes was evidenced in the cancer specimens of PC patients, and starvation influenced gene expression in PC cell lines, suggesting that the altered interplay between SIRT1 and

  20. GmPTF1, a novel transcription factor gene, is involved in conferring soybean tolerance to phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Li, X H; Wu, B; Kong, Y B; Zhang, C Y

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus plays a pivotal role in plant growth and development. In this study, we isolated and characterized GmPTF1, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor (TF) gene from soybean (Glycine max) with tolerance to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. Alignment analysis indicated that GmPTF1 and other reported bHLH TFs share significant similarity in the region of the bHLH domain. As with OsPTF1 and other homologous Pi starvation-related bHLH TFs (His-5, Glu-9, Arg-12, and Arg-13), all recognition motifs for the G-box (CACGTG) were present in the GmPTF1 domain. Prokaryotic expression in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) plysS showed that a novel 40-kDa polypeptide was expressed when cells containing GmPTF1 were induced. The subcellular localization in cells from onion epidermis and Arabidopsis roots demonstrated that the GmPTF1 protein was found in the nucleus. Furthermore, analysis of transcription activity in yeast revealed that full-length GmPTF1 and its N-terminal and C-terminal domains could activate the histidine, adenine, and uracil reporter genes. This suggested that the N-terminal and C-terminal peptides of GmPTF1 act as transcriptional activators. When real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed, the expression of GmPTF1 under conditions of phosphate starvation was significantly induced in soybean roots of the low-Pi-tolerant variety ZH15. Moreover, the relative level of expression was much higher there than in roots of the sensitive variety NMH from days 7 to 56 of low-Pi stress. These results imply that GmPTF1 is involved in conferring tolerance to phosphate starvation in soybean. PMID:24634113

  1. AMPK and PKA interaction in the regulation of survival of liver cancer cells subjected to glucose starvation

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Anabela C.; Tonucci, Facundo M.; Hidalgo, Florencia; Almada, Evangelina; Larocca, Maria C.; Favre, Cristián

    2016-01-01

    The signaling pathways that govern survival response in hepatic cancer cells subjected to nutritional restriction have not been clarified yet. In this study we showed that liver cancer cells undergoing glucose deprivation both arrested in G0/G1 and died mainly by apoptosis. Treatment with the AMPK activator AICAR phenocopied the effect of glucose deprivation on cell survival, whereas AMPK silencing in HepG2/C3A, HuH-7 or SK-Hep-1 cells blocked the cell cycle arrest and the increase in apoptotic death induced by glucose starvation. Both AMPK and PKA were promptly activated after glucose withdrawal. PKA signaling had a dual role during glucose starvation: whereas it elicited an early decreased in cell viability, it later improved this parameter. We detected AMPK phosphorylation (AMPKα(Ser173)) by PKA, which was increased in glucose starved cells and was associated with diminution of AMPK activation. To better explore this inhibitory effect, we constructed a hepatocarcinoma derived cell line which stably expressed an AMPK mutant lacking that PKA phosphorylation site: AMPKα1(S173C). Expression of this mutant significantly decreased viability in cells undergoing glucose starvation. Furthermore, after 36 h of glucose deprivation, the index of AMPKα1(S173C) apoptotic cells doubled the apoptotic index observed in control cells. Two main remarks arise: 1. AMPK is the central signaling kinase in the scenario of cell cycle arrest and death induced by glucose starvation in hepatic cancer cells; 2. PKA phosphorylation of Ser173 comes out as a strong control point that limits the antitumor effects of AMPK in this situation. PMID:26894973

  2. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  3. An immunological strategy To monitor In situ the phosphate starvation state in thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed

    Varela; Levican; Rivera; Jerez

    1998-12-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is one of the chemolithoautotrophic bacteria important in industrial biomining operations. During the process of ore bioleaching, the microorganisms are subjected to several stressing conditions, including the lack of some essential nutrients, which can affect the rates and yields of bioleaching. When T. ferrooxidans is starved for phosphate, the cells respond by inducing the synthesis of several proteins, some of which are outer membrane proteins of high molecular weight (70,000 to 80,000). These proteins were considered to be potential markers of the phosphate starvation state of these microorganisms. We developed a single-cell immunofluorescence assay that allowed monitoring of the phosphate starvation condition of this biomining microorganism by measuring the increased expression of the surface proteins. In the presence of low levels of arsenate (2 mM), the growth of phosphate-starved T. ferrooxidans cells was greatly inhibited compared to that of control nonstarved cells. Therefore, the determination of the phosphorus nutritional state is particularly relevant when arsenic compounds are solubilized during the bioleaching of different ores. PMID:9835593

  4. CtaA of Staphylococcus aureus Is Required for Starvation Survival, Recovery, and Cytochrome Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Mark O.; Watson, Sean P.; Poole, Robert K.; Foster, Simon J.

    1999-01-01

    A Staphylococcus aureus mutant (SPW3) apparently unable to survive long-term starvation was shown to have a transposon insertion within a gene homologous to ctaA of Bacillus subtilis which encodes a heme A synthase. Analysis of the cytochrome profiles of SPW3 revealed the absence of heme A-containing cytochromes compared to the parental 8325-4 strain. SPW3 demonstrated a 100-fold reduction in the ability to survive starvation induced by glucose limitation, under aerated conditions, compared to 8325-4. Analysis of starved cultures revealed that greater than 90% of the cells which demonstrated metabolism (as shown by rhodamine 123 accumulation) were unable to recover and form colonies on agar. Analysis of the lag phase and initial growth kinetics of those cells which could recover also showed a defect. This recovery defect could be partially alleviated by the inclusion of catalase in the recovery medium, indicating the probable involvement of oxidative stress. SPW3 also exhibited reduced colony size similar to that of a small-colony variant, increased resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, and reduced hemolysin and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 production, but no alteration in the ability to form lesions in a subcutaneous mouse infection model. PMID:9882664

  5. A role for adenine nucleotides in the sensing mechanism to purine starvation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Yates, Phillip A; Boitz, Jan M; Koop, Dennis R; Fulwiler, Audrey L; Cassera, Maria Belen; Ullman, Buddy; Carter, Nicola S

    2016-07-01

    Purine salvage by Leishmania is an obligatory nutritional process that impacts both cell viability and growth. Previously, we have demonstrated that the removal of purines in culture provokes significant metabolic changes that enable Leishmania to survive prolonged periods of purine starvation. In order to understand how Leishmania sense and respond to changes in their purine environment, we have exploited several purine pathway mutants, some in which adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism is uncoupled. While wild type parasites grow in any one of a variety of naturally occurring purines, the proliferation of these purine pathway mutants requires specific types or combinations of exogenous purines. By culturing purine pathway mutants in high levels of extracellular purines that are either permissive or non-permissive for growth and monitoring for previously defined markers of the adaptive response to purine starvation, we determined that adaptation arises from a surveillance of intracellular purine nucleotide pools rather than from a direct sensing of the extracellular purine content of the environment. Specifically, our data suggest that perturbation of intracellular adenine-containing nucleotide pools provides a crucial signal for inducing the metabolic changes necessary for the long-term survival of Leishmania in a purine-scarce environment. PMID:27062185

  6. Role of the evolutionarily conserved starvation response in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, D S; Horton, R Y; Aamodt, E J

    2011-06-01

    This review will summarize recent findings concerning the biological regulation of starvation as it relates to anorexia nervosa (AN), a serious eating disorder that mainly affects female adolescents and young adults. AN is generally viewed as a psychosomatic disorder mediated by obsessive concerns about weight, perfectionism and an overwhelming desire to be thin. By contrast, the thesis that will be developed here is that, AN is primarily a metabolic disorder caused by defective regulation of the starvation response, which leads to ambivalence towards food, decreased food consumption and characteristic psychopathology. We will trace the starvation response from yeast to man and describe the central role of insulin (and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1))/Akt/ F-box transcription factor (FOXO) signaling in this response. Akt is a serine/threonine kinase downstream of the insulin and IGF-1 receptors, whereas FOXO refers to the subfamily of Forkhead box O transcription factors, which are regulated by Akt. We will also discuss how initial bouts of caloric restriction may alter the production of neurotransmitters that regulate appetite and food-seeking behavior and thus, set in motion a vicious cycle. Finally, an integrated approach to treatment will be outlined that addresses the biological aspects of AN. PMID:20838399

  7. Remodeling of secretory compartments creates CUPS during nutrient starvation.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Garcia, David; Curwin, Amy J; Popoff, Jean-François; Bruns, Caroline; Duran, Juan M; Malhotra, Vivek

    2014-12-22

    Upon starvation, Grh1, a peripheral membrane protein located at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit sites and early Golgi in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under growth conditions, relocates to a compartment called compartment for unconventional protein secretion (CUPS). Here we report that CUPS lack Golgi enzymes, but contain the coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle tethering protein Uso1 and the Golgi t-SNARE Sed5. Interestingly, CUPS biogenesis is independent of COPII- and COPI-mediated membrane transport. Pik1- and Sec7-mediated membrane export from the late Golgi is required for complete assembly of CUPS, and Vps34 is needed for their maintenance. CUPS formation is triggered by glucose, but not nitrogen starvation. Moreover, upon return to growth conditions, CUPS are absorbed into the ER, and not the vacuole. Altogether our findings indicate that CUPS are not specialized autophagosomes as suggested previously. We suggest that starvation triggers relocation of secretory and endosomal membranes, but not their enzymes, to generate CUPS to sort and secrete proteins that do not enter, or are not processed by enzymes of the ER-Golgi pathway of secretion. PMID:25512390

  8. Effects of starvation on bacterial transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Alfred B.; Sharp, Robert R.; Caccavo, Frank; Gerlach, Robin

    2007-06-01

    A major problem preventing widespread implementation of microbial injection strategies for bioremediation and/or microbially enhanced oil recovery is the tendency of bacteria to strongly adhere to surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the injection point. Long term (weeks to months) nutrient starvation of bacteria prior to injection can decrease attachment and enhance transport through porous media. This paper summarizes results of starvation-enhanced transport experiments in sand columns of 30 cm, 3 m, and 16 m in length. The 16 m column experiments compared transport, breakthrough and distribution of adhered cells for starved and vegetative cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca, a copious biofilm producer. Results from these experiments were subsequently used to design and construct a field-scale biofilm barrier using starved Pseudomonas fluorescens. The 30 cm and 3 m sand columns experiments investigated starvation-enhanced transport of Shewanella algae BrY, a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In both cases the vegetative cells adsorbed onto the sand in higher numbers than the starved cells, especially near the entrance of the column. These results, taken together with studies cited in the literature, indicate that starved cells penetrate farther (i.e. higher breakthrough concentration) and adsorb more uniformly along the flow path than vegetative cells.

  9. Natural malaria infection reduces starvation resistance of nutritionally stressed mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lalubin, Fabrice; Delédevant, Aline; Glaizot, Olivier; Christe, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    In disease ecology, there is growing evidence that environmental quality interacts with parasite and host to determine host susceptibility to an infection. Most studies of malaria parasites have focused on the infection costs incurred by the hosts, and few have investigated the costs on mosquito vectors. The interplay between the environment, the vector and the parasite has therefore mostly been ignored and often relied on unnatural or allopatric Plasmodium/vector associations. Here, we investigated the effects of natural avian malaria infection on both fecundity and survival of field-caught female Culex pipiens mosquitoes, individually maintained in laboratory conditions. We manipulated environmental quality by providing mosquitoes with different concentrations of glucose-feeding solution prior to submitting them to a starvation challenge. We used molecular-based methods to assess mosquitoes' infection status. We found that mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium had lower starvation resistance than uninfected ones only under low nutritional conditions. The effect of nutritional stress varied with time, with the difference of starvation resistance between optimally and suboptimally fed mosquitoes increasing from spring to summer, as shown by a significant interaction between diet treatment and months of capture. Infected and uninfected mosquitoes had similar clutch size, indicating no effect of infection on fecundity. Overall, this study suggests that avian malaria vectors may suffer Plasmodium infection costs in their natural habitat, under certain environmental conditions. This may have major implications for disease transmission in the wild. PMID:24286465

  10. Correlation between fouling propensity of soluble extracellular polymeric substances and sludge metabolic activity altered by different starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siang Chen; Lee, Chi Mei

    2011-05-01

    Soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) cause membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs), correlated with MBR sludge characteristics. Effects of F/M ratios on the evolution of soluble EPSs, fouling propensity of supernatants, and sludge metabolic activity were measured in this study in a two-period sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental results show that fouling propensity was directly correlated with soluble-EPS concentration and composition. Sludge that had entirely lost active cells by long-term starvation released 64.4 ± 0.9 mg/L of humic acids, which caused a rapid increase in membrane resistance (40.67 ± 2.24 × 10(11) m(-1)) during fouling tests. During short-term starvation, induced by incubation at a normal to low F/M ratio of 0.05 d(-1), sludge can use previously secreted utilization-associated products (UAPs) to maintain endogenous respiration. Therefore, the strategies of accumulating sludge and prolonging sludge retention time in MBRs may create long-term starvation and promote membrane fouling. PMID:21163646

  11. An engineered lipid remodeling system using a galactolipid synthase promoter during phosphate starvation enhances oil accumulation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shimojima, Mie; Madoka, Yuka; Fujiwara, Ryota; Murakawa, Masato; Yoshitake, Yushi; Ikeda, Keiko; Koizumi, Ryota; Endo, Keiji; Ozaki, Katsuya; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) depletion is a serious problem for plant growth. Membrane lipid remodeling is a defense mechanism that plants use to survive Pi-depleted conditions. During Pi starvation, phospholipids are degraded to supply Pi for other essential biological processes, whereas galactolipid synthesis in plastids is up-regulated via the transcriptional activation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase 3 (MGD3). Thus, the produced galactolipids are transferred to extraplastidial membranes to substitute for phospholipids. We found that, Pi starvation induced oil accumulation in the vegetative tissues of various seed plants without activating the transcription of enzymes involved in the later steps of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. Moreover, the Arabidopsis starchless phosphoglucomutase mutant, pgm-1, accumulated higher TAG levels than did wild-type plants under Pi-depleted conditions. We generated transgenic plants that expressed a key gene involved in TAG synthesis using the Pi deficiency–responsive MGD3 promoter in wild-type and pgm-1 backgrounds. During Pi starvation, the transgenic plants accumulated higher TAG amounts compared with the non-transgenic plants, suggesting that the Pi deficiency–responsive promoter of galactolipid synthase in plastids may be useful for producing transgenic plants that accumulate more oil under Pi-depleted conditions. PMID:26379690

  12. AMPK-Dependent Phosphorylation of GAPDH Triggers Sirt1 Activation and Is Necessary for Autophagy upon Glucose Starvation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chunmei; Su, Hua; Zhang, Danhong; Wang, Yusha; Shen, Qiuhong; Liu, Bo; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Tianhua; Peng, Chao; Wong, Catherine C L; Shen, Han-Ming; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Liu, Wei

    2015-12-17

    Eukaryotes initiate autophagy to cope with the lack of external nutrients, which requires the activation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1). However, the mechanisms underlying the starvation-induced Sirt1 activation for autophagy initiation remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a conventional glycolytic enzyme, is a critical mediator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-driven Sirt1 activation. Under glucose starvation, but not amino acid starvation, cytoplasmic GAPDH is phosphorylated on Ser122 by activated AMPK. This causes GAPDH to redistribute into the nucleus. Inside the nucleus, GAPDH interacts directly with Sirt1, displacing Sirt1's repressor and causing Sirt1 to become activated. Preventing this shift of GAPDH abolishes Sirt1 activation and autophagy, while enhancing it, through overexpression of nuclear-localized GAPDH, increases Sirt1 activation and autophagy. GAPDH is thus a pivotal and central regulator of autophagy under glucose deficiency, undergoing AMPK-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation to activate Sirt1 deacetylase activity. PMID:26626483

  13. OsPTF1, a Novel Transcription Factor Involved in Tolerance to Phosphate Starvation in Rice1[w

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Keke; Wu, Zhongchang; Zhou, Jie; Du, Liming; Guo, Longbiao; Wu, Yunrong; Wu, Ping

    2005-01-01

    We report here on a novel transcription factor with a basic helix-loop-helix domain for tolerance to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation in rice (Oryza sativa). The gene is designated OsPTF1. The expression of OsPTF1 is Pi starvation induced in roots while constitutively expressed in shoots, as shown by northern-blot analysis. Overexpression of OsPTF1 enhanced tolerance to Pi starvation in transgenic rice. Tillering ability, root and shoot biomass, and phosphorus content of transgenic rice plants were about 30% higher than those of the wild-type plants in Pi-deficient conditions in hydroponic experiments. In soil pot and field experiments, more than 20% increase in tiller number, panicle weight, and phosphorus content was observed in transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants at low-Pi levels. In Pi-deficient conditions, transgenic rice plants showed significantly higher total root length and root surface area, which results in a higher instantaneous Pi uptake rate over their wild-type counterparts. Microarray analysis for transgenic plants overexpressing OsPTF1 has been performed to investigate the downstream regulation of OsPTF1. PMID:16006597

  14. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods. PMID:26942684

  15. Phosphate Starvation Triggers Distinct Alterations of Genome Expression in Arabidopsis Roots and Leaves1[w

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Ma, Ligeng; Hou, Xingliang; Wang, Mingyi; Wu, Yungrong; Liu, Feiyan; Deng, Xing Wang

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis genome expression pattern changes in response to phosphate (Pi) starvation were examined during a 3-d period after removal of Pi from the growth medium. Available Pi concentration was decreased after the first 24 h of Pi starvation in roots by about 22%, followed by a slow recovery during the 2nd and 3rd d after Pi starvation, but no significant change was observed in leaves within the 3 d of Pi starvation. Microarray analysis revealed that more than 1,800 of the 6,172 genes present in the array were regulated by 2-fold or more within 72 h from the onset of Pi starvation. Analysis of these Pi starvation-responsive genes shows that they belong to wide range of functional categories. Many genes for photosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation were down-regulated. A complex set of metabolic adaptations appears to occur during Pi starvation. More than 100 genes each for transcription factors and cell-signaling proteins were regulated in response to Pi starvation, implying major regulatory changes in cellular growth and development. A significant fraction of those regulatory genes exhibited distinct or even contrasting expression in leaves and roots in response to Pi starvation, supporting the idea that distinct Pi starvation response strategies are used for different plant organs in response to a shortage of Pi in the growth medium. PMID:12857808

  16. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. PMID:24845200

  17. Distinct roles for the p53-like transcription factor XprG and autophagy genes in the response to starvation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Margaret E; Buckland, Rebecca; Hunter, Cameron C; Todd, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy and autolysis are two cannibalistic pathways which allow filamentous fungi to obtain nutrients once environmental nutrient sources are exhausted. In Aspergillus nidulans, the effects of mutations in two key autophagy genes, atgA, the ATG1 ortholog, and atgH, the ATG8 ortholog, were compared with mutations in xprG, which encodes a transcriptional activator that plays a key role in autolysis. The anti-fungal drug rapamycin induces autophagy in a range of organisms. Mutations in atgA and atgH did not alter sensitivity to rapamycin, which inhibits growth and asexual spore production (conidiation), indicating that autophagy is not required for rapamycin sensitivity in A. nidulans. In contrast, inhibition of conidiation by rapamcyin was partially suppressed by the xprG1 gain-of-function mutation, indicating that XprG acts in the pathway(s) affected by rapamycin. It was anticipated that the absence of an intact autophagy pathway would accelerate the response to starvation. However, extracellular and intracellular protease production in response to carbon or nitrogen starvation was not increased in the atgAΔ and atgHΔ mutants, and the onset of autolysis was not accelerated. Compared to wild-type strains and the xprGΔ and xprG1 mutants, conidiation of the autophagy mutants was reduced in carbon- or nitrogen-limiting conditions but not during growth on nutrient-sufficient medium. Nuclear localization of the global nitrogen regulator AreA in response to nitrogen starvation was blocked in the xprG2 loss-of-function mutant, but not in the atgHΔ mutant. Conversely, the atgAΔ mutation but not the xprGΔ mutation prevented vacuolar accumulation of GFP-AtgH, a hallmark of autophagy. These results indicate that in A. nidulans there is little interaction between autophagy and autolysis and the two pathways are activated in parallel during starvation. PMID:26296599

  18. Salt stress leads to differential expression of two isogenes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during Crassulacean acid metabolism induction in the common ice plant.

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, J C; Meyer, G; Michalowski, C B; Schmitt, J M; Bohnert, H J

    1989-01-01

    The common ice plant is a facultative halophyte in which Crassulacean acid metabolism, a metabolic adaptation to arid environments, can be induced by irrigating plants with high levels of NaCl or by drought. This stress-induced metabolic transition is accompanied by up to a 50-fold increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase). To analyze the molecular basis of this plant response to water stress, we have isolated and characterized two members of the PEPCase gene family from the common ice plant. The PEPCase isogenes, designated Ppc1 and Ppc2, have conserved intron-exon organizations, are 76.4% identical at the nucleotide sequence level within exons, and encode predicted polypeptides with 83% amino acid identity. Steady-state levels of mRNAs from the two genes differ dramatically when plants are salt-stressed. Transcripts of Ppc1 increase about 30-fold in leaves within 5 days of salt stress. In contrast, steady-state levels of Ppc2 transcripts decrease slightly in leaf tissue over the same stress period. Steady-state levels of transcripts of both genes decrease in roots over 5 days of salt stress. We have used in vitro transcription assays with nuclei isolated from leaves to demonstrate that the increased expression of Ppc1 caused by water stress occurs in part at the transcriptional level. PMID:2535520

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase, a Key Enzyme That Controls Blood Glucose, Is a Target of Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Shima, Akiho; Kuramoto, Daisuke; Kikumoto, Daisuke; Matsui, Takashi; Michihara, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes a committed and rate-limiting step in hepatic gluconeogenesis, and its activity is tightly regulated to maintain blood glucose levels within normal limits. PEPCK activity is primarily regulated through hormonal control of gene transcription. Transcription is additionally regulated via a cAMP response unit, which includes a cAMP response element and four binding sites for CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP). Notably, the cAMP response unit also contains a putative response element for retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα). In this paper, we characterize the effect of the RORα response element on cAMP-induced transcription. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay indicates that RORα binds this response element in a sequence-specific manner. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays indicate that RORα interacts with C/EBP at the PEPCK promoter to synergistically enhance transcription. We also found that cAMP-induced transcription depends in part on RORα and its response element. In addition, we show that suppression of RORα by siRNA significantly decreased PEPCK transcription. Finally, we found that a RORα antagonist inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis in an in vitro glucose production assay. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that PEPCK is a direct RORα target. These results define possible new roles for RORα in hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:26383638

  20. Structural and functional analysis of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene from the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7.

    PubMed Central

    Inui, M; Dumay, V; Zahn, K; Yamagata, H; Yukawa, H

    1997-01-01

    The ppc gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), from Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7 was cloned and sequenced. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start site 42 bp upstream of the ppc initiation codon. An R. palustris No. 7 PEPC-deficient strain showed a slower doubling time compared with the wild-type strain either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark, when pyruvate was used as a carbon source. PMID:9244286

  1. Effect of Nitrate and Ammonium Nutrition of Nonnodulated Phaseolus vulgaris L. on Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Pyruvate Kinase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Patrick; Erismann, Karl H.

    1985-01-01

    Young bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) were fed with 3.5 or 10 millimolar N in either the form of NO3− or NH4+, after being grown on N-free nutrient solution for 8 days. The pH of the nutrient solutions was either 6 or 4. The cell sap pH and the extractable activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and of pyruvate kinase from roots and primary leaves were measured over several days. The extractable activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (based on soluble protein) from primary leaves increased with NO3− nutrition, whereas with NH4+ nutrition and on N-free nutrient solution the activity remained at a low level. Phosphoenopyruvate carboxylase activity from the roots of NH4+-fed plants at pH 4 was finally somewhat higher than from the roots of plants grown on NO3− at the same pH. There was no difference in activity from the root between the N treatments when pH in the nutrient solutions was 6. The extractable activity of pyruvate kinase from roots and primary leaves seemed not to be influenced by the N nutrition of the plants. The results are discussed in relation to the physiological function of both enzymes with special regard to the postulated functions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C3 plants as an anaplerotic enzyme and as part of a cellular pH stat. PMID:16664265

  2. Effects of sigmaS and the transcriptional activator AppY on induction of the Escherichia coli hya and cbdAB-appA operons in response to carbon and phosphate starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Atlung, T; Knudsen, K; Heerfordt, L; Brøndsted, L

    1997-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation of two energy metabolism operons, hya and cbdAB-appA, has been investigated during carbon and phosphate starvation. The hya operon encodes hydrogenase 1, and the cbdAB-appA operon encodes cytochrome bd-II oxidase and acid phosphatase, pH 2.5. Both operons are targets for the transcriptional activator AppY. In exponential growth, expression of the hya and cbd operons was reduced in an rpoS mutant lacking the RNA polymerase sigmaS factor, and the induction of the two operons by entry into stationary phase in rich medium was strongly dependent on sigmaS. Both operons were induced by carbon starvation, but only induction of the hya operon was dependent on sigmaS, whereas that of the cbd promoter was dependent on AppY. The appY gene also showed sigmaS-dependent induction by carbon starvation. The cbd and hya operons were also found to exhibit a sigmaS-dependent transient twofold induction by osmotic upshift. Like the cbd operon, the hya operon was highly induced by phosphate starvation. For both operons the induction was strongly dependent on AppY. The induction ratio of the two operons was the same in rpoS+ and rpoS mutant strains, indicating that the phosphate starvation-induced increase in sigmaS concentration is not involved in the phosphate regulation of these operons. PMID:9079897

  3. Effects of sigmaS and the transcriptional activator AppY on induction of the Escherichia coli hya and cbdAB-appA operons in response to carbon and phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Atlung, T; Knudsen, K; Heerfordt, L; Brøndsted, L

    1997-04-01

    The transcriptional regulation of two energy metabolism operons, hya and cbdAB-appA, has been investigated during carbon and phosphate starvation. The hya operon encodes hydrogenase 1, and the cbdAB-appA operon encodes cytochrome bd-II oxidase and acid phosphatase, pH 2.5. Both operons are targets for the transcriptional activator AppY. In exponential growth, expression of the hya and cbd operons was reduced in an rpoS mutant lacking the RNA polymerase sigmaS factor, and the induction of the two operons by entry into stationary phase in rich medium was strongly dependent on sigmaS. Both operons were induced by carbon starvation, but only induction of the hya operon was dependent on sigmaS, whereas that of the cbd promoter was dependent on AppY. The appY gene also showed sigmaS-dependent induction by carbon starvation. The cbd and hya operons were also found to exhibit a sigmaS-dependent transient twofold induction by osmotic upshift. Like the cbd operon, the hya operon was highly induced by phosphate starvation. For both operons the induction was strongly dependent on AppY. The induction ratio of the two operons was the same in rpoS+ and rpoS mutant strains, indicating that the phosphate starvation-induced increase in sigmaS concentration is not involved in the phosphate regulation of these operons. PMID:9079897

  4. Ketogenic diet-fed rats have increased fat mass and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Letícia C; Chittó, Ana L; Müller, Alexandre P; Rocha, Juliana K; Castro da Silva, Mariane; Quincozes-Santos, André; Nardin, Patrícia; Rotta, Liane N; Ziegler, Denize R; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Da Silva, Roselis S M; Perry, Marcos L S; Gottfried, Carmem

    2008-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD), characterized by high fat and low carbohydrate and protein contents, has been proposed to be beneficial in children with epilepsy disorders not helped by conventional anti-epileptic drug treatment. Weight loss and inadequate growth is an important drawback of this diet and metabolic causes are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine body weight variation during KD feeding for 6 wk of Wistar rats; fat mass and adipocyte cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were also observed. PEPCK activity was determined based on the [H(14)CO(3) (-)]-oxaloacetate exchange reaction. KD-fed rats gained weight at a less rapid rate than normal-fed rats, but with a significant increment in fat mass. The fat mass/body weight ratio already differed between ketogenic and control rats after the first week of treatment, and was 2.4 x higher in ketogenic rats. The visceral lipogenesis was supported by an increment in adipocyte PEPCK, aiming to provide glycerol 3-phosphate to triacylglycerol synthesis and this fat accumulation was accompanied by glucose intolerance. These data contribute to our understanding of the metabolic effects of the KD in adipose tissue and liver and suggest some potential risks of this diet, particularly visceral fat accumulation. PMID:18655006

  5. Gluconeogenesis in Leishmania mexicana: contribution of glycerol kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Hamilton, Nicklas

    2014-11-21

    Gluconeogenesis is an active pathway in Leishmania amastigotes and is essential for their survival within the mammalian cells. However, our knowledge about this pathway in trypanosomatids is very limited. We investigated the role of glycerol kinase (GK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) in gluconeogenesis by generating the respective Leishmania mexicana Δgk, Δpepck, and Δppdk null mutants. Our results demonstrated that indeed GK, PEPCK, and PPDK are key players in the gluconeogenesis pathway in Leishmania, although stage-specific differences in their contribution to this pathway were found. GK participates in the entry of glycerol in promastigotes and amastigotes; PEPCK participates in the entry of aspartate in promastigotes, and PPDK is involved in the entry of alanine in amastigotes. Furthermore, the majority of alanine enters into the pathway via decarboxylation of pyruvate in promastigotes, whereas pathway redundancy is suggested for the entry of aspartate in amastigotes. Interestingly, we also found that l-lactate, an abundant glucogenic precursor in mammals, was used by Leishmania amastigotes to synthesize mannogen, entering the pathway through PPDK. On the basis of these new results, we propose a revision in the current model of gluconeogenesis in Leishmania, emphasizing the differences between amastigotes and promastigotes. This work underlines the importance of studying the trypanosomatid intracellular life cycle stages to gain a better understanding of the pathologies caused in humans. PMID:25288791

  6. Utilization of Substrate Intrinsic Binding Energy for Conformational Change and Catalytic Function in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Mcleod, Matthew J; Holyoak, Todd

    2016-01-26

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Previous work has demonstrated that the enzyme cycles between a catalytically inactive open state and a catalytically active closed state. The transition of the enzyme between these states requires the transition of several active site loops to shift from mobile, disordered structural elements to stable ordered states. The mechanism by which these disorder-order transitions are coupled to the ligation state of the active site however is not fully understood. To further investigate the mechanisms by which the mobility of the active site loops is coupled to enzymatic function and the transitioning of the enzyme between the two conformational states, we have conducted structural and functional studies of point mutants of E89. E89 is a proposed key member of the interaction network of mobile elements as it resides in the R-loop region of the enzyme active site. These new data demonstrate the importance of the R-loop in coordinating interactions between substrates at the OAA/PEP binding site and the mobile R- and Ω-loop domains. In turn, the studies more generally demonstrate the mechanisms by which the intrinsic ligand binding energy can be utilized in catalysis to drive unfavorable conformational changes, changes that are subsequently required for both optimal catalytic activity and fidelity. PMID:26709450

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is regulated by redox mechanisms and interaction with thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Machová, Iva; Snašel, Jan; Zimmermann, Michael; Laubitz, Daniel; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Dostál, Jiři; Sauer, Uwe; Pichová, Iva

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major health concern worldwide. Eradication of its causative agent, the bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is particularly challenging due to a vast reservoir of latent carriers of the disease. Despite the misleading terminology of a so-called dormant state associated with latent infections, the bacteria have to maintain basic metabolic activities. Hypoxic conditions have been widely used as an in vitro system to study this dormancy. Such studies identified a rearrangement of central carbon metabolism to exploit fermentative processes caused by the lack of oxygen. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck; EC 4.1.1.32) is the enzyme at the center of these metabolic rearrangements. Although Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis under standard growth conditions, the enzyme can catalyze the reverse reaction, supporting anaplerosis of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, under conditions leading to slowed or stopped bacterial replication. To study the mechanisms that regulate the switch between two Pck functions, we systematically investigated factors influencing the gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reaction kinetics. We demonstrate that a reducing environment, as found under hypoxia-triggered non-replicating conditions, accelerates the reaction in the anaplerotic direction. Furthermore, we identified proteins that interact with Pck. The interaction between Pck and the reduced form of mycobacterial thioredoxin, gene expression of which is increased under hypoxic conditions, also increased the Pck anaplerotic activity. We thus propose that a reducing environment and the protein-protein interaction with thioredoxin in particular enable the Pck anaplerotic function under fermentative growth conditions. PMID:24659783

  8. Deregulation of feedback inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase for improved lysine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Frank, Doinita; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) controls the metabolic flux distribution of anaplerotic pathways. In this study, the feedback inhibition of Corynebacterium glutamicum PEPC was rationally deregulated, and its effect on metabolic flux redistribution was evaluated. Based on rational protein design, six PEPC mutants were designed, and all of them showed significantly reduced sensitivity toward aspartate and malate inhibition. Introducing one of the point mutations (N917G) into the ppc gene, encoding PEPC of the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum LC298, resulted in ∼37% improved lysine production. In vitro enzyme assays and (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis showed ca. 20 and 30% increases in the PEPC activity and corresponding flux, respectively, in the mutant strain. Higher demand for NADPH in the mutant strain increased the flux toward pentose phosphate pathway, which increased the supply of NADPH for enhanced lysine production. The present study highlights the importance of allosteric regulation on the flux control of central metabolism. The strategy described here can also be implemented to improve other oxaloacetate-derived products. PMID:24334667

  9. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from cherimoya fruit: properties, kinetics and effects of high CO(2).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, T; Escribano, M I; Merodio, C

    2001-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) regulatory properties were studied in non-photosynthetic (mesocarp) and photosynthetic (peel) tissues from cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) fruit stored in air, in order to gain a better understanding of in vivo enzyme regulation. Analyses were also performed with fruit treated with 20% CO(2)-20% O(2) to define the role of PEPC as part of an adaptive mechanism to high external carbon dioxide levels. The results revealed that the special kinetic characteristics of the enzyme from mesocarp--high V(max) and low sensibility to L-malate inhibition - are related to the active acid metabolism of these fruits and point to a high rate of reassimilation of respired CO(2) into keto-acids. With respect to fruit stored in air, PEPC in crude extracts from CO(2)-treated cherimoyas gave a similar V(max) (1.12+/-0.03 microkat x mg(-1) protein), a lower apparent K(m) (68+/-9 microM for PEP) and a higher I(50) of L-malate (5.95+/-0.3 mM). These kinetic values showed the increase in the affinity of this enzyme toward one of its substrate, PEP, by elevated external CO(2) concentrations. The lower K(m) value and lower sensitivity to L-malate are consistent with higher in vivo carboxylation reaction efficiency in CO(2)-treated cherimoyas, while pointing to an additional enzyme regulation system via CO(2). PMID:11730863

  10. Improvement of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity of Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 through protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang Suk; Jeon, Hancheol; Seo, Seungbeom; Lee, Yew; Jin, EonSeon

    2014-06-10

    In order to mitigate CO2 accumulation and decrease the rate of global warming and climate change, we previously presented a strategy for the development of an efficient CO2 capture and utilization system. The system employs two recombinant enzymes, carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which were originated from microalgae. Although utilization of this integrated system would require a large quantity of high quality PEPCase protein, such quantities could be produced by increasing the solubility of the Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 (PtPEPCase 1) protein in the Escherichia coli heterologous expression system. We first expressed the putative mitochondria targeting peptide- and chloroplast transit peptide-truncated proteins of PtPEPCase 1, mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1, respectively, in E. coli. After affinity chromatography, the amount of purified PEPCase protein from 500mL of E. coli culture was greatest for cPtPEPCase 1 (1.99mg), followed by mPtPEPCase 1 (0.82mg) and PtPEPCase 1 (0.61mg). Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1 showed approximately 1.6-fold (32.19 units/mg) and 3-fold (59.48 units/mg) increases, respectively. Therefore, cPtPEPCase 1 purified using the E. coli heterogeneous expression system could be a strong candidate for a platform technology to capture CO2 and produce value-added four-carbon platform chemicals. PMID:24835101

  11. A role for mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W; Shulman, Gerald I; Kibbey, Richard G

    2014-03-14

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism. PMID:24497630

  12. Control of Transposon-mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances, it also regulates mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutation have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of Insertion Sequence-5 (IS5) hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing growth of wild type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of non-metabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated. PMID:26159081

  13. Trypanosoma evansi contains two auxiliary enzymes of glycolytic metabolism: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Luz Amira; Concepción, Juan Luis; Quintero-Troconis, Ender; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Michels, Paul A M; Acosta, Héctor

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma evansi is a monomorphic protist that can infect horses and other animal species of economic importance for man. Like the bloodstream form of the closely related species Trypanosoma brucei, T. evansi depends exclusively on glycolysis for its free-energy generation. In T. evansi as in other kinetoplastid organisms, the enzymes of the major part of the glycolytic pathway are present within organelles called glycosomes, which are authentic but specialized peroxisomes. Since T. evansi does not undergo stage-dependent differentiations, it occurs only as bloodstream forms, it has been assumed that the metabolic pattern of this parasite is identical to that of the bloodstream form of T. brucei. However, we report here the presence of two additional enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and PPi-dependent pyruvate phosphate dikinase in T. evansi glycosomes. Their colocalization with glycolytic enzymes within the glycosomes of this parasite has not been reported before. Both enzymes can make use of PEP for contributing to the production of ATP within the organelles. The activity of these enzymes in T. evansi glycosomes drastically changes the model assumed for the oxidation of glucose by this parasite. PMID:26968775

  14. Stereochemical course of the reactions catalyzed by the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: Mannitol phosphotransferase system

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.G.; Knowles, J.R. ); Khandekar, S.S.; Jacobson, G.R. )

    1990-07-24

    The authors have determined the overall stereochemical course of the reactions leading to the phosphorylation of D-mannitol by mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII{sup Mtl}) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate- (PEP) dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the presence of enzyme I and HPr of the PTS, and of membranes containing EII{sup Mtl}, the phospho group from ((R)-{sup 16}O, {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O)PEP was transferred to D-mannitol to form mannitol 1-phosphate with overall inversion of the configuration at phosphorus with respect to that of PEP. Since in the course of these reactions enzyme I and HPr are each covalently phosphorylated at a single site and inversion of the chiral phospho group from PEP indicates an odd number of transfer steps overall, transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol via EII{sup Mtl} must also occur in an odd number of steps. Taken together with the fact that catalytically important phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates have been demonstrated biochemically, the results imply that EII{sup Mtl} is sequentially phosphorylated at two different sites during phospho transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol. This conclusion is consistent with the available evidence on phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates and in particular with the recent report that two different phospho peptides can be isolated from the fully phosphorylated protein.

  15. Metal Ion Interactions with Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Crassula argentea and Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tien T.; Ngam-ek, Apinya; Jenkins, Joane; Grover, Scott D.

    1988-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from the CAM plant Crassula argentea and the C4 plant Zea mays were kinetically analyzed. Fe2+ and Cd2+ were found to be active metal cofactors along with the previously known active metals Mg2+, Mn2+, and Co2+. In studies with the Crassula enzyme, Mg2+ yielded the highest Vmax value but also generated the highest values of Km(metal) and Km(pep). For these five active metals lower Km(metal) values tended to be associated with lower Km(pep) values. PEP saturation curves showed more kinetic cooperativity than the corresponding metal saturation curves. The activating metal ions all have ionic radii in the range of 0.86 to 1.09 Å. Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, and Ni2+ inhibited competitively with respect to Mg2+, whereas Be2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Pd2+ showed mixed-type inhibition. Vmax trends with the five active metals were similar for the C. argentea and Z. mays enzymes except that Cd2+ was less effective with the maize enzyme. Km(metal) values were 10- to 60-fold higher in the enzyme from Z. mays. PMID:16665847

  16. Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase deficiency presenting with acute liver failure following gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Santra, Saikat; Cameron, Jessie M; Shyr, Casper; Zhang, Linhua; Drögemöller, Britt; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Wevers, Ron A; Rodenburg, Richard J; Gupte, Girish; Preece, Mary Anne; van Karnebeek, Clara D

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with transient acute liver failure and biochemical patterns suggestive of disturbed urea cycle and mitochondrial function, for whom conventional genetic and metabolic investigations for acute liver failure failed to yield a diagnosis. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous 12-bp deletion in PCK1 (MIM 614168) encoding cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK); enzymatic studies subsequently confirmed its pathogenic nature. We propose that PEPCK deficiency should be considered in the young child with unexplained liver failure, especially where there are marked, accumulations of TCA cycle metabolites on urine organic acid analysis and/or an amino acid profile with hyperammonaemia suggestive of a proximal urea cycle defect during the acute episode. If suspected, intravenous administration of dextrose should be initiated. Long-term management comprising avoidance of fasting with the provision of a glucose polymer emergency regimen for illness management may be sufficient to prevent future episodes of liver failure. This case report provides further insights into the (patho-)physiology of energy metabolism, confirming the power of genomic analysis of unexplained biochemical phenotypes. PMID:26971250

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase intrinsically located in the chloroplast of rice plays a crucial role in ammonium assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Chisato; Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Takuya; Taniguchi, Yojiro; Murayama, Seiji; Kusano, Miyako; Saito, Kazuki; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Miyao, Mitsue

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme of primary metabolism in bacteria, algae, and vascular plants, and is believed to be cytosolic. Here we show that rice (Oryza sativa L.) has a plant-type PEPC, Osppc4, that is targeted to the chloroplast. Osppc4 was expressed in all organs tested and showed high expression in the leaves. Its expression in the leaves was confined to mesophyll cells, and Osppc4 accounted for approximately one-third of total PEPC protein in the leaf blade. Recombinant Osppc4 was active in the PEPC reaction, showing Vmax comparable to cytosolic isozymes. Knockdown of Osppc4 expression by the RNAi technique resulted in stunting at the vegetative stage, which was much more marked when rice plants were grown with ammonium than with nitrate as the nitrogen source. Comparison of leaf metabolomes of ammonium-grown plants suggested that the knockdown suppressed ammonium assimilation and subsequent amino acid synthesis by reducing levels of organic acids, which are carbon skeleton donors for these processes. We also identified the chloroplastic PEPC gene in other Oryza species, all of which are adapted to waterlogged soil where the major nitrogen source is ammonium. This suggests that, in addition to glycolysis, the genus Oryza has a unique route to provide organic acids for ammonium assimilation that involves a chloroplastic PEPC, and that this route is crucial for growth with ammonium. This work provides evidence for diversity of primary ammonium assimilation in the leaves of vascular plants. PMID:20194759

  18. A Role for Mitochondrial Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the Regulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C.; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Kibbey, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism. PMID:24497630

  19. An assessment of the capacity for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to contribute to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E

    2015-06-01

    Three C4 acid decarboxylases, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) were recruited from C3 plants to support C4 photosynthesis. In Poaceae, there are established lineages having PEPCK type species, and some NADP-ME lineages in which PEPCK contributes to C4. Besides family Poaceae, recently PEPCK has been reported to function in C4 photosynthesis in eudicot species including Cleome gynandra (Cleomaceae), Trianthema portulacastrum and Zaleya pentandra (Aizoaceae). We evaluated PEPCK by enzyme assay and western blots in representatives of Poaceae, Aizoaceae, Cleomaceae, and Chenopodiaceae compared to that in the PEPCK type C4 grass Spartina anglica. Eragrostis nutans was identified as the first NAD-ME type C4 grass having substantial amounts of PEPCK. In the eudicots, including C. gynandra, Cleome angustifolia, T. portulacastrum, Z. pentandra, and nine C4 members of family Chenopodiaceae (which has the most C4 species and diversity in forms among eudicot families), amounts of PEPCK were generally very low (barely detectable up to 4% of that in S. anglica). Based on these results, C4 species can be classified biochemically according to the dominant decarboxylase recruited for C4 function; and, Poaceae remains the only family in which PEPCK is known to have a significant role in C4 photosynthesis. PMID:25900567

  20. Acidosis Blocks CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Homologous Protein (CHOP)- and c-Jun-Mediated Induction of p53-Upregulated Mediator of Apoptosis (PUMA) during Amino Acid Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Christopher B.; McColl, Karen; Distelhorst, Clark W.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells must avoid succumbing to a variety of noxious conditions within their surroundings. Acidosis is one such prominent feature of the tumor microenvironment that surprisingly promotes tumor survival and progression. We recently reported that acidosis prevents apoptosis of starved or stressed lymphoma cells through regulation of several Bcl-2 family members (Ryder et al., JBC, 2012). Mechanistic studies in that work focused on the acid-mediated upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, while additionally showing inhibition of glutamine starvation-induced expression of pro-apoptotic PUMA by acidosis. Herein we report that amino acid (AA) starvation elevates PUMA, an effect that is blocked by extracellular acidity. Knockdown studies confirm that PUMA induction during AA starvation requires expression of both CHOP and c-Jun. Interestingly, acidosis strongly attenuates AA starvation-mediated c-Jun expression, which correlates with PUMA repression. As c-Jun exerts a tumor suppressive function in this and other contexts, its inhibition by acidosis has broader implications for survival of cancer cells in the acidic tumor milieu. PMID:23261451

  1. OsPHR2 Is Involved in Phosphate-Starvation Signaling and Excessive Phosphate Accumulation in Shoots of Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Jiao, FangChang; Wu, Zhongchang; Li, Yiyi; Wang, Xuming; He, Xiaowei; Zhong, Weiqi; Wu, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that AtPHR1 plays a central role in phosphate (Pi)-starvation signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this work, two OsPHR genes from rice (Oryza sativa) were isolated and designated as OsPHR1 and OsPHR2 based on amino acid sequence homology to AtPHR1. Their functions in Pi signaling in rice were investigated using transgenic plants. Our results showed that both OsPHR1 and OsPHR2 are involved in Pi-starvation signaling pathway by regulation of the expression of Pi-starvation-induced genes, whereas only OsPHR2 overexpression results in the excessive accumulation of Pi in shoots under Pi-sufficient conditions. Under Pi-sufficient conditions, overexpression of OsPHR2 mimics Pi-starvation stress in rice with enhanced root elongation and proliferated root hair growth, suggesting the involvement of OsPHR2 in Pi-dependent root architecture alteration by both systematic and local pathways. In OsPHR2-overexpression plants, some Pi transporters were up-regulated under Pi-sufficient conditions, which correlates with the strongly increased content of Pi. The mechanism behind the OsPHR2 regulated Pi accumulation will provide useful approaches to develop smart plants with high Pi efficiency. PMID:18263782

  2. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Carbon Starvation in Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Casaletti, Luciana; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. Conclusions/Significance For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding

  3. β-Hydroxybutyrate: A signaling metabolite in starvation response?

    PubMed

    Rojas-Morales, Pedro; Tapia, Edilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-08-01

    Ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate are important metabolic substrates for energy production during prolonged fasting. However, BHB also has signaling functions. Through several metabolic pathways or processes, BHB modulates nutrient utilization and energy expenditure. These findings suggest that BHB is not solely a metabolic intermediate, but also acts as a signal to regulate metabolism and maintain energy homeostasis during nutrient deprivation. We briefly summarize the metabolism and emerging physiological functions of ketone bodies and highlight the potential role for BHB as a signaling molecule in starvation response. PMID:27083590

  4. Insights into possible cell-death markers in the diatom Skeletonema marinoi in response to senescence and silica starvation.

    PubMed

    Orefice, Ida; Lauritano, Chiara; Procaccini, Gabriele; Ianora, Adrianna; Romano, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are a hugely diverse microalgal class, which possesses unique biological features and complex metabolic pathways and may activate sophisticated mechanisms to respond to environmental changes. Abiotic stress factors may limit growth rate of diatoms, but may also trigger intracellular signaling pathways that cause cells to undergo programmed cell death (PCD). Here we investigate the gene expression of different target genes related to cell death, namely programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101), developmental and cell death (DCD) domain, death specific protein (DSP) and metacaspase (MC), using RT-qPCR in the cosmopolitan coastal centric diatom species Skeletonema marinoi, which contributes significantly to phytoplankton blooms in temperate waters. To this end, we undertook a detailed study of the best reference genes to analyze gene expression in S. marinoi under different experimental conditions (i.e. in different growth phases or under silica starvation). Results showed that DSP gene expression had a clear and constant increase along the S. marinoi growth curve reaching its maximum during the senescent phase. On the contrary, PDCD4, DCD, TSG101 and MC did not show any significant variation. These findings indicate that the DSP gene is a possible PCD marker induced by aging in this diatom species. In contrast, levels of DSP transcripts induced by silica starvation were relatively low compared to those induced by cell aging suggesting differential activation and/or regulation of the PCD machinery in response to different stressful conditions. Our study also expands the list of reference genes available for the diatom S. marinoi for normalization of RT-qPCR data of cells cultivated under different growth phases or under silica starvation. PMID:26118837

  5. Evaluating the Carbon Starvation Hypothesis: Shifts in Carbohydrate Concentrations During Tree Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Fox, D.; Pockman, W.; McDowell, N. G.

    2011-12-01

    Climate-induced stresses, including drought and increased temperature, are believed to be the primary cause of recent tree mortality events worldwide. The specific physiological mechanisms causing tree mortality are poorly understood, limiting models of vegetation dynamics needed to predict future responses of the carbon cycle to changing climate. Carbon starvation and hydraulic failure are two mechanisms hypothesized to cause tree mortality. Isohydric plants, such as piñon pine (Pinus edulis), close their stomata in the early stages of drought, preventing significant carbon fixation and making them more susceptible to carbon starvation. Conversely, anisohydric plants, such as juniper (Juniperus monosperma), continue photosynthesis at high xylem water tensions and should be more susceptible to hydraulic failure. We tested the carbon starvation hypothesis in two studies. In the first, we exposed piñon pine trees to drought and shade treatments in a greenhouse setting. In the second, we evaluated the effects of different drought stress regulation mechanisms (isohydric vs. anisohydric) on carbohydrate pools from mature piñon and juniper trees exposed to ecosystem scale precipitation reductions and additions. In both experiments tissue samples for carbohydrate analysis were collected regularly over the course of the experiment and after death. The first experiment revealed that, upon mortality, total carbohydrate concentrations in all tissues declined by approximately 50% and 75% in the drought and shaded treatments, respectively. Transportable sugars-glucose, fructose, and sucrose-are responsible for this treatment difference, as starch concentrations at death did not differ between the treatments. In the second experiment, both piñon and juniper trees that died in the precipitation reduction plots exhibited lower carbohydrate concentrations and a significant lack of seasonal variation as compared to trees in water addition and ambient control plots. In both

  6. Metabolic and ultrastructural responses of lupine embryo axes to sugar starvation.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, Iwona; Garnczarska, Małgorzata; Bednarski, Waldemar; Ratajczak, Wiktoria; Waplak, Stefan

    2003-03-01

    the activity of SOD in sugar-starved embryos, whereas CAT and POX activities were lower in axes grown without sucrose as compared to control. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase zymogram analyses showed that synthesis of new isoforms was not induced by sugar starvation. An accumulation of phytoferritin was found in plastids of sucrose starved embryos. These results are discussed in relation to the metabolic changes observed in senescing plant tissues. PMID:12749088

  7. Water potential and starvation stress in deep subsurface microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Rosacker, L.L.; Willcox, D.; Franklin, A.J.

    1990-12-31

    Nine intact core samples, collected aseptically from depths of 10--436 m near the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, were tested for water potential, microbial numbers, and microbial activity. Although all samples were collected from below the water table, two samples (a Pee Dee clay from 238 m and a Middendorf clay from 324 m) showed unsaturated conditions ({minus}2.7 and {minus}2.1 MPa, respectively). Both of these samples had very low numbers of culturable cells, low microbial biomass (ATP assay), and low microbial activities (measured as respiration), suggesting that low metric waterpotentials in these strata are limiting factors to microorganisms. An Acinetobacter sp. isolated from the 324 m depth was found to maintain viability under starvation conditions in sterilized aquifer material, even when subjected to severe desiccation ({minus}22 MPa). A Pseudomonas sp., with the ability to oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate, was isolated from the 378 m Middendorf clay sample. This organism survived nutrient deprivation reasonably well; however, the presence of thiosulfate appeared to interfere with its normal ability to maintain viability by endogenous metabolism. Cells cultured in the presence of thiosulfate did not undergo dwarfing and cell viability declines. These are two examples of indigenous subsurface microorganisms, each with different adaptations for long-term survival under conditions of desiccation and/or starvation.

  8. Water potential and starvation stress in deep subsurface microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Rosacker, L.L.; Willcox, D.; Franklin, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Nine intact core samples, collected aseptically from depths of 10--436 m near the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, were tested for water potential, microbial numbers, and microbial activity. Although all samples were collected from below the water table, two samples (a Pee Dee clay from 238 m and a Middendorf clay from 324 m) showed unsaturated conditions ({minus}2.7 and {minus}2.1 MPa, respectively). Both of these samples had very low numbers of culturable cells, low microbial biomass (ATP assay), and low microbial activities (measured as respiration), suggesting that low metric waterpotentials in these strata are limiting factors to microorganisms. An Acinetobacter sp. isolated from the 324 m depth was found to maintain viability under starvation conditions in sterilized aquifer material, even when subjected to severe desiccation ({minus}22 MPa). A Pseudomonas sp., with the ability to oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate, was isolated from the 378 m Middendorf clay sample. This organism survived nutrient deprivation reasonably well; however, the presence of thiosulfate appeared to interfere with its normal ability to maintain viability by endogenous metabolism. Cells cultured in the presence of thiosulfate did not undergo dwarfing and cell viability declines. These are two examples of indigenous subsurface microorganisms, each with different adaptations for long-term survival under conditions of desiccation and/or starvation.

  9. Multiple Inter-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers in the Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  10. Transcriptional regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene by cooperation between hepatic nuclear factors.

    PubMed Central

    Yanuka-Kashles, O; Cohen, H; Trus, M; Aran, A; Benvenisty, N; Reshef, L

    1994-01-01

    To study the transcriptional regulation of the liver gluconeogenic phenotype, the underdifferentiated mouse Hepa-1c1c7 (Hepa) hepatoma cell line was used. These cells mimicked the fetal liver by appreciably expressing the alpha-fetoprotein and albumin genes but not the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Unlike the fetal liver, however, Hepa cells failed to express the early-expressed factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF-1 alpha) and HNF-4 and the late-expressed factor C/EBP alpha, thereby providing a suitable system for examining possible cooperation between these factors in the transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene. Transient transfection assays of a chimeric PEPCK-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase construct showed a residual PEPCK promoter activity in the Hepa cell line, which was slightly stimulated by cotransfection with a single transcription factor from either the C/EBP family or HNF-1 alpha but not at all affected by cotransfection of HNF-4. In contrast, cotransfection of the PEPCK construct with members from the C/EBP family plus HNF-1 alpha resulted in a synergistic stimulation of the PEPCK promoter activity. This synergistic effect depended on the presence in the PEPCK promoter region of the HNF-1 recognition sequence and on the presence of two C/EBP recognition sequences. The results demonstrate a requirement for coexistence and cooperation between early and late liver-enriched transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene. In addition, the results suggest redundancy between members of the C/EBP family of transcription factors in the regulation of PEPCK gene expression. Images PMID:7935427

  11. Regulation of the acuF Gene, Encoding Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Draht, Oliver W.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key enzyme required for gluconeogenesis when microorganisms grow on carbon sources metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Aspergillus nidulans acuF mutants isolated by their inability to use acetate as a carbon source specifically lack PEPCK. The acuF gene has been cloned and shown to encode a protein with high similarity to PEPCK from bacteria, plants, and fungi. The regulation of acuF expression has been studied by Northern blotting and by the construction of lacZ fusion reporters. Induction by acetate is abolished in mutants unable to metabolize acetate via the TCA cycle, and induction by amino acids metabolized via 2-oxoglutarate is lost in mutants unable to form 2-oxoglutarate. Induction by acetate and proline is not additive, consistent with a single mechanism of induction. Malate and succinate result in induction, and it is proposed that PEPCK is controlled by a novel mechanism of induction by a TCA cycle intermediate or derivative, thereby allowing gluconeogenesis to occur during growth on any carbon source metabolized via the TCA cycle. It has been shown that the facB gene, which mediates acetate induction of enzymes specifically required for acetate utilization, is not directly involved in PEPCK induction. This is in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Cat8p and Sip4p, homologs of FacB, regulate PEPCK as well as the expression of other genes necessary for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in response to the carbon source present. This difference in the control of gluconeogenesis reflects the ability of A. nidulans and other filamentous fungi to use a wide variety of carbon sources in comparison with S. cerevisiae. The acuF gene was also found to be subject to activation by the CCAAT binding protein AnCF, a protein homologous to the S. cerevisiae Hap complex and the mammalian NFY complex. PMID:11741859

  12. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  13. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Feria, Ana-Belén; Ni, Hong; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110 kDa and 107 kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460 kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme's feedback inhibition by L-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell's immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon-nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  14. Developmental and molecular physiological evidence for the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in rapid cotton fibre elongation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Rong; Wang, Lu; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Cotton fibres are hair-like single-cells that elongate to several centimetres long after their initiation from the ovule epidermis at anthesis. The accumulation of malate, along with K+ and sugars, is thought to play an important role in fibre elongation through osmotic regulation and charge balance. However, there is a lack of evidence for or against such an hypothesis. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme responsible for the synthesis of malate. The potential role of PEPC in cotton fibre elongation is examined here. Developmentally, PEPC activity was higher at the rapid elongation phase than that at the slow elongation stage. Genotypically, PEPC activity correlated positively with the rate of fibre elongation and the final fibre length attained. Importantly, suppression of PEPC activity by LiCl that reduces its phosphorylation status decreased fibre length. To examine the molecular basis underlying PEPC activity, two cDNAs encoding PEPC, GhPEPC1 and 2, were cloned, which represents the major PEPC genes expressed in cotton fibre. RT-PCR analyses revealed that GhPEPC1 and 2 were highly expressed at the rapid elongation phase but weakly at the slow-to-terminal elongation period. In situ hybridization detected mRNA of GhPEPC1 and 2 in 1 d young fibres but not in the ovule epidermis prior to fibre initiation. Collectively, the data indicate that cotton fibre elongation requires high activity of PEPC, probably through the expression of the GhPEPC1 and 2 genes. PMID:19815688

  15. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi. PMID:25195688

  16. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  17. Association of phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase activity with the cytosolic pyruvate kinase of germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1991-12-01

    The procedure of Malhotra and Kayastha ([1990] Plant Physiology 93: 194-200) for the purification to homogeneity of a phosphoenolpyruvate-specific alkaline phosphatase (PEP phosphatase) from germinating mung beans (Vigna radiata) was followed. Although a higher specific activity of 1.4 micromoles pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein was obtained, the final preparation was less than 10% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Attempts to further purify the enzyme resulted in loss of activity. The partially purified enzyme contained significant pyruvate kinase activity (0.13 micromole pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein) when assayed at pH 7.2, but not at pH 8.5. The PEP phosphatase activity of the final preparation exhibited hysteresis; a lag time of 5 to 6 minutes was required before a steady-state reaction rate was attained. A western blot of the final preparation revealed an immunoreactive 57 kilodalton polypeptide when probed with monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared against germinating castor bean cytosolic pyruvate kinase. No antigenic cross-reaction of the final preparation was observed with antibodies against castor bean leucoplast pyruvate kinase, or black mustard PEP-specific acid phosphatase. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final preparation resulted in a single PEP phosphatase activity band; when this band was excised and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting, a 57 kilodalton silver-staining polypeptide was obtained that strongly cross-reacted with the anti-(cytosolic pyruvate kinase) immunoglobulin G. It is suggested that mung bean PEP-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is due to cytosolic pyruvate kinase, in which pyruvate and ortho-phosphate are formed in the absence of ADP. PMID:16668551

  18. Association of Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphatase Activity with the Cytosolic Pyruvate Kinase of Germinating Mung Beans 1

    PubMed Central

    Podestá, Florencio E.; Plaxton, William C.

    1991-01-01

    The procedure of Malhotra and Kayastha ([1990] Plant Physiology 93: 194-200) for the purification to homogeneity of a phosphoenolpyruvate-specific alkaline phosphatase (PEP phosphatase) from germinating mung beans (Vigna radiata) was followed. Although a higher specific activity of 1.4 micromoles pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein was obtained, the final preparation was less than 10% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Attempts to further purify the enzyme resulted in loss of activity. The partially purified enzyme contained significant pyruvate kinase activity (0.13 micromole pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein) when assayed at pH 7.2, but not at pH 8.5. The PEP phosphatase activity of the final preparation exhibited hysteresis; a lag time of 5 to 6 minutes was required before a steady-state reaction rate was attained. A western blot of the final preparation revealed an immunoreactive 57 kilodalton polypeptide when probed with monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared against germinating castor bean cytosolic pyruvate kinase. No antigenic cross-reaction of the final preparation was observed with antibodies against castor bean leucoplast pyruvate kinase, or black mustard PEP-specific acid phosphatase. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final preparation resulted in a single PEP phosphatase activity band; when this band was excised and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting, a 57 kilodalton silver-staining polypeptide was obtained that strongly cross-reacted with the anti-(cytosolic pyruvate kinase) immunoglobulin G. It is suggested that mung bean PEP-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is due to cytosolic pyruvate kinase, in which pyruvate and ortho-phosphate are formed in the absence of ADP. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668551

  19. In Vivo and in Vitro Phosphorylation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Wheat Seeds during Germination.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, L.; Gonzalez, M. C.; Cejudo, F. J.; Vidal, J.; Echevarria, C.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity was detected in the aleurone endosperm of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Chinese Spring) seeds, and specific anti-Sorghum C4 PEPC polyclonal anti-bodies cross-reacted with 103- and 100-kD polypeptides present in dry seeds and seeds that had imbibed; in addition, a new, 108-kD polypeptide was detected 6 h after imbibition. The use of specific anti-phosphorylation-site immunoglobulin G (APS-IgG) identified the presence of a phosphorylation motif equivalent to that found in other plant PEPCs studied so far. The binding of this APS-IgG to the target protein promoted changes in the properties of seed PEPC similar to those produced by phosphorylation, as previously shown for the recombinant Sorghum leaf C4 PEPC. In desalted seed extracts, an endogenous PEPC kinase activity catalyzed a bona fide phosphorylation of the target protein, as deduced from the immunoinhibition of the in vitro phosphorylation reaction by the APS- IgG. In addition, the major, 103-kD PEPC polypeptide was also shown to be radiolabeled in situ 48 h after imbibition in [32P]orthophosphate. The ratio between optimal (pH 8) and suboptimal (pH 7.3 or 7.1) PEPC activity decreased during germination, thereby suggesting a change in catalytic rate related to an in vivo phosphorylation process. These collective data document that the components needed for the regulatory phosphorylation of PEPC are present and functional during germination of wheat seeds. PMID:12226309

  20. Multiple inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfers in the evolution of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene family.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingmei; Cai, Jing; Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  1. Hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression after gastric bypass surgery in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Hou, S S; Wang, W; Yin, M; Cheng, N; Ge, L L; Yin, J J; Xu, J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) after gastric bypass surgery (GBS) in rats with type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM). Thirty-six male Goto-Kakizaki rats, aged 12 weeks, were randomly divided into the GBS, sham operation with diet restriction (SO), and sham operation alone (control) groups (N = 12 per group). Liver specimens from all rats were obtained during the operation and 8 weeks after operation. Blood lipid levels were measured before and 8 weeks after operation. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), food intake, and body weight were recorded at weekly time points after operation. The blood glucose area under the curve (AUC) was calculated, and insulin sensitivity indices (ISI) were assessed. The expression PEPCK mRNA and protein were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. Compared with those of the SO and control groups, the blood lipid levels and the FBG in the GBS group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05), as was the AUC (P < 0.05), whereas the ISI was significantly increased (P < 0.05). PEPCK mRNA and protein levels in the GBS group were lower than those in the control group, whereas those in the SO group were significantly higher than those in controls (P < 0.05). In conclusion, GBS can reduce blood glucose in T2DM rats while improving glucose tolerance and hyperglycemia, and the mechanism appears to be associated with a decrease of hepatic PEPCK mRNA and protein expression. PMID:26681041

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Leaves Plays a Crucial Role in Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianghua; Yi, Keke; Liu, Yu; Xie, Li; Zhou, Zhongjing; Chen, Yue; Hu, Zhanghua; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Chen, Yunlong; Chen, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes an irreversible primary metabolic reaction in plants. Previous studies have used transgenic plants expressing ectopic PEPC forms with diminished feedback inhibition to examine the role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. To date, the in vivo role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has not been analyzed in plants. In this study, we examined the role of PEPC in plants, demonstrating that PPC1 and PPC2 were highly expressed genes encoding PEPC in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and that PPC1 and PPC2 accounted for approximately 93% of total PEPC activity in the leaves. A double mutant, ppc1/ppc2, was constructed that exhibited a severe growth-arrest phenotype. The ppc1/ppc2 mutant accumulated more starch and sucrose than wild-type plants when seedlings were grown under normal conditions. Physiological and metabolic analysis revealed that decreased PEPC activity in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant greatly reduced the synthesis of malate and citrate and severely suppressed ammonium assimilation. Furthermore, nitrate levels in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant were significantly lower than those in wild-type plants due to the suppression of ammonium assimilation. Interestingly, starch and sucrose accumulation could be prevented and nitrate levels could be maintained by supplying the ppc1/ppc2 mutant with exogenous malate and glutamate, suggesting that low nitrogen status resulted in the alteration of carbon metabolism and prompted the accumulation of starch and sucrose in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant. Our results demonstrate that PEPC in leaves plays a crucial role in modulating the balance of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis. PMID:25588735

  3. Key role of hydrazine to the interaction between oxaloacetic against phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK): ONIOM calculations.

    PubMed

    Prajongtat, Pongthep; Phromyothin, Darinee Sae-Tang; Hannongbua, Supa

    2013-08-01

    The interactions between oxaloacetic (OAA) and phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK) binding pocket in the presence and absence of hydrazine were carried out using quantum chemical calculations, based on the two-layered ONIOM (ONIOM2) approach. The complexes were partially optimized by ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) method while the interaction energies between OAA and individual residues surrounding the pocket were performed at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated interaction energies (INT) indicated that Arg87, Gly237, Ser286, and Arg405 are key residues for binding to OAA with the INT values of -1.93, -2.06, -2.47, and -3.16 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The interactions are mainly due to the formation of hydrogen bonding interactions with OAA. Moreover, using ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) applied on the PEPCKHS complex, two proton transfers were observed; first, the proton was transferred from the carboxylic group of OAA to hydrazine while the second one was from Asp311 to Lys244. Such reactions cause the generation of binding strength of OAA to the pocket via electrostatic interaction. The orientations of Lys243, Lys244, His264, Asp311, Phe333, and Arg405 were greatly deviated after hydrazine incorporation. These indicate that hydrazine plays an important role in terms of not only changing the conformation of the binding pocket, but is also tightly bound to OAA resulting in its conformation change in the pocket. The understanding of such interaction can be useful for the design of hydrazine-based inhibitor for antichachexia agents. PMID:23624997

  4. Facilitated diffusion of fructose via the phosphoenolpyruvate/glucose phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kornberg, Hans L.; Lambourne, Linda T. M.; Sproul, Andrew A.

    2000-01-01

    From mutants of Escherichia coli unable to utilize fructose via the phosphoenolpyruvate/glycose phosphotransferase system (PTS), further mutants were selected that grow on fructose as the sole carbon source, albeit with relatively low affinity for that hexose (Km for growth ≈8 mM but with Vmax for generation time ≈1 h 10 min); the fructose thus taken into the cells is phosphorylated to fructose 6-phosphate by ATP and a cytosolic fructo(manno)kinase (Mak). The gene effecting the translocation of fructose was identified by Hfr-mediated conjugations and by phage-mediated transduction as specifying an isoform of the membrane-spanning enzyme IIGlc of the PTS, which we designate ptsG-F. Exconjugants that had acquired ptsG+ from Hfr strains used for mapping (designated ptsG-I) grew very poorly on fructose (Vmax ≈7 h 20 min), even though they were rich in Mak activity. A mutant of E. coli also rich in Mak but unable to grow on glucose by virtue of transposon-mediated inactivations both of ptsG and of the genes specifying enzyme IIMan (manXYZ) was restored to growth on glucose by plasmids containing either ptsG-F or ptsG-I, but only the former restored growth on fructose. Sequence analysis showed that the difference between these two forms of ptsG, which was reflected also by differences in the rates at which they translocated mannose and glucose analogs such as methyl α-glucoside and 2-deoxyglucose, resided in a substitution of G in ptsG-I by T in ptsG-F in the first position of codon 12, with consequent replacement of valine by phenylalanine in the deduced amino acid sequence. PMID:10677538

  5. Stochastic feeding of fish larvae and their metabolic handling of starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, S.; Litvak, M. K.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.

    2011-11-01

    Developmental patterns of yolk-sac larvae are well captured by the standard DEB model: (i) when feeding is delayed post birth the size at which post-feeding growth begins is reduced but the rate of growth post-feeding is unaffected and (ii) maternal effects (initial energy in egg) show up as differences in condition at birth and maximum length of non fed individuals. We extended the standard DEB model in two ways to account for starvation. (I): if somatic maintenance can no longer be paid structure is also mobilized to cover the costs, but at an extra cost-conversion efficiency of structure to energy. Death occurs if structure reaches a fraction of the maximum at the onset of shrinking. (II): if maturity maintenance can no longer be paid then maturity level decays exponentially (rejuvenation). Hazard due to rejuvenation is proportional to the difference between maturity and the maximum maturity at the onset of rejuvenation. We performed Monte Carlo simulation studies which treat feeding as a random process to evaluate the contribution of the metabolic handling of starvation to early teleost life history. The simulations suggest that food density strongly impacts growth, energy reserves, mineral fluxes, hazard and mortality from shrinking. Environmental factors can soon override maternal induced differences between individuals. Moreover in the low food density, simulated individuals from eggs of lower caloric content experience mortality from shrinking earlier than their counterparts issued from higher energy eggs. Empirically observed patterns of real data, i.e. high scatter in respiration in combination with low scatter in lengths, can be expected when the metabolism is treated as a deterministic system while behaviourally controlled input is stochastic. At low food densities where mortality from shrinking reaches 10% almost all individuals experience hazard due to rejuvenation. This hazard is difficult to access experimentally but represents moments of heightened

  6. Cloning of PaAtg8 and roles of autophagy in adaptation to starvation with respect to the fat body and midgut of the Americana cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Takeda, Makio

    2014-05-01

    Starvation, in particular amino acid deprivation, induces autophagy in trophocytes (adipocytes), the major component of the fat body cell types, in the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the fat body of cockroach has two additional cell types: urocytes depositing uric acid in urate vacuoles as a nitrogen resource and mycetocytes harboring an endosymbiont, Blattabacterium cuenoti, which can synthesize amino acids from the metabolites of the stored uric acid. These cells might complement the roles of autophagy in recycling amino acids in the fat body or other organs of cockroaches under starvation. We investigate the presence of autophagy in tissues such as the fat body and midgut of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, under starvation by immunoblotting with antibody against Atg8, a ubiquitin-like protein required for the formation of autophagosomes and by electron microscopy. Corresponding changes in acid phosphatase activity were also investigated as representing lysosome activity. Starvation increased the level of an autophagic marker, Atg8-II, in both the tissues, extensively stimulating the formation of autophagic compartments in trophocytes of the fat body and columnar cells of the midgut for over 2 weeks. Acid phosphatase showed no significant increase in the fat body of the starved cockroaches but was higher in the midgut of the continuously fed animals. Thus, a distinct autophagic mechanism operates in these tissues under starvation of 2 weeks and longer. The late induction of autophagy implies exhaustion of the stored uric acid in the fat body. High activity of acid phosphatase in the midgut of the fed cockroaches might represent enhanced assimilation and not an autophagy-related function. PMID:24696316

  7. IscR Regulates Synthesis of Colonization Factor Antigen I Fimbriae in Response to Iron Starvation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Sara; Arnaud-Barbe, Nadège; Poncet, David; Reverchon, Sylvie; Wawrzyniak, Julien; Nasser, William

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron availability functions as an environmental cue for enteropathogenic bacteria, signaling arrival within the human host. As enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of human diarrhea, the effect of iron on ETEC virulence factors was evaluated here. ETEC pathogenicity is directly linked to production of fimbrial colonization factors and secretion of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and/or heat-stable enterotoxin (ST). Efficient colonization of the small intestine further requires at least the flagellin binding adhesin EtpA. Under iron starvation, production of the CFA/I fimbriae was increased in the ETEC H10407 prototype strain. In contrast, LT secretion was inhibited. Furthermore, under iron starvation, gene expression of the cfa (CFA/I) and etp (EtpBAC) operons was induced, whereas transcription of toxin genes was either unchanged or repressed. Transcriptional reporter fusion experiments focusing on the cfa operon further showed that iron starvation stimulated cfaA promoter activity in ETEC, indicating that the impact of iron on CFA/I production was mediated by transcriptional regulation. Evaluation of cfaA promoter activity in heterologous E. coli single mutant knockout strains identified IscR as the regulator responsible for inducing cfa fimbrial gene expression in response to iron starvation, and this was confirmed in an ETEC ΔiscR strain. The global iron response regulator, Fur, was not implicated. IscR binding sites were identified in silico within the cfaA promoter and fixation confirmed by DNase I footprinting, indicating that IscR directly binds the promoter region to induce CFA/I. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic enterobacteria modulate expression of virulence genes in response to iron availability. Although the Fur transcription factor represents the global regulator of iron homeostasis in Escherichia coli, we show that several ETEC virulence factors are modulated by iron, with expression of the major fimbriae under the control of the iron

  8. Establishing the Influnence of Starvation Upon the Transport of Environmental Escherichia Coli Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study focuses on the influence of bacterial starvation on the surface chemistry and transport of 12 different E. coli isolates from varying sources including human, poultry, cattle, horse, and wildlife in traditional packed bed columns. The intention was to determine to what extent starvation a...

  9. Effect of feed starvation on side-stream anammox activity and key microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Petra J; Mouilleron, Irina; Chuang, Hui-Ping; Thwaites, Ben; Hyde, Kylie; Dinesh, Nirmala; Krampe, Joerg; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; van den Akker, Ben

    2016-04-15

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process is widely acknowledged to be susceptible to a wide range of environmental factors given the slow growth rate of the anammox bacteria. Surprisingly there is limited experimental data regarding the susceptibility of the anammox process to feed starvations which may be encountered in full-scale applications. Therefore, a study was established to investigate the impact of feed starvations on nitritation and anammox activity in a demonstration-scale sequencing batch reactor. Three starvation periods were trialled, lasting one fortnight (15 d), one month (33 d) and two months (62 d). Regardless of the duration of the starvation period, assessment of the ammonia removal performance demonstrated nitritation and anammox activity were reinstated within one day of recovery operation. Characterisation of the community structure using 16S rRNA and functional genes specific for nitrogen-related microbes showed there was no clear impact or shift in the microbial populations between starvation and recovery phases. PMID:26861222

  10. A Shoot-Specific Hypoxic Response of Arabidopsis Sheds Light on the Role of the Phosphate-Responsive Transcription Factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE11[W

    PubMed Central

    Klecker, Maria; Gasch, Philipp; Peisker, Helga; Dörmann, Peter; Schlicke, Hagen; Grimm, Bernhard; Mustroph, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses are often very specific, but signal transduction pathways can partially or completely overlap. Here, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the transcriptional responses to phosphate starvation and oxygen deficiency stress comprise a set of commonly induced genes. While the phosphate deficiency response is systemic, under oxygen deficiency, most of the commonly induced genes are found only in illuminated shoots. This jointly induced response to the two stresses is under control of the transcription factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE1 (PHR1), but not of the oxygen-sensing N-end rule pathway, and includes genes encoding proteins for the synthesis of galactolipids, which replace phospholipids in plant membranes under phosphate starvation. Despite the induction of galactolipid synthesis genes, total galactolipid content and plant survival are not severely affected by the up-regulation of galactolipid gene expression in illuminated leaves during hypoxia. However, changes in galactolipid molecular species composition point to an adaptation of lipid fluxes through the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast pathways during hypoxia. PHR1-mediated signaling of phosphate deprivation was also light dependent. Because a photoreceptor-mediated PHR1 activation was not detectable under hypoxia, our data suggest that a chloroplast-derived retrograde signal, potentially arising from metabolic changes, regulates PHR1 activity under both oxygen and phosphate deficiency. PMID:24753539

  11. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR070 Regulates Root Development and Phosphate Starvation-Mediated Responses1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Madhuvanthi; Jain, Ajay; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability is a major factor determining growth and consequently the productivity of crops. However, it is one of the least available macronutrients due to its high fixation in the rhizospheres. To overcome this constraint, plants have developed adaptive responses to better acquire, utilize, and recycle Pi. Molecular determinants of these adaptive mechanisms include transcription factors (TFs) that play a major role in transcriptional control, thereby regulating genome-scale networks. In this study, we have characterized the biological role of Arabidopsis thaliana Ethylene Response Factor070 (AtERF070), a Pi starvation-induced TF belonging to the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR family of TFs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). It is localized to the nucleus and induced specifically in Pi-deprived roots and shoots. RNA interference-mediated suppression of AtERF070 led to augmented lateral root development resulting in higher Pi accumulation, whereas there were reductions in both primary root length and lateral root number in 12-d-old transgenic seedlings overexpressing AtERF070. When the overexpressing lines were grown to maturity under greenhouse conditions, they revealed a stunted bushy appearance that could be rescued by gibberellic acid application. Furthermore, a number of Pi starvation-responsive genes were modulated in AtERF070-overexpressing and RNA interference lines, thereby suggesting a potential role for this TF in maintaining Pi homeostasis. PMID:24394776

  12. Role of glucocorticoids in increased muscle glutamine production in starvation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Cook, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The role of glucocorticoids in the synthesis of muscle glutamine during starvation was investigated in adrenalectomized fasted rats injected with cortisol (1 mg/100 g body weight). It was found that administration of cortisol in vivo increased (compared to nontreated starved adrenalectomized controls) the glutamine/glutamate ratio and the activity of glutamine synthetase in the diaphragm and the extensor digitorum muscles, and that these effects were abolished by prior treatment with actinomycin D or proflavine. The results obtained in in vitro experiments, using fresh-frozen soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscle preparations, supported the in vivo indications of the cortisol-enhanced glutamine synthesis and protein turnover in starved adrenalectomized animals.

  13. Strigolactone signaling in root development and phosphate starvation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Pandya-Kumar, Nirali; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs), have recently been recognized as phytohormone involve in orchestrating shoot and root architecture. In, roots SLs positively regulate root hair length and density, suppress lateral root formation and promote primary root meristem cell number. The biosynthesis and exudation of SLs increases under low phosphate level to regulate root responses. This hormonal response suggests an adaptation strategy of plant to optimize growth and development under nutrient limitations. However, little is known on signal-transduction pathways associated with SL activities. In this review, we outline the current knowledge on SL biology by describing their role in the regulation of root development. Also, we discuss the recent findings on the non-cell autonomous signaling of SLs, that involve PIN polarization, vesicle trafficking, changes in actin architecture and dynamic in response to phosphate starvation. PMID:26251884

  14. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  15. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  16. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Glucose/Mannose Phosphotransferase System of Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cochu, Armelle; Vadeboncoeur, Christian; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel

    2003-01-01

    In most streptococci, glucose is transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):glucose/mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) via HPr and IIABMan, two proteins involved in regulatory mechanisms. While most strains of Streptococcus thermophilus do not or poorly metabolize glucose, compelling evidence suggests that S. thermophilus possesses the genes that encode the glucose/mannose general and specific PTS proteins. The purposes of this study were to determine (i) whether these PTS genes are expressed, (ii) whether the PTS proteins encoded by these genes are able to transfer a phosphate group from PEP to glucose/mannose PTS substrates, and (iii) whether these proteins catalyze sugar transport. The pts operon is made up of the genes encoding HPr (ptsH) and enzyme I (EI) (ptsI), which are transcribed into a 0.6-kb ptsH mRNA and a 2.3-kb ptsHI mRNA. The specific glucose/mannose PTS proteins, IIABMan, IICMan, IIDMan, and the ManO protein, are encoded by manL, manM, manN, and manO, respectively, which make up the man operon. The man operon is transcribed into a single 3.5-kb mRNA. To assess the phosphotransfer competence of these PTS proteins, in vitro PEP-dependent phosphorylation experiments were conducted with purified HPr, EI, and IIABMan as well as membrane fragments containing IICMan and IIDMan. These PTS components efficiently transferred a phosphate group from PEP to glucose, mannose, 2-deoxyglucose, and (to a lesser extent) fructose, which are common streptococcal glucose/mannose PTS substrates. Whole cells were unable to catalyze the uptake of mannose and 2-deoxyglucose, demonstrating the inability of the S. thermophilus PTS proteins to operate as a proficient transport system. This inability to transport mannose and 2-deoxyglucose may be due to a defective IIC domain. We propose that in S. thermophilus, the general and specific glucose/mannose PTS proteins are not involved in glucose transport but might have regulatory functions associated with the

  17. Hepatic Subcellular Compartmentation of Cytoplasmic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Determined by Immunogold Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuixiong; Cardell, Emma Lou; Morris, Randal E.; Giffin, Bruce F.; Cardell, Robert R.

    1995-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is the rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme and in liver occurs in a lobular gradient from periportal to pericentral regions. The subcellular distribution of cytoplasmic PEPCK molecules within hepatocytes and its relationship to organelles have not been determined previously. In this study, we have used immunogold electron microscopy to evaluate the subcellar distribution of the enzyme, in addition to brightfield and epipolarized light microscopy. Cryosections (10 [mu]m) of perfusion-fixed rat liver were collected on silanated slides and immunostained using goat anti-rat PEPCK followed by 5-nm gold-labeled secondary and tertiary antibodies. Additionally, free-floating vibratome sections (25, 50, and 100 [mu]m) of perfusion-immersion-fixed rat liver were immunogold stained using goat anti-rat PEPCK and 5-nm gold-labeled secondary antibody, with and without silver enhancement. The immunogold labeled sections from both procedures were embedded in epoxy resin for the preparation of thin sections for electron microscopy. The results showed that the gold-labeled antibodies penetrated the entire thickness of cryosections, resulting in a high signal for PEPCK, but membranes in general, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in particular, were not identifiable as electron dense unit membranes. On the other hand, the vibratome sections of well-fixed tissue allowed good visualization of the ultrastructure of cellular organelles, with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum appearing as vesicles and tubules with electron dense unit membranes; however, the penetration of the gold-labeled antibody was limited to cells at the surface of the vibratome sections. In both procedures, PEPCK, as indicated by gold particles, is predominantly in the glycogen areas of the cytosome and not in mitochondria, nuclei, Golgi apparatus, or other cell organelles. Hepatocytes in periportal regions have a compact subcellular distribution of PEPCK shown by gold particles

  18. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during C4 photosynthetic isotope exchange and stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Asaph B; Baroli, Irene; Badger, Murray R; Ivakov, Alexander; Lea, Peter J; Leegood, Richard C; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) plays a key role during C(4) photosynthesis and is involved in anaplerotic metabolism, pH regulation, and stomatal opening. Heterozygous (Pp) and homozygous (pp) forms of a PEPC-deficient mutant of the C(4) dicot Amaranthus edulis were used to study the effect of reduced PEPC activity on CO(2) assimilation rates, stomatal conductance, and (13)CO(2) (Delta(13)C) and C(18)OO (Delta(18)O) isotope discrimination during leaf gas exchange. PEPC activity was reduced to 42% and 3% and the rates of CO(2) assimilation in air dropped to 78% and 10% of the wild-type values in the Pp and pp mutants, respectively. Stomatal conductance in air (531 mubar CO(2)) was similar in the wild-type and Pp mutant but the pp mutant had only 41% of the wild-type steady-state conductance under white light and the stomata opened more slowly in response to increased light or reduced CO(2) partial pressure, suggesting that the C(4) PEPC isoform plays an essential role in stomatal opening. There was little difference in Delta(13)C between the Pp mutant (3.0 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand) and wild type (3.3 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand), indicating that leakiness (), the ratio of CO(2) leak rate out of the bundle sheath to the rate of CO(2) supply by the C(4) cycle, a measure of the coordination of C(4) photosynthesis, was not affected by a 60% reduction in PEPC activity. In the pp mutant Delta(13)C was 16 per thousand +/- 3.2 per thousand, indicative of direct CO(2) fixation by Rubisco in the bundle sheath at ambient CO(2) partial pressure. Delta(18)O measurements indicated that the extent of isotopic equilibrium between leaf water and the CO(2) at the site of oxygen exchange () was low (0.6) in the wild-type and Pp mutant but increased to 0.9 in the pp mutant. We conclude that in vitro carbonic anhydrase activity overestimated as compared to values determined from Delta(18)O in wild-type plants. PMID:17827274

  19. Purification and characterization of a novel phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from banana fruit.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R D; Plaxton, W C

    1995-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from ripened banana (Musa cavendishii L.) fruits has been purified 127-fold to apparent homogeneity and a final specific activity of 32 mumol of oxaloacetate produced/min per mg of protein. Non-denaturing PAGE of the final preparation resolved a single protein-staining band that co-migrated with PEPC activity. Polypeptides of 103 (alpha-subunit) and 100 (beta-subunit) kDa, which stain for protein with equal intensity and cross-react strongly with anti-(maize leaf PEPC) immune serum, were observed following SDS/PAGE of the final preparation. CNBr cleavage patterns of the two subunits were similar, but not identical, suggesting that these polypeptides are related, but distinct, proteins. The enzyme's native molecular mass was estimated to be about 425 kDa. These data indicate that in contrast to the homotetrameric PEPC from most other sources, the banana fruit enzyme exists as an alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramer. Monospecific rabbit anti-(banana PEPC) immune serum effectively immunoprecipitated the activity of the purified enzyme. Immunoblotting studies established that the 100 kDa subunit did not arise via proteolysis of the 103 kDa subunit after tissue extraction, and that the subunit composition of banana PEPC remains uniform throughout the ripening process. PEPC displayed a typical pH activity profile with an alkaline optimum and activity rapidly decreasing below pH 7.0. Enzymic activity was absolutely dependent on the presence of a bivalent metal cation, with Mg2+ or Mn2+ fulfilling this requirement. The response of the PEPC activity to PEP concentration and to various effectors was greatly influenced by pH and glycerol addition to the assay. The enzyme was activated by hexose-monophosphates and potently inhibited by malate, succinate, aspartate and glutamate at pH 7.0, whereas the effect of these metabolites was considerably diminished or completely abolished at pH 8.0. The significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is

  20. The phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator is required for phenolic metabolism, palisade cell development, and plastid-dependent nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Streatfield, S J; Weber, A; Kinsman, E A; Häusler, R E; Li, J; Post-Beittenmiller, D; Kaiser, W M; Pyke, K A; Flügge, U I; Chory, J

    1999-01-01

    The Arabidopsis chlorophyll a/b binding protein (CAB) gene underexpressed 1 (cue1) mutant underexpresses light-regulated nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. cue1 also exhibits mesophyll-specific chloroplast and cellular defects, resulting in reticulate leaves. Both the gene underexpression and the leaf cell morphology phenotypes are dependent on light intensity. In this study, we determine that CUE1 encodes the plastid inner envelope phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator (PPT) and define amino acid residues that are critical for translocator function. The biosynthesis of aromatics is compromised in cue1, and the reticulate phenotype can be rescued by feeding aromatic amino acids. Determining that CUE1 encodes PPT indicates the in vivo role of the translocator in metabolic partitioning and reveals a mesophyll cell-specific requirement for the translocator in Arabidopsis leaves. The nuclear gene expression defects in cue1 suggest that a light intensity-dependent interorganellar signal is modulated through metabolites dependent on a plastid supply of phosphoenolpyruvate. PMID:10488230

  1. Phosphoenolpyruvate Provision to Plastids Is Essential for Gametophyte and Sporophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Veena; Löttgert, Tanja; Geimer, Stefan; Dörmann, Peter; Krüger, Stephan; Vijayakumar, Vinod; Schreiber, Lukas; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Kirstin; Feussner, Ivo; Marin, Kay; Staehr, Pia; Bell, Kirsten; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Häusler, Rainer E.

    2010-01-01

    Restriction of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) supply to plastids causes lethality of female and male gametophytes in Arabidopsis thaliana defective in both a phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator (PPT) of the inner envelope membrane and the plastid-localized enolase (ENO1) involved in glycolytic PEP provision. Homozygous double mutants of cue1 (defective in PPT1) and eno1 could not be obtained, and homozygous cue1 heterozygous eno1 mutants [cue1/eno1(+/−)] exhibited retarded vegetative growth, disturbed flower development, and up to 80% seed abortion. The phenotypes of diminished oil in seeds, reduced flavonoids and aromatic amino acids in flowers, compromised lignin biosynthesis in stems, and aberrant exine formation in pollen indicate that cue1/eno1(+/−) disrupts multiple pathways. While diminished fatty acid biosynthesis from PEP via plastidial pyruvate kinase appears to affect seed abortion, a restriction in the shikimate pathway affects formation of sporopollonin in the tapetum and lignin in the stem. Vegetative parts of cue1/eno1(+/−) contained increased free amino acids and jasmonic acid but had normal wax biosynthesis. ENO1 overexpression in cue1 rescued the leaf and root phenotypes, restored photosynthetic capacity, and improved seed yield and oil contents. In chloroplasts, ENO1 might be the only enzyme missing for a complete plastidic glycolysis. PMID:20798327

  2. Understanding of aerobic granulation enhanced by starvation in the perspective of quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Sun, Supu; Ma, Buyun; Zhang, Chen; Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Three sequencing batch reactors (M1, M2, and M3) were set up to investigate the influence of different lengths of starvation time (3, 5, and 7 h) on aerobic granulation in the perspective of quorum sensing (QS). Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) level was quantified to evaluate the QS ability of aerobic granules. The results indicated that AI-2 level increased steadily during a cycle of sequencing batch reactors, suggesting that starvation was closely related to AI-2 secretion. In the long-term operation, aerobic granules cultivated using a prolonged starvation period had a better integrity and a higher level of cell adhesiveness despite a slower formation speed. With the extension of the starvation period, the total amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) displayed an increasing tendency. EPS with large molecular weight (MW) also reached a higher level using a prolonged starvation period. However, a higher level of AI-2 and cell adhesiveness was observed in M2, which might be related to more stable granules. The results implied that the starvation period could trigger AI-2 secretion and promoted the production of large MW EPS, leading to cell adhesiveness enhancement and granule formation. Therefore, a combination of different starvation periods was proposed in this study in order to improve aerobic granulation. PMID:26695156

  3. An esterase gene from Lactobacillus casei cotranscribed with genes encoding a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and regulated by a LevR-like activator and sigma54 factor.

    PubMed

    Yebra, María J; Viana, Rosa; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2004-01-01

    A new esterase-encoding gene was found in the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei BL23 (CECT5275). It is located in an operon together with genes encoding the EIIA, EIIB, EIIC, and EIID proteins of a mannose class phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. After overproduction in Escherichia coli and purification, the esterase could hydrolyze acetyl sugars, hence the operon was named esu for esterase-sugar uptake genes. Upstream of the genes encoding the EII components (esuABCD) and the esterase (esuE), two genes transcribed in the opposite sense were found which encode a Bacillus subtilis LevR-like transcriptional activator (esuR) and a sigma54-like transcriptional factor (rpoN). As compared with the wild-type strain, elevated fructose phosphorylation was detected in L. casei mutants constitutively expressing the esu operon. However, none of the many sugars tested could induce the esu operon. The fact that EsuE exhibits esterase activity on acetyl sugars suggests that this operon could be involved in the uptake and metabolism of esterified sugars. Expression of the esu operon is similar to that of the B. subtilis lev operon: it contains a -12,-24 consensus promoter typical of sigma54-regulated genes, and EsuR and RpoN are essential for its transcription which is negatively regulated by EIIB(Esu). The esuABCDE transcription unit represents the first sigma54-regulated operon in lactobacilli. Furthermore, replacement of His852 in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system regulation domain II of EsuR with Ala indicated that the transcription activator function of EsuR is inhibited by EIIB(Esu)-mediated phosphorylation at His852. PMID:15925903

  4. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Neely, Greg G.; Masek, Pavel; Gibbs, Allen G.; Keene, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, revealing strong genetic relationships between sleep and nutrient availability. To determine the genetic and evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient deprivation, we assessed sleep in flies selected for desiccation or starvation resistance. While starvation resistant flies have higher levels of triglycerides, desiccation resistant flies have enhanced glycogen stores, indicative of distinct physiological adaptations to food or water scarcity. Strikingly, selection for starvation resistance, but not desiccation resistance, leads to increased sleep, indicating that enhanced sleep is not a generalized consequence of higher energy stores. Thermotolerance is not altered in starvation or desiccation resistant flies, providing further evidence for context-specific adaptation to environmental stressors. F2 hybrid flies were generated by crossing starvation selected flies with desiccation selected flies, and the relationship between nutrient deprivation and sleep was examined. Hybrids exhibit a positive correlation between starvation resistance and sleep, while no interaction was detected between desiccation resistance and sleep, revealing that prolonged sleep provides an adaptive response to starvation stress. Therefore, these findings demonstrate context-specific evolution of enhanced sleep in response to chronic food deprivation, and provide a model for understanding the evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient availability. PMID:26147198

  5. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Slocumb, Melissa E; Regalado, Josue M; Yoshizawa, Masato; Neely, Greg G; Masek, Pavel; Gibbs, Allen G; Keene, Alex C

    2015-01-01

    Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, revealing strong genetic relationships between sleep and nutrient availability. To determine the genetic and evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient deprivation, we assessed sleep in flies selected for desiccation or starvation resistance. While starvation resistant flies have higher levels of triglycerides, desiccation resistant flies have enhanced glycogen stores, indicative of distinct physiological adaptations to food or water scarcity. Strikingly, selection for starvation resistance, but not desiccation resistance, leads to increased sleep, indicating that enhanced sleep is not a generalized consequence of higher energy stores. Thermotolerance is not altered in starvation or desiccation resistant flies, providing further evidence for context-specific adaptation to environmental stressors. F2 hybrid flies were generated by crossing starvation selected flies with desiccation selected flies, and the relationship between nutrient deprivation and sleep was examined. Hybrids exhibit a positive correlation between starvation resistance and sleep, while no interaction was detected between desiccation resistance and sleep, revealing that prolonged sleep provides an adaptive response to starvation stress. Therefore, these findings demonstrate context-specific evolution of enhanced sleep in response to chronic food deprivation, and provide a model for understanding the evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient availability. PMID:26147198

  6. Transgenerational Effects of Early Life Starvation on Growth, Reproduction, and Stress Resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jobson, Meghan A; Jordan, James M; Sandrof, Moses A; Hibshman, Jonathan D; Lennox, Ashley L; Baugh, L Ryan

    2015-09-01

    Starvation during early development can have lasting effects that influence organismal fitness and disease risk. We characterized the long-term phenotypic consequences of starvation during early larval development in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine potential fitness effects and develop it as a model for mechanistic studies. We varied the amount of time that larvae were developmentally arrested by starvation after hatching ("L1 arrest"). Worms recovering from extended starvation grew slowly, taking longer to become reproductive, and were smaller as adults. Fecundity was also reduced, with the smallest individuals most severely affected. Feeding behavior was impaired, possibly contributing to deficits in growth and reproduction. Previously starved larvae were more sensitive to subsequent starvation, suggesting decreased fitness even in poor conditions. We discovered that smaller larvae are more resistant to heat, but this correlation does not require passage through L1 arrest. The progeny of starved animals were also adversely affected: Embryo quality was diminished, incidence of males was increased, progeny were smaller, and their brood size was reduced. However, the progeny and grandprogeny of starved larvae were more resistant to starvation. In addition, the progeny, grandprogeny, and great-grandprogeny were more resistant to heat, suggesting epigenetic inheritance of acquired resistance to starvation and heat. Notably, such resistance was inherited exclusively from individuals most severely affected by starvation in the first generation, suggesting an evolutionary bet-hedging strategy. In summary, our results demonstrate that starvation affects a variety of life-history traits in the exposed animals and their descendants, some presumably reflecting fitness costs but others potentially adaptive. PMID:26187123

  7. A single inhibitory upstream open reading frame (uORF) is sufficient to regulate Candida albicans GCN4 translation in response to amino acid starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Arunkumar; Grant, Chris M

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen that responds to various environmental cues as part of its infection mechanism. We show here that the expression of C. albicans GCN4, which encodes a transcription factor that regulates morphogenetic and metabolic responses, is translationally regulated in response to amino acid starvation induced by exposure to the histidine analog 3-aminotriazole (3AT). However, in contrast to the well-known translational control mechanisms that regulate yeast GCN4 and mammalian ATF4 expression via multiple upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in their 5'-leader sequences, a single inhibitory uORF is necessary and sufficient for C. albicans GCN4 translational control. The 5'-leader sequence of GCN4 contains three uORFs, but uORF3 alone is sufficient for translational regulation. Under nonstress conditions, uORF3 inhibits GCN4 translation. Amino acid starvation conditions promote Gcn2-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α and leaky ribosomal scanning to bypass uORF3, inducing GCN4 translation. GCN4 expression is also transcriptionally regulated, although maximal induction is observed at higher concentrations of 3AT compared with translational regulation. C. albicans GCN4 expression is therefore highly regulated by both transcriptional and translational control mechanisms. We suggest that it is particularly important that Gcn4 levels are tightly controlled since Gcn4 regulates morphogenetic changes during amino acid starvation conditions, which are important determinants of virulence in this fungus. PMID:24570481

  8. (1)H NMR metabolomic study of auxotrophic starvation in yeast using Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares for Pathway Analysis.

    PubMed

    Puig-Castellví, Francesc; Alfonso, Ignacio; Piña, Benjamin; Tauler, Romà

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of specific metabolic pathways constitutes the mode of action of many known toxicants and it is responsible for the adverse phenotypes associated to human genetic defects. Conversely, many industrial applications rely on metabolic alterations of diverse microorganisms, whereas many therapeutic drugs aim to selectively disrupt pathogens' metabolism. In this work we analyzed metabolic changes induced by auxotrophic starvation conditions in yeast in a non-targeted approach, using one-dimensional proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and chemometric analyses. Analysis of the raw spectral datasets showed specific changes linked to the different stages during unrestricted yeast growth, as well as specific changes linked to each of the four tested starvation conditions (L-methionine, L-histidine, L-leucine and uracil). Analysis of changes in concentrations of more than 40 metabolites by Multivariate Curve Resolution - Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) showed the normal progression of key metabolites during lag, exponential and stationary unrestricted growth phases, while reflecting the metabolic blockage induced by the starvation conditions. In this case, different metabolic intermediates accumulated over time, allowing identification of the different metabolic pathways specifically affected by each gene disruption. This synergy between NMR metabolomics and molecular biology may have clear implications for both genetic diagnostics and drug development. PMID:27485935

  9. 1H NMR metabolomic study of auxotrophic starvation in yeast using Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares for Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Castellví, Francesc; Alfonso, Ignacio; Piña, Benjamin; Tauler, Romà

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of specific metabolic pathways constitutes the mode of action of many known toxicants and it is responsible for the adverse phenotypes associated to human genetic defects. Conversely, many industrial applications rely on metabolic alterations of diverse microorganisms, whereas many therapeutic drugs aim to selectively disrupt pathogens’ metabolism. In this work we analyzed metabolic changes induced by auxotrophic starvation conditions in yeast in a non-targeted approach, using one-dimensional proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and chemometric analyses. Analysis of the raw spectral datasets showed specific changes linked to the different stages during unrestricted yeast growth, as well as specific changes linked to each of the four tested starvation conditions (L-methionine, L-histidine, L-leucine and uracil). Analysis of changes in concentrations of more than 40 metabolites by Multivariate Curve Resolution – Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) showed the normal progression of key metabolites during lag, exponential and stationary unrestricted growth phases, while reflecting the metabolic blockage induced by the starvation conditions. In this case, different metabolic intermediates accumulated over time, allowing identification of the different metabolic pathways specifically affected by each gene disruption. This synergy between NMR metabolomics and molecular biology may have clear implications for both genetic diagnostics and drug development. PMID:27485935

  10. Increase of chromium tolerance in Scenedesmus acutus after sulfur starvation: Chromium uptake and compartmentalization in two strains with different sensitivities to Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Marieschi, M; Gorbi, G; Zanni, C; Sardella, A; Torelli, A

    2015-10-01

    In photosynthetic organisms sulfate constitutes the main sulfur source for the biosynthesis of GSH and its precursor Cys. Hence, sulfur availability can modulate the capacity to cope with environmental stresses, a phenomenon known as SIR/SED (Sulfur Induced Resistance or Sulfur Enhanced Defence). Since chromate may compete for sulfate transport into the cells, in this study chromium accumulation and tolerance were investigated in relation to sulfur availability in two strains of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus acutus with different Cr-sensitivities. Paradoxically, sulfur deprivation has been demonstrated to induce a transient increase of Cr-tolerance in both strains. Sulfur deprivation is known to enhance the sulfate uptake/assimilation pathway leading to important consequences on Cr-tolerance: (i) reduced chromate uptake due to the induction of high affinity sulfate transporters (ii) higher production of cysteine and GSH which can play a role both through the formation of unsoluble complexes and their sequestration in inert compartments. To investigate the role of the above mentioned mechanisms, Cr accumulation in total cells and in different cell compartments (cell wall, membranes, soluble and miscellaneous fractions) was analyzed in both sulfur-starved and unstarved cells. Both strains mainly accumulated chromium in the soluble fraction, but the uptake was higher in the wild-type. In this type a short period of sulfur starvation before Cr(VI) treatment lowered chromium accumulation to the level observed in the unstarved Cr-tolerant strain, in which Cr uptake seems instead less influenced by S-starvation, since no significant decrease was observed. The increase in Cr-tolerance following S-starvation seems thus to rely on different mechanisms in the two strains, suggesting the induction of a mechanism constitutively active in the Cr-tolerant strain, maybe a high affinity sulfate transporter also in the wild-type. Changes observed in the cell wall and

  11. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Phosphorylation by Metabolites and Abscisic Acid during the Development and Germination of Barley Seeds1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Feria, Ana-Belén; Alvarez, Rosario; Cochereau, Ludivine; Vidal, Jean; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Echevarría, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    During barley (Hordeum vulgare) seed development, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity increased and PEPC-specific antibodies revealed housekeeping (103-kD) and inducible (108-kD) subunits. Bacterial-type PEPC fragments were immunologically detected in denatured protein extracts from dry and imbibed conditions; however, on nondenaturing gels, the activity of the recently reported octameric PEPC (in castor [Ricinus communis] oil seeds) was not detected. The phosphorylation state of the PEPC, as judged by l-malate 50% inhibition of initial activity values, phosphoprotein chromatography, and immunodetection of the phosphorylated N terminus, was found to be high between 8 and 18 d postanthesis (DPA) and during imbibition. In contrast, the enzyme appeared to be in a low phosphorylation state from 20 DPA up to dry seed. The time course of 32/36-kD, Ca2+-independent PEPC kinase activity exhibited a substantial increase after 30 DPA that did not coincide with the PEPC phosphorylation profile. This kinase was found to be inhibited by l-malate and not by putative protein inhibitors, and the PEPC phosphorylation status correlated with high glucose-6-phosphate to malate ratios, thereby suggesting an in vivo metabolic control of the kinase. PEPC phosphorylation was also regulated by photosynthate supply at 11 DPA. In addition, when fed exogenously to imbibing seeds, abscisic acid significantly increased PEPC kinase activity. This was further enhanced by the cytosolic protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide but blocked by protease inhibitors, thereby suggesting that the phytohormone acts on the stability of the kinase. We propose that a similar abscisic acid-dependent effect may contribute to produce the increase in PEPC kinase activity during desiccation stages. PMID:18753284

  12. The Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System in Group A Streptococcus Acts To Reduce Streptolysin S Activity and Lesion Severity during Soft Tissue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Kanika; Le, Tuquynh; Jamin, Rebecca; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining essential nutrients, such as carbohydrates, is an important process for bacterial pathogens to successfully colonize host tissues. The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is the primary mechanism by which bacteria transport sugars and sense the carbon state of the cell. The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a fastidious microorganism that has adapted to a variety of niches in the human body to elicit a wide array of diseases. A ΔptsI mutant (enzyme I [EI] deficient) generated in three different strains of M1T1 GAS was unable to grow on multiple carbon sources (PTS and non-PTS). Complementation with ptsI expressed under its native promoter in single copy was able to rescue the growth defect of the mutant. In a mouse model of GAS soft tissue infection, all ΔptsI mutants exhibited a significantly larger and more severe ulcerative lesion than mice infected with the wild type. Increased transcript levels of sagA and streptolysin S (SLS) activity during exponential-phase growth was observed. We hypothesized that early onset of SLS activity would correlate with the severity of the lesions induced by the ΔptsI mutant. In fact, infection of mice with a ΔptsI sagB double mutant resulted in a lesion comparable to that of either the wild type or a sagB mutant alone. Therefore, a functional PTS is not required for subcutaneous skin infection in mice; however, it does play a role in coordinating virulence factor expression and disease progression. PMID:24379283

  13. Activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol represses transcription of the gene for the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) by deacetylating hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cytosolic isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK-C) is a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. While this enzyme is often over-expressed in diabetes and obesity, studies showed that decrease in its expression results in lessening the diseases condition in animal...

  14. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  15. LIV-1 ZIP ectodomain shedding in prion-infected mice resembles cellular response to transition metal starvation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Sepehr; Salehzadeh, Ashkan; Huo, Hairu; Reginold, William; Pocanschi, Cosmin L; Ren, Hezhen; Wang, Hansen; So, Kelvin; Sato, Christine; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Strome, Robert; Trimble, William S; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Westaway, David; Carlson, George A; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2012-09-28

    We recently documented the co-purification of members of the LIV-1 subfamily of ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like Protein) zinc transporters (LZTs) with the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and, subsequently, established that the prion gene family descended from an ancestral LZT gene. Here, we begin to address whether the study of LZTs can shed light on the biology of prion proteins in health and disease. Starting from an observation of an abnormal LZT immunoreactive band in prion-infected mice, subsequent cell biological analyses uncovered a surprisingly coordinated biology of ZIP10 (an LZT member) and prion proteins that involves alterations to N-glycosylation and endoproteolysis in response to manipulations to the extracellular divalent cation milieu. Starving cells of manganese or zinc, but not copper, causes shedding of the N1 fragment of PrP(C) and of the ectodomain of ZIP10. For ZIP10, this posttranslational biology is influenced by an interaction between its PrP-like ectodomain and a conserved metal coordination site within its C-terminal multi-spanning transmembrane domain. The transition metal starvation-induced cleavage of ZIP10 can be differentiated by an immature N-glycosylation signature from a constitutive cleavage targeting the same site. Data from this work provide a first glimpse into a hitherto neglected molecular biology that ties PrP to its LZT cousins and suggest that manganese or zinc starvation may contribute to the etiology of prion disease in mice. PMID:22687393

  16. Ligninolytic enzyme system of Phanaerochaete chrysosporium: synthesized in the absence of lignin in response to nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Keyser, P; Kirk, T K; Zeikus, J G

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between growth, nutrient nitrogen assimilation, and the appearance of ligninolytic activity was examined in stationary batch cultures of the wood-destroying hymenomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burds. grown under conditions optimized for lignin metabolism. A reproducible sequence of events followed inoculation: 0 to 24 h, germination, linear growth, and depletion of nutrient nitrogen; 24 to 48 h, cessation of linear growth and derepression of ammonium permease activity (demonstrating nitrogen starvation); 72 to 96 h, appearance of ligninolytic activity (synthetic 14C-lignin leads to 14CO2). Experiments with cycloheximide demonstrated that appearance of ligninolytic activity occurs irrespective of the presence of lignin; lignin did not induce additional activity. Addition of NH4+ to cultures immediately prior to the time of appearance of the ligninolytic system delayed its appearance, suggesting that the NH4+ led to interference with synthesis of the enzyme system. Addition of NH4+ to ligninolytic cultures resulted in an eventual, temporary decrease in ligninolytic activity. The results suggest that all or essential protein components of the ligninolytic enzyme system are synthesized as part of a series of physiological ("secondary metabolic") events that are initiated by nutrient nitrogen starvation. PMID:690075

  17. Biotin starvation causes mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation and partial rescue by the SIRT3-like deacetylase Hst4p

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Christian T.; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B.; Young, Clifford; Larsen, Sara C.; Poulsen, Jon W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Palmqvist, Eva A.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jensen, Per B.; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The essential vitamin biotin is a covalent and tenaciously attached prosthetic group in several carboxylases that play important roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. Here we describe increased acetyl-CoA levels and mitochondrial hyperacetylation as downstream metabolic effects of biotin deficiency. Upregulated mitochondrial acetylation sites correlate with the cellular deficiency of the Hst4p deacetylase, and a biotin-starvation-induced accumulation of Hst4p in mitochondria supports a role for Hst4p in lowering mitochondrial acetylation. We show that biotin starvation and knockout of Hst4p cause alterations in cellular respiration and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that Hst4p plays a pivotal role in biotin metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis, and supports that Hst4p is a functional yeast homologue of the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3. With biotin deficiency being involved in various metabolic disorders, this study provides valuable insight into the metabolic effects biotin exerts on eukaryotic cells. PMID:26158509

  18. Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation: a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    Torres‐Ruiz, José M.; Poyatos, Rafael; Martinez‐Vilalta, Jordi; Meir, Patrick; Cochard, Hervé; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Understanding physiological processes involved in drought‐induced mortality is important for predicting the future of forests and for modelling the carbon and water cycles. Recent research has highlighted the variable risks of carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in drought‐exposed trees. However, little is known about the specific responses of leaves and supporting twigs, despite their critical role in balancing carbon acquisition and water loss. Comparing healthy (non‐defoliated) and unhealthy (defoliated) Scots pine at the same site, we measured the physiological variables involved in regulating carbon and water resources. Defoliated trees showed different responses to summer drought compared with non‐defoliated trees. Defoliated trees maintained gas exchange while non‐defoliated trees reduced photosynthesis and transpiration during the drought period. At the branch scale, very few differences were observed in non‐structural carbohydrate concentrations between health classes. However, defoliated trees tended to have lower water potentials and smaller hydraulic safety margins. While non‐defoliated trees showed a typical response to drought for an isohydric species, the physiology appears to be driven in defoliated trees by the need to maintain carbon resources in twigs. These responses put defoliated trees at higher risk of branch hydraulic failure and help explain the interaction between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in dying trees. PMID:25997464

  19. Development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa mushroom morphology and cavity formation by iron-starvation: a mathematical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James K.; Badawy, Hope T.; Clemons, Curtis; Kreider, K.L.; Wilber, Pat; Milsted, Amy; Young, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We present a mathematical model of mushroom-like architecture and cavity formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We demonstrate that a proposed disparity in internal friction between the stalk and cap extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) leads to spatial variation in volumetric expansion sufficient to produce the mushroom morphology. The capability of diffusible signals to induce the formation of a fluid-filled cavity within the cap is then investigated. We assume that conversion of bacteria to the planktonic state within the cap occurs in response to the accumulation or depletion of some signal molecule. We (a) show that neither simple nutrient starvation nor signal production by one or more subpopulations of bacteria is sufficient to trigger localized cavity formation. We then (b) demonstrate various hypothetical scenarios that could result in localized cavity formation. Finally, we (c) model iron availability as a detachment signal and show simulation results demonstrating cavity formation by iron starvation. We conclude that iron availability is a plausible mechanism by which fluid-filled cavities form in the cap region of mushroom-like structures. PMID:22677397

  20. LIV-1 ZIP Ectodomain Shedding in Prion-Infected Mice Resembles Cellular Response to Transition Metal Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Reginold, William; Pocanschi, Cosmin L.; Ren, Hezhen; Wang, Hansen; So, Kelvin; Sato, Christine; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Strome, Robert; Trimble, William S.; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Westaway, David; Carlson, George A.; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    We recently documented the co-purification of members of the LIV-1 subfamily of ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like Protein) zinc transporters (LZTs) with the cellular prion protein (PrPC) and, subsequently, established that the prion gene family descended from an ancestral LZT gene. Here, we begin to address whether the study of LZTs can shed light on the biology of prion proteins in health and disease. Starting from an observation of an abnormal LZT immunoreactive band in prion-infected mice, subsequent cell biological analyses uncovered a surprisingly coordinated biology of ZIP10 (an LZT member) and prion proteins that involves alterations to N-glycosylation and endoproteolysis in response to manipulations to the extracellular divalent cation milieu. Starving cells of manganese or zinc, but not copper, causes shedding of the N1 fragment of PrPC and of the ectodomain of ZIP10. For ZIP10, this posttranslational biology is influenced by an interaction between its PrP-like ectodomain and a conserved metal coordination site within its C-terminal multi-spanning transmembrane domain. The transition metal starvation-induced cleavage of ZIP10 can be differentiated by an immature N-glycosylation signature from a constitutive cleavage targeting the same site. Data from this work provide a first glimpse into a hitherto neglected molecular biology that ties PrP to its LZT cousins and suggest that manganese or zinc starvation may contribute to the etiology of prion disease in mice. PMID:22687393

  1. Binucleated HeLa cells are formed by cytokinesis failure in starvation and keep the potential of proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazunori; Watanabe, Sumiko; Hayashida, Ryo; Sugishima, Setsuo; Iwasaka, Tsuyoshi; Kaku, Tsunehisa

    2016-08-01

    Many cytological studies have reported that the numbers of binucleated cells were elevated in various tumors. However, binucleated cells are observed in not only malignant tumors but also normal tissues. Thus, the clinical significance of binucleated cells is controversial. Here we attempted to elucidate the characteristics of binucleated HeLa cells using time-lapse microscopy. To examine the frequency, viability, proliferation, and formation mechanism of binucleated cells, we grew HeLa cells on chamber slides and tissue culture dishes in DMEM supplemented with (10, 3, 1 and 0.5 % media) and without fetal bovine serum (0 % medium). The proliferation was evaluated by the medium improvement examination (cultured for 2 more days in 10% medium after culturing in 0% medium; starvation). In the 0 % medium, 150 binucleated cells were formed by cytokinesis failure. There were significantly more binucleated cells in the 0 % medium than in the 10, 3, 1 and 0.5 % media. About twice the number of binucleated cells underwent mitosis in the improvement examinations than in the serum-free examination. We found here that starvation induced the binucleation of HeLa cells and that some binucleated cells can reproduce. These findings might be helpful for understanding binucleated cells in tumors. PMID:25894790

  2. Increased expression of genes involved in uptake and degradation of murein tripeptide under nitrogen starvation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Umji; Park, Young-Ha; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Lee, Chang-Ro

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan (also known as murein) is an important envelope component of bacteria, and its turnover usually takes place at considerable levels during normal growth. Amino sugars and murein tripeptide resulting from murein degradation are used for resynthesis of peptidoglycan or as self-generated nutrients or energy sources for cell growth. PgrR (regulator of peptide glycan recycling; formerly YcjZ) was recently identified as a repressor of several genes participating in uptake and degradation of murein tripeptide. In this study, we identified the ycjG gene involved in murein tripeptide degradation as a new direct target of PgrR. The expression of PgrR-regulated genes including ycjY, mppA, mpaA and ycjG was repressed in the presence of a good nitrogen source, but their expression increased under poor nitrogen conditions. Under nitrogen starvation, the pgrR mutant cells exhibited faster growth than wild-type cells, implying that derepression of genes under the control of PgrR may help cells overcome nitrogen limitation. Therefore, these results suggest that nitrogen starvation induces derepression of PgrR-controlled genes involved in uptake and degradation of murein tripeptide, and this may stimulate the utilization of murein tripeptide as a nitrogen source. PMID:27231238

  3. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality. PMID:25810719

  4. RESPONSE OF THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS OF PHAEODACTYLYM TRICORNUTUM (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) TO NITRATE, PHOSPHATE OR IRON STARVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of nitrate, phosphate, and iron starvation and resupply on photosynthetic pigments, selected photosynthetic proteins, and photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry were examined in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin (CCMP1327). lthough cell chlorophyll a (chl a) c...

  5. Evidence for the adverse effect of starvation on bone quality: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200-800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality. PMID:25810719

  6. Effect of nitrogen starvation on the morphology and ultrastructure of the cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, S E; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A; Balkwill, D L

    1985-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen starvation on the morphology and ultrastructure of the branching, filamentous cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus were examined with light and electron microscopy. The internal ultrastructural characteristics of vegetative cells changed markedly during nitrogen starvation. Carboxysomes were degraded, while polyphosphate bodies and lipid bodies accumulated. The ultrastructure of mature heterocysts was also affected by nitrogen starvation; their intracytoplasmic membranes vesiculated to form vacuolelike structures and, eventually, large empty regions in the cytoplasm. Nitrogen starvation stimulated extensive heterocyst differentiation in M. laminosus, producing heterocyst frequencies of 17.5% in narrow filaments and 28.3% in wide filaments within 44 h after transfer to N-free conditions. Cells in wide filaments differentiated so extensively that only 16.8% of them failed to initiate the differentiation process within 44 h. Images PMID:3918986

  7. Escherichia coli Resistance to Chlorine and Glutathione Synthesis in Response to Oxygenation and Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Saby, Sébastien; Leroy, Pierre; Block, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and resistance to chlorine were measured for two isogenic Escherichia coli strains stressed by oxygenation and/or starvation. The E. coli mutant deficient in GSH was not more sensitive to the oxidant than its parent strain when the bacteria were cultured with a low oxygenation rate. Starvation or oxygenation increased the resistance of the parent strain to chlorine, while the resistance of the deficient strain remained unchanged. PMID:10584025

  8. SAR11 lipid renovation in response to phosphate starvation

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Paul; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Thrash, J. Cameron; White, Angelicque; Zhao, Yanlin; Campbell, Emily O.; Fredricks, Helen F.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton inhabiting oligotrophic ocean gyres actively reduce their phosphorus demand by replacing polar membrane phospholipids with those lacking phosphorus. Although the synthesis of nonphosphorus lipids is well documented in some heterotrophic bacterial lineages, phosphorus-free lipid synthesis in oligotrophic marine chemoheterotrophs has not been directly demonstrated, implying they are disadvantaged in phosphate-deplete ecosystems, relative to phytoplankton. Here, we show the SAR11 clade chemoheterotroph Pelagibacter sp. str. HTCC7211 renovates membrane lipids when phosphate starved by replacing a portion of its phospholipids with monoglucosyl- and glucuronosyl-diacylglycerols and by synthesizing new ornithine lipids. Lipid profiles of cells grown with excess phosphate consisted entirely of phospholipids. Conversely, up to 40% of the total lipids were converted to nonphosphorus lipids when cells were starved for phosphate, or when growing on methylphosphonate. Cells sequentially limited by phosphate and methylphosphonate transformed >75% of their lipids to phosphorus-free analogs. During phosphate starvation, a four-gene cluster was significantly up-regulated that likely encodes the enzymes responsible for lipid renovation. These genes were found in Pelagibacterales strains isolated from a phosphate-deficient ocean gyre, but not in other strains from coastal environments, suggesting alternate lipid synthesis is a specific adaptation to phosphate scarcity. Similar gene clusters are found in the genomes of other marine α-proteobacteria, implying lipid renovation is a common strategy used by heterotrophic cells to reduce their requirement for phosphorus in oligotrophic habitats. PMID:26056292

  9. Depletion-Controlled Starvation of a Diffusing Forager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénichou, O.; Redner, S.

    2014-12-01

    We study the starvation of a lattice random walker in which each site initially contains one food unit and the walker can travel S steps without food before starving. When the walker encounters food, it is completely eaten, and the walker can again travel S steps without food before starving. When the walker hits an empty site, the time until the walker starves decreases by 1. In spatial dimension d =1 , the average lifetime of the walker ⟨τ ⟩∝S , while for d >2 , ⟨τ ⟩≃exp (Sω) , with ω →1 as d →∞ ; the latter behavior suggests that the upper critical dimension is infinite. In the marginal case of d =2 , ⟨τ ⟩∝Sz , with z ≈2 . Long-lived walks explore a highly ramified region so they always remain close to sources of food and the distribution of distinct sites visited does not obey single-parameter scaling.

  10. Adenylate Energy Charge in Escherichia coli During Growth and Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Astrid G.; Fall, Lana; Atkinson, Daniel E.

    1971-01-01

    The value of the adenylate energy charge, [(adenosine triphosphate) + ½ (adenosine diphosphate)]/[(adenosine triphosphate) + (adenosine diphosphate) + (adenosine monophosphate)], in Escherichia coli cells during growth is about 0.8. During the stationary phase after cessation of growth, or during starvation in carbon-limited cultures, the energy charge declines slowly to a value of about 0.5, and then falls more rapidly. During the slow decline in energy charge, all the cells are capable of forming colonies, but a rapid fall in viability coincides with the steep drop in energy charge. These results suggest that growth can occur only at energy charge values above about 0.8, that viability is maintained at values between 0.8 and 0.5, and that cells die at values below 0.5. Tabulation of adenylate concentrations previously reported for various organisms and tissues supports the prediction, based on enzyme kinetic observations in vitro, that the energy charge is stabilized near 0.85 in intact metabolizing cells of a wide variety of types. PMID:4333317

  11. Voluntary palliated starvation: a lawful and ethical way to die?

    PubMed

    White, Ben; Willmott, Lindy; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, individuals want control over their own destiny. This includes the way in which they die and the timing of their death. The desire for self-determination at the end of life is one of the drivers for the ever-increasing number of jurisdictions overseas that are legalising voluntary euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, and for the continuous attempts to reform State and Territory law in Australia. Despite public support for law reform in this field, legislative change in Australia is unlikely in the near future given the current political landscape. This article argues that there may be another solution which provides competent adults with control over their death and to have any pain and symptoms managed by doctors, but which is currently lawful and consistent with prevailing ethical principles. "Voluntary palliated starvation" refers to the process which occurs when a competent individual chooses to stop eating and drinking, and receives palliative care to address pain, suffering and symptoms that may be experienced by the individual as he or she approaches death. The article argues that, at least in some circumstances, such a death would be lawful for the individual and doctors involved, and consistent with principles of medical ethics. PMID:25715538

  12. Starvation resistance is positively correlated with body lipid proportion in five wild caught Drosophila simulans populations.

    PubMed

    Ballard, J William O; Melvin, R G; Simpson, S J

    2008-09-01

    Stress resistance traits in Drosophila often show clinal variation, suggesting that selection affects resistance traits either directly or indirectly. One of the most common causes of stress for animals is the shortage or suboptimal quality of food, and individuals within many species must survive periods of starvation or exposure to nutritionally imbalanced diets. This study determines the relationship between starvation resistance, body lipid content, and lifespan in five recently collected Drosophila simulans populations from four distinct geographic localities. Despite rearing under standard nutritional conditions, we observed significant differences in starvation resistance between sexes and between localities. If body lipid proportion is included as a covariate in statistical analysis the difference between the sexes remains (slopes are parallel, with males more susceptible than females to starvation across all lipid proportions) but the effect of locality disappears. This result suggests that flies from different localities differ in their susceptibility to starvation because of differences in their propensity to store body lipid. We observed a negative relationship between lifespan and starvation resistance in both males and females, suggesting a fitness cost to increasing lipid reserves. These data raise issues about the role of diet in maintaining life history trait variation within and among populations. In conclusion, we show many similarities and surprising differences in life history traits between D. simulans and Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:18706419

  13. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process as a probable mechanism for the diurnal regulatory changes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in CAM plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Vidal, J; Le Marechal, P; Gadal, P; Queiroz, O; Kluge, M; Kruger, I

    1986-04-14

    Day and night forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) (PEPC) were extracted from leaves of the CAM plants Kalanchoe daigremontiana, K. tubiflora and K. blossfeldiana previously fed with [32P] labelled phosphate solution. A one-step immunochemical purification followed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed that, in all species, the night form of the enzyme was phosphorylated and not the day form. Limited acid hydrolysis of the night form and two-dimensional separation identified predominantly labelled phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. In vitro addition of exogenous acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) to desalted night form-containing extracts resulted within 30 min in a shift in PEPC enzymic properties similar to the in vivo changes from night to day form. It is suggested that phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the enzyme could be the primary in vivo process which might explain the observed rhythmicity of enzymic properties. PMID:3707571

  14. Deletion Mapping of the Genes Coding for HPr and Enzyme I of the Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Cordaro, J. Christopher; Roseman, Saul

    1972-01-01

    Sugars transported by a bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) require two soluble proteins: HPr, a low-molecular-weight phosphate-carrier protein, and enzyme I. The structural genes coding for HPr (ptsH) and Enzyme I (ptsI) are shown to be cotransducible in Salmonella typhimurium. The gene order of this region of the Salmonella chromosome is cysA-trzA-ptsH-ptsI...(crr). A method for the isolation of trzA-pts deletion is described. One class of pts deletions extends through ptsH and into ptsI; a second class includes both ptsH and ptsI and extends into or through the crr gene. The crr gene either codes for or regulates the synthesis of a third PTS protein (factor III) which is sugar-specific. A hypothesis is presented for a mechanism of deletion formation. PMID:4562394

  15. Cytosolic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Does Not Solely Control the Rate of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in the Intact Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Shawn C.; He, Tian Teng; Yan, Zheng; Lindner, Jill; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY When dietary carbohydrate is unavailable, glucose required to support metabolism in vital tissues is generated via gluconeogenesis in the liver. Expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), commonly considered the control point for liver gluconeogenesis, is normally regulated by circulating hormones to match systemic glucose demand. However, this regulation fails in diabetes. Because other molecular and metabolic factors can also influence gluconeogenesis, the explicit role of PEPCK protein content in the control of gluconeogenesis was unclear. In this study, metabolic control of liver gluconeogenesis was quantified in groups of mice with varying PEPCK protein content. Surprisingly, livers with a 90% reduction in PEPCK content showed only a ~40% reduction in gluconeogenic flux, indicating a lower than expected capacity for PEPCK protein content to control gluconeogenesis. However, PEPCK flux correlated tightly with TCA cycle activity, suggesting that under some conditions in mice, PEPCK expression must coordinate with hepatic energy metabolism to control gluconeogenesis. PMID:17403375

  16. The negative effect of starvation and the positive effect of mild thermal stress on thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Inon; Wexler, Yonatan; MacMillan, Heath Andrew; Presman, Shira; Simson, Eddie; Rosenstein, Shai

    2016-04-01

    The thermal tolerance of a terrestrial insect species can vary as a result of differences in population origin, developmental stage, age, and sex, as well as via phenotypic plasticity induced in response to changes in the abiotic environment. Here, we studied the effects of both starvation and mild cold and heat shocks on the thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Starvation led to impaired cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time, and this effect, which was stronger in males than females, persisted for longer than 2 days but less than 7 days. Heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time, was not affected by starvation. Our results highlight the difficulty faced by insects when encountering multiple stressors simultaneously and indicate physiological trade-offs. Both mild cold and heat shocks led to improved heat tolerance in both sexes. It could be that both mild shocks lead to the expression of heat shock proteins, enhancing heat tolerance in the short run. Cold tolerance was not affected by previous mild cold shock, suggesting that such a cold shock, as a single event, causes little stress and hence elicits only weak physiological reaction. However, previous mild heat stress led to improved cold tolerance but only in males. Our results point to both hardening and cross-tolerance between cold and heat shocks. PMID:26888763

  17. The negative effect of starvation and the positive effect of mild thermal stress on thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Inon; Wexler, Yonatan; MacMillan, Heath Andrew; Presman, Shira; Simson, Eddie; Rosenstein, Shai

    2016-04-01

    The thermal tolerance of a terrestrial insect species can vary as a result of differences in population origin, developmental stage, age, and sex, as well as via phenotypic plasticity induced in response to changes in the abiotic environment. Here, we studied the effects of both starvation and mild cold and heat shocks on the thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Starvation led to impaired cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time, and this effect, which was stronger in males than females, persisted for longer than 2 days but less than 7 days. Heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time, was not affected by starvation. Our results highlight the difficulty faced by insects when encountering multiple stressors simultaneously and indicate physiological trade-offs. Both mild cold and heat shocks led to improved heat tolerance in both sexes. It could be that both mild shocks lead to the expression of heat shock proteins, enhancing heat tolerance in the short run. Cold tolerance was not affected by previous mild cold shock, suggesting that such a cold shock, as a single event, causes little stress and hence elicits only weak physiological reaction. However, previous mild heat stress led to improved cold tolerance but only in males. Our results point to both hardening and cross-tolerance between cold and heat shocks.

  18. Influence of Molting and Starvation on Digestive Enzyme Activities and Energy Storage in Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs. PMID:24788197

  19. Siderophore production and membrane alterations by Bordetella pertussis in response to iron starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Agiato, L A; Dyer, D W

    1992-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis was grown in iron (Fe)-free defined medium to limit the growth of the organism. Doubling times of the Fe-starved organism increased by approximately 1 h, and a 40% reduction in the final extent of growth in Fe-depleted medium was observed. Under these conditions, a hydroxamate siderophore named bordetellin was secreted by B. pertussis. Lactoferrin and transferrin supported growth of B. pertussis even when the protein was sequestered inside dialysis tubing. This suggested that binding of lactoferrin and transferrin to B. pertussis was not essential and that bordetellin production plays a major role in Fe uptake. Solid-phase dot blot assays indicated weak binding of lactoferrin to the cell surface, consistent with previous reports of a lactoferrin receptor. Three new proteins of 97, 77, and 63 kDa were synthesized in response to Fe starvation. Fe-inducible proteins of 103, 72, 24, 21, and 18 kDa were also observed. The synthesis of lipopolysaccharide was also altered by Fe availability. Images PMID:1309510

  20. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P.; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed. PMID:26270653

  1. Short-Term Starvation of Immune Deficient Drosophila Improves Survival to Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Anthony E.; Baumbach, Janina; Cook, Peter E.; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary immunodeficiencies are inborn errors of immunity that lead to life threatening conditions. These predispositions describe human immunity in natura and highlight the important function of components of the Toll-IL-1- receptor-nuclear factor kappa B (TIR-NF-κB) pathway. Since the TIR-NF-κB circuit is a conserved component of the host defence in higher animals, genetically tractable models may contribute ideas for clinical interventions. Methodology/Principal Findings We used immunodeficient fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) to address questions pertaining to survival following bacterial infection. We describe here that flies lacking the NF-κB protein Relish, indispensable for countering Gram-negative bacteria, had a greatly improved survival to such infections when subject to dietary short-term starvation (STS) prior to immune challenge. STS induced the release of Nitric Oxide (NO), a potent molecule against pathogens in flies, mice and humans. Administering the NO Synthase-inhibitory arginine analog N-Nitro-L-Arginine-Methyl-Ester (L-NAME) but not its inactive enantiomer D-NAME increased once again sensitivity to infection to levels expected for relish mutants. Surprisingly, NO signalling required the NF-κB protein Dif, usually needed for responses against Gram-positive bacteria. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that NO release through STS may reflect an evolutionary conserved process. Moreover, STS could be explored to address immune phenotypes related to infection and may offer ways to boost natural immunity. PMID:19221590

  2. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  3. Effects of starvation and molting on the metabolic rate of the bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.).

    PubMed

    DeVries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    The bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) is a common hematophagous pest in the urban environment and is capable of surviving extended periods of starvation. However, the relationship between starvation and metabolism in bed bugs is not well understood. To better understand this relationship, we measured the metabolism of all life stages for >900 h after feeding (starvation) using closed-system respirometry. Measurements were made around molting for the immature life stages, which occurs only after a blood meal. In addition, both mated and unmated adults were measured. Starvation and molting had significant effects on the metabolism of the bed bug. Mass-specific metabolic rate (V(O2); mL g(-1) h(-1)) declined in a curvilinear fashion with the period of starvation for adults and with the postmolting period for immature bed bugs (used to standardize all immature life stages). A standard curve was developed to depict the generalized pattern of metabolic decline observed in all life stages that molted. Individual metabolic comparisons among life stages that molted revealed some differences in metabolic rate between unmated males and females. In addition, the mass scaling coefficient was found to decline with starvation time (postmolting time) for all life stages that molted. In most life stages, the ratio of V(CO2) to V(O2) (respiratory exchange ratio) declined over time, indicating a change in metabolic substrate with starvation. Finally, daily percent loss in body mass declined in a pattern similar to that of V(O2). The observed patterns in metabolic decline are evaluated in relation to the life history of bed bugs. In addition, the evolutionary development of these patterns is discussed. The metabolic pattern after feeding was also found to share several similarities with that of other ectothermic species. PMID:25590593

  4. Increased Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) Gene Expression and Steatosis During Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Subgenome Replication: Role of Nonstructural Component-5A (NS5A) and CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein ß (C/EBPß)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated tra...

  5. Physiological basis of starvation resistance in Drosophila leontia: analysis of sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-06-01

    Geographically varying starvation stress has often been considered as a natural selector that constrains between-population differences for starvation resistance (SR) in Drosophila species. On the Indian subcontinent, a dozen Drosophila species have shown clinal variations in SR across latitude, but the evolved physiological basis of such contrasting adaptations is largely unknown. In the present study, I untangled the physiological basis of sex-specific as well as between-population divergence for SR in D. leontia, collected across a latitudinal transect of the Indian subcontinent (11°45'-31°19'N). Secondly, I tested the assumptions that hardening to starvation stress facilitates an increased survival under subsequent lethal levels of starvation, and such plastic effects differ between the sexes. I observed several interesting results. In contrast to a steeper cline of starvation-related traits with latitude in females, a shallower gradient was observed for males. Females stored higher (~1.3-fold) dry-mass-specific levels of body lipids and glycogen contents, and utilized these both of these energy resources under starvation stress, whereas the starved males metabolized only body lipids as a source of energy. Conversely, the rate of body lipid utilization and threshold need were considerably higher in females as compared with males. Between-population differences were significant for storage levels of energy reserves only, but not for other avenues (rate of metabolite utilization and threshold need) of SR for both sexes. These findings indicate that multiple pathways shape the physiological basis of sexual dimorphism for SR in D. leontia. Further, single or multiple bouts of starvation hardening conferred an increased longevity (~4-9 h; P<0.001) under subsequent lethal levels of starvation stress for females only, and such plastic responses were consistent with a decrease in rate of metabolite utilization. Nevertheless, between-population effects were non

  6. Impacts of strigolactone on shoot branching under phosphate starvation in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba).

    PubMed

    Xi, Lin; Wen, Chao; Fang, Shuang; Chen, Xiaoli; Nie, Jing; Chu, JinFang; Yuan, Cunquan; Yan, Cunyu; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Liangjun

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba) shoot branching is determined by bud outgrowth during the vegetative growth stage. The degree of axillary bud outgrowth is highly influenced by environmental conditions, such as nutrient availability. Here, we demonstrated that phosphorus (Pi) starvation significantly reduces axillary bud outgrowth in chrysanthemum. A strigolactone (SL) biosynthesis gene, DgCCD7, was isolated and characterized as an ortholog of MAX3/DAD3/RMS5/D17. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), three putative SLs were identified and levels of all three SLs showed strong increase under Pi starvation conditions. Determinations of the distribution of SLs and regulation of DgCCD7/8 in response to Pi changes in root indicate that SL acts systemically. However, temporal expression patterns of biosynthesis and signaling genes in nodes revealed that Pi starvation causes a local response of SL pathway. Treatment of node segments with or without auxin and Pi revealed that in the absence of exogenous auxin, Pi delayed axillary buds outgrowth and up-regulated local SL pathway genes. These data indicated that an auxin-SL regulatory loop responded to Pi starvation for delaying bud outgrowth locally, root biosynthesized SLs were transported acropetally and functioned in shoot branching inhibition under Pi starvation. We proposed that SLs contributed to chrysanthemum shoot branching control in response to Pi-limiting conditions in a systemic way. PMID:26442011

  7. Performance of biotrickling filters for hydrogen sulfide removal under starvation and shock loads conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lan-he; Meng, Xiu-li; Wang, Ying; Liu, Li-dan

    2009-01-01

    In the industrial operation of biotrickling filters for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal, shock loads or starvation was common due to process variations or equipment malfunctions. In this study, effects of starvation and shock loads on the performance of biotrickling filters for H2S removal were investigated. Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the changes of biomass and viable bacteria numbers in the biotrickling filters during a 24-d starvation. Compared to biomass, viable bacteria numbers decreased significantly during the starvation, especially when airflow was maintained in the absence of spray liquid. During the subsequent re-acclimation, all the bioreactors could resume high removal efficiencies within 4 d regardless of the previous starvation conditions. The results show that the re-acclimation time, in the case of biotrickling filters for H2S removal, is mainly controlled by viable H2S oxidizing bacteria numbers. On the other hand, the biotrickling filters can protect against shock loads in inlet fluctuating H2S concentration after resuming normal operation. When the biotrickling filters were supplied with H2S at an input of lower than 1700 mg/m3, their removal efficiencies were nearly 98% regardless of previous H2S input. PMID:19650198

  8. Starvation effects on the hydrodynamic lubrication of rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of inlet starvation on the hydrodynamic lubrication of lightly loaded rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion is determined through a numerical solution of the Reynolds' equation for an isoviscous, incompressible lubricant. Starvation is effected by systematically reducing the fluid inlet level. The pressures are taken to be ambient at the inlet meniscus boundary and Reynolds' boundary condition is applied for film rupture in the exit region. Results are presented for the dynamic performance of the starved contacts in combined rolling and normal motion for both normal approach and separation. During normal approach the dynamic load ratio (i.e. ratio of dynamic to steady state load capacity) increases considerably with increase in the inlet starvation. The effect of starvation on the dynamic peak pressure ratio is relatively small. Further, it has been observed that with increasing starvation, film thickness effects become significant in the dynamic behavior of the nonconformal contacts. For significantly starved contacts the dynamic load ratio increases with increase in film thickness during normal approach and a similar reduction is observed during separation. A similar effect is noted for the dynamic peak pressure ratio.

  9. Starvation effects on the hydrodynamic lubrication of rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Hamrock, B. J.; Brewe, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of inlet starvation on the hydrodynamic lubrication of lightly loaded rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion is determined through a numerical solution of the Reynolds' equation for an isoviscous, incompressible lubricant. Starvation is effected by systematically reducing the fluid inlet level. The pressures are taken to be ambient at the inlet meniscus boundary and Reynolds' boundary condition is applied for film rupture in the exit region. Results are presented for the dynamic performance of the starved contacts in combined rolling and normal motion for both normal approach and separation. During normal approach the dynamic load ratio (i.e. ratio of dynamic to steady state load capacity) increases considerably with increase in the inlet starvation. The effect of starvation on the dynamic peak pressure ratio is relatively small. Further, it has been observed that with increasing starvation, film thickness effects become significant in the dynamic behavior of the nonconformal contacts. For significantly starved contacts the dynamic load ratio increases with increase in film thickness during normal approach and a similar reduction is observed during separation. A similar effect is noted for the dynamic peak pressure ratio.

  10. Light Enhances Survival of Dinoroseobacter shibae during Long-Term Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Soora, Maya; Cypionka, Heribert

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs) as being photoheterotrophs require organic substrates for growth and use light as a supplementary energy source under oxic conditions. We hypothesized that AAPs benefit from light particularly under carbon and electron donor limitation. The effect of light was determined in long-term starvation experiments with Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL 12T in both complex marine broth and defined minimal medium with succinate as the sole carbon source. The cells were starved over six months under three conditions: continuous darkness (DD), continuous light (LL), and light/dark cycle (LD, 12 h/12 h, 12 µmol photons m−2 s−1). LD starvation at low light intensity resulted in 10-fold higher total cell and viable counts, and higher bacteriochlorophyll a and polyhydroxyalkanoate contents. This coincided with better physiological fitness as determined by respiration rates, proton translocation and ATP concentrations. In contrast, LD starvation at high light intensity (>22 µmol photons m−2 s−1, LD conditions) resulted in decreasing cell survival rates but increasing carotenoid concentrations, indicating a photo-protective response. Cells grown in complex medium survived longer starvation (more than 20 weeks) than those grown in minimal medium. Our experiments show that D. shibae benefits from the light and dark cycle, particularly during starvation. PMID:24386315

  11. Impacts of strigolactone on shoot branching under phosphate starvation in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba)

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lin; Wen, Chao; Fang, Shuang; Chen, Xiaoli; Nie, Jing; Chu, JinFang; Yuan, Cunquan; Yan, Cunyu; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Liangjun

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba) shoot branching is determined by bud outgrowth during the vegetative growth stage. The degree of axillary bud outgrowth is highly influenced by environmental conditions, such as nutrient availability. Here, we demonstrated that phosphorus (Pi) starvation significantly reduces axillary bud outgrowth in chrysanthemum. A strigolactone (SL) biosynthesis gene, DgCCD7, was isolated and characterized as an ortholog of MAX3/DAD3/RMS5/D17. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), three putative SLs were identified and levels of all three SLs showed strong increase under Pi starvation conditions. Determinations of the distribution of SLs and regulation of DgCCD7/8 in response to Pi changes in root indicate that SL acts systemically. However, temporal expression patterns of biosynthesis and signaling genes in nodes revealed that Pi starvation causes a local response of SL pathway. Treatment of node segments with or without auxin and Pi revealed that in the absence of exogenous auxin, Pi delayed axillary buds outgrowth and up-regulated local SL pathway genes. These data indicated that an auxin-SL regulatory loop responded to Pi starvation for delaying bud outgrowth locally, root biosynthesized SLs were transported acropetally and functioned in shoot branching inhibition under Pi starvation. We proposed that SLs contributed to chrysanthemum shoot branching control in response to Pi-limiting conditions in a systemic way. PMID:26442011

  12. The effects of starvation and re-feeding on growth and swimming performance of juvenile black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus).

    PubMed

    Pang, Xu; Fu, Shi-Jian; Li, Xiu-Ming; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of starvation and re-feeding on growth and swimming performance and their relationship in juvenile black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus). We measured the specific growth rate (SGR), resting metabolic rate (RMR) and constant acceleration test speed (U CAT, the maximum swimming speed at exhaustion by constant acceleration test with 0.1667 cm s(-2) rate) in a treatment group (21 days of starvation then 21 days of re-feeding) and control group (routine feeding) (n = 20). Starvation resulted in a 17 % decrease in body mass of black carp (P < 0.05). After 21 days of re-feeding, body mass was greater than that of pre-starvation but still less than that of the control group at 42 days. During the re-feeding phase, the SGR of the treatment group was higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Starvation resulted in a significant decrease in the RMR and U CAT. After 21 days of re-feeding, both the RMR and U CAT recovered to the pre-starvation levels. In the control group, individual juvenile black carp displayed strong repeatability of the RMR and U CAT across the measurement periods (P ≤ 0.002). In the treatment group, RMR showed significant repeatability between pre-starvation and re-feeding (P = 0.007), but not between pre-starvation and starvation or between starvation and re-feeding. U CAT showed significant repeatability between pre-starvation and starvation (P = 0.006) and between pre-starvation and re-feeding (P = 0.001), but not between starvation and re-feeding. No correlation or only a weak correlation was found between any two variables of RMR, U CAT and SGR, whereas the increment of the U CAT (ΔU CAT) was negatively correlated with that of SGR during the starvation phase (r = -0.581, n = 20, P = 0.007) and re-feeding phase (r = -0.568, n = 20, P = 0.009). This suggested that within individual black carp, there is a trade-off between growth and maintenance (or development) of swimming

  13. Metabolic changes of starch and lipid triggered by nitrogen starvation in the microalga Chlorella zofingiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunni; Huang, Wei; Xu, Jin; Wang, Zhongming; Xu, Jingliang; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the metabolic changes of starch and lipid biosynthesis in the microalga Chlorella zofingiensis under nitrogen starvation in comparison to nitrogen abundant condition. C. zonfingiensis showed a rapid growth and kept stable chlorophyll content when grown in nitrogen-replete medium, while a severe inhibition of cell growth and a sharp degradation of chlorophyll occurred under nitrogen depletion. Nitrogen-replete C. zonfingiensis cells possessed basal levels of starch and lipid. Upon nitrogen starvation, both starch and lipid increased greatly within cells, but starch synthesis preceded lipid accumulation. After 2 days of stress condition, starch was partially degraded, possibly to support lipid synthesis. It was speculated that starch accumulation acted as a quick response to environmental stress, whereas lipid served as long-term energy storage. Additionally, C. zonfingiensis tends to lower the degree of unsaturation in response to nitrogen starvation which is desirable for biodiesel production. PMID:24308944

  14. Identification of an oxygen-responsive element in the 5'-flanking sequence of the rat cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-1 gene, modulating its glucagon-dependent activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bratke, J; Kietzmann, T; Jungermann, K

    1999-01-01

    The glucagon-stimulated transcription of the cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-1 (PCK1) gene is mediated by cAMP and positively modulated by oxygen in primary hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes were transfected with constructs containing the first 2500, 493 or 281 bp of the PCK1 5'-flanking region in front of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. With all three constructs glucagon induced CAT activity with decreasing efficiency maximally under arterial pO2 and to about 65% under venous pO2. Rat hepatocytes were then transfected with constructs containing the first 493 bp of the PCK1 5'-flanking region in front of the luciferase (LUC) reporter gene, which were block-mutated at the CRE1 (cAMP-response element-1; -93/-86), putative CRE2 (-146/-139), promoter element (P) 1 (-118/-104), P2 (-193/-181) or P4 (-291/-273) sites. Glucagon induced LUC activity strongly when the P1 and P2 sites were mutated and weakly when the P4 site was mutated; induction of the P1, P2 and P4 mutants was positively modulated by the pO2. Glucagon also induced LUC activity strongly when the putative CRE2 site was altered; however, induction of the CRE2 mutant was not modulated by the pO2. Glucagon did not induce LUC activity when the CRE1 site was modified. These experiments suggested that the CRE1 but not the putative CRE2 was an essential site necessary for the cAMP-mediated PCK1 gene activation by glucagon and that the putative CRE2 site was involved in the oxygen-dependent modulation of PCK1 gene activation. To confirm these conclusions rat hepatocytes were transfected with simian virus 40 (SV40)-promoter-driven LUC-gene constructs containing three CRE1 sequences (-95/-84), three CRE2 sequences (-148/-137) or three CRE1 sequences plus two CRE2 sequences of the PCK1 gene in front of the SV40 promoter. Glucagon induced LUC activity markedly when the CRE1, but not when the CRE2, sites were in front of the SV40-LUC gene; however, induction of the (CRE1)3SV40-LUC

  15. A TRPV Channel Modulates C. elegans Neurosecretion, Larval Starvation Survival, and Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian H.; Ashrafi, Kaveh

    2008-01-01

    For most organisms, food is only intermittently available; therefore, molecular mechanisms that couple sensation of nutrient availability to growth and development are critical for survival. These mechanisms, however, remain poorly defined. In the absence of nutrients, newly hatched first larval (L1) stage Caenorhabditis elegans halt development and survive in this state for several weeks. We isolated mutations in unc-31, encoding a calcium-activated regulator of neural dense-core vesicle release, which conferred enhanced starvation survival. This extended survival was reminiscent of that seen in daf-2 insulin-signaling deficient mutants and was ultimately dependent on daf-16, which encodes a FOXO transcription factor whose activity is inhibited by insulin signaling. While insulin signaling modulates metabolism, adult lifespan, and dauer formation, insulin-independent mechanisms that also regulate these processes did not promote starvation survival, indicating that regulation of starvation survival is a distinct program. Cell-specific rescue experiments identified a small subset of primary sensory neurons where unc-31 reconstitution modulated starvation survival, suggesting that these neurons mediate perception of food availability. We found that OCR-2, a transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channel that localizes to the cilia of this subset of neurons, regulates peptide-hormone secretion and L1 starvation survival. Moreover, inactivation of ocr-2 caused a significant extension in adult lifespan. These findings indicate that TRPV channels, which mediate sensation of diverse noxious, thermal, osmotic, and mechanical stimuli, couple nutrient availability to larval starvation survival and adult lifespan through modulation of neural dense-core vesicle secretion. PMID:18846209

  16. Arabidopsis Roots and Shoots Show Distinct Temporal Adaptation Patterns toward Nitrogen Starvation1[W

    PubMed Central

    Krapp, Anne; Berthomé, Richard; Orsel, Mathilde; Mercey-Boutet, Stéphanie; Yu, Agnes; Castaings, Loren; Elftieh, Samira; Major, Hilary; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient for plants. N levels in soil vary widely, and plants have developed strategies to cope with N deficiency. However, the regulation of these adaptive responses and the coordinating signals that underlie them are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize N starvation in adult Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants in a spatiotemporal manner by an integrative, multilevel global approach analyzing growth, metabolites, enzyme activities, and transcript levels. We determined that the remobilization of N and carbon compounds to the growing roots occurred long before the internal N stores became depleted. A global metabolite analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed organ-specific differences in the metabolic adaptation to complete N starvation, for example, for several tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, but also for carbohydrates, secondary products, and phosphate. The activities of central N metabolism enzymes and the capacity for nitrate uptake adapted to N starvation by favoring N remobilization and by increasing the high-affinity nitrate uptake capacity after long-term starvation. Changes in the transcriptome confirmed earlier studies and added a new dimension by revealing specific spatiotemporal patterns and several unknown N starvation-regulated genes, including new predicted small RNA genes. No global correlation between metabolites, enzyme activities, and transcripts was evident. However, this multilevel spatiotemporal global study revealed numerous new patterns of adaptation mechanisms to N starvation. In the context of a sustainable agriculture, this work will give new insight for the production of crops with increased N use efficiency. PMID:21900481

  17. Response of barley plants to Fe deficiency and Cd contamination as affected by S starvation.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, S; Zuchi, S; Neumann, G; Cesco, S; Sanità di Toppi, L; Pinton, R

    2012-02-01

    Both Fe deficiency and Cd exposure induce rapid changes in the S nutritional requirement of plants. The aim of this work was to characterize the strategies adopted by plants to cope with both Fe deficiency (release of phytosiderophores) and Cd contamination [production of glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins] when grown under conditions of limited S supply. Experiments were performed in hydroponics, using barley plants grown under S sufficiency (1.2 mM sulphate) and S deficiency (0 mM sulphate), with or without Fe(III)-EDTA at 0.08 mM for 11 d and subsequently exposed to 0.05 mM Cd for 24 h or 72 h. In S-sufficient plants, Fe deficiency enhanced both root and shoot Cd concentrations and increased GSH and phytochelatin levels. In S-deficient plants, Fe starvation caused a slight increase in Cd concentration, but this change was accompanied neither by an increase in GSH nor by an accumulation of phytochelatins. Release of phytosiderophores, only detectable in Fe-deficient plants, was strongly decreased by S deficiency and further reduced after Cd treatment. In roots Cd exposure increased the expression of the high affinity sulphate transporter gene (HvST1) regardless of the S supply, and the expression of the Fe deficiency-responsive genes, HvYS1 and HvIDS2, irrespective of Fe supply. In conclusion, adequate S availability is necessary to cope with Fe deficiency and Cd toxicity in barley plants. Moreover, it appears that in Fe-deficient plants grown in the presence of Cd with limited S supply, sulphur may be preferentially employed in the pathway for biosynthesis of phytosiderophores, rather than for phytochelatin production. PMID:22090437

  18. Membrane Glycerolipid Remodeling Triggered by Nitrogen and Phosphorus Starvation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum1

    PubMed Central

    Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Meï, Coline; Villanova, Valeria; Conte, Melissa; Block, Maryse A.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bastien, Olivier; Tirichine, Leïla; Bowler, Chris; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms constitute a major phylum of phytoplankton biodiversity in ocean water and freshwater ecosystems. They are known to respond to some chemical variations of the environment by the accumulation of triacylglycerol, but the relative changes occurring in membrane glycerolipids have not yet been studied. Our goal was first to define a reference for the glycerolipidome of the marine model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a necessary prerequisite to characterize and dissect the lipid metabolic routes that are orchestrated and regulated to build up each subcellular membrane compartment. By combining multiple analytical techniques, we determined the glycerolipid profile of P. tricornutum grown with various levels of nitrogen or phosphorus supplies. In different P. tricornutum accessions collected worldwide, a deprivation of either nutrient triggered an accumulation of triacylglycerol, but with different time scales and magnitudes. We investigated in depth the effect of nutrient starvation on the Pt1 strain (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa no. 1055/3). Nitrogen deprivation was the more severe stress, triggering thylakoid senescence and growth arrest. By contrast, phosphorus deprivation induced a stepwise adaptive response. The time scale of the glycerolipidome changes and the comparison with large-scale transcriptome studies were consistent with an exhaustion of unknown primary phosphorus-storage molecules (possibly polyphosphate) and a transcriptional control of some genes coding for specific lipid synthesis enzymes. We propose that phospholipids are secondary phosphorus-storage molecules broken down upon phosphorus deprivation, while nonphosphorus lipids are synthesized consistently with a phosphatidylglycerol-to-sulfolipid and a phosphatidycholine-to-betaine lipid replacement followed by a late accumulation of triacylglycerol. PMID:25489020

  19. Systems-Level Analysis of Nitrogen Starvation–Induced Modifications of Carbon Metabolism in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Starchless Mutant[W

    PubMed Central

    Blaby, Ian K.; Glaesener, Anne G.; Mettler, Tabea; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T.; Gallaher, Sean D.; Liu, Bensheng; Boyle, Nanette R.; Kropat, Janette; Stitt, Mark; Johnson, Shannon; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis underlying increased triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless (sta) Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants, we undertook comparative time-course transcriptomics of strains CC-4348 (sta6 mutant), CC-4349, a cell wall–deficient (cw) strain purported to represent the parental STA6 strain, and three independent STA6 strains generated by complementation of sta6 (CC-4565/STA6-C2, CC-4566/STA6-C4, and CC-4567/STA6-C6) in the context of N deprivation. Despite N starvation–induced dramatic remodeling of the transcriptome, there were relatively few differences (5 × 102) observed between sta6 and STA6, the most dramatic of which were increased abundance of transcripts encoding key regulated or rate-limiting steps in central carbon metabolism, specifically isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, transaldolase, fructose bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (encoded by ICL1, MAS1, TAL1, FBP1, and PCK1 respectively), suggestive of increased carbon movement toward hexose-phosphate in sta6 by upregulation of the glyoxylate pathway and gluconeogenesis. Enzyme assays validated the increase in isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities. Targeted metabolite analysis indicated increased succinate, malate, and Glc-6-P and decreased Fru-1,6-bisphosphate, illustrating the effect of these changes. Comparisons of independent data sets in multiple strains allowed the delineation of a sequence of events in the global N starvation response in C. reinhardtii, starting within minutes with the upregulation of alternative N assimilation routes and carbohydrate synthesis and subsequently a more gradual upregulation of genes encoding enzymes of TAG synthesis. Finally, genome resequencing analysis indicated that (1) the deletion in sta6 extends into the neighboring gene encoding respiratory burst oxidase, and (2) a commonly used STA6 strain (CC-4349) as well as the sequenced reference (CC-503) are not congenic with respect to sta6 (CC-4348

  20. Partial derepression of the isoleucine-valine enzymes during methionine starvation is Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Rizzino, A; Mastanduno, M; Freundlich, M

    1977-03-18

    Methionine starvation of methionine auxotrophs in the presence of excess branched-chain amino acids results in a partial derepression of the isoleucine and valine enzymes. Reversed-phase chromatography indicated that isoleucine, valine and leucine tRNA were altered during methionine starvation. In addition, the total tRNA isolated from cells under these conditions were undermethylated. The observed derepression may be caused by the inability of methyl-deficient tRNA's to participate adequately in normal regulatory functions. PMID:321028

  1. Transcription Factors CysB and SfnR Constitute the Hierarchical Regulatory System for the Sulfate Starvation Response in Pseudomonas putida▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Endoh, Takayuki; Omori, Toshio; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Habe, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DS1 is able to utilize dimethyl sulfone as a sulfur source. Expression of the sfnFG operon responsible for dimethyl sulfone oxygenation is directly regulated by a σ54-dependent transcriptional activator, SfnR, which is encoded within the sfnECR operon. We investigated the transcription mechanism for the sulfate starvation-induced expression of these sfn operons. Using an in vivo transcription assay and in vitro DNA-binding experiments, we revealed that SfnR negatively regulates the expression of sfnECR by binding to the downstream region of the transcription start point. Additionally, we demonstrated that a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, CysB, directly activates the expression of sfnECR by binding to its upstream region. CysB is a master regulator that controls the sulfate starvation response of the sfn operons, as is the case for the sulfonate utilization genes of Escherichia coli, although CysBDS1 appeared to differ from that of E. coli CysB in terms of the effect of O-acetylserine on DNA-binding ability. Furthermore, we investigated what effector molecules repress the expression of sfnFG and sfnECR in vivo by using the disruptants of the sulfate assimilatory genes cysNC and cysI. The measurements of mRNA levels of the sfn operons in these gene disruptants suggested that the expression of sfnFG is repressed by sulfate itself while the expression of sfnECR is repressed by the downstream metabolites in the sulfate assimilatory pathway, such as sulfide and cysteine. These results indicate that SfnR plays a role independent of CysB in the sulfate starvation-induced expression of the sfn operons. PMID:18456803

  2. A major root-associated acid phosphatase in Arabidopsis, AtPAP10, is regulated by both local and systemic signals under phosphate starvation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyue; Lu, Shan; Liu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    The induction and secretion of acid phosphatases (APases) is a universal response of plants to phosphate (Pi) starvation. AtPAP10 (Arabidopsis purple acid phosphatase 10) is a major Pi starvation-induced APase that is associated with the root surface in Arabidopsis. So far, the roles of local and systemic signalling in regulating root-associated AtPAP10 activity remain largely unknown. In this work, we show that a decrease of local, external Pi availability is sufficient to induce AtPAP10 transcription in roots in the presence of sucrose, a systemic signal from shoots, whereas the magnitude of the induction is affected by the Pi status of the whole plant. Once the AtPAP10 mRNAs are synthesized in roots, subsequent accumulation of AtPAP10 proteins in root cells and increase in AtPAP10 activity on the root surface are mainly controlled by local signalling. Previously, ethylene has been demonstrated to be a positive regulator of AtPAP10 activity. In this study, we provide evidence that under Pi deficiency ethylene mainly modulates enzymatic activity of AtPAP10 on the root surface, but not AtPAP10 transcription and protein accumulation, suggesting that it functions as a local signal. Furthermore, our work indicates that the effect of ethylene on the induction of root-associated AtPAP10 activity depends on sucrose, but that the effect of sucrose does not depend on ethylene. These results reveal new insights into the distinct roles of local and systemic signalling in the regulation of root-associated AtPAP10 activity under Pi starvation. PMID:25246445

  3. PheP, a putative amino acid permease of Staphylococcus aureus, contributes to survival in vivo and during starvation.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, Malcolm J; Wiltshire, Michael D; Crossley, Howard; Ingham, Eileen; Foster, Simon J

    2004-05-01

    PheP, a putative amino acid permease in Staphylococcus aureus, contributes to starvation survival under glucose-limiting conditions and virulence. A pheP mutation led to poor growth after microaerobic or anaerobic incubation on pig serum agar, which was recovered by phenylalanine addition. Genetic complementation of pheP restored growth and starvation survival. PMID:15102825

  4. Metabolic priorities during starvation: enzyme sparing in liver and white muscle of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Lapointe, Dominique; Bédard, Martin; Dutil, Jean-Denis

    2003-06-01

    Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, respond to starvation first by mobilising hepatic lipids, then muscle and hepatic glycogen and finally muscle proteins. The dual role of proteins as functional elements and energetic reserves should lead to a temporal hierarchy of mobilisation where the nature of a function dictates its conservation during starvation. We examined (1) whether lysosomal and anti-oxidant enzymes in liver and white muscle are spared during prolonged starvation, (2) whether the responses of these enzymes in muscle vary longitudinally. Hepatic contents of lysosomal proteases decreased with starvation, whereas those of catalase (CAT) increased and lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and glutathione S-transferase (GST) did not change. In white muscle, starvation decreased the specific activity of lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate degradation and doubled that of cathepsin D (CaD). The activity of anti-oxidant enzymes and acid phosphatase in muscle was unchanged with starvation. In white muscle neither lysosomal enzymes nor anti-oxidant enzymes varied significantly with sampling position. In cod muscle, antioxidant enzymes, CaD and acid phosphatase are spared during a period of starvation that decreases lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and decreases glycolytic enzyme activities. In cod liver, the anti-oxidant enzymes, CAT and GST, were also spared during starvation. PMID:12781835

  5. Metabolic analysis of Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the carboxylating enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Gokarn, R.R.; Eiteman, M.A.; Altman, E.

    2000-05-01

    Fermentation patterns of Escherichia coli with and without the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) enzymes were compared under anaerobic conditions with glucose as a carbon source. Time profiles of glucose and fermentation product concentrations were determined and used to calculate metabolic fluxes through central carbon pathways during exponential cell growth. The presence of the Rhizobium etli pyc gene in E. coli (JCL1242/pTrc99A-pyc) restored the succinate producing ability of E. coli ppc null mutants (JCL1242), with PYC competing favorably with both pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase. Succinate formation was slightly greater by JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc than by cells which overproduced PPC(JCL1242/pPC201, ppc{sup +}), even though PPC activity in cell extracts of JCL1242/pPC201 (ppc{sup +}) was 40-fold greater than PYC activity in extracts of JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc. Flux calculations indicate that during anaerobic metabolism the pyc{sup +} strain had a 34% greater specific glucose consumption rate, a 37% greater specific rate of ATP formation, and a 6% greater specific growth rate compared to the ppc{sup +} strain. In light of the important position of pyruvate at the juncture of NADH-generating pathways and NADH-dissimilating branches, the results show that when PPC or PYC is expressed, the metabolic network adapts by altering the flux to lactate and the molar ratio of ethanol to acetate formation.

  6. Reciprocal Changes in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Pyruvate Kinase with Age Are a Determinant of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yiyuan; Hakimi, Parvin; Kao, Clara; Kao, Allison; Liu, Ruifu; Janocha, Allison; Boyd-Tressler, Andrea; Hang, Xi; Alhoraibi, Hanna; Slater, Erin; Xia, Kevin; Cao, Pengxiu; Shue, Quinn; Ching, Tsui-Ting; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Erzurum, Serpil C; Dubyak, George R; Berger, Nathan A; Hanson, Richard W; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2016-01-15

    Aging involves progressive loss of cellular function and integrity, presumably caused by accumulated stochastic damage to cells. Alterations in energy metabolism contribute to aging, but how energy metabolism changes with age, how these changes affect aging, and whether they can be modified to modulate aging remain unclear. In locomotory muscle of post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a progressive decrease in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C), a longevity-associated metabolic enzyme, and a reciprocal increase in glycolytic pyruvate kinase (PK) that were necessary and sufficient to limit lifespan. Decline in PEPCK-C with age also led to loss of cellular function and integrity including muscle activity, and cellular senescence. Genetic and pharmacologic interventions of PEPCK-C, muscle activity, and AMPK signaling demonstrate that declines in PEPCK-C and muscle function with age interacted to limit reproductive life and lifespan via disrupted energy homeostasis. Quantifications of metabolic flux show that reciprocal changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age shunted energy metabolism toward glycolysis, reducing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Last, calorie restriction countered changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age to elicit anti-aging effects via TOR inhibition. Thus, a programmed metabolic event involving PEPCK-C and PK is a determinant of aging that can be modified to modulate aging. PMID:26631730

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) deficiency affects the germination, growth and fruit sugar content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Xing; Yin, Yong-Gen; Sanuki, Atsuko; Fukuda, Naoya; Ezura, Hiroshi; Matsukura, Chiaki

    2015-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key regulatory enzyme and is utilized in the gluconeogenesis pathway in plants. Although, its catalytic and regulatory properties are quite well understood, there are uncertainties regarding its physiological role in many plants tissues such as the flesh of developing fruits. To further understand the function of PEPCK in fruits and other tissues, RNAi transgenic tomato plants in which SlPEPCK transcription was down-regulated by either CaMV 35S constitutive promoter or the fruit-specific E8 promoter were generated and characterized on the basis of their phenotypic and metabolic aspects. In the PEPCK-deficient lines, prominent growth suppression of germinated seedlings was observed and other vegetative suppression appeared during the early stage of plant growth in the 35S promoter-driven lines. In particular, root elongation was most obviously suppressed in the germinated seedlings, indicating that the gluconeogenesis pathway is involved in the root growth of seedlings. Regarding the primary metabolism in fruit, the soluble sugar content tended to decrease, whereas the malate content tended to increase in ripening fruits of the RNAi lines compared with the wild type. These results indicate that activation of the gluconeogenesis pathway from organic acids to sugars occurs during ripening but is suppressed by the knocking down of the PEPCK gene, suggesting that PEPCK participates in determining the sugar/acid ratio in ripening fruit. PMID:26381194

  8. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  9. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+). PMID:24594398

  10. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B. Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L.; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. PMID:24913627

  11. [Activity of NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in wheat leaves under water stress].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I; Monakhova, O F

    2006-01-01

    The activities of NADP: glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme complex comprising of phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPK; EC 4.1.1.31) in seedlings and leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants of the cultivars Mironovskaya 808 and Lutescens 758 have been compared under conditions of normal water supply, water deficiency, and subsequent rehydration. GAPDH activity, which determines the carbohydrate route of photosynthetic metabolism at the initial stages, is decreased by water stress to a greater extent than that of PEPK, on the activity of which non-carbohydrate metabolic pathways depend. Pretreatment of seedlings and mature plants with natural (6-benzylaminopurine) and synthetic (tidiazuron, kartolin-2, and kartolin-4) cytokinins attenuates the loss of enzyme activities during drought and facilitates their recovery within the period of rehydration; both effects are underlain by augmentation of reparation processes. The relative intensification of non-carbohydrate pathways of photosynthetic metabolism, observed under conditions of water deficiency, is accompanied by an increase in the osmotic pressure of cell sap. Possible mechanisms of this protector effect of cytokinin preparations are discussed. PMID:16878554

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase in Tobacco Leaves Is Activated by Light in a Similar but Not Identical Way as in Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Li, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chollet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported the partial purification of a Ca2+- independent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein-serine/threonine kinase (PEPC-PK) from illuminated leaves of N-sufficient tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants (Y.-H. Wang, R. Chollet [1993] FEBS Lett 328: 215-218). We now report that this C3 PEPC-kinase is reversibly light activated in vivo in a time-dependent manner. As the kinase becomes light activated, the activity and L-malate sensitivity of its target protein increases and decreases, respectively. The light activation of tobacco PEPC-PK is prevented by pretreatment of detached leaves with various photosynthesis and cytosolic protein-synthesis inhibitors. Similarly, specific inhibitors of glutamine synthetase block the light activation of tobacco leaf PEPC-kinase under both photorespiratory and nonphotorespiratory conditions. This striking effect is partially and specifically reversed by exogenous glutamine, whereas it has no apparent effect on the light activation of the maize (Zea mays L.) leaf kinase. Using an in situ "activity-gel" phosphorylation assay, we have identified two major Ca2+-independent PEPC-kinase catalytic polypeptides in illuminated tobacco leaves that have the same molecular masses (approximately 30 and 37 kD) as found in illuminated maize leaves. Collectively, these results indicate that the phosphorylation of PEPC in N-sufficient leaves of tobacco (C3) and maize (C4) is regulated through similar but not identical light-signal transduction pathways. PMID:12226305

  13. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Mediated by a Plastid Inner Envelope Phosphoenolpyruvate/Phosphate Translocator CUE1 in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Ren, Xiaozhi; Cao, Rui; Liu, Jun; Gong, Zhizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1) lead to the transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of ProRD29A:LUC (LUCIFERASE) and Pro35S:NPTII (Neomycin Phosphotransferase II) reporter genes. We performed a genetic screen to find suppressors of ros1 that identified two mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN UNDEREXPRESSED1 (CUE1) gene, which encodes a plastid inner envelope phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator. The cue1 mutations released the TGS of Pro35S:NPTII and the transcriptionally silent endogenous locus TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION in a manner that was independent of DNA methylation but dependent on chromatin modification. The cue1 mutations did not affect the TGS of ProRD29A:LUC in ros1, which was dependent on RNA-directed DNA methylation. It is possible that signals from chloroplasts help to regulate the epigenetic status of a subset of genomic loci in the nucleus. PMID:19515789

  14. [The effect of prolonged starvation on changes in the activity of selected adaptive enzymes in rat liver].

    PubMed

    Toropila, M; Ahlers, I; Ahlersová, E; Ondrasovic, M; Benová, K

    1996-02-01

    Male rats of Wistar SPF stain (Velaz Prague) were used to investigate the influence of prolonged starvation on changes in the activity of selected adaptive enzymes in the liver and corticosterone in serum. Analyses were carried out on days 1,2,3,5 and 7 of starvation. The activity of tyrosine aminotransferase significantly increased in the period between days 2 and 5 of starvation, after which a decrease to the level of satiated animals was observed in the terminal period. Activities of tryptophane-2-3-dioxygenase and alanine aminotransferase increased in two phases reaching maximum values on days 2 and 7 of starvation. The activity of aspartate aminotransferase showed a progressive significant increase in dependence on the length of starvation. A more than threefold increase in corticosterone concentration was observed in the serum of starved animals in comparison with satiated rats. PMID:8629317

  15. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in guard cells of Vicia faba L. is enhanced by fusicoccin and suppressed by abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.; Aghoram, K.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Plants regulate water loss and CO{sub 2} gain by modulating the aperture sizes of stomata that penetrate the epidermis. Aperture size itself is increased by osmolyte accumulation and consequent turgor increase in the pair of guard cells that flank each stoma. Guard-cell phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the regulated step leading to malate synthesis, is crucial for charge and pH maintenance during osmolyte accumulation. Regulation of this cytosolic enzyme by effectors is well documented, but additional regulation by posttranslational modification is predicted by the alteration of PEPC kinetics during stomatal opening. In this study, the authors have investigated whether this alteration is associated with the phosphorylation status of this enzyme. Using sonicated epidermal peels (isolated guard cells) pre-loaded with {sub 32}PO{sub 4}, the authors induced stomatal opening and guard-cell malate accumulation by incubation with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with the FC antagonist, 10 {micro}M abscisic acid (ABA). The phosphorylation status of PEPC was assessed by immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and autoradiography. PEPC was phosphorylated when stomata were stimulated to open, and phosphorylation was lessened by incubation with ABA.

  16. Carnitine levels in severe infection and starvation: a possible key to the prolonged catabolic state.

    PubMed

    Border, J R; Burns, G P; Rumph, C; Schenk, W G

    1970-07-01

    Tissue carnitine levels have been measured in man and the dog. Skeletal muscle carnitine levels rise in the dog with starvation to roughly twice the normal level. An equal degree of starvation plus peritonitis is associated with unchanged skeletal muscle carnitine levels. In the presence of peritonitis, sequential skeletal muscle biopsies show a progressive fall in the tissue carnitine levels with a subsequent rise in those animals which survive and clear their peritonitis. Normal human skeletal muscle levels are essentially the same as in the dog. A combination of sepsis and starvation in man is associated with essentially unchanged skeletal muscle carnitine levels, whereas pure sepsis without starvation is associated with decreased skeletal muscle carnitine levels. It is suggested that these changes are in the direction expected for a limitation of fat catabolism and, in the presence of a limited exogenous source of glucose, that this would result secondarily in a protein catabolic state to supply glucose for the body's energy needs. PMID:10483466

  17. Do thyroid hormones mediate the effects of starvation on mood in adolescent girls with eating disorders?

    PubMed

    Swenne, Ingemar; Rosling, Agneta

    2010-11-01

    In the eating disorders (ED) comorbid depression is common and clinical experience suggests that it is partly related to starvation. Starvation affects thyroid hormone status and thyroid hypofunction is in turn associated with depressed mood. We have therefore investigated the possibility that thyroid hormones and starvation are associated with mood in ED. Two-hundred and thirty-nine adolescent girls were examined at presentation of an ED. Analyses of thyroid hormones, documentation of weight and weight changes, self-reports of depressive symptomatology and clinical diagnoses of ED and depression were used in the analyses. Of the 239 girls 100 were diagnosed with depression. The girls with and without depression did not differ in age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), weight loss or duration of disease. Plasma free thyroxine concentrations were lower in depressed girls (11.9±1.7 versus 12.8±1.9 pmol/L; p<0.01). Plasma triodothyronine and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations did not differ between groups. In a logistic regression analysis the odds ratio for depression was 41.1 (95% confidence interval 4.18-405; p=0.001) for a 10 pmol/L change of plasma free thyroxine after correction for BMI, weight loss, duration of disease, rate of weight loss, plasma triodothyronine and an interaction between BMI and plasma free thyroxine. BMI did not predict depression. Low circulating thyroxine concentrations may provide a link between starvation and depression in adolescent girls with ED. PMID:20576362

  18. Somatic insulin signaling regulates a germline starvation response in Drosophila egg chambers

    PubMed Central

    Burn, K. Mahala; Shimada, Yuko; Ayers, Kathleen; Lu, Feiyue; Hudson, Andrew M.; Cooley, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Egg chambers from starved Drosophila females contain large aggregates of processing (P) bodies and cortically enriched microtubules. As this response to starvation is rapidly reversed upon re-feeding females or culturing egg chambers with exogenous bovine insulin, we examined the role of endogenous insulin signaling in mediating the starvation response. We found that systemic Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) activate the insulin pathway in follicle cells, which then regulate both microtubule and P body organization in the underlying germline cells. This organization is modulated by the motor proteins Dynein and Kinesin. Dynein activity is required for microtubule and P body organization during starvation, while Kinesin activity is required during nutrient-rich conditions. Blocking the ability of egg chambers to form P body aggregates in response to starvation correlated with reduced progeny survival. These data suggest a potential mechanism to maximize fecundity even during periods of poor nutrient availability, by mounting a protective response in immature egg chambers. PMID:25481758

  19. The Role of Starvation on Escherichia coli Adhesion and Transport in Saturated Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of bacterial starvation on cell fate and transport has been examined using two Escherichia coli isolates: one human isolate (HU) and one dairy cow isolate (DC). To better understand the transport of starved bacteria, deposition experiments were conducted in a packed bed column system ...

  20. Expression stability of 13 housekeeping genes during carbon starvation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Alqarni, Budoor; Colley, Brendan; Klebensberger, Janosch; McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a reliable technique for quantifying mRNA levels when normalised by a stable reference gene/s. Many putative reference genes are known to be affected by physiological stresses, such as nutrient limitation and hence may not be suitable for normalisation. In this study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of 13 commonly used reference genes, rpoS, proC, recA, rpsL, rho, oprL, anr, tipA, nadB, fabD, ampC, algD and gyrA, were analysed for changes in expression under carbon starvation and nutrient replete conditions. The results showed that rpoS was the only stably expressed housekeeping gene during carbon starvation. In contrast, other commonly used housekeeping genes were shown to vary by as much as 10-100 fold under starvation conditions. This study has identified a suitable reference gene for qRT-PCR in P. aeruginosa during carbon starvation. The results presented here highlight the need to validate housekeeping genes under the chosen experimental conditions. PMID:27297333

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis to investigate the high starch accumulation of duckweed (Landoltia punctata) under nutrient starvation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duckweed can thrive on anthropogenic wastewater and produce tremendous biomass production. Due to its relatively high starch and low lignin percentage, duckweed is a good candidate for bioethanol fermentation. Previous studies have observed that water devoid of nutrients is good for starch accumulation, but its molecular mechanism remains unrevealed. Results This study globally analyzed the response to nutrient starvation in order to investigate the starch accumulation in duckweed (Landoltia punctata). L. punctata was transferred from nutrient-rich solution to distilled water and sampled at different time points. Physiological measurements demonstrated that the activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, the key enzyme of starch synthesis, as well as the starch percentage in duckweed, increased continuously under nutrient starvation. Samples collected at 0 h, 2 h and 24 h time points respectively were used for comparative gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq. A comprehensive transcriptome, comprising of 74,797 contigs, was constructed by a de novo assembly of the RNA-Seq reads. Gene expression profiling results showed that the expression of some transcripts encoding key enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis was up-regulated, while the expression of transcripts encoding enzymes involved in starch consumption were down-regulated, the expression of some photosynthesis-related transcripts were down-regulated during the first 24 h, and the expression of some transporter transcripts were up-regulated within the first 2 h. Very interestingly, most transcripts encoding key enzymes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were highly expressed regardless of starvation, while transcripts encoding laccase, the last rate-limiting enzyme of lignifications, exhibited very low expression abundance in all three samples. Conclusion Our study provides a comprehensive expression profiling of L. punctata under nutrient starvation, which indicates that nutrient starvation down

  2. Starvation metabolism of two common species of chironomids in Biandantang Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Yan, Yunjun

    2006-12-01

    Starvation metabolism is one of the important parts of respiration for normal activities of chironomids. During April 1996 to March 1997, the relationships of starvation metabolism and temperature, body weight of two common chironomids in Biandantang Lake were carefully investigated. The results showed relationship between starvation metabolism ( R, mgO2/ind.d) and body weight ( Ww, mg wet wt) was: Chironomus plumosus lg R=-2.573+1.0211g Ww (5°C), lg R=-2.710+1.354lg Ww (10°C), lg R=-1.824+0.823 lg Ww (15°C), lg R=-1.364+0.442lg, Ww (20°C), lg R=-2.763+1.517lg Ww (25°C); and Tokunagayusurika akamusi, lg R=-2.390+0.752lg Ww (5°C), lg R=-1.978+0.710lg Ww (10°C), lg R=-1.676+0.648lg Ww (15°C), lg R=-1.517+0.650lg Ww (20°C), lg R=-2.434+1.290lg Ww (25°C). Relationship of starvation metabolism and temperature ( T, °C) was: C. plumosus, R=-0.051+0.021 T-0.0006 T 2; T. akamusi, R=-0.051+0.021 T-0.0006 T 2. The complex relationship of the three parameters was: C. plumosus, R=0.0098 Ww 0.3882e0.1068 T ; T. akamusi, R=0.0012 Ww 1.1936e0.0711 T . With the above regressions, the estimated annual starvation metabolisms of the two chironomid species in Biandantang Lake were: C. plumosus, 24.2791 kJ/m2.a; T. akamusi, 8.7864 kJ/m2.a, respectively. This provides a firm foundation for the comparative study of bioenergetics of the chironomids.

  3. Divergence of larval resource acquisition for water conservation and starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal; Ranga, Poonam; Singh, Divya

    2012-07-01

    Laboratory selection experiments have evidenced storage of energy metabolites in adult flies of desiccation and starvation resistant strains of D. melanogaster but resource acquisition during larval stages has received lesser attention. For wild populations of D. melanogaster, it is not clear whether larvae acquire similar or different energy metabolites for desiccation and starvation resistance. We tested the hypothesis whether larval acquisition of energy metabolites is consistent with divergence of desiccation and starvation resistance in darker and lighter isofemale lines of D. melanogaster. Our results are interesting in several respects. First, we found contrasting patterns of larval resource acquisition, i.e., accumulation of higher carbohydrates during 3rd instar larval stage of darker flies versus higher levels of triglycerides in 1st and 2nd larval instars of lighter flies. Second, 3rd instar larvae of darker flies showed ~40 h longer duration of development at 21°C; and greater accumulation of carbohydrates (trehalose and glycogen) in fed larvae as compared with larvae non-fed after 150 h of egg laying. Third, darker isofemale lines have shown significant increase in total water content (18%); hemolymph (86%) and dehydration tolerance (11%) as compared to lighter isofemale lines. Loss of hemolymph water under desiccation stress until death was significantly higher in darker as compared to lighter isofemale lines but tissue water loss was similar. Fourth, for larvae of darker flies, about 65% energy content is contributed by carbohydrates for conferring greater desiccation resistance while the larvae of lighter flies acquire 2/3 energy from lipids for sustaining starvation resistance; and such energy differences persist in the newly eclosed flies. Thus, larval stages of wild-caught darker and lighter flies have evolved independent physiological processes for the accumulation of energy metabolites to cope with desiccation or starvation stress. PMID

  4. Metabolism and water loss rate of the haematophagous insect Rhodnius prolixus: effect of starvation and temperature.

    PubMed

    Rolandi, Carmen; Iglesias, Mónica S; Schilman, Pablo E

    2014-12-15

    Haematophagous insects suffer big changes in water needs under different levels of starvation. Rhodnius prolixus is the most important haematophagous vector of Chagas disease in the north of South America and a model organism in insect physiology. Although there have been some studies on patterns of gas exchange and metabolic rates, there is little information regarding water loss in R. prolixus. We investigated whether there is any modulation of water loss and metabolic rate under different requirements for saving water. We measured simultaneously CO2 production, water emission and activity in individual insects in real time by open-flow respirometry at different temperatures (15, 25 and 35°C) and post-feeding days (0, 5, 13 and 29). We found: (1) a clear drop in metabolic rate between 5 and 13 days after feeding that cannot be explained by activity and (2) a decrease in water loss rate with increasing starvation level, by a decrease in cuticular water loss during the first 5 days after feeding and a drop in the respiratory component thereafter. We calculated the surface area of the insects and estimated cuticular permeability. In addition, we analysed the pattern of gas exchange; the change from a cyclic to a continuous pattern was affected by temperature and activity, but it was not affected by the level of starvation. Modulation of metabolic and water loss rates with temperature and starvation could help R. prolixus to be more flexible in tolerating different periods of starvation, which is adaptive in a changing environment with the uncertainty of finding a suitable host. PMID:25394633

  5. Effect of starvation on global gene expression and proteolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed; Silverstein, Jeff; Rexroad, Caird E; Yao, Jianbo

    2007-01-01

    Background Fast, efficiently growing animals have increased protein synthesis and/or reduced protein degradation relative to slow, inefficiently growing animals. Consequently, minimizing the energetic cost of protein turnover is a strategic goal for enhancing animal growth. Characterization of gene expression profiles associated with protein turnover would allow us to identify genes that could potentially be used as molecular biomarkers to select for germplasm with improved protein accretion. Results We evaluated changes in hepatic global gene expression in response to 3-week starvation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Microarray analysis revealed a coordinated, down-regulated expression of protein biosynthesis genes in starved fish. In addition, the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism/transport, aerobic respiration, blood functions and immune response were decreased in response to starvation. However, the microarray approach did not show a significant increase of gene expression in protein catabolic pathways. Further studies, using real-time PCR and enzyme activity assays, were performed to investigate the expression of genes involved in the major proteolytic pathways including calpains, the multi-catalytic proteasome and cathepsins. Starvation reduced mRNA expression of the calpain inhibitor, calpastatin long isoform (CAST-L), with a subsequent increase in the calpain catalytic activity. In addition, starvation caused a slight but significant increase in 20S proteasome activity without affecting mRNA levels of the proteasome genes. Neither the mRNA levels nor the activities of cathepsin D and L were affected by starvation. Conclusion These results suggest a significant role of calpain and 20S proteasome pathways in protein mobilization as a source of energy during fasting and a potential association of the CAST-L gene with fish protein accretion. PMID:17880706

  6. Recurrent growth factor starvation promotes drug resistance in human leukaemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, K; Okuma, E; Yuo, A

    2002-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance can be induced by various environmental stresses including an exposure to chemical drugs and X-ray irradiation. In addition, hypo-nutritive conditions are known to promote multi-drug resistance in solid tumours. To understand the importance of nutritive conditions in the development of drug resistance in non-solid tumours and to know whether a transient malnutrition could induce a permanent reduction in drug sensitivity, leukaemic cells were transiently cultured under growth factor-starved conditions. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent human leukaemic MO7e cells were cultured in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor for 2 weeks, during which the majority of the cells died, and the minor viable cells were expanded in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor for following 1 week. This procedure was repeated three times, and the surviving cells were cloned by limiting dilution. These clones underwent G1 arrest in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor, while parental cells underwent apoptosis. Interestingly, activities of the downstream targets of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor receptor were regulated in a granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor-independent manner, indicating that the ligand-independent activation of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor receptor had not taken place. Moreover, the 4–7-fold increases in IC50 for etoposide and the 2–6-fold increase in IC90 for doxorubicin was observed. Furthermore, Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly up-regulated in the clones while no significant changes in Bax, Bcl-xL, P-glycoprotein and Hsp70 protein expression and no consistent changes in p53 expression were detected. We propose that recurrent growth factor starvation, which may occur in vivo when stromal function is damaged after intensive chemotherapy or bone marrow occupation by malignant cells, causes

  7. Effects of starvation, refeeding, and insulin on energy-linked metabolic processes in catfish (Rhamdia hilarii) adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C.R.; Garofalo, M.A.; Roselino, J.E.; Kettelhut, I.C.; Migliorini, R.H.

    1988-09-01

    The effects of starvation and of a short period of refeeding on energy-linked metabolic processes, as well as the effects of insulin administration, were investigated in an omnivorous fish (catfish, Rhamdia hilarii) previously adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet. Following food deprivation blood sugar levels declined progressively to about 50% of fed values after 30 days. During the same period plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration increased twofold. Starvation resulted in reduced concentrations of lipid and glycogen in the liver and of glycogen, lipid, and protein in white muscle. However, taking into account the initial and final concentrations of tissue constituents, the liver weight, and the large fractions of body weight represented by muscle, it could be estimated that most of the energy utilized during starvation derived from the catabolism of muscle lipid and protein. Refeeding starved fishes for 48 hr induced several-fold increases in the rates of in vivo and in vitro incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver and muscle lipid and of (14C)glycine into liver and muscle protein. Incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver glycogen was also increased. However; refeeding did not affect the incorporation of labeled glucose into muscle glycogen, neither in vivo nor in vitro. Administration of pharmacological doses of insulin to normally fed catfishes resulted in marked increases in the in vivo incorporation of 14C from glucose into lipid and protein in both liver and muscle. In contrast, labeled glucose incorporation into muscle glycogen was not affected by insulin and label incorporation into liver glycogen was actually lower than that in noninjected controls.

  8. Mechanisms of Activation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Escherichia coli by Ca2+ and of Desensitization by Trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Sudom, Athena; Walters, Robert; Pastushok, Landon; Goldie, Douglas; Prasad, Lata; Delbaere, Louis T. J.; Goldie, Hughes

    2003-01-01

    The 1.8-Å resolution structure of the ATP-Mg2+-Ca2+-pyruvate quinary complex of Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) is isomorphous to the published complex ATP-Mg2+-Mn2+-pyruvate-PCK, except for the Ca2+ and Mn2+ binding sites. Ca2+ was formerly implicated as a possible allosteric regulator of PCK, binding at the active site and at a surface activating site (Glu508 and Glu511). This report found that Ca2+ bound only at the active site, indicating that there is likely no surface allosteric site. 45Ca2+ bound to PCK with a Kd of 85 μM and n of 0.92. Glu508Gln Glu511Gln mutant PCK had normal activation by Ca2+. Separate roles of Mg2+, which binds the nucleotide, and Ca2+, which bridges the nucleotide and the anionic substrate, are implied, and the catalytic mechanism of PCK is better explained by studies of the Ca2+-bound structure. Partial trypsin digestion abolishes Ca2+ activation (desensitizes PCK). N-terminal sequencing identified sensitive sites, i.e., Arg2 and Arg396. Arg2Ser, Arg396Ser, and Arg2Ser Arg396Ser (double mutant) PCKs altered the kinetics of desensitization. C-terminal residues 397 to 540 were removed by trypsin when wild-type PCK was completely desensitized. Phe409 and Phe413 interact with residues in the Ca2+ binding site, probably stabilizing the C terminus. Phe409Ala, ΔPhe409, Phe413Ala, Δ397-521 (deletion of residues 397 to 521), Arg396(TAA) (stop codon), and Asp269Glu (Ca2+ site) mutations failed to desensitize PCK and, with the exception of Phe409Ala, appeared to have defects in the synthesis or assembly of PCK, suggesting that the structure of the C-terminal domain is important in these processes. PMID:12837799

  9. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase 1 Gene (Pck1) Displays Parallel Evolution between Old World and New World Fruit Bats

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle. PMID:25807515

  10. Hepatic nuclear factor 3 is an accessory factor required for the stimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene transcription by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C; Strömstedt, P E; O'Brien, R M; Granner, D K

    1996-07-01

    Transcription of the hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene is stimulated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. The glucocorticoid response is mediated by a complex glucocorticoid response unit that consists of two glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-binding sites (GR1 and GR2) and two accessory factor-binding sites (AF1 and AF2). The complete unit is required for the full glucocorticoid response. The dominant insulin effect is mediated in part through an insulin response sequence that is coincident with the AF2 element. Members of the hepatic nuclear factor 3 (HNF3) and CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) families bind to the AF2 element; however, there is no correlation between binding of these factors and the ability of the AF2 element to mediate an insulin response. We show here that binding of HNF3 does correlate with the stimulation of the glucocorticoid response by the AF2 element and that C/EBP is apparently not involved in this effect. This requirement for HNF3 is quite specific since the substitution of elements known to enhance the action of the GR in other promoters fails to recapitulate AF2 accessory factor activity. By contrast, an HNF3-binding site from the transthyretin gene is able to substitute for the wild type AF2 sequence and elicit a maximal glucocorticoid response. Based on current and previous observations, the glucocorticoid response unit consists of four DNA elements that bind four different proteins. These are: AF1 (hepatic nuclear factor 4/chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor), AF2 (HNF3), GR1 (GR), and GR2 (GR). PMID:8813720

  11. Metabolite Control Overrides Circadian Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase and CO(2) Fixation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Borland; Hartwell; Jenkins; Wilkins; Nimmo

    1999-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) catalyzes the primary fixation of CO(2) in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Flux through the enzyme is regulated by reversible phosphorylation. PEPc kinase is controlled by changes in the level of its translatable mRNA in response to a circadian rhythm. The physiological significance of changes in the levels of PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and the involvement of metabolites in control of the kinase was investigated by subjecting Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaves to anaerobic conditions at night to modulate the magnitude of malate accumulation, or to a rise in temperature at night to increase the efflux of malate from vacuole to cytosol. Changes in CO(2) fixation and PEPc kinase activity reflected those in kinase mRNA. The highest rates of CO(2) fixation and levels of kinase mRNA were observed in leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment for the first half of the night and then transferred to ambient air. In leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment overnight and transferred to ambient air at the start of the day, PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and activity, the phosphorylation state of PEPc, and fixation of atmospheric CO(2) were significantly higher than those for control leaves for the first 3 h of the light period. A nighttime temperature increase from 19 degrees C to 27 degrees C led to a rapid reduction in kinase mRNA and activity; however, this was not observed in leaves in which malate accumulation had been prevented by anaerobic treatment. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a high concentration of malate reduces both kinase mRNA and the accumulation of the kinase itself. PMID:10557237

  12. The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system: regulation by protein phosphorylation and phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, Josef; Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  13. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function. PMID:24600021

  14. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  15. Identification of tumor necrosis factor as a transcriptional regulator of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene following endotoxin treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M R; McCallum, R E

    1992-01-01

    The decreased synthesis of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, that occurs during endotoxemia was shown previously in rats to occur at the transcriptional level. In the current study, the exogenous administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a proximal mediator of endotoxic shock, reduced the PEPCK transcription rate, mRNAPEPCK levels, and PEPCK enzyme activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner in CD-1 mice. Comparable amounts of circulating TNF were measured in mice 2 h after injection of human recombinant TNF (10(5) U) or a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg). Direct action of TNF to decrease the PEPCK transcription rate was confirmed in vitro with H-4-II-E Reuber hepatoma cells, in which a dose-dependent inhibition of PEPCK transcription was observed with 1 to 100 U of TNF per ml. A role for TNF-elicited changes in PEPCK gene expression during endotoxemia was confirmed by the protective effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to recombinant murine TNF. C57BL/6 mice passively immunized with anti-TNF 4 h prior to endotoxin challenge exhibited normal PEPCK enzyme activity. Neutralization of circulating TNF with anti-TNF failed, however, to prevent the hypoglycemia commonly observed during endotoxemia, suggesting the participation of other mediators. Anti-TNF treatment reduced circulating interleukins 1 and 6 at 3 and 6 h after endotoxin treatment, respectively. These results suggest that during endotoxemia, the development of hypoglycemia is multifaceted and that several cytokines are most likely involved. The findings from the Reuber hepatoma cell model afford an opportunity in future work to map putative cytokine response elements in the PEPCK promoter responsible for perturbed hormonal regulation of the gene during endotoxemia. PMID:1398916

  16. Co-expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase for succinate production in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Chen, Xu; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Wan, Qing; Wu, Mingke; Zhang, Hanwen; Ma, Jiangfeng; Chen, Kequan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-03-01

    Succinate is not the dominant fermentation product from xylose in wild-type Escherichia coli K12. E. coli BA 203 is a lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA), pyruvate formate lyase (pflB), and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-carboxylase (ppc) deletion strain. To increase succinate accumulation and reduce byproduct formation, engineered E. coli BA204, in which ATP-forming PEP-carboxykinase (PEPCK) is overexpressed in BA203, was constructed and produced 2.17-fold higher succinate yield. To further improve the biomass and the consumption rate of xylose, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase), a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NAD(H), was also overexpressed. Thus, co-expression of PEPCK and NAPRTase in recombinant E. coli BA209 was investigated. In BA209, the pck gene and the pncB gene each have a trc promoter, hence, both genes are well expressed. During a 72-h anaerobic fermentation in sealed bottles, the total concentration of NAD(H) in BA209 was 1.25-fold higher than that in BA204, and the NADH/NAD+ ratio decreased from 0.28 to 0.11. During the exclusively anaerobic fermentation in a 3-L bioreactor, BA209 consumed 17.1 g L⁻¹ xylose and produced 15.5 g L⁻¹ succinate. Furthermore, anaerobic fermentation of corn stalk hydrolysate contained 30.1 g L⁻¹ xylose, 2.1 g L⁻¹ glucose and 1.5 g L⁻¹ arabinose, it produced a final succinate concentration of 17.2 g L⁻¹ with a yield of 0.94 g g⁻¹ total sugars. PMID:24564896

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 gene (Pck1) displays parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yin, Qiuyuan; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle. PMID:25807515

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Escherichia coli Ketopantoate Hydroxymethyltransferase Crystal Structure Confirms that It Is a Member of the (βα)8 Phosphoenolpyruvate/Pyruvate Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Schmitzberger, Florian; Smith, Alison G.; Abell, Chris; Blundell, Tom L.

    2003-01-01

    Escherichia coli ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase (KPHMT) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis pathway of pantothenate (vitamin B5), the transfer of a hydroxymethyl group onto α-ketoisovalerate. Here we describe a detailed comparative analysis of the KPHMT crystal structure and the identification of structural homologues, some of which have remarkable similarities in their active sites, modes of binding to substrates, and mechanisms. We show that KPHMT forms a family within the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate superfamily. Based on the analysis, we propose that in this superfamily there should be a subdivision into two groups. This paper completes our structural analysis of the E. coli enzymes in the pantothenate pathway. PMID:12837791

  19. High-Throughput Profiling of Caenorhabditis elegans Starvation-Responsive microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Segura, Laura; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Hernandez-Mendoza, Armando; Dimitrova Dinkova, Tzvetanka D.; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Perez-Andrade, Martha Elva; Miranda-Rios, Juan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs of ~22 nucleotides in length that regulate gene expression by interfering with the stability and translation of mRNAs. Their expression is regulated during development, under a wide variety of stress conditions and in several pathological processes. In nature, animals often face feast or famine conditions. We observed that subjecting early L4 larvae from Caenorhabditis elegans to a 12-hr starvation period produced worms that are thinner and shorter than well-fed animals, with a decreased lipid accumulation, diminished progeny, reduced gonad size, and an increased lifespan. Our objective was to identify which of the 302 known miRNAs of C. elegans changed their expression under starvation conditions as compared to well-fed worms by means of deep sequencing in early L4 larvae. Our results indicate that 13 miRNAs (miR-34-3p, the family of miR-35-3p to miR-41-3p, miR-39-5p, miR-41-5p, miR-240-5p, miR-246-3p and miR-4813-5p) were upregulated, while 2 miRNAs (let-7-3p and miR-85-5p) were downregulated in 12-hr starved vs. well-fed early L4 larvae. Some of the predicted targets of the miRNAs that changed their expression in starvation conditions are involved in metabolic or developmental process. In particular, miRNAs of the miR-35 family were upregulated 6–20 fold upon starvation. Additionally, we showed that the expression of gld-1, important in oogenesis, a validated target of miR-35-3p, was downregulated when the expression of miR-35-3p was upregulated. The expression of another reported target, the cell cycle regulator lin-23, was unchanged during starvation. This study represents a starting point for a more comprehensive understanding of the role of miRNAs during starvation in C. elegans. PMID:26554708

  20. Influence of starvation on the larval development of Hyas araneus (Decapoda, Majidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, K.; Dawirs, R. R.

    1981-09-01

    The influence of starvation on larval development of the spider crab Hyas araneus (L.) was studied in laboratory experiments. No larval stage suffering from continual lack of food had sufficient energy reserves to reach the next instar. Maximal survival times were observed at four different constant temperatures (2°, 6°, 12° and 18 °C). In general, starvation resistance decreased as temperatures increased: from 72 to 12days in the zoea-1, from 48 to 18 days in the zoea-2, and from 48 to 15 days in the megalopa stage. The length of maximal survival is of the same order of magnitude as the duration of each instar at a given temperature. “Sublethal limits” of early starvation periods were investigated at 12 °C: Zoea larvae must feed right from the beginning of their stage (at high food concentration) and for more than one fifth, approximately, of that stage to have at least some chance of surviving to the next instar, independent of further prey availability. The minimum time in which enough reserves are accumulated for successfully completing the instar without food is called “point-of-reserve-saturation” (PRS). If only this minimum period of essential initial feeding precedes starvation, development in both zoeal stages is delayed and mortality is greater, when compared to the fed control. Starvation periods beginning right after hatching of the first zoea cause a prolongation of this instar and, surprisingly, a slight shortening of the second stage. The delay in the zoea-1 increases proportionally to the length of the initial fasting period. If more than approximately 70 % of the maximum possible survival time has elapsed without food supply, the larvae become unable to recover and to moult to the second stage even when re-fed (“point-of-no-return”, PNR). The conclusion, based on own observations and on literature data, is that initial feeding is of paramount importance in the early development of planktotrophic decapod larvae. Taking into account

  1. Starvation is more efficient than the washing technique for purification of rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh-Hasankolaei, Mohammad; Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Sedighi-Gilani, Mohammadali; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2014-09-01

    Sertoli cells (SCs), one of the most important components of seminiferous tubules, are vital for normal spermatogenesis and male fertility. In recent years, numerous in vitro studies have shown the potential and actual activities of SCs. However, pure SCs are necessary for various in vitro studies. In this study, we have evaluated the efficiency of the starvation method for SC purification as compared with the washing method. Seminiferous tubule-derived cells (STDCs) of rats' testes underwent two different techniques for SC purification. In the first group (washing group), the medium was changed every 3-4 d, and cells were washed twice with phosphate-buffered saline that lacked CaC12 and MgSO4 (PBS(-)) before the addition of fresh medium. In the second group (starvation), the medium was changed every 7-8 d. Primary culture (P0), passage 1 (P1), and passage 2 (P2) cells were analyzed for the expression of SC-specific genes, vimentin, Wilm's tumor 1 (WT1), germ cell gene (vasa), Leydig cell marker, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 (Hsd17b3), and a marker of peritubular myoid cells, alpha smooth muscle actin (αSma), by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time RT-PCR. Gene expression analysis showed that P0 cells expressed all tested genes except Hsd17b3. The starvation method caused significant downregulation of vasa and αSma expression in P0, P1, and P2 cells, whereas vimentin and WT1 were upregulated. In contrast, the washing method was less effective than the starvation method for the removal of germ and pretubular myoid cells (p < 0.001). Totally, the results have revealed that although washing is the only common technique for elimination of contaminant cells in SC cultures, starvation has a stronger effect and is a suitable, affordable technique for SC purification. We propose that starvation is an efficient, inexpensive method that can be used for purification of SCs in animal species. PMID:24789729

  2. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  3. [Physiologic significance of "stringent control" in Escherichia coli under extreme starvation].

    PubMed

    Mach, H; Hecker, M; Hill, I; Schroeter, A; Mach, F

    1989-01-01

    The viability of three isogenic relA+/relA strain pairs of Escherichia coli (CP78/CP79; NF161/NF162; CP107/CP143) was studied during prolonged starvation for amino acids, glucose or phosphate. After amino acid limitation we found a prolonged viability of all relA+ strains which synthesized ppGpp. We suggest that some ppGpp-mediated pleiotropic effects of the stringent response (e.g. glykogen accumulation, enhanced protein turnover) might be involved in this prolongation of survival. After glucose or phosphate starvation there was no difference in the relA+/relA strains either in the ppGpp content or in the survival. PMID:2686672

  4. Synthesis of HPr(Ser-P)(His-P) by enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Casabon, Israël; Couture, Manon; Vaillancourt, Katy; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2006-05-30

    HPr is a protein of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS). In Gram-positive bacteria, HPr can be phosphorylated on Ser(46) by HPr(Ser) kinase/phosphorylase (HPrK/P) and on His(15) by enzyme I (EI) of the PTS. In vitro studies have shown that phosphorylation on one residue greatly inhibits the second phosphorylation. However, streptococci contain significant amounts of HPr(Ser-P)(His approximately P) during exponential growth, and recent studies suggest that phosphorylation of HPr(Ser-P) by EI is involved in the recycling of HPr(Ser-P)(His approximately P). We report in this paper a study on the phosphorylation of Streptococcus salivarius HPr, HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(S46D) by EI. Our results indicate that (i) the specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) of EI for HPr(Ser-P) at pH 7.9 was approximately 5000-fold smaller than that observed for HPr, (ii) no metabolic intermediates were able to stimulate HPr(Ser-P) phosphorylation, (iii) the rate of HPr phosphorylation decreased at pHs below 6.5, while that of HPr(Ser-P) increased and was almost 10-fold higher at pH 6.1 than at pH 7.9, (iv) HPr(S46D), a mutated HPr alleged to mimic HPr(Ser-P), was also phosphorylated more efficiently under acidic conditions, and, lastly, (v) phosphorylation of Bacillus subtilis HPr(Ser-P) by B. subtilis EI was also stimulated at acidic pH. Our results suggest that the high levels of HPr(Ser-P)(His approximately P) in streptococci result from the combination of two factors, a high physiological concentration of HPr(Ser-P) and stimulation of HPr(Ser-P) phosphorylation by EI at acidic pH, an intracellular condition that occurs in response to the acidification of the external medium during growth of the culture. PMID:16716080

  5. Physiological and Transcriptional Characterization of Escherichia Coli Strains Lacking Interconversion of Phosphoenolpyruvate and Pyruvate When Glucose and Acetate are Coutilized

    PubMed Central

    Sabido, Andrea; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Flores, Noemí; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is a precursor involved in the biosynthesis of aromatics and other valuable compounds in Escherichia coli. The PEP:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is the major glucose transport system and the largest PEP consumer. To increase intracellular PEP availability for aromatics production purposes, mutant strains of E. coli JM101 devoid of the ptsHIcrr operon (PB11 strain) have been previously generated. In this derivative, transport and growth rate on glucose decreased significantly. A laboratory evolved strain derived from PB11 that partially recovered its growth capacity on glucose was named PB12. In the present study, we blocked carbon skeletons interchange between PEP and pyruvate (PYR) in these ptsHIcrr− strains by deleting the pykA, pykF, and ppsA genes. The PB11 pykAF− ppsA− strain exhibited no growth on glucose or acetate alone, but it was viable when both substrates were consumed simultaneously. In contrast, the PB12 pykAF− ppsA− strain displayed a low growth rate on glucose or acetate alone, but in the mixture, growth was significantly improved. RT-qPCR expression analysis of PB11 pykAF− ppsA− growing with both carbon sources showed a downregulation of all central metabolic pathways compared with its parental PB11 strain. Under the same conditions, transcription of most of the genes in PB12 pykAF− ppsA− did not change, and few like aceBAK, sfcA, and poxB were overexpressed compared with PB12. We explored the aromatics production capabilities of both ptsHIcrr− pykAF− ppsA− strains and the engineered PB12 pykAF− ppsA− tyrR− pheAev2+/pJLBaroGfbrtktA enhanced the yield of aromatic compounds when coutilizing glucose and acetate compared with the control strain PB12 tyrR− pheAev2+/pJLBaroGfbrtktA. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 1150–1160. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24375081

  6. Insight into the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate mutase catalysis derived from site-directed mutagenesis studies of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y; Lu, Z; Huang, K; Herzberg, O; Dunaway-Mariano, D

    1999-10-26

    PEP mutase catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate in biosynthetic pathways leading to phosphonate secondary metabolites. A recent X-ray structure [Huang, K., Li, Z., Jia, Y., Dunaway-Mariano, D., and Herzberg, O. (1999) Structure (in press)] of the Mytilus edulis enzyme complexed with the Mg(II) cofactor and oxalate inhibitor reveals an alpha/beta-barrel backbone-fold housing an active site in which Mg(II) is bound by the two carboxylate groups of the oxalate ligand and the side chain of D85 and, via bridging water molecules, by the side chains of D58, D85, D87, and E114. The oxalate ligand, in turn, interacts with the side chains of R159, W44, and S46 and the backbone amide NHs of G47 and L48. Modeling studies identified two feasible PEP binding modes: model A in which PEP replaces oxalate with its carboxylate group interacting with R159 and its phosphoryl group positioned close to D58 and Mg(II) shifting slightly from its original position in the crystal structure, and model B in which PEP replaces oxalate with its phosphoryl group interacting with R159 and Mg(II) retaining its original position. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the key mutase active site residues (R159, D58, D85, D87, and E114) were carried out in order to evaluate the catalytic roles predicted by the two models. The observed retention of low catalytic activity in the mutants R159A, D85A, D87A, and E114A, coupled with the absence of detectable catalytic activity in D58A, was interpreted as evidence for model A in which D58 functions in nucleophilic catalysis (phosphoryl transfer), R159 functions in PEP carboxylate group binding, and the carboxylates of D85, D87 and E114 function in Mg(II) binding. These results also provide evidence against model B in which R159 serves to mediate the phosphoryl transfer. A catalytic motif, which could serve both the phosphoryl transfer and the C-C cleavage enzymes of the PEP mutase superfamily, is proposed. PMID:10571990

  7. Protein Kinase A Activation Promotes Cancer Cell Resistance to Glucose Starvation and Anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Yuri; De Vitto, Humberto; De Palma, Sara; Airoldi, Cristina; Vasso, Michele; Ricciardiello, Francesca; Lombardi, Pietro Paolo; Cirulli, Claudia; Rizzi, Raffaella; Nicotra, Francesco; Hiller, Karsten; Gelfi, Cecilia; Alberghina, Lilia; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells often rely on glycolysis to obtain energy and support anabolic growth. Several studies showed that glycolytic cells are susceptible to cell death when subjected to low glucose availability or to lack of glucose. However, some cancer cells, including glycolytic ones, can efficiently acquire higher tolerance to glucose depletion, leading to their survival and aggressiveness. Although increased resistance to glucose starvation has been shown to be a consequence of signaling pathways and compensatory metabolic routes activation, the full repertoire of the underlying molecular alterations remain elusive. Using omics and computational analyses, we found that cyclic adenosine monophosphate-Protein Kinase A (cAMP-PKA) axis activation is fundamental for cancer cell resistance to glucose starvation and anoikis. Notably, here we show that such a PKA-dependent survival is mediated by parallel activation of autophagy and glutamine utilization that in concert concur to attenuate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and to sustain cell anabolism. Indeed, the inhibition of PKA-mediated autophagy or glutamine metabolism increased the level of cell death, suggesting that the induction of autophagy and metabolic rewiring by PKA is important for cancer cellular survival under glucose starvation. Importantly, both processes actively participate to cancer cell survival mediated by suspension-activated PKA as well. In addition we identify also a PKA/Src mechanism capable to protect cancer cells from anoikis. Our results reveal for the first time the role of the versatile PKA in cancer cells survival under chronic glucose starvation and anoikis and may be a novel potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:26978032

  8. The DNA protection during starvation protein (Dps) influences attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goulter-Thorsen, Rebecca M; Gentle, Ian R; Gobius, Kari S; Dykes, Gary A

    2011-08-01

    The attachment of bacterial species such as Escherichia coli to abiotic materials is of concern to the food industry. This study investigated the role of DNA protection during starvation protein (Dps) in cell surface hydrophobicity and attachment of E. coli to glass, stainless steel, and Teflon surfaces. The Dps was not found to influence hydrophobicity, but did have a putative role in attachment in a strain- and substrate-dependent manner. PMID:21438764

  9. Protein Kinase A Activation Promotes Cancer Cell Resistance to Glucose Starvation and Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Palorini, Roberta; Votta, Giuseppina; Pirola, Yuri; De Vitto, Humberto; De Palma, Sara; Airoldi, Cristina; Vasso, Michele; Ricciardiello, Francesca; Lombardi, Pietro Paolo; Cirulli, Claudia; Rizzi, Raffaella; Nicotra, Francesco; Hiller, Karsten; Gelfi, Cecilia; Alberghina, Lilia; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2016-03-01

    Cancer cells often rely on glycolysis to obtain energy and support anabolic growth. Several studies showed that glycolytic cells are susceptible to cell death when subjected to low glucose availability or to lack of glucose. However, some cancer cells, including glycolytic ones, can efficiently acquire higher tolerance to glucose depletion, leading to their survival and aggressiveness. Although increased resistance to glucose starvation has been shown to be a consequence of signaling pathways and compensatory metabolic routes activation, the full repertoire of the underlying molecular alterations remain elusive. Using omics and computational analyses, we found that cyclic adenosine monophosphate-Protein Kinase A (cAMP-PKA) axis activation is fundamental for cancer cell resistance to glucose starvation and anoikis. Notably, here we show that such a PKA-dependent survival is mediated by parallel activation of autophagy and glutamine utilization that in concert concur to attenuate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and to sustain cell anabolism. Indeed, the inhibition of PKA-mediated autophagy or glutamine metabolism increased the level of cell death, suggesting that the induction of autophagy and metabolic rewiring by PKA is important for cancer cellular survival under glucose starvation. Importantly, both processes actively participate to cancer cell survival mediated by suspension-activated PKA as well. In addition we identify also a PKA/Src mechanism capable to protect cancer cells from anoikis. Our results reveal for the first time the role of the versatile PKA in cancer cells survival under chronic glucose starvation and anoikis and may be a novel potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:26978032

  10. Oxidative stress and starvation in Dinoroseobacter shibae: the role of extrachromosomal elements

    PubMed Central

    Soora, Maya; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wang, Hui; Michael, Victoria; Petersen, Jörn; Engelen, Bert; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Cypionka, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAP) are abundant in the photic zone of the marine environment. Dinoroseobacter shibae, a representative of the Roseobacter group, converts light into additional energy that enhances its survival especially under starvation. However, light exposure results in the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in AAPs. Here we investigated the response of D. shibae to starvation and oxidative stress, focusing on the role of extrachromosomal elements (ECRs). D. shibae possessing five ECRs (three plasmids and two chromids) was starved for 4 weeks either in the dark or under light/dark cycles and the survival was monitored. Transcriptomics showed that on the chromosome genes with a role in oxidative stress response and photosynthesis were differentially expressed during the light period. Most extrachromosomal genes in contrast showed a general loss of transcriptional activity, especially in dark-starved cells. The observed decrease of gene expression was not due to plasmid loss, as all five ECRs were maintained in the cells. Interestingly, the genes on the 72-kb chromid were the least downregulated, and one region with genes of the oxygen stress response and a light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase of cyanobacterial origin was strongly activated under the light/dark cycle. A Δ72-kb curing mutant lost the ability to survive under starvation in a light/dark cycle demonstrating the essential role of this chromid for adaptation to starvation and oxidative stress. Our data moreover suggest that the other four ECRs of D. shibae have no vital function under the investigated conditions and therefore were transcriptionally silenced. PMID:25859246

  11. Comparison of endogenous metabolism during long-term anaerobic starvation of nitrite/nitrate cultivated denitrifying phosphorus removal sludges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yayi; Zhou, Shuai; Wang, Hong; Ye, Liu; Qin, Jian; Lin, Ximao

    2015-01-01

    Denitrifying phosphorus removal (DPR) by denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating organisms (DPAOs) is a promising approach for reducing energy and carbon usage. However, influent fluctuations or interruptions frequently expose the DPAOs biomass to starvation conditions, reducing biomass activity and amount, and ultimately degrading the performance of DPR. Therefore, a better understanding of the endogenous metabolism and recovery ability of DPAOs is urgently required. In the present study, anaerobic starvation (12 days) and recovery were investigated in nitrite- and nitrate-cultivated DPAOs at 20 ± 1 °C. The cell decay rates in nitrite-DPAOs sludges from the end of the anaerobic and aerobic phase were 0.008 day⁻¹ and 0.007 day⁻¹, respectively, being 64% and 68% lower than those of nitrate-DPAOs sludges. Nitrite-DPAOs sludges also recovered more rapidly than nitrate-DPAOs sludge after 12 days of starvation. The maintenance energy of nitrite-DPAOs sludges from the end of the anaerobic and aerobic phase were approximately 31% and 34% lower, respectively, than those of nitrate-DPAOs sludges. Glycogen and polyphosphate (poly-P) sequentially served as the main maintenance energy sources in both nitrite-and nitrate-DPAOs sludges. However, the transformation pathway of the intracellular polymers during starvation differed between them. Nitrate-DPAOs sludge used extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (mainly polysaccharides) as an additional maintenance energy source during the first 3 days of starvation. During this phase, EPS appeared to contribute to 19-27% of the ATP production in nitrate-DPAOs, but considerably less to the cell maintenance of nitrite-DPAOs. The high resistance of nitrite-DPAOs to starvation might be attributable to frequent short-term starvation and exposure to toxic substances such as nitrite/free nitrous acids in the parent nitrite-fed reactor. The strong resistance of nitrite-DPAOs sludge to anaerobic starvation may be exploited in P removal

  12. On the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PEPs) and its inhibition by sodium fluoride: potential magnesium and aluminum fluoride complexes of phosphoryl transfer.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicole E; Jakeman, David L

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPs) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) using a two-step mechanism invoking a phosphorylated-His intermediate. Formation of PEP is an initial step in gluconeogenesis, and PEPs is essential for growth of Escherichia coli on 3-carbon sources such as pyruvate. The production of PEPs has also been linked to bacterial virulence and antibiotic resistance. As such, PEPs is of interest as a target for antibiotic development, and initial investigations of PEPs have indicated inhibition by sodium fluoride. Similar inhibition has been observed in a variety of phospho-transfer enzymes through the formation of metal fluoride complexes within the active site. Herein we quantify the inhibitory capacity of sodium fluoride through a coupled spectrophotometric assay. The observed inhibition provides indirect evidence for the formation of a MgF3(-) complex within the enzyme active site and insight into the phospho-transfer mechanism of PEPs. The effect of AlCl3 on PEPs enzyme activity was also assessed and found to decrease substrate binding and turnover. PMID:25707819

  13. Involvement of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the light-dependent up-regulation of sorghum leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Monreal, José Antonio; López-Baena, Francisco Javier; Vidal, Jean; Echevarría, Cristina; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2010-01-01

    The photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C4-PEPC) is regulated by phosphorylation by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PEPC-k). In Digitaria sanguinalis mesophyll protoplasts, this light-mediated transduction cascade principally requires a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and a Ca2+-dependent step. The present study investigates the cascade components at the higher integrated level of Sorghum bicolor leaf discs and leaves. PEPC-k up-regulation required light and photosynthetic electron transport. However, the PI-PLC inhibitor U-73122 and inhibitors of calcium release from intracellular stores only partially blocked this process. Analysis of [32P]phosphate-labelled phospholipids showed a light-dependent increase in phospholipase D (PLD) activity. Treatment of leaf discs with n-butanol, which decreases the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) by PLD, led to the partial inhibition of the C4-PEPC phosphorylation, suggesting the participation of PLD/PA in the signalling cascade. PPCK1 gene expression was strictly light-dependent. Addition of neomycin or n-butanol decreased, and a combination of both inhibitors markedly reduced PPCK1 expression and the concomitant rise in PEPC-k activity. The calcium/calmodulin antagonist W7 blocked the light-dependent up-regulation of PEPC-k, pointing to a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) integrating both second messengers, calcium and PA, which were shown to increase the activity of sorghum CDPK. PMID:20410319

  14. Daily foraging patterns in free-living birds: exploring the predation–starvation trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, David N.; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Sedgwick, Carolyn W.; Hochachka, Wesley M.

    2013-01-01

    Daily patterns in the foraging behaviour of birds are assumed to balance the counteracting risks of predation and starvation. Predation risks are a function of the influence of weight on flight performance and foraging behaviours that may expose individuals to predators. Although recent research sheds light on daily patterns in weight gain, little data exist on daily foraging routines in free-living birds. In order to test the predictions of various hypotheses about daily patterns of foraging, we quantified the activity of four species of passerines in winter using radio-frequency identification receivers built into supplemental feeding stations. From records of 472 368 feeder visits by tagged birds, we found that birds generally started to feed before sunrise and continued to forage at a steady to increasing rate throughout the day. Foraging in most species terminated well before sunset, suggesting their required level of energy reserves was being reached before the end of the day. These results support the risk-spreading theorem over a long-standing hypothesis predicting bimodality in foraging behaviour purportedly driven by a trade-off between the risks of starvation and predation. Given the increased energetic demands experienced by birds during colder weather, our results suggest that birds' perceptions of risk are biased towards starvation avoidance in winter. PMID:23595267

  15. Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen starvation in wine alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tesnière, Catherine; Brice, Claire; Blondin, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen is an important nutrient in alcoholic fermentation because its starvation affects both fermentation kinetics and the formation of yeast metabolites. In most alcoholic fermentations, yeasts have to ferment in nitrogen-starved conditions, which requires modifications of cell functions to maintain a high sugar flux and enable cell survival for long periods in stressful conditions. In this review, we present an overview of our current understanding of the responses of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to variations of nitrogen availability. Adaptation to nitrogen starvation involves changes in the activity of signaling pathways such as target of rapamycin (TOR) and nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which are important for the remodeling of gene expression and the establishment of stress responses. Upon starvation, protein degradation pathways involving autophagy and the proteasome play a major role in nitrogen recycling and the adjustment of cellular activity. Recent progress in the understanding of the role of these mechanisms should enable advances in fermentation management and the design of novel targets for the selection or improvement of yeast strains. PMID:26201494

  16. Growth Phase-Dependent Response of Helicobacter pylori to Iron Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, D. Scott; Thompson, Lucinda J.; Kim, Charles C.; Mitchell, Hazel; Tompkins, Lucy S.; Lee, Adrian; Falkow, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that is often found in extremely limited available quantities within eukaryotic hosts. Because of this, many pathogenic bacteria have developed regulated networks of genes important for iron uptake and storage. In addition, it has been shown that many bacteria use available iron concentrations as a signal to regulate virulence gene expression. We have utilized DNA microarray technology to identify genes of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori that are differentially regulated on a growth-inhibiting shift to iron starvation conditions. In addition, the growth phase-dependent expression of these genes was investigated by examining both exponential and stationary growth phase cultures. We identified known iron-regulated genes, as well as a number of genes whose regulation by iron concentration was not previously appreciated. Included in the list of regulated factors were the known virulence genes cagA, vacA, and napA. We examined the effect of iron starvation on the motility of H. pylori and found that exponential- and stationary-phase cultures responded differently to the stress. We further found that while growing cells are rapidly killed by iron starvation, stationary-phase cells show a remarkable ability to survive iron depletion. Finally, bioinformatic analysis of the predicted promoter regions of the differentially regulated genes led to identification of several putative Fur boxes, suggesting a direct role for Fur in iron-dependent regulation of these genes. PMID:14573673

  17. Proteomic analysis of mycelial proteins from Magnaporthe oryzae under nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X-G; Yu2, P; Yao, C-X; Ding, Y-M; Tao, N; Zhao, Z-W

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is an important model system in studies of plant pathogenic fungi, and nitrogen is a key nutrient source affecting microbial growth and development. In order to understand how nitrogen stress causes changes in mycelial proteins, we analyzed differentially expressed mycelial proteins from the M. oryzae virulent strain CH-63 using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in complete medium or under nitrogen starvation conditions. A total of 975 ± 70 and 1169 ± 90 protein spots were detected in complete medium and under nitrogen starvation conditions, respectively. Forty-nine protein spots exhibited at least 2-fold up-regulation or down-regulation at the protein level according to PDQuest7.4. Moreover, 43 protein spots were successfully identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among these spots, 6 proteins were functionally unknown and 37 proteins were categorized into 5 groups according to their functions, including development, metabolism, biosynthesis, and biological process. These 37 proteins were further analyzed for their enriched metabolic pathways by KOBAS2.0, and 14 proteins were found to be involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, the regulation of M. oryzae growth under the nitrogen starvation conditions appears to be complex because of the various proteins and enzymes involved. PMID:27323032

  18. Personality predicts individual responsiveness to the risks of starvation and predation.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J L; Cole, E F; Bates, J; Payne, R W; Cresswell, W

    2012-05-22

    Theory suggests that individual personality is tightly linked to individual life histories and to environmental variation. The reactive-proactive axis, for example, is thought to reflect whether individuals prioritize productivity or survival, mutually exclusive options that can be caused by conflicts between foraging and anti-predation behaviour. Evidence for this trade-off hypothesis, however, is limited. Here, we tested experimentally whether exploration behaviour (EB), an assay of proactivity, could explain how great tits (Parus major) respond to changes in starvation and predation risk. Individuals were presented with two feeders, holding good or poor quality food, which interchanged between safe and dangerous positions 10 m apart, across two 24 h treatments. Starvation risk was assumed to be highest in the morning and lowest in the afternoon. The proportion of time spent feeding on good quality food (PTG) rather than poor quality food was repeatable within treatments, but individuals varied in how PTG changed with respect to predation- and starvation-risk across treatments. This individual plasticity variation in foraging behaviour was linked to EB, as predicted by the reactive-proactive axis, but only among individuals in dominant social classes. Our results support the trade-off hypothesis at the level of individuals in a wild population, and suggest that fine-scale temporal and spatial variation may play important roles in the evolution of personality. PMID:22179807

  19. Serum starvation improves transient transfection efficiency in differentiating embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wallenstein, Eric J; Barminko, Jeffrey; Schloss, Rene S; Yarmush, Martin L

    2010-01-01

    Control of genetic expression is a critical issue in the field of stem cell biology, where determining a cell fate or reprogramming adult somatic cells into pluripotent cells has become a common experimental practice. In turn, for these cells to have therapeutic clinical potential, techniques for controlling gene expression are needed that minimizes or eliminates the risk of oncogenesis and mutagenesis. Possible routes for achieving this outcome could come in the form of a transient nonviral gene delivery system. In this study, we improved the efficiency of transient gene delivery to differentiating murine embryonic stem (ES) cells via serum starvation for 3 days before transfection. The transient expression of a constitutively-controlled plasmid increased from ∼50% (replated control) to ∼83% when transfected after 3 days of serum starvation but decreased to ∼28% when transfected after 3 days in normal high serum-containing media. When probed with a liver-specific reporter, Cyp7A1, expression increased from ∼1.4% (replated control) to ∼3.7% when transfected after 3 days of serum starvation but decreased to ∼0.7% when transfected after 3 days in high serum-containing media. Cy3-tagged oligonucleotides were used to rapidly quantify DNA uptake and predict ultimate transfection efficiency. This study suggests that modifications in media serum levels before transfection can have a profound effect on improving nonviral gene delivery. PMID:20574993

  20. Theoretical lessons for increasing algal biofuel: Evolution of oil accumulation to avert carbon starvation in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Akita, Tetsuya; Kamo, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae-derived oil is considered as a feasible alternative to fossil-derived oil. To produce more algal biomass, both algal population size and oil accumulation in algae must be maximized. Most of the previous studies have concentrated on only one of these issues, and relatively little attention has been devoted to considering the tradeoff between them. In this paper, we first theoretically investigated evolutionary reasons for oil accumulation and then by coupling population and evolutionary dynamics, we searched for conditions that may provide better yields. Using our model, we assume that algae allocate assimilated carbon to growth, maintenance, and carbon accumulation as biofuel and that the amount of essential materials (carbon and nitrate) are strongly linked in fixed proportions. Such stoichiometrically explicit models showed that (i) algae with more oil show slower population growth; therefore, the use of such algae results in lower total yields of biofuel and (ii) oil accumulation in algae is caused by carbon and not nitrate starvation. The latter can be interpreted as a strategy for avoiding the risk of increased death rate by carbon starvation. Our model also showed that both strong carbon starvation and moderately limited nitrate will promote total biofuel production. Our results highlight considering the life-history traits for a higher total yields of biofuel, which leads to insight into both establishing a prolonged culture and collection of desired strains from a natural environment. PMID:26047852

  1. Transcriptome landscape of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 for nitrogen starvation responses using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Park, Byeonghyeok; Choi, In-Geol; Sim, Sang Jun; Lee, Sun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technology using RNA-seq has allowed understanding of cellular mechanisms and regulations of bacterial transcription. In addition, transcriptome analysis with RNA-seq has been used to accelerate strain improvement through systems metabolic engineering. Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, a photosynthetic bacterium, has remarkable potential for biochemical and biofuel production due to photoautotrophic cell growth and direct CO2 conversion. Here, we performed a transcriptome analysis of S. elongatus PCC 7942 using RNA-seq to understand the changes of cellular metabolism and regulation for nitrogen starvation responses. As a result, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and functionally categorized. With mapping onto metabolic pathways, we probed transcriptional perturbation and regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolisms relating to nitrogen starvation responses. Experimental evidence