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Sample records for phospholipid turnover relevant

  1. Turnover of pancreas phospholipids in rats fed inadequate dietary protein.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, V; Kumar, V; Misra, U K

    1986-01-01

    Effect of feeding rice diets with and without lysine and threonine supplementation has been studied on phospholipid turnover of rat pancreas and compared to rats fed casein diet at 20% protein level. Rice diet without amino acid supplementation significantly reduced the levels of pancreas PC, PE, PI, PS and Sph and increased that of total cholesterol and TG. Incorporation of palmitate-1-14C, labelled choline, labelled methionine and NaH2(32)PO4 into PC and of palmitate-1-14C into TG was significantly reduced in rats fed unsupplemented rice diet. Incorporation of NaH2(32)PO4 into pancreas PI, DPI, TPI, PA, LPA and into IP, IP2', IP3 and GPI was significantly reduced in rats fed unsupplemented rice diet. PMID:3781752

  2. Phospholipid turnover during phagocytosis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    García Gil, Merche; Alonso, Fernando; Alvarez Chiva, Vicente; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Mato, José M.

    1982-01-01

    We have previously observed that the phagocytosis of zymosan particles coated with complement by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes is accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation [García Gil, Alonso, Sánchez Crespo & Mato (1981) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 101, 740–748]. The present studies show that phosphatidylcholine synthesis by a cholinephosphotransferase reaction is enhanced, up to 3-fold, during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. This effect was tested by both measuring the incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine in cells labelled with [Me-14C]choline, and by assaying the activity of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase. The time course of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase activation by zymosan mirrors the inhibition of phospholipid methyltransferase activity previously reported. The extent of incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine induced by various doses of zymosan correlates with the physiological response of the cells to this stimulus. This effect was specific for phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine turnover was not affected by zymosan. The purpose of this enhanced phosphatidylcholine synthesis is not to provide phospholipid molecules rich in arachidonic acid. The present studies show that about 80% of the arachidonic acid generated in response to zymosan derives from phosphatidylinositol. A transient accumulation of arachidonoyldiacylglycerol has also been observed, which indicates that a phospholipase C is responsible, at least in part, for the generation of arachidonic acid. Finally, isobutylmethylxanthine and quinacrine, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol turnover, inhibit both arachidonic acid generation and phagocytosis, indicating a function for this pathway during this process. PMID:6181780

  3. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  4. The turnover of myelin phospholipids in the adult and developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Jungalwala, F. B.; Dawson, R. M. C.

    1971-01-01

    1. Inorganic [32P]phosphate, [U-14C]glycerol and [2-14C]ethanolamine were injected into the lateral ventricles in the brains of adult rats, and the labelling of individual phospholipids was followed over 2–4 months in both a microsomal and a highly purified myelin fraction. 2. All the phospholipids in myelin became appreciably labelled, although initially the specific radioactivities of the microsomal phospholipids were somewhat higher. Eventually the specific radioactivities in microsomal and myelin phospholipids fell rapidly at a rate corresponding to the decline of radioactivity in the acid-soluble pools. 3. Equivalent experiments carried out in developing rats with [32P]phosphate administered at the start of myelination showed some persistence of phospholipid labelling in the myelin, but this could partly be attributed to the greater retention of 32P in the acid-soluble phosphorus pool and recycling. 4. It is concluded that a substantial part of the phospholipid molecules in adult myelin membranes is readily exchangeable, although a small pool of slowly exchangeable material also exists. 5. A slow incorporation into or loss of labelled precursor from myelin phospholipids does not necessarily give a good indication of the rate of renewal of the molecules in the membrane. As presumably such labelled molecules originate by exchange with those in another membrane site (not necessarily where synthesis occurs) it is only possible to calculate the turnover rate in the myelin membrane if the behaviour of the specific radioactivity with time of the phospholipid molecules in the immediate precursor pool is known. PMID:5124379

  5. Depletion of arachidonic acid from GH3 cells. Effects on inositol phospholipid turnover and cellular activation.

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, D T; Macfarlane, D E; Spector, A A

    1987-01-01

    We have adapted rat pituitary GH3 cells to grow in delipidated culture medium. In response, esterfied linoleic acid and arachidonic acid become essentially undetectable, whereas eicosa-5,8,11-trienoic acid accumulates and oleic acid increases markedly. These changes occur in all phospholipid classes, but are particularly pronounced in inositol phospholipids, where the usual stearate/arachidonate profile is replaced with oleate/eicosatrienoate (n - 9) and stearate/eicosatrienoate (n - 9). Incubation of arachidonate-depleted cells with 10 microM-arachidonic acid for only 24 h results in extensive remodelling of phospholipid fatty acids, such that close-to-normal compositions and arachidonic acid content are achieved for the inositol phospholipids. In comparison studies with arachidonic acid-depleted or -repleted cells, it was found that the arachidonate content does not affect thyrotropin-releasing-hormone (TRH)-stimulated responses measured at long time points, including [32P]Pi labelling of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid, stimulation of protein phosphorylation, and basal or TRH-stimulated prolactin release. However, transient events such as stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids and an initial rise in diacylglycerol are enhanced by the presence of arachidonate. These results show that arachidonic acid itself is not required for operation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and is not an obligatory intermediate in TRH-mediated GH3 cell activation. It is possible that any structural or functional role of arachidonic acid in these processes is largely met by replacement with eicosatrienoate (n - 9). However, since arachidonate in inositol phospholipids facilitates their hydrolysis upon stimulation by TRH, arachidonic acid apparently may have a specific role in the recognition of these lipids by phospholipase C. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3120699

  6. Subcellular localization of yeast Sec14 homologues and their involvement in regulation of phospholipid turnover.

    PubMed

    Schnabl, Martina; Oskolkova, Olga V; Holic, Roman; Brezná, Barbara; Pichler, Harald; Zágorsek, Milos; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Paltauf, Fritz; Daum, Günther; Griac, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Sec14p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in protein secretion and regulation of lipid synthesis and turnover in vivo, but acts as a phosphatidylinositol-phosphatidylcholine transfer protein in vitro. In this work, the five homologues of Sec14p, Sfh1p-Sfh5p, were subjected to biochemical and cell biological analysis to get a better view of their physiological role. We show that overexpression of SFH2 and SFH4 suppressed the sec14 growth defect in a more and SFH1 in a less efficient way, whereas overexpression of SFH3 and SFH5 did not complement sec14. Using C-terminal yEGFP fusions, Sfh2p, Sfh4p and Sfh5p are mainly localized to the cytosol and microsomes similar to Sec14p. Sfh1p was detected in the nucleus and Sfh3p in lipid particles and in microsomes. In contrast to Sec14p, which inhibits phospholipase D1 (Pld1p), overproduction of Sfh2p and Sfh4p resulted in the activation of Pld1p-mediated phosphatidylcholine turnover. Interestingly, Sec14p and the two homologues Sfh2p and Sfh4p downregulate phospholipase B1 (Plb1p)-mediated turnover of phosphatidylcholine in vivo. In summary, Sfh2p and Sfh4p are the Sec14p homologues with the most pronounced functional similarity to Sec14p, whereas the other Sfh proteins appear to be functionally less related to Sec14p. PMID:12869188

  7. Phospholipid turnover in Torpedo marmorata electric organ during discharge in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, J E; Hawthorne, J N; Widlund, L; Heilbronn, E

    1976-01-01

    One electric organ of anaesthetized Torpedo marmorata was stimulated through electrodes placed on the electric lobe of the brain. Nerves to the other electric organ were cut to provide an unstimulated control. Glucose 6-[32P]phosphate was injected into each organ 16h before electrical stimulation. After stimulation for 10 min at 5 Hz, the organs were removed homogenized and centrifuged on a density gradient for the preparation of subcellular fractions. Stimulation increased the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidate, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine. The increased phosphatidate labelling, but not that of the other two lipids, was seen in fractions rich in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation had no effect on ATP labelling. The phosphatidate content of most fractions fell slightly after stimulation, but amounts of other phospholipids were not affected. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:825114

  8. Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 Is Induced by Gram-negative Bacteria and Lipopolysaccharide and Is Required for Phospholipid Turnover in Stimulated Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Rubinow, Katya B.; Wall, Valerie Z.; Nelson, Joel; Mar, Daniel; Bomsztyk, Karol; Askari, Bardia; Lai, Marvin A.; Smith, Kelly D.; Han, Myoung Sook; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Albert, Carolyn J.; Ford, David A.; Davis, Roger J.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) is induced by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARγ in insulin target tissues, such as skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, and plays an important role in β-oxidation in these tissues. In macrophages, however, ACSL1 mediates inflammatory effects without significant effects on β-oxidation. Thus, the function of ACSL1 varies in different tissues. We therefore investigated the signals and signal transduction pathways resulting in ACSL1 induction in macrophages as well as the consequences of ACSL1 deficiency for phospholipid turnover in LPS-activated macrophages. LPS, Gram-negative bacteria, IFN-γ, and TNFα all induce ACSL1 expression in macrophages, whereas PPAR agonists do not. LPS-induced ACSL1 expression is dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its adaptor protein TRIF (Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 1) but does not require the MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88) arm of TLR4 signaling; nor does it require STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1) for maximal induction. Furthermore, ACSL1 deletion attenuates phospholipid turnover in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Thus, the regulation and biological function of ACSL1 in macrophages differ markedly from that in insulin target tissues. These results suggest that ACSL1 may have an important role in the innate immune response. Further, these findings illustrate an interesting paradigm in which the same enzyme, ACSL1, confers distinct biological effects in different cell types, and these disparate functions are paralleled by differences in the pathways that regulate its expression. PMID:23426369

  9. Disruption of G1-phase phospholipid turnover by inhibition of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 induces a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest in G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu Hannah; Zhao, Chunying; Seleznev, Konstantin; Song, Keying; Manfredi, James J; Ma, Zhongmin Alex

    2006-03-15

    The G1 phase of the cell cycle is characterized by a high rate of membrane phospholipid turnover. Cells regulate this turnover by coordinating the opposing actions of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase and the group VI Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2). However, little is known about how such turnover affects cell-cycle progression. Here, we show that G1-phase phospholipid turnover is essential for cell proliferation. Specific inhibition of iPLA2 arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This G1-phase arrest was associated with marked upregulation of the tumour suppressor p53 and the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1. Inactivation of iPLA2 failed to arrest p53-deficient HCT cells in the G1 phase and caused massive apoptosis of p21-deficient HCT cells, suggesting that this G1-phase arrest requires activation of p53 and expression of p21cip1. Furthermore, downregulation of p53 by siRNA in p21-deficient HCT cells reduced the cell death, indicating that inhibition of iPLA2 induced p53-dependent apoptosis in the absence of p21cip1. Thus, our study reveals hitherto unrecognized cooperation between p53 and iPLA2 to monitor membrane-phospholipid turnover in G1 phase. Disrupting the G1-phase phospholipid turnover by inhibition of iPLA2 activates the p53-p21cip1 checkpoint mechanism, thereby blocking the entry of G1-phase cells into S phase. PMID:16492706

  10. Clinical relevance of multiple antibody specificity testing in anti-phospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Tebo, A E; Jaskowski, T D; Hill, H R; Branch, D W

    2008-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate whether testing for anti-phosholipid antibodies other than anti-cardiolipin (aCL) and anti-beta-2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM identifies patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) who may be positive for anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). In a cross-sectional study comprising 62 patients with APS, 66 women with RPL, 50 healthy blood donors and 24 women with a history of successful pregnancies, we tested IgM and IgG antibodies to phosphatidic acid, phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol and phosphatidyl serine with and without beta-2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) from a single manufacturer as well as aCL and aβ2GPI antibodies. Diagnostic accuracies of individual and combined anti-phospholipid (aPL) assays were assessed by computing sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values and negative predictive values together with their 95% confidence intervals. There was a general trend for increased sensitivities in the presence of β2GPI co-factor with significant effect for certain specificities. The overall combined sensitivity of the non-recommended aPL assays was not significantly higher than that of the aCL and aB2GPI tests. Multiple aPL specificities in RPL group is not significantly different from controls and therefore of no clinical significance. PMID:18826497

  11. Clinical relevance of multiple antibody specificity testing in anti-phospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Tebo, A E; Jaskowski, T D; Hill, H R; Branch, D W

    2008-12-01

    We wanted to evaluate whether testing for anti-phosholipid antibodies other than anti-cardiolipin (aCL) and anti-beta-2 glycoprotein I (abeta2GPI) immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM identifies patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) who may be positive for anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). In a cross-sectional study comprising 62 patients with APS, 66 women with RPL, 50 healthy blood donors and 24 women with a history of successful pregnancies, we tested IgM and IgG antibodies to phosphatidic acid, phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol and phosphatidyl serine with and without beta-2 glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) from a single manufacturer as well as aCL and abeta2GPI antibodies. Diagnostic accuracies of individual and combined anti-phospholipid (aPL) assays were assessed by computing sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values and negative predictive values together with their 95% confidence intervals. There was a general trend for increased sensitivities in the presence of beta2GPI co-factor with significant effect for certain specificities. The overall combined sensitivity of the non-recommended aPL assays was not significantly higher than that of the aCL and aB2GPI tests. Multiple aPL specificities in RPL group is not significantly different from controls and therefore of no clinical significance. PMID:18826497

  12. Minimal Peptidoglycan (PG) Turnover in Wild-Type and PG Hydrolase and Cell Division Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 Growing Planktonically and in Host-Relevant Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Michael J.; Kuru, Erkin; Rittichier, Jonathan T.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    as signals for bacteria to induce antibiotic resistance and as activators of innate immune responses. S. pneumoniae is a commensal bacterium that colonizes the human nasopharynx and opportunistically causes serious respiratory and invasive diseases. The results presented here demonstrate a distinct demarcation between regions of old PG and regions of new PG synthesis and minimal turnover of PG in S. pneumoniae cells growing in culture or in host-relevant biofilms. These findings suggest that S. pneumoniae minimizes the release of PG breakdown products by turnover, which may contribute to evasion of the innate immune system. PMID:26303829

  13. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  14. Turnover Begets Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the association between turnover of caregivers and turnover of nursing home top management. The top managers examined were administrators and directors of nursing, and the caregivers examined were registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides. Design and Methods: The data came from a survey of 419…

  15. Phospholipid Scramblases

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of phospholipid types between the two leaflets of a membrane bilayer is a controlled feature of membrane structure. One of the two membrane catalytic activities governing this distribution randomizes the composition of the two leaflets—the phospholipid scramblases. Two proteins (Xkr8 and TMEM16F) required for the activation of these activities have been identified. One of these proteins (TMEM16F) is quite clearly a scramblase itself and provides insight into the mechanism by which transbilayer phospholipid movement is facilitated. PMID:26843813

  16. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is composed of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23026158

  17. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients*

    PubMed Central

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-01-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  18. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  19. Phospholipid transport via mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yasushi; Sesaki, Hiromi; Endo, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, complex membrane structures called organelles are highly developed to exert specialized functions. Mitochondria are one of such organelles consisting of the outer and inner membranes with characteristic protein and phospholipid compositions. Maintaining proper phospholipid compositions of the membranes is crucial for mitochondrial integrity, thereby contributing to normal cell activities. Since cellular locations for phospholipid synthesis are restricted to specific compartments such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and the mitochondrial inner membrane, newly synthesized phospholipids have to be transported and distributed properly from the ER or mitochondria to other cellular membranes. Although understanding of molecular mechanisms of phospholipid transport are much behind those of protein transport, recent studies using yeast as a model system began to provide intriguing insights into phospholipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria as well as between the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes. In this review, we summarize the latest findings of phospholipid transport via mitochondria and discuss the implicated molecular mechanisms. PMID:24954234

  20. Phospholipid Metabolism in Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Short, Steven A.; White, David C.; Aleem, M. I. H.

    1969-01-01

    The lipid composition of the chemoautotroph Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans has been examined. Fatty acids represent 2% of the dry weight of the cells and 86% of the total are extractable with organic solvents. About 25% of the total fatty acids are associated with diacyl phospholipids. Polar carotenoids, the benzoquinone coenzyme Q-8, and most of the fatty acids are present in the neutral lipids. The phospholipids have been identified as phosphatidyl monomethylethanolamine (42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (23%), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20%), cardiolipin (13%), phosphatidyl choline (1.5%), and phosphatidyl dimethylethanolamine (1%) by chromatography of the diacyl lipids, by chromatography in four systems of the glycerol phosphate esters derived from the lipids by mild alkaline methanolysis, and by chromatographic identification of the products of acid hydrolysis of the esters. No trace of phosphatidylserine (PS), glycerolphosphorylserine, or serine could be detected in the lipid extract or in derivatives of that extract. This casts some doubt on the postulated involvement of PS in iron metabolism. After growth in the presence of 14C and 32P, there was essentially no difference in the turnover of either isotope in the glycerolphosphate ester derived from each lipid in cells grown at pH 1.5 or 3.5. Images PMID:5802599

  1. Tissue phospholipids (TPL) in avian tuberculosis (AT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nandedkar, A.K.N.; Malhotra, H.C.

    1986-05-01

    AT constitutes one of the major problems in animal husbandry. Chickens (white, leg horn, male, 400-600 g) were infected with Mycobacterium avium maintained on I.U.T. medium to induce clinical AT which was confirmed by histopathological examinations of the affected tissues. Fatty infiltration and tissue enlargement was visible in infected birds. After 4 wks, incorporation of i.v. /sup 32/P (50 uCi/100 g body wt.) in affected tissues was followed for 3,7,9,12 hr intervals. Lipids were extracted and fractionated by silicic acid (SA) column and SA impregnated paper chromatography. When compared with pair-fed controls, in AT slower turnover of TPL in liver, slightly higher in heart and significantly increased turnover of TPL in serum were observed. No appreciable change in total TPL content was noticed in brain, spleen and kidney. Further fractionation of TPL provided better understanding of the metabolism. Increase in lysophosphatidyl-choline (LPC) and -ethanolamine (LPE) content, powerful hemolytic agents, in liver may explain frequent occurrence of anemia in tuberculosis. Also, a concomitant marked increase in the ratio of total saturated/unsaturated fatty acids is observed in serum phosphatidyl choline fraction. This confirms the observation that the membrane phospholipid metabolism is significantly affected in tuberculosis infection.

  2. Measurement of Phospholipids May Improve Diagnostic Accuracy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lorelei; Han, Gang; Zhu, Weiwei; Molina, Ashley D.; Arango, Hector; LaPolla, James P.; Hoffman, Mitchell S.; Sellers, Thomas; Kirby, Tyler; Nicosia, Santo V.; Sutphen, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background More than two-thirds of women who undergo surgery for suspected ovarian neoplasm do not have cancer. Our previous results suggest phospholipids as potential biomarkers of ovarian cancer. In this study, we measured the serum levels of multiple phospholipids among women undergoing surgery for suspected ovarian cancer to identify biomarkers that better predict whether an ovarian mass is malignant. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained serum samples preoperatively from women with suspected ovarian cancer enrolled through a prospective, population-based rapid ascertainment system. Samples were analyzed from all women in whom a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) was confirmed and from benign disease cases randomly selected from the remaining (non-EOC) samples. We measured biologically relevant phospholipids using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We applied a powerful statistical and machine learning approach, Hybrid huberized support vector machine (HH-SVM) to prioritize phospholipids to enter the biomarker models, and used cross-validation to obtain conservative estimates of classification error rates. Results The HH-SVM model using the measurements of specific combinations of phospholipids supplements clinical CA125 measurement and improves diagnostic accuracy. Specifically, the measurement of phospholipids improved sensitivity (identification of cases with preoperative CA125 levels below 35) among two types of cases in which CA125 performance is historically poor - early stage cases and those of mucinous histology. Measurement of phospholipids improved the identification of early stage cases from 65% (based on CA125) to 82%, and mucinous cases from 44% to 88%. Conclusions/Significance Levels of specific serum phospholipids differ between women with ovarian cancer and those with benign conditions. If validated by independent studies in the future, these biomarkers may serve as an adjunct at the time of clinical

  3. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  4. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-02-01

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. We investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin-cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (∼334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexation of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder-order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. PMID:25298002

  5. [Phospholipids: properties and health effects].

    PubMed

    Torres García, Jairo; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids are amphipathic lipids, which are found in all the cell membranes, organized as a lipid bilayer. They belong to the glycerol-derived lipids, showing a similar structure as triglycerides. The current interest of them comes from its effectiveness to incorporate different fatty acids in the cell membrane, as they exhibit better absorption and utilization than triglycerides. In this paper, the bibliographical data published about the benefits of the phospholipids in inflammatory processes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, liver disease and as an antioxidants transporter is reviewed. PMID:25561100

  6. Effect of gentamicin on phospholipid metabolism in cultured rabbit proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsammy, L.S.; Josepovitz, C.; Lane, B.; Kaloyanides, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that the accumulation of phospholipid in cells exposed to gentamicin is due to impaired degradation. Experiments were performed in rabbit proximal tubular cells grown in primary culture. Cells exposed to 10(-3) M gentamicin manifested myeloid body formation and a progressive increase in total phospholipid that by day 6 was 44% higher than that of control cells and reflected increases of phosphatidylinositol of 235%, phosphatidylcholine of 60%, phosphatidylethanolamine of 90%, and phosphatidylserine of 55% above control values. Gentamicin impaired the degradation of these phospholipids. The t1/2 of the phospholipid pool labeled with (3H)myoinositol increased 146% from 1.17 (control) to 2.88 days (gentamicin); the t1/2 of the (3H)choline pool increased 34% from 1.77 to 2.38 days; the t1/2 of the (3H)ethanolamine pool increased 57% from 3.14 to 4.93 days; the t1/2 of the (3H) serine pool increased 37% from 6.30 to 8.63 days. Exposure of cells to gentamicin for 2 days also stimulated increased incorporation of (3H)myoinositol (68%) and (3H)ethanolamine (59%) into phospholipid. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that gentamicin inhibits the activity of lysosomal phospholipases that results in the accumulation of phospholipid within the lysosome in the form of myeloid bodies. Increased phospholipid synthesis may represent a compensatory response to the impaired lysosomal degradation of phospholipid. We postulate that the preferential increase of phosphatidylinositol reflects the capacity of the polycationic gentamicin to interact electrostatically with the anionic phosphoinositides and inhibit their turnover.

  7. Phospholipid Metabolism and Membrane Synthesis During Sporulation in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Karen; White, David

    1974-01-01

    In view of previously published reports of localized membrane growth in exponentially growing Bacillus megaterium and in sporulating Bacillus cereus, an attempt was made to describe phospholipid metabolism and the topology of membrane synthesis during sporulation in B. megaterium. The cells were pulsed with radioactive glycerol or acetate at the time of septum formation, and the specific activity of the lipid fraction was measured at various times through the free spore stage. The bulk of the material labeled during septation could not be recovered in the spore. Rather, it was found that the labeled lipid fraction underwent considerable turnover during spore development. Additionally, other experiments revealed that the lipid made before the initiation of sporulation was also subject to extensive turnover. In order to minimize both the confounding effects of lipid turnover and the possible presence of lateral diffusion of labeled lipid in the membrane, autoradiography of cells pulse labeled with radioactive glycerol at the time of septation was performed; a symmetrical grain distribution resulted. Thus, despite previously published suggestions to the contrary, the current experimental techniques could not demonstrate the existence of localized membrane synthesis in B. megaterium during sporulation. PMID:4206872

  8. Langmuir films containing ibuprofen and phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Pavinatto, Felippe J.; Nobre, Thatyane M.; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-02-01

    This study shows the incorporation of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug, in Langmuir monolayers as cell membrane models. Significant effects were observed for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) monolayers with relevant changes in the elasticity of the monolayer. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) monolayers were affected by small concentrations of ibuprofen, from 1 to 5 mol%. For both types of monolayer, ibuprofen could penetrate into the hydrophobic part of the monolayer, which was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed that ibuprofen prevents the formation of large domains of DPPC. The pharmacological action should occur primarily with penetration of ibuprofen via electrically neutral phospholipid headgroups of the membrane.

  9. Metabolism of the phospholipid precursor inositol and its relationship to growth and viability in the natural auxotroph Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, S; Homann, M J; Henry, S A; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was examined. Three enzymes of phospholipid biosynthesis, cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol synthase (CDP-DG), phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthase, and phosphatidylserine (PS) synthase, were characterized in extracts of S. pombe cells. Contrary to an earlier report, we were able to demonstrate that CDP-DG served as a precursor for PI and PS biosynthesis in S. pombe. S. pombe is naturally auxotrophic for the phospholipid precursor inositol. We found that S. pombe was much more resistant to loss of viability during inositol starvation than artificially generated inositol auxotrophs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phospholipid composition of S. pombe cells grown in inositol-rich medium (50 microM) was similar to that of S. cerevisiae cells grown under similar conditions. However, growth of S. pombe at low inositol concentrations (below 30 microM) affected the ratio of the anionic phospholipids PI and PS, while the relative proportions of other glycerophospholipids remained unchanged. During inositol starvation, the rate of PI synthesis decreased rapidly, and there was a concomitant increase in the rate of PS synthesis. Phosphatidic acid and CDP-DG, which are precursors to these phospholipids, also increased when PI synthesis was blocked by lack of exogenous inositol. The major product of turnover of inositol-containing phospholipids in S. pombe was found to be free inositol, which accumulated in the medium and could be reused by the cell. Images PMID:3011744

  10. [Relevance of metabolism of membrane phospholipids for Alzheimer dementia].

    PubMed

    Gattaz, W F; Levy, R; Cairns, N J; Förstl, H; Braus, D F; Maras, A

    1996-01-01

    We found a decreased activity of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in brain tissue from 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to 20 non-demented controls. The decrement was more pronounced in patients with an early onset of disease and correlated significantly with higher counts of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Decreased PLA2 activity may inhibit the secretion of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and thus contribute to the formation of the beta-amyloid peptide, the major component of the amyloid plaque in AD. Because PLA2 activity is under genetic control, it is conceivable that the enzyme activity in the brain is related to the activity in blood cells. To test this assumption we investigated PLA2 in platelet membranes from AD patients compared to healthy and psychiatric controls. Platelets are interesting peripheral models in AD research, because they contain and secrete APP. We determined the platelet PLA2 activity in 16 patients with a "probable" AD (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) as compared to 13 healthy controls and to 14 psychiatric patients with a major depression. There were no significant differences between the three groups regarding age and sex distribution. In the AD patients the cognitive performance was assessed with the CAMCOG and the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE). The radioenzymatic assay for the determination of PLA2 activity is described elsewhere. Platelet PLA2 activity was significantly reduced in AD patients as compared to healthy (p < 0.03) and to psychiatric controls (p < 0.002). The reduction of the enzyme activity correlated with an early onset of the disease (rs = .43, p < 0.10) and with the cognitive impairment in the CAMCOG (rs = .55, p < 0.05). AD patients with a MMSE-score lower than 10 (median) showed significantly lower PLA2 activity (11.8 +/- 3.1) than patients with MMSE-score higher than 10 (16.2 +/- 4.6, p < 0.05). These findings in platelets are in line with our previous results in brain tissue. In both studies decreased PLA2 activity was related to a more severe form of AD (early onset, more cognitive impairment and higher number of plaques and tangles). Moreover, reduced platelet PLA2 activity was specific for AD as compared to age-matched psychiatric controls. Further studies should clarify whether PLA2 activity in platelets could be useful as a peripheral marker for a subgroup of AD. PMID:8850090

  11. Calcium dependency of arachidonic acid incorporation into cellular phospholipids of different cell types.

    PubMed

    Daniele, J J; Fidelio, G D; Bianco, I D

    1999-07-01

    Ca2+ -independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is involved in the incorporation of arachidonic acid (AA) into resting macrophages by the generation of the lysophospholipid acceptor. The role of iPLA2 in AA remodeling in different cells was evaluated by studying the Ca2+ dependency of AA uptake from the medium, the incorporation into cellular phospholipids, and the effect of the iPLA2 inhibitor bromoenol lactone on these events. Uptake and esterification of AA into phospholipids were not affected by Ca2+ depletion in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and rat fibroblasts. The uptake was Ca2+ independent in chick embryo glial cells, but the incorporation into phospholipids was partially dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Both events were fully dependent on extra and intracellular Ca2+ in human platelets. In human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, the kinetics of incorporation in several isospecies of phospholipids was not affected by the absence of Ca2+ at short times (<30 min). The involvement of iPLA2 in the incorporation of AA from the medium was confirmed by the selective inhibition of this enzyme with bromoenol lactone, which reduced < or =50% of the incorporation of AA into phospholipids of human neutrophils. These data provide evidence that suggests iPLA2 plays a major role in regulating AA turnover in different cell types. PMID:10480488

  12. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  13. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  14. Interactions of Amelogenin with Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral and cell surfaces. We investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, towards the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin-cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. Though in DLS studies we cannot exclude the possibility of fusion of liposomes as the result of amelogenin addition, NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder-order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong FRET from Trp in rP172 to DNS–bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. PMID:25298002

  15. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  16. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  17. Modulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase by Neutral Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M.; González-Flecha, F. Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA). We found that Ca2+-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca2+-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA. PMID:25605721

  18. Recent advances and future prospects of phyto-phospholipid complexation technique for improving pharmacokinetic profile of plant actives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid; Alexander, Amit; Ajazuddin; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, Shailendra

    2013-05-28

    The phyto-phospholipid complexation technique has emerged as one of the leading methods of improving bioavailability of phytopharmaceuticals having poor competency of solubilizing and crossing the biological membranes. Several plant actives in spite having potent in vitro pharmacological activities have failed to demonstrate similar in vivo response. Such plant actives have been made more effective systemically by incorporating them with dietary phospholipids forming new cellular structures which are amphipathic in nature. In the last few years phospholipids have been extensively explored for improved bioavailability and efficacy of plant drugs. Further, it is also much relevant to mention that phospholipids show unique compatibility with biological membranes and have inherent hepatoprotective activity. Different methods have been adopted to formulate phospholipid complexes of plant extractives utilizing varying solvent systems, molar ratios of drug/phospholipids and different drying techniques. Some methods of formulating such drug-phospholipid complexes have been patented as well. However, the stability of phyto-phospholipid complexes is still a matter of concern which needs attention. But still a number of products exploiting this technique are under clinical trials and some of them are now in market. The current review highlights key findings of recent years with our own viewpoints which can give the new directions to this strategy and also includes advancements in the technical aspects of phyto-phospholipid formulations which have been done in the recent past with future challenges. PMID:23474031

  19. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  20. Occupational stress and employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Robert S; Day, Andrea J; Morton, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaire data captured in January-March 2007 were examined in relation to turnover in males and females during the next five years. In general, most of the workplace stressors (such as role conflict or peer support) were not antecedents of turnover in any group. Junior personnel with psychological strain in 2007 had an increased risk of turnover in the next five years. Low commitment to the service in 2007 increased the odds of turnover in male and female juniors and in female officers. Female juniors with less effective skills for coping with stress and who exercised less frequently on a weekly basis were more likely to leave. An incidental finding was that the odds of turnover were three times greater in female officers with children than in female officers with no children. Stress management interventions focusing on effective coping and sports and exercise participation which are targeted appropriately may improve retention. PMID:24047248

  1. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Our research for the past two years has involved the study of phosphoinositides and their potential role in regulating plant growth and development. Our initial goal was to document the sequence of events involved in inositol phospholipid metabolism in response to external stimuli. Our working hypothesis was that phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) was in the plasma membrane of plants cells and would be hydrolyzed by phospholipase C to yield the second messengers inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacyglycerol (DAG) and that IP/sub 3/ would mobilize intracellular calcium as has been shown for animal cells. Our results with both carrot suspension culture cells and sunflower hypocotyl indicate that this paradigm is not the primary mechanism of signal transduction in these systems. We have observed very rapid, within 5 sec, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase which resulted in an increase in PIP/sub 2/. However, there was no evidence for activation of phospholipase C. In addition, we have shown that PIP and PIP/sub 2/ can activate the plasma membrane ATPase. The results of these studies are described briefly in the paragraphs below. Inositol phospholipids are localized in distinct membrane fractions. If PIP and PIP/sub 2/ play a role in the transduction of external signals, they should be present in the plasma membrane. We used the fusogenic carrot suspension culture cells as a model system to study the distribution of inositol phospholipids in various membrane fractions and organelles. Cells were labeled 12 to 18 h with myo(2-/sup 3/H) inositol and the membranes were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The plasma membrane was enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/ compared to the intracellular membranes.

  2. Phospholipid liposomes functionalized by protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Savostyanov, G. V.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Finding new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in newborns is one of the contemporary problems of medicine and pharmaceutical industry. Modern researches in this field indicate the promising prospects of supramolecular transport systems for targeted drug delivery to the brain which can overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the solution of this problem is actual not only for medicine, but also for society as a whole because it determines the health of future generations. Phospholipid liposomes due to combination of lipo- and hydrophilic properties are considered as the main future objects in medicine for drug delivery through the BBB as well as increasing their bioavailability and toxicity. Liposomes functionalized by various proteins were used as transport systems for ease of liposomes use. Designing of modification oligosaccharide of liposomes surface is promising in the last decade because it enables the delivery of liposomes to specific receptor of human cells by selecting ligand and it is widely used in pharmacology for the treatment of several diseases. The purpose of this work is creation of a coarse-grained model of bilayer of phospholipid liposomes, functionalized by specific to the structural elements of the BBB proteins, as well as prediction of the most favorable orientation and position of the molecules in the generated complex by methods of molecular docking for the formation of the structure. Investigation of activity of the ligand molecule to protein receptor of human cells by the methods of molecular dynamics was carried out.

  3. Role of phospholipids in the actions of prolactin in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Etindi, R.O.N.

    1987-01-01

    These studies were designed to determine the role of phospholipid turnover in the mechanism of action of prolactin in mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis 12-16h after cultured mouse mammary tissues are exposed to it. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis at physiological concentrations and the response is maximal at all PRL concentrations above 25 ng/ml. p-Bromphenacyl bromide (BPB) at concentrations of 50 ..mu..M and above and quinacrine (50 ..mu..M) abolish the actions of prolactin on casein and lipid biosynthesis in cultured mouse mammary gland explants. In mouse mammary gland explants, binding of prolactin to its receptor leads to a phospholipase C type hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids, but this effect is transient and does not occur immediately after hormone exposure. Prolactin significantly stimulated the accumulation of (/sup 3/H)label in inositol monophosphate (IP/sub 1/), inositol bisphosphate (IP/sub 2/) and inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) 1-3 hours after addition of prolactin. Gossypol, a drug which has been shown to be an inhibitor of kinase C activity in mouse mammary tissues, is shown to abolish several of the actions of prolactin in cultured mouse mammary gland expalants.

  4. Extensive exchange of rat liver microsomal phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Zilversmit, D B; Hughes, M E

    1977-08-15

    Liver microsomal fractions were prepared from rats injected with a single dose of choline [14C]methylchloride or with single or multiple doses of 32Pi. Exchangeability of microsomal phospholipids was determined by incubation with an excess of mitochondria and phospholipid exchange proteins derived from beef heart, beef liver or rat liver. Labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were found to act as a single pool and were 85--95% exchangeable in 1--2h. High latencies of mannose-6-phosphate phosphohydrolase activities and impermeability of microsomes to EDTA proved that phospholipid exchange proteins did not have access to the intracisternal space. If microsomal membranes are largely composed of phospholipid bilayers, the experiments suggest that one or more of the phospholipid classes in microsomal membranes undergo rapid translocation between the inner and outer portions of the bilayer. PMID:889827

  5. Phospholipid composition of cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E J; Joseph, L; Stephens, R; Horrocks, L A

    1992-02-01

    Detailed analyses of the phospholipid compositions of cultured human endothelial cells are reported here. No significant differences were found between the phospholipid compositions of cells from human artery, saphenous and umbilical vein. However, due to the small sample sizes, relatively large standard deviations for some of the phospholipid classes were observed. A representative composition of endothelial cells is: phosphatidylcholine 36.6%, choline plasmalogen 3.7%, phosphatidylethanolamine 10.2%, ethanolamine plasmalogen 7.6%, sphingomyelin 10.8%, phosphatidylserine 7.1%, lysophosphatidylcholine 7.5%, phosphatidylinositol 3.1%, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 3.6%, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 1.8%, phosphatidic acid 1.9%, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 1.5%, and cardiolipin 1.9%. The cells possess high choline plasmalogen and lysophosphatidylethanolamine contents. The other phospholipids are within the normal biological ranges expected. Phospholipids were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and quantified by lipid phosphorus assay. PMID:1315902

  6. Patterning and characterization of model phospholipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Calzzani, Fernando A., Jr.; Taguenang, Jean M.; Sileshi, Redahegn K.; Sharma, Anup

    2008-08-01

    Phospholipid, which is a building block of biological membranes, plays an important role in compartmentalization of cellular reaction environment and control of the physicochemical conditions inside the reaction environment. Phospholipid bilayer membrane has been proposed as a natural biocompatible platform for attaching biological molecules like proteins for biosensing related application. Due to the enormous potential applications of biomimetic model biomembranes, various techniques for depositions and patterning of these membranes onto solid supports and their possible biotechnological applications have been reported by different groups. In this work, patterning of phospholipid thin-films is accomplished by interferometric lithography as well as using lithographic masks in liquid phase. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Atomic Force microscopy are used to characterize the model phospholipid membrane and the patterning technique. We describe an easy and reproducible technique for direct patterning of azo-dye (NBD)-labeled phospholipid (phosphatidylcholine) in aqueous medium using a low-intensity 488 nm Ar+ laser and various kinds of lithographic masks.

  7. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein. PMID:26928591

  8. Molecular Mechanisms for Biliary Phospholipid and Drug Efflux Mediated by ABCB4 and Bile Salts

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    On the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, several ABC transporters are responsible for the secretion of bile lipids. Among them, ABCB4, also called MDR3, is essential for the secretion of phospholipids from hepatocytes into bile. The biliary phospholipids are associated with bile salts and cholesterol in mixed micelles, thereby reducing the detergent activity and cytotoxicity of bile salts and preventing cholesterol crystallization. Mutations in the ABCB4 gene result in progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma. In vivo and cell culture studies have demonstrated that the secretion of biliary phospholipids depends on both ABCB4 expression and bile salts. In the presence of bile salts, ABCB4 located in nonraft membranes mediates the efflux of phospholipids, preferentially phosphatidylcholine. Despite high homology with ABCB1, ABCB4 expression cannot confer multidrug resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of ABCB4 functions and physiological relevance, and discusses the molecular mechanism for the ABCB4-mediated efflux of phospholipids. PMID:25133187

  9. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  10. Localization of Anionic Phospholipids in Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Piercen M.; Crooks, John A.; Leidl, Mathias; Yoon, Earl J.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid with a characteristically large curvature and is of growing interest for two primary reasons: (i) it binds to and regulates many peripheral membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria, and (ii) it is distributed asymmetrically in rod-shaped cells and is concentrated at the poles and division septum. Despite the growing number of studies of CL, its function in bacteria remains unknown. 10-N-Nonyl acridine orange (NAO) is widely used to image CL in bacteria and mitochondria, as its interaction with CL is reported to produce a characteristic red-shifted fluorescence emission. Using a suite of biophysical techniques, we quantitatively studied the interaction of NAO with anionic phospholipids under physiologically relevant conditions. We found that NAO is promiscuous in its binding and has photophysical properties that are largely insensitive to the structure of diverse anionic phospholipids to which it binds. Being unable to rely solely on NAO to characterize the localization of CL in Escherichia coli cells, we instead used quantitative fluorescence microscopy, mass spectrometry, and mutants deficient in specific classes of anionic phospholipids. We found CL and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) concentrated in the polar regions of E. coli cell membranes; depletion of CL by genetic approaches increased the concentration of PG at the poles. Previous studies suggested that some CL-binding proteins also have a high affinity for PG and display a pattern of cellular localization that is not influenced by depletion of CL. Framed within the context of these previous experiments, our results suggest that PG may play an essential role in bacterial physiology by maintaining the anionic character of polar membranes. PMID:25002539

  11. Analyzing plant signaling phospholipids through 32Pi-labeling and TLC.

    PubMed

    Munnik, Teun; Zarza, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Lipidomic analyses through LC-, GC-, and ESI-MS/MS can detect numerous lipid species based on headgroup and fatty acid compositions but usually miss the minor phospholipids involved in cell signaling because of their low chemical abundancy. Due to their high turnover, these signaling lipids are, however, readily picked up by labeling plant material with (32)P-orthophosphate and subsequent analysis of the lipid extracts by thin layer chromatography. Here, protocols are described for suspension-cultured tobacco BY-2 cells, young Arabidopsis seedlings, Vicia faba roots, and Arabidopsis leaf disks, which can easily be modified for other plant species and tissues. PMID:23681518

  12. Mitochondrial phospholipids: role in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential components of eukaryotic cells and are involved in a diverse set of cellular processes that include ATP production, cellular signalling, apoptosis and cell growth. These organelles are thought to have originated from a symbiotic relationship between prokaryotic cells in an effort to provide a bioenergetic jump and thus, the greater complexity observed in eukaryotes (Lane and Martin 2010). Mitochondrial processes are required not only for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, but also allow cell to cell and tissue to tissue communication (Nunnari and Suomalainen 2012). Mitochondrial phospholipids are important components of this system. Phospholipids make up the characteristic outer and inner membranes that give mitochondria their shape. In addition, these membranes house sterols, sphingolipids and a wide variety of proteins. It is the phospholipids that also give rise to other characteristic mitochondrial structures such as cristae (formed from the invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane), the matrix (area within cristae) and the intermembrane space (IMS) which separates the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Phospholipids are the building blocks that make up these structures. However, the phospholipid composition of the OMM and IMM is unique in each membrane. Mitochondria are able to synthesize some of the phospholipids it requires, but the majority of cellular lipid biosynthesis takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in conjunction with the Golgi apparatus (Fagone and Jackowski 2009). In this review, we will focus on the role that mitochondrial phospholipids play in specific cellular functions and discuss their biosynthesis, metabolism and transport as well as the differences between the OMM and IMM phospholipid composition. Finally, we will focus on the human diseases that result from disturbances to mitochondrial phospholipids and the current research being performed to help

  13. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  14. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  15. Vinculin acts as a sensor in lipid regulation of adhesion-site turnover.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Indra; Stradal, Theresia E B; Holt, Mark R; Entschladen, Frank; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2005-04-01

    The dynamics of cell adhesion sites control cell morphology and motility. Adhesion-site turnover is thought to depend on the local availability of the acidic phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). PIP(2) can bind to many cell adhesion proteins such as vinculin and talin, but the consequences of this interaction are poorly understood. To study the significance of phospholipid binding to vinculin for adhesion-site turnover and cell motility, we constructed a mutant, vinculin-LD, deficient in acidic phospholipid binding yet with functional actin-binding sites. When expressed in cells, vinculin-LD was readily recruited to adhesion sites, as judged by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis, but cell spreading and migration were strongly impaired, and PIP(2)-dependent disassembly of adhesions was suppressed. Thus, PIP(2) binding is not essential for vinculin activation and recruitment, as previously suggested. Instead, we propose that PIP(2) levels can regulate the uncoupling of adhesion sites from the actin cytoskeleton, with vinculin functioning as a sensor. PMID:15769850

  16. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  17. [Phospholipids metabolism disorders in acute stroke].

    PubMed

    Solovieva, E Yu; Farrahova, K I; Karneev, A N; Chipova, D T

    2016-01-01

    The disturbances of cerebral circulation results in the violation of phospholipid metabolism. Activation of lipid peroxidation and protein kinase C and release of intracellular calcium leads to disruption of the homeostasis of phosphatidylcholine. The use of cytidine-5-diphosphocholine, which is used as an intermediate compound in the biosynthesis of phospholipids of the cell membrane, helps to stabilize cell membranes, and reduce the formation of free radicals. PMID:27045147

  18. Phospholipids and fatty acids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Sud, I J; Feingold, D S

    1975-01-01

    The phospholipids and fatty acids of two strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae of different penicillin susceptibilities were examined. The phospholipids, which comprise about 8% of the dry weight of the cells, consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine (70%) and phosphatidylglycerol (20%); small amounts of phosphatidylcholine and traces of cardiolipin were also present. Growing and stationary-phase cells were similar in content and composition of phospholipids except for phosphatidylcholine, which increased two- to fivefold in the stationary-phase cells. The fatty acids of the phospholipids were characterized by two major acids, palmitic and a C16:1, with myristic and a C18:1 acid present in smaller amounts. The fatty acids present in purified phospholipid fractions varied considerably in relative proportions from fraction to fraction. No significant difference in the composition of phospholipids from the two strains was evident. Large amounts of beta-hydroxy lauric acid were detected only after saponification of the organisms. Differences in the lipid composition between the gonococcus and other gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:810478

  19. Metabolomics annotates ABHD3 as a physiologic regulator of medium-chain phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jonathan Z.; Cisar, Justin S.; Milliken, David; Niessen, Sherry; Wang, Chu; Trauger, Sunia A.; Siuzdak, Gary; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    All organisms, including humans, possess a huge number of uncharacterized enzymes. Here, we describe a general cell-based screen for enzyme substrate discovery by untargeted metabolomics and its application to identify α/β-hydrolase domain-containing 3 (ABHD3) as a lipase that selectively cleaves medium-chain and oxidatively-truncated phospholipids. Abhd3−/− mice possess elevated myristoyl (C14)-phospholipids, including the bioactive lipid C14-lysophosphatidylcholine, confirming the physiological relevance of our substrate assignments. PMID:21926997

  20. Co-ordination between membrane phospholipid synthesis and accelerated biosynthesis of cytoplasmic ribonucleic acid and protein

    PubMed Central

    Tata, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The rate of synthesis of membrane phospholipid was studied in rat liver and seminal vesicles by following the incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate, [14C]choline and [14C]glycerol. Particular emphasis was laid on the endoplasmic reticulum, which was fractionated into smooth microsomal membranes, heavy rough membranes, light rough membranes and free polyribosomes. 2. Phospholipid labelling patterns suggested a heterogeneity in the synthesis and turnover of the different lipid moieties of smooth and rough endoplasmic membranes. The major phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were labelled relatively rapidly with 32P over a short period of time whereas incorporation of radioisotope into the minor phospholipids, sphingomyelin, lysolecithin and phosphatidylinositol proceeded slowly but over a longer period of time. 3. The incorporation of orotic acid into RNA and labelled amino acids into protein of the four submicrosomal fractions was also studied. 4. Rapid growth of the liver was induced by the administration of growth hormone and tri-iodothyronine to hypophysectomized and thyroidectomized rats and by partial hepatectomy. Growth of seminal vesicles of castrated rats was stimulated with testosterone propionate. 5. The rate of labelling of membrane phospholipids was enhanced in all major subcellular particulate fractions (nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal) during induced growth. However, it was in the rough endoplasmic reticulum that the accumulation of phospholipids, RNA and protein was most marked. The effect of hormone administration was also to accelerate preferentially the labelling with 32P of sphingomyelin relative to that of phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine. 6. Time-course analyses showed that, in all four growth systems studied, the enhancement of the rate of membrane phospholipid synthesis coincided with the rather abrupt increase in the synthesis of RNA and protein of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Growth

  1. Turnover in the Advancement Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarrobino, Jon D.

    2006-01-01

    Recruitment and retention is an area with which most organizations are concerned. Excessive turnover has exorbitant costs and wastes valuable time. Institutions of higher education are no exception. One of the most vital operations in nonprofit colleges and universities is its Office of Institutional Advancement. More and more, an institution of…

  2. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  3. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Hruz, Paul W

    2016-08-12

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  4. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  5. Filamentous Fungi with High Cytosolic Phospholipid Transfer Activity in the Presence of Exogenous Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Record, Eric; Lesage, Laurence; Cahagnier, Bernard; Marion, Didier; Asther, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The phospholipid transfer activity of cell extracts from 15 filamentous fungus strains grown on a medium containing phospholipids as the carbon source was measured by a fluorescence assay. This assay was based on the transfer of pyrene-labeled phosphatidylcholines forming the donor vesicles to acceptor vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholines. The highest phosphatidylcholine transfer activity was obtained with cell extracts from Aspergillus oryzae. The presence of exogenous phospholipids in the culture medium of A. oryzae was shown to increase markedly the activity of phospholipid transfer as well as the pool of exocellular proteins during the primary phase of growth. Modifications in the biochemical marker activities of cellular organelles were observed: succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial marker; inosine diphosphatase, a Golgi system marker; and cytochrome c oxidoreductase, an endoplasmic reticulum marker, were increased 7.3-, 2-, and 22-fold, respectively, when A. oryzae was grown in the presence of phospholipids. PMID:16349388

  6. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  7. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  8. Chronic Teacher Turnover in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guin, Kacey

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics of elementary schools that experience chronic teacher turnover and the impacts of turnover on a school's working climate and ability to effectively function. Based on evidence from staff climate surveys and case studies, it is clear that high turnover schools face significant organizational challenges.…

  9. Estimating Teacher Turnover Costs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Joy, Lois; Ellis, Pamela; Jablonski, Erica; Karelitz, Tzur M.

    2012-01-01

    High teacher turnover in large U.S. cities is a critical issue for schools and districts, and the students they serve; but surprisingly little work has been done to develop methodologies and standards that districts and schools can use to make reliable estimates of turnover costs. Even less is known about how to detect variations in turnover costs…

  10. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  12. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  13. Benchmarking of homogeneous electrocatalysts: overpotential, turnover frequency, limiting turnover number.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Passard, Guillaume; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-29

    In relation to contemporary energy challenges, a number of molecular catalysts for the activation of small molecules, mainly based on transition metal complexes, have been developed. The time has thus come to develop tools allowing the benchmarking of these numerous catalysts. Two main factors of merit are addressed. One involves their intrinsic catalytic performances through the comparison of "catalytic Tafel plots" relating the turnover frequency to the overpotential independently of the characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The other examines the effect of deactivation of the catalyst during the course of electrolysis. It introduces the notion of the limiting turnover number as a second key element of catalyst benchmarking. How these two factors combine with one another to control the course of electrolysis is analyzed in detail, leading to procedures that allow their separate estimation from measurements of the current, the charge passed, and the decay of the catalyst concentration. Illustrative examples from literature data are discussed. PMID:25757058

  14. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  15. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982). PMID:10106673

  16. Phospholipids accumulation in mucolipidosis IV cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bargal, R; Bach, G

    1988-01-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from mucolipidosis IV patients accumulated phospholipids when compared to normal controls or cells from other genotypes. The major stored compounds were identified as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and to a larger extent lysophosphatidylcholine and lysobisphosphatidic acid. Pulse chase experiments of 32P-labelled phospholipids showed increased retention of these compounds in the mucolipidosis IV lines throughout the pulse and chase periods. Phospholipase A1, A2, C, D and lysophospholipase showed normal activity in the mucolipidosis IV lines and thus the metabolic cause for this storage remains to be identified. PMID:3139925

  17. Phospholipid exchange reactions within the liver cell

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, W. C.; Dawson, R. M. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isolated rat liver mitochondria do not synthesize labelled phosphatidylcholine from CDP-[14C]choline or any phospholipid other than phosphatidic acid from [32P]phosphate. The minimal labelling of phosphatidylcholine and other phosphoglycerides can be attributed to microsomal contamination. However, when mitochondria and microsomes are incubated together with [32P]phosphate, the phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine of the reisolated mitochondria become labelled, suggesting a transfer of phospholipids between the two fractions. 2. When liver microsomes or mitochondria containing labelled phosphatidylcholine are independently incubated with the opposite un-labelled fraction, there is a substantial and rapid exchange of the phospholipid between the two membranes. Exchange of phosphatidylinositol also occurs rapidly, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid exchange only slowly. There is no corresponding transfer of marker enzymes. The transfer of phosphatidylcholine does not occur at 0°, and there is no requirement for added substrate, ATP or Mg2+, but the omission of a heat-labile supernatant fraction markedly decreases the exchange. 3. After intravenous injection of [32P]phosphate, short-period labelling experiments of the individual phospholipids of rat liver microsomes and mitochondria in vivo give no evidence for a similar exchange process. However, the incubation of isolated microsomes and mitochondria with [32P]phosphate also fails on reisolation of the fractions to demonstrate a precursor–product relationship between the individual phospholipids of the two membranes. 4. The intraperitoneal injection of [32P]phosphate results in a far greater proportion of the dose entering the liver than does intravenous administration. After intraperitoneal administration of [32P]phosphate the specific radioactivities of the individual phospholipids are in the order microsomes > outer mitochondrial membrane > inner

  18. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover. PMID:19949883

  19. Sex-chromosome turnovers induced by deleterious mutation load.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Olivier; Grossen, Christine; Neuenschwander, Samuel; Perrin, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    In sharp contrast with mammals and birds, many cold-blooded vertebrates present homomorphic sex chromosomes. Empirical evidence supports a role for frequent turnovers, which replace nonrecombining sex chromosomes before they have time to decay. Three main mechanisms have been proposed for such turnovers, relying either on neutral processes, sex-ratio selection, or intrinsic benefits of the new sex-determining genes (due, e.g., to linkage with sexually antagonistic mutations). Here, we suggest an additional mechanism, arising from the load of deleterious mutations that accumulate on nonrecombining sex chromosomes. In the absence of dosage compensation, this load should progressively lower survival rate in the heterogametic sex. Turnovers should occur when this cost outweighs the benefits gained from any sexually antagonistic genes carried by the nonrecombining sex chromosome. We use individual-based simulations of a Muller's ratchet process to test this prediction, and investigate how the relevant parameters (effective population size, strength and dominance of deleterious mutations, size of nonrecombining segment, and strength of sexually antagonistic selection) are expected to affect the rate of turnovers. PMID:23461315

  20. Protein turnover, nitrogen balance and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fern, E B; Waterlow, J C

    1983-01-01

    Not many studies have been done on protein turnover during recovery from malnutrition. Some relevant information can, however, be obtained from measurements on normal growing animals, since rehabilitation and normal growth have in common a rapid rate of net protein synthesis. The key question is the extent to which net gain in protein results from an increase in synthesis or a decrease in breakdown or both. Different studies have used different methods, and all methods for measuring protein turnover have some disadvantages and sources of error. It is important to bear this in mind in evaluating the results. Consequently, part of this paper will be devoted to questions of methodology. Whole body protein turnover has been measured in children recovering from severe malnutrition. During the phase of rapid catch-up growth the rate of protein synthesis is increased. As might be expected, it increases linearly with the rate of weight gain. At the same time there is a smaller increase in the rate of protein breakdown. The resultant of these two processes is that, over and above the basal rate of protein synthesis, 1.4 grams of protein have to be synthesized for 1 gram to be laid down. Very similar results have been obtained in rapidly growing young pigs. Experimental studies on muscle growth in general confirm the conclusion that, at least in muscle, rapid growth is associated with rapid rates of protein breakdown as well as of synthesis. This has been shown in muscles of young growing rats, as well as in muscles in which hypertrophy has been induced by stretch or other stimuli. In contrast, the evidence suggests that rapid growth involves a fall in the rate of protein degradation. The magnitude of the nitrogen balance under any conditions is determined by the difference between synthesis and breakdown. In the absence of any storage of amino acids, this must be the same as the difference between intake and excretion (S - B = I - E). A question of great interest is whether

  1. Multidisciplinary analytical investigation of phospholipids and triglycerides in offshore farmed gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fed commercial diets.

    PubMed

    Anedda, Roberto; Piga, Carlo; Santercole, Viviana; Spada, Simona; Bonaglini, Elia; Cappuccinelli, Roberto; Mulas, Gilberto; Roggio, Tonina; Uzzau, Sergio

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a quantitative characterisation of lipid (both triglycerides and phospholipids) rearrangements in the muscle of offshore-raised gilthead sea bream was carried out as a function of fish growth between April and September. Relative percentages of lipid classes and fatty acids/acyls composition of the commercial feeds and fish dorsal muscles were assessed by means of an interdisciplinary analytical approach. A combination of preparative chemistry and experimental results from NMR spectroscopy, GC, 3D-TLC as well as proximate analysis permitted the observed growth parameters in key metabolic events to be linked with fish fattening and lipid turnover. While defined effects of feed composition on fatty acid profiles of fillets were ascertained, the relative increase of fatty acyls in triglycerides and phospholipids were also estimated enabling detailed evaluation of TAG:PL ratio in adult offshore-farmed gilthead sea bream. NMR was also used to quantify PUFA regiospecific distribution in TAG and PL. PMID:23411224

  2. Rpe65 Isomerase Associates with Membranes through an Electrostatic Interaction with Acidic Phospholipid Headgroups*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Kaylor, Joanna J.; Miu, Anh; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2010-01-01

    Opsins are light-sensitive pigments in the vertebrate retina, comprising a G protein-coupled receptor and an 11-cis-retinaldehyde chromophore. Absorption of a photon by an opsin pigment induces isomerization of its chromophore to all-trans-retinaldehyde. After a brief period of activation, opsin releases all-trans-retinaldehyde and becomes insensitive to light. Restoration of light sensitivity to the apo-opsin involves the conversion of all-trans-retinaldehyde back to 11-cis-retinaldehyde via an enzyme pathway called the visual cycle. The critical isomerization step in this pathway is catalyzed by Rpe65. Rpe65 is strongly associated with membranes but contains no membrane-spanning segments. It was previously suggested that the affinity of Rpe65 for membranes is due to palmitoylation of one or more Cys residues. In this study, we re-examined this hypothesis. By two independent strategies involving mass spectrometry, we show that Rpe65 is not palmitoylated nor does it appear to undergo other post-translational modifications at significant stoichiometry. Instead, we show that Rpe65 binds the acidic phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin, but not phosphatidic acid. No binding of Rpe65 to basic phospholipids or neutral lipids was observed. The affinity of Rpe65 to acidic phospholipids was strongly pH-dependent, suggesting an electrostatic interaction of basic residues in Rpe65 with negatively charged phospholipid headgroups. Binding of Rpe65 to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol, but not the basic or neutral phospholipids, allowed the enzyme to extract its insoluble substrate, all-trans-retinyl palmitate, from the lipid bilayer for synthesis of 11-cis-retinol. The interaction of Rpe65 with acidic phospholipids is therefore biologically relevant. PMID:19892706

  3. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data. PMID:3176021

  4. PLA2-responsive and SPIO-loaded phospholipid micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Yan, Lesan; Chiorazzo, Michael; Delikatny, E. James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cheng, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    A PLA2-responsive and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-loaded phospholipid micelle was developed. The release of phospholipid-conjugated dye from these micelles was triggered due to phospholipid degradation by phospholipase A2. High relaxivity of the encapsulated SPIO could enable non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26139589

  5. Phospholipid association with the bovine cardiac mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R E; Montgomery, R I; Spach, P I; Cunningham, C C

    1985-01-01

    The association of different phospholipids with a lipid-depleted oligomycin-sensitive ATPase from bovine cardiac mitochondria [Serrano, Kanner & Racker (1976) J. Biol. Chem. 251, 2453-2461] has been examined using three approaches. First, reconstitution of the ATPase with different synthetic diacyl phospholipids resulted in a 2-10-fold stimulation of ATPase specific activity depending upon the particular phospholipid employed. The phospholipid headgroup region displayed the following order of ATPase reactivation potential: dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol greater than dioleoylphosphatidic acid greater than dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, the ATPase showed higher levels of specific activity when reconstituted with dioleoyl phospholipid derivatives compared with dimyristoyl derivatives. Second, examination of the phospholipid remaining associated with the lipid-depleted ATPase upon purification showed that phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol were present. No relative enrichment of any of these phospholipids (compared with their distribution in submitochondrial particles) was noted. Therefore, no preferential association between the ATPase and any one phospholipid could be found in the mitochondrial ATPase. Third, the sodium cholate-mediated phospholipid exchange procedure was employed for studying the phospholipid requirements of the ATPase. Replacement of about 50% of the mitochondrial phospholipid remaining with the lipid-depleted ATPase could be achieved utilizing either synthetic phosphatidic acid or phosphatidylcholine. Examination of the displaced mitochondrial phospholipid showed that phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol were replaced with equal facility. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3156584

  6. Feruloyl Dioleoyglycerol Antioxidant Capacity in Phospholipid Vesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl dioleoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molecule was incorporated into single-lamellar vesicles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine at ...

  7. Interaction of phospholipid with silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anju, K. N.; Mahesh, S.; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar

    2014-01-01

    Development of a simple method for incorporating phospholipids onto the surfaces of anisotropic silver nanorods as a stepping-stone for creating responsive and multifunctional nanocomposites. 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC)-silver nanorod composites were prepared by immobilizing liposomes onto the surface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) capped silver nanorods. Here we report the role of phospholipids to control the self assembly of silver nanorods into agglomerate architectures ranging from open "end-to-end" networks to densely packed "side-to-side" arrays. The tuning of electrostatic interactions within the phospholipid layers is governed to lipid silver nanorod assembly and also about the organization of phospholipid layers themselves around nanorod surfaces. The initial studies on passive lipid functionalized nanorods could serve as the groundwork for introducing active components into these systems to make more switchable or reconfigurable nanocomposite material. Changing the surface species on silver nanorods from CTAB to DSPC is reflected in ξ- potential measurements. The surface morphology is studied using SEM and TEM. The optical studies are carried out using UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  8. Revisiting nurse turnover costs: adjusting for inflation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2008-01-01

    Organizational knowledge of nurse turnover costs is important, but gathering these data frequently may not always be feasible in today's fast-paced and complex healthcare environment. The author presents a method to inflation adjust baseline nurse turnover costs using the Consumer Price Index. This approach allows nurse executives to gain current knowledge of organizational nurse turnover costs when primary data collection is not practical and to determine costs and potential savings if nurse retention investments are made. PMID:18157000

  9. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  10. Marine by-product phospholipids as booster of medicinal compounds.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koretaro; Inoue, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Marine phospholipids are defined as phospholipids containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid that would be more effective than fish oil, which is mostly composed of triacylglycerol, in exerting health benefits. Marine phospholipids would boost the effect of both the health-beneficial hydrophilic and the hydrophobic compounds such as cell differentiators, anticancer compounds, and antiobesity compounds. When marine phospholipids are served as liposomal drinks, they would be more effective than adding into solid foods or feeds. As long as the liposome bilayer is basically composed of marine phospholipids, they would promote the encapsulated functional compounds. And this is the principal advantage of choosing marine phospholipids as liposomal membrane. Bioconversion of marine phospholipid would also be advantageous in delivering DHA into the desired tissue. For example, lysophosphatidylserine obtained through phospholipase D-mediated transphosphatidylation and phospholipase A₁ or sn-1 positional specific lipase-mediated partial hydrolysis seemed to be the most effective chemical form in delivering DHA into brain. PMID:22361179

  11. Relevancy 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Newman, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Where we present an overview on why relevancy is a problem, how important it is and how we can improve it. The topic of relevancy is becoming increasingly important in earth data discovery as our audience is tuned to the accuracy of standard search engines like Google.

  12. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Maternal Diet and Erythrocyte Phospholipid Status in Chilean Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñán, Karla A.; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Chamorro, Rodrigo; Valencia, Alejandra; Barrera, Cynthia; Puigrredon, Claudia; Sandoval, Jorge; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Chilean diets are characterized by a low supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), which are critical nutrients during pregnancy and lactation, because of their role in brain and visual development. DHA is the most relevant n-3 PUFA in this period. We evaluated the dietary n-3 PUFA intake and erythrocyte phospholipids n-3 PUFA in Chilean pregnant women. Eighty healthy pregnant women (20–36 years old) in the 3rd–6th month of pregnancy were included in the study. Dietary assessment was done applying a food frequency questionnaire, and data were analyzed through the Food Processor SQL® software. Fatty acids of erythrocyte phospholipids were assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Diet composition was high in saturated fat, low in mono- and PUFA, high in n-6 PUFA (linoleic acid) and low in n-3 PUFA (alpha-linolenic acid and DHA), with imbalance in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Similar results were observed for fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipids. The sample of Chilean pregnant women showed high consumption of saturated fat and low consumption of n-3 PUFA, which is reflected in the low DHA content of erythrocyte phospholipids. Imbalance between n-6/n-3 PUFA could negatively affect fetal development. New strategies are necessary to improve n-3 PUFA intake throughout pregnancy and breast feeding periods. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop dietary interventions to improve the quality of consumed foods with particular emphasis on n-3 PUFA. PMID:25386693

  13. Tracking synthesis and turnover of triacylglycerol in leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tjellström, Henrik; Strawsine, Merissa; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG), typically represents <1% of leaf glycerolipids but can accumulate under stress and other conditions or if leaves are supplied with fatty acids, or in plants transformed with regulators or enzymes of lipid metabolism. To better understand the metabolism of TAG in leaves, pulse–chase radiolabelling experiments were designed to probe its synthesis and turnover. When Arabidopsis leaves were incubated with [14C]lauric acid (12:0), a major initial product was [14C]TAG. Thus, despite low steady-state levels, leaves possess substantial TAG biosynthetic capacity. The contributions of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 and phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 to leaf TAG synthesis were examined by labelling of dgat1 and pdat1 mutants. The dgat1 mutant displayed a major (76%) reduction in [14C]TAG accumulation whereas pdat1 TAG labelling was only slightly reduced. Thus, DGAT1 has a principal role in TAG biosynthesis in young leaves. During a 4h chase period, radioactivity in TAG declined 70%, whereas the turnover of [14C]acyl chains of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and other polar lipids was much lower. Sixty percent of [14C]12:0 was directly incorporated into glycerolipids without modification, whereas 40% was elongated and desaturated to 16:0 and 18:1 by plastids. The unmodified [14C]12:0 and the plastid products of [14C]12:0 metabolism entered different pathways. Although plastid-modified 14C-labelled products accumulated in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, PC, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diacylglcerol (DAG), there was almost no accumulation of [14C]16:0 and [14C]18:1 in TAG. Because DAG and acyl-CoA are direct precursors of TAG, the differential labelling of polar glycerolipids and TAG by [14C]12:0 and its plastid-modified products provides evidence for multiple subcellular pools of both acyl-CoA and DAG. PMID:25609824

  14. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  15. Employee Turnover among Full-time Public Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Richard

    1989-01-01

    A study of employee turnover in 31 public libraries in the American Midwest established baseline turnover rates and examined the relationship of gender to turnover behavior. Findings showed that: turnover rates are low compared to other occupations; and turnover rates of males and females are similar. (28 references) (Author/MES)

  16. Adsorption of ruthenium red to phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, D; Smejtek, P

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the distribution of the hexavalent ruthenium red cation (RuR) between water and phospholipid membranes, have shown the critical importance of membrane negative surface charge for RuR binding, and determined the association constant of RuR for different phospholipid bilayers. The studies were performed with liposomes made of mixtures of zwitterionic L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (PC), and one of the negatively charged phospholipids: L-alpha-phosphatidylserine (PS), L-alpha-phosphatidylinositol (PI), or L-alpha-phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Lipid composition of PC:PX membranes was 1:0, 19:1, 9:1, and 4:1. Liposomes were processed using freeze-and-thaw treatment, and their size distribution was characterized by light scattering and electron microscopy. Experimental distribution isotherms of RuR obtained by ultracentrifugation and spectrophotometry can be reproduced with the Langmuir-Stern-Grahame model, assuming that RuR behaves in the diffuse double layer as an ion with effective valency < 6. In terms of this model, PC-PS, PC-PI, and PC-PG membranes were found to be electrostatically equivalent and the intrinsic association constants of RuR were obtained. RuR has highest affinity to PS-containing membranes; its association constant for PC-PI and PC-PG membranes is about 5 times smaller than that for PC-PS membranes. From the comparison of RuR binding to mixed negatively charged phospholipid membranes and RuR binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), we conclude that the low-affinity RuR binding sites may indeed be associated with the lipid bilayer of SR. PMID:8789099

  17. Bolaamphiphiles Promote Phospholipid Translocation Across Vesicle Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Christopher C.; DiVittorio, Kristy M.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles (molecules with two hydrophilic end-groups connected by a hydrophobic linker) were prepared by a modular synthetic method and evaluated for their abilities to affect the dynamics of a surrounding bilayer membrane. The goal was to determine if the bolaamphiphiles promote the translocation of phospholipids across vesicle membranes. The bolaamphiphiles were incorporated at low levels (up to 5 mol%) in vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Inward translocation assays were performed using fluorescent, NBD-labeled phospholipid probes with phosphocholine (PC) or phosphoglycerol (PG) head-groups. The membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles promote the translocation of both phospholipid probes in the order PG > PC, while shorter bolaamphiphiles (structures that must adopt a U-shape and keep both end-groups in the same leaflet of the membrane), and regular amphiphiles with one hydrophilic end-group, are inactive. These results are an exception to the rule-of-thumb that membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles are inherently membrane stabilizing molecules that inhibit all types of membrane transport. PMID:16834395

  18. Contextual Factors Related to Elementary Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partlow, Michelle C.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of school leadership instability and how it affects schools and student achievement has been studied. The question of how to predict turnover of the principal remains an unknown. The purpose of this research was to search for possible relationships between certain contextual variables and principal turnover and to test the independent…

  19. Employee Turnover: An Empirical and Methodological Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchinsky, Paul M.; Tuttle, Mark L.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews research on the prediction of employee turnover. Groups predictor variables into five general categories: attitudinal (job satisfaction), biodata, work-related, personal, and test-score predictors. Consistent relationships between common predictor variables and turnover were found for four categories. Eight methodological problems/issues…

  20. Principal Turnover. Information Capsule. Volume 0914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that school districts are facing increasing rates of principal turnover. Frequent principal changes deprive schools of the leadership stability they need to succeed, disrupt long-term school reform efforts, and may even be linked to increased teacher turnover and lower levels of student achievement. This Information Capsule…

  1. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  2. Predicting Employee Turnover from Communication Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas H.; Barnett, George A.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates three social network models of employee turnover: a structural equivalence model, a social influence model, and an erosion model. Administers a communication network questionnaire to all 170 employees of an organization. Finds support for all three models of turnover, with the erosion model explaining more of the variance than do the…

  3. Mitochondrial Turnover in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial quality control is increasingly recognized as an essential element in maintaining optimally functioning tissues. Mitochondrial quality control depends upon a balance between biogenesis and autophagic destruction. Mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission) allows for the redistribution of mitochondrial components. We speculate that this permits sorting of highly functional components into one end of a mitochondrion, while damaged components are segregated at the other end, to be jettisoned by asymmetric fission followed by selective mitophagy. Ischemic preconditioning requires autophagy/mitophagy, resulting in selective elimination of damaged mitochondria, leaving behind a population of robust mitochondria with a higher threshold for opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. In this review we will consider the factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and destruction, the machinery involved in both processes, and the biomedical consequences associated with altered mitochondrial turnover. PMID:21147177

  4. Social Disadvantage and Network Turnover

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups—especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)—experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Method. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents’ confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. Results. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants—especially due to death—than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals’ poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Discussion. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. PMID:24997286

  5. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  6. Effects of chronic ethanol administration and withdrawal on incorporation of arachidonate into membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Sun, G Y; Kelleher, J A; Sun, A Y

    1985-01-01

    A plasma membrane fraction isolated from cerebral cortex of control and ethanol-treated rats was used to study the effects of chronic ethanol administration on uptake of arachidonate by membrane phospholipids. Upon incubation of the membranes with [(14)C] arachidonic acid in the presence of ATP, Mg(2+), and CoA, radioactivity was incorporated into all of the phospholipids, although a large proportion of the label was found in phosphatidylinositols (PI, 60%) and phosphatidylcholines (PC, 20%). Rats given ethanol (8-10 g/kg body wt) via intubation in the form of a liquid diet for 4 weeks showed an increase (17-20%) in arachidonate incorporation into PI and PC as compared to phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylserines (PS). A similar increase in uptake activity was observed at 2 or 24 h upon withdrawal of ethanol, but uptake activity returned readily to that of control level by 72 h. The method described in this study is a sensitive and reliable procedure for monitoring the arachidonoyl turnover activity in neural membranes with respect to chronic ethanol induction and withdrawal. PMID:20492952

  7. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Peter; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  8. Neutral Lipid Metabolism Influences Phospholipid Synthesis and Deacylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Gabriel; Scharnewski, Michael; Fulda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of equilibrium in the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids (PL) requires both regulation of the substrate available for PL synthesis (the acyl-CoA pool) and extensive PL turnover and acyl editing. In the present study, we utilize acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) deficient cells, unable to recycle FA derived from lipid deacylation, to evaluate the role of several enzymatic activities in FA trafficking and PL homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The data presented show that phospholipases B are not contributing to constitutive PL deacylation and are therefore unlikely to be involved in PL remodeling. In contrast, the enzymes of neutral lipid (NL) synthesis and mobilization are central mediators of FA trafficking. The phospholipid:DAG acyltransferase (PDAT) Lro1p has a substantial effect on FA release and on PL equilibrium, emerging as an important mediator in PL remodeling. The acyl-CoA dependent biosynthetic activities of NL metabolism are also involved in PL homeostasis through active modulation of the substrate available for PL synthesis. In addition TAG mobilization makes an important contribution, especially in cells from stationary phase, to FA availability. Beyond its well-established role in the formation of a storage pool, NL metabolism could play a crucial role as a mechanism to uncouple the pools of PL and acyl-CoAs from each other and thereby to allow independent regulation of each one. PMID:23139841

  9. Selective acceleration of arachidonic acid reincorporation into brain membrane phospholipid following transient ischemia in awake gerbil.

    PubMed

    Rabin, O; Chang, M C; Grange, E; Bell, J; Rapoport, S I; Deutsch, J; Purdon, A D

    1998-01-01

    Awake gerbils were subjected to 5 min of forebrain ischemia by clamping the carotid arteries for 5 min and then allowing recirculation. Radiolabeled arachidonic or palmitic acid was infused intravenously for 5 min at the start of recirculation, after which the brains were prepared for quantitative autoradiography or chemical analysis. Dilution of specific activity of the acyl-CoA pool was independently determined for these fatty acids in control gerbils and following 5 min of ischemia and 5 min of reperfusion. Using a quantitative method for measuring regional in vivo fatty acid incorporation into and turnover within brain phospholipids and determining unlabeled concentrations of acyl-CoAs following recirculation, it was shown that reperfusion after 5 min of ischemia was accompanied by a threefold increase compared with the control in the rate of reincorporation of unlabeled arachidonate that had been released during ischemia, whereas reincorporation of released palmitate was not different from the control. Selective and accelerated reincorporation of arachidonate into brain phospholipids shortly after ischemia may ameliorate specific deleterious effects of arachidonate and its metabolites on brain membranes. PMID:9422378

  10. A method for the modulation of membrane fluidity: homogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of phospholipids and phospholipids and phospholipid-water model biomembranes.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, D; Quinn, P J

    1976-01-01

    The fatty acids associated with phospholipids of cell membranes, and particularly their degree of unsaturation, contribute to the fluidity of their structure and hance determine many of their biological properties. We describe a technique for modulating membrane fluidity which consists of hydrogenating the unsaturated double bonds of membrane phospholipids. This has been accomplished using a homogeneous catalyst. The process has been applied to phospholipids in organic solvents, to phospholipids dispersed as multibilayers in aqueous systems, and also to sonicated preparations of phospholipids arranged as single bilayer vesicles. Preliminary experiments have also been performed with biological membranes. These results indicate that the process of homogeneous catalysis for the modulation of lipid fluidity of biological cell membranes may have considerable future biological and biochemical application. PMID:1069280

  11. PHOSPHOLIPIDS IN VEGETATIVE CELLS AND SPORES OF BACILLUS POLYMYXA1

    PubMed Central

    Matches, Jack R.; Walker, Homer W.; Ayres, John C.

    1964-01-01

    Matches, Jack R. (Iowa State University of Science and Technology, Ames), Homer W. Walker, and John C. Ayres. Phospholipids in vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus polymyxa. J. Bacteriol. 87:16–23. 1964.—The same types of phospholipids were recovered from both vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus polymyxa 1A39. Nitrogen-containing phospholipids were identified as phosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysophosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysophosphatidyl serine, and lysolecithin. Acidic phosphatides containing no nitrogen were identified as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidyl glycerol, and a fraction appearing to be bis (phosphatidic) acid. The major phosphatide fraction in both cells and spores was phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Smaller amounts of phosphatidyl glycerol and bis (phosphatidic) acid were present; the other acidic phospholipid components were present only in trace amounts. Heat resistance of the spore as compared to the vegetative cell could not be attributed to a specific phospholipid, since no difference in the type of phospholipids present was observed. PMID:14102851

  12. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  13. Essential phospholipids in fatty liver: a scientific update

    PubMed Central

    Gundermann, Karl-Josef; Gundermann, Simon; Drozdzik, Marek; Mohan Prasad, VG

    2016-01-01

    Aim Although essential phospholipids (EPL) from soybean are often used in membrane-associated disorders and diseases, their high quality of purification and effects on prevalent liver diseases, especially on fatty liver diseases (FLDs) of different origin, are still widely unknown and a matter of continuous active research. The aim of this article is to review, discuss, and summarize the available results of EPL in the treatment of FLD. Methods Database research was carried out on Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, country-specific journals, and follow-up literature citations for relevant hepatogastroenterological articles published between 1988 and 2014. We searched for and reviewed only those papers that indicated minimum extraction amount of 72% (3-sn-phosphatidyl)choline from soybean as being necessary to treat patients with a considerable amount of 1,2-dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine as a key component in EPL. Results EPL has a well-established mode of action, therapeutic effectiveness, and lack of toxicity, which ensures clinically relevant efficacy-to-safety ratio. It influences membrane- dependent cellular functions and shows anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic, anti apoptotic, membrane-protective, and lipid-regulating effects. Due to its positive effects on membrane composition and functions, it accelerates the improvement or normalization of subjective symptoms; pathological, clinical, and biochemical findings; hepatic imaging; and liver histology. It is justified to administer EPL together with other therapeutic measurements in the liver. Conclusion Pharmacological and clinical results confirm the efficacy of EPL in the treatment of FLD. PMID:27217791

  14. Critical assessment of phospholipid measurement in amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Badham, L P; Worth, H G

    1975-09-01

    We assessed several methods of inorganic phosphate assay for their suitability in estimating phospholipids in digested extracts of amniotic fluids. The extraction and digestion procedures used for phospholipids from amniotic fluid were also examined critically. The effect of contamination by blood or obstetric cream has been examined. Accordingly, we suggest a method for measuring total phospholipids in amniotic fluids, and results of it are compared with the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio measurement in some clinical situations. PMID:1157310

  15. Looking Beyond Structure: Membrane Phospholipids of Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heden, Timothy D; Neufer, P Darrell; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondria are highly dynamic and are capable of tremendous expansion to meet cellular energetic demands. Such proliferation in mitochondrial mass requires a synchronized supply of enzymes and structural phospholipids. While transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial enzymes has been extensively studied, there is limited information on how mitochondrial membrane lipids are generated in skeletal muscle. Herein we describe how each class of phospholipids that constitute mitochondrial membranes are synthesized and/or imported, and summarize genetic evidence indicating that membrane phospholipid composition represents a significant modulator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. We also discuss how skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids may mediate the effect of diet and exercise on oxidative metabolism. PMID:27370525

  16. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  17. Specific heating power of fatty acid and phospholipid stabilized magnetic fluids in an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCuyper, M.; Hodenius, M.; Ivanova, G.; Baumann, M.; Paciok, E.; Eckert, T.; Soenen, S. J. H.; Schmitz-Rode, T.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic fluids (MFs) with a similar narrow size distribution of the iron oxide core were stabilized with lauric acid (MF 1), oleate (MF 2) or, after dialysis in the presence of liposomes, with phospholipid molecules (MF 3 and MF 4, respectively). The hydrodynamic sizes of the MF 1 and MF 3 were half those found for MF 2 and MF 4. The MFs were exposed to inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field at a frequency of 200 kHz and a maximum magnetic field strength of 3.8 kA m-1. Specific absorption rates (SAR) of 294 ± 42 (MF 1), 214 ± 16 (MF 2), 297 ± 13 (MF 3) and 213 ± 6 W g-1 Fe (MF 4) were obtained. The data for MF 2 and MF 4 were identical to those found for the commercially available ferucarbotran. The biomedical relevance of the phospholipid-coated MFs is briefly discussed.

  18. Drug induced `softening' in phospholipid monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay; Bhattacharya, Dhananjay

    2015-06-01

    Compressibility measurements on Langmuir monolayers of the phospholipid Dimystoryl Phospatidylcholine (DMPC) in pristine form and in the presence of the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Piroxicam at 0.025 drug/lipid (D/L) molecular ratio at different temperatures, show that the monolayer exhibits large increase (and subsequent decrease) in compressibility due to the drug in the vicinity of the Liquid Expanded - Liquid Condensed (LE-LC) phase transition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lipid monolayer in presence of drug molecules show a disordering of the tail tilt, which is consistent with the above result.

  19. Improvements to Kramers turnover theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Eli; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    The Kramers turnover problem, that is, obtaining a uniform expression for the rate of escape of a particle over a barrier for any value of the external friction was solved in the 1980s. Two formulations were given, one by Mel'nikov and Meshkov (MM) [V. I. Mel'nikov and S. V. Meshkov, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 1018 (1986), 10.1063/1.451844], which was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion of the particle in the presence of friction. The other, by Pollak, Grabert, and Hänggi (PGH) [E. Pollak, H. Grabert, and P. Hänggi, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4073 (1989), 10.1063/1.456837], valid also for memory friction, was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion along the collective unstable normal mode of the particle. Both theories did not take into account the temperature dependence of the average energy loss to the bath. Increasing the bath temperature will reduce the average energy loss. In this paper, we analyse this effect, using a novel perturbation theory. We find that within the MM approach, the thermal energy gained from the bath diverges, the average energy gain becomes infinite implying an essential failure of the theory. Within the PGH approach increasing the bath temperature reduces the average energy loss but only by a finite small amount of the order of the inverse of the reduced barrier height. Then, this does not seriously affect the theory. Analysis and application for a cubic potential and Ohmic friction are presented.

  20. The aminosterol antibiotic squalamine permeabilizes large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Selinsky, B S; Zhou, Z; Fojtik, K G; Jones, S R; Dollahon, N R; Shinnar, A E

    1998-03-13

    The ability of the shark antimicrobial aminosterol squalamine to induce the leakage of polar fluorescent dyes from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) has been measured. Micromolar squalamine causes leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from vesicles prepared from the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), and cardiolipin. Binding analyses based on the leakage data show that squalamine has its highest affinity to phosphatidylglycerol membranes, followed by phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin membranes. Squalamine will also induce the leakage of CF from phosphatidylcholine (PC) LUVs at low phospholipid concentrations. At high phospholipid concentrations, the leakage of CF from PC LUVs deviates from a simple dose-response relationship, and it appears that some of the squalamine can no longer cause leakage. Fluorescent dye leakage generated by squalamine is graded, suggesting the formation of a discrete membrane pore rather than a generalized disruption of vesicular membranes. By using fluorescently labeled dextrans of different molecular weight, material with molecular weight /=10,000 is retained. Negative stain electron microscopy of squalamine-treated LUVs shows that squalamine decreases the average vesicular size in a concentration-dependent manner. Squalamine decreases the size of vesicles containing anionic phospholipid at a lower squalamine/lipid molar ratio than pure PC LUVs. In a centrifugation assay, squalamine solubilizes phospholipid, but only at significantly higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios than required for either dye leakage or vesicle size reduction. Squalamine solubilizes PC at lower squalamine/phospholipid ratios than PG. We suggest that squalamine complexes with phospholipid to form a discrete structure within the bilayers of LUVs, resulting in the transient leakage of small encapsulated molecules. At higher

  1. Plagued by Turnover? Train Your Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with managers is a major cause of employee turnover The Charles Schwab Corporation surveys employees annually and holds employee focus groups and online town meetings. The information is used for the coaching and training of department heads. (JOW)

  2. Biomimetic catalysis: Taking on the turnover challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooley, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    Emulating the efficiency with which enzymes catalyse reactions has often been used as inspiration to develop self-assembled cages. Now two studies present approaches to achieving catalyst turnover -- one of the biggest challenges in achieving truly biomimetic catalysis.

  3. Coping with Turnovers in School Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy V.

    1988-01-01

    Labor shortages, cost increases, and turnover have prompted Fairfax County Schools, Virginia, food service managers to offer training programs and recruitment bonuses, to use more convenience foods, and to price out every service. (MLF)

  4. Phospholipid/aromatic thiol hybrid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Mingming; Ferguson, Matthew; Zhan, Wei

    2015-05-12

    Gold-supported hybrid bilayers comprising phospholipids and alkanethiols have been found to be highly useful in biomembrane mimicking as well as biosensing ever since their introduction by Plant in 1993 (Plant, A. L. Langmuir 1993, 9, 2764-2767). Generalizing the mechanism (i.e., hydrophobic/hydrophobic interaction) that primarily drives bilayer formation, we report here that such a bilayer structure can also be successfully obtained when aromatic thiols are employed in place of alkanethiols. Four aromatic thiols were studied here (thiophenol, 2-naphthalene thiol, biphenyl-4-thiol, and diphenylenevinylene methanethiol), all affording reliable bilayer formation when 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes were incubated with self-assembled monolayers of these thiols. Characterization of the resultant structures, using cyclic voltammetry, impedance analysis, and atomic force microscopy, confirms the bilayer formation. Significant differences in electrochemical blocking and mechanical characteristics of these new bilayers were identified in comparison to their alkanethiol counterparts. Taking advantage of these new features, we present a new scheme for the straightforward biorecognition of a lipolytic enzyme (phospholipase A2) using these phospholipid/aromatic thiol bilayers. PMID:25896646

  5. The costs of nurse turnover, part 2: application of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article in a 2-part series focusing on nurse turnover and its costs. Part 1 (December 2004) described nurse turnover costs within the context of human capital theory, and using human resource accounting methods, presented the updated Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. Part 2 presents an application of this method in an acute care setting and the estimated costs of nurse turnover that were derived. Administrators and researchers can use these methods and cost information to build a business case for nurse retention. PMID:15647669

  6. On gigahertz spectral turnovers in pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwade, K.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are known to emit non-thermal radio emission that is generally a power-law function of frequency. In some cases, a turnover is seen at frequencies around 100 MHz. Kijak et al. have reported the presence of a new class of `Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum' (GPS) pulsars that show spectral turnovers at frequencies around 1 GHz. We apply a model based on free-free thermal absorption to explain these turnovers in terms of surrounding material such as the dense environments found in H II regions, pulsar wind nebulae, or in cold, partially ionized molecular clouds. We show that the turnover frequency depends on the electron temperature of the environment close to the pulsar, as well as the emission measure along the line of sight. We fitted this model to the radio fluxes of known GPS pulsars and show that it can replicate the GHz turnover. From the thermal absorption model, we demonstrate that normal pulsars would exhibit a GPS-like behaviour if they were in a dense environment. We discuss the application of this model in the context of determining the population of neutron stars within the central parsec of the Galaxy. We show that a non-negligible fraction of this population might exhibit high-frequency spectral turnovers, which has implications on the detectability of these sources in the Galactic Centre.

  7. Spatial turnover in the global avifauna

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Richard G; Orme, C. David L; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Lennon, Jack J; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P.F; Blackburn, Tim M

    2007-01-01

    Despite its wide implications for many ecological issues, the global pattern of spatial turnover in the occurrence of species has been little studied, unlike the global pattern of species richness. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we present the first global maps of variation in spatial turnover for an entire taxonomic class, a pattern that has to date remained largely a matter of conjecture, based on theoretical expectations and extrapolation of inconsistent patterns from different biogeographic realms. We use these maps to test four predictions from niche theory as to the form that this variation should take, namely that turnover should increase with species richness, towards lower latitudes, and with the steepness of environmental gradients and that variation in turnover is determined principally by rare (restricted) species. Contrary to prediction, we show that turnover is high both in areas of extremely low and high species richness, does not increase strongly towards the tropics, and is related both to average environmental conditions and spatial variation in those conditions. These results are closely associated with a further important and novel finding, namely that global patterns of spatial turnover are driven principally by widespread species rather than the restricted ones. This complements recent demonstrations that spatial patterns of species richness are also driven principally by widespread species, and thus provides an important contribution towards a unified model of how terrestrial biodiversity varies both within and between the Earth's major land masses. PMID:17472910

  8. Doxorubicin enhances nucleosome turnover around promoters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kemp, Christopher J; Henikoff, Steven

    2013-05-01

    Doxorubicin is an anthracycline DNA intercalator that is among the most commonly used anticancer drugs. Doxorubicin causes DNA double-strand breaks in rapidly dividing cells, although whether it also affects general chromatin properties is unknown. Here, we use a metabolic labeling strategy to directly measure nucleosome turnover to examine the effect of doxorubicin on chromatin dynamics in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines derived from genetically defined mice. We find that doxorubicin enhances nucleosome turnover around gene promoters and that turnover correlates with gene expression level. Consistent with a direct action of doxorubicin, enhancement of nucleosome turnover around promoters gradually increases with time of exposure to the drug. Interestingly, enhancement occurs both in wild-type cells and in cells lacking either the p53 tumor suppressor gene or the master regulator of the DNA damage response, ATM, suggesting that doxorubicin action on nucleosome dynamics is independent of the DNA damage checkpoint. In addition, another anthracycline drug, aclarubicin, shows similar effects on enhancing nucleosome turnover around promoters. Our results suggest that anthracycline intercalation promotes nucleosome turnover around promoters by its effect on DNA topology, with possible implications for mechanisms of cell killing during cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23602475

  9. Rapid Lateral Diffusion of Phospholipids in Rabbit Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Scandella, Carl J.; Devaux, Philippe; McConnell, Harden M.

    1972-01-01

    Phospholipid spin labels incorporated in the sarcoplasmic reticulum from rabbit-skeletal muscle undergo rapid lateral diffusion within the plane of the membrane. The diffusion constant, D, is 6×10-8 cm2/sec at 37°. With this diffusion constant, a phospholipid molecule can diffuse a distance of the order of 5000 nm in 1 sec. PMID:4506073

  10. Different oxidized phospholipid molecules unequally affect bilayer packing.

    PubMed

    Megli, Francesco M; Russo, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed knowledge about the effect of the presence of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules in phospholipid bilayers. After chromatographic and mass spectrometry analysis, the previously used product of the Fenton reaction with unsaturated lecithins proved to consist of a plethora of oxidatively modified lecithins, useless either for the detailed study of the effects brought about in the bilayer or as the source of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules. The latter, particularly 2-(omega-carboxyacyl)- and 2-(n-hydroperoxyacyl)-lecithins, can be more conveniently prepared by chemical or enzymatic synthesis rather than by chemical or physical oxidation. The effect of those molecules and of commercially available 12-hydroxy-stearic and dodecanedioic acid was studied in planar supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) by use of EPR spectrometry. The SPBs also contained 2-(5-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin as the spin probe, and the EPR spectral anisotropy loss, indicative of bilayer disordering, was measured as a function of the molar percentage of oxidized lipid. Most oxidized lipid molecules examined in this study were able to induce bilayer disordering, while hydroperoxyl group-bearing acyl chains appeared to be much less effective. It is concluded that the effects of different oxidized phospholipids on phospholipid bilayer structure cannot be generalized, as happens with batch-oxidized phospholipids, and that the use of defined oxidized phospholipid molecular species for membrane oxidative stress guarantees a more reliable and detailed response. PMID:18054893

  11. The costs of nurse turnover: part 1: an economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2004-12-01

    Nurse turnover is costly for healthcare organizations. Administrators and nurse executives need a reliable estimate of nurse turnover costs and the origins of those costs if they are to develop effective measures of reducing nurse turnover and its costs. However, determining how to best capture and quantify nurse turnover costs can be challenging. Part 1 of this series conceptualizes nurse turnover via human capital theory and presents an update of a previously developed method for determining the costs of nurse turnover, the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Method. Part 2 (January 2005) presents a recent application of the methodology in an acute care hospital. PMID:15632752

  12. Regulation of lung surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Goss, Victoria; Hunt, Alan N; Postle, Anthony D

    2013-02-01

    The alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cell is highly specialised for the synthesis and storage, in intracellular lamellar bodies, of phospholipid destined for secretion as pulmonary surfactant into the alveolus. Regulation of the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism has been extensively characterised at both molecular and functional levels, but understanding of surfactant phospholipid metabolism in vivo in either healthy or, especially, diseased lungs is still relatively poorly understood. This review will integrate recent advances in the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid metabolism with metabolic studies in vivo in both experimental animals and human subjects. It will highlight developments in the application of stable isotope-labelled precursor substrates and mass spectrometry to probe lung phospholipid metabolism in terms of individual molecular lipid species and identify areas where a more comprehensive metabolic model would have considerable potential for direct application to disease states. PMID:23200861

  13. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Guanosine Tetraphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Merlie, John P.; Pizer, Lewis I.

    1973-01-01

    Phospholipid synthesis has been reported to be subject to stringent control in Escherichia coli. We present evidence that demonstrates a strict correlation between guanosine tetraphosphate accumulation and inhibition of phospholipid synthesis. In vivo experiments designed to examine the pattern of phospholipid labeling with 32P-inorganic phosphate and 32P-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate suggest that regulation must occur at the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase step. Assay of phospholipid synthesis by cell-free extracts and semipurified preparations revealed that guanosine tetraphosphate inhibits at least two enzymes specific for the biosynthetic pathway, sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase as well as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatidyl transferase. These findings provide a biochemical basis for the stringent control of lipid synthesis as well as regulation of steady-state levels of phospholipid in growing cells. Images PMID:4583220

  14. Addressing employee turnover and retention: keeping your valued performers.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee turnover and employee retention are inextricably linked; to control turnover is to enhance retention. Turnover is a relatively simple concept; however, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some that can be corrected and some that cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role; every improvement in turnover is a direct improvement in retention, with eventual positive effects on the bottom line. PMID:21808181

  15. Phospholipid Species in Newborn and 4 Month Old Infants after Consumption of Different Formulas or Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Olaf; Fleddermann, Manja; Hellmuth, Christian; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids for neuronal and cognitive development and are ingredients of infant formulae that are recommended but there is no evidence based minimal supplementation level available. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the effect of supplemented AA and DHA on phospholipid metabolism. Methods Plasma samples of a randomized, double-blind infant feeding trial were used for the analyses of phospholipid species by flow-injection mass spectrometry. Healthy term infants consumed isoenergetic formulae (intervention formula with equal amounts of AA and DHA—IF, control formula without additional AA and DHA—CF) from the first month of life until the age of 120 days. A group of breast milk (BM) -fed infants was followed as a reference. Results The plasma profile detected in newborns was different from 4 month old infants, irrespective of study group. Most relevant changes were seen in higher level of LPC16:1, LPC20:4, PC32:1, PC34:1 and PC36:4 and lower level of LPC18:0, LPC18:2, PC32:2, PC36:2 and several ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in newborns. The sum of all AA and DHA species at 4 month old infants in the CF group showed level of 40% (AA) and 51% (DHA) of newborns. The supplemented amount of DHA resulted in phospholipid level comparable to BM infants, but AA phospholipids were lower than in BM infants. Interestingly, relative contribution of DHA was higher in ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in CF fed infants, but IF and BM fed infants showed higher overall ether-linked phosphatidylcholines levels. Conclusion In conclusion, we have shown that infant plasma phospholipid profile changes remarkably from newborn over time and is dependent on the dietary fatty acid composition. A supplementation of an infant formula with AA and DHA resulted in increased related phospholipid species. PMID:27571269

  16. The effect of hydroxylated fatty acid-containing phospholipids in the remodeling of lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Piotto, Stefano; Trapani, Alfonso; Bianchino, Erminia; Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J; Busquets, Xavier; Concilio, Simona

    2014-06-01

    The synthetic fatty acid 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA) is an antitumor drug that regulates membrane lipid composition and structure. An important effect of this drug is the restoration of sphingomyelin (SM) levels in cancer cell membranes, where the SM concentration is lower than in non-tumor cells. It is well known that free fatty acid concentration in cell membranes is lower than 5%, and that fatty acid excess is rapidly incorporated into phospholipids. In a recent work, we have considered the effect of free 2OHOA in model membranes in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phases, by using all-atom molecular dynamics. This study concerns membranes that are modified upon incorporation of 2OHOA into different phospholipids. 2OHOA-containing phospholipids have a permanent effect on lipid membranes, making a Ld membrane surface more compact and less hydrated, whereas the opposite effect is observed in Lo domains. Moreover, the hydroxyl group of fatty acid chains increases the propensity of Ld model membranes to form hexagonal or other non-lamellar structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. PMID:24463068

  17. Fibrillation of β amyloid peptides in the presence of phospholipid bilayers and the consequent membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Schulte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillation of β amyloid (Aβ) peptides and the accumulation of amyloid plaques are considered as an important clinical hallmark to identify Alzheimer's disease (AD). The physiological connection between Aβ plaques and the disruption of neuronal cells has not been clearly understood. One hypothesis to explain the Aβ neurotoxicity is that the fibrillation process induces disruption to the cellular membrane. We studied the Aβ fibrillation process in two biologically relevant conditions with the peptide either pre-incorporated into or externally added to the synthetic phospholipid bilayers. These two sample preparation conditions mimic the physiological membrane proximities of Aβ peptides before and after the enzymatic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Using thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we were able to monitor the kinetics and morphological evolution of fibril formation, which was highly sensitive to the two sample preparation protocols. While the external addition protocol generates long and mature fibrils through normal fibrillation process, the pre-incubation protocol was found to stabilize the immature protofibrils. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies with doubly-labeled phospholipids indicated that there may be a lipid uptake process associated with the fibril formation. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provided evidence for high resolution structural variations in fibrils formed with different protocols, and in particular the stabilization of long-range contact between N- and C-terminal β strands. In addition, disruption of phospholipid bilayers was supported by measurements with ³¹P chemical shifts and relaxation time constants. PMID:24769158

  18. Allosteric regulation of G protein-coupled receptor activity by phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Masureel, Matthieu; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kobilka, Brian K; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are emerging as key regulators of membrane protein structure and activity. These effects can be attributed either to the modification of bilayer properties (thickness, curvature and surface tension) or to the binding of specific lipids to the protein surface. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the effects of phospholipids on receptor structure and activity remain poorly understood. Here we reconstituted purified β2-adrenergic receptor (β2R) in high-density lipoparticles to systematically characterize the effect of biologically relevant phospholipids on receptor activity. We observed that the lipid headgroup type affected ligand binding (agonist and antagonist) and receptor activation. Specifically, phosphatidylgycerol markedly favored agonist binding and facilitated receptor activation, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine favored antagonist binding and stabilized the inactive state of the receptor. We then showed that these effects could be recapitulated with detergent-solubilized lipids, demonstrating that the functional modulation occurred in the absence of a bilayer. Our data suggest that phospholipids act as direct allosteric modulators of GPCR activity. PMID:26571351

  19. Cholesterol transfer between lipid vesicles. Effect of phospholipids and gangliosides.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P D; Poznansky, M J

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lipid composition on the rate of cholesterol movement between cellular membranes is investigated using lipid vesicles. The separation of donor and acceptor vesicles required for rate measurement is achieved by differential centrifugation so that the lipid effect can be quantified in the absence of a charged lipid generally used for ion-exchange-based separation. The rate of cholesterol transfer from small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing 50 mol% cholesterol to a common large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) acceptor containing 20 mol% cholesterol decreases with increasing mol% of sphingomyelin in the SUVs, while phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine have no appreciable effect at physiologically relevant levels. There is a large decrease in rate when phosphatidylethanolamine constitutes 50 mol% of donor phospholipids. Interestingly, gangliosides which have the same hydrocarbon moiety as sphingomyelin exert an opposite effect. The effect of spingomyelin seems to be mediated by its ability to decrease the fluidity of the lipid matrix, while that of gangliosides may arise from a weakening of phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol interactions or from a more favourable (less polar) microenvironment for the desorption of cholesterol provided by the head-group interactions involving sugar residues. If the effect of asymmetric transbilayer distribution of lipids is taken into consideration, the observed composition-dependent rate changes could partly account for the large difference in the rates of cholesterol desorption from the inner and outer layers of plasma membrane. Such rate differences may be responsible for an unequal steady-state distribution of cholesterol among various cellular membranes and lipoproteins. PMID:3390160

  20. The impact of phospholipids and phospholipid removal on bioanalytical method performance.

    PubMed

    Carmical, Jennifer; Brown, Stacy

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are a component of cellmembranes, biological fluids and tissues. These compounds are problematic for the bioanalytical chemist, especially when PLs are not the analytes of interest. PL interference with bioanalysis highly impacts reverse-phase chromatographic methods coupled with mass spectrometric detection. Phospholipids are strongly retained on hydrophobic columns, and can cause significant ionization suppression in the mass spectrometer, as they outcompete analyte molecules for ionization. Strategies for improving analyte detection in the presence of PLs are reviewed, including in-analysis modifications and sample preparation strategies. Removal of interfering PLs prior to analysis seems to be most effective atmoderating thematrix effects fromthese endogenous cellular components, and has the potential to simplify chromatography and improve column lifetime. Products targeted at PL removal for sample pre-treatment, as well as products that combine multiplemodes of sample preparation (i.e. Hybrid SPE), show significant promise inmediating the effect on PL interference in bioanalysis. PMID:26773720

  1. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians’ responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  2. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians' responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  3. Phospholipid monolayers between fluid and solid states.

    PubMed Central

    Helm, C A; Möhwald, H; Kjaer, K; Als-Nielsen, J

    1987-01-01

    Monolayers of the phospholipid dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid on the surface of water have been studied by a combination of the new techniques of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence microscopy with classical surface pressure data. The pressure vs. area isotherm changes slope at the surface pressures pi c and pi s. The optical technique demonstrates that between pi c and pi s the fluid phase coexists with a denser "gel" phase. Electron diffraction data have shown that the gel phase has bond orientational order over tens of micrometers. However, the x-ray data demonstrate that positional correlations extend only over tens of angstroms. Thus, the gel phase is not crystalline. Above pi s a solid phase is formed with a positional correlation range that is eight times longer for the chemically purest films. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3651557

  4. Simulations of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kaznessis, Yiannis N; Kim, Sangtae; Larson, Ronald G

    2002-04-01

    Results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol monolayers at the air/water interface are presented. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is zwitterionic and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol is anionic at physiological pH. NaCl and CaCl2 water subphases are simulated. The simulations are carried out at different surface densities, and a simulation cell geometry is chosen that greatly facilitates the investigation of phospholipid monolayer properties. Ensemble average monolayer properties calculated from simulation are in agreement with experimental measurements. The dependence of the properties of the monolayers on the surface density, the type of the headgroup, and the ionic environment are explained in terms of atomistically detailed pair distribution functions and electron density profiles, demonstrating the strength of simulations in investigating complex, multicomponent systems of biological importance. PMID:11916834

  5. Retaining your high performers: moderators of the performance-job satisfaction-voluntary turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Two divergent ideas explain the relationship between performance and voluntary turnover. One suggests that higher performing employees, who are rewarded for their superior work product, will desire to remain with an organization that values their performance and will, consequently, be less likely than lower performing employees to voluntarily leave. An alternative idea suggests that higher performing employees, who are more desirable to external companies as a result of their superior work product, will have more external job opportunities and will, consequently, be more likely than their lower performing colleagues to voluntarily leave. The current study evaluated the behaviors and attitudes of 12,545 insurance employees over a 3-year period to examine how these 2 divergent expectations influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship. Results show that both pay growth and the relevant unemployment rate interact with performance to influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship and that they work independently of employee job satisfaction influences. PMID:20476825

  6. Phospholipids at the Interface: Current Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Roman; Watson, Richard L.; Norton, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipids are one of the major structural elements of biological membranes. Due to their amphiphilic character, they can adopt various molecular assemblies when dispersed in water, such as bilayer vesicles or micelles, which give them unique interfacial properties and render them very attractive in terms of foam or emulsion stabilization. This article aims at reviewing the properties of phospholipids at the air/water and oil/water interfaces, as well as the recent advances in using these natural components as stabilizers, alone or in combination with other compounds such as proteins. A discussion regarding the challenges and opportunities offered by phospholipids-stabilized structure concludes the review. PMID:23736688

  7. Comparative Proteome Analysis of hAT-MSCs Isolated from Chronic Renal Failure Patients with Differences in Their Bone Turnover Status

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Gurler; Tuncay, Mehmet; Aksoy, Ayça; Karaoz, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the stem cells and the bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to chronic renal failure (CRF) is not described. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bone turnover status on stem cell properties. To search for the presence of such link and shed some light on stem-cell relevant mechanisms of bone turnover, we carried out a study with mesenchymal stem cells. Tissue biopsies were taken from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of a CRF patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism with the high turnover bone disease. This patient underwent parathyroidectomy operation (PTX) and another sample was taken from this patient after PTX. A CRF patient with adynamic bone disease with low turnover and a healthy control were also included. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the subjects were analyzed using proteomic and molecular approaches. Except ALP activity, the bone turnover status did not affect common stem cell properties. However, detailed proteome analysis revealed the presence of regulated protein spots. A total of 32 protein spots were identified following 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF analyzes. The identified proteins were classified into seven distinct groups and their potential relationship to bone turnover were discussed. Distinct protein expression patterns emerged in relation to the bone turnover status indicate a possible link between the stem cells and bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to CRF. PMID:26575497

  8. Docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species of glycerophospholipids from frog retinal rod outer segments show different rates of biosynthesis and turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.; Wiegand, R.D.; Anderson, R.E.

    1988-12-13

    The authors have studied the de novo synthesis and subsequent turnover of major docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species in frog rod outer segment (ROS) phospholipids following intravitreal injection of (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol. On selected days after injection, ROS were prepared and phospholipids extracted. Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS) were isolated and converted to diradylglycerols with phospholipase C. Diradylglycerols were derivatized with benzoic anhydride and resolve into diacylglycerobenzoates and ether-linked glycerobenzoates. The diacylglycerobenzoates were fractionated into molecular species by HPLC, quantitated, and counted for radioactivity. Label was incorporated into ROS phospholipids by day 1 and was followed up through the eighth day. The dipolyenoic species 22:6-22:6 from PC showed 1 3-5 times higher radiospecific activity than the same species from either PE or PS. The rate of decline was determined by calculating the half-life of each molecular species, which was used as a measure of the turnover of the species. The percent distribution of radioactivity in the molecular species of PC and PE was quite different from the relative mass distribution at day 1. However, percent dpm approached the mole percent by 31 days. In PS, percent dpm and mole percent were the same at all time points. These results indicate that the molecular species composition of PC and PE in frog retinal ROS is determined by a combination of factors, which include rate of synthesis, rate of degradation, and selective interconversions. In contrast, PS composition appears to be determined at the time of synthesis.

  9. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  10. Phospholipid synthesis in HeLa cells exposed to immunoglobulin G and complement

    PubMed Central

    Güttler, Flemming

    1972-01-01

    1. HeLa cells were cultured in the presence of heterologous immunoglobulin G and guinea-pig serum together with [32P]phosphate. 2. Incorporation of [32P]phosphate was significantly stimulated by anti-HeLa immunoglobulin G and complement-sufficient serum compared with immunoglobulin G from unimmunized rabbits and complement. Within 2.5h heat-inactivated guinea-pig serum and anti-HeLa immunoglobulin G stimulated [32P]phosphate incorporation to the same extent as heat-inactivated complement and immunoglobulin G from unimmunized rabbits. 3. Compared with cells exposed to immunoglobulin G from unimmunized rabbits together with complement, anti-HeLa immunoglobulin G with complement increased the phospholipid content of HeLa cells twofold within 5h of incubation. 4. Exposure of HeLa cells to anti-HeLa immunoglobulin G and complement for 5–22h resulted in a twofold increase in the net accumulation of [32P]phosphate in sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine and a 50% increase in the net accumulation of [32P]phosphate in phosphatidylethanolamine, compared with cultures exposed to immunoglobulin G from unimmunized rabbits and complement. 5. A transient accumulation of 32P-labelled lysophosphoglycerides in HeLa cells exposed to antibody and complement was detected, confirming previous findings (Güttler & Clausen, 1969b). 6. The stimulation of [32P]phosphate turnover occurred in cells filling up their cytoplasma with vacuoles. This supports the suggestion that the accumulation of phospholipid in these cells may be concerned with the synthesis and function of cytomembranes. PMID:4674125

  11. Mitochondrial protein turnover: methods to measure turnover rates on a large scale

    PubMed Central

    Chan, X’avia CY; Black, Caitlin M; Lin, Amanda J; Ping, Peipei; Lau, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins carry out diverse cellular functions including ATP synthesis, ion homeostasis, cell death signaling, and fatty acid metabolism and biogenesis. Compromised mitochondrial quality control is implicated in various human disorders including cardiac diseases. Recently it has emerged that mitochondrial protein turnover can serve as an informative cellular parameter to characterize mitochondrial quality and uncover disease mechanisms. The turnover rate of a mitochondrial protein reflects its homeostasis and dynamics under the quality control systems acting on mitochondria at a particular cell state. This review article summarizes some recent advances and outstanding challenges for measuring the turnover rates of mitochondrial proteins in health and disease. PMID:25451168

  12. p53 attenuates AKT signaling by modulating membrane phospholipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Bloch, Katarzyna; Derua, Rita; Vyas, Rajesh; Harms, Amy; Hankemeier, Thomas; Khan, Niamat Ali; Dehairs, Jonas; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Waelkens, Etienne; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Swinnen, Johannes V.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is the central component of a complex network of signaling pathways that protect organisms against the propagation of cells carrying oncogenic mutations. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of p53 in membrane phospholipids composition. By repressing the expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, SCD, the enzyme that converts saturated to mono-unsaturated fatty acids, p53 causes a shift in the content of phospholipids with mono-unsaturated acyl chains towards more saturated phospholipid species, particularly of the phosphatidylinositol headgroup class. This shift affects levels of phosphatidylinositol phosphates, attenuates the oncogenic AKT pathway, and contributes to the p53-mediated control of cell survival. These findings expand the p53 network to phospholipid metabolism and uncover a new molecular pathway connecting p53 to AKT signaling. PMID:26061814

  13. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  14. A phospholipid uptake system in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; López-Marqués, Rosa L; Pedas, Pai R; McDowell, Stephen C; Brown, Elizabeth; Kunze, Reinhard; Harper, Jeffrey F; Pomorski, Thomas G; Palmgren, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Plants use solar energy to produce lipids directly from inorganic elements and are not thought to require molecular systems for lipid uptake from the environment. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Aminophospholipid ATPase10 (ALA10) is a P4-type ATPase flippase that internalizes exogenous phospholipids across the plasma membrane, after which they are rapidly metabolized. ALA10 expression and phospholipid uptake are high in the epidermal cells of the root tip and in guard cells, the latter of which regulate the size of stomatal apertures to modulate gas exchange. ALA10-knockout mutants exhibit reduced phospholipid uptake at the root tips and guard cells and are affected in growth and transpiration. The presence of a phospholipid uptake system in plants is surprising. Our results suggest that one possible physiological role of this system is to internalize lysophosphatidylcholine, a signalling lipid involved in root development and stomatal control. PMID:26212235

  15. Supported phospholipid/alkanethiol biomimetic membranes: insulating properties.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, A L; Gueguetchkeri, M; Yap, W

    1994-01-01

    A novel model lipid bilayer membrane is prepared by the addition of phospholipid vesicles to alkanethiol monolayers on gold. This supported hybrid bilayer membrane is rugged, easily and reproducibly prepared in the absence of organic solvent, and is stable for very long periods of time. We have characterized the insulating characteristics of this membrane by examining the rate of electron transfer and by impedance spectroscopy. Supported hybrid bilayers formed from phospholipids and alkanethiols are pinhole-free and demonstrate measured values of conductivity and resistivity which are within an order of magnitude of that reported for black lipid membranes. Capacitance values suggest a dielectric constant of 2.7 for phospholipid membranes in the absence of organic solvent. The protein toxin, melittin, destroys the insulating capability of the phospholipid layer without significantly altering the bilayer structure. This model membrane will allow the assessment of the effect of lipid membrane perturbants on the insulating properties of natural lipid membranes. PMID:7811924

  16. Inhibition by calmodulin of calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, K A; Wu, W C; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P

    1984-01-01

    Calmodulin was previously found to inhibit the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of an endogenous substrate, called the 87-kilodalton protein, in a crude extract prepared from rat brain synaptosomal cytosol. We investigated the mechanism of this inhibition, using Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase and the 87-kilodalton protein, both of which had been purified to homogeneity from bovine brain. Rabbit brain calmodulin and some other Ca2+-binding proteins inhibited the phosphorylation of the 87-kilodalton protein by this kinase in the purified system. Calmodulin also inhibited the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of H1 histone, synapsin I, and the delta subunit of the acetylcholine receptor, with use of purified components. These results suggest that calmodulin may be a physiological regulator of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase. Images PMID:6233611

  17. Evidence that phospholipid turnover is the signal transducing system coupled to serotonin-S2 receptor sites

    SciTech Connect

    de Chaffoy de Courcelles, D.; Leysen, J.E.; De Clerck, F.; Van Belle, H.; Janssen, P.A.

    1985-06-25

    Upon stimulation with serotonin of washed human platelets prelabeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, the authors found an approximately 250% increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, a small decrease in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and a concomitant increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Using (/sup 3/H)arachidonate for prelabeling, (/sup 3/H)diacylglycerol accumulated transiently at 10 s after addition of the agonist, (/sup 3/H)PA increased but to a lower extent compared to /sup 32/P-labeled lipid, and the formation of both (/sup 3/H)polyphosphoinositides increased. The serotonin-induced dose-dependent changes in (/sup 32/P)PA correlate with its effect on the changes in slope of aggregation of platelets. The potency of 13 drugs to antagonize the serotonin-induced PA formation closely corresponds to both their potency to inhibit platelet aggregation and their binding affinity for serotonin-S2 receptor sites. It is suggested that at least part of the signal transducing system following activation of the serotonin-S2 receptors involves phospholipase C catalyzed inositol lipid breakdown yielding diacylglycerol which is subsequently phosphorylated to PA.

  18. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nybo, Mads; Macaubas, Claudia; Lønstrup, Lars; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid cardiolipin, and as the last step, coupling of the product with azide-containing linker and copper-catalyzed click chemistry with β2-glycoprotein I and prothrombin. To prove utility of the product antigens, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and three cohorts of samples obtained from patients in Denmark (n = 34) and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14). Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity and specificity. Unlike previously used antigens the obtained autoantibody titers strongly correlate with high disease activity and in particular, with arthritis, renal involvement, anti-Smith antibodies and high lymphocyte count. Importantly, chemical composition of antigens has a strong influence on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens’ composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity. PMID:27257889

  19. Effects of gamma irradiation on solid and lyophilised phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensrud, G.; Redford, K.; Smistad, G.; Karlsen, J.

    1999-11-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation (25 kGy) as a sterilisation method for phospholipids (distearoylphosphatidylcholine and distearoylphosphatidylglycerol) were investigated. 31P-NMR revealed minor chemical degradation of the phospholipids but lower dynamic viscosity and pseudoplasticity, lower turbidity, higher diffusion constant, smaller size, more negative zeta potential and changes in the phase transition behaviour of the subsequently produced liposomes were observed. The observed changes could to some extent be explained by the irradiation-induced degradation products (distearoylphosphatidic acid, fatty acids, lysophospholipids).

  20. Uncoupling binding of substrate CO from turnover by vanadium nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung; Fay, Aaron W.; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Krest, Courtney M.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis by nitrogenase, particularly the reduction of N2 and CO by this enzyme, has tremendous significance in environment- and energy-related areas. Elucidation of the detailed mechanism of nitrogenase has been hampered by the inability to trap substrates or intermediates in a well-defined state. Here, we report the capture of substrate CO on the resting-state vanadium-nitrogenase in a catalytically competent conformation. The close resemblance of this active CO-bound conformation to the recently described structure of CO-inhibited molybdenum-nitrogenase points to the mechanistic relevance of sulfur displacement to the activation of iron sites in the cofactor for CO binding. Moreover, the ability of vanadium-nitrogenase to bind substrate in the resting-state uncouples substrate binding from subsequent turnover, providing a platform for generation of defined intermediate(s) of both CO and N2 reduction. PMID:26515097

  1. Turnover of Public School Superintendents in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Joyce Ntsoaki

    2013-01-01

    This study used a descriptive qualitative design utilizing a phenomenological approach to determine and examine the reasons behind the voluntary or involuntary turnover of Arizona school superintendents. Open-ended questions were used to interview five superintendents who had left their districts between 2008 and 2013 about their perceptions on…

  2. Cusp catastrophe model of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, J E; Abelson, M A

    1983-09-01

    A cusp catastrophe model is developed to explain job turnover of nursing employees. The temporal dynamics of the catastrophe model suggest that leavers experience lower organization commitment than do stayers prior to termination. Leavers' perceptions of job tension and commitment appear to cross the threshold levels prior to the termination dates. PMID:10262614

  3. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  4. Antecedents of Norwegian Beginning Teachers' Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiplic, Dijana; Brandmo, Christian; Elstad, Eyvind

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at exploring several individual, organizational, and contextual factors that may affect beginning teachers' turnover intentions during their first years of practice. The sample consists of 227 beginning teachers (69% female and 31% male) from 133 schools in Norway. The results show four important antecedents of beginning teachers'…

  5. A Turnover Model for the Mexican Maquiladoras.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P.; Stevens, Michael J.; Campion, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    From interviews with 47 Mexican maquiladora workers, a model of voluntary turnover was created and compared with models from the United States, Canada, England, and Australia. Despite similarities, the cultural and economic environment affected the precise content of antecedents in the Mexican model. (Contains 63 references.) (SK)

  6. Home Visitor Job Satisfaction and Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchbinder, Sharon B.; Duggan, Anne K.; Young, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Sia, Cal

    This paper summarizes findings of a 3-year study of the job satisfaction and turnover of home visitors, both professional and paraprofessional, in programs which link families-at-risk for impaired functioning to medical home care and other resources. Specifically, the study examined: (1) home visitor personal characteristics that influence…

  7. Job Turnover Intentions Among Pharmacy Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Mark H.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the primary reasons why pharmacy faculty intend to remain or leave their current institution and why they left their most recent academic institution, and the relative contribution of various organizational and individual characteristics toward explaining variance in turnover intentions. Methods A survey instrument was e-mailed to pharmacy faculty members asking respondents to indicate up to 5 reasons for their intentions and up to 5 reasons why they left a previous institution. The survey also elicited perceptions on quality of work life in addition to demographic and institutional data, upon which turnover intentions were regressed using a forward-conditional procedure. Organizational commitment as a moderator of turnover intentions was regressed over the remaining variables not acting directly on employer intentions. Results Just over 1 in 5 respondents indicated intentions to leave their current academic institution. Excessive workload, seeking a new challenge, poor salary, and poor relationships with college or school administrators were frequently cited as reasons for leaving. Turnover intentions are influenced directly by department chair support and organizational commitment, which moderates various support and satisfaction variables. Conclusions Pharmacy faculty members’ decision to remain or leave an institution is dependent upon developing a sense of commitment toward the institution. Commitment is facilitated by support from the institution and department chair, in addition to a sense of satisfaction with the teaching environment. PMID:17786250

  8. Teacher Turnover in Charter Schools. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David; Smith, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to contribute to a deeper understanding of the organizational conditions of charter schools by examining teacher turnover. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) and the Teacher Follow-Up Survey (TFS), researchers from the National Center on School…

  9. Costing Child Protective Services Staff Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graef, Michelle I.; Hill, Erick L.

    2000-01-01

    Details process of determining a child welfare agency's actual dollar costs directly attributed to protective services staff turnover, using the agency's human resources database and interviews with administrative personnel. Provides formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to employee separation, replacement, and training.…

  10. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  11. Normal Bone Turnover in Transient Hyperphosphatasemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutilek, Stepan; Cervickova, Barbora; Bebova, Pavla; Kmonickova, Marie; Nemec, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Transient hyperphosphatasemia of infancy and early childhood (THI) is characterized by a temporary isolated elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), predominantly its bone or liver isoform, in either sick or healthy children under 5 years of age. Return to normal ALP levels usually occurs within four months. Spontaneous rise of ALP might concern the physician, especially when treating seriously ill children. However, THI is considered a benign biochemical disorder with no clinical consequences. Some existing reports support the hypothesis that THI is a result of increased bone turnover. We present evidence of normal bone turnover in two children with THI. In a one-year-old girl and a boy of the same age, high ALP levels (31 and 109 μkat/L, respectively) were accidentally detected. The children had no signs of metabolic bone disease or of liver disease. The high ALP levels returned to normal in two months, thus fulfilling the diagnosis of THI. In both patients, serum parathyroid hormone and bone turnover markers, serum CrossLaps, and serum osteocalcin were neither elevated, nor did these markers follow the ALP dynamics, thus reflecting normal bone turnover in THI. Children with THI should be spared from extensive investigations and unnecessary vitamin D treatment. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22664360

  12. Molecular Insights into Phospholipid -- NSAID Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2007-03-01

    Non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. Using all atomistic simulations and two different methodologies, we studied the partitioning behavior of two model NSAIDs (Aspirin and Ibuprofen) as a function of pH and drug loading. The results from two methodologies are consistent in describing the equilibrium drug distribution in the bilayers. Additionally, the heterogeneity in density and polarity of the bilayer in the normal direction along with the fact that NSAIDs are amphiphilic (all of them have a carboxylic acid group and a non-polar part consisting of aromatic moieties), indicate that the diffusion mechanism in the bilayer is far different compared to the same in a bulk medium. This study summarizes the various effects of NSAIDs and their behavior inside the lipid bilayer both as a function of pH and drug concentration.

  13. Effects of phospholipids on renal function.

    PubMed

    Buckalew, V M; Strandhoy, J W; Handa, R K

    1993-01-01

    The effects of two classes of phospholipids (PL) on renal function have been studied. Bolus injections of 1 ng (10 pmol) of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) caused natriuresis and diuresis in rats. Natriuretic activity was eliminated by substituting unsaturated bonds in the 1-acyl group and by removing the choline group on the sn-3 position. Natriuretic activity was not affected by substitution of 1-alkyl for 1-acyl groups. In the dog, LPC was natriuretic when given as a bolus of 3.0 micrograms/kg or as a constant infusion at 5 ng/kg/min. To explore further the effect of alkyl PLs on renal function, a series of studies with platelet activating factor (PAF) was performed. PAF injected directly into the renal artery (IR) in bolus doses of 0.5-10 ng/kg caused renal vasodilation that was blocked by a specific PAF receptor antagonist. This effect was not due to release of vasodilatory eicosanoids, dopamine, or nitric oxide (NO). PAF given IR as a continuous infusion at 2.5 ng/kg/min attenuated the renal vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II and norepinephrine but not vasopressin. This effect to attenuate vasoconstriction was blocked by the NO inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine. These studies using picomolar amounts of PL suggest a physiologic role for these compounds in control of renal function. PMID:7508037

  14. Hyaluronan and phospholipid association in biolubrication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Dėdinaitė, Andra

    2013-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the outstanding lubrication of synovial joints is achieved by a sophisticated hierarchical structure of cartilage combined with synergistic actions of surface-active components present in the synovial fluid. In this work we focus on the association of two components of the synovial fluid, hyaluronan and dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), in bulk solution and at interfaces. We demonstrate that hyaluronan associates with DPPC vesicles and adsorbs to supported DPPC bilayers. The association structures formed at the interface are sufficiently stable to allow sequential adsorption of DPPC and hyaluronan, whereby promoting the formation of thick composite layers of these two components. The lubricating ability of such composite layers was probed by the AFM colloidal probe technique and found to be very favorable with low friction coefficients and high load bearing capacity. With DPPC as the last adsorbed component, a friction coefficient of 0.01 was found up to pressures significantly above what is encountered in healthy synovial joints. Hyaluronan as the last added component increases the friction coefficient to 0.03 and decreases the load bearing capacity somewhat (but still above what is needed in the synovial joint). Our data demonstrate that self-assembly structures formed by hyaluronan and phospholipids at interfaces are efficient aqueous lubricants, and it seems plausible that such self-assembly structures contribute to the exceptional lubrication of synovial joints. PMID:24171653

  15. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes. PMID:27050618

  16. Enhancement by cytidine of membrane phospholipid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    G-Coviella, I. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Cytidine, as cytidine 5'-diphosphate choline, is a major precursor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in cell membranes. In the present study, we examined the relationships between extracellular levels of cytidine, the conversion of [14C]choline to [14C]phosphatidylcholine, and the net syntheses of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine by PC12 cells. The rate at which cytidine (as [3H]cytidine) was incorporated into the PC12 cells followed normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 5 microM; Vmax = 12 x 10(-3) mmol/mg of protein/min) when the cytidine concentrations in the medium were below 50 microM; at higher concentrations, intracellular [3H]cytidine nucleotide levels increased linearly. Once inside the cell, cytidine was converted mainly into cytidine triphosphate. In pulse-chase experiments, addition of cytidine to the medium caused a time- and dose-dependent increase (by up to 30%) in the incorporation of [14C]choline into membrane [14C]-phosphatidylcholine. When the PC12 cells were supplemented with both cytidine and choline for 14 h, small but significant elevations (p less than 0.05) were observed in their absolute contents of membrane phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine, all increasing by 10-15% relative to their levels in cells incubated with choline alone. Exogenous cytidine, acting via cytidine triphosphate, can thus affect the synthesis and levels of cell membrane phospholipids.

  17. Specific RNA binding to ordered phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Tadeusz; Janas, Teresa; Yarus, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We have studied RNA binding to vesicles bounded by ordered and disordered phospholipid membranes. A positive correlation exists between bilayer order and RNA affinity. In particular, structure-dependent RNA binding appears for rafted (liquid-ordered) domains in sphingomyelin-cholesterol-1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine vesicles. Binding to more highly ordered gel phase membranes is stronger, but much less RNA structure-dependent. All modes of RNA-membrane association seem to be electrostatic and headgroup directed. Fluorometry on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes indicates that bound RNA broadens the gel-fluid melting transition, and reduces lipid headgroup order, as detected via fluorometric measurement of intramembrane electric fields. RNA preference for rafted lipid was visualized and confirmed using multiple fluorophores that allow fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy on RNA molecules closely associated with ordered lipid patches within giant vesicles. Accordingly, both RNA structure and membrane order could modulate biological RNA–membrane interactions. PMID:16641318

  18. Lipid metabolizing enzyme activities modulated by phospholipid substrate lateral distribution.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Dino G; Reyes, Juan G; De la Fuente, Milton

    2011-09-01

    Biological membranes contain many domains enriched in phospholipid lipids and there is not yet clear explanation about how these domains can control the activity of phospholipid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used the surface dilution kinetic theory to derive general equations describing how complex substrate distributions affect the activity of enzymes following either the phospholipid binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules directly bind the phospholipid substrate molecules), or the surface-binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules bind to the membrane before binding the phospholipid substrate). Our results strongly suggest that, if the enzyme follows the phospholipid binding kinetic model, any substrate redistribution would increase the enzyme activity over than observed for a homogeneous distribution of substrate. Besides, enzymes following the surface-binding model would be independent of the substrate distribution. Given that the distribution of substrate in a population of micelles (each of them a lipid domain) should follow a Poisson law, we demonstrate that the general equations give an excellent fit to experimental data of lipases acting on micelles, providing reasonable values for kinetic parameters--without invoking special effects such as cooperative phenomena. Our theory will allow a better understanding of the cellular-metabolism control in membranes, as well as a more simple analysis of the mechanisms of membrane acting enzymes. PMID:21108012

  19. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility. PMID:25630300

  20. Work-Related Variables and Turnover Intention among Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooyan, Abdullah; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Health institutions have become more interested in the causes of job turnover among registered nurses. Proper management of job turnover can improve the financial health and long-term survival of health care institutions. (Author)

  1. Looking for a Challenge? Watch That Labour Turnover!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Roderick

    1975-01-01

    Low labor turnover is an essential factor in the success of an enterprise. Steps in dealing with the turnover problem include: establish the objective, get the facts, decide what to do, take action, and check results. (MW)

  2. Staff turnover: occasional friend, frequent foe, and continuing frustration.

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1999-09-01

    Turnover appears to be a relatively simple concept. However, considerable confusion results when discussing turnover because of differences in how it is defined--what is counted, how it is counted, and how the rate of turnover is expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to turnover's cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some which can be corrected and some which cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role. PMID:10747463

  3. A concept analysis of turnover intention: implications for nursing management.

    PubMed

    Takase, Miyuki

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review and concept analysis of turnover intention. The aim was to promote Nurse Managers' understanding of the meanings and mechanisms of turnover intention, which could help them counteract nurse turnover. Sixty-six papers published between January 1998 and August 2007 were collected from CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases, and were subjected to Rogers' concept analysis. The results showed that turnover intention is a multi-stage process involving the voluntary departure of employees from their current position, and is triggered by negative psychological responses to internal/external job context. These psychological responses evolve into withdrawal cognition and behaviours, and lead to actual turnover. To prevent nurse turnover, Nurse Managers should closely observe the internal and external causes of turnover, and the stage of nurses' turnover intention. PMID:20394269

  4. Gaussian Process Modeling of Protein Turnover.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Previs, Stephen F; Kasumov, Takhar; Sadygov, Rovshan G

    2016-07-01

    We describe a stochastic model to compute in vivo protein turnover rate constants from stable-isotope labeling and high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments. We show that the often-used one- and two-compartment nonstochastic models allow explicit solutions from the corresponding stochastic differential equations. The resulting stochastic process is a Gaussian processes with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck covariance matrix. We applied the stochastic model to a large-scale data set from (15)N labeling and compared its performance metrics with those of the nonstochastic curve fitting. The comparison showed that for more than 99% of proteins, the stochastic model produced better fits to the experimental data (based on residual sum of squares). The model was used for extracting protein-decay rate constants from mouse brain (slow turnover) and liver (fast turnover) samples. We found that the most affected (compared to two-exponent curve fitting) results were those for liver proteins. The ratio of the median of degradation rate constants of liver proteins to those of brain proteins increased 4-fold in stochastic modeling compared to the two-exponent fitting. Stochastic modeling predicted stronger differences of protein turnover processes between mouse liver and brain than previously estimated. The model is independent of the labeling isotope. To show this, we also applied the model to protein turnover studied in induced heart failure in rats, in which metabolic labeling was achieved by administering heavy water. No changes in the model were necessary for adapting to heavy-water labeling. The approach has been implemented in a freely available R code. PMID:27229456

  5. Relating microbial community structure to functioning in forest soil organic carbon transformation and turnover.

    PubMed

    You, Yeming; Wang, Juan; Huang, Xueman; Tang, Zuoxin; Liu, Shirong; Sun, Osbert J

    2014-03-01

    Forest soils store vast amounts of terrestrial carbon, but we are still limited in mechanistic understanding on how soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization or turnover is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors in forest ecosystems. We used phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarker to study soil microbial community structure and measured activities of five extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose (i.e., β-1,4-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase), chitin (i.e., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase), and lignin (i.e., phenol oxidase and peroxidase) as indicators of soil microbial functioning in carbon transformation or turnover across varying biotic and abiotic conditions in a typical temperate forest ecosystem in central China. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was performed to determine the interrelationship between individual PFLAs and biotic and abiotic site factors as well as the linkage between soil microbial structure and function. Path analysis was further conducted to examine the controls of site factors on soil microbial community structure and the regulatory pathway of changes in SOC relating to microbial community structure and function. We found that soil microbial community structure is strongly influenced by water, temperature, SOC, fine root mass, clay content, and C/N ratio in soils and that the relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, saprophytic fungi, and actinomycetes explained most of the variations in the specific activities of soil enzymes involved in SOC transformation or turnover. The abundance of soil bacterial communities is strongly linked with the extracellular enzymes involved in carbon transformation, whereas the abundance of saprophytic fungi is associated with activities of extracellular enzymes driving carbon oxidation. Findings in this study demonstrate the complex interactions and linkage among plant traits, microenvironment, and soil physiochemical properties in affecting SOC via microbial regulations. PMID

  6. Structure and interactive properties of highly fluorinated phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, T J; Simon, S A; Vierling, P; Santaella, C; Ravily, V

    1996-01-01

    Because liposomes containing fluoroalkylated phospholipids are being developed for in vivo drug delivery, the structure and interactive properties of several fluoroalkylated glycerophosphocholines (PCs) were investigated by x-ray diffraction/osmotic stress, dipole potential, and hydrophobic ion binding measurements. The lipids included PCs with highly fluorinated tails on both alkyl chains and PCs with one hydrocarbon chain and one fluoroalkylated chain. Electron density profiles showed high electron density peaks in the center of the bilayer corresponding to the fluorine atoms. The height and width of these high density peaks varied systematically, depending on the number of fluorines and their position on the alkyl chains, and on whether the bilayer was in the gel or liquid crystalline phase. Wide-angle diffraction showed that in both gel and liquid crystalline bilayers the distance between adjacent alkyl chains was greater in fluoroalkylated PCs than in analogous hydrocarbon PCs. For interbilayer separations of less than about 8 A, pressure-distance relations for fluoroalkylated PCs were similar to those previously obtained from PC bilayers with hydrocarbon chains. However, for bilayer separations greater than 8A, the total repulsive pressure depended on whether the fluoroalkylated PC was in a gel or liquid-crystalline phase. We argue that these pressure-distance relations contain contributions from both hydration and entropic repulsive pressures. Dipole potentials ranged from -680 mV for PCs with both chains fluoroalkylated to -180 mV for PCs with one chain fluoroalkylated, compared to +415 mV for egg PC. The change in dipole potential as a function of subphase concentration of tetraphenyl-boron was much larger for egg PC than for fluorinated PC monolayers, indicating that the fluorine atoms modified the binding of this hydrophobic anion. Thus, compared to conventional liposomes, liposomes made from fluoroalkylated PCs have different binding properties, which

  7. New insights into water-phospholipid model membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Milhaud, Jeannine

    2004-05-27

    Modulating the relative humidity (RH) of the ambient gas phase of a phospholipid/water sample for modifying the activity of phospholipid-sorbed water [humidity-controlled osmotic stress methods, J. Chem. Phys. 92 (1990) 4519 and J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 446] has opened a new field of research of paramount importance. New types of phase transitions, occurring at specific values of this activity, have been then disclosed. Hence, it is become recognized that this activity, like the temperature T, is an intensive parameter of the thermodynamical state of these samples. This state can be therefore changed (phase transition) either, by modulating T at a given water activity (a given hydration level), or, by modulating the water activity, at a given T. The underlying mechanisms of these two types of transition differ, especially when they appear as disorderings of fatty chains. In lyotropic transitions, this disordering follows from two thermodynamical laws. First, acting on the activity (the chemical potential) of water external to a phospholipid/water sample, a transbilayer gradient of water chemical potential is created, leading to a transbilayer flux of water (Fick's law). Second, water molecules present within the hydrocarbon region of this phospholipid bilayer interact with phospholipid molecules through their chemical potential (Gibbs-Duhem relation): the conformational state of fatty chains (the thermodynamical state of the phospholipid molecules) changes. This process is slow, as revealed by osmotic stress time-resolved experiments. In thermal chain-melting transitions, the first rapid step is the disordering of fatty chains of a fraction of phospholipid molecules. It occurs a few degrees before the main transition temperature, T(m), during the pretransition and the sub-main transition. The second step, less rapid, is the redistribution of water molecules between the different parts of the sample, as revealed by T-jump time-resolved experiments. Finally, in

  8. Phase behavior and permeability properties of phospholipid bilayers containing a short-chain phospholipid permeability enhancer.

    PubMed

    Risbo, J; Jørgensen, K; Sperotto, M M; Mouritsen, O G

    1997-10-01

    The thermodynamic phase behavior and trans-bilayer permeability properties of multilamellar phospholipid vesicles containing a short-chain DC10PC phospholipid permeability enhancer have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The calorimetric scans of DC14PC lipid bilayer vesicles incorporated with high concentrations of DC10PC demonstrate a distinct influence on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics manifested as a pronounced freezing-point depression and a narrow phase coexistence region. Increasing amounts of DC10PC lead to a progressive lowering of the melting enthalpy, implying a mixing behavior of the DC10PC in the bilayer matrix similar to that of a substitutional impurity. The phase behavior of the DC10PC-DC14PC mixture is supported by fluorescence polarization measurements which, furthermore, in the low-temperature gel phase reveal a non-monotonic concentration-dependent influence on the structural bilayer properties; small concentrations of DC10PC induce a disordering of the acyl chains, whereas higher concentrations lead to an ordering. Irreversible fluorescence quench measurements demonstrate a substantial increase in the trans-bilayer permeability over broad temperature and composition ranges. At temperatures corresponding to the peak positions of the heat capacity, a maximum in the trans-bilayer permeability is observed. The influence of DC10PC on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics and the associated permeability properties is discussed in terms of microscopic effects on the lateral lipid organization and heterogeneity of the bilayer. PMID:9370247

  9. Job Satisfaction, Commitment, Withdrawal Cognitions and Turnover: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Kenneth W.; Campbell, James P.

    Recent research on organizational turnover has examined the validity of the turnover decision process, in particular, the model of employee turnover proposed by Mobley (1977). This study followed-up on a previous (Kerber and Campbell, 1986) study of new employees of a large computer company in which participants completed a questionnaire that…

  10. A Ministudy of employee turnover in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric P; Collins, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    A ministudy was conducted to collect self-reported employee turnover rates in US hospitals. The results indicate many hospitals are struggling with high employee turnover rates. Widespread variances in ratings were observed across hospitals, which may be due to lack of consistency in how they each calculate their employee turnover. This makes benchmarking for the purposes of performance improvement challenging. PMID:25627851

  11. Investing in Leadership: The District's Role in Managing Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascall, Blair; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into the impact of principal turnover on schools, and the ability of schools to mitigate the negative effects of frequent turnover by distributing leadership in the schools. The findings from this qualitative and quantitative analysis show that rapid principal turnover does indeed have a negative…

  12. Job Turnover and Job Satisfaction among Nursing Home Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Howard M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Interviewed 234 aides in seven nursing homes concerning job turnover rate, job satisfaction, and perception of milieu. A positive association found between turnover rate and aides' perceptions of the homes' order, organization, and control suggested that job turnover would lessen with more involvement in the decision-making process. (JAC)

  13. Employee Turnover in the Federal Government. A Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musell, R. Mark

    A study of employee turnover in the Federal government showed that in 1984, about 195,000 full-time, nonpostal Federal workers with permanent appointments left Federal jobs or transferred to other Federal agencies--representing a turnover rate of 11.5 percent. The turnover was about three percentage points higher for white-collar workers than for…

  14. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  15. Salary and Ranking and Teacher Turnover: A Statewide Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Cynthia Martinez; Slate, John R.; Delgado, Carmen Tejeda

    2009-01-01

    This study examined three years of data obtained from the Academic Excellence Indicator System of the State of Texas regarding teacher turnover rate and teacher salary. Across all public school districts, teacher salary was consistently negatively related to teacher turnover; that is, where salary was lower, turnover rate was higher When data were…

  16. High School Band Students' Perspectives of Teacher Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloss, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher turnover remains an important issue in education. The least researched perspectives, though, are those of the students who experience teacher turnover. The purpose of this study was to examine how high school band students experience teacher turnover. A total of twelve students were interviewed, representing three schools that experienced…

  17. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert I.; Thomson, Bruce C.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of rhizosphere soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h) and DNA (30 h) turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 days), while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) had the slowest turnover (42 days). PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings. PMID:25914679

  18. SEC14 Phospholipid Transfer Protein Is Involved in Lipid Signaling-Mediated Plant Immune Responses in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Kiba, Akinori; Galis, Ivan; Hojo, Yuko; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a gene related to the SEC14-gene phospholipid transfer protein superfamily that is induced in Nicotiana benthamiana (NbSEC14) in response to infection with Ralstonia solanacearum. We here report that NbSEC14 plays a role in plant immune responses via phospholipid-turnover. NbSEC14-silencing compromised expression of defense–related PR-4 and accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivative JA-Ile. Transient expression of NbSEC14 induced PR-4 gene expression. Activities of diacylglycerol kinase, phospholipase C and D, and the synthesis of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid elicited by avirulent R. solanacearum were reduced in NbSEC14-silenced plants. Accumulation of signaling lipids and activation of diacylglycerol kinase and phospholipases were enhanced by transient expression of NbSEC14. These results suggest that the NbSEC14 protein plays a role at the interface between lipid signaling-metabolism and plant innate immune responses. PMID:24845602

  19. Camptothecin-catalyzed phospholipid hydrolysis in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Saetern, Ann Mari; Skar, Merete; Braaten, Asmund; Brandl, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phospholipid (PL) within camptothecin (CPT)-containing liposomes was studied systematically, after elevated lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC)-concentrations in pH 5, CPT-containing liposomes (22.1+/-0.9 mol%) relative to control-liposomes (7.3+/-0.5 mol%) occasionally had been observed after four months storage in fridge. Liposomes were prepared by dispersing freeze-dried PL/CPT mixtures in 25 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of varying pH (5.0-7.8) and CPT concentrations (0, 3 and 6 mM). PL-hydrolysis was monitored by HPTLC, quantifying LPC. In an accelerated stability study (60 degrees C), a catalytic effect of CPT on PL-hydrolysis was observed after 40 h, but not up to 30 h of incubation. The pH profile of the hydrolysis indicated a stability optimum at pH 6.0 for the liposomes independent of CPT. The equilibrium point between the more active lactone- and the carboxylate-form of CPT was found to be pH 6.8. As a compromise, pH 6.0 was chosen, assuring >85% CPT to be present in the lactone form. At this pH, both control- and CPT-liposomes showed only minor hydrolysis after autoclaving (121 degrees C, 15 min). Storage at room temperature and in fridge (2 months), as well as accelerated ageing (70 degrees C, 25 h), gave a significant elevation of LPC content in CPT-liposomes relative to control-liposomes. This study demonstrates a catalytic effect of CPT on PL-hydrolysis, the onset of which seems to require a certain threshold level of hydrolytic degradation. PMID:15607259

  20. The Charge Properties of Phospholipid Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Her, Cheng; Filoti, Dana I; McLean, Mark A; Sligar, Stephen G; Alexander Ross, J B; Steele, Harmen; Laue, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are a major, diverse constituent of cell membranes. PL diversity arises from the nature of the fatty acid chains, as well as the headgroup structure. The headgroup charge is thought to contribute to both the strength and specificity of protein-membrane interactions. Because it has been difficult to measure membrane charge, ascertaining the role charge plays in these interactions has been challenging. Presented here are charge measurements on lipid Nanodiscs at 20°C in 100 mM NaCl, 50 mM Tris, at pH 7.4. Values are also reported for measurements made in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and temperature, and in solvents containing other types of cations and anions. Measurements were made for neutral (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) and anionic (phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)) PLs containing palmitoyl-oleoyl and dimyristoyl fatty acid chains. In addition, charge measurements were made on Nanodiscs containing an Escherichia coli lipid extract. The data collected reveal that 1) POPE is anionic and not neutral at pH 7.4; 2) high-anionic-content Nanodiscs exhibit polyelectrolyte behavior; 3) 3 mM Ca(2+) neutralizes a constant fraction of the charge, but not a constant amount of charge, for POPS and POPC Nanodiscs; 4) in contrast to some previous work, POPC only interacts weakly with Ca(2+); 5) divalent cations interact with lipids in a lipid- and ion-specific manner for POPA and PIP2 lipids; and 6) the monovalent anion type has little influence on the lipid charge. These results should help eliminate inconsistencies among data obtained using different techniques, membrane systems, and experimental conditions, and they provide foundational data for developing an accurate view of membranes and membrane-protein interactions. PMID:27602726

  1. Identification of phospholipid species affected by miltefosine action in Leishmania donovani cultures using LC-ELSD, LC-ESI/MS, and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Imbert, L; Ramos, R G; Libong, D; Abreu, S; Loiseau, P M; Chaminade, P

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a widespread parasitic disease principally treated by intravenous drugs. Hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) has recently proved its efficacy by oral route. Although its mechanism of action has been investigated, and principally relies on perturbations of the metabolism of lipids and especially phospholipids, further studies need to be conducted to detect precisely which metabolic pathways are impacted. For this purpose, the present work proposes a complete lipidomic study focused on membrane phospholipids of clones of Leishmania donovani non-treated (NT), treated (T) and resistant (R) to miltefosine. Firstly, a separation of phospholipids in normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) was coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS) equipped with an electrospray (ESI) ion source, and response was compared to evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD). Secondly, a quantification of phospholipid classes was performed using NP-HPLC/ESI/MS on NT, T and R clones of L. donovani. Thirdly, full-scan acquisitions of analyzed samples were compared using orthogonal signal correction-partial least square-discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) to highlight phospholipid molecular species of interest between the three types of clones. Structural determination of the most relevant species has finally been performed using tandem mass spectrometry. A first hypothesis on the effect of miltefosine on lipid metabolic pathways is then proposed. PMID:22065347

  2. Turnover intention in new graduate nurses: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beecroft, Pauline C; Dorey, Frederick; Wenten, Madé

    2008-01-01

    Title Turnover intention in new graduate nurses: a multivariate analysis Aim This paper is a report of a study to determine the relationship of new nurse turnover intent with individual characteristics, work environment variables and organizational factors and to compare new nurse turnover with actual turnover in the 18 months of employment following completion of a residency. Background Because of their influence on patient safety and health outcomes nurse turnover and turnover intent have received considerable attention worldwide. When nurse staffing is inadequate, especially during nursing shortages, unfavourable clinical outcomes have been documented. Method Prospective data collection took place from 1999 to 2006 with 889 new paediatric nurses who completed the same residency. Scores on study instruments were related to likelihood of turnover intent using logistic regression analysis models. Relationships between turnover intent and actual turnover were compared using Kaplan–Meier survivorship. Results The final model demonstrated that older respondents were more likely to have turnover intent if they did not get their ward choice. Also higher scores on work environment and organizational characteristics contributed to likelihood that the new nurse would not be in the turnover intent group. These factors distinguish a new nurse with turnover intent from one without 79% of the time. Increased seeking of social support was related to turnover intent and older new graduates were more likely to be in the turnover intent group if they did not get their ward choice. Conclusion When new graduate nurses are satisfied with their jobs and pay and feel committed to the organization, the odds against turnover intent decrease. What is already known about this topic There is concern in many countries about nurse turnover and the resulting effects on patient safety and quality of care. Decreasing ability to recruit experienced nurses has increased the emphasis on

  3. Organisation turnover among registered nurses: an exploratory model.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Flatt, S

    1988-11-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, turnover among hospital nurses has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that organisation of hospital work is a determinant of voluntary turnover among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualised at the organisational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 310 community hospitals. Results suggest the importance of administrative work structures and the professionalisation of the workforce as contributors to higher turnover. PMID:10296903

  4. Replicator dynamics with turnover of players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Jeppe; Kianercy, Ardeshir; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-08-01

    We study adaptive dynamics in games where players abandon the population at a given rate and are replaced by naive players characterized by a prior distribution over the admitted strategies. We demonstrate how such a process leads macroscopically to a variant of the replicator equation, with an additional term accounting for player turnover. We study how Nash equilibria and the dynamics of the system are modified by this additional term for prototypical examples such as the rock-paper-scissors game and different classes of two-action games played between two distinct populations. We conclude by showing how player turnover can account for nontrivial departures from Nash equilibria observed in data from lowest unique bid auctions.

  5. Role of Cholesterol and Phospholipids in Amylin Misfolding, Aggregation and Etiology of Islet Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Bhowmick, Diti Chatterjee; Sarkar, Anjali A.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a biological event in which proteins undergo structural transitions from soluble monomers and oligomers to insoluble fibrillar aggregates that are often toxic to cells. Exactly how amyloid proteins, such as the pancreatic hormone amylin, aggregate and kill cells is still unclear. Islet amyloid polypeptide, or amylin, is a recently discovered hormone that is stored and co-released with insulin from pancreatic islet β-cells. The pathology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by an excessive extracellular and intracellular accumulation of toxic amylin species, soluble oligomers and insoluble fibrils, in islets, eventually leading to β-cell loss. Obesity and elevated serum cholesterol levels are additional risk factors implicated in the development of T2DM. Because the homeostatic balance between cholesterol synthesis and uptake is lost in diabetics, and amylin aggregation is a hallmark of T2DM, this chapter focuses on the biophysical and cell biology studies exploring molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol and phospholipids modulate secondary structure, folding and aggregation of human amylin and other amyloid proteins on membranes and in cells. Amylin turnover and toxicity in pancreatic cells and the regulatory role of cholesterol in these processes are also discussed. PMID:26149927

  6. Turnover of soil monosaccharides: Recycling versus Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, Anna; Dyckmans, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a mixture of differently degradable compounds. Each of these compounds are characterised by different dynamics due to different chemical recalcitrance, transformation or stabilisation processes in soil. Carbohydrates represent one of these compounds and contribute up to 25 % to the soil organic matter. Vascular plants are the main source of pentose sugars (Arabinose and Xylose), whereas hexoses (Galactose and Mannose) are primarily produced by microorganisms. Several studies suggest that the mean turnover times of the carbon in soil sugars are similar to the turnover dynamics of the bulk carbon in soil. The aim of the study is to characterise the influence of stabilisation and turnover of soil carbohydrates. Soil samples are collected from (i) a continuous maize cropping experiment ('Höhere Landbauschule' Rotthalmünster, Bavaria) established 1979 on a Stagnic Luvisol and (ii) from a continuous wheat cropping, established 1969, as reference site. The effect of stabilisation is estimated by the comparison of turnover times of microbial and plant derived soil carbohydrates. As the dynamics of plant derived carbohydrate are solely influenced by stabilisation processes, whereas the dynamics of microbial derived carbohydrates are affected by recycling of organic carbon compounds derived by C3 plant substrate as well as stabilisation processes. The compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) of soil carbohydrates was performed using a HPLC/o/IRMS system. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric subunits were coupled with a LC-Isolink interface. Soil sugars were extracted after mild hydrolysis using 4 M trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Chromatographic separation of the sugars was achieved using a low strength 0.25 mM NaOH solution as mobile phase at a ?ow rate of 250 μL min-1 at 10 ° C.

  7. Health Care Workplace Discrimination and Physician Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M.; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between physician race/ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Methods Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006–2007 of practicing physicians [n = 529] randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and The National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and χ2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Results Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover [adjusted odes ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4–4.9]. Among physicians who experienced work-place discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .01], and 40% were con-templating a career change (vs 10% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .001). Conclusion Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist. PMID:20070016

  8. Strategies to manage low-bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, G

    2009-01-01

    A change in paradigm occurred lately whereby not hypocalcemia but hypercalcemia and positive calcium balance were considered negative factors. Namely, the use of calcium- based binders in combination with vitamin D analogues, has been shown to lead to an over-suppression of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and development of low-bone turnover adynamic bone disease (ABD). The changing prevalence of various types of bone diseases from a high to low-bone turnover goes in line with the presence of increased risk for vascular calcification (VC), morbidity and mortality in the dialysis population. The attenuation of the previous great expectations in calcium-based phosphate binders and vitamin D-analogues entailed a new treatment strategy to preserve bone and vascular health. Hence, a new evidence for treatment of ABD with various types of non calcium based binders and low calcium dialysate is presented. Sevelamer treatment has reduced calcium concentration and increased PTH levels, resulting in the improvement of markers of bone turnover, increased bone formation and improved trabecular architecture, providing a slower progression of VC. Data on lanthanum beneficial effect on ABD histology have been demonstrated in long-term clinical studies. Although there is a slow release of lanthanum from its bone deposits after discontinuation of the treatment and no association with aluminium- like bone toxicity, there is still an ongoing scientific debate about its long-term toxic potential. Finally, reducing the number of calcium based binders and low calcium dialysate (1.25 mmol/l) has been reported to have an impact on the evolution towards markers reflecting higher bone turnover. Then, adoption of the non calcium-based binders should be reserved to high risk patients with ABD and progression of vascular calcifications associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:19668299

  9. Phospholipids of subcellular organelles isolated from cultured BHK cells.

    PubMed

    Brotherus, J; Renkonen, O

    1977-02-23

    Mitochondrial and nuclei were purified from cultured hamster fibroblasts (BHK21 cells) by centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The phospholipid compositions of the preparations were compared to those of the previously purified plasma membranes, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. The mitochondria had a characteristically high content (approx. 16% of lipid phosphorus) of cardiolipin, which was practically absent from the other purified organelles. The nuclei were enriched in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol (approx. 68% and 5% of lipid phosphorus, respectively). Lysobisphosphatidic acid was almost absent from the mitochondria and nuclei, as well as from the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum, which suggests that this phospholipid is confined to the lysosomes of the BHK cell. The nuclei and the mitochondria contained relatively little sphingomyelin, a characteristic lipid of the plasma membrane. The distributions of the total cellular phospholipid and protein between the various organelles were calculated and compared to the corresponding data estimated for the rat liver. The BHK cell contained relatively more phospholipids in the nucleus and the lysosomes than the liver. All the organelles of the BHK cell contained less protein per phospholipid than the equivalent organelles of the liver. PMID:836856

  10. Identification of a Plasmodium falciparum Phospholipid Transfer Protein*

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, Christiaan; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Ringel, Alessa; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Haldar, Kasturi; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of erythrocytes by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum results in dramatic modifications to the host cell, including changes to its antigenic and transport properties and the de novo formation of membranous compartments within the erythrocyte cytosol. These parasite-induced structures are implicated in the transport of nutrients, metabolic products, and parasite proteins, as well as in parasite virulence. However, very few of the parasite effector proteins that underlie remodeling of the host erythrocyte are functionally characterized. Using bioinformatic examination and modeling, we have found that the exported P. falciparum protein PFA0210c belongs to the START domain family, members of which mediate transfer of phospholipids, ceramide, or fatty acids between membranes. In vitro phospholipid transfer assays using recombinant PFA0210 confirmed that it can transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin between phospholipid vesicles. Furthermore, assays using HL60 cells containing radiolabeled phospholipids indicated that orthologs of PFA0210c can also transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Biochemical and immunochemical analysis showed that PFA0210c associates with membranes in infected erythrocytes at mature stages of intracellular parasite growth. Localization studies in live parasites revealed that the protein is present in the parasitophorous vacuole during growth and is later recruited to organelles in the parasite. Together these data suggest that PFA0210c plays a role in the formation of the membranous structures and nutrient phospholipid transfer in the malaria-parasitized erythrocyte. PMID:24043620

  11. Ibuprofen-phospholipid solid dispersions: improved dissolution and gastric tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Delwar; Saxena, Vipin; Brausch, James F; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2012-01-17

    Solid dispersions of ibuprofen with various phospholipids were prepared, and the effect of phospholipids on the in vitro dissolution and in vivo gastrointestinal toxicity of ibuprofen was evaluated. Most phospholipids improved the dissolution of ibuprofen; dimyristoylphosphatidyl-glycerol (DMPG) had the greatest effect. At 45 min, the extent of dissolution of ibuprofen from the ibuprofen-DMPG system (weight ratio 9:1) increased about 69% compared to ibuprofen alone; the initial rate of dissolution increased sevenfold. Increasing the DMPG content from 9:1 to 4:1 in this system did not significantly increase the rate and the extent of dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron micrograph indicated a smaller crystallite size of ibuprofen with fairly uniform distribution in the ibuprofen-DMPG solid dispersion. A small amount of carrier phospholipid significantly increases the rate and the extent of dissolution, which may increase the bioavailability of ibuprofen. The number of ulcers >0.5mm in size formed in the gastric mucosa of rats following ibuprofen, DMPG, DMPC and DPPC solid dispersions (ibuprofen and phospholipid weight ratio 4:1) were 8.6 ± 6.2, 3.9 ± 5.3, 5.3 ± 4.9 and 9.1 ± 7.4, respectively. Solid dispersion of ibuprofen with DMPG was significantly less irritating to the gastric mucosa than ibuprofen itself (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Solid dispersion of ibuprofen and DMPG decreases the gastric side effects of ibuprofen. PMID:22101290

  12. Morphological and Physical Analysis of Natural Phospholipids-Based Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacquot, Adrien; Francius, Grégory; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Dehghani, Fariba; Tamayol, Ali; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposomes are currently an important part of biological, pharmaceutical, medical and nutritional research, as they are considered to be among the most effective carriers for the introduction of various types of bioactive agents into target cells. Scope of Review In this work, we study the lipid organization and mechanical properties of biomembranes made of marine and plant phospholipids. Membranes based on phospholipids extracted from rapeseed and salmon are studied in the form of liposome and as supported lipid bilayer. Dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) are used as references to determine the lipid organization of marine and plant phospholipid based membranes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy measurements are performed to investigate the membranes' topography at the micrometer scale and to determine their mechanical properties. Major Conclusions The mechanical properties of the membranes are correlated to the fatty acid composition, the morphology, the electrophoretic mobility and the membrane fluidity. Thus, soft and homogeneous mechanical properties are evidenced for salmon phospholipids membrane containing various polyunsaturated fatty acids. Besides, phase segregation in rapeseed membrane and more important mechanical properties were emphasized for this type of membranes by contrast to the marine phospholipids based membranes. General Significance This paper provides new information on the nanomechanical and morphological properties of membrane in form of liposome by AFM. The originality of this work is to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanoliposome from the natural sources containing various fatty acids and polar head. PMID:25238543

  13. Tracing Viable Bacteria in Wadden Sea Sediments Using Phospholipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetters, H.; Sass, H.; Cypionka, H.; Rullkotter, J.

    2001-12-01

    Lipid analysis is a commonly used tool for chemotaxonomical characterization of bacterial strains. In particular, phospholipids - determined as polar lipid fatty acids (PLFA) - have proven to be appropriate biomarkers for viable bacterial cells. In this study the lipid content of different bacterial isolates from an intertidal mudflat (Wadden Sea, NW Germany) was investigated. To identify the phospholipids present in the isolated bacteria, fractionated lipid extracts were studied using HPLC-ESI-MS and -MS-MS. This technique gives information on types of phospholipids and their corresponding fatty acid substituents. It could be shown by cluster analyses that the combined information of phospholipid types and corresponding fatty acids allows a better differentiation of bacterial groups than fatty acid patterns determined after whole cell hydrolysis. Sedimentary microbial communities were studied by an interdisciplinary approach using microbiological as well as geochemical techniques. Characteristic phospholipids were traced in the sediment cores (0-70 cm) in order to estimate the relative contributions of different bacterial groups to the sedimentary microbial communities. Seasonal variations of environmental parameters (temperature, sulfate concentrations, oxygen availability etc.) and their influence on the microbial communities were studied.

  14. Forest turnover rates follow global and regional patterns of productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global database, we found that forest turnover rates (the average of tree mortality and recruitment rates) parallel broad-scale patterns of net primary productivity. First, forest turnover was higher in tropical than in temperate forests. Second, as recently demonstrated by others, Amazonian forest turnover was higher on fertile than infertile soils. Third, within temperate latitudes, turnover was highest in angiosperm forests, intermediate in mixed forests, and lowest in gymnosperm forests. Finally, within a single forest physiognomic type, turnover declined sharply with elevation (hence with temperature). These patterns of turnover in populations of trees are broadly similar to the patterns of turnover in populations of plant organs (leaves and roots) found in other studies. Our findings suggest a link between forest mass balance and the population dynamics of trees, and have implications for understanding and predicting the effects of environmental changes on forest structure and terrestrial carbon dynamics. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  15. Generational differences in registered nurse turnover.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Wang, Chen-Yen; Mathews, Barbara; Boland, Mary

    2009-08-01

    The chronic nature of the nursing workforce shortage in the United States is a continuing concern. As the nationwide gap between supply and demand grows, it remains unknown what impact turnover will have on nursing, access to care, and efforts to improve quality and safety of health care. It also remains unclear whether the recent turnover trends among new graduate registered nurses differ from past generational cohorts of new nurses. The aims of this study were to identify the reasons why registered nurses turnover by generational cohort (Veterans, Baby Boomers, and GenXMs) and to compare the length of time nurses were employed in their first five nursing positions by generational cohort. The findings suggest the three generational cohorts displayed similar reasons for leaving nursing positions with relocation, career advancement, and personal/family reasons reported most frequently. Except for the first nursing position, significant generational effects were found in the length of time Veterans, Baby Boomer, and GenXMs stayed employed in their nursing positions. It remains unknown why the GenXMs displayed a significantly shorter length of employment time in their second, third, fourth, and fifth nursing positions. The decline in length of employment time displayed in both the Baby Boomers and GenXMs may be an issue of concern requiring future research. PMID:20026454

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE AND TURNOVER INTENTION OF HOSPITAL NURSES IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Tourani, Sogand; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Omrani, Amir; Sokhanvar, Mobin; Kakemam, Edris; Najafi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in science and technology, human resources are of the major capital for organizations. Workforce retention is required to improve organizational efficiencies. Objective: Therefore, in this study, the relationship between organizational justice (as one of the most influential factors) and turnover intention was investigated. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was done in the Comprehensive Jame Women’s Hospital of Tehran in 2015. The statistical sample consisted of 135 nursing staff members. The data were collected using a questionnaire of Beugre’s organizational justice and analyzed by the use of Spearman’s and Anova statistical tests. Results: Averages of organizational justice was obtained to be 68.85 ± 7.67 . Among different sorts of organizational justice, the highest average score of 75.24 ± 16.68 was achieved relevant to interactional justice. A significant relationship was observed between organizational justice (r = -0.36), interactional justice (r = -0.38), and procedural justice (r = -0.36) and turnover intention, but no relation was found between turnover intention and systemic and distributive justice. Furthermore, there was no relationship between demographic variables, organizational justice, and turnover intention. Conclusion: Considering the prominent role of organizational justice in the personnel’s intention to stay or leave and due to the high costs of recruiting and training new staff, managers should pay especial attention to justice and provide their employees’ satisfaction and stability in their organizations by creating a positive mindset in them. PMID:27482163

  17. Phosphocreatine Interacts with Phospholipids, Affects Membrane Properties and Exerts Membrane-Protective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F.; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R.; Meier, Beat H.; Epand, Richard M.; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are still controversial and far from being understood. The reversible conversion of Cr and ATP into PCr and ADP by creatine kinase, generating highly diffusible PCr energy reserves, is certainly an important element. However, some protective effects of Cr and analogues cannot be satisfactorily explained solely by effects on the cellular energy state. Here we used mainly liposome model systems to provide evidence for interaction of PCr and PcCr with different zwitterionic phospholipids by applying four independent, complementary biochemical and biophysical assays: (i) chemical binding assay, (ii) surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), (iii) solid-state 31P-NMR, and (iv) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SPR revealed low affinity PCr/phospholipid interaction that additionally induced changes in liposome shape as indicated by NMR and SPR. Additionally, DSC revealed evidence for membrane packing effects by PCr, as seen by altered lipid phase transition. Finally, PCr efficiently protected against membrane permeabilization in two different model systems: liposome-permeabilization by the membrane-active peptide melittin, and erythrocyte hemolysis by the oxidative drug doxorubicin, hypoosmotic stress or the mild detergent saponin. These findings suggest a new molecular basis for non-energy related functions of PCr and its cyclic analogue. PCr/phospholipid interaction and alteration of membrane structure may not only protect cellular membranes against various insults, but could

  18. Oxidized phospholipids as biomarkers of tissue and cell damage with a focus on cardiolipin

    PubMed Central

    Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Ji, Jing; Demidova, Olga M.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Feng, Weihong; Tyurin, Vladimir; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Epperly, Michael W.; Shvedova, Anna A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E.; Amoscato, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidized phospholipid species are important, biologically relevant, lipid signaling molecules that usually exist in low abundance in biological tissues. Along with their inherent stability issues, these oxidized lipids present themselves as a challenge in their detection and identification. Often times, oxidized lipid species can co-chromatograph with non-oxidized species making the detection of the former extremely difficult, even with the use of mass spectrometry. In this study, a normal-phase and reverse-phase two dimensional HPLC-mass spectrometric system was applied to separate oxidized phospholipids from their non-oxidized counterparts, allowing unambiguous detection in a total lipid extract. We have utilized bovine heart cardiolipin as well as commercially available tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin oxidized with cytochrome c (cyt c) and hydrogen peroxide as well as with lipoxygenase to test the separation power of the system. Our findings indicate that oxidized species of not only cardiolipin, but other phospholipid species, can be effectively separated from their non-oxidized counterparts in this two dimensional system. We utilized three types of biological tissues and oxidative insults, namely rotenone treatment of lymphocytes to induce mitochondrial damage and cell death, pulmonary inhalation exposure to single walled carbon nanotubes, as well as total body irradiation, in order to identify cardiolipin oxidation products, critical to the cell damage/cell death pathways in these tissues following cellular stress/injury. Our results indicate that selective cardiolipin (CL) oxidation is a result of a non-random free radical process. In addition, we assessed the ability of the system to identify CL oxidation products in the brain, a tissue known for its extreme complexity and diversity of CL species. The ability of the two-dimensional HPLC-mass spectrometric system to detect and characterize oxidized lipid products will allow new studies to be formulated to probe

  19. Plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate: relationship to plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester transfer activities and lipid parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, J J

    1996-09-27

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has been shown to facilitate the transfer of phospholipid from liposomes or isolated very low and low density lipoproteins to high density lipoproteins. Its activity in plasma and its physiological function are presently unknown. To elucidate the role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism and to delineate factors that may affect the rate of phospholipid transfer between lipoproteins, we determined the plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate (PLTR) in 16 healthy adult volunteers and assessed its relationship to plasma lipid levels, and to phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) measured by radioassays. The plasma PLTR in these subjects was 27.2 +/- 11.8 nmol/ml per h at 37 degrees C (mean +/- S.D.), and their PLTA and CETA were 13.0 +/- 1.7 mumol/ml per h and 72.8 +/- 15.7 nmol/ml per h, respectively. Plasma PLTR was correlated directly with total, non-HDL, and HDL triglyceride (rs = 0.76, P < 0.001), total and non-HDL phospholipid (rs > 0.53, P < 0.05), and inversely with HDL free cholesterol (rs = -0.54, P < 0.05), but not with plasma PLTA and CETA. When 85% to 96% of the PLTA in plasma was removed by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human PLTP, phospholipid mass transfer from VLDL and LDL to HDL was reduced by 50% to 72%, but 80% to 100% of CETA could still be detected. These studies demonstrate that PLTP plays a major role in facilitating the transfer of phospholipid between lipoproteins, and suggest that triglyceride is a significant modulator of intravascular phospholipid transport. Furthermore, most of the PLTP and CETP in human plasma is associated with different particles. Plasma PLTA and CETA were also measured in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, dog, pig, and monkey. Compared to human, PLTA in rat and mouse was significantly higher and in rabbit and guinea pig was significantly lower while the remaining animal species had PLTA similar to humans. No

  20. Intestinal interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, dietary fibers, and cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, D; Schneeman, B O

    1986-04-01

    Binding of bile acids and phospholipids to a number of dietary fibers and cholestyramine (CH) within the small intestine was determined. The fibers used were cellulose, wheat bran, oat bran, guar gum (GG), and lignin (LG). GG, LG, and CH bound significant quantities of bile acids. However, only the CH reduced the bile acid concentration within the aqueous phase of the intestinal contents. Significant phospholipid binding was found only with CH. None of the test substances significantly reduced the quantity of solubilized lipid. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the total quantity of bile acids and phospholipids in the aqueous phase of the intestinal contents was a significant predictor of the quantity of lipid solubilized within the contents (r2 = 0.67). The failure of GG and LG to significantly decrease the amount of solubilized lipid suggests that the hypocholesterolemic effect of these fibers is due more to their bile acid binding capacity than to an effect on lipid solubilization. PMID:3008573

  1. Shear-induced morphology in mixed phospholipid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsa, Amir; Young, James; Posada, David; Lopez, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Flow of mixed phospholipid films on liquid surfaces plays a significant role in biological processes ranging from lipid bilayer fluidity and the associated behavior of cellular membranes, to flow on the liquid lining in the lungs. Phospholipid films are also central to the process of two-dimensional protein crystallization below a ligand-bearing film. Here, we study a binary mixture of phospholipids that form an insoluble monolayer on the air-water interface. Brewster angle microscopy reveals that a shearing flow induces a phase separation in the binary film, resulting in the appearance of 10 micron-scale dark domains. Hydrodynamic response of the binary film is quantified at the macro-scale by measurements of the surface shear viscosity, via a deep-channel surface viscometer. Reynolds number was shown to be a state variable, along with surface pressure, controlling the surface shear viscosity of a biotinylated lipid film.

  2. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  3. The role of lamellate phospholipid bilayers in lubrication of joints.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Zenon; Urbaniak, Wiesław; Gadomski, Adam; Yusuf, Kehinde Q; Afara, Isaac O; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of progressive loss of the surface active phospholipids on the characteristics, and hence tribological function of articular cartilage. In accordance to Hill's hypothesis, 3-7 lipid bilayers at pH 7.4 operate as the solid lubricant in the cartilage-cartilage interface during physiological function. These bilayers are known to be depleted during cartilage degeneration. This study models this loss of phospholipid bilayers, studying experimentally both wet and dry cartilage surfaces, measuring surface wettability, and friction coefficient under a constant stress of 1.2 MPa. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient increases gradually with loss of the phospholipid bilayers, and gains in value with decrease in wettability. PMID:23394101

  4. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  5. The mechanism of acyl specific phospholipid remodeling by tafazzin

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, Michael; Acehan, Devrim; Berno, Bob; Xu, Yang; Valvo, Salvatore; Ren, Mindong; Stokes, David L.; Epand, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid with a characteristic acyl chain composition that depends on the function of tafazzin, a phospholipid-lysophospholipid transacylase, although the enzyme itself lacks acyl specificity. We incubated isolated tafazzin with various mixtures of phospholipids and lysophospholipids, characterized the lipid phase by 31P-NMR, and measured newly formed molecular species by mass spectrometry. Significant transacylation was observed only in non-bilayer lipid aggregates and the substrate specificity was highly sensitive to the lipid phase. In particular, tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin, a prototype molecular species, formed only under conditions that favor the inverted hexagonal phase. In isolated mitochondria, <1 percent of lipids participated in transacylations, suggesting that the action of tafazzin is limited to privileged lipid domains. We propose that tafazzin reacts with non-bilayer type lipid domains that occur in curved or hemifused membrane zones, and that acyl specificity is driven by the packing properties of these domains. PMID:22941046

  6. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  7. NMR analyses of deuterated phospholipids isolated from Pichia angusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massou, S.; Augé, S.; Tropis, M.; Lindley, N. D.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    The phospholipid composition of methylotrophic yeasts grown on deuterated and hydrogenated media has been determined by proton and phosphorus NMR. By using a line narrowing solvent, we could obtain linewidth lower than 2 Hz, and all the resonances could be resolved. Phospholipids were identified on the basis of their chemical shift and by 31P - H correlations (HMQC - HOHAHA gradient enhanced experiments). We have thus analysed qualitatively and quantitatively lipids mixtures directly after chloroform-methanol extraction. The lipid composition is deeply modified after growth in deuterated medium were phosphatidyl Inositol (PI) becomes the major lipid, instead of a PC, PS, PI mixture in hydrogenated conditions. La composition en phospholipides de levures méthylotrophes ayant poussé sur des milieux de cultures hydrogénés et deutériés a été déterminée par RMN du proton et du phosphore31. L'utilisation d'un solvant d'affinement a permis d'obtenir des largeurs de raies inférieures à 2Hz et de résoudre toutes les classes de phospholipides. Ils sont ensuite identifiés par leur déplacement chimique et par des corrélations phosphore - proton spécifiques (expériences HMQC-HOHAHA gradients). Cette approche a permis une analyse qualitative et quantitative de mélanges de phospholipides directement après extraction au chloroforme-méthanol. La composition en phospholipides est profondément modifiée lors de la croissance en milieu perdeutérié où l'on observe un lipide majoritaire, le phosphatidyl Inositol (PI), au lieu d'un mélange PC, PS PI en milieu hydrogéné.

  8. Dynamic aspects of voluntary turnover: an integrated approach to curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Becker, William J; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a downward performance change may increase the likelihood of organizational separation. Drawing on decision theory, we propose and test an integrative framework. This approach incorporates both of these earlier models. Specifically, we argue that individuals are most likely to voluntarily exit when they are below-average performers who are also experiencing a downward performance change. Furthermore, the interaction between this downward change and performance partially accounts for the curvilinear relationship proposed by the push-pull model. Findings from a longitudinal field study supported this integrative theory. PMID:20853945

  9. Light and phospholipid driven structural transitions in nematic microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubtsov, A. V.; Pasechnik, S. V.; Shmeliova, D. V.; Kralj, Samo

    2014-10-01

    We studied the UV-irradiation and phospholipid driven bipolar-radial structural transitions within azoxybenzene nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water. It was found that the UV-irradiation induced trans-cis isomerisation of LC molecules could enable structural transitions into radial-type configurations at a critical UV-irradiation time tc. In particular, we show that under appropriate conditions, a value of tc could sensitively fingerprint the concentration of phospholipid molecules present in LC-water dispersions. This demonstrated proof-of-principle mechanism could be exploited for development of sensitive detectors for specific nanoparticles (NPs), where value of tc reveals concentration of NPs.

  10. Genetic Analysis of Digestive Physiology Using Fluorescent Phospholipid Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Steven A.; Pack, Michael; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Johnson, Iain D.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Dosch, Roland; Mullins, Mary C.; Hendrickson, H. Stewart; Hendrickson, Elizabeth K.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2001-05-01

    Zebrafish are a valuable model for mammalian lipid metabolism; larvae process lipids similarly through the intestine and hepatobiliary system and respond to drugs that block cholesterol synthesis in humans. After ingestion of fluorescently quenched phospholipids, endogenous lipase activity and rapid transport of cleavage products results in intense gall bladder fluorescence. Genetic screening identifies zebrafish mutants, such as fat free, that show normal digestive organ morphology but severely reduced phospholipid and cholesterol processing. Thus, fluorescent lipids provide a sensitive readout of lipid metabolism and are a powerful tool for identifying genes that mediate vertebrate digestive physiology.

  11. Saturated anionic phospholipids enhance transdermal transport by electroporation.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arindam; Zhao, Ya-Li; Hui, Sek Wen

    2002-01-01

    Anionic phospholipids, but not cationic or neutral phospholipids, were found to enhance the transdermal transport of molecules by electroporation. When added as liposomes to the milieus of water-soluble molecules to be delivered through the epidermis of porcine skin by electroporation, these phospholipids enhance, by one to two orders of magnitude, the transdermal flux. Encapsulation of molecules in liposomes is not necessary. Dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS), phosphatidylserine from bovine brain (brain-PS), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) were used to test factors affecting the potency of anionic lipid transport enhancers. DMPS with saturated acyl chains was found to be a much more potent transport enhancer than those with unsaturated acyl chains (DOPS and DOPG). There was no headgroup preference. Saturated DMPS was also more effective in delaying resistance recovery after pulsing, and with a greater affinity in the epidermis after pulsing. Using fluorescent carboxyl fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Dextrans as test water-soluble molecules for transport, and rhodamine-labeled phospholipids to track anionic phospholipids, we found, by conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, that transport of water-soluble molecules was localized in local transport spots or regions (LTRs) created by the electroporation pulses. Anionic phospholipids, especially DMPS, were located at the center of the LTRs and spanned the entire thickness of the stratum corneum (SC). The degree of saturation of anionic phospholipids made no difference in the densities of LTRs created. We deduce that, after being driven into the epidermis by negative electric pulses, saturated anionic phospholipids mix and are retained better by the SC lipids. Anionic lipids prefer loose layers or vesicular rather than multilamellar forms, thereby prolonging the structural recovery of SC lipids to the native multilamellar form. In the

  12. Profiling of phospholipids and related lipid structures using multidimensional ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Tan, Bo; Bohrer, Brian C.; O'Dell, David K.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Pazos, Mauricio X.; Clemmer, David E.; Walker, J. Michael

    2009-10-01

    Increasingly comprehensive questions related to the biosynthesis of lipids relevant to understanding new signaling pathways have created daunting tasks for their chemical analysis. Here, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques combined with electrospray ionization have been used to examine mixtures of closely related lipid structures. The drift time distributions of sphingomyelins show baseline separations for ethylene chain length differences ([Delta] ~ 1.2 ms) and partial separations in single unsaturation differences ([Delta] ~ 0.3 ms) revealing that the most compact structures are observed with shorter chains and increasing unsaturation. Drift time distributions of different ionizations frequently fall into families with the same drift times (isodrifts) indicating that the ion attached to the lipid has little structural influence. The present data show that phospholipids, especially phosphatidylinositol, aggregate to form inverted micelles. Phospholipids (phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol) are effectively separated according to their polar head groups. This method also provides information about the mixture composition of the chemically different lipids N-palmitoyl glycine, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide, and phosphatidylcholine existing over an array of charge states and sizes (inverted micelles) depending on mixture concentration. Multidimensional IMS3-MS introduces an additional dimension to fragmentation analysis by separating the fragmented ions into groups related to size, shape and charge and allows determination of sn-1 and sn-2 substitution as is shown for phosphatidylglycerols. This contribution provides evidence for extending the targeted approach to global lipidomics analysis using the high-efficiency gas-phase separation afforded by multidimensional IMS-MS.

  13. Stability of Monodisperse Phospholipid-Coated Microbubbles Formed by Flow-Focusing at High Production Rates.

    PubMed

    Segers, Tim; de Rond, Leonie; de Jong, Nico; Borden, Mark; Versluis, Michel

    2016-04-26

    Monodisperse microbubble ultrasound contrast agents may dramatically increase the sensitivity and efficiency in ultrasound imaging and therapy. They can be produced directly in a microfluidic flow-focusing device, but questions remain as to the interfacial chemistry, such as the formation and development of the phospholipid monolayer coating over time. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of monodisperse bubbles with radii of 2-10 μm at production rates ranging from 10(4) to 10(6) bubbles/s. All bubbles were found to dissolve to a stable final radius 2.55 times smaller than their initial radius, independent of the nozzle size and shear rate, indicating that the monolayer self-assembles prior to leaving the nozzle. The corresponding decrease in surface area by a factor 6.6 reveals that lipid molecules are adsorbed to the gas-liquid interface in the disordered expanded state, and they become mechanically compressed by Laplace pressure-driven bubble dissolution to a more ordered condensed state with near zero surface tension. Acoustic characterization of the stabilized microbubbles revealed that their shell stiffness gradually increased from 0.8 to 2.5 N/m with increasing number of insonations through the selective loss of the more soluble lipopolymer molecules. This work therefore demonstrates high-throughput production of clinically relevant monodisperse contrast microbubbles with excellent control over phospholipid monolayer elasticity and microbubble resonance. PMID:27006083

  14. The role of anti-phospholipid antibodies in autoimmune reproductive failure.

    PubMed

    Pantham, Priyadarshini; Abrahams, Vikki M; Chamley, Lawrence W

    2016-05-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) are autoantibodies that are associated with thrombosis and a range of pregnancy complications including recurrent pregnancy loss and pre-eclampsia. The three clinically relevant, well-characterized aPL are anti-cardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant and anti-beta-2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) antibodies. aPL do not bind directly to phospholipids but instead bind to a plasma-binding 'cofactor'. The most extensively studied cofactor is β2GPI, whose role in pregnancy is not fully elucidated. Although the pathogenicity of aPL in recurrent pregnancy loss is well established in humans and animal models, the association of aPL with infertility does not appear to be causative. aPL may exert their detrimental effects during pregnancy by directly binding trophoblast cells of the placenta, altering trophoblast signalling, proliferation, invasion and secretion of hormones and cytokines, and by increasing apoptosis. Heparin is commonly used to treat pregnant women with aPL; however, as thrombotic events do not occur in the placentae of all women with aPL, it may exert a protective effect by preventing the binding of aPL to β2GPI or by acting through non-thrombotic pathways. The aim of this review is to present evidence summarizing the current understanding of this field. PMID:26884418

  15. Fish Oil Supplementation in Humans: Effects on Platelet Responses, Phospholipid Composition and Metabolism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeaff, Clark Murray

    Platelets are believed to play a significant role in the development of occlusive vascular diseases. Epidemiological reports have correlated the high intake of marine foods, rich in omega3 fatty acids, with diminished platelet responses and a low incidence of arterial thrombosis and myocardial infarction. The activation of platelet responses is mediated by the accelerated metabolism of membrane phospholipid; therefore, it was of interest to examine, in human volunteers, the effect of a dietary fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA), enriched in omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, on platelet aggregation and phospholipid composition/metabolism. For the complete separation of cellular phospholipids, a one-dimensional thin-layer chromatography system using silica-gel pre-coated glass plates was developed. The solvent system consisted of CHCl_3/CH_3OH/CH _3COOH/H_2O (50/37.5/3.5/2.0, by vol), required approximately 90-120 minutes for full phospholipid separation, and was highly reproducible even under conditions of variable humidity and temperature. The consumption of a fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA) for 6 weeks (3.6 g of 20:5omega 3 and 2.4 g of 22:6omega3 per day) diminished both the collagen- and platelet activating factor-induced maximum aggregation responses in washed human platelet suspensions by 50.1% and 27.2%, respectively, as compared to initial unsupplemented baseline responses. Thrombin -induced aggregation remained unchanged. Thrombin stimulation of intact human platelets produced a significant decrease in the mass of phosphatidylinositol in plasma membrane. In platelets pre-labelled with (2-^3H) glycerol and stimulated with either thrombin or low-dose collagen, the loss of (^3H) phosphatidylinositol did not differ between those subjects consuming olive oil or fish oil. Likewise, the thrombin-stimulated accumulation of diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, was unaffected by fish oil consumption. The ratio of collagen -induced increase in radioactivity

  16. Oxidized phospholipids as biomarkers of tissue and cell damage with a focus on cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K; Ji, Jing; Demidova, Olga M; Sparvero, Louis J; Feng, Weihong; Tyurin, Vladimir; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Epperly, Michael W; Shvedova, Anna A; Greenberger, Joel S; Bayır, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E; Amoscato, Andrew A

    2012-10-01

    Oxidized phospholipid species are important, biologically relevant, lipid signaling molecules that usually exist in low abundance in biological tissues. Along with their inherent stability issues, these oxidized lipids present themselves as a challenge in their detection and identification. Often times, oxidized lipid species can co-chromatograph with non-oxidized species making the detection of the former extremely difficult, even with the use of mass spectrometry. In this study, a normal-phase and reverse-phase two dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-mass spectrometric system was applied to separate oxidized phospholipids from their non-oxidized counterparts, allowing unambiguous detection in a total lipid extract. We have utilized bovine heart cardiolipin as well as commercially available tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin oxidized with cytochrome c (cyt c) and hydrogen peroxide as well as with lipoxygenase to test the separation power of the system. Our findings indicate that oxidized species of not only cardiolipin, but other phospholipid species, can be effectively separated from their non-oxidized counterparts in this two dimensional system. We utilized three types of biological tissues and oxidative insults, namely rotenone treatment of lymphocytes to induce mitochondrial damage and cell death, pulmonary inhalation exposure to single walled carbon nanotubes, as well as total body irradiation, in order to identify cardiolipin oxidation products, critical to the cell damage/cell death pathways in these tissues following cellular stress/injury. Our results indicate that selective cardiolipin (CL) oxidation is a result of a non-random free radical process. In addition, we assessed the ability of the system to identify CL oxidation products in the brain, a tissue known for its extreme complexity and diversity of CL species. The ability of the two dimensional HPLC-mass spectrometric system to detect and characterize oxidized lipid products will

  17. Organizational commitment and turnover of nursing home administrators.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2006-01-01

    In this investigation, the associations between organizational commitment (OC), intent-to-turnover, and actual turnover of a large sample of nursing home administrators (NHAs) are examined. Data used come from a mail survey, from which 632 responses were received from the NHAs (response rate = 63%). The one-year turnover rate of NHAs was 39 percent, and in almost all cases (87%) these NHAs had also exhibited low OC scores. The intent-to-turnover results show thinking about quitting comes before searching for a new position, which in turn both comes before the intention to quit. Multivariate analyses show work overload has a strong and robust association with both intent-to-turnover and turnover of NHAs, and may indicate that NHAs are leaving their positions because they are understaffed. PMID:16648695

  18. The implications of linking the dynamic performance and turnover literatures.

    PubMed

    Sturman, M C; Trevor, C O

    2001-08-01

    This article examines how the literatures of dynamic performance and the performance-turnover relationship inform each other. The nonrandom performance turnover relationship suggests that dynamic performance studies may be biased by their elimination of participants who do not remain for the entire study period. The authors demonstrated that the performance slopes of those who leave an organization differ from the performance slopes of those who remain. This finding suggests that studies of the performance-turnover relationship need to consider employee performance trends when predicting turnover. Replicating and extending the research of D. A. Harrison, M. Virick, and S. William (1996), the authors found that performance changes from the previous month and performance trends measured over a longer time period explained variance in voluntary turnover beyond current performance. Finally, the authors showed that performance trends interacted with current performance in the prediction of voluntary turnover. PMID:11519652

  19. The experience of work and turnover intentions: interactive effects of value attainment, job satisfaction, and positive mood.

    PubMed

    George, J M; Jones, G R

    1996-06-01

    The researchers proposed that the phenomenological experience of work is multifaceted and that simultaneously considering the combined effects of the different aspects of the work experience holds considerable promise for increasing understanding of turnover intentions and other organizationally relevant outcomes. Research in subjective well-being and other areas suggests that there are 3 important aspects of the experience of work: attainment of values, attitudes, and moods. It was hypothesized and found that the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intentions is jointly moderated by value attainment and positive mood. The nature of this triple interaction was such that the job satisfaction-turnover intention relationship was strongest when workers' jobs did not help them to attain terminal values and positive moods were experienced, and the relationship was weakest when jobs helped workers to attain terminal values and positive moods were experienced. PMID:8690691

  20. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Harwood, John L

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  1. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  2. Work–family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ⋆

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

  3. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  4. Temperature Control of Phospholipid Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sinensky, Michael

    1971-01-01

    The higher the growth temperature of Escherichia coli cultures the greater is the proportion of saturated fatty acids in the bacterial phospholipids. When fatty acids are exogenously supplied to E. coli, higher growth temperatures will likewise increase the relative incorporation of saturated fatty acids into phospholipids. One of the steps in the utilization of fatty acids for phospholipid biosynthesis is, therefore, temperature-controlled. The temperature effect observed in vivo with mixtures of 3H-oleate and 14C-palmitate is demonstrable in vitro by using mixtures of the coenzyme A derivative of these fatty acids for the acylation of α-glycerol phosphate to lysophosphatidic and phosphatidic acids. In E. coli extracts, the relative rates of transacylation of palmityl and oleyl coenzyme A vary as a function of incubation temperature in a manner which mimics the temperature control observed in vivo. The phosphatidic acid synthesized in vitro shows a striking enrichment of oleate at the β position analogous to the positional specificity observed in phospholipids synthesized in vivo. PMID:4324806

  5. Hexamodal imaging with porphyrin-phospholipid-coated upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, James; Chen, Feng; Kim, Jeesu; Chen, Guanying; Shao, Wei; Shao, Shuai; Chitgupi, Upendra; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Nickles, Robert J; Prasad, Paras N; Kim, Chulhong; Cai, Weibo; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2015-03-11

    Hexamodal imaging using simple nanoparticles is demonstrated. Porphyrin-phospholipids are used to coat upconversion nanoparticles in order to generate a new biocompatible material. The nanoparticles are characterized in vitro and in vivo for imaging via fluorescence, upconversion, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, Cerenkov luminescence, and photoacoustic tomography. PMID:25640213

  6. Porphyrin-phospholipid liposomes permeabilized by near-infrared light.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kevin A; Shao, Shuai; Hoopes, Matthew I; Luo, Dandan; Ahsan, Bilal; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Song, Wentao; Huang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Guojian; Pandey, Ravindra K; Geng, Jumin; Pfeifer, Blaine A; Scholes, Charles P; Ortega, Joaquin; Karttunen, Mikko; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic compounds to target tissues is a central challenge in treating disease. Externally controlled drug release systems hold potential to selectively enhance localized delivery. Here we describe liposomes doped with porphyrin-phospholipid that are permeabilized directly by near-infrared light. Molecular dynamics simulations identified a novel light-absorbing monomer esterified from clinically approved components predicted and experimentally demonstrated to give rise to a more stable porphyrin bilayer. Light-induced membrane permeabilization is enabled with liposomal inclusion of 10 molar % porphyrin-phospholipid and occurs in the absence of bulk or nanoscale heating. Liposomes reseal following laser exposure and permeability is modulated by varying porphyrin-phospholipid doping, irradiation intensity or irradiation duration. Porphyrin-phospholipid liposomes demonstrate spatial control of release of entrapped gentamicin and temporal control of release of entrapped fluorophores following intratumoral injection. Following systemic administration, laser irradiation enhances deposition of actively loaded doxorubicin in mouse xenografts, enabling an effective single-treatment antitumour therapy. PMID:24699423

  7. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  8. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  9. Lysosomal phospholipids from rat liver after treatment with different drugs.

    PubMed

    Tjiong, H B; Lepthin, J; Debuch, H

    1978-01-01

    Rats were treated with 5 different drugs p-ethoxyacetanilide (I), indometacin (II) and nor-amidopyrine-methanesulfonate (III), O,O'-bis(diethylaminoethyl)hexestrol(IV) and choloroquine (V) for 3 - 4 weeks. Liver cell fractions were isolated by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and the specific activity of acid phosphatase was determined in each. Lysosomal fractions contained widely varying amounts of this marker enzyme, indicating that the concentration of lysosomes within these fractions differed. The amounts and patterns of phospholipids reflected this fact. Since we assumed bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate [(MAG)2-P; synonym:lysobisphosphatidic acid] is a marker lipid for secondary lysosomes, we expected and found significant quantities of this acidic phospholipid only in those lysosomal fractions which were also rich in acid phosphatase activity. 12% of the lysosomal phospholipids from animals receiving the hexestrol derivative (IV), and 19% of those from the chloroquine (V) experiment were present as (MAG)2P. The fatty acid compositions of this lysosomal phospholipid were not the same in all lysosome fractions. The more (MAG)2P present in the lysosomes, the more unsaturated are the fatty acids. Thus, after treatment with chloroquine, more than 90% of the fatty acids from (MAG)2P are unsaturated; C22:6 represents about 70% of the total. PMID:627402

  10. Skeletal Muscle Phospholipid Metabolism Regulates Insulin Sensitivity and Contractile Function.

    PubMed

    Funai, Katsuhiko; Lodhi, Irfan J; Spears, Larry D; Yin, Li; Song, Haowei; Klein, Samuel; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is an early defect in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lipid overload induces insulin resistance in muscle and alters the composition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle phospholipid metabolism regulates systemic glucose metabolism, we perturbed choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase 1 (CEPT1), the terminal enzyme in the Kennedy pathway of phospholipid synthesis. In C2C12 cells, CEPT1 knockdown altered SR phospholipid composition and calcium flux. In mice, diet-induced obesity, which decreases insulin sensitivity, increased muscle CEPT1 expression. In high-fat diet-fed mice with skeletal muscle-specific knockout of CEPT1, systemic and muscle-based approaches demonstrated increased muscle insulin sensitivity. In CEPT1-deficient muscles, an altered SR phospholipid milieu decreased sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase-dependent calcium uptake, activating calcium-signaling pathways known to improve insulin sensitivity. Altered muscle SR calcium handling also rendered these mice exercise intolerant. In obese humans, surgery-induced weight loss increased insulin sensitivity and decreased skeletal muscle CEPT1 protein. In obese humans spanning a spectrum of metabolic health, muscle CEPT1 mRNA was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that high-fat feeding and obesity induce CEPT1, which remodels the SR to preserve contractile function at the expense of insulin sensitivity. PMID:26512026