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Sample records for phospholipase-c pi-plc family

  1. Biochemical characterization of the tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family and its role in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed M; Vossen, Jack H; van Zeijl, Arjan; Dezhsetan, Sara; Testerink, Christa; Seidl, Michael F; Beck, Martina; Strutt, James; Robatzek, Silke; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2016-09-01

    Plants possess effective mechanisms to quickly respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. The rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes occurs early after the stimulation of plant immune-receptors. Genomes of different plant species encode multiple PLC homologs belonging to one class, PLCζ. Here we determined whether all tomato homologs encode active enzymes and whether they can generate signals that are distinct from one another. We searched the recently completed tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) genome sequence and identified a total of seven PLCs. Recombinant proteins were produced for all tomato PLCs, except for SlPLC7. The purified proteins showed typical PLC activity, as different PLC substrates were hydrolysed to produce diacylglycerol. We studied SlPLC2, SlPLC4 and SlPLC5 enzymes in more detail and observed distinct requirements for Ca(2+) ions and pH, for both their optimum activity and substrate preference. This indicates that each enzyme could be differentially and specifically regulated in vivo, leading to the generation of PLC homolog-specific signals in response to different stimuli. PLC overexpression and specific inhibition of PLC activity revealed that PLC is required for both specific effector- and more general "pattern"-triggered immunity. For the latter, we found that both the flagellin-triggered response and the internalization of the corresponding receptor, Flagellin Sensing 2 (FLS2) of Arabidopsis thaliana, are suppressed by inhibition of PLC activity. Altogether, our data support an important role for PLC enzymes in plant defence signalling downstream of immune receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:26825689

  2. Leishmania amazonensis: heme stimulates (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity via phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C/protein kinase C-like (PI-PLC/PKC) signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo; Cardoso, Viviane Carrozino; Francioli, Fernanda Gomes; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2010-04-01

    In the present paper we studied the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC (PI-PLC)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway in (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase stimulation by heme in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes. Heme stimulated the PKC-like activity with a concentration of 50nM. Interestingly, the maximal stimulation of the PKC-like activity promoted by phorbol ester was of the same magnitude promoted by heme. However, the stimulatory effect of heme is completely abolished by ET-18-OCH(3) and U73122, specific inhibitors of PI-PLC. (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity is increased in the presence of increased concentrations of heme, being maximally affected at 50nM. This effect was completely reversed by 10nM calphostin C, an inhibitor of PKC. Thus, the effect of 50nM heme on (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity is completely abolished by ET-18-OCH(3) and U73122. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the heme receptor mediates the stimulatory effect of heme on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity through a PI-PLC/PKC signaling pathway. PMID:20045694

  3. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    PubMed

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP). CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP) and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem) in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV), we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC), using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM). Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues. PMID:23940667

  4. Plant phospholipase C family: Regulation and functional role in lipid signaling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjeet; Bhatnagar, Nikita; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-08-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC), a major membrane phospholipid hydrolyzing enzyme generates signaling messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in animals, and their phosphorylated forms such as phosphatidic acid (PA) and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) are thought to regulate various cellular processes in plants. Based on substrate specificity, plant PLC family is sub-divided into phosphatidylinositol-PLC (PI-PLC) and phosphatidylcholine-PLC (PC-PLC) groups. The activity of plant PLCs is regulated by various factors and the major ones include, Ca(2+) concentration, phospholipid substrate, post-translational modifications and interacting proteins. Most of the PLC members have been localized at the plasma membrane, suited for their function of membrane lipid hydrolysis. Several PLC members have been implicated in various cellular processes and signaling networks, triggered in response to a number of environmental cues and developmental events in different plant species, which makes them potential candidates for genetically engineering the crop plants for stress tolerance and enhancing the crop productivity. In this review article, we are focusing mainly on the plant PLC signaling and regulation, potential cellular and physiological role in different abiotic and biotic stresses, nutrient deficiency, growth and development. PMID:25933832

  5. Genome-Wide Analysis and Expression Profiling of the Phospholipase C Gene Family in Soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fawei; Deng, Yu; Zhou, Yonggang; Dong, Jinye; Chen, Huan; Dong, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) hydrolyses phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate to produce diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. It plays an important role in plant development and abiotic stress responses. However, systematic analysis and expression profiling of the phospholipase C (PLC) gene family in soybean have not been reported. In this study, 12 putative PLC genes were identified in the soybean genome. Soybean PLCs were found on chromosomes 2, 11, 14 and 18 and encoded 58.8-70.06 kD proteins. Expression pattern analysis by RT-PCR demonstrated that expression of the GmPLCs was induced by PEG, NaCl and saline-alkali treatments in roots and leaves. GmPLC transcripts accumulated specifically in roots after ABA treatment. Furthermore, GmPLC transcripts were analyzed in various tissues. The results showed that GmPLC7 was highly expressed in most tissues, whereas GmPLC12 was expressed in early pods specifically. In addition, subcellular localization analysis was carried out and confirmed that GmPLC10 was localized in the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our genomic analysis of the soybean PLC family provides an insight into the regulation of abiotic stress responses and development. It also provides a solid foundation for the functional characterization of the soybean PLC gene family. PMID:26421918

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis and Expression Profiling of the Phospholipase C Gene Family in Soybean (Glycine max)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yonggang; Dong, Jinye; Chen, Huan; Dong, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) hydrolyses phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate to produce diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. It plays an important role in plant development and abiotic stress responses. However, systematic analysis and expression profiling of the phospholipase C (PLC) gene family in soybean have not been reported. In this study, 12 putative PLC genes were identified in the soybean genome. Soybean PLCs were found on chromosomes 2, 11, 14 and 18 and encoded 58.8–70.06 kD proteins. Expression pattern analysis by RT-PCR demonstrated that expression of the GmPLCs was induced by PEG, NaCl and saline-alkali treatments in roots and leaves. GmPLC transcripts accumulated specifically in roots after ABA treatment. Furthermore, GmPLC transcripts were analyzed in various tissues. The results showed that GmPLC7 was highly expressed in most tissues, whereas GmPLC12 was expressed in early pods specifically. In addition, subcellular localization analysis was carried out and confirmed that GmPLC10 was localized in the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our genomic analysis of the soybean PLC family provides an insight into the regulation of abiotic stress responses and development. It also provides a solid foundation for the functional characterization of the soybean PLC gene family. PMID:26421918

  7. Listeria monocytogenes listeriolysin O and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C affect adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk-Balska, Agata; Bielecki, Jacek

    2005-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborn intracellular animal and human pathogen, produces several exotoxins contributing to virulence. Among these are listeriolysin O (LLO), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent hemolysin, and a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). LLO is known to play an important role in the escape of bacteria from the primary phagocytic vacuole of macrophages, and PI-PLC supports this process. Evidence is accumulating that LLO and PI-PLC are multifunctional virulence factors with many important roles in the host-parasite interaction other than phagosomal membrane disruption. LLO and PI-PLC may induce a number of host cell responses by modulating signal transduction of infected cells via intracellular Ca2+ levels and the metabolism of phospholipids. This would result in the activation of host phospholipase C and protein kinase C. In the present study, using Bacillus sub tilis strains expressing LLO, PI-PLC, and simultaneously LLO and PI-PLC, we show that LLO and PI-PLC enhance bacterial binding to epithelial cells Int407, with LLO being necessary and PI-PLC playing an accessory role. The results of this work suggest that these two listerial proteins act on epithelial cells prior to internalization. PMID:16391652

  8. Revealing Transient Interactions between Phosphatidylinositol-specific Phospholipase C and Phosphatidylcholine--Rich Lipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Boqian; He, Tao; Grauffel, Cédric; Reuter, Nathalie; Roberts, Mary; Gershenson, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes transiently interact with target membranes. Previous fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments showed that Bacillus thuringiensis PI-PLC specifically binds to phosphatidylcholine (PC)-rich membranes and preferentially interacts with unilamellar vesicles that show larger curvature. Mutagenesis studies combined with FCS measurements of binding affinity highlighted the importance of interfacial PI-PLC tyrosines in the PC specificity. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of PI-PLC performed in the presence of a PC membrane indicate these tyrosines are involved in specific cation-pi interactions with choline headgroups. To further understand those transient interactions between PI-PLC and PC-rich vesicles, we monitor single fluorescently labeled PI-PLC proteins as they cycle on and off surface-tethered small unilamellar vesicles using total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy. The residence times on vesicles along with vesicle size information, based on vesicle fluorescence intensity, reveal the time scales of PI-PLC membrane interactions as well as the curvature dependence. The PC specificity and the vesicle curvature dependence of this PI-PLC/membrane interaction provide insight into how the interface modulates protein-membrane interactions. This work was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Science of the National Institutes of Health (R01GM060418).

  9. Salicylic acid modulates levels of phosphoinositide dependent-phospholipase C substrates and products to remodel the Arabidopsis suspension cell transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ruelland, Eric; Pokotylo, Igor; Djafi, Nabila; Cantrel, Catherine; Repellin, Anne; Zachowski, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Basal phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity controls gene expression in Arabidopsis suspension cells and seedlings. PI-PLC catalyzes the production of phosphorylated inositol and diacylglycerol (DAG) from phosphoinositides. It is not known how PI-PLC regulates the transcriptome although the action of DAG-kinase (DGK) on DAG immediately downstream from PI-PLC is responsible for some of the regulation. We previously established a list of genes whose expression is affected in the presence of PI-PLC inhibitors. Here this list of genes was used as a signature in similarity searches of curated plant hormone response transcriptome data. The strongest correlations obtained with the inhibited PI-PLC signature were with salicylic acid (SA) treatments. We confirm here that in Arabidopsis suspension cells SA treatment leads to an increase in phosphoinositides, then demonstrate that SA leads to a significant 20% decrease in phosphatidic acid, indicative of a decrease in PI-PLC products. Previous sets of microarray data were re-assessed. The SA response of one set of genes was dependent on phosphoinositides. Alterations in the levels of a second set of genes, mostly SA-repressed genes, could be related to decreases in PI-PLC products that occur in response to SA action. Together, the two groups of genes comprise at least 40% of all SA-responsive genes. Overall these two groups of genes are distinct in the functional categories of the proteins they encode, their promoter cis-elements and their regulation by DGK or phospholipase D. SA-regulated genes dependent on phosphoinositides are typical SA response genes while those with an SA response that is possibly dependent on PI-PLC products are less SA-specific. We propose a model in which SA inhibits PI-PLC activity and alters levels of PI-PLC products and substrates, thereby regulating gene expression divergently. PMID:25426125

  10. Phospholipase C treatment of certain human target cells reduces their susceptibility to NK lysis without affecting binding or sensitivity to lytic granules.

    PubMed

    Une, C; Grönberg, A; Axberg, I; Jondal, M; Orn, A

    1991-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) is an enzyme that has the capacity to release glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol (G-PI)-anchored proteins from the cells surface. Pretreatment of the human T-cell leukemia cell line Molt-4 with PI-PLC resulted in a decrease in the susceptibility to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Treatment of the erythroleukemia cell line K562 with PI-PLC had no effect on its NK susceptibility. PI-PLC-treated and untreated Molt-4 bound equally well to lymphocytes in target-binding studies with effector cell preparations enriched for NK cells. Susceptibility to cytolytic granules isolated from rat LGL tumor cells remained the same after treatment of Molt-4 or K562 with PI-PLC. Combined treatment of Molt-4 with PI-PLC and rlFN-alpha or rlFN-gamma resulted in additive reductions of the NK susceptibility, suggesting that PI-PLC and interferons act on different mechanisms to protect cells from NK lysis. When expression of a number of antigens on Molt-4 and K562 was analyzed in flow cytometry, only the expression of CD58 was reduced after PI-PLC treatment. The susceptibility of Con A blasts to MLR derived cytotoxic T-cells was not altered by treatment with phospholipase. These data suggest that PI-PLC treatment reduces the capacity of some target cells to activate NK cells upon contract. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is presently unclear. PMID:1703925

  11. Bacterial phospholipases C.

    PubMed Central

    Titball, R W

    1993-01-01

    A variety of pathogenic bacteria produce phospholipases C, and since the discovery in 1944 that a bacterial toxin (Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin) possessed an enzymatic activity, there has been considerable interest in this class of proteins. Initial speculation that all phospholipases C would have lethal properties has not been substantiated. Most of the characterized enzymes fall into one of four groups of structurally related proteins: the zinc-metallophospholipases C, the sphingomyelinases, the phosphatidylinositol-hydrolyzing enzymes, and the pseudomonad phospholipases C. The zinc-metallophospholipases C have been most intensively studied, and lethal toxins within this group possess an additional domain. The toxic phospholipases C can interact with eukaryotic cell membranes and hydrolyze phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, leading to cell lysis. However, measurement of the cytolytic potential or lethality of phospholipases C may not accurately indicate their roles in the pathogenesis of disease. Subcytolytic concentrations of phospholipase C can perturb host cells by activating the arachidonic acid cascade or protein kinase C. Nonlethal phospholipases C, such as the Listeria monocytogenes PLC-A, appear to enhance the release of the organism from the host cell phagosome. Since some phospholipases C play important roles in the pathogenesis of disease, they could form components of vaccines. A greater understanding of the modes of action and structure-function relationships of phospholipases C will facilitate the interpretation of studies in which these enzymes are used as membrane probes and will enhance the use of these proteins as models for eukaryotic phospholipases C. PMID:8336671

  12. Constitutive Macropinocytosis in Oncogene-transformed Fibroblasts Depends on Sequential Permanent Activation of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase and Phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    Amyere, Mustapha; Payrastre, Bernard; Krause, Ulrike; Smissen, Patrick Van Der; Veithen, Alex; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2000-01-01

    Macropinocytosis results from the closure of lamellipodia generated by membrane ruffling, thereby reflecting cortical actin dynamics. Both transformation of Rat-1 fibroblasts by v-Src or K-Ras and stable transfection for expression of dominant-positive, wild-type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) regulatory subunit p85α constitutively led to stress fiber disruption, cortical actin recruitment, extensive ruffling, and macropinosome formation, as measured by a selective acceleration of fluid-phase endocytosis. These alterations closely correlated with activation of PI3K and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), as assayed by 3-phosphoinositide synthesis in situ and in vitro and inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate steady-state levels, respectively; they were abolished by stable transfection of v-Src–transformed cells for dominant-negative truncated p85α expression and by pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and PI-PLC, indicating a requirement for both enzymes. Whereas PI3K activation resisted PI-PLC inhibition, PI-PLC activation was abolished by a PI3K inhibitor and dominant-negative transfection, thus placing PI-PLC downstream of PI3K. Together, these data suggest that permanent sequential activation of both PI3K and PI-PLC is necessary for the dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in oncogene-transformed fibroblasts, resulting in constitutive ruffling and macropinocytosis. PMID:11029048

  13. Mammalian phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol (DAG). DAG and IP(3) each control diverse cellular processes and are also substrates for synthesis of other important signaling molecules. PLC is thus central to many important interlocking regulatory networks. Mammals express six families of PLCs, each with both unique and overlapping controls over expression and subcellular distribution. Each PLC also responds acutely to its own spectrum of activators that includes heterotrimeric G protein subunits, protein tyrosine kinases, small G proteins, Ca(2+), and phospholipids. Mammalian PLCs are autoinhibited by a region in the catalytic TIM barrel domain that is the target of much of their acute regulation. In combination, the PLCs act as a signaling nexus that integrates numerous signaling inputs, critically governs PIP(2) levels, and regulates production of important second messengers to determine cell behavior over the millisecond to hour timescale. PMID:23140367

  14. Molecular and Enzymatic Characterization of Three Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C Isoforms from Potato1

    PubMed Central

    Kopka, Joachim; Pical, Christophe; Gray, Julie E.; Müller-Röber, Bernd

    1998-01-01

    Many cellular responses to stimulation of cell-surface receptors by extracellular signals are transmitted across the plasma membrane by hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), which is cleaved into diacylglycerol and inositol-1,4,5-tris-phosphate by phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). We present structural, biochemical, and RNA expression data for three distinct PI-PLC isoforms, StPLC1, StPLC2, and StPLC3, which were cloned from a guard cell-enriched tissue preparation of potato (Solanum tuberosum) leaves. All three enzymes contain the catalytic X and Y domains, as well as C2-like domains also present in all PI-PLCs. Analysis of the reaction products obtained from PIP2 hydrolysis unequivocally identified these enzymes as genuine PI-PLC isoforms. Recombinant StPLCs showed an optimal PIP2-hydrolyzing activity at 10 μm Ca2+ and were inhibited by Al3+ in equimolar amounts. In contrast to PI-PLC activity in plant plasma membranes, however, recombinant enzymes could not be activated by Mg2+. All three stplc genes are expressed in various tissues of potato, including leaves, flowers, tubers, and roots, and are affected by drought stress in a gene-specific manner. PMID:9449844

  15. A plasma-membrane linker for the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kimiyo; Sano, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We previously screened genes that were transcriptionally activated during the early stage of wound response in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum), and isolated a particular clone, which encoded a membrane-located protein, designated as NtC7. Upon overexpression in tobacco plants, NtC7 conferred a marked tolerance to osmotic stress, suggesting it to be involved in maintenance of osmotic adjustments. In this study, we searched for proteins which interact with NtC7 by the yeast two-hybrid screening, and isolated a clone encoding phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, designated as NtPI-PLC. Physical interaction between NtC7 and C2 domain of NtPI-PLC was confirmed by the pull-down assay. Expression of fused protein to green-fluorescence protein in onion epidermal cell layers indicated both proteins to predominantly localize to the plasma membrane. Their interaction in planta was shown by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation, which exhibited a clear fluorescence of reconstituted yellow fluorescence protein. Transcripts of NtC7 and NtPI-PLC were markedly increased 30 to 60 min after wounding. PI-PLC is one of key enzymes in metabolism of inositol phospholipids, which function in signal transduction and also in response to stresses including osmotic changes. It was shown to localize to plasma-membrane and, to a lesser extent, to cytosol. However, molecular mechanism of membrane localization has remained to be determined, because of the apparent lack of domains for membrane association. The present results suggest that one of such mechanisms is tethering NtPI-PLC to the plasma membrane through interaction with NtC7, which possesses a transmembrane domain at the C-terminus. PMID:19704699

  16. A mutation in PLC1, a candidate phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causes aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W E; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M

    1993-01-01

    We identified a putative Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) gene, PLC1, which encodes a protein most similar to the delta class of PI-PLC enzymes. The PLC1 gene was isolated during a study of yeast strains that exhibit defects in chromosome segregation. plc1-1 cells showed a 10-fold increase in aberrant chromosome segregation compared with the wild type. Molecular analysis revealed that PLC1 encodes a predicted protein of 101 kDa with approximately 50 and 26% identity to the highly conserved X and Y domains of PI-PLC isozymes from humans, bovines, rats, and Drosophila melanogaster. The putative yeast protein also contains a consensus EF-hand domain that is predicted to bind calcium. Interestingly, the temperature-sensitive and chromosome missegregation phenotypes exhibited by plc1-1 cells were partially suppressed by exogenous calcium. Images PMID:8391635

  17. Thromboxane-insensitive dog platelets have impaired activation of phospholipase C due to receptor-linked G protein dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G J; Leis, L A; Dunlop, P C

    1993-01-01

    Human platelet thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptors are linked to phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) via a G protein tentatively identified as a member of the Gq class. In contrast, platelet thrombin receptors appear to activate PI-PLC via other unidentified G proteins. Platelets from most dogs are TXA2 insensitive (TXA2-); i.e., they do not aggregate irreversibly or secrete although they bind TXA2, but they respond normally to thrombin. In contrast, a minority of dogs have TXA2-sensitive (TXA2+) platelets that are responsive to TXA2. To determine the mechanism responsible for TXA2- platelets, we evaluated receptor activation of PI-PLC. Equilibrium binding of TXA2/PGH2 receptor agonists, [125I]BOP and [3H]U46619, and antagonist, [3H]SQ29,548, revealed comparable high-affinity binding to TXA2-, TXA2+, and human platelets. U46619-induced PI-PLC activation was impaired in TXA2- platelets as evidenced by reduced (a) phosphorylation of the 47-kD substrate of protein kinase C, (b) phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, (c) rise in cytosolic calcium concentration, and (d) inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3) formation, while thrombin-induced PI-PLC activation was not impaired. GTPase activity stimulated by U46619, but not by thrombin, was markedly reduced in TXA2- platelets. Antisera to Gq class alpha subunits abolished U46619-induced GTPase activity in TXA2-, TXA2+, and human platelets. Direct G protein stimulation by GTP gamma S yielded significantly less PA and IP3 in TXA2- platelets. Immunotransfer blotting revealed comparable quantities of Gq class alpha-subunits in all three platelet types. Thus, TXA2- dog platelets have impaired PI-PLC activation in response to TXA2/PGH2 receptor agonists secondary to G protein dysfunction, presumably involving a member of the Gq class. Images PMID:8227362

  18. The study on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus thuringiensis: synthesis of homogeneous substrates, substrate specificity and other properties.

    PubMed

    Kume, T; Taguchi, R; Tomita, M; Tokuyama, S; Morizawa, K; Nakachi, O; Hirano, J; Ikezawa, H

    1992-08-01

    The properties of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis were studied in detail. The enzyme was extremely thermostable in 0.1% bovine serum albumin and retained 73% of its activity at 100 degrees C for 10 min, while it was labile in the absence of albumin. The enzymatic activity was inhibited by HgCl2 or p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and restored by dithiothreitol. The kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of PI-PLC were determined for the mixed micelle of yeast phosphatidylinositol (PI)/Triton X-100 or sodium deoxycholate. Four PIs having different acyl chains: dilauroylphosphatidylinositol (DLPI), dimyristoylphosphatidylinositol (DMPI), dipalmitoylphosphatidylinositol (DPPI) and dioleoylphosphatidylinositol (DOPI) were synthesized from yeast PI through the processes of deacylation and reacylation, identified by infrared (IR) and Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectra, and subjected to the action of PI-PLC. All the synthetic PIs were hydrolyzed by this enzyme, with DLPI and DMPI being the best substrates. PI-PLC did not catalyze the hydrolysis of the phosphatidylnucleosides 5'-phosphatidylcytidine, 5'-phosphatidyluridine, 5'-phosphatidylthymidine, 5'-phosphatidyladenosine and 5'-phosphatidyl-2'-deoxyadenosine. PMID:1423768

  19. Biochemical and Genetic Evidence for the Presence of Multiple Phosphatidylinositol- and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate-Specific Phospholipases C in Tetrahymena▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Leondaritis, George; Sarri, Theoni; Dafnis, Ioannis; Efstathiou, Antonia; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases C (PI-PLC) specifically hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], produce the Ca2+-mobilizing agent inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and regulate signaling in multicellular organisms. Bacterial PtdIns-specific PLCs, also present in trypanosomes, hydrolyze PtdIns and glycosyl-PtdIns, and they are considered important virulence factors. All unicellular eukaryotes studied so far contain a single PI-PLC-like gene. In this report, we show that ciliates are an exception, since we provide evidence that Tetrahymena species contain two sets of functional genes coding for both bacterial and eukaryotic PLCs. Biochemical characterization revealed two PLC activities that differ in their phosphoinositide substrate utilization, subcellular localization, secretion to extracellular space, and sensitivity to Ca2+. One of these activities was identified as a typical membrane-associated PI-PLC activated by low-micromolar Ca2+, modestly activated by GTPγS in vitro, and inhibited by the compound U73122 [1-(6-{[17β-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino}hexyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione]. Importantly, inhibition of PI-PLC in vivo resulted in rapid upregulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels, suggesting its functional importance in regulating phosphoinositide turnover in Tetrahymena. By in silico and molecular analysis, we identified two PLC genes that exhibit significant similarity to bacterial but not trypanosomal PLC genes and three eukaryotic PI-PLC genes, one of which is a novel inactive PLC similar to proteins identified only in metazoa. Comparative studies of expression patterns and PI-PLC activities in three T. thermophila strains showed a correlation between expression levels and activity, suggesting that the three eukaryotic PI-PLC genes are functionally nonredundant. Our findings imply the presence of a conserved and elaborate PI-PLC-Ins(1,4,5)P3-Ca2+ regulatory axis in ciliates. PMID:21169416

  20. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Flick, J S; Thorner, J

    1993-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) generates two second messengers, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol. The polymerase chain reaction was used to isolate a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene (PLC1) that encodes a protein of 869 amino acids (designated Plc1p) that bears greatest resemblance to the delta isoforms of mammalian PI-PLC in terms of overall sequence similarity and domain arrangement. Plc1p contains the conserved X and Y domains found in all higher eukaryotic PI-PLCs (51 and 29% identity, respectively, to the corresponding domains of rat delta 1 PI-PLC) and also contains a presumptive Ca(2+)-binding site (an E-F hand motif). Plc1p, modified by in-frame insertion of a His6 tract and a c-myc epitope near its amino terminus, was overexpressed from the GAL1 promoter, partially purified by nickel chelate affinity chromatography, and shown to be an active PLC enzyme in vitro with properties similar to those of its mammalian counterparts. Plc1p activity was strictly Ca2+ dependent: at a high Ca2+ concentration (0.1 mM), the enzyme hydrolyzed PIP2 at a faster rate than phosphatidylinositol, and at a low Ca2+ concentration (0.5 microM), it hydrolyzed PIP2 exclusively. Cells carrying either of two different deletion-insertion mutations (plc1 delta 1::HIS3 and plc1 delta 2::LEU2) were viable but displayed several distinctive phenotypes, including temperature-sensitive growth (inviable above 35 degrees C), osmotic sensitivity, and defects in the utilization of galactose, raffinose, and glycerol at permissive temperatures (23 to 30 degrees C). The findings reported here suggest that hydrolysis of PIP2 in S. cerevisiae is required for a number of nutritional and stress-related responses. Images PMID:8395015

  1. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS. PMID:19491339

  2. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S.; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Goñi, Félix M.

    2015-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  3. Phospholipase C beta3 is a key component in the Gbetagamma/PKCeta/PKD-mediated regulation of trans-Golgi network to plasma membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Díaz Añel, Alberto M

    2007-08-15

    The requirement of DAG (diacylglycerol) to recruit PKD (protein kinase D) to the TGN (trans-Golgi network) for the targeting of transport carriers to the cell surface, has led us to a search for new components involved in this regulatory pathway. Previous findings reveal that the heterotrimeric Gbetagamma (GTP-binding protein betagamma subunits) act as PKD activators, leading to fission of transport vesicles at the TGN. We have recently shown that PKCeta (protein kinase Ceta) functions as an intermediate member in the vesicle generating pathway. DAG is capable of activating this kinase at the TGN, and at the same time is able to recruit PKD to this organelle in order to interact with PKCeta, allowing phosphorylation of PKD's activation loop. The most qualified candidates for the production of DAG at the TGN are PI-PLCs (phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipases C), since some members of this family can be directly activated by Gbetagamma, utilizing PtdIns(4,5)P2 as a substrate, to produce the second messengers DAG and InsP3. In the present study we show that betagamma-dependent Golgi fragmentation, PKD1 activation and TGN to plasma membrane transport were affected by a specific PI-PLC inhibitor, U73122 [1-(6-{[17-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino}hexyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione]. In addition, a recently described PI-PLC activator, m-3M3FBS [2,4,6-trimethyl-N-(m-3-trifluoromethylphenyl)benzenesulfonamide], induced vesiculation of the Golgi apparatus as well as PKD1 phosphorylation at its activation loop. Finally, using siRNA (small interfering RNA) to block several PI-PLCs, we were able to identify PLCbeta3 as the sole member of this family involved in the regulation of the formation of transport carriers at the TGN. In conclusion, we demonstrate that fission of transport carriers at the TGN is dependent on PI-PLCs, specifically PLCbeta3, which is necessary to activate PKCeta and PKD in that Golgi compartment, via DAG production. PMID:17492941

  4. 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 stimulates phospholipase C-gamma in rat colonocytes: role of c-Src in PLC-gamma activation.

    PubMed Central

    Khare, S; Bolt, M J; Wali, R K; Skarosi, S F; Roy, H K; Niedziela, S; Scaglione-Sewell, B; Aquino, B; Abraham, C; Sitrin, M D; Brasitus, T A; Bissonnette, M

    1997-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3) rapidly stimulated polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, raised intracellular Ca2+, and activated two Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, PKC-alpha and -betaII in the rat large intestine. We also showed that the direct addition of 1,25(OH)2D3 to isolated colonic membranes failed to stimulate PI hydrolysis, but required secosteroid treatment of intact colonocytes, suggesting the involvement of a soluble factor. Furthermore, this PI hydrolysis was restricted to the basal lateral plasma membrane of these cells. In the present studies, therefore, we examined whether polyphosphoinositide-phospholipase C-gamma (PI-PLC-gamma), a predominantly cytosolic isoform of PI-PLC, was involved in the hydrolysis of colonic membrane PI by 1,25(OH)2D3. This isoform has been shown to be activated and membrane-associated by tyrosine phosphorylation. We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 caused a significant increase in the biochemical activity, particulate association, and the tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma, specifically in the basal lateral membranes. This secosteroid also induced a twofold increase in the activity of Src, a proximate activator of PLC-gamma in other cells, with peaks at 1 and 9 min in association with Src tyrosine dephosphorylation. 1,25(OH)2D3 also increased the physical association of activated c-Src with PLC-gamma. In addition, Src isolated from colonocytes treated with 1,25(OH)2D3, demonstrated an increased ability to phosphorylate exogenous PLC-gamma in vitro. Inhibition of 1,25(OH)2D3-induced Src activation by PP1, a specific Src family protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked the ability of this secosteroid to stimulate the translocation and tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma in the basolateral membrane (BLM). Src activation was lost in D deficiency, and was reversibly restored with the in vivo repletion of 1,25(OH)2D3. These studies demonstrate for the first time

  5. Listeriolysin O suppresses Phospholipase C-mediated activation of the microbicidal NADPH oxidase to promote Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Grace Y.; Fattouh, Ramzi; Muise, Aleixo M.; Grinstein, Sergio; Higgins, Darren E.; Brumell, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes produces phospholipases C (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) and the pore-forming cytolysin listeriolysin O (LLO) to escape the phagosome and replicate within the host cytosol. We found that PLCs can also activate the phagocyte NADPH oxidase during L. monocytogenes infection, a response that would adversely affect pathogen survival. However, secretion of LLO inhibits the NADPH oxidase by preventing its localization to phagosomes. LLO-deficient bacteria can be complemented by perfringolysin O, a related cytolysin, suggesting that other pathogens may also use pore-forming cytolysins to inhibit the NADPH oxidase. Our studies demonstrate that while the PLCs induce antimicrobial NADPH oxidase activity, this effect is alleviated by the pore-forming activity of LLO. Therefore, the combined activities of PLCs and LLO on membrane lysis and the inhibitory effects of LLO on NADPH oxidase activity allows L. monocytogenes to efficiently escape the phagosome while avoiding the microbicidal respiratory burst. PMID:22177565

  6. Assaying nonspecific phospholipase C activity.

    PubMed

    Pejchar, Přemysl; Scherer, Günther F E; Martinec, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Plant nonspecific phospholipase C (NPC) is a recently described enzyme which plays a role in membrane rearrangement during phosphate starvation. It is also involved in responses of plants to brassinolide, abscisic acid (ABA), elicitors, and salt. The NPC activity is decreased in cells treated with aluminum. In the case of salt stress, the molecular mechanism of NPC action is based on accumulation of diacylglycerol (DAG) by hydrolysis of phospholipids and conversion of DAG, the product of NPC activity, to phosphatidic acid (PA) that participates in ABA signaling pathways. Here we describe a step-by-step protocol, which can be used to determine in situ or in vitro NPC activity. Determination is based on quantification of fluorescently labeled DAG as a product of cleavage of the fluorescently labeled substrate lipid, phosphatidylcholine. High-performance thin-layer chromatography is used for separation of fluorescent DAG. The spot is visualized with a laser scanner and the relative amounts of fluorescent DAG are quantified using imaging software. PMID:23681535

  7. Identification of Leptospira interrogans Phospholipase C as a Novel Virulence Factor Responsible for Intracellular Free Calcium Ion Elevation during Macrophage Death

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Zhao, Xin; Sun, Dexter; Ge, Yu-Mei; Zheng, Lin-Li; Lin, Xu’ai; Li, Lan-Juan; Yan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospira-induced macrophage death has been confirmed to play a crucial role in pathogenesis of leptospirosis, a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation induced by infection can cause cell death, but [Ca2+]i changes and high [Ca2+]i-induced death of macrophages due to infection of Leptospira have not been previously reported. Methodology/Principal Findings We first used a Ca2+-specific fluorescence probe to confirm that the infection of L. interrogans strain Lai triggered a significant increase of [Ca2+]i in mouse J774A.1 or human THP-1 macrophages. Laser confocal microscopic examination showed that the [Ca2+]i elevation was caused by both extracellular Ca2+ influx through the purinergic receptor, P2X7, and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, as seen by suppression of [Ca2+]i elevation when receptor-gated calcium channels were blocked or P2X7 was depleted. The LB361 gene product of the spirochete exhibited phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (L-PI-PLC) activity to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), which in turn induces intracellular Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum, with the Km of 199 µM and Kcat of 8.566E-5 S-1. Secretion of L-PI-PLC from the spirochete into supernatants of leptospire-macrophage co-cultures and cytosol of infected macrophages was also observed by Western Blot assay. Lower [Ca2+]i elevation was induced by infection with a LB361-deficient leptospiral mutant, whereas transfection of the LB361 gene caused a mild increase in [Ca2+]i. Moreover, PI-PLCs (PI-PLC-β3 and PI-PLC-γ1) of the two macrophages were activated by phosphorylation during infection. Flow cytometric detection demonstrated that high [Ca2+]i increases induced apoptosis and necrosis of macrophages, while mild [Ca2+]i elevation only caused apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated that L. interrogans infection induced [Ca2

  8. Alopecia in a Viable Phospholipase C Delta 1 and Phospholipase C Delta 3 Double Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Runkel, Fabian; Hintze, Maik; Griesing, Sebastian; Michels, Marion; Blanck, Birgit; Fukami, Kiyoko; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Franz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Inositol 1,4,5trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) are important intracellular signalling molecules in various tissues. They are generated by the phospholipase C family of enzymes, of which phospholipase C delta (PLCD) forms one class. Studies with functional inactivation of Plcd isozyme encoding genes in mice have revealed that loss of both Plcd1 and Plcd3 causes early embryonic death. Inactivation of Plcd1 alone causes loss of hair (alopecia), whereas inactivation of Plcd3 alone has no apparent phenotypic effect. To investigate a possible synergy of Plcd1 and Plcd3 in postnatal mice, novel mutations of these genes compatible with life after birth need to be found. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterise a novel mouse mutant with a spontaneously arisen mutation in Plcd3 (Plcd3mNab) that resulted from the insertion of an intracisternal A particle (IAP) into intron 2 of the Plcd3 gene. This mutation leads to the predominant expression of a truncated PLCD3 protein lacking the N-terminal PH domain. C3H mice that carry one or two mutant Plcd3mNab alleles are phenotypically normal. However, the presence of one Plcd3mNab allele exacerbates the alopecia caused by the loss of functional Plcd1 in Del(9)olt1Pas mutant mice with respect to the number of hair follicles affected and the body region involved. Mice double homozygous for both the Del(9)olt1Pas and the Plcd3mNab mutations survive for several weeks and exhibit total alopecia associated with fragile hair shafts showing altered expression of some structural genes and shortened phases of proliferation in hair follicle matrix cells. Conclusions/Significance The Plcd3mNab mutation is a novel hypomorphic mutation of Plcd3. Our investigations suggest that Plcd1 and Plcd3 have synergistic effects on the murine hair follicle in specific regions of the body surface. PMID:22723964

  9. Listeriolysin O suppresses phospholipase C-mediated activation of the microbicidal NADPH oxidase to promote Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Lam, Grace Y; Fattouh, Ramzi; Muise, Aleixo M; Grinstein, Sergio; Higgins, Darren E; Brumell, John H

    2011-12-15

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes produces phospholipases C (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) and the pore-forming cytolysin listeriolysin O (LLO) to escape the phagosome and replicate within the host cytosol. We found that PLCs can also activate the phagocyte NADPH oxidase during L. monocytogenes infection, a response that would adversely affect pathogen survival. However, secretion of LLO inhibits the NADPH oxidase by preventing its localization to phagosomes. LLO-deficient bacteria can be complemented by perfringolysin O, a related cytolysin, suggesting that other pathogens may also use pore-forming cytolysins to inhibit the NADPH oxidase. Our studies demonstrate that while the PLCs induce antimicrobial NADPH oxidase activity, this effect is alleviated by the pore-forming activity of LLO. Therefore, the combined activities of PLCs and LLO on membrane lysis and the inhibitory effects of LLO on NADPH oxidase activity allow L. monocytogenes to efficiently escape the phagosome while avoiding the microbicidal respiratory burst. PMID:22177565

  10. Primary phospholipase C and brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Kang, Du-Seock; Lee, Cheol; Seok, Heon; Follo, Matilde Y; Cocco, Lucio; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, the primary phospholipase C (PLC) proteins, PLCβ, and PLCγ, are activated primarily by neurotransmitters, neurotrophic factors, and hormones through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Among the primary PLC isozymes, PLCβ1, PLCβ4, and PLCγ1 are highly expressed and differentially distributed, suggesting a specific role for each PLC subtype in different regions of the brain. Primary PLCs control neuronal activity, which is important for synapse function and development. In addition, dysregulation of primary PLC signaling is linked to several brain disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Huntington's disease, depression and Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we included current knowledge regarding the roles of primary PLC isozymes in brain disorders. PMID:26639088

  11. Selective and programmed cleavage of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface membrane by phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexandra; Klöppel, Christine; Smith-Valentine, Megan; Van Houten, Judith; Simon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Many surface proteins of eukaryotic cells are tethered to the membrane by a GPI-anchor which is enzymatically cleavable. Here, we investigate cleavage and release of different GPI-proteins by phospholipase C from the outer membrane of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. Our data indicate that different GPI-proteins are not equally cleaved as proteins of the surface antigen family are preferentially released in vitro compared to several smaller GPI-proteins. Likewise, the analysis of culture medium indicates exclusive in vivo release of surface antigens by two phospholipase C isoforms (PLC2 and PLC6). This suggests that phospholipase C shows affinity for select groups of GPI-anchored proteins. Our data also reveal an up-regulation of PLC isoforms in GPI-anchored protein cleavage during antigenic switching. As a consequence, silencing of these PLCs leads to a drastic decrease of antigen concentration in the medium. These results suggest a higher order of GPI-regulation by phospholipase C as cleavage occurs programmed and specific for single GPI-proteins instead of an unspecific shedding of the entire surface membrane GPI-content. PMID:22024023

  12. Purification and characterization of phospholipase C of Salmonella gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R; Sharma, V D

    1998-12-01

    Phospholipase C was isolated from an outbreak strain of Salmonella gallinarum with ciprofloxacin extraction, dialysis, gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography and chromatofocussing. Purified phospholipase C (mol wt. 65 KDa; isoelectric point, pI 3.5) was resistant to pasteurization, stomach enzyme (pepsin), bacterial protease and lipase but lost its activity on trypsin and chymotrypsin treatment. It was sensitive to pH > or = 8.0. It was haemolytic, embryotoxic, enterohaemorrhagic, lethal to birds, cytotoxic to Vero and MDBK cells, dermonecrotoxic in rabbit and antigenically active protein. Antisera raised against purified phospholipase C neutralized its all biological activities and agglutinated the producer Salmonella strains. Serologically it was proved similar to phospholipase C of Klebsiella pneumoniae and S. weltevreden. Fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was standardized to detect phospholipase producer strains. PMID:10093508

  13. Arabidopsis non-specific phospholipase C1: characterization and its involvement in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Krčková, Zuzana; Brouzdová, Jitka; Daněk, Michal; Kocourková, Daniela; Rainteau, Dominique; Ruelland, Eric; Valentová, Olga; Pejchar, Přemysl; Martinec, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis non-specific phospholipase C (NPC) protein family is encoded by the genes NPC1 - NPC6. It has been shown that NPC4 and NPC5 possess phospholipase C activity; NPC3 has lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase activity. NPC3, 4 and 5 play roles in the responses to hormones and abiotic stresses. NPC1, 2 and 6 has not been studied functionally yet. We found that Arabidopsis NPC1 expressed in Escherichia coli possesses phospholipase C activity in vitro. This protein was able to hydrolyse phosphatidylcholine to diacylglycerol. NPC1-green fluorescent protein was localized to secretory pathway compartments in Arabidopsis roots. In the knock out T-DNA insertion line NPC1 (npc1) basal thermotolerance was impaired compared with wild-type (WT); npc1 exhibited significant decreases in survival rate and chlorophyll content at the seventh day after heat stress (HS). Conversely, plants overexpressing NPC1 (NPC1-OE) were more resistant to HS compared with WT. These findings suggest that NPC1 is involved in the plant response to heat. PMID:26581502

  14. Arabidopsis non-specific phospholipase C1: characterization and its involvement in response to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Krčková, Zuzana; Brouzdová, Jitka; Daněk, Michal; Kocourková, Daniela; Rainteau, Dominique; Ruelland, Eric; Valentová, Olga; Pejchar, Přemysl; Martinec, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis non-specific phospholipase C1 (NPC) protein family is encoded by the genes NPC1 – NPC6. It has been shown that NPC4 and NPC5 possess phospholipase C activity; NPC3 has lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase activity. NPC3, 4 and 5 play roles in the responses to hormones and abiotic stresses. NPC1, 2 and 6 has not been studied functionally yet. We found that Arabidopsis NPC1 expressed in Escherichia coli possesses phospholipase C activity in vitro. This protein was able to hydrolyse phosphatidylcholine to diacylglycerol. NPC1-green fluorescent protein was localized to secretory pathway compartments in Arabidopsis roots. In the knock out T-DNA insertion line NPC1 (npc1) basal thermotolerance was impaired compared with wild-type (WT); npc1 exhibited significant decreases in survival rate and chlorophyll content at the seventh day after heat stress (HS). Conversely, plants overexpressing NPC1 (NPC1-OE) were more resistant to HS compared with WT. These findings suggest that NPC1 is involved in the plant response to heat. PMID:26581502

  15. Mapping of sites on the Src family protein tyrosine kinases p55blk, p59fyn, and p56lyn which interact with the effector molecules phospholipase C-gamma 2, microtubule-associated protein kinase, GTPase-activating protein, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Pleiman, C M; Clark, M R; Gauen, L K; Winitz, S; Coggeshall, K M; Johnson, G L; Shaw, A S; Cambier, J C

    1993-01-01

    Engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor complex induces immediate activation of receptor-associated Src family tyrosine kinases including p55blk, p59fyn, p53/56lyn, and perhaps p56lck, and this response is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of distinct cellular substrates. These kinases act directly or indirectly to phosphorylate and/or activate effector proteins including p42 (microtubule-associated protein kinase) (MAPK), phospholipases C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and C-gamma 2 (PLC gamma 2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), and p21ras-GTPase-activating protein (GAP). Although coimmunoprecipitation results indicate that the Src family protein tyrosine kinases interact physically with some of these effector molecules, the molecular basis of this interaction has not been established. Here, we show that three distinct sites mediate the interaction of these kinases with effectors. The amino-terminal 27 residues of the unique domain of p56lyn mediate association with PLC gamma 2, MAPK, and GAP. Binding to PI 3-K is mediated through the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of the Src family kinases. Relatively small proportions of cellular PI 3-K, PLC gamma 2, MAPK, and GAP, presumably those which are tyrosine phosphorylated, bind to the SH2 domains of these kinases. Comparative analysis of binding activities of Blk, Lyn, and Fyn shows that these kinases differ in their abilities to associate with MAPK and PI 3-K, suggesting that they may preferentially bind and subsequently phosphorylate distinct sets of downstream effector molecules in vivo. Fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q column-fractionated MAPK maintains the ability to bind bacterially expressed Lyn, suggesting that the two kinases may interact directly. Images PMID:8395016

  16. Odorant-sensitive phospholipase C in insect antennae.

    PubMed

    Boekhoff, I; Strotmann, J; Raming, K; Tareilus, E; Breer, H

    1990-01-01

    Exogenous tritiated phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate added to antennal preparations from locust and cockroach was hydrolysed releasing inositol trisphosphate. High activity of phospholipase C was detected in the soluble as well as in the membrane fraction. At low free calcium concentrations hydrolysis of the labelled lipid was stimulated by odorants and pheromones in a GTP-dependent manner. Consequently the level of inositol trisphosphate in antennal preparations increased upon odorant stimulation. PMID:2176800

  17. Phospholipase C in Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mirsamadi, ES; Farnia, P; Jahani Sherafat, S; Esfahani, M; Faramarzi, N

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Phospholipase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in pathogenesis through breaking up phospholipids and production of diacylglycerol. In this study, we examined the Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from Iranian patients for the genes encoding this enzyme. Materials and Methods DNA extraction was performed using CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) from positive culture specimens in tuberculosis patients. PCR was then used to amplify the plcA, plcB, plcC genes of Beijing strain, and non-Beijing strains were identified by spoligotyping. Results Of 200 specimens, 19 (9.5%) were Beijing strain and 181 (90.5%) were non-Beijing strains. The results of PCR for Beijing strains were as follows: 16 strains (84.2%) were positive for plcA, 17 (89.4%) were positive for plcB and 17 (89.4%) were positive for plcC genes. The standard strain (H37RV) was used as control. Conclusion The majority of Beijing strains have phospholipase C genes which can contribute to their pathogenesis but we need complementary studies to confirm the role of phospholipase C in pathogenecity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:22347572

  18. Expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C isoenzymes in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Artico, Marco; Cocco, Lucio; Billi, Anna Maria; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Manzoli, Francesco Antonio

    2007-03-01

    Signal transduction from plasma membrane to cell nucleus is a complex process depending on various components including lipid signaling molecules, in particular phosphoinositides and their related enzymes, which act at cell periphery and/or plasma membrane as well as at nuclear level. As far as the nervous system may concern the inositol lipid cycle has been hypothesized to be involved in numerous neural as well as glial functions. In this context, however, a precise panel of glial PLC isoforms has not been determined yet. In the present experiments we investigated astrocytic PLC isoforms in astrocytes obtained from foetal primary cultures of rat brain and from an established cultured (C6) rat astrocytoma cell line, two well known cell models for experimental studies on glia. Identification of PLC isoforms was achieved by using a combination of RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry experiments. While in both cell models the most represented PI-PLC isoforms were beta4, gamma1, delta4, and epsilon, isoforms PI-PLC beta2 and delta3 were not detected. Moreover, in primary astrocyte cultures PI-PLC delta3 resulted well expressed in C6 cells but was absent in astrocytes. Immunocytochemistry performed with antibodies against specific PLC isoforms substantially confirmed this pattern of expression both in astrocytes and C6 glioma cells. In particular while some isoenzymes (namely isoforms beta3 and beta4) resulted mainly nuclear, others (isoforms delta4 and epsilon) were preferentially localized at cytoplasmic and plasma membrane level. PMID:17063484

  19. Recent research progress with phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Yan; Ye, Lidan; Xu, Jun; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to produce phosphate monoesters and diacylglycerol. It has many applications in the enzymatic degumming of plant oils. PLC Bc , a bacterial PLC from Bacillus cereus, is an optimal choice for this activity in terms of its wide substrate spectrum, high activity, and approved safety. Unfortunately, its large-scale production and reliable high-throughput screening of PLC Bc remain challenging. Herein, we summarize the research progress regarding PLC Bc with emphasis on the screening methods, expression systems, catalytic mechanisms and inhibitor of PLC Bc . This review hopefully will inspire new achievements in related areas, to promote the sustainable development of PLC Bc and its application. PMID:26437973

  20. Defective phosphatidic acid-phospholipase C signaling in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Dibrov, Elena; Austria, J Alejandro; Sahi, Nidhi; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2004-03-26

    The effects of exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) on Ca2+ transients and contractile activity were studied in cardiomyocytes isolated from chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In control cells, 25 microM PA induced a significant increase in active cell shortening and Ca2+ transients. PA increased IP3 generation in the control cardiomyocytes and its inotropic effects were blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In cardiomyocytes from diabetic rats, PA induced a 25% decrease in active cell shortening and no significant effect on Ca2+ transients. Basal and PA-induced IP3 generation in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes was 3-fold lower as compared to control cells. Sarcolemmal membrane PLC activity was impaired. Insulin treatment of the diabetic animals resulted in a partial recovery of PA responses. Our results, therefore, identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for heart dysfunction during diabetes. PMID:15003542

  1. Expression, characterization, and crystallization of the catalytic core of rat phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase C delta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, J. A.; Hurley, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase Cs (PI-PLCs) catalyze the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositides in response to diverse stimuli in higher eukaryotes. Mammalian PI-PLCs contain divergent regulatory regions, but all share three conserved regions: an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, X, and Y. We report the high-level expression and characterization of a recombinant "catalytic core" of rat PI-PLC delta 1 that contains the catalytically essential X and Y regions, but not the PH domain. The expressed protein, PI-PLC delta delta 1-134, is catalytically active versus phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in deoxycholate micelles with a K(m) of 182 microM and a Vmax of 27 mumol/min/mg. PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 is monomeric and monodisperse as judged by dynamic light scattering. Far-UV CD indicates a structure with approximately 35% alpha-helix. A reversible change in the near-UV CD spectrum is observed on addition of calcium, suggesting that calcium can bind PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 in the absence of phospholipid. Triclinic crystals of PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 have been obtained that diffract beyond 2.4 A resolution under cryogenic conditions. Based on Vm = 2.72 Da/A3 and on the self-rotation function, there are two PI-PLC delta delta 1-134 molecules per asymmetric unit that are related to each other by a noncrystallographic axis of approximate twofold symmetry parallel to a. PMID:8845757

  2. Down-regulation of phospholipase C-beta1 following chronic muscarinic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, S D; Linseman, D A; Fisher, S K

    1998-04-01

    To determine whether prolonged activation of a phospholipase C-coupled receptor can lead to a down-regulation of its effector enzyme, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were incubated for 24 h with the muscarinic receptor agonist, oxotremorine-M. Under these conditions, significant reductions (46-53%) in muscarinic cholinergic receptor density, G(alphaq/11) and phospholipase C-beta1 (but not the beta3-or gamma1 isoforms) were observed. These results suggest that a selective down-regulation of phospholipase C-beta1 may play a role in adaptation to chronic muscarinic receptor activation. PMID:9617763

  3. Effects of Phospholipase C on Fusarium graminearum Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qili; Zhou, Benguo; Gao, Zhengliang; Liang, Yuancun

    2015-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) plays important roles in regulating various biological processes in eukaryotes. Currently, little is known about the function of PLC in filamentous fungi, especially the plant pathogenic fungi. Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in many cereal crops. BLAST search revealed that Fusarium genome contains six FgPLC genes. Using quantitative RT-PCR, different FgPLC gene expressions in mycelia were analyzed. To investigate the role of FgPLC in F. graminearum biology, a pharmacological study using a known inhibitor of PLC (U73122) was conducted. Results showed that inhibition of FgPLC resulted in significant alterations of mycelial growth, conidiation, conidial germination, perithecium formation, and expressions of Tri5 and Tri6 genes. As expected, the treatment of F. graminearum with U73343, an inactive analog of U73122, showed no effect on F. graminearum biology. Our results suggested strongly that FgPLC plays important roles in F. graminearum growth and development. PMID:26316232

  4. Molecular characteristics of horse phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ).

    PubMed

    Sato, Kana; Wakai, Takuya; Seita, Yasunari; Takizawa, Akiko; Fissore, Rafael A; Ito, Junya; Kashiwazaki, Naomi

    2013-04-01

    A sperm-specific phospholipase C (PLC), PLCzeta (PLCζ), is thought to underlie the initiation of calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) oscillations that induce egg activation in mammals. In large domestic species, only bovine, porcine and recently equine PLCζ have been cloned, and the physiological functions of these molecules have not been fully characterized. Here, we evaluated the physiological functions of equine PLCζ (ePLCζ) in mouse oocytes. ePLCζ was cloned from testis using RT-PCR. The expression of ePLCζ messenger RNA was confirmed in testis but not in other tissues. Microinjection of ePLCζ complementary RNA (cRNA) into mouse oocytes induced long-lasting [Ca(2+) ]i oscillations, and most of the injected oocytes formed pronuclei (PN). The injection of cRNAs encoding horse, mouse, human and cow PLCζ into mouse oocytes showed that ePLCζ had the highest [Ca(2+) ]i oscillation-inducing activity among the species tested. Mutation of D202R, which renders the protein inactive, abrogated the activity of ePLCζ. The nuclear translocation ability of ePLCζ was defective when expressed in mouse oocytes. Taken together, our findings show for the first time that ePLCζ has highest activity of the mammalian species studied to date. Our findings will be useful for the improvement of reproductive technologies in the horse. PMID:23590511

  5. Differential regulation of renal phospholipase C isoforms by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Yu, P Y; Asico, L D; Eisner, G M; Jose, P A

    1995-01-01

    Dopamine and D1 agonists and NE all increase phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity, but whereas dopamine produces a natriuresis, NE has an antinatriuretic effect. To determine if catecholamines differentially regulate the expression of PLC isoforms, we infused fenoldopam, a D1 agonist, or pramipexole, a D1/D2 agonist, intravenously or infused fenoldopam or NE into the renal artery of anesthetized rats. After 3-4 h of infusion, when the expected natriuresis (fenoldopam or pramipexole) or antinatriuresis (NE) occurred, the kidneys were removed for analysis of PLC isoform protein expression activity. Western blot analysis revealed that in renal cortical membranes, fenoldopam and pramipexole increased expression of PLC beta 1 and decreased expression of PLC gamma 1; PLC delta was unchanged. In the cytosol, pramipexole and fenoldopam increased expression of both PLC beta 1 and PLC gamma 1. No effects were noted in the medulla. A preferential D1 antagonist, SKF 83742, which by itself had no effect, blocked the effects of pramipexole, thus confirming the involvement of the D1 receptor. In contrast, NE also increased PLC beta 1 but did not affect PLC gamma 1 protein expression in membranes. The changes in PLC isoform expression were accompanied by similar changes in PLC isoform activity. These studies demonstrate for the first time differential regulation of PLC isoforms by catecholamines. PMID:7814630

  6. Structure, function, and control of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Rebecchi, M J; Pentyala, S N

    2000-10-01

    Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) subtypes beta, gamma, and delta comprise a related group of multidomain phosphodiesterases that cleave the polar head groups from inositol lipids. Activated by all classes of cell surface receptor, these enzymes generate the ubiquitous second messengers inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. The last 5 years have seen remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular and biological facets of PLCs. New insights into their multidomain arrangement and catalytic mechanism have been gained from crystallographic studies of PLC-delta(1), while new modes of controlling PLC activity have been uncovered in cellular studies. Most notable is the realization that PLC-beta, -gamma, and -delta isoforms act in concert, each contributing to a specific aspect of the cellular response. Clues to their true biological roles were also obtained. Long assumed to function broadly in calcium-regulated processes, genetic studies in yeast, slime molds, plants, flies, and mammals point to specific and conditional roles for each PLC isoform in cell signaling and development. In this review we consider each subtype of PLC in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals and discuss their molecular regulation and biological function. PMID:11015615

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate phospholipase C and phosphomonoesterase in Dunaliella salina membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Einspahr, K.J.; Peeler, T.C.; Thompson, G.A. Jr. )

    1989-07-01

    In comparison with other cell organelles, the Dunaliella salina plasma membrane was found to be highly enriched in phospholipase C activity toward exogenous ({sup 3}H)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}). Based on release of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates, the plasma membrane exhibited a PIP{sub 2}-phospholipase C activity nearly tenfold higher than the nonplasmalemmal, nonchloroplast bottom phase (BP) membrane fraction and 47 times higher than the chloroplast membrane fraction. The majority of phospholipase activity was clearly of a phospholipase C nature since over 80% of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates released were recovered as ({sup 3}H)inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}). These results suggest a plausible mechanism for the rapid breakdown of PIP{sub 2} and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) following hypoosmotic shock. The authors have also examined some of the in vitro characteristics of the plasma membrane phospholipase C activity and have found it to be calcium sensitive, reaching maximal activity at 10 micromolar free (Ca{sup 2+}). They also report here that 100 micromolar GTP{gamma}S stimulates phospholipase C activity over a range of free (Ca{sup 2+}). Together, these results provide evidence that the plasma membrane PIP{sub 2}-phospholipase C of D. salina may be subject to Ca{sup 2+} and G-protein regulation.

  8. Activation of a TRP-like channel and intracellular Ca2+ dynamics during phospholipase-C-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, A. Pedro; Cordeiro, J. Miguel; Monteiro, João; Muñoz, Alberto; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Read, Nick D.; Videira, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The model organism Neurospora crassa undergoes programmed cell death when exposed to staurosporine. Here, we show that staurosporine causes defined changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) dynamics and a distinct Ca2+ signature that involves Ca2+ influx from the external medium and internal Ca2+ stores. We investigated the molecular basis of this Ca2+ response by using [Ca2+]c measurements combined with pharmacological and genetic approaches. Phospholipase C was identified as a pivotal player during cell death, because modulation of the phospholipase C signaling pathway and deletion of PLC-2, which we show to be involved in hyphal development, results in an inability to trigger the characteristic staurosporine-induced Ca2+ signature. Using Δcch-1, Δfig-1 and Δyvc-1 mutants and a range of inhibitors, we show that extracellular Ca2+ entry does not occur through the hitherto described high- and low-affinity Ca2+ uptake systems, but through the opening of plasma membrane channels with properties resembling the transient receptor potential (TRP) family. Partial blockage of the response to staurosporine after inhibition of a putative inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor suggests that Ca2+ release from internal stores following IP3 formation combines with the extracellular Ca2+ influx. PMID:25037570

  9. Expression of Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C Isoforms in Native Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Béziau, Delphine M.; Toussaint, Fanny; Blanchette, Alexandre; Dayeh, Nour R.; Charbel, Chimène; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η) based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs) remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA), pulmonary (PA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA). mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA), δ4 (only expressed in MCA), η1 (expressed in all but MA) and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested). The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1) in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found in the

  10. A maternally inherited autosomal point mutation in human phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) leads to male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kashir, Junaid; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Jones, Celine; Lemmon, Bernadette; Chang Lee, Hoi; Hamer, Rebecca; Heindryckx, Bjorn; Deane, Charlotte M.; De Sutter, Petra; Fissore, Rafael A.; Parrington, John; Wells, Dagan; Coward, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Male factor and idiopathic infertility contribute significantly to global infertility, with abnormal testicular gene expression considered to be a major cause. Certain types of male infertility are caused by failure of the sperm to activate the oocyte, a process normally regulated by calcium oscillations, thought to be induced by a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ). Previously, we identified a point mutation in an infertile male resulting in the substitution of histidine for proline at position 398 of the protein sequence (PLCζH398P), leading to abnormal PLCζ function and infertility. METHODS AND RESULTS Here, using a combination of direct-sequencing and mini-sequencing of the PLCζ gene from the patient and his family, we report the identification of a second PLCζ mutation in the same patient resulting in a histidine to leucine substitution at position 233 (PLCζH233L), which is predicted to disrupt local protein interactions in a manner similar to PLCζH398P and was shown to exhibit abnormal calcium oscillatory ability following predictive 3D modelling and cRNA injection in mouse oocytes respectively. We show that PLCζH233L and PLCζH398P exist on distinct parental chromosomes, the former inherited from the patient's mother and the latter from his father. Neither mutation was detected utilizing custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism assays in 100 fertile males and females, or 8 infertile males with characterized oocyte activation deficiency. CONCLUSIONS Collectively, our findings provide further evidence regarding the importance of PLCζ at oocyte activation and forms of male infertility where this is deficient. Additionally, we show that the inheritance patterns underlying male infertility are more complex than previously thought and may involve maternal mechanisms. PMID:22095789

  11. Involvement of a phospholipase C in the hemolytic activity of a clinical strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Gaelle; Merieau, Annabelle; Guerillon, Josette; Veron, Wilfried; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc GJ; Orange, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium frequently encountered in hospitals as a contaminant of injectable material and surfaces. This psychrotrophic bacterium, commonly described as unable to grow at temperatures above 32°C, is now considered non pathogenic. We studied a recently identified clinical strain of P. fluorescens biovar I, MFN1032, which is considered to cause human lung infection and can grow at 37°C in laboratory conditions. Results We found that MFN1032 secreted extracellular factors with a lytic potential at least as high as that of MF37, a psychrotrophic strain of P. fluorescens or the mesophilic opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We demonstrated the direct, and indirect – through increases in biosurfactant release – involvement of a phospholipase C in the hemolytic activity of this bacterium. Sequence analysis assigned this phospholipase C to a new group of phospholipases C different from those produced by P. aeruginosa. We show that changes in PlcC production have pleiotropic effects and that plcC overexpression and plcC extinction increase MFN1032 toxicity and colonization, respectively. Conclusion This study provides the first demonstration that a PLC is involved in the secreted hemolytic activity of a clinical strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Moreover, this phospholipase C seems to belong to a complex biological network associated with the biosurfactant production. PMID:18973676

  12. INFLUENCE OF CCL4 BIOTRANSFORMATION ON THE ACTIVATION OF RAT LIVER PHOSPHOLIPASE C IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Influence of CCl4 Biotransforrnation on the Activation of Rat Liver Phospholipase C in Vitro. Coleman, J.F., Condie, L.W. AND LAMB, R.G. (1988). Toxicol. Appl Pharmacol. 95, 200-207. Carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) biotransformation and covalent binding was measured in l000g live...

  13. Phospholipase C and diacylglycerol lipase in human gallbladder and hepatic bile.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, N R; Willis, K E

    1990-12-01

    A phospholipase C in bile, free of bacterial infection, has recently been identified from cholesterol gallstone patients. Because of the importance of phosphatidylcholine in solubilizing cholesterol in bile, this study further investigates the metabolism of phosphatidylcholine in delipidated gallbladder and common bile duct biles. Phospholipase C activity, as measured by the release of phosphoryl[3H]choline from the substrate 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho [N-methyl-3H]choline, was identified in both hepatic and gallbladder biles. Similar levels of activity (nmol.h-1.mg-1 of delipidated protein) were found in common bile duct (11.25 +/- 14.23) and gallbladder bile (19.07 +/- 22.24), although per milliliter of bile, the mean gallbaldder levels were 6.4 times greater than those found in common duct bile. With the tow substrates, 1-palmitoyl-2[9,10-3H] palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2(1-14C) dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the majority of organically extracted label, after thin-layer chromatography, was recovered as radiolabeled diglyceride, confirming the presence of phospholipase C. Diglyceride levels were found to be closely correlated with [3H]choline (slope, 0.9820; r = 0.9844). In addition to diglyceride, both radiolabeled free fatty acid and monoglyceride were identified in common bile duct and gallbladder biles, although their levels were an order of magnitude less than measurable phospholipase C activity. To determine whether the free fatty acid release was due to either a diacylglycerol-lipase or a phospholipase A2, the effect of adding unlabeled diglyceride on free fatty acid formation from the substrate [14C]DPPC was examined. As the concentration of unlabeled diglyceride was increased, the amount of free fatty acid and monoglyceride released were both reduced in parallel. Direct measurement of diacylglycerol-lipase activity by incubating the diglyceride, sn-2[3H]dipalmitoyl, resulted in release of both products in a ratio

  14. Phospholipase C and diacylglycerol mediate olfactory responses to amino acids in the main olfactory epithelium of an amphibian.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Alfredo; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Syed, Adnan S; Korsching, Sigrun I; Manzini, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The semi-aquatic lifestyle of amphibians represents a unique opportunity to study the molecular driving forces involved in the transition of aquatic to terrestrial olfaction in vertebrates. Most amphibians have anatomically segregated main and vomeronasal olfactory systems, but at the cellular and molecular level the segregation differs from that found in mammals. We have recently shown that amino acid responses in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of larval Xenopus laevis segregate into a lateral and a medial processing stream, and that the former is part of a vomeronasal type 2 receptor expression zone in the MOE. We hypothesized that the lateral amino acid responses might be mediated via a vomeronasal-like transduction machinery. Here we report that amino acid-responsive receptor neurons in the lateral MOE employ a phospholipase C (PLC) and diacylglycerol-mediated transduction cascade that is independent of Ca(2+) store depletion. Furthermore, we found that putative transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blockers inhibit most amino acid-evoked responses in the lateral MOE, suggesting that ion channels belonging to the TRP family may be involved in the signaling pathway. Our data show, for the first time, a widespread PLC- and diacylglycerol-dependent transduction cascade in the MOE of a vertebrate already possessing a vomeronasal organ. PMID:24489954

  15. High-level over-expression, purification, and crystallization of a novel phospholipase C/sphingomyelinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Truan, Daphné; Vasil, Adriana; Stonehouse, Martin; Vasil, Michael L.; Pohl, Ehmke

    2013-01-01

    The hemolytic phospholipase C/sphingomyelinase PlcH from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents the founding member of a growing family of virulence factors identified in a wide range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. In P. aeruginosa PlcH is co-expressed with a 17 kDa chaperone (PlcR2) and secreted as a fully folded heterodimer (PlcHR2) of approximately 95 kDa, by the twin arginine translocase (TAT) via the cytoplasmic membrane and through the outer membrane, by the Xcp (TypeII) secretory system. PlcHR2 has been shown to be an important virulence factor in model P. aeruginosa infections and is selectively cytotoxic, at picomolar concentrations to mammalian endothelial cells. Here we report how the various challenges starting from protein overexpression in the native organism P. aeruginosa, the use of detergents in the crystallization and data collection using the most advanced μ-focus synchrotron beam lines were overcome. Native diffraction data of this heterodimeric protein complex were collected up to a resolution of 4 Å, whereas needle-shaped crystals of l-selenomethionine substituted PlcHR2 with a maximum diameter of 10 micron were used to collect data sets with a maximum resolution of 2.75 Å. PMID:23201280

  16. The phenotype of a phospholipase C (plc-1) mutant in a filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Giblon, Rachel E; Lorenti, Miranda S H

    2015-09-01

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, phospholipase C may play a role in hyphal extension at the growing tips as part of a growth-sensing mechanism that activates calcium release from internal stores to mediate continued expansion of the hyphal tip. One candidate for a tip-localized phospholipase C is PLC-1. We characterized morphology and growth characteristics of a knockout mutant (KO plc-1) and a RIP mutated strain (RIP plc-1) (missense mutations and a nonsense mutation render the gene product non-functional). Growth and hyphal cytology of wildtype and KO plc-1 were similar, but the RIP plc-1 mutant grew slower and exhibited abnormal membrane structures at the hyphal tip, imaged using the fluorescence dye FM4-64. To test for causes of the slower growth of the RIP plc-1 mutant, we examined its physiological poise compared to wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. The electrical properties of all three strains and the electrogenic contribution of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (identified by cyanide inhibition) were the same. Responses to high osmolarity were also similar. However, the RIP plc-1 mutant had a significantly lower turgor, a possible cause of its slower growth. While growth of all three strains was inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor 3-nitrocoumarin, the RIP plc-1 mutant did not exhibit hyphal bursting after addition of the inhibitor, observed in both wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. Although the plc-1 gene is not obligatory for tip growth, the phenotype of the RIP plc-1 mutant - abnormal tip cytology, lower turgor and resistance to inhibitor-induced hyphal bursting - suggest it does play a role in tip growth. The expression of a dysfunctional plc-1 gene may cause a shift to alternative mechanism(s) of growth sensing in hyphal extension. PMID:26212074

  17. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development.

    PubMed

    Stith, Bradley J

    2015-05-15

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  18. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development

    PubMed Central

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  19. phospholipase C gamma-1 is required downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor during arterial development

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Nathan D.; Mugford, Joshua W.; Diamond, Brigid A.; Weinstein, Brant M.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we utilize transgenic zebrafish with fluorescently labeled blood vessels to identify and characterize a mutant (y10) that displays specific defects in the formation of arteries, but not veins. We find that y10 encodes phospholipase C gamma-1 (plcg1), a known effector of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. We further show that plcg1y10 mutant embryos fail to respond to exogenous Vegf. Our results indicate that Plcg1 functions specifically downstream of the Vegf receptor during embryonic development to govern formation of the arterial system. PMID:12782653

  20. Serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor activation induces 2-arachidonoylglycerol release through a phospholipase c-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Jason C; Nichols, David E

    2006-11-01

    To date, several studies have demonstrated that phospholipase C-coupled receptors stimulate the production of endocannabinoids, particularly 2-arachidonoylglycerol. There is now evidence that endocannabinoids are involved in phospholipase C-coupled serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated behavioral effects in both rats and mice. The main objective of this study was to determine whether activation of the 5-HT(2A) receptor leads to the production and release of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. NIH3T3 cells stably expressing the rat 5-HT(2A) receptor were first incubated with [(3)H]-arachidonic acid for 24 h. Following stimulation with 10 mum serotonin, lipids were extracted from the assay medium, separated by thin layer chromatography, and analyzed by liquid scintillation counting. Our results indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptor activation stimulates the formation and release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol. The 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol was partially dependent on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activation. Diacylglycerol produced downstream of 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated phospholipase D or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation did not appear to contribute to 2-arachidonoylglycerol formation in NIH3T3-5HT(2A) cells. In conclusion, our results support a functional model where neuromodulatory neurotransmitters such as serotonin may act as regulators of endocannabinoid tone at excitatory synapses through the activation of phospholipase C-coupled G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:17010161

  1. Cyclin A2 modulates EMT via β-catenin and phospholipase C pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Caroline T; Bendris, Nawal; Paul, Conception; Hamieh, Abdallah; Anouar, Youssef; Hahne, Michael; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Lemmers, Bénédicte

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Cyclin A2 is involved in cytoskeletal dynamics, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. This phenotype was potentiated by activated oncogenic H-Ras. However, the mechanisms governing EMT in these cells have not yet been elucidated. Here, we dissected the pathways that are responsible for EMT in cells deficient for Cyclin A2. In Cyclin A2-depleted normal murine mammary gland (NMuMG) cells expressing RasV12, we found that β-catenin was liberated from the cell membrane and cell-cell junctions and underwent nuclear translocation and activation. Components of the canonical wingless (WNT) pathway, including WNT8b, WNT10a, WNT10b, frizzled 1 and 2 and TCF4 were upregulated at the messenger RNA and protein levels following Cyclin A2 depletion. However, suppression of the WNT pathway using the acetyltransferase porcupine inhibitor C59 did not reverse EMT whereas a dominant negative form of TCF4 as well as inhibition of phospholipase C using U73122 were able to do so. This suggests that a WNT-independent mechanism of β-catenin activation via phospholipase C is involved in the EMT induced by Cyclin A2 depletion. Our findings will broaden our knowledge on how Cyclin A2 contributes to EMT and metastasis. PMID:25993989

  2. An autoinhibitory helix in the C-terminal region of phospholipase C-[beta] mediates G[alpaha subscript q] activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Dhamsania, Vishan D.; Thal, David M.; Gutierrez, Joanne; Chowdhury, Shoaib; Suddala, Krishna C.; Northup, John K.; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    The enzyme phospholipase C-{beta} (PLC{beta}) is a crucial regulator of intracellular calcium levels whose activity is controlled by heptahelical receptors that couple to members of the G{sub q} family of heterotrimeric G proteins. We have determined atomic structures of two invertebrate homologs of PLC{beta} (PLC21) from cephalopod retina and identified a helix from the C-terminal regulatory region that interacts with a conserved surface of the catalytic core of the enzyme. Mutations designed to disrupt the analogous interaction in human PLC{beta}3 considerably increase basal activity and diminish stimulation by G{alpha}{sub q}. G{alpha}{sub q} binding requires displacement of the autoinhibitory helix from the catalytic core, thus providing an allosteric mechanism for activation of PLC{beta}.

  3. High-level production of Bacillus cereus phospholipase C in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, Pablo; Braia, Mauricio; Eberhardt, Florencia; Elena, Claudia; Cerminati, Sebastián; Peirú, Salvador; Castelli, Maria Eugenia; Menzella, Hugo G

    2015-12-20

    Enzymatic oil degumming (removal of phospholipids) using phospholipase C (PLC) is a well-established and environmentally friendly process for vegetable oil refining. In this work, we report the production of recombinant Bacillus cereus PLC in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13869 in a high cell density fermentation process and its performance in soybean oil degumming. A final concentration of 5.5g/L of the recombinant enzyme was achieved when the respective gene was expressed from the tac promoter in a semi-defined medium. After treatment with trypsin to cleave the propeptide, the mature enzyme completely hydrolyzed phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, which represent 70% of the phospholipids present in soybean oil. The results presented here show the feasibility of using B. cereus PLC for oil degumming and provide a manufacturing process for the cost effective production of this enzyme. PMID:26519562

  4. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by phospholipase C-β3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Young Hwan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Sun Ja; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has an essential role in many pathophysiologies. Here, we show that phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3) isoform regulates endothelial cell function and retinal angiogenesis. Silencing of PLC-β3 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) significantly delayed proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation. In addition, mice lacking PLC-β3 showed impaired retinal angiogenesis with delayed endothelial proliferation, reduced endothelial cell activation, abnormal vessel formation and hemorrhage. Finally, tumor formation was significantly reduced in mice lacking PLC-β3 and showed irregular size and shape of blood vessels. These results suggest that regulation of endothelial function by PLC-β3 may contribute to angiogenesis. PMID:27311705

  5. Synthesis of substrates for periodate-coupled assay of phospholipases C and sphingomyelinases.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Kira Løw; Andersen, Rokhsana J; Brask, Jesper

    2016-09-01

    A series of 4-nitrophenyl (pNP) and 4-methylumbelliferyl (4MU) substrate analogues of phosphatidyl choline (PC) and phosphatidic acid (PA) were synthesized from 4-bromo-1-butene by ether formation, olefin epoxidation and ring opening with the phosphate head group. The pNP PC analogue, 4-(4-nitrophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-butyl-1-phosphoryl choline (1) was evaluated in assays of fungal sphingomyelinases, also displaying phospholipase C activity. Reactions were terminated with a periodate-containing stop solution, leading to liberation of pNP, quantified spectrophotometrically in an end-point measurement. A kinetic evaluation of sphingomyelinases from Kionochaeta sp. and Penicillium emersonii showed relatively high KM and low kcat values for this substrate, limiting its practical applicability in assays with low sphingomyelinase concentrations. PMID:27444331

  6. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by phospholipase C-β3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Min; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Young Hwan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Sun Ja; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has an essential role in many pathophysiologies. Here, we show that phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3) isoform regulates endothelial cell function and retinal angiogenesis. Silencing of PLC-β3 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) significantly delayed proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation. In addition, mice lacking PLC-β3 showed impaired retinal angiogenesis with delayed endothelial proliferation, reduced endothelial cell activation, abnormal vessel formation and hemorrhage. Finally, tumor formation was significantly reduced in mice lacking PLC-β3 and showed irregular size and shape of blood vessels. These results suggest that regulation of endothelial function by PLC-β3 may contribute to angiogenesis. PMID:27311705

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  8. Sinorhizobium meliloti phospholipase C required for lipid remodeling during phosphorus limitation

    PubMed Central

    Zavaleta-Pastor, Maritza; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Gao, Jun-Lian; Guan, Ziqiang; Zaheer, Rahat; Finan, Turlough M.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; López-Lara, Isabel M.; Geiger, Otto

    2009-01-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative soil bacteria able to establish nitrogen-fixing root nodules with their respective legume host plants. Besides phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylethanolamine, rhizobial membranes contain phosphatidylcholine (PC) as a major membrane lipid. Under phosphate-limiting conditions of growth, some bacteria replace their membrane phospholipids with lipids lacking phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, these phosphorus-free lipids are sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol, ornithine-containing lipid, and diacylglyceryl trimethylhomoserine (DGTS). Pulse–chase experiments suggest that the zwitterionic phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine and PC act as biosynthetic precursors of DGTS under phosphorus-limiting conditions. A S. meliloti mutant, deficient in the predicted phosphatase SMc00171 was unable to degrade PC or to form DGTS in a similar way as the wild type. Cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli, in which SMc00171 had been expressed, convert PC to phosphocholine and diacylglycerol, showing that SMc00171 functions as a phospholipase C. Diacylglycerol , in turn, is the lipid anchor from which biosynthesis is initiated during the formation of the phosphorus-free membrane lipid DGTS. Inorganic phosphate can be liberated from phosphocholine. These data suggest that, in S. meliloti under phosphate-limiting conditions, membrane phospholipids provide a pool for metabolizable inorganic phosphate, which can be used for the synthesis of other essential phosphorus-containing biomolecules. This is an example of an intracellular phospholipase C in a bacterial system; however, the ability to degrade endogenous preexisting membrane phospholipids as a source of phosphorus may be a general property of Gram-negative soil bacteria. PMID:20018679

  9. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. PMID:27002154

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances cholinergic contraction of longitudinal muscle of rabbit intestine via activation of phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qudah, M.; Anderson, C. D.; Mahavadi, S.; Bradley, Z. L.; Akbarali, H. I.; Murthy, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family of proteins best known for its role in neuronal survival, differentiation, migration, and synaptic plasticity in central and peripheral neurons. BDNF is also widely expressed in nonneuronal tissues including the gastrointestinal tract. The role of BDNF in intestinal smooth muscle contractility is not well defined. The aim of this study was to identify the role of BDNF in carbachol (CCh)- and substance P (SP)-induced contraction of intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle. BDNF, selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor agonists, and pharmacological inhibitors of signaling pathways were examined for their effects on contraction of rabbit intestinal longitudinal muscle strips induced by CCh and SP. BDNF activation of intracellular signaling pathways was examined by Western blot in homogenates of muscle strips and isolated muscle cells. One-hour preincubation with BDNF enhanced intestinal muscle contraction induced by CCh but not by SP. The selective synthetic TrkB agonists LM 22A4 and 7,8-dihydroxyflavone produced similar effects to BDNF. The Trk antagonist K-252a, a TrkB antibody but not p75NTR antibody, blocked the effect of BDNF. The enhancement of CCh-induced contraction by BDNF was blocked by the phospholipase C (PLC) antagonist U73122, but not by ERK1/2 or Akt antagonists. Direct measurement in muscle strips and isolated muscle cells showed that BDNF caused phosphorylation of TrkB receptors and PLC-γ, but not ERK1/2 or Akt. We conclude that exogenous BDNF augments the CCh-induced contraction of longitudinal muscle from rabbit intestine by activating TrkB receptors and subsequent PLC activation. PMID:24356881

  11. THE ROLE OF CCL4 BIOTRANSFORMATION IN THE ACTIVATION OF HEPATOCYTE PHOSPHOLIPASE C IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of CC14 Biotransformation in the Activation of Hepatocyte Phospholipase C in ivo and in Vitro. Coleman, J. B., Condie, L.W. AND LAMB, R.G. (1988). Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 95,208-219. Rats treated with a single 0.5 ml/kg dose (ip) of CCl4 exhibited a threefold increase ...

  12. A Cell-Permeable Phospholipase C[gamma]1-Binding Peptide Transduces Neurons and Impairs Long-Term Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Sonja; Dash, Pramod K.

    2004-01-01

    Growth factor-mediated signaling has emerged as an essential component of memory formation. In this study, we used a phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC[gamma]1) binding, cell-penetrating peptide to sequester PLC[gamma]1 away from its target, the phosphotyrosine residues within the activated growth factor receptor. Peptides appear to transduce neurons…

  13. Phospholipase C in Dictyostelium discoideum. Cyclic AMP surface receptor and G-protein-regulated activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bominaar, A A; Kesbeke, F; Van Haastert, P J

    1994-01-01

    The cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum shows several responses after stimulation with the chemoattractant cAMP, including a transient rise in cyclic AMP (cAMP), cGMP and Ins(1,4,5)P3. In this paper the regulation of phospholipase C in vitro is described. Under our experimental conditions commercial PtdIns(4,5)P2 cannot be used to analyse phospholipase C activity in Dictyostelium lysates, because it is hydrolysed mainly to glycerophosphoinositol instead of Ins(1,4,5)P3. Enzyme activity was determined with endogenous unlabelled PtdInsP2 as a substrate. The product was measured by isotope-dilution assay and identified as authentic Ins(1,4,5)P3. Since phospholipase C is strictly Ca(2+)-dependent, with an optimal concentration range of 1-100 microM, cell lysates were prepared in EGTA and the enzyme reaction was started by adding 10 microM free Ca2+. Phospholipase C activity increased 2-fold during Dictyostelium development up to 8 h of starvation, after which the activity declined to less than 10% of the vegetative level. Enzyme activity in vitro increased up to 2-fold after stimulation of cells with the agonist cAMP in vivo. Addition of 10 microM guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate during lysis activated the enzyme to the same extent, and this effect was antagonized by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate. These results strongly suggest that surface cAMP receptors and G-proteins regulate phospholipase C during Dictyostelium development. PMID:8280097

  14. GDP beta S enhances the activation of phospholipase C caused by thrombin in human platelets: evidence for involvement of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Oberdisse, E.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1987-05-14

    Guanosine 5'-O-thiotriphosphate (GTP gamma S) and thrombin stimulate the activity of phospholipase C in platelets that have been permeabilized with saponin and whose inositol phospholipids have been prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol. Ca/sup 2 +/ has opposite effects on the formation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates induced by thrombin or GTP gamma S. While the action of GTP gamma S on the formation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates is inhibited by Ca/sup 2 +/, action of thrombin is stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/. Guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S), which inhibits the function of GTP-binding proteins, also inhibits the effect of GTP gamma S on phospholipase C stimulation but, surprisingly, increases the effect of thrombin. Ca/sup 2 +/ increases the inhibitory effect of GDP beta S on GTP gamma S activation of phospholipase C, but Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhances the stimulatory effect of GDP beta S on the thrombin activation of phospholipase C. This indicates that two mechanisms are responsible for the activation of phospholipase C in platelets. A GTP-binding protein is responsible for regulation of phospholipase C induced by GTP gamma S, while the effect of thrombin on the stimulation of phospholipase C is independent of GTP-binding proteins. However, the effect of thrombin may be modulated by the action of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein.

  15. Biochemical and molecular analysis of phospholipase C and phospholipase D activity in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, K A; Gill, R E; Vasil, M L

    1996-01-01

    Resurgence of mycobacterial infections in the United States has led to an intense effort to identify potential virulence determinants in the genus Mycobacterium, particularly ones that would be associated with the more virulent species (e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis). Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) using radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin as substrates indicated that cell extracts of M. tuberculosis contain both phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) activities. In contrast, only PLD activity was detected in cell extracts of M. smegmatis. Neither activity was detected in cell-free culture supernatants from these organisms. We and others recently identified two open reading frames in M. tuberculosis with the potential to encode proteins which are highly homologous to the nonhemolytic (PlcN) and hemolytic (PlcH) phospholipase C enzymes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In contrast to the plc genes in P. aeruginosa, which are considerably distal to each other (min 34 and 64 on the chromosome), the mycobacterial genes, designated mpcA and mpcB, are tandemly arranged in the same relative orientation and separated by only 191 bp. Both the mpcA and the mpcB genes were individually cloned in M. smegmatis, and PLC activity was expressed from each gene in this organism. Hybridization experiments using the mpcA and the mpcB genes as probes under conditions of moderate stringency identified sequences homologous to these genes in M. bovis, M. bovis BCG, and M. marinum but not in several other Mycobacterium species, including M. smegmatis, M. avium, and M. intracellulare. TLC analysis using radiolabeled substrates indicated that M. bovis and M. marinum cell extracts contain PLC and PLD activities, but only PLD activity was detected in M. bovis BCG cell extracts. Sphingomyelinase activity was also detected in whole-cell extracts of M. tuberculosis, M. marinum, M. bovis, and M. bovis BCG, but this activity was not detected in extracts of M. smegmatis

  16. Melanopsin-Expressing Amphioxus Photoreceptors Transduce Light via a Phospholipase C Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Angueyra, Juan Manuel; Pulido, Camila; Malagón, Gerardo; Nasi, Enrico; Gomez, Maria del Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin, the receptor molecule that underlies light sensitivity in mammalian ‘circadian’ receptors, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins and has been proposed to operate via a similar signaling pathway. Its downstream effectors, however, remain elusive. Melanopsin also expresses in two distinct light-sensitive cell types in the neural tube of amphioxus. This organism is the most basal extant chordate and can help outline the evolutionary history of different photoreceptor lineages and their transduction mechanisms; moreover, isolated amphioxus photoreceptors offer unique advantages, because they are unambiguously identifiable and amenable to single-cell physiological assays. In the present study whole-cell patch clamp recording, pharmacological manipulations, and immunodetection were utilized to investigate light transduction in amphioxus photoreceptors. A Gq was identified and selectively localized to the photosensitive microvillar membrane, while the pivotal role of phospholipase C was established pharmacologically. The photocurrent was profoundly depressed by IP3 receptor antagonists, highlighting the importance of IP3 receptors in light signaling. By contrast, surrogates of diacylglycerol (DAG), as well as poly-unsaturated fatty acids failed to activate a membrane conductance or to alter the light response. The results strengthen the notion that calcium released from the ER via IP3-sensitive channels may fulfill a key role in conveying - directly or indirectly - the melanopsin-initiated light signal to the photoconductance; moreover, they challenge the dogma that microvillar photoreceptors and phoshoinositide-based light transduction are a prerogative of invertebrate eyes. PMID:22235344

  17. On-Tissue Phospholipase C Digestion for Enhanced MALDI-MS Imaging of Neutral Glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Vens-Cappell, Simeon; Kouzel, Ivan U; Kettling, Hans; Soltwisch, Jens; Bauwens, Andreas; Porubsky, Stefan; Müthing, Johannes; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) can be used to simultaneously visualize the lateral distribution of different lipid classes in tissue sections, but the applicability of the method to real-life samples is often limited by ion suppression effects. In particular, the presence of abundant phosphatidylcholines (PCs) can reduce the ion yields for all other lipid species in positive ion mode measurements. Here, we used on-tissue treatment with buffer-free phospholipase C (PLC) to near-quantitatively degrade PCs in fresh-frozen tissue sections. The ion signal intensities of mono-, di-, and oligohexosylceramides were enhanced by up to 10-fold. In addition, visualization of Shiga toxin receptor globotriaosylceramide (Gb3Cer) in the kidneys of wild-type and α-galactosidase A-knockout (Fabry) mice was possible at about ten micrometer resolution. Importantly, the PLC treatment did not decrease the high lateral resolution of the MS imaging analysis. PMID:27212679

  18. Kinetic Analysis of Phospholipase C from Catharanthus roseus Transformed Roots Using Different Assays1

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sotomayor, S.M. Teresa; De Los Santos-Briones, César; Muñoz-Sánchez, J. Armando; Loyola-Vargas, Victor M.

    1999-01-01

    The properties of phospholipase C (PLC) partially purified from Catharanthus roseus transformed roots were analyzed using substrate lipids dispersed in phospholipid vesicles, phospholipid-detergent mixed micelles, and phospholipid monolayers spread at an air-water interface. Using [33P]phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) of high specific radioactivity, PLC activity was monitored directly by measuring the loss of radioactivity from monolayers as a result of the release of inositol phosphate and its subsequent dissolution on quenching in the subphase. PLC activity was markedly affected by the surface pressure of the monolayer, with reduced activity at extremes of initial pressure. The optimum surface pressure for PIP2 hydrolysis was 20 mN/m. Depletion of PLC from solution by incubation with sucrose-loaded PIP2 vesicles followed by ultracentrifugation demonstrated stable attachment of PLC to the vesicles. A mixed micellar system was established to assay PLC activity using deoxycholate. Kinetic analyses were performed to determine whether PLC activity was dependent on both bulk PIP2 and PIP2 surface concentrations in the micelles. The interfacial Michaelis constant was calculated to be 0.0518 mol fraction, and the equilibrium dissociation constant of PLC for the lipid was 45.5 μm. These findings will add to our understanding of the mechanisms of regulation of plant PLC. PMID:10444091

  19. Relationship between phospholipase C zeta immunoreactivity and DNA fragmentation and oxidation in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hee; Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Jayeon; Kim, Ji Hee; Chang, Jae Hoon; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of measuring phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) using immunostaining in human sperm and to investigate the relationship between PLCζ immunoreactivity and DNA fragmentation and oxidation in human sperm. Methods Semen samples were obtained from participants (n=44) and processed by the conventional swim-up method. Sperm concentration, motility, normal form by strict morphology, DNA fragmentation index assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling method and immunofluorescent expression for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and PLCζ were assessed. Results When duplicate PLCζ tests were performed on two sperm samples from each of the 44 participants, similar results were obtained (74.1±9.4% vs. 75.4±9.7%). Two measurements of PLCζ were found to be highly correlated with each other (r=0.759, P<0.001). Immunoreactivity of PLCζ was not associated with donor's age, sperm concentration, motility, and the percentage of normal form as well as DNA fragmentation index. However, immunoreactivity of PLCζ showed a significant negative relationship with 8-OHdG immunoreactivity (r=-0.404, P=0.009). Conclusion Measurement of PLCζ by immunostaining is feasible and reproducible. Lower expression of PLCζ in human sperm may be associated with higher sperm DNA oxidation status. PMID:26023673

  20. Charge Shielding of PIP2 by Cations Regulates Enzyme Activity of Phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Huang, Weigang; Zhang, Qisheng; Koh, Duk-Su

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) of the plasma membrane by phospholipase C (PLC) generates two critical second messengers, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. For the enzymatic reaction, PIP2 binds to positively charged amino acids in the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC. Here we tested the hypothesis that positively charged divalent and multivalent cations accumulate around the negatively charged PIP2, a process called electrostatic charge shielding, and therefore inhibit electrostatic PIP2-PLC interaction. This charge shielding of PIP2 was measured quantitatively with an in vitro enzyme assay using WH-15, a PIP2 analog, and various recombinant PLC proteins (β1, γ1, and δ1). Reduction of PLC activity by divalent cations, polyamines, and neomycin was well described by a theoretical model considering accumulation of cations around PIP2 via their electrostatic interaction and chemical binding. Finally, the charge shielding of PIP2 was also observed in live cells. Perfusion of the cations into cells via patch clamp pipette reduced PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC as triggered by M1 muscarinic receptors with a potency order of Mg2+ < spermine4+ < neomycin6+. Accumulation of divalent cations into cells through divalent-permeable TRPM7 channel had the same effect. Altogether our results suggest that Mg2+ and polyamines modulate the activity of PLCs by controlling the amount of free PIP2 available for the enzymes and that highly charged biomolecules can be inactivated by counterions electrostatically. PMID:26658739

  1. Sodium and potassium regulate endothelial phospholipase C-γ and Bmx.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal J; Sanders, Paul W

    2014-07-01

    The amount of Na(+) and K(+) in the diet promotes significant changes in endothelial cell function. In the present study, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments determined the role of Na(+) and K(+) in the regulation of two pleckstrin homology domain-containing intracellular signaling molecules, phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1 and epithelial and endothelial tyrosine kinase/bone marrow tyrosine kinase on chromosome X (Bmx), and agonist-generated Ca(2+) signaling in the endothelium. Extracellular K(+) concentration regulated the levels of activated PLC-γ1, Bmx, and carbachol-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in human endothelial cells. Additional experiments confirmed that high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase mediated these effects. The content of Na(+) and K(+) in the diet also regulated Bmx levels in endothelial cells and activated PLC-γ1 levels in rats in vivo. The effects of dietary K(+) on Bmx were more pronounced in rats fed a high-salt diet compared with rats fed a low-salt diet. These experiments elucidated an endothelial cell signaling mechanism regulated by electrolytes, further demonstrating an integral relationship between endothelial cell function and dietary Na(+) and K(+) content. PMID:24785188

  2. Charge Shielding of PIP2 by Cations Regulates Enzyme Activity of Phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Huang, Weigang; Zhang, Qisheng; Koh, Duk-Su

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) of the plasma membrane by phospholipase C (PLC) generates two critical second messengers, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. For the enzymatic reaction, PIP2 binds to positively charged amino acids in the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC. Here we tested the hypothesis that positively charged divalent and multivalent cations accumulate around the negatively charged PIP2, a process called electrostatic charge shielding, and therefore inhibit electrostatic PIP2-PLC interaction. This charge shielding of PIP2 was measured quantitatively with an in vitro enzyme assay using WH-15, a PIP2 analog, and various recombinant PLC proteins (β1, γ1, and δ1). Reduction of PLC activity by divalent cations, polyamines, and neomycin was well described by a theoretical model considering accumulation of cations around PIP2 via their electrostatic interaction and chemical binding. Finally, the charge shielding of PIP2 was also observed in live cells. Perfusion of the cations into cells via patch clamp pipette reduced PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC as triggered by M1 muscarinic receptors with a potency order of Mg2+ < spermine4+ < neomycin6+. Accumulation of divalent cations into cells through divalent-permeable TRPM7 channel had the same effect. Altogether our results suggest that Mg2+ and polyamines modulate the activity of PLCs by controlling the amount of free PIP2 available for the enzymes and that highly charged biomolecules can be inactivated by counterions electrostatically. PMID:26658739

  3. Distinction in vitro between rat liver phosphatidate phosphatase and phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, R.; Foster, K.; McGuffin, M.

    1986-03-05

    Hepatocellular membranes (1000 x g) were incubated with sn-(1,3-/sup 14/C) glycerol-3-P, ATP, Ca/sup 2 +/, NaF and palmitate to form labeled, membrane-associated phosphatidate(PA). Membranes incubated with 2mM oleate or 5mM bromobenzene showed rapid (5-10 min) and significant (2-6 fold) increases in the dephosphorylation of PA. However, oleate and bromobenzene activated the dephosphorylation of PA by phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) and phospholipase C (PLC), respectively. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the PAP stimulated by oleate is: 1) Mg/sup 2 +/-dependent; 2) inhibited by Ca/sup 2 +/ and NaF; 3) specific for PA; 4) associated with a rise in liver cell triacylglycerol (TG) formation. Bromobenzene, however, activated a PLC that is: 1) stimulated by various metals; 2) enhanced by NaF; 3) is associated with a rise in the degradation of membrane phospholipids and liver cell injury. These results suggest that under the appropriate conditions in vitro the dephosphorylation of PA can be used to assess chemical-dependent changes in PAP and/or PLC activity.

  4. Phospholipase C-β1 Hypofunction in the Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Wook; Cho, Taesup; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that is characterized by various abnormal symptoms. Previous studies indicate decreased expression of phospholipase C-β1 (PLC-β1) in the brains of patients with schizophrenia. PLC-β1-null (PLC-β1−/−) mice exhibit multiple endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Furthermore, a study of PLC-β1 knockdown in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice has shown a specific behavioral deficit, impaired working memory. These results support the notion that disruption of PLC-β1-linked signaling in the brain is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we broadly investigate recent studies regarding schizophrenia-related behaviors as well as their various clinical and biological correlates in PLC-β1−/− and knockdown mouse models. This will provide a better understanding of the pathological relevance of the altered expression of PLC-β1 in the brains of patients with schizophrenia. Evidence accumulated will shed light on future in-depth studies, possibly in human subjects. PMID:26635636

  5. Glucose and carbachol activate phospholipase C in digitonin-permeabilized islets

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Florholmen, J.; Turk, J.; McDaniel, M.L.

    1987-05-01

    Stimulation of intact islets with D-glucose, the major insulin secretagogue, or with carbachol, a muscarinic agonist, results in the accumulation of inositoltrisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) suggesting that activation of phospholipase C (PLC) has a major role in stimulus-secretion coupling. Carbachol activation of PLC is an example of receptor-mediated activation in islets, whereas, the mechanism of glucose activation of PLC is controversial since a glucose receptor has not been identified. They have measured PLC activity in digitonin-permeabilized islets. Islets were labeled with /sup 3/H-inositol, permeabilized and IP/sub 3/ accumulation measured by HPLC. Carbachol, in the presence of ATP, GTP and 1 ..mu..M free Ca/sup 2 +/ released two-fold more Ins 1,3,4-P/sub 3/ than control in a time-dependent manner. Glucose, under the same conditions also significantly released more Ins 1,3,4-P/sub 3/ than control. This effect was not due to metabolism of glucose nor to an effect on the IP/sub 3/-phosphomonoesterase. Preliminary Ca/sup 2 +/-dependency studies indicate that PLC is not activated by Ca/sup 2 +/ in the submicromolar range. In conclusion, these studies show that Ca/sup 2 +/ does not activate PLC, and furthermore, that D-glucose may be recognized directly by PLC.

  6. Exploring phospholipase C-coupled Ca(2+) signalling networks using Boolean modelling.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, G; Wells, C P; Albert, R; van Rossum, D B; Patterson, R L

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the authors explored the utility of a descriptive and predictive bionetwork model for phospholipase C-coupled calcium signalling pathways, built with non-kinetic experimental information. Boolean models generated from these data yield oscillatory activity patterns for both the endoplasmic reticulum resident inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) and the plasma-membrane resident canonical transient receptor potential channel 3 (TRPC3). These results are specific as randomisation of the Boolean operators ablates oscillatory pattern formation. Furthermore, knock-out simulations of the IP(3)R, TRPC3 and multiple other proteins recapitulate experimentally derived results. The potential of this approach can be observed by its ability to predict previously undescribed cellular phenotypes using in vitro experimental data. Indeed, our cellular analysis of the developmental and calcium-regulatory protein, DANGER1a, confirms the counter-intuitive predictions from our Boolean models in two highly relevant cellular models. Based on these results, the authors theorise that with sufficient legacy knowledge and/or computational biology predictions, Boolean networks can provide a robust method for predictive modelling of any biological system. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21639591

  7. Mechanosensitivity of human osteosarcoma cells and phospholipase C {beta}2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hoberg, M. . E-mail: Maik.Hoberg@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Gratz, H.-H.; Noll, M.; Jones, D.B.

    2005-07-22

    Bone adapts to mechanical load by osteosynthesis, suggesting that osteoblasts might respond to mechanical stimuli. We therefore investigated cell proliferation and phospholipase C (PLC) expression in osteoblasts. One Hertz uniaxial stretching at 4000 {mu}strains significantly increased the proliferation rates of human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 and primary human osteoblasts. However, U-2/OS, SaOS-2, OST, and MNNG/HOS cells showed no significant changes in proliferation rate. We investigated the expression pattern of different isoforms of PLC in these cell lines. We were able to detect PLC {beta}1, {beta}3, {gamma}1, {gamma}2, and {delta}1 in all cells, but PLC {beta}2 was only detectable in the mechanosensitive cells. We therefore investigated the possible role of PLC {beta}2 in mechanotransduction. Inducible antisense expression for 24 h inhibited the translation of PLC {beta}1 in U-2/OS cells by 35% and PLC {beta}2 in MG-63 by 29%. Fluid shear flow experiments with MG-63 lacking PLC {beta}2 revealed a significantly higher level of cells losing attachment to coverslips and a significantly lower number of cells increasing intracellular free calcium.

  8. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. ({sup 3}H)PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 {mu}M. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRP{gamma}S and GDP{beta}S, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).

  9. Revisiting the role of phospholipases C in virulence and the lifecycle of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Le Chevalier, Fabien; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Frigui, Wafa; Pawlik, Alexandre; Boritsch, Eva C.; Bottai, Daria; Majlessi, Laleh; Herrmann, Jean Louis; Brosch, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of human tuberculosis has developed different virulence mechanisms and virulence-associated tools during its evolution to survive and multiply inside the host. Based on previous reports and by analogy with other bacteria, phospholipases C (PLC) of M. tuberculosis were thought to be among these tools. To get deeper insights into the function of PLCs, we investigated their putative involvement in the intracellular lifestyle of M. tuberculosis, with emphasis on phagosomal rupture and virulence, thereby re-visiting a research theme of longstanding interest. Through the construction and use of an M. tuberculosis H37Rv PLC-null mutant (ΔPLC) and control strains, we found that PLCs of M. tuberculosis were not required for induction of phagosomal rupture and only showed marginal, if any, impact on virulence of M. tuberculosis in the cellular and mouse infection models used in this study. In contrast, we found that PLC-encoding genes were strongly upregulated under phosphate starvation and that PLC-proficient M. tuberculosis strains survived better than ΔPLC mutants under conditions where phosphatidylcholine served as sole phosphate source, opening new perspectives for studies on the role of PLCs in the lifecycle of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26603639

  10. Nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-zeta, an egg-activating factor, during early embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Yoshie; Ito, Masahiko; Shirakawa, Hideki; Shikano, Tomohide; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi . E-mail: shunm@research.twmu.ac.jp

    2005-05-13

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC{zeta}), a strong candidate of the egg-activating sperm factor, causes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} oscillations and egg activation, and is subsequently accumulated into the pronucleus (PN), when expressed in mouse eggs by injection of RNA encoding PLC{zeta}. Changes in the localization of expressed PLC{zeta} were investigated by tagging with a fluorescent protein. PLC{zeta} began to translocate into the PN formed at 5-6 h after RNA injection and increased there. Observation in the same embryo revealed that PLC{zeta} in the PN dispersed to the cytoplasm upon nuclear envelope breakdown and translocated again into the nucleus after cleavage. The dynamics was found in the second mitosis as well. When RNA was injected into fertilization-originated 1-cell embryos or blastomere(s) of 2-8-cell embryos, the nuclear localization of expressed PLC{zeta} was recognized in every embryo up to blastocyst. Thus, PLC{zeta} exhibited alternative cytoplasm/nucleus localization during development. This supports the view that the sperm factor could control cell cycle-dependent generation of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in early embryogenesis.

  11. The alpha 1-adrenergic transduction system in hamster brown adipocytes. Release of arachidonic acid accompanies activation of phospholipase C.

    PubMed Central

    Schimmel, R J

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies of brown adipocytes identified an increased breakdown of phosphoinositides after selective alpha 1-adrenergic-receptor activation. The present paper reports that this response, elicited with phenylephrine in the presence of propranolol and measured as the accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates, is accompanied by increased release of [3H]arachidonic acid from cells prelabelled with [3H]arachidonic acid. Differences between stimulated arachidonic acid release and formation of inositol phosphates included a requirement for extracellular Ca2+ for stimulated release of arachidonic acid but not for the formation of inositol phosphates and the preferential inhibition of inositol phosphate formation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The release of arachidonic acid in response to phenylephrine was associated with an accumulation of [3H]arachidonic acid-labelled diacylglycerol, and this response was not dependent on extracellular Ca2+ but was partially prevented by treatment with the phorbol ester. The release of arachidonic acid was also stimulated by melittin, which increases the activity of phospholipase A2, by ionophore A23187, by lipolytic stimulation with forskolin and by exogenous phospholipase C. The arachidonic acid response to phospholipase C was completely blocked by RHC 80267, an inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, but this inhibitor had no effect on release stimulated with melittin or A23187 and inhibited phenylephrine-stimulated release by only 40%. The arachidonate response to forskolin was additive with the responses to either phenylephrine or exogenous phospholipase C. These data indicate that brown adipocytes are capable of releasing arachidonic acid from neutral lipids via triacylglycerol lipolysis, and from phospholipids via phospholipase A2 or by the sequential activities of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol lipase. Our findings also suggest that the action of phenylephrine to promote the liberation of arachidonic acid utilizes both

  12. The effects of phorbol ester, diacylglycerol, phospholipase C and Ca2+ ionophore on protein phosphorylation in human and sheep erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Raval, P J; Allan, D

    1985-01-01

    Treatment of human or sheep erythrocytes with PMA (phorbol myristate acetate) enhanced [32P]phosphate labelling of membrane polypeptides of approx. 100, 80 and 46 kDa. The 80 kDa and 46 kDa polypeptides coincided with bands 4.1 and 4.9 respectively on Coomassie-Blue-stained gels. Similar but smaller effects were obtained by treating human cells with 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-rac-glycerol (OAG), exogenous bacterial phospholipase C or ionophore A23187 + Ca2+, each of which treatments would be expected to raise the concentration of membrane diacylglycerol. In contrast, sheep cells, which do not increase their content of diacylglycerol when treated with phospholipase C or A23187 + Ca2+, only showed enhanced phosphorylation with OAG. Neither human nor sheep cells showed any enhanced [32P]phosphate labelling of phosphoproteins when treated with 1-mono-oleoyl-rac-glycerol. It is concluded that diacylglycerol from a variety of sources can activate erythrocyte protein kinase C, but that the most effective diacylglycerol is that derived from endogenous polyphosphoinositides. In contrast with bacterial phospholipase C and A23187, which stimulate synthesis of phosphatidate by increasing the cell-membrane content of diacylglycerol in human erythrocytes, PMA, OAG or 1-mono-oleoyl-rac-glycerol caused no change in phospholipid metabolism. Images PMID:4084238

  13. Lysophosphatidylcholine metabolism to 1,2-diacylglycerol in lymphoblasts: Involvement of a phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, J.; Wright, T.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Liao, F.; Symer, D.E.; Shin, H.S. )

    1989-04-04

    The authors have previously described the chemoattraction of lymphoblasts by lysophosphatidylcholine. In studying the mechanism of chemoattraction it was found that lysophosphatidylcholine was metabolized to 1,2-diacylglycerol by the lymphoblastic cell line 6C3HED. One route of metabolism involves the acylation of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholine with subsequent hydrolysis to 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphocholine by the action of phospholipase C. The increase in cellular 1,2-diacylglycerol was established by metabolic experiments using ({sup 14}C)glycerol-labeled lysophosphatidylcholine and by mass measurements of 1,2-diacylglycerol. The presence of a phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase C was confirmed in 6C3HED cell homogenates. In intact cells, lysophosphatidylcholine induced a pattern of protein phosphorylation similar to those of 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, two known activators of protein kinase C. This pathway of lysophosphatidylcholine metabolism, which involves a phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase C, may be important in the activation of protein kinase C independent of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis.

  14. Role of Inositol Phosphosphingolipid Phospholipase C1, the Yeast Homolog of Neutral Sphingomyelinases in DNA Damage Response and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids play a very crucial role in many diseases and are well-known as signaling mediators in many pathways. Sphingolipids are produced during the de novo process in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) from the nonsphingolipid precursor and comprise both structural and bioactive lipids. Ceramide is the central core of the sphingolipid pathway, and its production has been observed following various treatments that can induce several different cellular effects including growth arrest, DNA damage, apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramides are generally produced through the sphingomyelin hydrolysis and catalyzed by the enzyme sphingomyelinase (SMase) in mammals. Presently, there are many known SMases and they are categorized into three groups acid SMases (aSMases), alkaline SMases (alk-SMASES), and neutral SMases (nSMases). The yeast homolog of mammalians neutral SMases is inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C. Yeasts generally have inositol phosphosphingolipids instead of sphingomyelin, which may act as a homolog of mammalian sphingomyelin. In this review, we shall explain the structure and function of inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1, its localization inside the cells, mechanisms, and its roles in various cell responses during replication stresses and diseases. This review will also give a new basis for our understanding for the mechanisms and nature of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1/nSMase. PMID:26346287

  15. Heterogeneous distribution of PIP/sub 2/-specific phospholipase C in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.J.; Fukui, T.; Lowenstein, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-specific phospholipase C (PIP/sub 2/-PLC) activity was found in both a plasma membrane-enriched fraction prepared by Percoll gradient centrifugation and cytosol isolated from rat liver. PIP/sub 2/-PLC was assayed in the presence of 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 100 ..mu..M free Ca/sup 2 +/, 150 mM KCl, 0.1% deoxycholate, 50 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H-inositol)PIP/sub 2/. No PIP/sub 2/-PLC activity was released from the membrane fraction whe washed with 50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.4, under which conditions residual lactate dehydrogenase was completely removed. Approximately 70% of the membrane-associated activity was solubilized by 0.5 M KCl in 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4 (S-PLC). 30% of the membrane-associated activity was especially resistant to solubilization (M-PLC); it remained in the particulate fraction following three successive washes with 0.5 M KCl and an extraction with 1% Triton X-100. Cytosolic PIP/sub 2/-PLC, S-PLC, and M-PLC hydrolyze PIP/sub 2/ at rates 4, 20, and 15-times greater than phosphatidylinositol and at rates 20, 430, and 60-times greater than phosphatidylcholine respectively. The three PIP/sub 2/-PLC activities are activated by calcium and enhanced by deoxycholate and monovalent salts.

  16. Stimulation of Ca(2+)-regulated olfactory phospholipase C by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lo, Y H; Bradley, T M; Rhoads, D E

    1993-11-23

    L-Amino acids are potent olfactory stimuli for Atlantic salmon. A plasma membrane fraction, previously shown to be rich in amino acid binding sites, was prepared from olfactory rosettes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and utilized to investigate the role of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis in olfactory signal transduction. A cocktail of L-amino acids (Ser, Glu, Lys, and Gly) stimulated PIP2 hydrolysis by phospholipase C (PLC) in a dose-dependent manner with half-maximal stimulation when all amino acids were present at approximately 1 microM. Stimulation of PIP2 hydrolysis by amino acids required GTP gamma S, which alone had no effect on PLC activity. Unlike GTP gamma S, AlF4- and Ca2+ stimulated PIP2 breakdown. Preincubation with 1 mM GDP beta S eliminated the effect of amino acids and AlF4- on PIP2 hydrolysis, suggesting the involvement of G protein regulation. The lack of stimulation by GTP gamma S alone suggested that there was negligible exchange of GTP gamma S for GDP in the absence of odorant. There were no significant effects of amino acids on either adenylate cyclase or guanylate cyclase activities in the membrane preparation under these conditions. The effect of the amino acid cocktail was maximal at 1-10 nM free Ca2+. At or above 100 nM free Ca2+, no effect of amino acids on PIP2 hydrolysis was found. However, between 100 nM and 100 microM, Ca2+ directly stimulated PLC activity in a dose-dependent manner. This stimulation by Ca2+ appeared to be G protein independent because it did not require GTP gamma S and was not inhibited by GDP beta S.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8241123

  17. Juvenile hormone-activated phospholipase C pathway enhances transcriptional activation by the methoprene-tolerant protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengcheng; Peng, Hong-Juan; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-04-14

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of a wide diversity of developmental and physiological events in insects. Although the intracellular JH receptor methoprene-tolerant protein (MET) functions in the nucleus as a transcriptional activator for specific JH-regulated genes, some JH responses are mediated by signaling pathways that are initiated by proteins associated with plasma membrane. It is unknown whether the JH-regulated gene expression depends on the membrane-mediated signal transduction. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, we found that JH activated the phospholipase C (PLC) pathway and quickly increased the levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, diacylglycerol, and intracellular calcium, leading to activation and autophosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). When abdomens from newly emerged mosquitoes were cultured in vitro, the JH-activated gene expression was repressed substantially if specific inhibitors of PLC or CaMKII were added to the medium together with JH. In newly emerged female mosquitoes, RNAi-mediated depletion of PLC or CaMKII considerably reduced the expression of JH-responsive genes, including the Krüppel homolog 1 gene (AaKr-h1) and the early trypsin gene (AaET). JH-induced loading of MET to the promoters of AaKr-h1 and AaET was weakened drastically when either PLC or CaMKII was inactivated in the cultured tissues. Therefore, the results suggest that the membrane-initiated signaling pathway modifies the DNA-binding activity of MET via phosphorylation and thus facilitates the genomic responses to JH. In summary, this study reveals an interplay of genomic and nongenomic signaling mechanisms of JH. PMID:25825754

  18. Signal-dependent Hydrolysis of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate without Activation of Phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Shaya; Katz, Ben; Tzarfaty, Vered; Minke, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila, a phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated signaling cascade, couples photo-excitation of rhodopsin to the opening of the transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) channels. A lipid product of PLC, diacylglycerol (DAG), and its metabolites, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may function as second messengers of channel activation. However, how can one separate between the increase in putative second messengers, change in pH, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) depletion when exploring the TRPL gating mechanism? To answer this question we co-expressed the TRPL channels together with the muscarinic (M1) receptor, enabling the openings of TRPL channels via G-protein activation of PLC. To dissect PLC activation of TRPL into its molecular components, we used a powerful method that reduced plasma membrane-associated PI(4,5)P2 in HEK cells within seconds without activating PLC. Upon the addition of a dimerizing drug, PI(4,5)P2 was selectively hydrolyzed in the cell membrane without producing DAG, inositol trisphosphate, or calcium signals. We show that PI(4,5)P2 is not an inhibitor of TRPL channel activation. PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis combined with either acidification or application of DAG analogs failed to activate the channels, whereas PUFA did activate the channels. Moreover, a reduction in PI(4,5)P2 levels or inhibition of DAG lipase during PLC activity suppressed the PLC-activated TRPL current. This suggests that PI(4,5)P2 is a crucial substrate for PLC-mediated activation of the channels, whereas PUFA may function as the channel activator. Together, this study defines a narrow range of possible mechanisms for TRPL gating. PMID:22065576

  19. Cloning and identification of amino acid residues of human phospholipase C delta 1 essential for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Jiang, M J; Chen, C L; Liu, S M; Wong, L P; Lomasney, J W; King, K

    1995-03-10

    In vitro single point mutagenesis, inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, and substrate protection experiments were used to identify catalytic residues of human phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase C delta 1 (PLC delta 1) isolated from a human aorta cDNA library. Invariant amino acid residues containing a functional side chain in the highly conserved X region were changed by in vitro mutagenesis. Most of the mutant enzymes were still able to hydrolyze inositol phospholipid with activity ranging from 10 to 100% of levels in the wild type enzyme. Exceptions were mutants with the conversion of Arg338 to Leu (R338L), Glu341 to Gly (E341G), or His356 to Leu (H356L), which made the enzyme severely defective in hydrolyzing inositol phospholipid. Phospholipid vesicle binding experiments showed that these three cleavage-defective mutant forms of PLC delta 1 could specifically bind to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) with an affinity similar to that of wild type enzyme. Western blotting analysis of trypsin-treated enzyme-PIP2 complexes revealed that a 67-kDa major protein fragment survived trypsin digestion if the wild type enzyme, E341G, or H356L mutant PLC delta 1 was preincubated with 7.5 microM PIP2, whereas if it was preincubated with 80 microM PIP2, the size of major protein surviving was comparable to that of intact enzyme. However, mutant enzyme R338L was not protected from trypsin degradation by PIP2 binding. These observations suggest that PLC delta 1 can recognize PIP2 through a high affinity and a low affinity binding site and that residues Glu341 and His356 are not involved in either high affinity or low affinity PIP2 binding but rather are essential for the Ca(2+)-dependent cleavage activity of PLC. PMID:7890667

  20. Nuclear phospholipase C-β1 and diacylglycerol LIPASE-α in brain cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    García del Caño, Gontzal; Montaña, Mario; Aretxabala, Xabier; González-Burguera, Imanol; López de Jesús, Maider; Barrondo, Sergio; Sallés, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide (PtdIns) signaling involves the generation of lipid second messengers in response to stimuli in a receptor-mediated manner at the plasma membrane. In neuronal cells of adult brain, the standard model proposes that activation of metabotropic receptors coupled to Phospholipase C-β1 (PLC-β1) is linked to endocannabinoid signaling through the production of diacylglycerol (DAG), which could be systematically metabolized by 1,2-diacylglycerol Lipases (DAGL) to produce an increase of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), the most abundant endocannabinoid in the brain. However, the existence of a nuclear PtdIns metabolism independent from that occurring elsewhere in the cell is now widely accepted, suggesting that the nucleus constitutes both a functional and a distinct compartment for PtdIns metabolism. In this review, we shall highlight the main achievements in the field of neuronal nuclear inositol lipid metabolism with particular attention to progress made linked to the 2-AG biosynthesis. Our aim has been to identify potential sites of 2-AG synthesis other than the neuronal cytoplasmic compartment by determining the subcellular localization of PLC-β1 and DAGL-α, which is much more abundant than DAGL-β in brain. Our data show that PLC-β1 and DAGL-α are detected in discrete brain regions, with a marked predominance of pyramidal morphologies of positive cortical cells, consistent with their role in the biosynthesis and release of 2-AG by pyramidal neurons to control their synaptic inputs. However, as novelty, we showed here an integrated description of the localization of PLC-β1 and DAGL-α in the neuronal nuclear compartment. We discuss our comparative analysis of the expression patterns of PLC-β1 and DAGL-α, providing some insight into the potential autocrine role of 2-AG production in the neuronal nuclear compartment that probably subserve additional roles to the recognized activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. PMID:24076015

  1. Juvenile hormone-activated phospholipase C pathway enhances transcriptional activation by the methoprene-tolerant protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengcheng; Peng, Hong-Juan; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of a wide diversity of developmental and physiological events in insects. Although the intracellular JH receptor methoprene-tolerant protein (MET) functions in the nucleus as a transcriptional activator for specific JH-regulated genes, some JH responses are mediated by signaling pathways that are initiated by proteins associated with plasma membrane. It is unknown whether the JH-regulated gene expression depends on the membrane-mediated signal transduction. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, we found that JH activated the phospholipase C (PLC) pathway and quickly increased the levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, diacylglycerol, and intracellular calcium, leading to activation and autophosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). When abdomens from newly emerged mosquitoes were cultured in vitro, the JH-activated gene expression was repressed substantially if specific inhibitors of PLC or CaMKII were added to the medium together with JH. In newly emerged female mosquitoes, RNAi-mediated depletion of PLC or CaMKII considerably reduced the expression of JH-responsive genes, including the Krüppel homolog 1 gene (AaKr-h1) and the early trypsin gene (AaET). JH-induced loading of MET to the promoters of AaKr-h1 and AaET was weakened drastically when either PLC or CaMKII was inactivated in the cultured tissues. Therefore, the results suggest that the membrane-initiated signaling pathway modifies the DNA-binding activity of MET via phosphorylation and thus facilitates the genomic responses to JH. In summary, this study reveals an interplay of genomic and nongenomic signaling mechanisms of JH. PMID:25825754

  2. Phospholipase C Epsilon (PLCε) Induced TRPC6 Activation: A Common but Redundant Mechanism in Primary Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kalwa, Hermann; Storch, Ursula; Demleitner, Jana; Fiedler, Susanne; Mayer, Tim; Kannler, Martina; Fahlbusch, Meike; Barth, Holger; Smrcka, Alan; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Gudermann, Thomas; Dietrich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, activation of phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled membrane receptors by hormones leads to an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i. Catalytic activity of PLCs results in the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) which opens DAG-sensitive classical transient receptor channels 3, 6, and 7 (TRPC3/6/7), initiating Ca2+ influx from the extracellular space. Patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) express gain-of-function mutants of TRPC6, while others carry loss-of-function mutants of PLCε, raising the intriguing possibility that both proteins interact and might work in the same signalling pathway. While TRPC6 activation by PLCβ and PLCγ isozymes was extensively studied, the role of PLCε in TRPC6 activation remains elusive. TRPC6 was co-immunoprecipitated with PLCε in a heterologous overexpression system in HEK293 cells as well as in freshly isolated murine podocytes. Receptor-operated TRPC6 currents in HEK293 cells expressing TRPC6 were reduced by a specific PLCε siRNA and by a PLCε loss-of-function mutant isolated from a patient with FSGS. PLCε-induced TRPC6 activation was also identified in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Gαq/11 proteins. Further analysis of the signal transduction pathway revealed a Gα12/13 Rho-GEF activation which induced Rho-mediated PLCε stimulation. Therefore, we identified a new pathway for TRPC6 activation by PLCε. PLCε-/- podocytes however, were undistinguishable from WT podocytes in their angiotensin II-induced formation of actin stress fibers and their GTPγS-induced TRPC6 activation, pointing to a redundant role of PLCε-mediated TRPC6 activation at least in podocytes. PMID:25521631

  3. Filamin and Phospholipase C-ε Are Required for Calcium Signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans Spermatheca

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, Ismar; Orozco, Jose M.; Cram, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue. PMID:23671426

  4. Macroscopic consequences of the action of phospholipase C on giant unilamellar liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Juha M; Angelova, Miglena I; Söderlund, Tim; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2002-01-01

    Macroscopic consequences of the formation of diacylglycerol by phospholipase C (PC-PLC) in giant 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) unilamellar vesicles (GUVs, diameter 10-100 microm) were studied by phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy. PC-PLC caused a series of fast stepwise shrinkages of fluid SOPC GUVs, continuing until the vesicle disappeared beyond the optical resolution of the microscope. The presence of N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin (mole fraction X = 0.25) in the GUVs did not affect the outcome of the PC-PLC reaction. In addition to hydrolysis, PC-PLC induced adhesion of vicinal vesicles. When multilamellar SOPC vesicles were used only a minor decrease in their diameter was evident suggesting that PC-PLC can exert its hydrolytic activity only in the outer monolayer. A series of stepwise shrinkages was observed also for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) GUVs above their main phase transition temperature, T(m), i.e., when the bilayer is in the liquid crystalline state. However, this process was not observed for DMPC GUVs in the gel state, below T(m). These results are supported by the enhanced activity of PC-PLC upon exceeding T(m) of DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (diameter approximately 0.1 microm) used as a substrate. Studies on SOPC monolayers revealed that PC-PLC can exert its hydrolytic activity only at surface pressures below approximately 30 mN/m. Accordingly, the lack of changes in the gel state DMPC GUVs could be explained by the equilibrium lateral pressure in these vesicles exceeding this critical value. PMID:12124275

  5. Membrane activity of the phospholipase C-δ1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    PH-PLCδ1 [the PH domain (pleckstrin homology domain) of PLCδ1 (phospholipase C-δ1)] is among the best-characterized phosphoinositide-binding domains. PH-PLCδ1 binds with high specificity to the headgroup of PtdIns(4,5)P2, but little is known about its interfacial properties. In the present study, we show that PH-PLCδ1 is also membrane-active and can insert significantly into PtdIns(4,5)P2-containing monolayers at physiological (bilayer-equivalent) surface pressures. However, this membrane activity appears to involve interactions distinct from those that target PH-PLCδ1 to the PtdIns(4,5)P2 headgroup. Whereas the majority of PtdIns(4,5)P2-bound PH-PLCδ1 can be displaced by adding excess of soluble headgroup [Ins(1,4,5)P3], membrane activity of PH-PLCδ1 cannot. PH-PLCδ1 differs from other phosphoinositide-binding domains in that its membrane insertion does not require that the phosphoinositide-binding site be occupied. Significant monolayer insertion remains when the phosphoinositide-binding site is mutated, and PH-PLCδ1 can insert into monolayers that contain no PtdIns(4,5)P2 at all. Our results suggest a model in which reversible membrane binding of PH-PLCδ1, mediated by PtdIns(4,5)P2 or other acidic phospholipids, occurs without membrane insertion. Accumulation of the PH domain at the membrane surface enhances the efficiency of insertion, but does not significantly affect its extent, whereas the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol in the lipid mixture promotes the extent of insertion. This is the first report of membrane activity in an isolated PH domain and has implications for understanding the membrane targeting by this common type of domain. PMID:15755258

  6. Targeted Inhibition of Phospholipase C γ2 Adaptor Function Blocks Osteoclastogenesis and Protects from Pathological Osteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Corinne; Hesker, Pamela; Zhang, Kaihua; Faccio, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C γ2 (PLCγ2) is a critical regulator of innate immune cells and osteoclasts (OCs) during inflammatory arthritis. Both the catalytic domain and the adaptor motifs of PLCγ2 are required for OC formation and function. Due to the high homology between the catalytic domains of PLCγ2 and the ubiquitously expressed PLCγ1, molecules encompassing the adaptor motifs of PLCγ2 were designed to test the hypothesis that uncoupling the adaptor and catalytic functions of PLCγ2 could specifically inhibit osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion. Wild-type (WT) bone marrow macrophages (BMM) that overexpress the tandem Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of PLCγ2 (SH2(N+C)) failed to form mature OCs and resorb bone in vitro. Activation of the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling pathway, which is critical for OC development, was impaired in cells expressing SH2(N+C). Arrest in OC differentiation was evidenced by a reduction of p38 and Iκ-Bα phosphorylation as well as decreased NFATc1 and c-Fos/c-Jun levels. Consistent with our hypothesis, SH2(N+C) abrogated formation of the RANK-Gab2 complex, which mediates NF-κB and AP-1 activation following RANK ligand (RANKL) stimulation. Furthermore, the ability of SH2(N+C) to prevent inflammatory osteolysis was examined in vivo following RANKL or LPS injections over the calvaria. Both models induced osteolysis in the control group, whereas the SH2(N+C)-treated cohort was largely protected from bone erosion. Collectively, these data indicate that inflammatory osteolysis can be abrogated by treatment with a molecule composed of the tandem SH2 domains of PLCγ2. PMID:24081142

  7. Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C and Sphingomyelinase Activities in Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus Group

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantsev, A. P.; Kalnin, K. V.; Osorio, M.; Leppla, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is nonhemolytic, even though it is closely related to the highly hemolytic Bacillus cereus. Hemolysis by B. cereus results largely from the action of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and sphingomyelinase (SPH), encoded by the plc and sph genes, respectively. In B. cereus, these genes are organized in an operon regulated by the global regulator PlcR. B. anthracis contains a highly similar cereolysin operon, but it is transcriptionally silent because the B. anthracis PlcR is truncated at the C terminus. Here we report the cloning, expression, purification, and enzymatic characterization of PC-PLC and SPH from B. cereus and B. anthracis. We also investigated the effects of expressing PlcR on the expression of plc and sph. In B. cereus, PlcR was found to be a positive regulator of plc but a negative regulator of sph. Replacement of the B. cereus plcR gene by its truncated orthologue from B. anthracis eliminated the activities of both PC-PLC and SPH, whereas introduction into B. anthracis of the B. cereus plcR gene with its own promoter did not activate cereolysin expression. Hemolytic activity was detected in B. anthracis strains containing the B. cereus plcR gene on a multicopy plasmid under control of the strong B. anthracis protective antigen gene promoter or in a strain carrying a multicopy plasmid containing the entire B. cereus plc-sph operon. Slight hemolysis and PC-PLC activation were found when PlcR-producing B. anthracis strains were grown under anaerobic-plus-CO2 or especially under aerobic-plus-CO2 conditions. Unmodified parental B. anthracis strains did not demonstrate obvious hemolysis under the same conditions. PMID:14573681

  8. Regulation of the phospholipase C-gamma2 pathway in B cells.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, T; Maeda, A; Ishiai, M; Hashimoto, A; Inabe, K; Takata, M

    2000-08-01

    In B lymphocytes, a signaling complex that contributes to cell fate decisions is the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR), with different extents of receptor engagement leading to such outcomes as cell death, survival, or proliferation. Here, based upon the available genetic and biochemical data of the BCR signal components, we discuss several mechanisms by which BCR signals are propagated and modified, with specific emphasis on the phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma2-calcium pathway Gene-targeting experiments in DT40 chicken B cells highlighted the importance of the intracellular protein tyrosine kinases Syk and Btk in PLC-gamma2 activation. Until recently, the molecular mechanism underlying the double requirement for Syk and Btk in PLC-gamma2 activation remained unclear, but new data suggest that an adapter molecule, B-cell linker protein (alternatively named SLP-65 or BASH), phosphorylated by Syk, provides docking sites for Btk SH2 domain as well as PLC-gamma2 SH2 domains, thus bringing Btk into close proximity with PLC-gamma2. The activated Btk then phosphorylates PLC-gamma2, leading to its activation. The activated PLC-gamma2 converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate into the second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), which in turn binds to IP3 receptors located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of IP3 to the IP3 receptors is essential for triggering a calcium release from the ER and subsequent entry of extracellular calcium. Balancing these activation signals in the PLC-gamma2-calcium pathway are the inhibitory receptors expressed on B cells, FcyRII and paired immunoglobin-like receptor (PIR)-B. Although both FcyRII and PIR-B inhibits the BCR-mediated [Ca2+]i increase, the inhibitory mechanisms of these receptors are distinct. The FcyRII-mediated inhibitory signal is dependent on lipid phosphatase SHIP, whereas the PIR-B requires redundant functions of protein phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. Thus, PIR-B and FcgammaRII inhibit calcium signals by

  9. Oocyte activation and phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ): diagnostic and therapeutic implications for assisted reproductive technology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Infertility affects one in seven couples globally and has recently been classified as a disease by the World Health Organisation (WHO). While in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) offers effective treatment for many infertile couples, cases exhibiting severe male infertility (19–57%) often remain difficult, if not impossible to treat. In such cases, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), a technique in which a single sperm is microinjected into the oocyte, is implemented. However, 1–5% of ICSI cycles still fail to fertilise, affecting over 1000 couples per year in the UK alone. Pregnancy and delivery rates for IVF and ICSI rarely exceed 30% and 23% respectively. It is therefore imperative that Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) protocols are constantly modified by associated research programmes, in order to provide patients with the best chances of conception. Prior to fertilisation, mature oocytes are arrested in the metaphase stage of the second meiotic division (MII), which must be alleviated to allow the cell cycle, and subsequent embryogenesis, to proceed. Alleviation occurs through a series of concurrent events, collectively termed ‘oocyte activation’. In mammals, oocytes are activated by a series of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) oscillations following gamete fusion. Recent evidence implicates a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ), introduced into the oocyte following membrane fusion as the factor responsible. This review summarises our current understanding of oocyte activation failure in human males, and describes recent advances in our knowledge linking certain cases of male infertility with defects in PLCζ expression and activity. Systematic literature searches were performed using PubMed and the ISI-Web of Knowledge. Databases compiled by the United Nations and World Health Organisation databases (UNWHO), and the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) were also scrutinised. It is clear that PLCζ plays a fundamental role in

  10. Phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) and male infertility: Clinical update and topical developments.

    PubMed

    Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Coward, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    The development of a mammalian embryo is initiated by a sequence of molecular events collectively referred to as 'oocyte activation' and regulated by the release of intracellular calcium in the ooplasm. Over the last decade, phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm protein introduced into the oocyte upon gamete fusion, has gained almost universal acceptance as the protein factor responsible for initiating oocyte activation. A large body of consistent and reproducible evidence, from both biochemical and clinical settings, confers support for the role of PLCζ in this fundamental biological context, which has significant ramifications for the management of human male infertility. Oocyte activation deficiency (OAD) and total fertilisation failure (TFF) are known causes of infertility and have both been linked to abnormalities in the structure, expression, and localisation pattern of PLCζ in human sperm. Assisted oocyte activators (AOAs) represent the only therapeutic option available for OAD at present, although these agents have been the source of much debate recently, particularly with regard to their potential epigenetic effects upon the embryo. Consequently, there is much interest in the deployment of sensitive PLCζ assays as prognostic/diagnostic tests and human recombinant PLCζ protein as an alternative form of therapy. Although PLCζ deficiency has been directly linked to a cohort of infertile cases, we have yet to identify the specific causal mechanisms involved. While two genetic mutations have been identified which link defective PLCζ protein to an infertile phenotype, both were observed in the same patient, and have yet to be described in other patients. Consequently, some researchers are investigating the possibility that genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could provide some explanation, especially since >6000 SNPs have been identified in the PLCζ gene. As yet, however, there is no consistent data to suggest that any

  11. Mu-opioids activate phospholipase C in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells via calcium-channel opening.

    PubMed

    Smart, D; Smith, G; Lambert, D G

    1995-01-15

    We have recently reported that, in SH-SY5Y cells, mu-opioid receptor occupancy activates phospholipase C via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein. In the present study we have further characterized the mechanisms involved in this process. Fentanyl (0.1 microM) caused a monophasic increase in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate mass formation, with a peak (20.5 +/- 3.6 pmol/mg of protein) at 15 s. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free buffer abolished this response, while Ca2+ replacement 1 min later restored the stimulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation (20.1 +/- 0.6 pmol/mg of protein). In addition, nifedipine (1 nM-0.1 mM), an L-type Ca(2+)-channel antagonist, caused a dose-dependent inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation, with an IC50 of 60.3 +/- 1.1 nM. Elevation of endogenous beta/gamma subunits by selective activation of delta-opioid and alpha 2 adrenoceptors failed to stimulate phospholipase C. Fentanyl also caused a dose-dependent (EC50 of 16.2 +/- 1.0 nM), additive enhancement of carbachol-induced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. In summary, we have demonstrated that in SH-SY5Y cells activation of the mu-opioid receptor allows Ca2+ influx to activate phospholipase C. However, the possible role of this mechanism in the process of analgesia remains to be elucidated. PMID:7832776

  12. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide requires parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C to entrain circadian rhythms to a predictable phase

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.; Tsai, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Circadian oscillations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) depend on transcriptional repression by Period (PER)1 and PER2 proteins within single cells and on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) signaling between cells. Because VIP is released by SCN neurons in a circadian pattern, and, after photic stimulation, it has been suggested to play a role in the synchronization to environmental light cycles. It is not known, however, if or how VIP entrains circadian gene expression or behavior. Here, we tested candidate signaling pathways required for VIP-mediated entrainment of SCN rhythms. We found that single applications of VIP reset PER2 rhythms in a time- and dose-dependent manner that differed from light. Unlike VIP-mediated signaling in other cell types, simultaneous antagonism of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities was required to block the VIP-induced phase shifts of SCN rhythms. Consistent with this, VIP rapidly increased intracellular cAMP in most SCN neurons. Critically, daily VIP treatment entrained PER2 rhythms to a predicted phase angle within several days, depending on the concentration of VIP and the interval between VIP applications. We conclude that VIP entrains circadian timing among SCN neurons through rapid and parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities. PMID:21389307

  13. Muscarine enhances soluble amyloid precursor protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y by a pathway dependent on protein kinase C(alpha), src-tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but not phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Canet-Aviles, Rosa-Maria; Anderton, Mark; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J; Vaughan, Peter F T

    2002-06-15

    The signalling pathways by which muscarine and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate the secretion of the alpha-secretase cleavage product (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were examined in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y. Using specific inhibitors it was found that over 80% of sAPPalpha secretion, enhanced by muscarine, occurred via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and was dependent on protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src-TK). In contrast the stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion by EGF was not affected by inhibitors of PKC nor Src-TK but was dependent on ERK1/2. In addition muscarine-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion and ERK1/2 activation were inhibited 60 and 80%, respectively, by micromolar concentrations of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitor wortmannin. In comparison wortmannin decreased EGF stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion and ERK 1/2 activation by approximately 40%. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, did not inhibit muscarine enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion. These data are discussed in relation to a pathway for the enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion by muscarine which involves the activation of a Src-TK by G-protein beta/gamma-subunits leading to activation of PKCalpha, and ERK1/2 by a mechanism not involving phospholipase C. PMID:12191495

  14. A dynamic set point for thermal adaptation requires phospholipase C-mediated regulation of TRPM8 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Daniel S; Golden, Judith P; Vogt, Sherri K; Dhaka, Ajay; Story, Gina M; Gereau Iv, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    The ability to sense and respond to thermal stimuli at varied environmental temperatures is essential for survival in seasonal areas. In this study, we show that mice respond similarly to ramping changes in temperature from a wide range of baseline temperatures. Further investigation suggests that this ability to adapt to different ambient environments is based on rapid adjustments made to a dynamic temperature set point. The adjustment of this set point requires transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily member 8 (TRPM8), but not transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1), and is regulated by phospholipase C (PLC) activity. Overall, our findings suggest that temperature response thresholds in mice are dynamic, and that this ability to adapt to environmental temperature seems to mirror the in vitro findings that PLC-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate modulates TRPM8 activity and thereby regulates the response thresholds to cold stimuli. PMID:25109670

  15. Recombinant broad-range phospholipase C from Listeria monocytogenes exhibits optimal activity at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiongying; Gershenson, Anne; Roberts, Mary F

    2016-06-01

    The broad-range phospholipase C (PLC) from Listeria monocytogenes has been expressed using an intein expression system and characterized. This zinc metalloenzyme, similar to the homologous enzyme from Bacillus cereus, targets a wide range of lipid substrates. With monomeric substrates, the length of the hydrophobic acyl chain has significant impact on enzyme efficiency by affecting substrate affinity (Km). Based on a homology model of the enzyme to the B. cereus protein, several active site residue mutations were generated. While this PLC shares many of the mechanistic characteristics of the B. cereus PLC, a major difference is that the L. monocytogenes enzyme displays an acidic pH optimum regardless of substrate status (monomer, micelle, or vesicle). This unusual behavior might be advantageous for its role in the pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26976751

  16. Aluminum ions alter the function of non-specific phospholipase C through the changes in plasma membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Pejchar, Přemysl; Martinec, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The first indication of the aluminum (Al) toxicity in plants growing in acidic soils is the cessation of root growth, but the detailed mechanism of Al effect is unknown. Here we examined the impact of Al stress on the activity of non-specific phospholipase C (NPC) in the connection with the processes related to the plasma membrane using fluorescently labeled phosphatidylcholine. We observed a rapid and significant decrease of labeled diacylglycerol (DAG), product of NPC activity, in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with AlCl₃. Interestingly, an application of the membrane fluidizer, benzyl alcohol, restored the level of DAG during Al treatment. Our observations suggest that the activity of NPC is affected by Al-induced changes in plasma membrane physical properties. PMID:26024014

  17. Aluminum ions alter the function of non-specific phospholipase C through the changes in plasma membrane physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Pejchar, Přemysl; Martinec, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The first indication of the aluminum (Al) toxicity in plants growing in acidic soils is the cessation of root growth, but the detailed mechanism of Al effect is unknown. Here we examined the impact of Al stress on the activity of non-specific phospholipase C (NPC) in the connection with the processes related to the plasma membrane using fluorescently labeled phosphatidylcholine. We observed a rapid and significant decrease of labeled diacylglycerol (DAG), product of NPC activity, in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with AlCl3. Interestingly, an application of the membrane fluidizer, benzyl alcohol, restored the level of DAG during Al treatment. Our observations suggest that the activity of NPC is affected by Al-induced changes in plasma membrane physical properties. PMID:26024014

  18. AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN NEUTRAL SPHINGOMYELIN-SPECIFIC PHOSPHOLIPASE C ACTIVITY IN STRIATUM, HIPPOCAMPUS, AND FRONTAL CORTEX: IMPLICATION FOR SENSITIVITY TO STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies show the enrichment of mammalian brain with neutral sphingomyelin specific phospholipase C (ceramide-phosphocholine phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12; N-Sase). The objective of this study was to evaluate the subcellular N-Sase activity in striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Resu...

  19. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase c gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, Bmax showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes. PMID:20513244

  20. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus combines intrinsic phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities: A sup 31 P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Shashidhar, M.S.; Kuppe, A. ); Volwerk, J.J.; Griffith, O.H.

    1990-09-04

    The inositol phosphate products formed during the cleavage of phosphatidylinositol by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus were analyzed by {sup 31}P NMR. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy can distinguish between the inositol phosphate species and phosphatidylinositol. Chemical shift values (with reference to phosphoric acid) observed are {minus}0.41, 3.62, 4.45, and 16.30 ppm for phosphatidylinositol, myo-inositol 1-monophosphate, myo-inositol 2-monophosphate, and myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate, respectively. It is shown that under a variety of experimental conditions this phospholipase C cleaves phosphatidylinositol via an intramolecular phosphotransfer reaction producing diacylglycerol and D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate. The authors also report the new and unexpected observation that the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus is able to hydrolyze the inositol cyclic phosphate to form D-myo-inositol 1-monophosphate. The enzyme, therefore, possesses phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. The second reaction requires thousandfold higher enzyme concentrations to be observed by {sup 31}P NMR. This reaction was shown to be regiospecific in that only the 1-phosphate was produced and stereospecific in that only D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate was hydrolyzed. Inhibition with a monoclonal antibody specific for the B.cereus phospholipase C showed that the cyclic phosphodiesterase activity is intrinsic to the bacterial enzyme. They propose a two-step mechanism for the phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus involving sequential phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. This mechanism bears a resemblance to the well-known two-step mechanism of pancreatic ribonuclease, RNase A.

  1. Molecular cloning, expression and regulatory activity of G alpha 11- and beta gamma-subunit-stimulated phospholipase C-beta from avian erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Waldo, G L; Paterson, A; Boyer, J L; Nicholas, R A; Harden, T K

    1996-01-01

    A turkey erythrocyte phospholipase C (PLC) has been instrumental in delineating the role of G-proteins in receptor-regulated inositol lipid signalling. This isoenzyme is uniquely regulated both by alpha-subunits of the Gq family and by G-protein beta gamma-subunits. A 4819 bp cDNA encoding this PLC has been cloned from a turkey erythrocyte cDNA library. The open reading frame of this cDNA encodes a 1211-amino-acid protein (calculated molecular mass 139050 Da) that contains amino acid sequences of 16 peptides sequenced from the turkey erythrocyte PLC. The predicted sequence of the turkey PLC shows considerable similarity with the sequences of previously cloned members of the PLC-beta family, with the highest identity (71%) shared with PLC-beta 2 and lesser identities observed with PLC-beta 1 (49%), PLC-beta 3 (46%) and PLC-beta 4 (37%). The largest differences in sequence between the turkey PLC-beta and other PLC-beta isoenzymes occur in the C-terminal domain and in the region between the X- and Y-domains. The turkey isoenzyme and PLC-beta 2, which differ in their regulation by G-protein alpha-subunits, are only 44% similar across the approx. 400 amino acid residues of the C-terminal domain that has been implicated in alpha q activation of these proteins. Recombinant turkey PLC-beta was purified to homogeneity following expression from a recombinant baculovirus in Sf9 insect cells. The immunoreactivity and mobility on SDS/PAGE of the recombinant enzyme were the same as observed with native turkey erythrocyte PLC-beta. Moreover, the catalytic activities of the recombinant enzyme were indistinguishable from those of native turkey erythrocyte PLC-beta in assays carried out in the presence of cholate and Ca2+, or in assays of activity after reconstitution with G alpha 11 or G-protein beta gamma-subunits. The turkey PLC-beta was more sensitive to activation by G alpha 11 than was PLC-beta 2, and was more sensitive to activation by beta gamma-subunits than either PLC

  2. Non-specific phospholipase C1 affects silicon distribution and mechanical strength in stem nodes of rice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huasheng; Zhuo, Lin; Su, Yuan; Sun, Linxiao; Wang, Xuemin

    2016-05-01

    Silicon, the second abundant element in the crust, is beneficial for plant growth, mechanical strength, and stress responses. Here we show that manipulation of the non-specific phospholipase C1, NPC1, alters silicon content in nodes and husks of rice (Oryza sativa). Silicon content in NPC1-overexpressing (OE) plants was decreased in nodes but increased in husks compared to wild-type, whereas RNAi suppression of NPC1 resulted in the opposite changes to those of NPC1-OE plants. NPC1 from rice hydrolyzed phospholipids and galactolipids to generate diacylglycerol that can be phosphorylated to phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid interacts with Lsi6, a silicon transporter that is expressed at the highest level in nodes. In addition, the node cells of NPC1-OE plants have lower contents of cellulose and hemicellulose, and thinner sclerenchyma and vascular bundle fibre cells than wild-type plants; whereas NPC1-RNAi plants displayed the opposite changes. These data indicate that NPC1 modulates silicon distribution and secondary cell wall deposition in nodes and grains, affecting mechanical strength and seed shattering. PMID:26991499

  3. Does advancing male age influence the expression levels and localisation patterns of phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) in human sperm?

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Yelumalai, Suseela; Mounce, Ginny; da Silva, Sarah J Martins; Child, Tim; Coward, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Socio-economic factors have led to an increasing trend for couples to delay parenthood. However, advancing age exerts detrimental effects upon gametes which can have serious consequences upon embryo viability. While such effects are well documented for the oocyte, relatively little is known with regard to the sperm. One fundamental role of sperm is to activate the oocyte at fertilisation, a process initiated by phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein. While PLCζ deficiency can lead to oocyte activation deficiency and infertility, it is currently unknown whether the expression or function of PLCζ is compromised by advancing male age. Here, we evaluate sperm motility and the proportion of sperm expressing PLCζ in 71 males (22-54 years; 44 fertile controls and 27 infertile patients), along with total levels and localisation patterns of PLCζ within the sperm head. Three different statistical approaches were deployed with male age considered both as a categorical and a continuous factor. While progressive motility was negatively correlated with male age, all three statistical models concurred that no PLCζ-related parameter was associated with male age, suggesting that advancing male age is unlikely to cause problems in terms of the sperm's fundamental ability to activate an oocyte. PMID:27270687

  4. Light-Dependent Translocation of Arrestin in Rod Photoreceptors is Signaled Through a Phospholipase C Cascade and Requires ATP

    PubMed Central

    Orisme, Wilda; Li, Jian; Goldmann, Tobias; Bolch, Susan; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay

    2009-01-01

    Partitioning of cellular components is a critical mechanism by which cells can regulate their activity. In rod photoreceptors, light induces a large-scale translocation of arrestin from the inner segments to the outer segments. The purpose of this project is to elucidate the signaling pathway necessary to initiate arrestin translocation to the outer segments and the mechanism for arrestin translocation. Mouse retinal organotypic cultures and eyes from transgenic Xenopus tadpoles expressing a fusion of GFP and rod arrestin were treated with both activators and inhibitors of proteins in the phosphoinositide pathway. Confocal microscopy was used to image the effects of the pharmacological agents on arrestin translocation in rod photoreceptors. Retinas were also depleted of ATP using potassium cyanide to assess the requirement for ATP in arrestin translocation. In this study, we demonstrate that components of the G-protein-linked phospholipase C (PLC) pathway play a role in initiating arrestin translocation. Our results show that arrestin translocation can be stimulated by activators of PLC and protein kinase C (PKC), and by cholera toxin in the absence of light. Arrestin translocation to the outer segments is significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC and PKC. Importantly, we find that treatment with potassium cyanide inhibits arrestin translocation in response to light. Collectively, our results suggest that arrestin translocation is initiated by a G-protein-coupled cascade through PLC and PKC signaling. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that at least the initiation of arrestin translocation requires energy input. PMID:19887106

  5. Non-specific phospholipase C5 and diacylglycerol promote lateral root development under mild salt stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Carlotta; Kim, Sang-Chul; Devaiah, Shivakumar; Li, Maoyin; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-09-01

    Developing a robust root system is crucial to plant survival and competition for soil resources. Here we report that the non-specific phospholipase C5 (NPC5) and its derived lipid mediator diacylglycerol (DAG) mediate lateral root (LR) development during salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. T-DNA knockout mutant npc5-1 produced few to no LR under mild NaCl stress, whereas overexpression of NPC5 increased LR number. Roots of npc5-1 contained a lower level of DAG than wild type, whereas NPC5 overexpressor exhibited an increase in DAG level. Application of DAG, but not phosphatidic acid, fully restored LR growth of npc5-1 to that of wild type under NaCl stress. NPC5 expression was significantly induced in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with NaCl. Npc5-1 was less responsive to auxin-mediated root growth than the wild type. These results indicate that NPC5 mediates LR development in response to salt stress and suggest that DAG functions as a lipid mediator in the stress signalling. PMID:24689655

  6. Time-dependent inhibition of phospholipase C beta-catalysed phosphoinositide hydrolysis: a comparison of different assays.

    PubMed Central

    James, S R; Smith, S; Paterson, A; Harden, T K; Downes, C P

    1996-01-01

    The properties of three different beta-isoforms of phospholipase C (PLC) were analysed using substrate lipids dispersed in phospholipid vesicles, phospholipid-detergent mixed micelles and phospholipid monolayers spread at an air-water interface. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis went virtually to completion in monolayers, but inositol trisphosphate production was curtailed prematurely in vesicular and micellar assays. Assays were linear for less than 2 min with vesicles; the linear portion could be significantly extended in micelles by increasing the ratio of micelles to enzyme molecules. However, onset of a second lower rate of substrate hydrolysis always occurred when < or = 10% of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) had been utilized. This was not due to enzyme inactivation in the micellar interface, determined by addition of fresh substrate or fresh enzyme after the slow phase of activity had started, nor was it due to overt product inhibition of PLC or apparent entrapment of PLC at the micelle surface. These results are similar to those seen in assays using bacterial PLC and we suggest that the biphasic kinetics may be due to product-dependent changes in the presentation of substrate lipic to PLC in lamellar assays, leading to reduced activity. PMID:8615789

  7. Role of lipid packing in the activity of phospholipase C-delta1 as determined by hydrostatic pressure measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Rebecchi, M; Bonhomme, M; Scarlata, S

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies with phospholipid monolayers revealed a large decrease in the activity of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-delta(1) (PLC-delta(1)) which catalyses the hydrolysis of PtdIns(4, 5)P(2) as lateral pressure is applied to the membrane. If stress on the membrane is the sole inhibitor of PLC-delta(1) activity, the enzyme must penetrate the membrane surface to engage its substrate. To test the effect on PLC-delta(1) activity of lipid packing in the absence of a directional stress, we examined the effects of increasing hydrostatic pressure on enzymic activity. We find that, in contrast with monolayer studies, increasing lipid packing by hydrostatic pressure does not affect membrane binding and increases enzymic activity by 90% in going from atmospheric pressure to 10(8) Pa (approx. 1000 atm). The increase in activity could be accounted for mainly by electrostriction of water around the multiply-charged product. Our results show that when there is no net stress on the monolayer, lipid packing does not alter PLC-delta(1) activity, possibly because penetration of the enzyme into the membrane surface is shallow. We suggest that, in biological membranes, the activity of this and possibly other interfacial proteins is independent of headgroup packing. PMID:10417319

  8. Does advancing male age influence the expression levels and localisation patterns of phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) in human sperm?

    PubMed Central

    Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Yelumalai, Suseela; Mounce, Ginny; da Silva, Sarah J. Martins; Child, Tim; Coward, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Socio-economic factors have led to an increasing trend for couples to delay parenthood. However, advancing age exerts detrimental effects upon gametes which can have serious consequences upon embryo viability. While such effects are well documented for the oocyte, relatively little is known with regard to the sperm. One fundamental role of sperm is to activate the oocyte at fertilisation, a process initiated by phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein. While PLCζ deficiency can lead to oocyte activation deficiency and infertility, it is currently unknown whether the expression or function of PLCζ is compromised by advancing male age. Here, we evaluate sperm motility and the proportion of sperm expressing PLCζ in 71 males (22–54 years; 44 fertile controls and 27 infertile patients), along with total levels and localisation patterns of PLCζ within the sperm head. Three different statistical approaches were deployed with male age considered both as a categorical and a continuous factor. While progressive motility was negatively correlated with male age, all three statistical models concurred that no PLCζ–related parameter was associated with male age, suggesting that advancing male age is unlikely to cause problems in terms of the sperm’s fundamental ability to activate an oocyte. PMID:27270687

  9. Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C induced ROS production and cytotoxicity require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  10. Clostridium perfringens Phospholipase C Induced ROS Production and Cytotoxicity Require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  11. Membrane-binding properties of phospholipase C-beta1 and phospholipaseC-beta2: role of the C-terminus and effects of polyphosphoinositides, G-proteins and Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Jenco, J M; Becker, K P; Morris, A J

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the binding of two G-protein-regulated phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes, PLCs-beta1 and -beta2, to membrane surfaces using sucrose-loaded bilayer phospholipid vesicles of varying compositions. Neither enzyme binds appreciably to pure phosphatidylcholine vesicles at lipid concentrations up to 10(-3) M. PLC-beta1 and PLC-beta2 bind vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine (molar ratio 1:1:1) with an approximate Kd of 10(-5) M. Inclusion of 2% PtdIns(4,5)P2 in these vesicles had no effect on the affinity of this interaction. As reported by others, removal of the C-terminus of PLC-beta1 and PLC-beta2 produces catalytically active fragments. The affinity of these truncated proteins for phospholipid vesicles is dramatically reduced suggesting that this region of the proteins contains residues important for membrane binding. Inclusion of G-protein alpha- and betagamma-subunit activators in the phospholipid vesicles does not increase the binding of PLC-beta1 or PLC-beta2, and the magnitude of G-protein-mediated PLC activation observed at low phospholipid concentrations (10(-6) M) is comparable to that observed at concentrations at which the enzymes are predominantly membrane-bound (10(-3) M). PLC-beta1 and -beta2 contain C2 domains but Ca2+ does not enhance binding to the vesicles. Our results indicate that binding of these enzymes to membranes involves the C-temini of the proteins and suggest that activation of these enzymes by G-proteins results from a regulated interaction between the membrane-bound proteins rather than G-protein-dependent recruitment of soluble enzymes to a substrate-containing phospholipid surface. PMID:9359412

  12. Cool-temperature-mediated activation of phospholipase C-γ2 in the human hereditary disease PLAID.

    PubMed

    Schade, Anja; Walliser, Claudia; Wist, Martin; Haas, Jennifer; Vatter, Petra; Kraus, Johann M; Filingeri, Davide; Havenith, George; Kestler, Hans A; Milner, Joshua D; Gierschik, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Deletions in the gene encoding signal-transducing inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C-γ2 (PLCγ2) are associated with the novel human hereditary disease PLAID (PLCγ2-associated antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation). PLAID is characterized by a rather puzzling concurrence of augmented and diminished functions of the immune system, such as cold urticaria triggered by only minimal decreases in temperature, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency. Understanding of the functional effects of the genomic alterations at the level of the affected enzyme, PLCγ2, is currently lacking. PLCγ2 is critically involved in coupling various cell surface receptors to regulation of important functions of immune cells such as mast cells, B cells, monocytes/macrophages, and neutrophils. PLCγ2 is unique by carrying three Src (SH) and one split pleckstrin homology domain (spPH) between the two catalytic subdomains (spPHn-SH2n-SH2c-SH3-spPHc). Prevailing evidence suggests that activation of PLCγ2 is primarily due to loss of SH-region-mediated autoinhibition and/or enhanced plasma membrane translocation. Here, we show that the two PLAID PLCγ2 mutants lacking portions of the SH region are strongly (>100-fold), rapidly, and reversibly activated by cooling by only a few degrees. We found that the mechanism(s) underlying PLCγ2 PLAID mutant activation by cool temperatures is distinct from a mere loss of SH-region-mediated autoinhibition and dependent on both the integrity and the pliability of the spPH domain. The results suggest a new mechanism of PLCγ activation with unique thermodynamic features and assign a novel regulatory role to its spPH domain. Involvement of this mechanism in other human disease states associated with cooling such as exertional asthma and certain acute coronary events appears an intriguing possibility. PMID:27196803

  13. Methylmercury-induced toxicity is mediated by enhanced intracellular calcium through activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Mi Sun; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Seo, Ji Heui; Jeon, Hyung Jun; Jung, Kwang Mook; Chin, Mi-Reyoung; Moon, Chang-Kiu; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Jung, Sung Yun; Kim, Dae Kyong . E-mail: proteinlab@hanmail.net

    2006-10-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant to which humans can be exposed by ingestion of contaminated food. MeHg has been suggested to exert its toxicity through its high reactivity to thiols, generation of arachidonic acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation of free intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). However, the precise mechanism has not been fully defined. Here we show that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is a critical pathway for MeHg-induced toxicity in MDCK cells. D609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC, significantly reversed the toxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner with concomitant inhibition of the diacylglycerol (DAG) generation and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-breakdown. MeHg activated the group IV cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) and acidic form of sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) downstream of PC-PLC, but these enzymes as well as protein kinase C (PKC) were not linked to the toxicity by MeHg. Furthermore, MeHg produced ROS, which did not affect the toxicity. Addition of EGTA to culture media resulted in partial decrease of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and partially blocked the toxicity. In contrast, when the cells were treated with MeHg in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} in the culture media, D609 completely prevented cell death with parallel decrease in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Our results demonstrated that MeHg-induced toxicity was linked to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} through activation of PC-PLC, but not attributable to the signaling pathways such as cPLA{sub 2}, A-SMase, and PKC, or to the generation of ROS.

  14. Metabolic evidence for PtdIns(4,5)P2-directed phospholipase C in permeabilized plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Brearley, C A; Parmar, P N; Hanke, D E

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of the sequences of the genes encoding phospholipase C (PLC) which have been cloned to date in plants with their mammalian counterparts suggests that plant PLC is similar to PLCdelta of mammalian cells. The physiological role and mechanism of activation of PLCdelta is unclear. It has recently been shown that Ins(1,4,5)P3 may not solely be the product of PtdIns(4,5)P2-directed PLC activity. Enzyme activities capable of producing Ins(1,4,5)P3 from endogenous inositol phosphates are present in Dictyostelium and also in rat liver. Significantly it has not been directly determined whether Ins(1,4,5)P3 present in higher plants is the product of a PtdIns(4, 5)P2-directed PLC activity. Therefore we have developed an experimental strategy for the identification of d-Ins(1,4,5)P3 in higher plants. By the use of a short-term non-equilibrium labelling strategy in permeabilized plant protoplasts, coupled to the use of a 'metabolic trap' to prevent degradation of [32P]Ins(1,4,5)P3, we were able to determine the distribution of 32P in individual phosphate esters of Ins(1,4,5)P3. The [32]Ins(1,4,5)P3 identified showed the same distribution of label in individual phosphate esters as that of [32P]PtdIns(4,5)P2 isolated from the same tissue. We thus provide in vivo evidence for the action of a PtdIns(4,5)P2-directed PLC activity in plant cells which is responsible for the production of Ins(1,4,5)P3 observed here. This observation does not, however, exclude the possibility that in other cells or under different conditions Ins(1,4,5)P3 can be generated by alternative routes. PMID:9164848

  15. Mycobacterium abscessus phospholipase C expression is induced during coculture within amoebae and enhances M. abscessus virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Bakala N'Goma, Jean Claude; Le Moigne, Vincent; Soismier, Nathalie; Laencina, Laura; Le Chevalier, Fabien; Roux, Anne-Laure; Poncin, Isabelle; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Etienne, Gilles; Brosch, Roland; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Canaan, Stéphane; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium involved in pulmonary and cutaneo-mucous infections worldwide, to which cystic fibrosis patients are exquisitely susceptible. The analysis of the genome sequence of M. abscessus showed that this bacterium is endowed with the metabolic pathways typically found in environmental microorganisms that come into contact with soil, plants, and aquatic environments, where free-living amoebae are frequently present. M. abscessus also contains several genes that are characteristically found only in pathogenic bacteria. One of them is MAB_0555, encoding a putative phospholipase C (PLC) that is absent from most other rapidly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we report that purified recombinant M. abscessus PLC is highly cytotoxic to mouse macrophages, presumably due to hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. We further showed by constructing and using an M. abscessus PLC knockout mutant that loss of PLC activity is deleterious to M. abscessus intracellular survival in amoebae. The importance of PLC is further supported by the fact that M. abscessus PLC was found to be expressed only in amoebae. Aerosol challenge of mice with M. abscessus strains that were precultured in amoebae enhanced M. abscessus lung infectivity relative to M. abscessus grown in broth culture. Our study underlines the importance of PLC for the virulence of M. abscessus. Despite the difficulties of isolating M. abscessus from environmental sources, our findings suggest that M. abscessus has evolved in close contact with environmental protozoa, which supports the argument that amoebae may contribute to the virulence of opportunistic mycobacteria. PMID:25486995

  16. Mycobacterium abscessus Phospholipase C Expression Is Induced during Coculture within Amoebae and Enhances M. abscessus Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bakala N'Goma, Jean Claude; Le Moigne, Vincent; Soismier, Nathalie; Laencina, Laura; Le Chevalier, Fabien; Roux, Anne-Laure; Poncin, Isabelle; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Etienne, Gilles; Brosch, Roland; Canaan, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium involved in pulmonary and cutaneo-mucous infections worldwide, to which cystic fibrosis patients are exquisitely susceptible. The analysis of the genome sequence of M. abscessus showed that this bacterium is endowed with the metabolic pathways typically found in environmental microorganisms that come into contact with soil, plants, and aquatic environments, where free-living amoebae are frequently present. M. abscessus also contains several genes that are characteristically found only in pathogenic bacteria. One of them is MAB_0555, encoding a putative phospholipase C (PLC) that is absent from most other rapidly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we report that purified recombinant M. abscessus PLC is highly cytotoxic to mouse macrophages, presumably due to hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. We further showed by constructing and using an M. abscessus PLC knockout mutant that loss of PLC activity is deleterious to M. abscessus intracellular survival in amoebae. The importance of PLC is further supported by the fact that M. abscessus PLC was found to be expressed only in amoebae. Aerosol challenge of mice with M. abscessus strains that were precultured in amoebae enhanced M. abscessus lung infectivity relative to M. abscessus grown in broth culture. Our study underlines the importance of PLC for the virulence of M. abscessus. Despite the difficulties of isolating M. abscessus from environmental sources, our findings suggest that M. abscessus has evolved in close contact with environmental protozoa, which supports the argument that amoebae may contribute to the virulence of opportunistic mycobacteria. PMID:25486995

  17. Dephosphorylation of the adaptor LAT and phospholipase C-γ by SHP-1 inhibits natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Omri; Fried, Sophia; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Joseph, Noah; Keizer, Danielle; Piterburg, Marina; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between healthy cells and virally infected or transformed self-cells by tuning activating and inhibitory signals received through cell surface receptors. Inhibitory receptors inhibit NK cell function by recruiting and activating the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to the plasma membrane. However, to date, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor VAV1 is the only direct SHP-1 substrate identified in NK cells. We reveal that the adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) as well as phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) and PLC-γ2 are SHP-1 substrates. Dephosphorylation of Tyr(132) in LAT by SHP-1 in NK cells abrogated the recruitment of PLC-γ1 and PLC-γ2 to the immunological synapse between the NK cell and a cancer cell target, which reduced NK cell degranulation and target cell killing. Furthermore, the ubiquitylation of LAT by the E3 ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b, which was induced by LAT phosphorylation, led to the degradation of LAT in response to the engagement of inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which abrogated NK cell cytotoxicity. Knockdown of the Cbl proteins blocked LAT ubiquitylation, which promoted NK cell function. Expression of a ubiquitylation-resistant mutant LAT blocked inhibitory receptor signaling, enabling cells to become activated. Together, these data identify previously uncharacterized SHP-1 substrates and inhibitory mechanisms that determine the response of NK cells. PMID:27221712

  18. The effect of CD137-CD137 ligand interaction on phospholipase C signaling pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinchuan; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Zhongqun; Yuan, Wei

    2013-11-25

    We previously reported the emerging role of CD137-CD137L interaction in inflammation and atherosclerosis. The mechanism of CD137-CD137L interaction may be related to a variety of signaling pathways. The most important signaling pathway involves the activation of phospholipase C(PLC) which induces the diacylglycerol-protein kinase C(DAG-PKC) and the inositol trisphosphate-intracellular free calcium (IP3-[Ca(2+)]i) pathway. In the current study, we investigated whether CD137-CD137L interaction can stimulate the PLC signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) levels in HUVEC were measured by radioenzymatic assay. The activity of protein kinase (PKC) was detected by its ability to transfer phosphate from [γ-(32)P]ATP to lysine-rich histone. The [Ca(2+)]i concentrations were measured by flow cytometric analysis. The DAG level and PKC activity were increased in a concentration-dependent, biphasic manner in HUVEC induced by anti-CD137. PKC activity was mainly in the cytosol at rest, and then translocated to the membrane when stimulated by anti-CD137. Similarly, rapid IP3 formation induced by anti-CD137 coincided with the peak of the DAG level. Moreover, anti-CD137 induced peak [Ca(2+)]i responses including the rapid transient phase and the sustained phase. However, anti-CD137L suppressed the activation of the DAG-PKC and IP3-[Ca(2+)]i signaling pathway, which was stimulated by anti-CD137 in HUVEC. In conclusion, the data suggested that CD137-CD137L interaction induces robust activation of the PLC signaling pathway in HUVEC. PMID:24070733

  19. Interfacial hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate by turkey erythrocyte phospholipase C.

    PubMed Central

    James, S R; Demel, R A; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    The activity of a beta-isoform of phospholipase C (PLC) partially purified from turkey erythrocyte cytosol was assayed using phospholipid monolayers formed at an air-water interface. PLC was rapidly purified at least 8000-fold by a sequence of ion-exchange, hydrophobic and heparin chromatographies. 33P-labelled substrates were prepared using partially purified PtdIns kinase and PtdIns4P 5-kinases, respectively, and purified by h.p.l.c. using an amino-cyano analytical column. Using such 33P-labelled phosphoinositides of high specific radioactivity, PLC activity was monitored directly by measuring the loss of radioactivity from monolayers as a result of the release of inositol phosphates and their subsequent dissolution and quenching in the subphase. Under these conditions, PtdIns4P hydrolysis obeyed approximately first-order kinetics whereas PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis was zero-order at least until 80% of the substrate had been degraded. PLC activity was markedly affected by the surface pressure of the monolayer, with reduced activity at extremes of initial pressure and with the most permissive pressures in the middle of the range investigated. The optimum surface pressure for hydrolysis of PtdIns4P was approx. 25 mN/m, but for PtdIns(4,5)P2 the maximum activity occurred at the markedly higher surface pressure of 30 mN/m. These data are discussed in terms of the substrate specificity and likely regulation of PLC beta isoforms engaged in degrading their substrate in biological membranes. PMID:8135761

  20. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-delta 1: effect of monolayer surface pressure and electrostatic surface potentials on activity.

    PubMed

    Rebecchi, M; Boguslavsky, V; Boguslavsky, L; McLaughlin, S

    1992-12-29

    We added phospholipase C-delta 1 (PLC-delta) to the aqueous subphase beneath monolayers formed from mixtures of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (2% PIP2), phosphatidylserine (33% PS), and phosphatidylcholine (65% PC) and then measured the initial rate of hydrolysis of PIP2 after addition of 10 microM free calcium. Increasing the surface pressure of the monolayer, pi, from 20 to 40 mN/m decreased the rate of hydrolysis 200-fold. The rate of hydrolysis depends exponentially on the surface pressure: rate alpha exp(-pi Ap/kT) where k is the Boltzmann constant, T is the temperature, and Ap congruent to 1 nm2. Similar results were obtained with different (1 and 100 microM) free [Ca2+] and with different mole fractions of PIP2. The results are consistent with a model in which PLC-delta binds to PIP2 with high affinity (Ka = 10(6) M-1) in the absence of calcium ions [Rebecchi, M.J., Peterson, A., & McLaughlin, S. (1993) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)], and a portion of PLC-delta of area Ap inserts into the monolayer doing work = pi Ap prior to hydrolysis of PIP2. Removing the monovalent acidic lipid PS from the monolayer decreases the activity of PLC-delta 4-fold, this effect of PS on activity is similar to the effect of monovalent acidic lipids on the binding of PLC-delta to PIP2 in bilayer vesicles. PMID:1334430

  1. Intercellular Odontoblast Communication via ATP Mediated by Pannexin-1 Channel and Phospholipase C-coupled Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaki; Furuya, Tadashi; Kimura, Maki; Kojima, Yuki; Tazaki, Masakazu; Sato, Toru; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular ATP released via pannexin-1 channels, in response to the activation of mechanosensitive-TRP channels during odontoblast mechanical stimulation, mediates intercellular communication among odontoblasts in dental pulp slice preparation dissected from rat incisor. Recently, odontoblast cell lines, such as mouse odontoblast lineage cells, have been widely used to investigate physiological/pathological cellular functions. To clarify whether the odontoblast cell lines also communicate with each other by diffusible chemical substance(s), we investigated the chemical intercellular communication among cells from mouse odontoblast cell lines following mechanical stimulation. A single cell was stimulated using a glass pipette filled with standard extracellular solution. We measured intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) by fura-2 in stimulated cells, as well as in cells located nearby. Direct mechanical stimulation to a single odontoblast increased [Ca(2+)]i, which showed sensitivity to capsazepine. In addition, we observed increases in [Ca(2+)]i not only in the mechanically stimulated odontoblast, but also in nearby odontoblasts. We could observe mechanical stimulation-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in a stimulated human embryo kidney (HEK) 293 cell, but not in nearby HEK293 cells. The increase in [Ca(2+)]i in nearby odontoblasts, but not in the stimulated odontoblast, was inhibited by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release channel (pannexin-1) inhibitor in a concentration- and spatial-dependent manner. Moreover, in the presence of phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, the increase in [Ca(2+)]i in nearby odontoblasts, following mechanical stimulation of a single odontoblast, was abolished. We could record some inward currents evoked from odontoblasts near the stimulated odontoblast, but the currents were observed in only 4.8% of the recorded odontoblasts. The results of this study showed that ATP is released via pannexin-1, from a mechanically stimulated

  2. Phospholipase C-η2 interacts with nuclear and cytoplasmic LIMK-1 during retinoic acid-stimulated neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Arastoo, Mohammed; Hacker, Christian; Popovics, Petra; Lucocq, John M; Stewart, Alan J

    2016-02-01

    Neurite growth is central to the formation and differentiation of functional neurons, and recently, an essential role for phospholipase C-η2 (PLCη2) in neuritogenesis was revealed. Here we investigate the function of PLCη2 in neuritogenesis using Neuro2A cells, which upon stimulation with retinoic acid differentiate and form neurites. We first investigated the role of the PLCη2 calcium-binding EF-hand domain, a domain that is known to be required for PLCη2 activation. To do this, we quantified neurite outgrowth in Neuro2A cells, stably overexpressing wild-type PLCη2 and D256A (EF-hand) and H460Q (active site) PLCη2 mutants. Retinoic acid-induced neuritogenesis was highly dependent on PLCη2 activity, with the H460Q mutant exhibiting a strong dominant-negative effect. Expression of the D256A mutant had little effect on neurite growth relative to the control, suggesting that calcium-directed activation of PLCη2 is not essential to this process. We next investigated which cellular compartments contain endogenous PLCη2 by comparing immunoelectron microscopy signals over control and knockdown cell lines. When signals were analyzed to reveal specific labeling for PLCη2, it was found to be localized predominantly over the nucleus and cytosol. Furthermore in these compartments (and also in growing neurites), a proximity ligand assay revealed that PLCη2 specifically interacts with LIMK-1 in Neuro2A cells. Taken together, these data emphasize the importance of the PLCη2 EF-hand domain and articulation of PLCη2 with LIMK-1 in regulating neuritogenesis. PMID:26671787

  3. Positive association of genetic variations in the phospholipase C-like 1 gene with dermatomyositis in Chinese Han.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Chen, Si; Li, Yuan; Li, Ping; Wu, Chanyuan; Wu, Ziyan; Wu, Qingjun; Sun, Fei; Li, Jing; Zheng, Wenjie; Deng, Chuiwen; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are autoimmune diseases with an underlying yet undefined genetic component. Recently, phospholipase C-like 1 (PLCL1) has been identified as a potential genetic susceptibility locus for dermatomyositis (DM) in patients of European ancestry. Here, association between PLCL1 polymorphisms and IIMs was investigated in Chinese Han. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples (2 mL) collected from Chinese Han (≥18 years) with polymyositis (PM, n = 286) or dermatomyositis (DM, n = 535) and ethnically matched controls (n = 968). Patients and controls were genotyped for five SNPs (rs938929, rs1518364, rs6738825, rs2117339, and rs7572733) previously associated with DM, with the Sequenom MassARRAY system. SNPs rs6738825 and rs7572733 were found to be associated with the development of DM in Chinese Han (P c = 0.015; P c = 0.025, respectively) as well as the risk A allele of rs938929 and T allele of rs1518364 (P c = 0.030; P c = 0.029). None of the five SNPs were associated with PM (all P c > 0.05). The frequency of the two haplotypes of these five SNPs was also significantly different between DM patients and healthy controls. In addition, conditional analysis with rs6738825 revealed that these SNPs were not independent factors contributing to DM. Finally, a novel association between rs6738825 and rs7572733 and DM with complicating interstitial lung disease was observed (ILD; P c = 0.040; P c = 0.030, respectively). A positive association between PLCL1 polymorphisms and DM patients and DM patients with ILD was observed, indicating that PLCL1 might be the susceptibility gene for DM patients in Chinese Han. PMID:26603167

  4. The role of CCl4 biotransformation in the activation of hepatocyte phospholipase C in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coleman, J B; Condie, L W; Lamb, R G

    1988-09-15

    Rats treated with a single 0.5 ml/kg dose (ip) of CCl4 exhibited a threefold increase in liver microsomal phospholipase C (PLC) activity that was enhanced by phenobarbital and diminished by metyrapone pretreatment, respectively. Hepatocytes and hepatocellular fractions exposed to 0.5 mM CCl4 in vitro also exhibited a rapid rise in PLC activity that was reduced by metyrapone. Metyrapone also reduced the CCl4-related increase in the PLC-mediated reductions in cellular phosphatidylcholine content. The influence of CCl4 biotransformation on the activation of liver cell PLC was assessed in vitro. Covalent binding of 14CCl4 metabolites to isolated hepatocyte proteins and lipids was linear through 20 min of incubation and then quickly plateaued. The association of CCl4 metabolites with cellular phospholipids was inhibited by metyrapone and preceded the CCl4-dependent rise in PLC activity. CCl4-mediated increases in PLC activity were rapid and preceded reductions in cell viability. The translocation of cytosolic PLC to membranes such as the endoplasmic reticulum may explain the rapid, metabolite-dependent activation of PLC.PLC activation by haloalkanes was proportional to dose and incubation time in the order of CBrCl3 greater than CCl4 greater than CHCl3 greater than CFCl3 which corresponds to the observed hepatotoxic potential of these agents in vivo and in vitro. Haloalkane-dependent increases in PLC activity were inhibited by metyrapone. These results suggest that chemical metabolites activate PLC in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, the activation of a PLC that degrades membrane phospholipids may represent an important step in the pathogenic scheme of chemical-mediated liver cell necrosis. PMID:3420613

  5. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) Haplotypes are Associated with Increased Risk of Gastric Cancer in Kashmir Valley

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Manzoor A.; Srivastava, Priya; Zargar, Showkat A.; Mittal, Balraj

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) plays a crucial role in carcinogenesis and progression of several types of cancers. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs2274223) in PLCE1 has been identified as a novel susceptibility locus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of three potentially functional SNPs (rs2274223A > G, rs3765524C > T, and rs7922612C > T) of PLCE1 in gastric cancer patients from Kashmir Valley. Patients and Methods: The study was conducted in 108 GC cases and 195 healthy controls from Kashmir Valley. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Data were statistically analyzed using χ2 test and logistic regression models. A P value of less than 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. Results: The frequency of PLCE1 A2274223C3765524T7922612, G2274223C3765524T7922612, and G2274223T3765524C7922612 haplotypes were higher in patients compared with controls, conferred high risk for GC [odds ratio (OR) =6.29; P = 0.001; Pcorr = 0.003], (OR = 3.23; P = 0.011; Pcorr = 0.033), and (OR = 5.14; P = 0.011; Pcorr = 0.033), respectively. Smoking and salted tea are independent risk factors for GC, but we did not find any significant modulation of cancer risk by PLCE1 variants with smoking or excessive consumption of salted tea. Conclusion: These results suggest that variation in PLCE1 may be associated with GC risk in Kashmir Valley. PMID:25434319

  6. pH-regulated activation and release of a bacteria-associated phospholipase C during intracellular infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Marquis, H; Hager, E J

    2000-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes grows in the cytosol of mammalian cells and spreads from cell to cell without exiting the intracellular milieu. During cell-cell spread, bacteria become transiently entrapped in double-membrane vacuoles. Escape from these vacuoles is mediated in part by a bacterial phospholipase C (PC-PLC), whose activation requires cleavage of an N-terminal peptide. PC-PLC activation occurs in the acidified vacuolar environment. In this study, the pH-dependent mechanism of PC-PLC activation was investigated by manipulating the intracellular pH of the host. PC-PLC secreted into infected cells was immunoprecipitated, and both forms of the protein were identified by SDS-PAGE fluorography. PC-PLC activation occurred at pH 7.0 and lower, but not at pH 7.3. Total amounts of PC-PLC secreted into infected cells increased several-fold over controls within 5 min of a decrease in intracellular pH, and the active form of PC-PLC was the most abundant species detected. Bacterial release of active PC-PLC was dependent on Mpl, a bacterial metalloprotease that processes the proform (proPC-PLC), and did not require de novo protein synthesis. The amount of proPC-PLC released in response to a decrease in pH was the same in wild-type and Mpl-minus-infected cells. Immunofluorescence detection of PC-PLC in infected cells was performed. When fixed and permeabilized infected cells were treated with a bacterial cell wall hydrolase, over 97% of wild-type and Mpl-minus bacteria stained positively for PC-PLC, in contrast to less than 5% in untreated cells. These results indicate that intracellular bacteria carry pools of proPC-PLC. Upon cell-cell spread, a decrease in vacuolar pH triggers Mpl activation of proPC-PLC, resulting in bacterial release of active PC-PLC. PMID:10652090

  7. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  8. Pyrimidinoceptor-mediated activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, W. W.; Lee, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    1. As well as the presence of P2Z purinoceptors previously found in macrophages, we identified pyrimidinoceptors in RAW 264.7 cells, which activate phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2). 2. The relative potency of agonists to stimulate inositol phosphate (IP) formation and arachidonic acid (AA) release was UTP = UDP > > ATP, ATP gamma S, 2MeSATP. For both signalling pathways, the EC50 values for UTP and UDP (3 microM) were significantly lower than that for ATP and all other analogues tested (> 100 microM). 3. UTP and UDP displayed no additivity in terms of IP formation and AA release at maximally effective concentrations. 4. UTP-, but not ATP-, evoked AA release was 60% inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), while stimulation of IP formation by both agonists was unaffected. Short-term treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) led to a dose-dependent inhibition of IP responses to UTP and UDP, but failed to affect the AA responses. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ inhibited the PI response to UTP, but abolished its AA response. 5. ATP-induction of these two transmembrane signal pathways was decreased in high Mg(2+)-containing medium but potentiated by the removal of extracellular Mg2+. 6. Suramin and reactive blue displayed equal potency to inhibit the IP responses of UTP and ATP. 7. Both UTP and UDP (0.1-100 microM) induced a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i which lasted for more than 10 min. 8. Taken together, these results indicate that in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, pyrimidinoceptors with specificity for UTP and UDP mediate the activation of PLC and cytosolic (c) PLA2. The activation of PLC is via a PTX-insensitive G protein, whereas that of cPLA2 is via a PTX-sensitive G protein-dependent pathway. The sustained Ca2+ influx caused by UTP contributes to the activation of cPLA2. RAW 264.7 cells also possess P2z purinoceptors which mediate ATP(4-)-induced PLC and PLA2 activation. Images Figure 3 PMID:8886407

  9. Association of solubilized angiotensin II receptors with phospholipase C-alpha in murine neuroblastoma NIE-115 cells.

    PubMed

    Mah, S J; Ades, A M; Mir, R; Siemens, I R; Williamson, J R; Fluharty, S J

    1992-08-01

    The peptide angiotensin II (AngII) has been reported to stimulate phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity in the murine neuroblastoma cell line N1E-115. In the present study, polyclonal antibodies raised against a PLC isoenzyme, PLC-alpha, reacted with a 60-kDa protein present in both membrane and cytosolic fractions of differentiated N1E-115 cells. In order to examine the possible association of PLC-alpha with cell surface AngII receptors (AngII-Rs), membranes from differentiated N1E-115 cells were solubilized, using the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). CHAPS (1%) solubilized AngII-Rs, from N1E-115 cells, that maintained their high affinity for agonists. Gel filtration analysis of the solubilized membranes revealed that the majority of the specific binding of 125I-AngII eluted as a large protein complex with a molecular mass of 380 kDa and that agonist binding was partially reduced by guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S), within this complex. CHAPS also effectively solubilized immunoreactive PLC-alpha, from N1E-115 cell membranes, that was similarly present within the 380-kDa AngII-binding complex. Anti-PLC-alpha antisera immunoprecipitated approximately 16% of the total phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate-specific PLC activity in the 1% CHAPS extract and 40% of cytosolic PLC activity. Moreover, a 60-kDa 35S-Trans S-labeled protein, comigrating with immunoreactive PLC-alpha, was immunoprecipitated from the 1% CHAPS extract by the antisera. In addition, anti-PLC-alpha antisera immunoprecipitated approximately 20% of solubilized AngII-Rs prebound with 125I-AngII but failed to precipitate receptors prebound with the antagonist 125I-Sarc1,Ile8-AngII. The anti-PLC-alpha antisera also immunoprecipitated AngII-Rs when intact membranes were labeled with 125I-AngII before solubilization in 1% CHAPS, suggesting that the AngII-R interaction with PLC-alpha was not the result of detergent

  10. Inhibition of Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C Interferes with Proliferation and Survival of Tumor Initiating Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Renata; Mercurio, Laura; Canevari, Silvana; Podo, Franca; Miotti, Silvia; Iorio, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), the enzyme involved in cell differentiation and proliferation, has not yet been explored in tumor initiating cells (TICs). We investigated PC-PLC expression and effects of PC-PLC inhibition in two adherent (AD) squamous carcinoma cell lines (A431 and CaSki), with different proliferative and stemness potential, and in TIC-enriched floating spheres (SPH) originated from them. Results Compared with immortalized non-tumoral keratinocytes (HaCaT) A431-AD cells showed 2.5-fold higher PC-PLC activity, nuclear localization of a 66-kDa PC-PLC isoform, but a similar distribution of the enzyme on plasma membrane and in cytoplasmic compartments. Compared with A431-AD, A431-SPH cells showed about 2.8-fold lower PC-PLC protein and activity levels, but similar nuclear content. Exposure of adherent cells to the PC-PLC inhibitor D609 (48h) induced a 50% reduction of cell proliferation at doses comprised between 33 and 50 μg/ml, without inducing any relevant cytotoxic effect (cell viability 95±5%). In A431-SPH and CaSki-SPH D609 induced both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at about 20 to 30-fold lower doses (IC50 ranging between 1.2 and 1.6 μg/ml). Furthermore, D609 treatment of A431-AD and CaSki-AD cells affected the sphere-forming efficiency, which dropped in both cells, and induced down-modulation of stem-related markers mRNA levels (Oct4, Nestin, Nanog and ALDH1 in A431; Nestin and ALDH1 in CaSki cells). Conclusions These data suggest that the inhibition of PC-PLC activity may represent a new therapeutic approach to selectively target the most aggressive and tumor promoting sub-population of floating spheres originated from squamous cancer cells possessing different proliferative and stemness potential. PMID:26402860

  11. Phospholipase C gamma mediates endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor-regulated calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in colitis-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Fiza; Liu, Miao; Shen, Shanwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a complex pathophysiological paradigm with unclear mechanisms. Primary afferent neuronal plasticity marked by alterations in neuroactive compounds such as calcitonin gene-related peptide is suggested to underlie the heightened sensory responses. Signal transduction that leads to calcitonin gene-related peptide expression thereby sensory neuroplasticity during colitis remains to be elucidated. Results In a rat model with colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, we found that endogenously elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor elicited an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the lumbar L1 dorsal root ganglia. At seven days of colitis, neutralization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor with a specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody reversed calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia. Colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide transcription was also inhibited by brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody treatment. Signal transduction studies with dorsal root ganglia explants showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression was mediated by the phospholipase C gamma, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt or the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway. Application of PLC inhibitor U73122 in vivo confirmed that colitis-induced and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia was regulated by the phospholipase C gamma pathway. In contrast, suppression of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in vivo had no effect on colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression. During colitis, calcitonin gene-related peptide also co-expressed with phospholipase C gamma but not with p-Akt. Calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation during colitis correlated to the activation

  12. Arabidopsis AtPLC2 Is a Primary Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C in Phosphoinositide Metabolism and the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Kanehara, Kazue; Yu, Chao-Yuan; Cho, Yueh; Cheong, Wei-Fun; Torta, Federico; Shui, Guanghou; Wenk, Markus R; Nakamura, Yuki

    2015-09-01

    Phosphoinositides represent important lipid signals in the plant development and stress response. However, multiple isoforms of the phosphoinositide biosynthetic genes hamper our understanding of the pivotal enzymes in each step of the pathway as well as their roles in plant growth and development. Here, we report that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C2 (AtPLC2) is the primary phospholipase in phosphoinositide metabolism and is involved in seedling growth and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lipidomic profiling of multiple plc mutants showed that the plc2-1 mutant increased levels of its substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, suggesting that the major phosphoinositide metabolic pathway is impaired. AtPLC2 displayed a distinct tissue expression pattern and localized at the plasma membrane in different cell types, where phosphoinositide signaling occurs. The seedlings of plc2-1 mutant showed growth defect that was complemented by heterologous expression of AtPLC2, suggesting that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity borne by AtPLC2 is required for seedling growth. Moreover, the plc2-1 mutant showed hypersensitive response to ER stress as evidenced by changes in relevant phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Our results revealed the primary enzyme in phosphoinositide metabolism, its involvement in seedling growth and an emerging link between phosphoinositide and the ER stress response. PMID:26401841

  13. Arabidopsis AtPLC2 Is a Primary Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C in Phosphoinositide Metabolism and the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Kanehara, Kazue; Yu, Chao-Yuan; Cho, Yueh; Cheong, Wei-Fun; Torta, Federico; Shui, Guanghou; Wenk, Markus R; Nakamura, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phosphoinositides represent important lipid signals in the plant development and stress response. However, multiple isoforms of the phosphoinositide biosynthetic genes hamper our understanding of the pivotal enzymes in each step of the pathway as well as their roles in plant growth and development. Here, we report that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C2 (AtPLC2) is the primary phospholipase in phosphoinositide metabolism and is involved in seedling growth and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lipidomic profiling of multiple plc mutants showed that the plc2-1 mutant increased levels of its substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, suggesting that the major phosphoinositide metabolic pathway is impaired. AtPLC2 displayed a distinct tissue expression pattern and localized at the plasma membrane in different cell types, where phosphoinositide signaling occurs. The seedlings of plc2-1 mutant showed growth defect that was complemented by heterologous expression of AtPLC2, suggesting that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity borne by AtPLC2 is required for seedling growth. Moreover, the plc2-1 mutant showed hypersensitive response to ER stress as evidenced by changes in relevant phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Our results revealed the primary enzyme in phosphoinositide metabolism, its involvement in seedling growth and an emerging link between phosphoinositide and the ER stress response. PMID:26401841

  14. A phospholipase C from the Dallas 1E strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 5: purification and characterization of conditions for optimal activity with an artificial substrate.

    PubMed

    Baine, W B

    1988-02-01

    Phospholipase C from the Dallas 1E strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 5 was purified from buffered yeast extract culture supernate by ion-exchange chromatography followed by fractionation by manganous chloride and ammonium sulphate precipitation steps. Enzyme activity was assayed by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine and confirmed by release of radioactivity from tritiated L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine labelled in the methyl groups of choline. After SDS-PAGE, the purified preparation yielded a single band upon Coomassie-blue staining. This protein migrated with an apparent Mr of 50,000-54,000. Phospholipase C activity was maximal at pH greater than or equal to 8.4 and was enhanced in the presence of sorbitol and of several nonionic detergents but was eliminated by SDS. EDTA, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Zn2+ inhibited enzyme activity, whereas Ba2+, Ca2+, Co2+, Mg2+ and Mn2+ restored activity to EDTA-treated material. No haemolytic activity was demonstrated with the purified enzyme. PMID:3171547

  15. Cerebral visual impairment and intellectual disability caused by PGAP1 variants.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Daniëlle G M; Boonstra, F Nienke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Jhangiani, Shalini; de Ligt, Joep; Cremers, Frans P M; Lupski, James R; Murakami, Yoshiko; de Vries, Bert B A

    2015-12-01

    Homozygous variants in PGAP1 (post-GPI attachment to proteins 1) have recently been identified in two families with developmental delay, seizures and/or spasticity. PGAP1 is a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and remodeling pathway and defects in this pathway are a subclass of congenital disorders of glycosylation. Here we performed whole-exome sequencing in an individual with cerebral visual impairment (CVI), intellectual disability (ID), and factor XII deficiency and revealed compound heterozygous variants in PGAP1, c.274_276del (p.(Pro92del)) and c.921_925del (p.(Lys308Asnfs*25)). Subsequently, PGAP1-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-cell lines were transfected with either mutant or wild-type constructs and their sensitivity to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) treatment was measured. The mutant constructs could not rescue the PGAP1-deficient CHO cell lines resistance to PI-PLC treatment. In addition, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) of the affected individual showed no sensitivity to PI-PLC treatment, whereas the LCLs of the heterozygous carrier parents were partially resistant. In conclusion, we report novel PGAP1 variants in a boy with CVI and ID and a proven functional loss of PGAP1 and show, to our knowledge, for the first time this genetic association with CVI. PMID:25804403

  16. Phospholipase C{gamma}1 stimulates transcriptional activation of the matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene via the protein kinase C/Raf/ERK cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soon Young; Choi, Ha Young; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Son, Sang Wook; Lee, Young Han . E-mail: younghan@hanyang.ac.kr

    2007-02-16

    The phospholipid hydrolase phospholipase C{gamma}1 (PLC{gamma}1) plays a major role in regulation of cell proliferation, development, and cell motility. Overexpression of PLC{gamma}1 is associated with tumor development, and it is overexpressed in some tumors. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is a protein involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of PLC{gamma}1 stimulates MMP-3 expression at the transcriptional level via the PKC-mediated Raf/MEK1/ERK signaling cascade. We propose that modulation of PLC{gamma}1 activity might be of value in controlling the activity of MMPs, which are important regulators of invasion and metastasis in malignant tumors.

  17. The effects of acute exposure to ethanol on neurotensin and guanine nucleotide-stimulation of phospholipase C activity in intact NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Both ethanol and neurotensin produce sedation and hypothermia. When administered in combination the behavioral effects of these two substances are potentiated. In order to better understand the biochemical nature of this interaction, the direct effects of ethanol on neurotensin receptors and an associated signal transduction process were determined in NIE-115 neuroblastoma cells. Ethanol in physiologically relevant concentrations significantly reduced neurotensin stimulated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production while having no effect on the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)neurotensin. In addition, ethanol up to 200 mM had no effect on GTPYS mediated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production. The results indicate that acute exposure ethanol partially disrupts the normal coupling of activated neurotensin receptors to the guanine nucleotide binding protein associated with phospholipase C.

  18. β-Catenin Inhibits T Cell Activation by Selective Interference with Linker for Activation of T Cells–Phospholipase C-γ1 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Driessens, Gregory; Zheng, Yan; Locke, Frederick; Cannon, Judy L.; Gounari, Fotini; Gajewski, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the defined function of the β-catenin pathway in thymocytes, its functional role in peripheral T cells is poorly understood. We report that in a mouse model, β-catenin protein is constitutively degraded in peripheral T cells. Introduction of stabilized β-catenin into primary T cells inhibited proliferation and cytokine secretion after TCR stimulation and blunted effector cell differentiation. Functional and biochemical studies revealed that β-catenin selectively inhibited linker for activation of T cells phosphorylation on tyrosine 136, which was associated with defective phospholipase C-γ1 phosphorylation and calcium signaling but normal ERK activation. Our findings indicate that β-catenin negatively regulates T cell activation by a previously undescribed mechanism and suggest that conditions under which β-catenin might be inducibly stabilized in vivo would be inhibitory for T cell-based immunity. PMID:21149602

  19. Full-length Gαq-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2014-08-21

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis.

  20. Full-length Gα(q)-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Angeline M; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J G

    2013-03-01

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis. PMID:23377541

  1. Differential effects of aluminum on in vitro primary root growth, nutrient content and phospholipase C activity in coffee seedlings (Coffea arabica).

    PubMed

    de A Bojórquez-Quintal, Jesús E; Sánchez-Cach, Lucila A; Ku-González, Ángela; de los Santos-Briones, Cesar; de Fátima Medina-Lara, María; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana; Muñoz-Sánchez, José A; Teresa Hernández Sotomayor, S M; Estévez, Manuel Martínez

    2014-05-01

    Coffea arabica is a woody species that grows in acid soils, where aluminum is available and may affect growth and productivity. To determine the effect of aluminum on primary root growth of C. arabica cv. Typica, seedlings were exposed over 30 days to different concentrations of AlCl3 (0, 100, 300 and 500 μM) in vitro. The aluminum effect on primary root growth was dose-dependent: low aluminum concentrations (100 and 300 μM) stimulated primary root growth (6.98 ± 0.15 and 6.45 ± 0.17 cm, respectively) compared to the control (0 μM; 5.24 ± 0.17 cm), while high concentrations (500 μM) induced damage to the root tips and inhibition of primary root growth (2.96 ± 0.28 cm). Aluminum (100 μM) also increased the K and Ca contents around 33% and 35% in the coffee roots. It is possible that aluminum toxicity resides in its association with cell nuclei in the meristematic region of the root. Additionally, after 30 days of treatment with aluminum, two different effects could be observed on phospholipase C (PLC) activity. In shoots, aluminum concentrations ≥ 300 μM inhibited more than 50% of PLC activity. In contrast, in roots a contrasting behavior was determined: low (100 μM) and toxic concentrations (500 μM) increased the activity of PLC (100%). These results suggest the possible involvement of the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway, with the phospholipase C enzyme participating in the beneficial and toxic effects of aluminum in plants. PMID:24531533

  2. A tyrosine-phosphorylated carboxy-terminal peptide of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (Flg) is a binding site for the SH2 domain of phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, M; Honegger, A M; Rotin, D; Fischer, R; Bellot, F; Li, W; Dionne, C A; Jaye, M; Rubinstein, M; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) is a substrate of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR; encoded by the flg gene) and other receptors with tyrosine kinase activity. It has been demonstrated that the src homology region 2 (SH2 domain) of PLC-gamma and of other signalling molecules such as GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated p85 direct their binding toward tyrosine-autophosphorylated regions of the epidermal growth factor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. In this report, we describe the identification of Tyr-766 as an autophosphorylation site of flg-encoded FGFR by direct sequencing of a tyrosine-phosphorylated tryptic peptide isolated from the cytoplasmic domain of FGFR expressed in Escherichia coli. The same phosphopeptide was found in wild-type FGFR phosphorylated either in vitro or in living cells. Like other growth factor receptors, tyrosine-phosphorylated wild-type FGFR or its cytoplasmic domain becomes associated with intact PLC-gamma or with a fusion protein containing the SH2 domain of PLC-gamma. To delineate the site of association, we have examined the capacity of a 28-amino-acid tryptic peptide containing phosphorylated Tyr-766 to bind to various constructs containing SH2 and other domains of PLC-gamma. It is demonstrated that the tyrosine-phosphorylated peptide binds specifically to the SH2 domain but not to the SH3 domain or other regions of PLC-gamma. Hence, Tyr-766 and its flanking sequences represent a major binding site in FGFR for PLC-gamma. Alignment of the amino acid sequences surrounding Tyr-766 with corresponding regions of other FGFRs revealed conserved tyrosine residues in all known members of the FGFR family. We propose that homologous tyrosine-phosphorylated regions in other FGFRs also function as binding sites for PLC-gamma and therefore are involved in coupling to phosphatidylinositol breakdown. Images PMID:1656221

  3. A catalytic diad involved in substrate-assisted catalysis: NMR study of hydrogen bonding and dynamics at the active site of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M; Liu, T; Dahlquist, F W; Griffith, O H

    2001-08-14

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cs (PI-PLCs, EC 3.1.4.10) are ubiquitous enzymes that cleave phosphatidylinositol or phosphorylated derivatives, generating second messengers in eukaryotic cells. A catalytic diad at the active site of Bacillus cereus PI-PLC composed of aspartate-274 and histidine-32 was postulated from the crystal structure to form a catalytic triad with the 2-OH group of the substrate [Heinz, D. W., et al. (1995) EMBO J. 14, 3855-3863]. This catalytic diad has been observed directly by proton NMR. The single low-field line in the 1H NMR spectrum is assigned by site-directed mutagenesis: The peak is present in the wild type but absent in the mutants H32A and D274A, and arises from the histidine Hdelta1 forming the Asp274-His32 hydrogen bond. This hydrogen is solvent-accessible, and exchanges slowly with H2O on the NMR time scale. The position of the low-field peak shifts from 16.3 to 13.8 ppm as the pH is varied from 4 to 9, reflecting a pKa of 8.0 at 6 degrees C, which is identified with the pKa of His32. The Hdelta1 signal is modulated by rapid exchange of the Hepsilon2 with the solvent. Estimates of the exchange rate as a function of pH and protection factors are derived from a line shape analysis. The NMR behavior is remarkably similar to that of the serine proteases. The postulated function of the Asp274-His32 diad is to hydrogen-bond with the 2-OH of phosphatidylinositol (PI) substrate to form a catalytic triad analogous to Asp-His-Ser of serine proteases. This is an example of substrate-assisted catalysis where the substrate provides the catalytic nucleophile of the triad. This hydrogen bond becomes shorter as the imidazole is protonated, suggesting it is stronger in the transition state, contributing further to the catalytic efficiency. The hydrogen bond fits the NMR criteria for a short, strong hydrogen bond, i.e., a highly deshielded proton resonance, bond length of 2.64 +/- 0.04 A at pH 6 measured by NMR, a D/H fractionation

  4. Plasma membrane associated phospholipase C from human platelets: Synergistic stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis by thrombin and guanosine 5 prime -O-(3-thiotriphosphate)

    SciTech Connect

    Baldassare, J.J.; Henderson, P.A.; Fisher, G.J. )

    1989-01-10

    The effects of thrombin and GTP{gamma}S on the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides by membrane-associated phospholipase C (PLC) from human platelets were examined with endogenous ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes or with lipid vesicles containing either ({sup 3}H)phosphatidylinositol or ({sup 3}H)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) or thrombin (1 unit/mL) did not stimulate release of inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), inositol bisphosphate (IP{sub 2}), or inositol phosphate (IP) from ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes. IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3}, but not IP, from ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes were, however, stimulated 3-fold by GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). A higher concentration of GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) alone also stimulated IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3}, but not IP, release. In the presence of 1 mM calcium, release of IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3} was increased 6-fold over basal levels; however, formation of IP was not observed. At submicromolar calcium concentration, hydrolysis of exogenous phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) by platelet membrane associated PLC was also markedly enhanced by GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) or GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). Under identical conditions, exogenous phosphatidylinositol (PI) was not hydrolyzed. The same substrate specificity was observed when the membrane-associated PLC was activated with 1 mM calcium. Thrombin-induced hydrolysis of PIP{sub 2} was inhibited by treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin or pretreatment of intact platelets with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA) prior to preparation of membranes. Pertussis toxin did not inhibit GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) or calcium (1 mM) dependent PIP{sub 2} breakdown, while TPA inhibited GTP{gamma}S-dependent but not calcium-dependent phospholipase C activity.

  5. GH inhibition of lipogenesis and stimulation of lipolysis in sheep adipose tissue: involvement of protein serine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation and phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Vernon, R G

    1996-07-01

    The intracellular signalling systems involved in the chronic insulin-antagonistic, anti-lipogenic effects and also the lipolytic effect of GH have been investigated in sheep adipose tissue in an in vitro tissue culture system. During culture, chronic exposure to GH decreased the rate of lipogenesis and prevented the increase in lipogenesis induced by insulin. GH also increased glycerol release into the culture medium. GH had no acute, insulin-like effect on lipogenesis in sheep adipose tissue. Pretreatment with phorbol ester to down-regulate isoforms of protein kinase C or addition of the protein serine kinase inhibitor staurosporine decreased the anti-lipogenic effect of GH while the protein serine kinase inhibitor H7 eliminated it completely. Pretreatment with phorbol ester or addition of H7 also decreased the insulin-antagonistic effect of GH on lipogenesis. Addition of the protein serine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid or the phosphatidyl choline phospholipase C inhibitor D609 both diminished the anti-lipogenic and insulin-antagonistic effects of GH. Chronic exposure of adipose tissue to GH had no effect on the total activity of acetyl CoA carboxylase or its activation status but it did diminish the increase in activation status induced by insulin. H7 and okadaic acid also diminished the increase in activation status of acetyl CoA carboxylase induced by insulin but did not alter the effect of GH on this variable. Okadaic acid decreased total acetyl CoA carboxylase activity. Pretreatment with phorbol ester or the addition of H7, staurosporine or okadaic acid increased glycerol release into the culture medium to the same extent as GH itself; the effects of GH and these various agents were not additive. These studies suggest that the anti-lipogenic, insulin-antagonistic effects of GH involve both protein serine kinases and phosphatases, possibly including one or more isoforms of protein kinase C, and a phosphatidyl choline-specific phospholipase C. Comparison

  6. Hypermorphic mutation of phospholipase C, γ2 acquired in ibrutinib-resistant CLL confers BTK independency upon B-cell receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Ming; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Zhong, Yiming; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Dong, Shuai; Strattan, Ethan; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Flynn, Joseph; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Maddocks, Kami; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Byrd, John C.; Dubovsky, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib has significantly improved the outcome of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Recent reports attribute ibrutinib resistance to acquired mutations in Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK), the target of ibrutinib, as well as the immediate downstream effector phospholipase C, γ2 (PLCG2). Although the C481S mutation found in BTK has been shown to disable ibrutinib’s capacity to irreversibly bind this primary target, the detailed mechanisms of mutations in PLCG2 have yet to be established. Herein, we characterize the enhanced signaling competence, BTK independence, and surface immunoglobulin dependence of the PLCG2 mutation at R665W, which has been documented in ibrutinib-resistant CLL. Our data demonstrate that this missense alteration elicits BTK-independent activation after B-cell receptor engagement, implying the formation of a novel BTK-bypass pathway. Consistent with previous results, PLCG2R665W confers hypermorphic induction of downstream signaling events. Our studies reveal that proximal kinases SYK and LYN are critical for the activation of mutant PLCG2 and that therapeutics targeting SYK and LYN can combat molecular resistance in cell line models and primary CLL cells from ibrutinib-resistant patients. Altogether, our results engender a molecular understanding of the identified aberration at PLCG2 and explore its functional dependency on BTK, SYK, and LYN, suggesting alternative strategies to combat acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25972157

  7. The turkey erythrocyte beta-adrenergic receptor couples to both adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C via distinct G-protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    James, S R; Vaziri, C; Walker, T R; Milligan, G; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    By contrast with mammalian beta-adrenergic receptors, the avian isoform elicits two distinct effector responses, activation of adenylate cyclase and polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) leading to the accumulation of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol phosphates. We have investigated the mechanisms of beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in turkey erythrocytes. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase by the beta-adrenergic-receptor agonist isoprenaline exhibits a 30-fold lower EC50 than that for PLC activation, which may indicate a marked receptor reserve for the former effector. Similar Ki values were obtained for the inhibition of both responses by four beta-adrenergic antagonists, arguing that a single receptor population is responsible for both effects. Antibodies raised against G-protein peptide sequences were used to show that the identity of the G-protein mediating the PLC response was an avian homologue of G11, the level of expression of which was very similar to that of the stimulatory G-protein of adenylate cyclase, Gs. Thus a single population of beta-adrenergic receptors apparently interacts with distinct G-proteins to activate different effectors. The stoichiometries of the receptor-G-protein-effector interactions are therefore similar for both second-messenger responses and the data are discussed in terms of the different efficacies observed for each response. Images Figure 4 PMID:7998968

  8. Distinct phospholipase C-gamma-dependent signaling pathways in the Drosophila eye and wing are revealed by a new small wing allele.

    PubMed Central

    Mankidy, Rishikesh; Hastings, Jeremy; Thackeray, Justin R

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila genome contains a single phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) homolog, encoded by small wing (sl), that acts as an inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling during photoreceptor R7 development. Although the existing sl alleles behave genetically as nulls, they may still produce truncated Sl products that could in theory still provide limited PLC-gamma function. Both to identify a true null allele and to probe structure-function relationships in Sl, we carried out an F(1) screen for new sl mutations and identified seven new alleles. Flies homozygous for any of these alleles are viable, with the same short-wing phenotype described previously; however, two of the alleles differ from any of those previously isolated in the severity of the eye phenotype: sl(9) homozygotes have a slightly more extreme extra-R7 phenotype, whereas sl(7) homozygotes have an almost wild-type eye. We determined the mutant defect in all seven alleles, revealing that sl(9) is a molecular null due to a very early stop codon, while sl(7) has a missense mutation in the highly conserved Y catalytic domain. Together with in vitro mutagenesis of the residue affected by the sl(7) mutation, these results confirm the role of Sl in RTK signaling and provide evidence for two genetically separable PLC-gamma-dependent pathways affecting the development of the eye and the wing. PMID:12807776

  9. Imaging the early stages of phospholipase C/sphingomyelinase activity on vesicles containing coexisting ordered-disordered and gel-fluid domains[S

    PubMed Central

    Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J.; Montes, L.-Ruth; Sot, Jesús; Vasil, Adriana I.; Vasil, Michael L.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    The binding and early stages of activity of a phospholipase C/sphingomyelinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) have been monitored using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Both the lipids and the enzyme were labeled with specific fluorescent markers. GUV consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol in equimolar ratios, to which 5–10 mol% of the enzyme end-product ceramide and/or diacylglycerol were occasionally added. Morphological examination of the GUV in the presence of enzyme reveals that, although the enzyme diffuses rapidly throughout the observation chamber, detectable enzyme binding appears to be a slow, random process, with new bound-enzyme-containing vesicles appearing for several minutes. Enzyme binding to the vesicles appears to be a cooperative process. After the initial cluster of bound enzyme is detected, further binding and catalytic activity follow rapidly. After the activity has started, the enzyme is not released by repeated washing, suggesting a “scooting” mechanism for the hydrolytic activity. The enzyme preferentially binds the more disordered domains, and, in most cases, the catalytic activity causes the disordering of the other domains. Simultaneously, peanut- or figure-eight-shaped vesicles containing two separate lipid domains become spherical. At a further stage of lipid hydrolysis, lipid aggregates are formed and vesicles disintegrate. PMID:21252263

  10. A chimeric protein composed of the binding domains of Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C and Trueperella pyogenes pyolysin induces partial immunoprotection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunhao; Zhang, Wenlong; Bao, Jun; Wu, Yuhong; Yan, Minghui; Xiao, Ya; Yang, Lingxiao; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Junwei

    2016-08-01

    Trueperella pyogenes and Clostridium perfringens are two kinds of conditional pathogens frequently associated with wound infections and succeeding lethal complications in various economic livestock. Pyolysin (PLO) and phospholipase C (PLC) are the key virulence factors of these two pathogens, respectively. In our study, a chimeric protein called rPC-PD4, which is composed of the binding regions of PLO and PLC, was synthesized. The toxicity of rPC-PD4 was evaluated. Results revealed that rPC-PD4 is a safe chimeric molecule that can be used to develop vaccines. Immunizing BALB/c mice with rPC-PD4 induced high titers of serum antibodies that could efficiently neutralize the hemolytic activity of recombinant PLO and PLC. After the challenge with T. pyogenes or C. perfringens was performed through the intraperitoneal route, we observed that rPC-PD4 immunization could provide partial immunoprotection and reduce lung, intestine, and liver tissue damage to mice. This work demonstrated the efficacy of the rationally designed rPC-PD4 chimeric protein as a potential vaccine candidate against C. perfringens and T. pyogenes. PMID:27473983

  11. Phospholipase C-related Catalytically Inactive Protein Is a New Modulator of Thermogenesis Promoted by β-Adrenergic Receptors in Brown Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Oue, Kana; Zhang, Jun; Harada-Hada, Kae; Asano, Satoshi; Yamawaki, Yosuke; Hayashiuchi, Masaki; Furusho, Hisako; Takata, Takashi; Irifune, Masahiro; Hirata, Masato; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2016-02-19

    Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP) was first identified as an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-binding protein, and was later found to be involved in a variety of cellular events, particularly those related to protein phosphatases. We previously reported that Prip knock-out (KO) mice exhibit a lean phenotype with a small amount of white adipose tissue. In the present study, we examined whether PRIP is involved in energy metabolism, which could explain the lean phenotype, using high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Prip-KO mice showed resistance to HFD-induced obesity, resulting in protection from glucose metabolism dysfunction and insulin resistance. Energy expenditure and body temperature at night were significantly higher in Prip-KO mice than in wild-type mice. Gene and protein expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a thermogenic protein, was up-regulated in Prip-KO brown adipocytes in thermoneutral or cold environments. These phenotypes were caused by the promotion of lipolysis in Prip-KO brown adipocytes, which is triggered by up-regulation of phosphorylation of the lipolysis-related proteins hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipin, followed by activation of UCP1 and/or up-regulation of thermogenesis-related genes (e.g. peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α). The results indicate that PRIP negatively regulates UCP1-mediated thermogenesis in brown adipocytes. PMID:26706316

  12. Identification of two C-terminal autophosphorylation sites in the PDGF beta-receptor: involvement in the interaction with phospholipase C-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Rönnstrand, L; Mori, S; Arridsson, A K; Eriksson, A; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U; Claesson-Welsh, L; Heldin, C H

    1992-01-01

    Two novel sites of autophosphorylation were localized to the C-terminal tail of the PDGF beta-receptor. To evaluate the importance of these phosphorylation sites, receptor mutants in which Tyr1009, Tyr1021 or both were replaced with phenylalanine residues, were expressed in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells. These mutants were similar to the wild type receptor with regard to protein tyrosine kinase activity and ability to induce mitogenicity in response to PDGF-BB. However, both the Y1009F and Y1021F mutants showed a decreased ability to mediate association with and the tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) compared to the wild type PDGF beta-receptor; in the case of the Y1009F/Y1021F double mutant, no association or phosphorylation of PLC-gamma could be detected. These data show that tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma is dependent on autophosphorylation of the PDGF beta-receptor at Tyr1009 and Tyr1021. Images PMID:1396585

  13. Phospholipase C-delta extends intercellular signalling range and responses to injury-released growth factors in non-excitable cells

    PubMed Central

    Mi, L. Y.; Ettenson, D. S.; Edelman, E. R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Intercellular communication in non-excitable cells is restricted to a limited range close to the signal source. Here, we have examined whether modification of the intracellular microenvironment could prolong the spatial proposition of signal generation and could increase cell proliferation. Material and methods Mathematical models and experimental studies of endothelial repair after controlled mechanical injury were used. The models predict the diffusion range of injury-released growth factors and identify important parameters involved in a signalling regenerative mode. Transfected human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to validate model results, by examining intercellular calcium signalling range, cell proliferation and wound healing rate. Results The models predict that growth factors have a limited capacity of extracellular diffusion and that intercellular signals are specially sensitive to cell phospholipase C-delta (PLCδ) levels. As basal PLCδ levels are increased by transfection, a significantly increased intercellular calcium range, enhanced cell proliferation, and faster wound healing rate were observed. Conclusion Our in silico and in vitro studies demonstrated that non-excitable endothelial cells respond to stimuli in a complex manner, in which intercellular communication is controlled by physicochemical properties of the stimulus and by the cell microenvironment. Such findings may have profound implications for our understanding of the tight nature of autocrine cell growth control, compensation to stress states and response to altered microenvironment, under pathological conditions. PMID:18616695

  14. Diacylglycerol kinase δ phosphorylates phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C-dependent, palmitic acid-containing diacylglycerol species in response to high glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiromichi; Kado, Sayaka; Taketomi, Akinobu; Sakane, Fumio

    2014-09-19

    Decreased expression of diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) δ in skeletal muscles is closely related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. To identify DG species that are phosphorylated by DGKδ in response to high glucose stimulation, we investigated high glucose-dependent changes in phosphatidic acid (PA) molecular species in mouse C2C12 myoblasts using a newly established liquid chromatography/MS method. We found that the suppression of DGKδ2 expression by DGKδ-specific siRNAs significantly inhibited glucose-dependent increases in 30:0-, 32:0-, and 34:0-PA and moderately attenuated 30:1-, 32:1-, and 34:1-PA. Moreover, overexpression of DGKδ2 also enhanced the production of these PA species. MS/MS analysis revealed that these PA species commonly contain palmitic acid (16:0). D609, an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), significantly inhibited the glucose-stimulated production of the palmitic acid-containing PA species. Moreover, PC-PLC was co-immunoprecipitated with DGKδ2. These results strongly suggest that DGKδ preferably metabolizes palmitic acid-containing DG species supplied from the PC-PLC pathway, but not arachidonic acid (20:4)-containing DG species derived from the phosphatidylinositol turnover, in response to high glucose levels. PMID:25112873

  15. Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) produces reversible inhibition of phospholipase C by sequestering phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in lateral domains.

    PubMed

    Glaser, M; Wanaski, S; Buser, C A; Boguslavsky, V; Rashidzada, W; Morris, A; Rebecchi, M; Scarlata, S F; Runnels, L W; Prestwich, G D; Chen, J; Aderem, A; Ahn, J; McLaughlin, S

    1996-10-18

    The myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS) is a major protein kinase C (PKC) substrate in many different cell types. MARCKS is bound to the plasma membrane, and several recent studies suggest that this binding requires both hydrophobic insertion of its myristate chain into the bilayer and electrostatic interaction of its cluster of basic residues with acidic lipids. Phosphorylation of MARCKS by PKC introduces negative charges into the basic cluster, reducing its electrostatic interaction with acidic lipids and producing translocation of MARCKS from membrane to cytoplasm. The present study shows that physiological concentrations of MARCKS (<10 microM) inhibit phospholipase C (PLC)-catalyzed hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in phospholipid vesicles. A peptide corresponding to the basic cluster, MARCKS(151-175), produces a similar inhibition, which was observed with both PLC-delta1 and -beta1. Direct fluorescence microscopy observations demonstrate that the MARCKS peptide forms lateral domains enriched in the acidic lipids phosphatidylserine and PIP2 but not PLC, which accounts for the observed inhibition of PIP2 hydrolysis. Phosphorylation of MARCKS(151-175) by PKC releases the inhibition and allows PLC to produce a burst of inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. PMID:8824266

  16. Effect of monolayer surface pressure on the activities of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-beta 1, -gamma 1, and -delta 1.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, V; Rebecchi, M; Morris, A J; Jhon, D Y; Rhee, S G; McLaughlin, S

    1994-03-15

    Three isoforms of phospholipase C, either PLC-beta 1, PLC-gamma 1, or PLC-delta 1, were added to the aqueous subphase beneath phospholipid monolayers formed at an air-solution interface, and the initial rate of hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate was measured after addition of 10 microM free Ca2+. The monolayers were formed from mixtures of phosphatidylcholine (65% PC), phosphatidylserine (33% PS), and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (2% PIP2). Increasing the surface pressure of the monolayer, pi, from 15 to 25 mN/m decreases the rate of hydrolysis 16-, 13-, and 5-fold for PLC-beta 1, PLC-gamma 1, and PLC-delta 1, respectively. The simplest interpretation of these results is that a portion of each of the enzymes of area Ap must insert into the monolayer, doing work pi Ap, prior to hydrolysis of PIP2; binding studies with simple model compounds of known cross-sectional area are consistent with this interpretation. Removing the monovalent acidic lipid PS from the monolayer decreases the initial rates of hydrolysis of PIP2 about 3-fold for each PLC isoform, which suggests that negative electrostatic surface potentials increase the PLC activity. PMID:8130216

  17. Nod factor-induced phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate formation: a role for phospholipase C and D in root hair deformation.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, M; Musgrave, A; Munnik, T

    2001-01-01

    Rhizobium-secreted nodulation factors are lipochitooligosaccharides that trigger the initiation of nodule formation on host legume roots. The first visible effect is root hair deformation, but the perception and signalling mechanisms that lead to this response are still unclear. When we treated Vicia sativa seedlings with mastoparan root hairs deformed, suggesting that G proteins are involved. To investigate whether mastoparan and Nod factor activate lipid signalling pathways initiated by phospholipase C (PLC) and D (PLD), seedlings were radiolabelled with [(32)P]orthophosphate prior to treatment. Mastoparan stimulated increases in phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate, indicative of PLD or PLC activity in combination with diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) and PA kinase. Treatment with Nod factor had similar effects, although less pronounced. The inactive mastoparan analogue Mas17 had no effect. The increase in PA was partially caused by the activation of PLD that was monitored by its in vivo transphosphatidylation activity. The application of primary butyl alcohols, inhibitors of PLD activity, blocked root hair deformation. Using different labelling strategies, evidence was provided for the activation of DGK. Since the PLC antagonist neomycin inhibited root hair deformation and the formation of PA, we propose that PLC activation produced diacylglycerol (DAG), which was subsequently converted to PA by DGK. The roles of PLC and PLD in Nod factor signalling are discussed. PMID:11169182

  18. Transcript levels of the soluble sperm factor protein phospholipase C zeta 1 (PLCζ1) increase through induced spermatogenesis in European eel.

    PubMed

    Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Vílchez, María C; Gallego, Víctor; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Asturiano, Juan F; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Pérez, Luz

    2015-09-01

    Activation at fertilization of the vertebrate egg is triggered by Ca(2+) waves. Recent studies suggest the phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein, triggers egg activation by an IP3-mediated Ca(2+) release and allow Ca(2+) waves at fertilization. In the present study we cloned, characterized, and phylogenetically positioned the European eel PLCζ (PLCζ1). It is 1521 bp long, with 10 exons encoding an open reading frame of 506 amino acids. The amino acid sequence contains an EF-hand domain, X and Y catalytic domains, and a carboxy-terminal C2 domain, all typical of other PLCζ orthologous. The tissue distribution was studied, and the gene expression was determined in testis during induced sexual maturation at three different thermal regimes. Also, brain and pituitary expression was studied through sex maturation at constant temperature. plcζ1 was expressed in brain of male and female, in testis but not in ovaries. By first time in vertebrates, it is reported plcζ1 expression in the pituitary gland. Testis plcζ1 expression increased through spermatogenesis under all the thermal regimes, but being significantly elevated at lower temperatures. It was very low when testis contained only spermatogonia or spermatocytes, while maximum expression was found during spermiogenesis. These results support the hypothesis for an eel sperm-specific PLCζ1 inducing egg activation, similarly to mammals and some teleosts, but different from some other teleost species, which express this protein in ovaries, but not in testes. PMID:26051612

  19. Cbl Suppresses B Cell Receptor–Mediated Phospholipase C (Plc)-γ2 Activation by Regulating B Cell Linker Protein–Plc-γ2 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomoharu; Maeda, Akito; Kurosaki, Mari; Tezuka, Tohru; Hironaka, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2000-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the Cbl protein plays a negative role in immune receptor signaling; however, the mode of Cbl action in B cell receptor (BCR) signaling still remains unclear. DT40 B cells deficient in Cbl showed enhanced BCR-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)-γ2 activation, thereby leading to increased apoptosis. A possible explanation for the involvement of Cbl in PLC-γ2 activation was provided by findings that Cbl interacts via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain with B cell linker protein (BLNK) after BCR ligation. BLNK is a critical adaptor molecule for PLC-γ2 tyrosine phosphorylation through its binding to the PLC-γ2 SH2 domains. As a consequence of the interaction between Cbl and BLNK, the BCR-induced recruitment of PLC-γ2 to BLNK and the subsequent PLC-γ2 tyrosine phosphorylation were inhibited. Thus, our data suggest that Cbl negatively regulates the PLC-γ2 pathway by inhibiting the association of PLC-γ2 with BLNK. PMID:10684856

  20. The Cryptococcal Enzyme Inositol Phosphosphingolipid-Phospholipase C Confers Resistance to the Antifungal Effects of Macrophages and Promotes Fungal Dissemination to the Central Nervous System†

    PubMed Central

    Shea, John M.; Kechichian, Talar B.; Luberto, Chiara; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, sphingolipids have emerged as critical molecules in the regulation of microbial pathogenesis. In fungi, the synthesis of complex sphingolipids is important for the regulation of pathogenicity, but the role of sphingolipid degradation in fungal virulence is not known. Here, we isolated and characterized the inositol phosphosphingolipid-phospholipase C1 (ISC1) gene from the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans and showed that it encodes an enzyme that metabolizes fungal inositol sphingolipids. Isc1 protects C. neoformans from acidic, oxidative, and nitrosative stresses, which are encountered by the fungus in the phagolysosomes of activated macrophages, through a Pma1-dependent mechanism(s). In an immunocompetent mouse model, the C. neoformans Δisc1 mutant strain is almost exclusively found extracellularly and in a hyperencapsulated form, and its dissemination to the brain is remarkably reduced compared to that of control strains. Interestingly, the dissemination of the C. neoformans Δisc1 strain to the brain is promptly restored in these mice when alveolar macrophages are pharmacologically depleted or when infecting an immunodeficient mouse in which macrophages are not efficiently activated. These studies suggest that Isc1 plays a key role in protecting C. neoformans from the intracellular environment of macrophages, whose activation is important for preventing fungal dissemination of the Δisc1 strain to the central nervous system and the development of meningoencephalitis. PMID:16988277

  1. US28 Is a Potent Activator of Phospholipase C during HCMV Infection of Clinically Relevant Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William E.; Zagorski, William A.; Brenneman, Joanna D.; Avery, Diana; Miller, Jeanette L. C.; O’Connor, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the cytomegalovirus family each encode two or more genes with significant homology to G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In rodent models of pathogenesis, these viral encoded GPCRs play functionally significant roles, as their deletion results in crippled viruses that cannot traffic properly and/or replicate in virally important target cells. Of the four HCMV encoded GPCRs, US28 has garnered the most attention due to the fact that it exhibits both agonist-independent and agonist-dependent signaling activity and has been demonstrated to promote cellular migration and proliferation. Thus, it appears that the CMV GPCRs play important roles in viral replication in vivo as well as promote the development of virus-associated pathology. In the current study we have utilized a series of HCMV/US28 recombinants to investigate the expression profile and signaling activities of US28 in a number of cell types relevant to HCMV infection including smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cells derived from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. The results indicate that US28 is expressed and exhibits constitutive agonist-independent signaling activity through PLC-β in all cell types tested. Moreover, while CCL5/RANTES and CX3CL1/Fractalkine both promote US28-dependent Ca++ release in smooth muscle cells, this agonist-dependent effect appears to be cell-specific as we fail to detect US28 driven Ca++ release in the GBM cells. We have also investigated the effects of US28 on signaling via endogenous GPCRs including those in the LPA receptor family. Our data indicate that US28 can enhance signaling via endogenous LPA receptors. Taken together, our results indicate that US28 induces a variety of signaling events in all cell types tested suggesting that US28 signaling likely plays a significant role during HCMV infection and dissemination in vivo. PMID:23209769

  2. Activation of Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C in Breast and Ovarian Cancer: Impact on MRS-Detected Choline Metabolic Profile and Perspectives for Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Podo, Franca; Paris, Luisa; Cecchetti, Serena; Spadaro, Francesca; Abalsamo, Laura; Ramoni, Carlo; Ricci, Alessandro; Pisanu, Maria Elena; Sardanelli, Francesco; Canese, Rossella; Iorio, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the aberrant phosphatidylcholine cycle in cancer cells plays in favor of the use of metabolic imaging in oncology and opens the way for designing new targeted therapies. The anomalous choline metabolic profile detected in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging provides molecular signatures of tumor progression and response to therapy. The increased level of intracellular phosphocholine (PCho) typically detected in cancer cells is mainly attributed to upregulation of choline kinase, responsible for choline phosphorylation in the biosynthetic Kennedy pathway, but can also be partly produced by activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC). This hydrolytic enzyme, known for implications in bacterial infection and in plant survival to hostile environmental conditions, is reported to be activated in mitogen- and oncogene-induced phosphatidylcholine cycles in mammalian cells, with effects on cell signaling, cell cycle regulation, and cell proliferation. Recent investigations showed that PC-PLC activation could account for 20-50% of the intracellular PCho production in ovarian and breast cancer cells of different subtypes. Enzyme activation was associated with PC-PLC protein overexpression and subcellular redistribution in these cancer cells compared with non-tumoral counterparts. Moreover, PC-PLC coimmunoprecipitated with the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and EGFR in HER2-overexpressing breast and ovarian cancer cells, while pharmacological PC-PLC inhibition resulted into long-lasting HER2 downregulation, retarded receptor re-expression on plasma membrane and antiproliferative effects. This body of evidence points to PC-PLC as a potential target for newly designed therapies, whose effects can be preclinically and clinically monitored by metabolic imaging methods. PMID:27532027

  3. Contrasting role of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 in the expression of immediate early genes induced by epidermal or platelet-derived growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Hongjun; Santos, Josue de los; Carpenter, Graham . E-mail: graham.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-04-01

    While significant progress has been achieved in identifying the signal transduction elements that operate downstream of activated receptor tyrosine kinases, it remains unclear how different receptors utilize these signaling elements to achieve a common response. This study compares the capacity of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to elicit the induction of immediate early gene (IEG) mRNAs in the presence or absence of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 (PLC-{gamma}1). The results show that while PDGF induction of nearly all IEG mRNAs is abrogated in plcg1 null cells, EGF induction of the same genes is variable in the null cells and exhibits three distinct responses. Five IEG mRNAs (Nup475, Cyr61, TF, Gly, TS7) are completely inducible by EGF in the presence or absence of PLC-{gamma}1, while three others (JE, KC, FIC) exhibit a stringent requirement for the presence of PLC-{gamma}1. The third type of response is exhibited by c-fos and COX-2. While these mRNAs are completely induced by EGF in the absence of PLC-{gamma}1, the time course of their accumulation is significantly delayed. No IEG was identified as completely inducible by EGF and PDGF in the absence of PLC-{gamma}1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrate that PLC-{gamma}1 is necessary for nuclear extracts from PDGF-treated cells, but not EGF-treated cells, to interact with probes for AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B.

  4. The viral G protein-coupled receptor ORF74 unmasks phospholipase C signaling of the receptor tyrosine kinase IGF-1R.

    PubMed

    de Munnik, Sabrina M; van der Lee, Rosan; Velders, Daniëlle M; van Offenbeek, Jody; Smits-de Vries, Laura; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine J; Vischer, Henry F

    2016-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes the constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor ORF74, which is expressed on the surface of infected host cells and has been linked to the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase, also plays an essential role in Kaposi's sarcoma growth and survival. In this study we examined the effect of the constitutively active viral receptor ORF74 on human IGF-1R signaling. Constitutive and CXCL1-induced ORF74 signaling did not transactivate IGF-1R. In contrast, IGF-1 stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activation in an ORF74-dependent manner without affecting chemokine binding to ORF74. Inhibition of constitutive ORF74 activity by mutagenesis or the inverse agonist CXCL10, or neutralizing IGF-1R with an antibody or silencing IGF-1R expression using siRNA inhibited PLC activation by IGF-1. Transactivation of ORF74 in response to IGF-1 occurred independently of Src, PI3K, and secreted ORF74 ligands. Furthermore, tyrosine residues in the carboxyl-terminus and intracellular loop 2 of ORF74 are not essential for IGF-1-induced PLC activation. Interestingly, PLC activation in response to IGF-1 is specific for ORF74 as IGF-1 was unable to activate PLC in cells expressing the constitutively active human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded GPCR US28. Interestingly, IGF-1 does not induce β-arrestin recruitment to ORF74. The proximity ligation assay revealed close proximity between ORF74 and IGF-1R on the cell surface, but a physical interaction was not confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Unmasking IGF-1R signaling to PLC in response to IGF-1 is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74. PMID:26931381

  5. General base catalysis by the phosphatidylcholine-preferring phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus: the role of Glu4 and Asp55.

    PubMed

    Martin, S F; Hergenrother, P J

    1998-04-21

    To assess what roles the active site residues Glu4 and Asp55 of the phosphatidylcholine-preferring phospholipase C of Bacillus cereus (PLCBc) might play in binding and catalysis, selected mutants were prepared through site-directed mutagenesis of the plc gene. The mutants were then expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as fusion proteins with the maltose binding protein (MBP). Kinetic analysis showed that mutations at Glu4 had only modest effects on the catalytic activity, whereas those at Asp55 led to proteins whose values for kcat/KM were 10(4)-10(6) times less than that of the wild-type enzyme. The modest decrease in catalytic activity and the pH-dependent profile of the E4L mutant strongly suggest that glutamic acid at position 4 is not the general base in the PLCBc-catalyzed reaction. Rather, the results support the hypothesis that Glu4 is primarily involved in substrate binding, perhaps by electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the choline moiety of the phosphatidylcholine substrate. Examination of X-ray crystallographic data of PLCBc and its various complexes reveals that the carboxylate side chain of Asp55 is positioned such that it could activate a water for nucleophilic attack on the substrate or serve as a ligand for Zn1. However, the involvement of the side chain of Asp55 as an important Zn1 ligand is not consistent with the atomic absorption and thermostability data obtained for the D55L mutant, which are virtually identical with that of the wild-type enzyme. The large reduction in the measured kcat/KM of the D55E, D55N, and D55L mutants of PLCBc indicates that Asp55 plays a critical role in catalysis and likely serves as the general base in the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by PLCBc. PMID:9548962

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Phospholipase C zeta 1 (PLCz1) as a Stallion Fertility Locus in Hanoverian Warmblood Horses

    PubMed Central

    Schrimpf, Rahel; Dierks, Claudia; Martinsson, Gunilla; Sieme, Harald; Distl, Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    A consistently high level of stallion fertility plays an economically important role in modern horse breeding. We performed a genome-wide association study for estimated breeding values of the paternal component of the pregnancy rate per estrus cycle (EBV-PAT) in Hanoverian stallions. A total of 228 Hanoverian stallions were genotyped using the Equine SNP50 Beadchip. The most significant association was found on horse chromosome 6 for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within phospholipase C zeta 1 (PLCz1). In the close neighbourhood to PLCz1 is located CAPZA3 (capping protein (actin filament) muscle Z-line, alpha 3). The gene PLCz1 encodes a protein essential for spermatogenesis and oocyte activation through sperm induced Ca2+-oscillation during fertilization. We derived equine gene models for PLCz1 and CAPZA3 based on cDNA and genomic DNA sequences. The equine PLCz1 had four different transcripts of which two contained a premature termination codon. Sequencing all exons and their flanking sequences using genomic DNA samples from 19 Hanoverian stallions revealed 47 polymorphisms within PLCz1 and one SNP within CAPZA3. Validation of these 48 polymorphisms in 237 Hanoverian stallions identified three intronic SNPs within PLCz1 as significantly associated with EBV-PAT. Bioinformatic analysis suggested regulatory effects for these SNPs via transcription factor binding sites or microRNAs. In conclusion, non-coding polymorphisms within PLCz1 were identified as conferring stallion fertility and PLCz1 as candidate locus for male fertility in Hanoverian warmblood. CAPZA3 could be eliminated as candidate gene for fertility in Hanoverian stallions. PMID:25354211

  7. Up-regulated expression of phospholipase C, β1 is associated with tumor cell proliferation and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junxiang; Zhao, Xuya; Wang, Dazhi; He, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Cao, Wei; Huang, Yu; Wang, Ling; Zhou, Shi; Luo, Kaijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Phospholipase C, β1 (PLCB1) plays critical roles in intracellular transduction and regulating signal activation which are important to tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism of PLCB1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still unknown. This study aims to investigate whether its expression is associated with the clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of the patients with HCC. Methods Immunohistochemistry on two tissue microarrays containing 141 cases of HCC tissues and adjacent non-tumorous tissues were performed to analyze the correlation between PLCB1 expression and clinicopathological features. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox multivariate analysis were performed to determine the PLCB1 expression in HCC prognosis. Furthermore, effects of PLCB1 on proliferation of HCC cells were explored using a colony formation assay and apoptosis assay. Results We identified that PLCB1 expression was significantly higher in tumor tissues than that in adjacent non-tumorous tissues and associated with advanced tumor stage. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with PLCB1-positive tumors had poorer survival than the patients with PLCB1-negative tumors. In multivariate analyses, PLCB1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. Moreover, overexpression of PLCB1 in HCC cells promoted cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis, while knocking down PLCB1 reduced cell viability in vitro. Further investigation found that activation of ERK signaling might involve in PLCB1-mediated cell growth. Conclusion Our study suggests that PLCB1 promotes the progression of HCC and can be served as an independent prognostic factor and a promising therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:27051304

  8. Progesterone-Dependent Induction of Phospholipase C-Related Catalytically Inactive Protein 1 (PRIP-1) in Decidualizing Human Endometrial Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Muter, Joanne; Brighton, Paul J; Lucas, Emma S; Lacey, Lauren; Shmygol, Anatoly; Quenby, Siobhan; Blanks, Andrew M; Brosens, Jan J

    2016-07-01

    Decidualization denotes the transformation of endometrial stromal cells into specialized decidual cells. In pregnancy, decidual cells form a protective matrix around the implanting embryo, enabling coordinated trophoblast invasion and formation of a functional placenta. Continuous progesterone (P4) signaling renders decidual cells resistant to various environmental stressors, whereas withdrawal inevitably triggers tissue breakdown and menstruation or miscarriage. Here, we show that PLCL1, coding phospholipase C (PLC)-related catalytically inactive protein 1 (PRIP-1), is highly induced in response to P4 signaling in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Knockdown experiments in undifferentiated HESCs revealed that PRIP-1 maintains basal phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Protein kinase B activity, which in turn prevents illicit nuclear translocation of the transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 and induction of the apoptotic activator BIM. By contrast, loss of this scaffold protein did not compromise survival of decidual cells. PRIP-1 knockdown did also not interfere with the responsiveness of HESCs to deciduogenic cues, although the overall expression of differentiation markers, such as PRL, IGFBP1, and WNT4, was blunted. Finally, we show that PRIP-1 in decidual cells uncouples PLC activation from intracellular Ca(2+) release by attenuating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling. In summary, PRIP-1 is a multifaceted P4-inducible scaffold protein that gates the activity of major signal transduction pathways in the endometrium. It prevents apoptosis of proliferating stromal cells and contributes to the relative autonomy of decidual cells by silencing PLC signaling downstream of Gq protein-coupled receptors. PMID:27167772

  9. Inhibition of Ca(2+) signalling by p130, a phospholipase-C-related catalytically inactive protein: critical role of the p130 pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, H; Oike, M; Paterson, H F; Allen, V; Kanematsu, T; Ito, Y; Erneux, C; Katan, M; Hirata, M

    2000-01-01

    p130 was originally identified as an Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-binding protein similar to phospholipase C-delta but lacking any phospholipase activity. In the present study we have further analysed the interactions of p130 with inositol compounds in vitro. To determine which of the potential ligands interacts with p130 in cells, we performed an analysis of the cellular localization of this protein, the isolation of a protein-ligand complex from cell lysates and studied the effects of p130 on Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signalling by using permeabilized and transiently or stably transfected COS-1 cells (COS-1(p130)). In vitro, p130 bound Ins(1,4,5)P(3) with a higher affinity than that for phosphoinositides. When the protein was isolated from COS-1(p130) cells by immunoprecipitation, it was found to be associated with Ins(1,4,5)P(3). Localization studies demonstrated the presence of the full-length p130 in the cytoplasm of living cells, not at the plasma membrane. In cell-based assays, p130 had an inhibitory effect on Ca(2+) signalling. When fura-2-loaded COS-1(p130) cells were stimulated with bradykinin, epidermal growth factor or ATP, it was found that the agonist-induced increase in free Ca(2+) concentration, observed in control cells, was inhibited in COS-1(p130). This inhibition was not accompanied by the decreased production of Ins(1,4,5)P(3); the intact p130 pleckstrin homology domain, known to be the ligand-binding site in vitro, was required for this effect in cells. These results suggest that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) could be the main p130 ligand in cells and that this binding has the potential to inhibit Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signalling. PMID:10861248

  10. Differentiation of peptide molecular recognition by phospholipase C gamma-1 Src homology-2 domain and a mutant Tyr phosphatase PTP1bC215S.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, D.; Sefler, A. M.; Zhu, G.; Decker, S. J.; Saltiel, A. R.; Singh, J.; McNamara, D.; Dobrusin, E. M.; Sawyer, T. K.

    1995-01-01

    Activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) undergoes autophosphorylation on several cytoplasmic tyrosine residues, which may then associate with the src homology-2 (SH2) domains of effector proteins such as phospholipase C gamma-1 (PLC gamma-1). Specific phosphotyrosine (pTyr)-modified EGFR fragment peptides can inhibit this intermolecular binding between activated EGFR and a tandem amino- and carboxy-terminal (N/C) SH2 protein construct derived from PLC gamma-1. In this study, we further explored the molecular recognition of phosphorylated EGFR988-998 (Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu-pTyr-Leu-Ile-Pro-Gln-Gln-Gly, I) by PLC gamma-1 N/C SH2 in terms of singular Ala substitutions for amino acid residues N- and C-terminal to the pTyr (P site) of phosphopeptide I. Comparison of the extent to which these phosphopeptides inhibited binding of PLC gamma-1 N/C SH2 to activated EGFR showed the critical importance of amino acid side chains at positions P+2 (Ile994), P+3 (Pro995), and P+4 (Gln996). Relative to phosphopeptide I, multiple Ala substitution throughout the N-terminal sequence, N-terminal sequence, N-terminal truncation, or dephosphorylation of pTyr each resulted in significantly decreased binding to PLC gamma-1 N/C SH2. These structure-activity results were analyzed by molecular modeling studies of the predicted binding of phosphopeptide I to each the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of PLC gamma-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7773170

  11. L-Theanine Improves Immunity by Altering TH2/TH1 Cytokine Balance, Brain Neurotransmitters, and Expression of Phospholipase C in Rat Hearts.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjian; Tong, Haiou; Yan, Qiongxian; Tang, Shaoxun; Han, Xuefeng; Xiao, Wenjun; Tan, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to investigate the regulatory effects of L-theanine on secretion of immune cytokines, hormones, and neurotransmitters, and mRNA expression of phospholipase C (PLC) in rats, and to explore its regulatory mechanism in immune function. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats received daily intragastric infusion of different doses of L-theanine solution [0, 50 (LT), 200 (MT), and 400 (HT) mg/kg BW]. Cytokines, immunoglobulins, and hormones in the serum, neurotransmitters, and mRNA expression of PLC in the relevant tissues were assayed. RESULTS L-theanine administration increased the splenic organ index and decreased the contents of ILs-4/6/10 and the ratio of IL-4/IFN-γ in the serum. High-dose L-theanine administration increased the levels of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the pituitary and hippocampus, resulting in decrease in corticosterone level in the serum. L-theanine administration decreased the mRNA expressions of PLC isomers in the liver and PLC-γ1 and PLC-δ1 in the spleen. Interestingly, mRNA expressions of PLC-β1 in the spleen and PLC isomers mRNA in the heart were up-regulated by L-theanine administration. CONCLUSIONS Administration of 400 mg/kg BWL-theanine improved immune function of the rats by increasing the splenic weight, altering the Th2/Th1 cytokine balance, decreasing the corticosterone level in the serum, elevating dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brain, and regulating the mRNA expression of PLC isomers in the heart. PMID:26922362

  12. L-Theanine Improves Immunity by Altering TH2/TH1 Cytokine Balance, Brain Neurotransmitters, and Expression of Phospholipase C in Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengjian; Tong, Haiou; Yan, Qiongxian; Tang, Shaoxun; Han, Xuefeng; Xiao, Wenjun; Tan, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the regulatory effects of L-theanine on secretion of immune cytokines, hormones, and neurotransmitters, and mRNA expression of phospholipase C (PLC) in rats, and to explore its regulatory mechanism in immune function. Material/Methods Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats received daily intragastric infusion of different doses of L-theanine solution [0, 50 (LT), 200 (MT), and 400 (HT) mg/kg BW]. Cytokines, immunoglobulins, and hormones in the serum, neurotransmitters, and mRNA expression of PLC in the relevant tissues were assayed. Results L-theanine administration increased the splenic organ index and decreased the contents of ILs-4/6/10 and the ratio of IL-4/IFN-γ in the serum. High-dose L-theanine administration increased the levels of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the pituitary and hippocampus, resulting in decrease in corticosterone level in the serum. L-theanine administration decreased the mRNA expressions of PLC isomers in the liver and PLC-γ1 and PLC-δ1 in the spleen. Interestingly, mRNA expressions of PLC-βf1 in the spleen and PLC isomers mRNA in the heart were up-regulated by L-theanine administration. Conclusions Administration of 400 mg/kg BWL-theanine improved immune function of the rats by increasing the splenic weight, altering the Th2/Th1 cytokine balance, decreasing the corticosterone level in the serum, elevating dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brain, and regulating the mRNA expression of PLC isomers in the heart. PMID:26922362

  13. Anti-neuroinflammatory efficacy of the aldose reductase inhibitor FMHM via phospholipase C/protein kinase C-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Li, Jun; Dong, Xin; Wang, Ying-Hong; Ma, Zhi-Zhong; Jiang, Yong; Jin, Hong-Wei; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2013-11-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) has a key role in several inflammatory diseases: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, AR inhibition seems to be a useful strategy for anti-inflammation therapy. In the central nervous system (CNS), microglial over-activation is considered to be a central event in neuroinflammation. However, the effects of AR inhibition in CNS inflammation and its underlying mechanism of action remain unknown. In the present study, we found that FMHM (a naturally derived AR inhibitor from the roots of Polygala tricornis Gagnep.) showed potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting microglial activation and expression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistic studies showed that FMHM suppressed the activity of AR-dependent phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling, which further resulted in downstream inactivation of the IκB kinase/IκB/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway. Therefore, AR inhibition-dependent NF-κB inactivation negatively regulated the transcription and expression of various inflammatory genes. AR inhibition by FMHM exerted neuroprotective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuron–microglia co-cultures. These findings suggested that AR is a potential target for neuroinflammation inhibition and that FMHM could be an effective agent for treating or preventing neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • FMHM is a natural-derived aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor. • FMHM inhibits various neuroinflammatory mediator productions in vitro and in vivo. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent NF-κB pathway. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent MAPK pathway. • FMHM protects neurons against inflammatory injury in microglia-neuron co-cultures.

  14. Tetrahydropalmatine protects rat pulmonary endothelial cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting oxidative stress and the calcium sensing receptor/phospholipase C-γ1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhao, L; Liu, L; Yang, F; Zhu, X; Cao, B

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the protective effect of tetrahydropalmatine (THP) against irradiation-induced rat pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis and to explore the underlying mechanism, with a focus on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR)/phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) pathway. We established a model of irradiation-induced primary rat pulmonary endothelial cell injury. Cell apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were measured by flow cytometry. The expression of CaSR, cytochrome c, PLC-γ1, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and [Ca(2+)]i was also determined. Caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities were measured using commercial kits. Inositol triphosphate (IP3) and the production of inflammatory cytokines were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that THP significantly inhibited irradiation-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular accumulation of ROS. Pretreatment with THP significantly decreased the expression of CaSR, inhibited the CaSR/PLC-γ1 pathway and subsequent [Ca(2+)]i overload stimulated by irradiation. THP, NPS2390 (inhibitor of CaSR), U73122 (inhibitor of PLC-γ1) and 2-APB (inhibitor of IP3) further decreased cell apoptosis, along with down-regulation of cytochrome c, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation, disruption of Δψm and the production of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that THP protects primary rat pulmonary endothelial cells against irradiation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting oxidative stress and the CaSR/PLC-γ1 pathway. PMID:27134043

  15. Critical roles of Gi/o proteins and phospholipase C-δ1 in the activation of receptor-operated TRPC4 channels.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Dhananjay P; Tian, Jin-bin; Jeon, Jaepyo; Xiong, Jian; Huang, Yu; Flockerzi, Veit; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-01-26

    Transient Receptor Potential Canonical (TRPC) proteins form nonselective cation channels commonly known to be activated downstream from receptors that signal through phospholipase C (PLC). Although TRPC3/C6/C7 can be directly activated by diacylglycerols produced by PLC breakdown of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), the mechanism by which the PLC pathway activates TRPC4/C5 remains unclear. We show here that TRPC4 activation requires coincident stimulation of Gi/o subgroup of G proteins and PLCδ, with a preference for PLCδ1 over PLCδ3, but not necessarily the PLCβ pathway commonly thought to be involved in receptor-operated TRPC activation. In HEK293 cells coexpressing TRPC4 and Gi/o-coupled µ opioid receptor, µ agonist elicited currents biphasically, with an initial slow phase preceding a rapidly developing phase. The currents were dependent on intracellular Ca(2+) and PIP2. Reducing PIP2 through phosphatases abolished the biphasic kinetics and increased the probability of channel activation by weak Gi/o stimulation. In both HEK293 cells heterologously expressing TRPC4 and renal carcinoma-derived A-498 cells endogenously expressing TRPC4, channel activation was inhibited by knocking down PLCδ1 levels and almost completely eliminated by a dominant-negative PLCδ1 mutant and a constitutively active RhoA mutant. Conversely, the slow phase of Gi/o-mediated TRPC4 activation was diminished by inhibiting RhoA or enhancing PLCδ function. Our data reveal an integrative mechanism of TRPC4 on detection of coincident Gi/o, Ca(2+), and PLC signaling, which is further modulated by the small GTPase RhoA. This mechanism is not shared with the closely related TRPC5, implicating unique roles of TRPC4 in signal integration in brain and other systems. PMID:26755577

  16. Modulation of Enzymatic Activity and Biological Function of Listeria monocytogenes Broad-Range Phospholipase C by Amino Acid Substitutions and by Replacement with the Bacillus cereus Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Zückert, Wolfram R.; Marquis, Hélène; Goldfine, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The secreted broad-range phosphatidylcholine (PC)-preferring phospholipase C (PC-PLC) of Listeria monocytogenes plays a role in the bacterium’s ability to escape from phagosomes and spread from cell to cell. Based on comparisons with two orthologs, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin and Bacillus cereus PLC (PLCBc), we generated PC-PLC mutants with altered enzymatic activities and substrate specificities and analyzed them for biological function in tissue culture and mouse models of infection. Two of the conserved active-site zinc-coordinating histidines were confirmed by single amino acid substitutions H69G and H118G, which resulted in proteins inactive in broth culture and unstable intracellularly. Substitutions D4E and H56Y remodeled the PC-PLC active site to more closely resemble the PLCBc active site, while a gene replacement resulted in L. monocytogenes secreting PLCBc. All of these mutants yielded similar amounts of active enzyme as wild-type PC-PLC both in broth culture and intracellularly. D4E increased activity on and specificity for PC, while H56Y and D4E H56Y showed higher activity on both PC and sphingomyelin, with reduced specificity for PC. As expected, PLCBc expressed by L. monocytogenes was highly specific for PC. During early intracellular growth in human epithelial cells, the D4E mutant and the PLCBc-expressing strain performed significantly better than the wild type, while the H56Y and D4E H56Y mutants showed a significant defect. In assays for cell-to-cell spread, the H56Y and D4E mutants had close to wild-type characteristics, while the spreading efficiency of PLCBc was significantly lower. These studies emphasize the species-specific features of PC-PLC important for growth in mammalian cells. PMID:9746585

  17. Kinetics of Bacterial Phospholipase C Activity at Micellar Interfaces: Effect of Substrate Aggregate Microstructure and a Model for the Kinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha; Hajdu, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Activity at micellar interfaces of bacterial phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on phospholipids solubilized in micelles was investigated with the goal of elucidating the role of the interface microstructure and developing further an existing kinetic model. Enzyme kinetics and physicochemical characterization of model substrate aggregates were combined; thus enabling the interpretation of kinetics in the context of the interface. Substrates were diacylphosphatidylcholine of different acyl chain lengths in the form of mixed micelles with dodecyldimethylammoniopropanesulfonate. An early kinetic model, reformulated to reflect the interfacial nature of the kinetics, was applied to the kinetic data. A better method of data treatment is proposed, use of which makes the presence of microstructure effects quite transparent. Models for enzyme-micelle binding and enzyme-lipid binding are developed and expressions incorporating the microstructural properties are derived for the enzyme-micelle dissociation constant KS and the interface Michaelis-Menten constant, KM. Use of these expressions in the interface kinetic model brings excellent agreement between the kinetic data and the model. Numerical values for the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are determined. Enzyme-lipid binding is found to be an activated process with an acyl chain length dependent free energy of activation that decreases with micelle lipid molar fraction with a coefficient of about −15 RT and correlates with the tightness of molecular packing in the substrate aggregate. Thus the physical insight obtained includes a model for the kinetic parameters that shows that these parameters depend on the substrate concentration and acyl chain length of the lipid. Enzyme-micelle binding is indicated to be hydrophobic and solvent mediated with a dissociation constant of 1.2 mM. PMID:19367944

  18. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP) regulates lipolysis in adipose tissue by modulating the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshiya; Harada, Kae; Oue, Kana; Zhang, Jun; Asano, Satoshi; Hayashiuchi, Masaki; Mizokami, Akiko; Tanaka, Hiroto; Irifune, Masahiro; Kamata, Nobuyuki; Hirata, Masato; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin by protein kinase A (PKA) promotes the hydrolysis of lipids in adipocytes. Although activation of lipolysis by PKA has been well studied, inactivation via protein phosphatases is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP), a binding partner for protein phosphatase 1 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is involved in lipolysis by regulating phosphatase activity. PRIP knockout (PRIP-KO) mice displayed reduced body-fat mass as compared with wild-type mice fed with standard chow ad libitum. Most other organs appeared normal, suggesting that mutant mice had aberrant fat metabolism in adipocytes. HSL in PRIP-KO adipose tissue was highly phosphorylated compared to that in wild-type mice. Starvation of wild-type mice or stimulation of adipose tissue explants with the catabolic hormone, adrenaline, translocated both PRIP and PP2A from the cytosol to lipid droplets, but the translocation of PP2A was significantly reduced in PRIP-KO adipocytes. Consistently, the phosphatase activity associated with lipid droplet fraction in PRIP-KO adipocytes was significantly reduced and was independent of adrenaline stimulation. Lipolysis activity, as assessed by measurement of non-esterified fatty acids and glycerol, was higher in PRIP-KO adipocytes. When wild-type adipocytes were treated with a phosphatase inhibitor, they showed a high lipolysis activity at the similar level to PRIP-KO adipocytes. Collectively, these results suggest that PRIP promotes the translocation of phosphatases to lipid droplets to trigger the dephosphorylation of HSL and perilipin A, thus reducing PKA-mediated lipolysis. PMID:24945349

  19. Activation of Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C in Breast and Ovarian Cancer: Impact on MRS-Detected Choline Metabolic Profile and Perspectives for Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Podo, Franca; Paris, Luisa; Cecchetti, Serena; Spadaro, Francesca; Abalsamo, Laura; Ramoni, Carlo; Ricci, Alessandro; Pisanu, Maria Elena; Sardanelli, Francesco; Canese, Rossella; Iorio, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the aberrant phosphatidylcholine cycle in cancer cells plays in favor of the use of metabolic imaging in oncology and opens the way for designing new targeted therapies. The anomalous choline metabolic profile detected in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging provides molecular signatures of tumor progression and response to therapy. The increased level of intracellular phosphocholine (PCho) typically detected in cancer cells is mainly attributed to upregulation of choline kinase, responsible for choline phosphorylation in the biosynthetic Kennedy pathway, but can also be partly produced by activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC). This hydrolytic enzyme, known for implications in bacterial infection and in plant survival to hostile environmental conditions, is reported to be activated in mitogen- and oncogene-induced phosphatidylcholine cycles in mammalian cells, with effects on cell signaling, cell cycle regulation, and cell proliferation. Recent investigations showed that PC-PLC activation could account for 20–50% of the intracellular PCho production in ovarian and breast cancer cells of different subtypes. Enzyme activation was associated with PC-PLC protein overexpression and subcellular redistribution in these cancer cells compared with non-tumoral counterparts. Moreover, PC-PLC coimmunoprecipitated with the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and EGFR in HER2-overexpressing breast and ovarian cancer cells, while pharmacological PC-PLC inhibition resulted into long-lasting HER2 downregulation, retarded receptor re-expression on plasma membrane and antiproliferative effects. This body of evidence points to PC-PLC as a potential target for newly designed therapies, whose effects can be preclinically and clinically monitored by metabolic imaging methods. PMID:27532027

  20. The GTPase-activating protein of Ras suppresses platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor signaling by silencing phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Valius, M; Secrist, J P; Kazlauskas, A

    1995-01-01

    The beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (beta PDGFR) is activated by binding of PDGF and undergoes phosphorylation at multiple tyrosine residues. The tyrosine-phosphorylated receptor associates with numerous SH2-domain-containing proteins which include phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma), the GTPase-activating protein of Ras (GAP), the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), the phosphotyrosine phosphatase Syp, and several other proteins. Our previous studies indicated that PI3K and PLC gamma were required for relay of the mitogenic signal of beta PDGFR, whereas GAP and Syp did not appear to be required for this response. In this study, we further investigated the role of GAP and Syp in mitogenic signaling by beta PDGFR. Focusing on the PLC gamma-dependent branch of beta PDGFR signaling, we constructed a series of mutant beta PDGFRs that contained the binding sites for pairs of the receptor-associated proteins: PLC gamma and PI3K, PLC gamma and GAP, or PLC gamma and Syp. Characterization of these mutants showed that while all receptors were catalytically active and bound similar amounts of PLC gamma, they differed dramatically in their ability to initiate DNA synthesis. This signaling deficiency related to an inability to efficiently tyrosine phosphorylate and activate PLC gamma. Surprisingly, the crippled receptor was the one that recruited PLC gamma and GAP. Thus, GAP functions to suppress signal relay by the beta PDGFR, and it does so by silencing PLC gamma. These findings demonstrate that the biological response to PDGF depends not only on the ability of the beta PDGFR to recruit signal relay enzymes but also on the blend of these receptor-associated proteins. PMID:7760802

  1. GABA(A) receptor subunit alteration-dependent diazepam insensitivity in the cerebellum of phospholipase C-related inactive protein knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Akiko; Tanaka, Hiroto; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Umebayashi, Hisanori; Fukami, Kiyoko; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nabekura, Junichi; Kanematsu, Takashi; Hirata, Masato

    2010-07-01

    The GABA(A) receptor, a pentamer composed predominantly of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. We have previously reported that phospholipase C-related inactive protein (PRIP) is a modulator of GABA(A) receptor trafficking and that knockout (KO) mice exhibit a diazepam-insensitive phenotype in the hippocampus. The alpha subunit affects diazepam sensitivity; alpha1, 2, 3, and 5 subunits assemble with any form of beta and the gamma2 subunits to produce diazepam-sensitive receptors, whereas alpha4 or alpha6/beta/gamma2 receptors are diazepam-insensitive. Here, we investigated how PRIP is implicated in the diazepam-insensitive phenotype using cerebellar granule cells in animals expressing predominantly the alpha6 subunit. The expression of alpha1/beta/gamma2 diazepam-sensitive receptors was decreased in the PRIP-1 and 2 double KO cerebellum without any change in the total number of benzodiazepine-binding sites as assessed by radioligand-binding assay. Since levels of the alpha6 subunit were increased, the alpha1/beta/gamma2 receptors might be replaced with alpha6 subunit-containing receptors. Then, we further performed autoradiographic and electrophysiologic analyses. These results suggest that the expression of alpha6/delta receptors was decreased in cerebellar granule neurons, while that of alpha6/gamma2 receptors was increased. PRIP-1 and 2 double KO mice exhibit a diazepam-insensitive phenotype because of a decrease in diazepam-sensitive (alpha1/gamma2) and increase in diazepam-insensitive (alpha6/gamma2) GABA(A) receptors in the cerebellar granule cells. PMID:20412381

  2. Inhibition of P2Y6 receptor-mediated phospholipase C activation and Ca(2+) signalling by prostaglandin E2 in J774 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Isao

    2015-02-15

    Extracellular nucleotides act as inflammatory mediators through activation of multiple purinoceptors. Under inflammatory conditions, the purinergic signalling is affected by various inflammatory mediators. We previously showed that prostaglandin (PG) E2 suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) stimulated by P2X4, P2Y2, and P2Y6 receptors in J774 murine macrophages. In this study, we examined the mechanism of PGE2 inhibitory effects on P2Y6 receptor-mediated function in J774 cells. The P2Y6 receptor agonist UDP induced a sustained elevation of [Ca(2+)]i by stimulating the phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathway. PGE2 inhibited [Ca(2+)]i elevation and phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. J774 cells highly expressed the E-type prostanoid 2 (EP2) receptor subtype, a Gs-coupled receptor. PGE2 and a selective EP2 receptor agonist caused cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation in J774 cells. The inhibitory effects of PGE2 on P2Y6 receptor-mediated responses were mimicked by the selective EP2 receptor agonist. Although EP2 receptor is linked to adenylyl cyclase activation, PGE2-induced inhibition of Ca(2+) response and PI hydrolysis could not be mimicked by a lipophilic cAMP derivative, dibutyryl cAMP, or an adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin. The inhibition of UDP-induced PLC activation by PGE2 was not affected by down-regulation of protein kinase C by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate treatment. PGE2 inhibited PLC activation induced by aluminium fluoride, but not by the Ca(2+)-ionophore, ionomycin. Finally, the inhibition of UDP-induced PLC activation by PGE2 was impaired by Gs knockdown using siRNA. These results suggest that EP2 receptor activation in macrophages negatively controls the Gq/11-PLC signalling through a Gs-mediated, but cAMP-independent signalling mechanism. PMID:25614334

  3. Knockdown of phospholipase C-β1 in the medial prefrontal cortex of male mice impairs working memory among multiple schizophrenia endophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Wook; Seo, Misun; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kang, Moonkyung; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Koh, Hae-Young; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Background Decreased expression of phospholipase C-β1 (PLC-β1) has been observed in the brains of patients with schizophrenia, but, to our knowledge, no studies have shown a possible association between this altered PLC-β1 expression and the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Although PLC-β1-null (PLC-β1−/−) mice exhibit multiple endophenotypes of schizophrenia, it remains unclear how regional decreases in PLC-β1 expression in the brain contribute to specific behavioural defects. Methods We selectively knocked down PLC-β1 in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) using a small hairpin RNA strategy in mice. Results Silencing PLC-β1 in the mPFC resulted in working memory deficits, as assayed using the delayed non-match-to-sample T-maze task. Notably, however, other schizophrenia- related behaviours observed in PLC-β1−/− mice, including phenotypes related to locomotor activity, sociability and sensorimotor gating, were normal in PLC-β1 knockdown mice. Limitations Phenotypes of PLC-β1 knockdown mice, such as locomotion, anxiety and sensorimotor gating, have already been published in our previous studies. Further, the neural mechanisms underlying the working memory deficit in mice may be different from those in human schizophrenia. Conclusion These results indicate that PLC-β1 signalling in the mPFC is required for working memory. Importantly, these results support the notion that the decrease in PLC-β1 expression in the brains of patients with schizophrenia is a pathogenically relevant molecular marker of the disorder. PMID:25268789

  4. Progesterone-Dependent Induction of Phospholipase C-Related Catalytically Inactive Protein 1 (PRIP-1) in Decidualizing Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muter, Joanne; Brighton, Paul J.; Lucas, Emma S.; Lacey, Lauren; Shmygol, Anatoly; Quenby, Siobhan; Blanks, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Decidualization denotes the transformation of endometrial stromal cells into specialized decidual cells. In pregnancy, decidual cells form a protective matrix around the implanting embryo, enabling coordinated trophoblast invasion and formation of a functional placenta. Continuous progesterone (P4) signaling renders decidual cells resistant to various environmental stressors, whereas withdrawal inevitably triggers tissue breakdown and menstruation or miscarriage. Here, we show that PLCL1, coding phospholipase C (PLC)-related catalytically inactive protein 1 (PRIP-1), is highly induced in response to P4 signaling in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Knockdown experiments in undifferentiated HESCs revealed that PRIP-1 maintains basal phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Protein kinase B activity, which in turn prevents illicit nuclear translocation of the transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 and induction of the apoptotic activator BIM. By contrast, loss of this scaffold protein did not compromise survival of decidual cells. PRIP-1 knockdown did also not interfere with the responsiveness of HESCs to deciduogenic cues, although the overall expression of differentiation markers, such as PRL, IGFBP1, and WNT4, was blunted. Finally, we show that PRIP-1 in decidual cells uncouples PLC activation from intracellular Ca2+ release by attenuating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling. In summary, PRIP-1 is a multifaceted P4-inducible scaffold protein that gates the activity of major signal transduction pathways in the endometrium. It prevents apoptosis of proliferating stromal cells and contributes to the relative autonomy of decidual cells by silencing PLC signaling downstream of Gq protein-coupled receptors. PMID:27167772

  5. Platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C involves phosphoinositide turnover and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton but not 20,000 dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Huzoor-Akbar; Anwer, K.

    1986-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of phosphoinositides (PIns) and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton (P47) and 20,000 dalton (P20) proteins in platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C (PLC). PLC induced serotonin secretion (SS) and platelet aggregation (PA) in a concentration dependent manner. PLC (0.02 U/ml) caused phosphorylation of P47 in a time dependent manner (27% at 0.5 min to 378% at 7 min). PLC did not induce more than 15% phosphorylation of P20 by 7 min. Aspirin (500 ..mu..M) blocked phosphorylation of P20 but did not inhibit SS, PA or phosphorylation of P47. PLC (0.04 U/ml) decreased radioactivity (cpm) in /sup 32/P labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI-4,5-bis-PO4 (PIP2) and PI-4-PO4 (PIP) by 20%, 12% and 7.5% respectively at 15 sec. The level of PI but not that of PIP2 returned to base line in 3 min. PIP level increased above control values within one min. PLC increased phosphatidic acid level (75% at 0.5 min. to 1545% at 3 min). In other experiments PLC produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a time and concentration dependent manner. However, no DAG was detectable in the first 60 sec. These data suggest that: (a) PIns turnover and phosphorylation of P47 but not that of P20 is involved in platelet activation by PLC; and (b) DAG production from outer membrane phospholipids is not a prerequisite for platelet activation by PLC.

  6. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of the phosphatidylcholine-preferring phospholipase C of Bacillus cereus: probing the role of the active site Glu146.

    PubMed

    Martin, S F; Spaller, M R; Hergenrother, P J

    1996-10-01

    A series of site-specific mutants of the phosphatidylcholine-preferring phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus (PLCBc) was prepared in which the glutamic acid residue at position 146 was replaced with glutamine, aspartic acid, histidine, and leucine to elucidate what role Glu146 might play in catalysis. An expression system for the native enzyme in Escherichia coli was first developed to provide PLCBc that was fused via an intervening factor Xa protease recognition sequence at its N-terminus to maltose binding protein (MBP). This MBP-PLCBc fusion protein was isolated at levels of 50-70 mg/L of culture; selective trypsin digestion of the MBP-PLCBc fusion protein followed by chromatographic purification yielded recombinant PLCBc at levels of ca. 10 mg/L. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mutagenesis on the PLCBc gene (plc) was then used to replace the Glu146 codon with those for glutamine (E146Q), aspartic acid (E146D), histidine (E146H), and leucine (E146L). The catalytic efficiency of the E146Q mutant was 1.6% that of native PLCBc, while the other mutants each possessed activities of 0.2-0.3% of the wild type. The kcat/Km vs pH profiles for both E146Q and native PLCBc have ascending acidic limbs, suggesting that Glu146 does not serve as the general base in the hydrolysis reaction. As measured by circular dichroism, all of the mutant proteins contained less helical structure and underwent denaturation at lower temperatures than the wild type in the order: wild type > E146Q > E146D approximately E146H approximately E146L. Atomic absorption analyses indicated that the mutant proteins also exhibited lower Zn2+ content than the wild type. Thus, the Glu146 residue in PLCBc stabilizes the secondary and tertiary structure of the enzyme and serves as a critical ligand for Zn2, but it does not appear to have any specific catalytic role. PMID:8841144

  7. Guanine-nucleotide and hormone regulation of polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C activity of rat liver plasma membranes. Bivalent-cation and phospholipid requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S J; Exton, J H

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the GTP analogue guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) on the polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C (PLC) of rat liver was examined by using exogenous [3H]phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. GTP[S] stimulated the membrane-bound PLC up to 20-fold, with a half-maximal effect at approx. 100 nM. Stimulation was also observed with guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate, but not with adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, and was inhibited by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate. Membrane-bound PLC was entirely Ca2+-dependent, and GTP[S] produced both a decrease in the Ca2+ requirement and an increase in activity at saturating [Ca2+]. The stimulatory action of GTP[S] required millimolar Mg2+. [8-arginine]Vasopressin (100 nM) stimulated the PLC activity approx. 2-fold in the presence of 10 nM-GTP[S], but had no effect in the absence of GTP[S] or at 1 microM-GTP[S]. The hydrolysis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 by membrane-bound PLC was increased when the substrate was mixed with phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine or various combinations of these with phosphatidylserine. With PtdIns(4,5)P2, alone or mixed with phosphatidylcholine, GTP[S] evoked little or no stimulation of the PLC activity. However, maximal stimulation by GTP[S] was observed in the presence of a 2-fold molar excess of phosphatidylserine or various combinations of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Hydrolysis of [3H]phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate by membrane-bound PLC was also increased by GTP[S]. However, [3H]phosphatidylinositol was a poor substrate, and its hydrolysis was barely affected by GTP[S]. Cytosolic PtdIns(4,5)P2-PLC exhibited a Ca2+-dependence similar to that of the membrane-bound activity, but was unaffected by GTP[S]. It is concluded that rat liver plasma membranes possess a Ca2+-dependent polyphosphoinositide PLC that is activated by hormones and GTP analogues, depending on the Mg2+ concentration and phospholipid environment. It is

  8. PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and phospholipase C-independent Ins(1,4,5)P(3) signals induced by a nitrogen source in nitrogen-starved yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, J C; Kasri, N N; Donaton, M C; De Wever, V; Tisi, R; de Winde, J H; Martegani, E; Thevelein, J M; Wera, S

    2001-01-01

    Addition of ammonium sulphate to nitrogen-depleted yeast cells resulted in a transient increase in Ins(1,4,5)P(3), with a maximum concentration reached after 7-8 min, as determined by radioligand assay and confirmed by chromatography. Surprisingly, the transient increase in Ins(1,4,5)P(3) did not trigger an increase in the concentration of intracellular calcium, as determined in vivo using the aequorin method. Similar Ins(1,4,5)P(3) signals were also observed in wild-type cells treated with the phospholipase C inhibitor 3-nitrocoumarin and in cells deleted for the only phospholipase C-encoding gene in yeast, PLC1. This showed clearly that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) was not generated by phospholipase C-dependent cleavage of PtdIns(4,5)P(2). Apart from a transient increase in Ins(1,4,5)P(3), we observed a transient increase in PtdIns(4,5)P(2) after the addition of a nitrogen source to nitrogen-starved glucose-repressed cells. Inhibition by wortmannin of the phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, Stt4, which is involved in PtdIns(4,5)P(2) formation, did not affect the Ins(1,4,5)P(3) signal, but significantly delayed the PtdIns(4,5)P(2) signal. Moreover, wortmannin addition inhibited the nitrogen-induced activation of trehalase and the subsequent mobilization of trehalose, suggesting a role for PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in nitrogen activation of the fermentable-growth-medium-induced signalling pathway. PMID:11672425

  9. Possible involvement of phospholipase C and protein kinase C in stimulatory actions of L-leucine and its keto acid, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid, on protein synthesis in RLC-16 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Morisaki-Tsuji, Naoko; Miura, Atsuhito; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2002-11-01

    Effects of leucine and related compounds on protein synthesis were studied in RLC-16 hepatocytes. The incorporation of [(3)H] tyrosine into cellular protein was measured as an indexof protein synthesis. In leucine-depleted RLC-16 cells, L-leucineand its keto acid, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), stimulated protein synthesis, while D-leucine did not. Mepacrine, an inhibitor of both phospholipase A(2) and C canceled stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting a possible involvement of either arachidonic acid metabolism by phospholipase A(2), cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase, or phosphatidylinositol degradation by phospholipase C in the stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC.Neither indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, nor caffeic acid, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, diminished their stimulatory actions, suggesting no involvement of arachidonic acid metabolism. Conversely, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methylglycerol, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, significantly canceled the stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting an involvement of phosphatidylinositol degradation and activation of protein kinase C. These results strongly suggest that both L-leucine and KIC stimulate protein synthesis in RLC-16 cells via activation of phospholipase C and production of diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate from phosphatidylinositol, which in turn activate protein kinase C. PMID:19003115

  10. Changing serine-485 to alanine in the opossum parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor enhances PTH stimulation of phospholipase C in a stably transfected human kidney cell line: a useful model for PTH-analog screening?

    PubMed

    John, M R; Bösel, J; Breit, S; Wickert, H; Ziegler, R; Blind, E

    2001-02-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have introduced a serine-485-to-alanine mutation in the opossum parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor. This amino acid is considered to be phosphorylated by protein kinase A upon ligand binding. Both wild-type (WT) and mutant receptor were stably expressed in 293-EBNA HEK cells. The mutant receptor showed comparable binding characteristics and only a slight increase in cAMP production compared with WT. However, the PTH dose-dependent increase in inositol phosphate production was 24-fold for the mutant receptor vs. 6-fold for the WT receptor. This mutant might prove useful in the sensitive detection of phospholipase C activation through various ligands, as the PTH receptor becomes a target of therapeutic intervention in osteoporosis. PMID:11182376

  11. Phospholipase C inhibitors and prostaglandins differentially regulate phosphatidylcholine synthesis in rat renal papilla. Evidence of compartmental regulation of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase and CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tomé, María del Carmen; Speziale, Emir H S; Sterin-Speziale, Norma B

    2002-07-11

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in mammalian cell membranes. Several lines of evidence support that PC homeostasis is preserved by the equilibrium between PC biosynthetic enzymes and phospholipases catabolic activities. We have previously shown that papillary synthesis of PC depends on prostaglandins (PGs) that modulate biosynthetic enzymes. In papillary tissue, under bradikynin stimulus, arachidonic acid (AA) mobilization (the substrate for PG synthesis) requires a previous phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Thus, in the present work, we study the possible involvement of PLC in PC biosynthesis and its relationship with PG biosynthetic pathway on the maintenance of phospholipid renewal in papillary membranes; we also evaluated the relevance of CDP-choline pathway enzymes compartmentalization. To this end, neomycin, U-73122 and dibutiryl cyclic AMP, reported as PLC inhibitors, were used to study PC synthesis in rat renal papilla. All the PLC inhibitors assayed impaired PC synthesis. PG synthesis was also blocked by PLC inhibitors without affecting cyclooxygenase activity, indicating a metabolic connection between both pathways. However, we found that PC biosynthesis decrease in the presence of PLC inhibitors was not a consequence of PG decreased synthesis, suggesting that basal PLC activity and PGs exert their effect on different targets of PC biosynthetic pathway. The study of PC biosynthetic enzymes showed that PLC inhibitors affect CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) activity while PGD(2) operates on CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase (CPT), both activities associated to papillary enriched-nuclei fraction. The present results suggest that renal papillary PC synthesis is a highly regulated process under basal conditions. Such regulation might occur at least at two different levels of the CDP-choline pathway: on the one hand, PLC operates on CCT activity; on the other, while PGs regulate CPT activity. PMID

  12. Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C β 1b (PI-PLCβ1b) Interactome: Affinity Purification-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of PI-PLCβ1b with Nuclear Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Blalock, William L.; Bavelloni, Alberto; Faenza, Irene; D'Angelo, Antonietta; Maraldi, Nadir M.; Cocco, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    Two isoforms of inositide-dependent phospholipase C β1 (PI-PLCβ1) are generated by alternative splicing (PLCβ1a and PLCβ1b). Both isoforms are present within the nucleus, but in contrast to PLCβ1a, the vast majority of PLCβ1b is nuclear. In mouse erythroid leukemia cells, PI-PLCβ1 is involved in the regulation of cell division and the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nuclear localization is crucial for the enzymatic function of PI-PLCβ1, although the mechanism by which this nuclear import occurs has never been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to characterize both the mechanism of nuclear localization and the molecular function of nuclear PI-PLCβ1 by identifying its interactome in Friend's erythroleukemia isolated nuclei, utilizing a procedure that coupled immuno-affinity purification with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Using this procedure, 160 proteins were demonstrated to be in association with PI-PLCβ1b, some of which have been previously characterized, such as the splicing factor SRp20 (Srsf3) and Lamin B (Lmnb1). Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of selected proteins confirmed the data obtained via mass spectrometry. Of particular interest was the identification of the nuclear import proteins Kpna2, Kpna4, Kpnb1, Ran, and Rangap1, as well as factors involved in hematological malignancies and several anti-apoptotic proteins. These data give new insight into possible mechanisms of nuclear trafficking and functioning of this critical signaling molecule. PMID:23665500

  13. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes—all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  14. Temporal profiling of changes in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol allows comprehensive analysis of phospholipase C-initiated signalling in single neurons1

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carl P; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R A John

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) fulfils vital signalling roles in an array of cellular processes, yet until recently it has not been possible selectively to visualize real-time changes in PIP2 levels within living cells. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled Tubby protein (GFP-Tubby) enriches to the plasma membrane at rest and translocates to the cytosol following activation of endogenous Gαq/11-coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in both SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and primary rat hippocampal neurons. GFP-Tubby translocation is independent of changes in cytosolic inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and instead reports dynamic changes in levels of plasma membrane PIP2. In contrast, enhanced GFP (eGFP)-tagged pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C (PLCδ1) (eGFP-PH) translocation reports increases in cytosolic inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Comparison of GFP-Tubby, eGFP-PH and the eGFP-tagged C12 domain of protein kinase C-γ [eGFP-C1(2); to detect diacylglycerol] allowed a selective and comprehensive analysis of PLC-initiated signalling in living cells. Manipulating intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in the nanomolar range established that GFP-Tubby responses to a muscarinic agonist were sensitive to intracellular Ca2+ up to 100–200 nM in SH-SY5Y cells, demonstrating the exquisite sensitivity of agonist-mediated PLC activity within the range of physiological resting Ca2+ concentrations. We have also exploited GFP-Tubby selectively to visualize, for the first time, real-time changes in PIP2 in hippocampal neurons. PMID:18665913

  15. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes-all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  16. SH2 domains prevent tyrosine dephosphorylation of the EGF receptor: identification of Tyr992 as the high-affinity binding site for SH2 domains of phospholipase C gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Rotin, D; Margolis, B; Mohammadi, M; Daly, R J; Daum, G; Li, N; Fischer, E H; Burgess, W H; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1992-01-01

    Several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases contain a conserved, non-catalytic stretch of approximately 100 amino acids called the src homology 2 (SH2) domain, and a region of approximately 50 amino acids called the SH3 domain. SH2/SH3 domains are also found in several other proteins, including phospholipase C-gamma (PLC gamma). Recent studies indicate that SH2 domains promote association between autophosphorylated growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and signal transducing molecules such as PLC gamma. Because SH2 domains bind specifically to protein sequences containing phosphotyrosine, we examined their capacity to prevent tyrosine dephosphorylation of the EGF and other receptors with tyrosine kinase activity. For this purpose, various SH2/SH3 constructs of PLC gamma were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins. Our results show that purified SH2 domains of PLC gamma are able to prevent tyrosine dephosphorylation of the EGF receptor and other receptors with tyrosine activity. The inhibition of tyrosine dephosphorylation paralleled the capacity of various SH2-containing constructs to bind to the EGF receptor, suggesting that the tyrosine phosphatase and the SH2 domain compete for the same tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the carboxy-terminal tail of the EGF receptor. Analysis of the phosphorylation sites protected from dephosphorylation by PLC gamma-SH2 revealed substantial inhibition of dephosphorylation of Tyr992 at 1 microM SH2. This indicates that Tyr992 and its flanking sequence is the high-affinity binding site for SH2 domains of PLC gamma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1537335

  17. Evidence that a lipolytic enzyme—hematopoietic-specific phospholipase C-β2—promotes mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells by decreasing their lipid raft-mediated bone marrow retention and increasing the promobilizing effects of granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Adamiak, M; Poniewierska-Baran, A; Borkowska, S; Schneider, G; Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Suszynska, M; Abdel-Latif, A; Kucia, M; Ratajczak, J; Ratajczak, M Z

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment and are retained there by the interaction of membrane lipid raft-associated receptors, such as the α-chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the α4β1-integrin (VLA-4, very late antigen 4 receptor) receptor, with their respective specific ligands, stromal-derived factor 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, expressed in BM stem cell niches. The integrity of the lipid rafts containing these receptors is maintained by the glycolipid glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI-A). It has been reported that a cleavage fragment of the fifth component of the activated complement cascade, C5a, has an important role in mobilizing HSPCs into the peripheral blood (PB) by (i) inducing degranulation of BM-residing granulocytes and (ii) promoting their egress from the BM into the PB so that they permeabilize the endothelial barrier for subsequent egress of HSPCs. We report here that hematopoietic cell-specific phospholipase C-β2 (PLC-β2) has a crucial role in pharmacological mobilization of HSPCs. On the one hand, when released during degranulation of granulocytes, it digests GPI-A, thereby disrupting membrane lipid rafts and impairing retention of HSPCs in BM niches. On the other hand, it is an intracellular enzyme required for degranulation of granulocytes and their egress from BM. In support of this dual role, we demonstrate that PLC-β2-knockout mice are poor mobilizers and provide, for the first time, evidence for the involvement of this lipolytic enzyme in the mobilization of HSPCs. PMID:26582648

  18. Membrane associated phospholipase C from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Ryu, S.H.; Suh, P.; Choi, W.C.; Rhee, S.G.

    1987-05-01

    Cytosolic fractions of bovine brain contain 2 immunologically distinct phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase (PLC), PLC-I and PLC-II, whose MW are 150,000 and 145,000 respectively, under a denaturing condition. Monoclonal antibodies were derived against each form and specific radioimmunoassays were developed. Distribution of PLC-I and PLC-II in cytosolic and particulate fractions was measured using the radioimmunoassay. More than 90% of PLC-II was found in the cytosolic fraction, while the anti-PLC-I antibody cross-reacting protein was distributed nearly equally between the soluble fraction and the 2 M KCl extract of particulate fraction. The PLC enzyme in the particulate fraction was purified to homogeneity, yielding 2 proteins of 140 KDa and 150 KDa when analyzed on SDS-PAGE. Neither of the 2 enzymes cross-reacted with anti-PLC-II antibodies, but both could be immunoblotted by all 4 different anti-PLC-I antibodies. This suggests that the 140 KDa PLC was derived from the 150 KDa form. The 150 Kda form from particulate fraction was indistinguishable from the cytosolic PLC-I when their mixture was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. In addition, the elution profile of tryptic peptides derived from the 150 KDa particulate form was identical to that of cytosolic PLC-I. This result indicates that PLC-I is reversibly associated to membranes.

  19. Contribution of Membrane-Damaging Toxins to Bacillus Endophthalmitis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Callegan, Michelle C.; Cochran, Daniel C.; Kane, Scott T.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Gominet, Myriam; Lereclus, Didier

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-damaging toxins are thought to be responsible for the explosive clinical course of Bacillus endophthalmitis. This study analyzed the contribution of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) to the pathogenesis of experimental Bacillus endophthalmitis. Isogenic mutants were constructed by insertion of lacZ into Bacillus thuringiensis genes encoding PI-PLC (plcA) and PC-PLC (plcB). Rabbit eyes were injected intravitreally with 2 log10 CFU of strain BT407 (wild type), the PI-PLC mutant (BTplcA::lacZ), or the PC-PLC mutant (BTplcB::lacZ). The rates of decrease in retinal responses of eyes infected with the isogenic mutants were similar to that of wild type, with all infections resulting in elimination of retinal function by 18 h. Strain BT407 caused a significant increase in the latency of retinal responses at 6 h, but strains BTplcA::lacZ and BTplcB::lacZ did not. All strains elicited significant inflammatory cell influx into the anterior chamber by 12 h. Histologically, eyes infected with each strain were indistinguishable throughout the infection course. In this model, neither PI-PLC nor PC-PLC had an effect on the course or severity of experimental Bacillus endophthalmitis. Alterations in retinal responses early in infection may mark the beginnings of specific photoreceptor or glial cell dysfunction. PMID:12228262

  20. Tyrosines 1021 and 1009 are phosphorylation sites in the carboxy terminus of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta subunit and are required for binding of phospholipase C gamma and a 64-kilodalton protein, respectively.

    PubMed Central

    Valius, M; Bazenet, C; Kazlauskas, A

    1993-01-01

    Binding of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to the PDGF receptor (PDGFR) beta subunit triggers receptor tyrosine phosphorylation and the stable association of a number of signal transduction molecules, including phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma), the GTPase activating protein of ras (GAP), and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K). Previous reports have identified three PDGFR tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the kinase insert domain that are important for stable association of GAP and PI3K. Two of them, tyrosine (Y) 740, and Y-751 are required for the stable association of PI3K, while Y-771 is required for binding of GAP. Here we present data for two additional tyrosine phosphorylation sites, Y-1009 and Y-1021, that are both in the carboxy-terminal region of the PDGFR. Characterization of PDGFR mutants in which these phosphorylation sites are substituted with phenylalanine (F) indicated that Y-1021 and Y-1009 were required for the stable association of PLC gamma and a 64-kDa protein, respectively. An F-1009/F-1021 double mutant selectively failed to bind both PLC gamma and the 64-kDa protein, whereas all of the carboxy-terminal mutants bound wild-type levels of GAP and PI3K. The carboxy terminus encodes the complete binding site for PLC gamma, since a phosphorylated carboxy-terminal fusion protein selectively bound PLC gamma. To determine the biological consequences of failure to associate with PLC gamma, we measured PDGF-dependent inositol phosphate production and initiation of DNA synthesis. The PDGFR mutants that failed to associate with PLC gamma were not able to mediate the PDGF-dependent production of inositol phosphates. Since tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma enhances its enzymatic activity, we speculated that PDGFR mutants that failed to activate PLC gamma were unable to mediate its tyrosine phosphorylation. Surprisingly, the F-1021 receptor mediated readily detectable levels of PDGF-dependent PLC gamma tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, the

  1. Activation of the sigma receptor 1 modulates AMPA receptor-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei-Lei; Deng, Qin-Qin; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-09-22

    Sigma receptor (σR), a unique receptor family, is classified into three subtypes: σR1, σR2 and σR3. It was previously shown that σR1 activation induced by 1μM SKF10047 (SKF) suppressed N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses of rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and the suppression was mediated by a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase C (PLC)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. In the present work, using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we further demonstrate that SKF of higher dosage (50μM) significantly suppressed AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) of retinal ON-type GCs (ON GCs), and the effect was reversed by the σR1 antagonist BD1047, suggesting the involvement of σR1. The SKF (50μM) effect was unlikely due to a change in glutamate release from bipolar cells, as suggested by the unaltered paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of AMPAR-mediated EPSCs of ON GCs. SKF (50μM) did not change L-EPSCs of ON GCs when the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT5823 was intracellularly infused. Calcium imaging further revealed that SKF (50μM) did not change intracellular calcium concentration in GCs and persisted to suppress L-EPSCs when intracellular calcium was chelated by BAPTA. The SKF (50μM) effect was intact when protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphatidylinostiol (PI)-PLC signaling pathways were both blocked. We conclude that the SKF (50μM) effect is Ca(2+)-independent, PKG-dependent, but not involving PKA, PI-PLC pathways. PMID:27373906

  2. Dimer Structure of an Interfacially Impaired Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Pholpholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao,C.; Shi, X.; Wehbi, H.; Zambonelli, C.; Head, J.; Seaton, B.; Roberts, M,.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the W47A/W242A mutant of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis has been solved to 1.8{angstrom} resolution. The W47A/W242A mutant is an interfacially challenged enzyme, and it has been proposed that one or both tryptophan side chains serve as membrane interfacial anchors (Feng, J., Wehbi, H., and Roberts, M. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 19867-19875). The crystal structure supports this hypothesis. Relative to the crystal structure of the closely related (97% identity) wild-type PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus, significant conformational differences occur at the membrane-binding interfacial region rather than the active site. The Trp {yields} Ala mutations not only remove the membrane-partitioning aromatic side chains but also perturb the conformations of the so-called helix B and rim loop regions, both of which are implicated in interfacial binding. The crystal structure also reveals a homodimer, the first such observation for a bacterial PI-PLC, with pseudo-2-fold symmetry. The symmetric dimer interface is stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, contributed primarily by a central swath of aromatic residues arranged in a quasiherringbone pattern. Evidence that interfacially active wild-type PI-PLC enzymes may dimerize in the presence of phosphatidylcholine vesicles is provided by fluorescence quenching of PI-PLC mutants with pyrene-labeled cysteine residues. The combined data suggest that wild-type PI-PLC can form similar homodimers, anchored to the interface by the tryptophan and neighboring membrane-partitioning residues.

  3. Activation of phospholipase D by growth factors and oncogenes in murine fibroblasts follow alternative but cross-talking pathways.

    PubMed Central

    del Peso, L; Lucas, L; Esteve, P; Lacal, J C

    1997-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is activated by a variety of stimuli, including mitogenic stimulation by growth factors and oncogene transformation. Activation of PLD by growth factors requires protein kinase C (PKC) since depletion of the enzyme by down-regulation or direct inhibition by specific drugs completely abrogates this effect. Transformation by the ras and src oncogenes is also associated with an increase in basal PLD activity. However, this effect is not dependent on PKC, suggesting that growth factors and oncogenes may activate PLD by two independent mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that activation of PLD by phorbol esters is greatly enhanced in ras-transformed cells, suggesting synergistic activation of PLD by ras oncogenes and PKC. Also, ras-transformed cells showed a dramatic attenuation of the PLD activation induced by growth factors, although receptor function was still detectable. This attenuation paralleled the specific uncoupling of the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) pathway, indicating that activation of PLD by growth factors may be mediated by PI-PLC and PKC activation. Attenuation of PLD activation by platelet-derived growth factor was also observed in several oncogene-transformed cells, as well as the uncoupling of the PI-PLC pathway. Neither the co-operation with PKC activation nor the attenuation of the PLD response to growth factors in ras-transformed cells was a general consequence of cell transformation, since cells transformed by other oncogenes showed a normal response to either treatment. These results support the existence of at least two alternative signalling routes for the activation of PLD, one mediated by the PI-PLC/diacylglycerol/PKC pathway and a second one mediated by several oncogenes, independent of the PKC pathway, which synergizes with the PI-PLC/PKC-dependent pathway. PMID:9065772

  4. Major surface antigen, P30, of Toxoplasma gondii is anchored by a glycolipid

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S.D.; Boothroyd, J.C.

    1989-04-05

    P30, the major surface antigen of the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, can be specifically labeled with (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid and with myo-(2-/sup 3/H)inositol. The fatty acid label can be released by treatment of P30 with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Such treatment exposes an immunological cross-reacting determinant first described on Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein. PI-PLC cleavage of intact parasites metabolically labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine results in the release of intact P30 polypeptide in a form which migrates faster in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results argue that P30 is anchored by a glycolipid. Results from thin layer chromatography analysis of purified (/sup 3/H) palmitate-labeled P30 treated with PI-PLC, together with susceptibility to mild alkali hydrolysis and to cleavage with phospholipase A2, suggest that the glycolipid anchor of T. gondii P30 includes a 1,2-diacylglycerol moiety.

  5. Dual roles of plcA in Listeria monocytogenes pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Andrew; Tilney, Lewis G.; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The plcA gene of Listeria monocytogenes encodes a secreted phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Recent studies have established that transposon mutations within plcA result in avirulence for mice and pleiotropic effects when examined in tissue-culture models of infection. Genetic analysis reveals that many of the effects of the transposon insertions are due to loss of readthrough transcription from plcA into the downstream gene prfA, which encodes an essential transcription factor of numerous L. monocytogenes virulence genes. Construction of an in-frame deletion within plcA had no effect on expression of prfA thus allowing direct assignment of a role of the PI-PLC in pathogenesis. PI-PLC was shown to play a significant role in mediating escape of L. monocytogenes from phagosomes of primary murine macrophages. Interestingly, this defect manifested itself in vivo in the liver but not in the spleen of infected mice. PMID:8388529

  6. Family Preservation & Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, Jacquelyn; Meezan, William

    This book reports a study of the outcomes of home-based family preservation services for abusive and neglectful families in Los Angeles County. Using the Family Assessment Form, the research project evaluated services provided by two voluntary agencies, and focused on changes in family functioning between the opening and closing of services during…

  7. Genome-wide prediction and annotation of Burkholderia pseudomallei AraC/XylS family transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Lim, Boon-San; Chong, Chan-Eng; Zamrod, Zulkeflie; Nathan, Sheila; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2007-01-01

    Many members of the AraC/XylS family transcription regulator have been proven to play a critical role in regulating bacterial virulence factors in response to environmental stress. By using the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profile built from the alignment of a 99 amino acid conserved domain sequence of 273 AraC/XylS family transcription regulators, we detected a total of 45 AraC/XylS family transcription regulators in the genome of the Gram-negative pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. Further in silico analysis of each detected AraC/XylS family transcription regulatory protein and its neighboring genes allowed us to make a first-order guess on the role of some of these transcription regulators in regulating important virulence factors such as those involved in three type III secretion systems and biosynthesis of pyochelin, exopolysaccharide (EPS) and phospholipase C. This paper has demonstrated an efficient and systematic genome-wide scale prediction of the AraC/XylS family that can be applied to other protein families. PMID:18391231

  8. Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Badheka, Doreen; Borbiro, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are emerging as general regulators of the functionally diverse transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been reported to positively regulate many TRP channels, but in several cases phosphoinositide regulation is controversial. TRP melastatin 3 (TRPM3) is a heat-activated ion channel that is also stimulated by chemical agonists, such as pregnenolone sulfate. Here, we used a wide array of approaches to determine the effects of phosphoinositides on TRPM3. We found that channel activity in excised inside-out patches decreased over time (rundown), an attribute of PI(4,5)P2-dependent ion channels. Channel activity could be restored by application of either synthetic dioctanoyl (diC8) or natural arachidonyl stearyl (AASt) PI(4,5)P2. The PI(4,5)P2 precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) was less effective at restoring channel activity. TRPM3 currents were also restored by MgATP, an effect which was inhibited by two different phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase inhibitors, or by pretreatment with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzyme, indicating that MgATP acted by generating phosphoinositides. In intact cells, reduction of PI(4,5)P2 levels by chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases or a voltage-sensitive 5′-phosphatase inhibited channel activity. Activation of PLC via muscarinic receptors also inhibited TRPM3 channel activity. Overall, our data indicate that TRPM3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel and that decreasing PI(4,5)P2 abundance limits its activity. As all other members of the TRPM family have also been shown to require PI(4,5)P2 for activity, our data establish PI(4,5)P2 as a general positive cofactor of this ion channel subfamily. PMID:26123195

  9. Phospholipase cleavage of D- and L-chiro-glycosylphosphoinositides asymmetrically incorporated into liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Julia B; Cid, M Belén; Contreras, F-Xabier; Goñi, Félix M; Martín-Lomas, Manuel

    2006-02-01

    The nature of chiro-inositol-containing inositolphosphoglycans (IPGs), reported to be putative insulin mediators, was studied by examination of the substrate specificities of the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase D (GPI-PLD) by using a series of synthetic D- and L-chiro-glycosylphosphoinositides. 3-O-alpha-D-Glucosaminyl- (3) and -galactosaminyl-2-phosphatidyl-L-chiro-inositol (4), which show the maximum stereochemical similarity to the 6-O-alpha-D-glucosaminylphosphatidylinositol pseudodisaccharide motifs of GPI anchors, were synthesized and asymmetrically incorporated into phospholipid bilayers in the form of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs). Similarly, 2-O-alpha-D-glucosaminyl- (5) and -galactosaminyl-1-phosphatidyl-D-chiro-inositol (6), which differ from the corresponding pseudodisaccharide motif of the GPI anchors only in the axial orientation of the phosphatidyl moiety, were also synthesized and asymmetrically inserted into LUVs. The cleavage of these synthetic molecules in the liposomal constructs by PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus and by GPI-PLD from bovine serum was studied with the use of 6-O-alpha-D-glucosaminylphosphatidylinositol (7) and the conserved GPI anchor structure (8) as positive controls. Although PI-PLC cleaved 3 and 4 with about the same efficiency as 7 and 8, this enzyme did not accept 5 or 6. GPI-PLD accepted both the L-chiro- (3 and 4) and the D-chiro- (5 and 6) glycosylinositolphosphoinositides. Therefore, IPGs containing L-chiro-inositol only are expected to be released from chiro-inositol-containing GPIs if the cleavage is effected by a PI-PLC, whereas GPI-PLD cleavage could result in both L-chiro- and D-chiro-inositol-containing IPGs. PMID:16315198

  10. PC-PLC/sphingomyelin synthase activity plays a central role in the development of myogenic tone in murine resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zacharia, Joseph; Fairfax, Seth; Wier, Withrow Gil

    2015-01-01

    Myogenic tone is an intrinsic property of the vasculature that contributes to blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. Earlier investigations assigned a key role in myogenic tone to phospholipase C (PLC) and its products, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Here, we used the PLC inhibitor, U-73122, and two other, specific inhibitors of PLC subtypes (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) to delineate the role of PLC in myogenic tone of pressurized murine mesenteric arteries. U-73122 inhibited depolarization-induced contractions (high external K+ concentration), thus confirming reports of nonspecific actions of U-73122 and its limited utility for studies of myogenic tone. Edelfosine, a specific inhibitor of PI-PLC, did not affect depolarization-induced contractions but modulated myogenic tone. Because PI-PLC produces IP3, we investigated the effect of blocking IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release on myogenic tone. Incubation of arteries with xestospongin C did not affect tone, consistent with the virtual absence of Ca2+ waves in arteries with myogenic tone. D-609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC and sphingomyelin synthase, strongly inhibited myogenic tone and had no effect on depolarization-induced contraction. D-609 appeared to act by lowering cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration to levels below those that activate contraction. Importantly, incubation of pressurized arteries with a membrane-permeable analog of DAG induced vasoconstriction. The results therefore mandate a reexamination of the signaling pathways activated by the Bayliss mechanism. Our results suggest that PI-PLC and IP3 are not required in maintaining myogenic tone, but DAG, produced by PC-PLC and/or SM synthase, is likely through multiple mechanisms to increase Ca2+ entry and promote vasoconstriction. PMID:25888510

  11. A Role for Weak Electrostatic Interactions in Peripheral Membrane Protein Binding.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hanif M; He, Tao; Fuglebakk, Edvin; Grauffel, Cédric; Yang, Boqian; Roberts, Mary F; Gershenson, Anne; Reuter, Nathalie

    2016-03-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (BtPI-PLC) is a secreted virulence factor that binds specifically to phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers containing negatively charged phospholipids. BtPI-PLC carries a negative net charge and its interfacial binding site has no obvious cluster of basic residues. Continuum electrostatic calculations show that, as expected, nonspecific electrostatic interactions between BtPI-PLC and membranes vary as a function of the fraction of anionic lipids present in the bilayers. Yet they are strikingly weak, with a calculated ΔGel below 1 kcal/mol, largely due to a single lysine (K44). When K44 is mutated to alanine, the equilibrium dissociation constant for small unilamellar vesicles increases more than 50 times (∼2.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that interactions between K44 and lipids are not merely electrostatic. Comparisons of molecular-dynamics simulations performed using different lipid compositions reveal that the bilayer composition does not affect either hydrogen bonds or hydrophobic contacts between the protein interfacial binding site and bilayers. However, the occupancies of cation-π interactions between PC choline headgroups and protein tyrosines vary as a function of PC content. The overall contribution of basic residues to binding affinity is also context dependent and cannot be approximated by a rule-of-thumb value because these residues can contribute to both nonspecific electrostatic and short-range protein-lipid interactions. Additionally, statistics on the distribution of basic amino acids in a data set of membrane-binding domains reveal that weak electrostatics, as observed for BtPI-PLC, might be a less unusual mechanism for peripheral membrane binding than is generally thought. PMID:27028646

  12. Importance of phosphoinositide-dependent signaling pathways in the control of gene expression in resting cells and in response to phytohormones

    PubMed Central

    Kalachova, Tetiana; Kravets, Volodymyr; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2015-01-01

    “Phosphoinositide” refers to phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol, including phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. Both of these molecules could be in vivo substrates of plant phospholipase C. These phosphoinositides can also be biologically active “per se,” by directly binding to proteins and thus altering their location and/or activity. The use of pharmacological agents in Arabidopsis suspension cells allowed us to identify genes whose expression was positively or negatively controlled, in the basal state, by products of phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C. In this basal state, it seems that no genes exhibit a phosphoinositide-dependent expression “per se.” However, many genes whose expression is altered in the presence of phospholipase C inhibitors appeared to be responsive to salicylic acid. This allowed us to show that salicylic acid acts both by increasing the phosphoinositide pool and by inhibiting the phospholipase C. In response to salicylic acid it is possible to identify genes whose expression is controlled by products of PI-PLC, but also genes whose expression is controlled by phosphoinositides “per se.” Our data highlight the importance of phosphoinositide-dependent pathways in gene expression in resting cells and in response to phytohormones. PMID:26039482

  13. Mechanisms of inhibition and potentiation of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by members of the Ly6 protein family.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meilin; Puddifoot, Clare A; Taylor, Palmer; Joiner, William J

    2015-10-01

    α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are abundantly expressed throughout the central nervous system and are thought to be the primary target of nicotine, the main addictive substance in cigarette smoking. Understanding the mechanisms by which these receptors are regulated may assist in developing compounds to selectively interfere with nicotine addiction. Here we report previously unrecognized modulatory properties of members of the Ly6 protein family on α4β2 nAChRs. Using a FRET-based Ca(2+) flux assay, we found that the maximum response of α4β2 receptors to agonist was strongly inhibited by Ly6h and Lynx2 but potentiated by Ly6g6e. The mechanisms underlying these opposing effects appear to be fundamentally distinct. Receptor inhibition by Lynx2 was accompanied by suppression of α4β2 expression at the cell surface, even when assays were preceded by chronic exposure of cells to an established chaperone, nicotine. Receptor inhibition by Lynx2 also was resistant to pretreatment with extracellular phospholipase C, which cleaves lipid moieties like those that attach Ly6 proteins to the plasma membrane. In contrast, potentiation of α4β2 activity by Ly6g6e was readily reversible by pretreatment with phospholipase C. Potentiation was also accompanied by slowing of receptor desensitization and an increase in peak currents. Collectively our data support roles for Lynx2 and Ly6g6e in intracellular trafficking and allosteric potentiation of α4β2 nAChRs, respectively. PMID:26276394

  14. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  15. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  16. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  17. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  18. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Family Health History Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Family Health History The Basics Family Health History & Chronic Disease Planning ...

  19. Detection of multiple virulence-associated genes in Listeria monocytogenes isolated from bovine mastitis cases.

    PubMed

    Rawool, D B; Malik, S V S; Shakuntala, I; Sahare, A M; Barbuddhe, S B

    2007-01-25

    Clinical samples (n=725) were collected from bovines (n=243) which were positive for mastitis using the California mastitis test (CMT) and somatic cell count (SCC). The clinical samples comprising blood (n=239), milk (n=243), and faecal swabs (n=243) were examined for the presence of pathogenic Listeria spp. Isolation of the pathogen was done using selective enrichment in University of Vermont Medium and plating onto Dominguez-Rodriguez isolation agar. Confirmation of the isolates was based on biochemical tests and Christie, Atkins, Munch-Petersen (CAMP) test followed by pathogenicity testing. Pathogenicity of the isolates was tested by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) assay as well as in vivo tests namely, chick embryo and mice inoculation tests. The isolates were subjected to PCR assay for five virulence-associated genes, plcA, prfA, hlyA, actA and iap. Listeria spp. were isolated from 12 (1.66%) samples. Of these 4 (0.55%) and 1 (0.14%) were confirmed as Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii, respectively. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii were recovered from milk samples (2) and faecal (3) of mastitic cattle (3) and buffaloes (2). L. monocytogenes recovered from the milk of mastitic cattle and L. ivanovii from the faecal swab of buffalo turned out to be pathogenic. However, the remaining three hemolytic isolates exhibiting positive CAMP test turned out to be negative in PI-PLC assay, chick embryo and mice inoculation. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii isolates characterized as pathogenic by PI-PLC assay and in vivo pathogenicity tests were found to possess all the five virulence-associated genes and three genes, plcA, prfA and actA respectively. The remaining three hemolytic but non-pathogenic L. monocytogenes isolates were negative for plcA by PCR. It seems that the plcA gene and its expression (in the PI-PLC assay) have an important role as virulence determinants in pathogenic Listeria spp. In conclusion, the PI-PLC assay and

  20. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  1. Dopamine agonists rescue Aβ-induced LTP impairment by Src-family tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Yuan Xiang, PingAn; Janc, Oliwia; Grochowska, Katarzyna M; Kreutz, Michael R; Reymann, Klaus G

    2016-04-01

    Soluble forms of oligomeric amyloid beta (AβO) are involved in the loss of synaptic plasticity and memory, especially in early phases of Alzheimer's disease. Stimulation of dopamine D1/D5 receptors (D1R/D5R) is known to increase surface expression of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate subtype glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype glutamate receptors and facilitates the induction of the late phase of long-term potentiation (LTP), probably via a related mechanism. In this study, we show that the D1/D5R agonist SKF38393 protects LTP of hippocampal CA1 synapses from the deleterious action of oligomeric amyloid beta. Unexpectedly, the D1R/D5R-mediated recovery of LTP is independent of protein kinase A or phospholipase C pathways. Instead, we found that the inhibition of Src-family tyrosine kinases completely abolished the protective effects of D1R/D5R stimulation in a cellular model of learning and memory. PMID:26973108

  2. Cancer, Families, and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen; Gillig, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the family counselor in working with cancer patients and their families. Suggests ways in which the family counselor can work proactively with families in the area of cancer prevention and helping them cope more effectively with its impact on their lives. Uses a clinical case example to illustrate intervention with cancer…

  3. Family therapy by family doctors

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, R.

    1982-01-01

    The experiences of a group of general practitioners learning and attempting family therapy are described. Three principles for working with whole families — facilitation, formulation and focussing — are illustrated by case histories. Family therapy in general practice can be effective for patients and worthwhile for family doctors. PMID:7153974

  4. FAMILIAL SUICIDE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, K.E. Sadanaandan

    1996-01-01

    Seven completed suicides in a family of lower socioeconomic status and suburban domicile in Pondicherry are reported. The presence of bipolar affective disorder in the family members and the absence of exogenous factors are illustrated by utilising both family history method and family study method. The details collected formed the basis for the terminology ‘familial suicide’. The management of the index case, one of the only three surviving male members of the family, who presented with suicidal ruminations and depressive features, is described. PMID:21584122

  5. Family Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainor, Peggy

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Kellogg Family Collaborative project that involves the University of Montana and four tribal colleges in a family-strengths approach to improving student retention and achievement. States that the project is grounded in social work theory and research that recognize and reinforce family and student resilience through promotion of…

  6. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  7. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  8. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  9. Removal of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor from PrP(Sc) by cathepsin D does not reduce prion infectivity.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Patrick A; Properzi, Francesca; Prodromidou, Kanella; Clarke, Anthony R; Collinge, John; Jackson, Graham S

    2006-04-15

    According to the protein-only hypothesis of prion propagation, prions are composed principally of PrP(Sc), an abnormal conformational isoform of the prion protein, which, like its normal cellular precursor (PrP(C)), has a GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor at the C-terminus. To date, elucidating the role of this anchor on the infectivity of prion preparations has not been possible because of the resistance of PrP(Sc) to the activity of PI-PLC (phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C), an enzyme which removes the GPI moiety from PrP(C). Removal of the GPI anchor from PrP(Sc) requires denaturation before treatment with PI-PLC, a process that also abolishes infectivity. To circumvent this problem, we have removed the GPI anchor from PrP(Sc) in RML (Rocky Mountain Laboratory)-prion-infected murine brain homogenate using the aspartic endoprotease cathepsin D. This enzyme eliminates a short sequence at the C-terminal end of PrP to which the GPI anchor is attached. We found that this modification has no effect (i) on an in vitro amplification model of PrP(Sc), (ii) on the prion titre as determined by a highly sensitive N2a-cell based bioassay, or (iii) in a mouse bioassay. These results show that the GPI anchor has little or no role in either the propagation of PrP(Sc) or on prion infectivity. PMID:16441239

  10. Removal of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor from PrPSc by cathepsin D does not reduce prion infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Patrick A.; Properzi, Francesca; Prodromidou, Kanella; Clarke, Anthony R.; Collinge, John; Jackson, Graham S.

    2006-01-01

    According to the protein-only hypothesis of prion propagation, prions are composed principally of PrPSc, an abnormal conformational isoform of the prion protein, which, like its normal cellular precursor (PrPC), has a GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor at the C-terminus. To date, elucidating the role of this anchor on the infectivity of prion preparations has not been possible because of the resistance of PrPSc to the activity of PI-PLC (phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C), an enzyme which removes the GPI moiety from PrPC. Removal of the GPI anchor from PrPSc requires denaturation before treatment with PI-PLC, a process that also abolishes infectivity. To circumvent this problem, we have removed the GPI anchor from PrPSc in RML (Rocky Mountain Laboratory)-prion-infected murine brain homogenate using the aspartic endoprotease cathepsin D. This enzyme eliminates a short sequence at the C-terminal end of PrP to which the GPI anchor is attached. We found that this modification has no effect (i) on an in vitro amplification model of PrPSc, (ii) on the prion titre as determined by a highly sensitive N2a-cell based bioassay, or (iii) in a mouse bioassay. These results show that the GPI anchor has little or no role in either the propagation of PrPSc or on prion infectivity. PMID:16441239